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Sample records for wall reconstruction initial

  1. Prairie Reconstruction Initiative Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Prairie Reconstruction Initiative Advisory Team (PRIAT) is to identify and take steps to resolve uncertainties in the process of prairie...

  2. Iterative initial condition reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittfull, Marcel; Baldauf, Tobias; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by recent developments in perturbative calculations of the nonlinear evolution of large-scale structure, we present an iterative algorithm to reconstruct the initial conditions in a given volume starting from the dark matter distribution in real space. In our algorithm, objects are first moved back iteratively along estimated potential gradients, with a progressively reduced smoothing scale, until a nearly uniform catalog is obtained. The linear initial density is then estimated as the divergence of the cumulative displacement, with an optional second-order correction. This algorithm should undo nonlinear effects up to one-loop order, including the higher-order infrared resummation piece. We test the method using dark matter simulations in real space. At redshift z =0 , we find that after eight iterations the reconstructed density is more than 95% correlated with the initial density at k ≤0.35 h Mpc-1 . The reconstruction also reduces the power in the difference between reconstructed and initial fields by more than 2 orders of magnitude at k ≤0.2 h Mpc-1 , and it extends the range of scales where the full broadband shape of the power spectrum matches linear theory by a factor of 2-3. As a specific application, we consider measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale that can be improved by reducing the degradation effects of large-scale flows. In our idealized dark matter simulations, the method improves the BAO signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 2.7 at z =0 and by a factor of 2.5 at z =0.6 , improving standard BAO reconstruction by 70% at z =0 and 30% at z =0.6 , and matching the optimal BAO signal and signal-to-noise ratio of the linear density in the same volume. For BAO, the iterative nature of the reconstruction is the most important aspect.

  3. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  4. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-01-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function...... was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery...... pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the implementation of the pathway. The enhanced recovery after surgery pathway included preoperative high-dose steroid, daily assessment...

  5. Thoracic wall reconstruction after tumor resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran eHarati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical treatment of malignant thoracic wall tumors represents a formidable challenge. In particular, locally advanced tumors that have already infiltrated critical anatomic structures are associated with a high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects of the thoracic wall. Plastic surgery can reduce this surgical morbidity by reconstructing the thoracic wall through various tissue transfer techniques. Sufficient soft tissue reconstruction of the thoracic wall improves life quality and mitigates functional impairment after extensive resection. The aim of this article is to illustrate the various plastic surgery treatment options in the multimodal therapy of patients with malignant thoracic wall tumors.Material und methods: This article is based on a review of the current literature and the evaluation of a patient database.Results: Several plastic surgical treatment options can be implemented in the curative and palliative therapy of patients with malignant solid tumors of the chest wall. Large soft tissue defects after tumor resection can be covered by local, pedicled or free flaps. In cases of large full-thickness defects, flaps can be combined with polypropylene mesh to improve chest wall stability and to maintain pulmonary function. The success of modern medicine has resulted in an increasing number of patients with prolonged survival suffering from locally advanced tumors that can be painful, malodorous or prone to bleeding. Resection of these tumors followed by thoracic wall reconstruction with viable tissue can substantially enhance the life quality of these patients. Discussion: In curative treatment regimens, chest wall reconstruction enables complete resection of locally advanced tumors and subsequent adjuvant radiotherapy. In palliative disease treatment, stadium plastic surgical techniques of thoracic wall reconstruction provide palliation of tumor-associated morbidity and can therefore improve

  6. Reconstruction of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae-Min; Hur, Jun-Oh; Lee, Jong-Seo; Cheon, Sang-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Background The results after acetabular fracture are primarily related to the quality of the articular reduction. We evaluated the results of internal fixation of posterior wall fractures with using three-step reconstruction. Methods Thirty-three patients (mean age at the time of injury, 47.9 years; 28 males and 5 females) were followed for a minimum of 2 years after surgery. The three-step reconstruction included 1) preservation of soft tissues and reduction of the marginally impacted osteochondral (articular) fragments using screws, 2) filling the impacted cancellous void with a bone graft, and 3) reinforcement with buttress-plating. Clinical evaluation was done according to the criteria of D'aubigne and Postel, while the radiological criteria were those of Matta. The associated injuries and complications were evaluated. Results The clinical results were excellent in 15 (45.5%) patients and they were good in 5 (15.2%), (i.e., satisfactory in 60.7%), while the radiologic results were excellent in 10 (30.3%) and good in 14 (42.4%) (satisfactory in 72.7%). Heterotopic ossification was common, but this did not require excision, even without prophylactic treatment with indomethacin. Deep infection was the worst complication and this was accompanied by a poor outcome. Conclusions This study confirms that three-step reconstruction facilitates accurate and firm reduction of displaced posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum. Therefore, we anticipate less long-term arthrosis in the patients treated this way. PMID:21629471

  7. Preoperative steroid in abdominal wall reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Brøndum, Tina Lee; Belhage, Bo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Preoperative administration of high-dose glucocorticoid leads to improved recovery and decreased length of stay after abdominal surgery. Even so, studies on administration of glucocorticoids for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) for giant ventral hernia repair...... include subjective measures, wound complications and analysis of blood and wound fluids. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first trial on the effect of preoperative glucocorticoid administration in patients undergoing AWR. Due to long post-operative stays and a high rate of post-operative complications...

  8. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroulis CN

    2016-04-01

    mm polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE mesh in nine cases of lateral or posterior defects. Support from a plastic surgeon was necessary to cover the full-thickness chest wall defects in seven cases. Adjuvant oncologic treatment was administered in 13 patients. Local recurrences were observed in five cases where surgical reintervention was finally necessary in two cases. Recurrences were associated with larger tumors, histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and initial incomplete resection or misdiagnosis made by nonthoracic surgeons. Three patients died during the study period because of recurrent disease or complications of treatment for recurrent disease.Conclusion: Chest wall tumors are in their majority mesenchymal neoplasms, which often require major chest wall resection for their eradication. Long-term survival is expected in low-grade tumors where a radical resection is achieved, while big tumors and histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma are connected with the increase rate of recurrence.Keywords: chest wall tumors, chest wall resection, chest wall reconstruction, soft tissue sarcomas, sternal tumors, chondrosarcoma 

  9. Reconstruction of lateral attic wall in acquired cholesteatoma

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    Erdoglija Milan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Attic cholesteatoma is an epithelial cystic pseudotumor which arises in the top compartment of the middle ear. Surgery is the only therapeutic treatment for attic cholesteatoma. The aim of this study was to analyze the surgical and audiological results in tympanoplasties that use a logical application of several techniques for the management of attic cholesteatoma. Our hypothesis was that the tympanoplasty technique with cartilage/bone reconstruction of the achieve better outcome than the tympanoplasty technique with only temporal fascia reconstruction of the lateral attic wall. Methods. This retrospective clinical study included 80 patients, aged 16–65 years, with attic cholesteatoma undergoing canal “wall up” tympanoplasty with lateral attic wall reconstruction, under general anesthesia in the Eear, Nose and Throat Clinic, Military Medical Academy in Belgrade between 2006 and 2010. The patients were divided into two groups according to the type of lateral attic wall reconstruction: the group I of 60 patients with cartilage/bone plus temporalis fascia lateral attic wall reconstruction and the group II of 20 patients with only temporal fascia lateral attic wall reconstruction. Postoperative follow-up examinations were done at least 5 years after the surgery. The χ2 test was used to compare postoperative sequelae for two groups of operated patients with lateral attic wall reconstruction. The independent and paired samples t-test of air conduction and air-bone gap were used to compare the results of preoperative and postoperative hearing tests. Results. The differences between hearing measurements of the two groups according to preoperative and postoperative auditory thresholds of the air conduction and the air-bone gap were considered no statistically significant. The difference between the two groups recarding to recurrent attic retraction pocket appearance and recurrence of cholesteatoma was considered statistically

  10. Novel titanium constructs for chest wall reconstruction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jacob T; Song, Kit; Avansino, Jeffrey R; Mesher, Andrew; Waldhausen, John H T

    2011-05-01

    We have previously reported the use of the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) for treatment of thoracic dystrophy. This report describes our experience with this device and other novel titanium constructs for chest wall reconstruction. This is a retrospective chart review of all children and adolescents undergoing chest wall reconstruction with titanium constructs between December 2005 and May 2010. Six patients have undergone chest wall reconstruction with VEPTR or other titanium constructs. Four had chest wall resection for primary malignancy, 1 had metastatic chest wall tumor resection, and 1 had congenital chest wall deformity. There were no immediate complications, and all patients have exhibited excellent respiratory function with no scoliosis. Chest wall reconstruction after tumor resection or for primary chest wall deformities can be effectively accomplished with VEPTR and other customized titanium constructs. Goals should be durable protection of intrathoracic organs and preservation of thoracic volume and function throughout growth. Careful preoperative evaluation and patient-specific planning are important aspects of successful reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Abdominal wall reconstruction using De-epithelialized dermal flap: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdominal wall reconstruction using De-epithelialized dermal flap: A new technique. ... hernias, nine healed exomphalos major and two giant umbilical hernias. ... Morbidity was minimal and included skin dimpling in 11 patients, seroma in ...

  12. Abdominal wall reconstruction using De-epithelialized dermal flap: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to determine the place of de-epithelialized dermal flap in the reconstruction of abdominal wall hernias. Materials and Methods: A five-year prospective, descriptive analysis of eligible patients with difficult abdominal wall hernias closed with de-epithelialized dermal flap in a Nigerian Tertiary Health ...

  13. Materials and techniques in chest wall reconstruction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Stefano; Brandolini, Jury; Pardolesi, Alessandro; Argnani, Desideria; Mengozzi, Marta; Dell'Amore, Andrea; Solli, Piergiorgio

    2017-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction are a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeon, plastic surgeon and oncologist. In particular chest wall neoplastic pathology is associated with high surgical morbidity and can result in full thickness defects hard to reconstruct. The goals of a successful chest wall reconstruction are to restore the chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanic and protect the intrathoracic organs minimizing the thoracic deformity. In case of large full thickness defects synthetic, biologic or composite meshes can be used, with or without titanium plate to restore thoracic cage rigidity as like as more recently the use of allograft to reconstruct the sternum. After skeletal stability is established full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct suture, skin graft or local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps or free flaps. The aim of this article is to illustrate the indications, various materials and techniques for chest wall reconstruction with the goal to obtain the best chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage.

  14. Plastic surgery in chest wall reconstruction: relevant aspects - case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Franco

    Full Text Available Objective: to discuss the participation of Plastic Surgery in the reconstruction of the chest wall, highlighting relevant aspects of interdisciplinaryness. Methods: we analyzed charts from 20 patients who underwent extensive resection of the thoracic integument, between 2000 and 2014, recording the indication of resection, the extent and depth of the raw areas, types of reconstructions performed and complications. Results: among the 20 patients, averaging 55 years old, five were males and 15 females. They resections were: one squamous cell carcinoma, two basal cell carcinomas, five chondrosarcomas and 12 breast tumors. The extent of the bloody areas ranged from 4x9 cm to 25x40 cm. In 12 patients the resection included the muscular plane. In the remaining eight, the tumor removal achieved a total wall thickness. For reconstruction we used: one muscular flap associated with skin grafting, nine flaps and ten regional fasciocutaneous flaps. Two patients undergoing reconstruction with fasciocutaneous flaps had partially suffering of the flap, solved with employment of a myocutaneous flap. The other patients displayed no complications with the techniques used, requiring only one surgery. Conclusion: the proper assessment of local tissues and flaps available for reconstruction, in addition to the successful integration of Plastic Surgery with the specialties involved in the treatment, enable extensive resections of the chest wall and reconstructions that provide patient recovery.

  15. Safety of Silastic Sheet for Orbital Wall Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong June Moon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Many implants are being used for the reconstruction of orbital wall fractures. The effect of the choice of implant for the reconstruction of an orbital wall fracture on the surgical outcome is under debate. The purpose of this article is to compare the outcomes of orbital wall reconstruction of small orbital wall fractures on the basis of the implants used. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective study using electronic databases. Between March 2001 and December 2012, 461 patients with orbital wall fractures were included in this study. Among them, 431 patients in whom the fracture size was less than 300 mm2 were analyzed. The fracture size was calculated using computed tomography scans of the orbit in the sagittal and coronal images. Cases in which the fracture size was less than 300 mm2 were included in this study. Results One hundred and twenty-nine patients were treated with silastic sheets; 238 patients were treated with titanium meshes; and absorbable meshes were used in the case of 64 patients. Overall, 13 patients required revision, and the revision rate was 3.0%. The revision rate of the silastic sheet group was 5.4%. In the multivariable analysis, the revision rate of the group reconstructed with silastic sheets was highly statistically significant (P=0.043, odds ratio=3.65. However, other factors such as age, sex, fracture type, and fracture size were not significant. Conclusions Reconstruction of orbital wall fractures with silastic sheets may cause more complications than that with other materials such as titanium meshes and absorbable meshes.

  16. The phenomenon of infection with abdominal wall reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsman, Anton F.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Busscher, Henk J.

    This review presents the clinical background to abdominal wall reconstruction, the different types of surgical meshes employed and known mechanisms of infection. It is shown that there are major physico-chemical differences between available meshes, which, in combination with the location of the

  17. Reconstruction of massive full-thickness abdominal wall defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Paulsen, Ida Felbo; Bentzen, Vibeke Egerup

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to use a nonabsorbable mesh for abdominal wall reconstruction after total wound rupture and successfully split-skin graft directly on the mesh. Sufficient granulation tissue formation prior to skin grafting was obtained with long-term use of negative pressure wo...

  18. [Reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lingli; Xing, Xin; Li, Junhui; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Li, Zhigang

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the surgical techniques and effectiveness for reconstruction of severe full-thickness chest wall defects. Between January 2006 and December 2010, 14 patients with full-thickness chest wall defects were treated, including 12 cases caused by giant chest wall malignant tumor excision, 1 case by thermocompression injury, and 1 case by radiation necrosis. There were 8 males and 6 females with an average age of 42 years (range, 23-65 years). The size of chest wall defects ranged from 8 cm x 5 cm to 26 cm x 14 cm. All patients complicated by rib defect (1-5 ribs), and 3 cases by sternum defect. Thoracic skeleton reconstruction was performed with Vicryl mesh or polytetrafluoroethylene mesh in 10 patients. Other 4 patients did not undergo thoracic skeleton reconstruction. The bilobed skin flaps, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap, and rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap were utilized for repairing soft tissue defects. The size of the dissected flaps ranged from 10 cm x 7 cm to 25 cm x 13 cm. The donor sites were sutured directly or were repaired by free skin graft. Poor healing of incision occurred in 2 cases, which was cured after debridement, myocutaneous flap transfer, and skin graft. The other wounds healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 6-36 months (mean, 8 months). No tumor recurrence during follow-up, except 1 patient with osteosarcoma who died of liver metastasis at 6 months after operation. Transient slight paradoxical respiration occurred in 1 patient who did not undergo thoracic skeleton reconstruction at 5 days after operation. Integrity of chest wall in other patients was restored without paradoxical respiration and dyspnea. Depending on the cause, the size, and the location of defect, single or combination flaps could be used to repair soft tissue defect, and thoracic skeleton reconstruction should be performed when defect is severe by means of synthetic materials.

  19. Reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defect following tumor resection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Predrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reconstruction of a full thickness abdominal wall defect is a demanding procedure for general and also for plastic surgeons, requiring vigorous planning and reconstruction of three layers. Case Outline. We present a case of a 70-year-old patient with a huge abdominal wall tumor with 40 years evolution. Surgery was performed under general anesthesia. Full thickness abdominal defect appeared after the tumor resection. Reconstruction followed in the same act. The defect was reconstructed using a combination of techniques, including omental flap, fascia lata graft, local skin flaps and skin grafts. After surgery no major complications were noted, only a partial skin flap loss, which was repaired using partial thickness skin grafts. The final result was described by the patient as very good, without hernia formation. Conclusion. Omenthoplasty, abdominal wall reconstruction in combination with free fascia lata graft and skin grafts can be one of good options for the reconstruction of full thickness abdominal wall defects.

  20. Effects of prosthetic reconstruction of the abdominal wall on respiratory mechanics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, P R; Fonseca, S M; Pinto, A P; Medeiros, A S; Contador, R S; Zin, W A

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory mechanics and thoracoabdominal morphometry were determined in four sets of animal experiments before and after surgery. In group RRA the rectus abdominus muscles were removed; in RRAH rats the muscle resection was followed by lung hyperinflation; in PPM animals the defect was repaired by suturing a polypropylene mesh (Marlex); and in PPMH lung hyperinflation was performed after abdominal wall reconstruction. Lung and chest wall elastances, and chest wall viscoelastic/inhomogeneous pressures increased in RRA, RRAH and PPM groups. Static lung elastance was progressively smaller in the following order: RRA, PPM, and PPMH. In conclusion, removal of the rectus abdominus muscles and abdominal wall reconstruction could account for higher energy losses against viscoelastic and elastic forces acting on the chest wall, and these are related to a cephalad deviation of the diaphragm. Furthermore, hyperinflation reverses lung elastic modification after abdominal wall reconstruction with PPM, without beneficial effects in the presence of abdominal wall defect.

  1. AUTOMATED RECONSTRUCTION OF WALLS FROM AIRBORNE LIDAR DATA FOR COMPLETE 3D BUILDING MODELLING

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    Y. He

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Automated 3D building model generation continues to attract research interests in photogrammetry and computer vision. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR data with increasing point density and accuracy has been recognized as a valuable source for automated 3D building reconstruction. While considerable achievements have been made in roof extraction, limited research has been carried out in modelling and reconstruction of walls, which constitute important components of a full building model. Low point density and irregular point distribution of LIDAR observations on vertical walls render this task complex. This paper develops a novel approach for wall reconstruction from airborne LIDAR data. The developed method commences with point cloud segmentation using a region growing approach. Seed points for planar segments are selected through principle component analysis, and points in the neighbourhood are collected and examined to form planar segments. Afterwards, segment-based classification is performed to identify roofs, walls and planar ground surfaces. For walls with sparse LIDAR observations, a search is conducted in the neighbourhood of each individual roof segment to collect wall points, and the walls are then reconstructed using geometrical and topological constraints. Finally, walls which were not illuminated by the LIDAR sensor are determined via both reconstructed roof data and neighbouring walls. This leads to the generation of topologically consistent and geometrically accurate and complete 3D building models. Experiments have been conducted in two test sites in the Netherlands and Australia to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that planar segments can be reliably extracted in the two reported test sites, which have different point density, and the building walls can be correctly reconstructed if the walls are illuminated by the LIDAR sensor.

  2. Reconstruction of the chest wall after excision of a giant malignant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-29

    Jul 29, 2011 ... Novoa N, Benito P, Jiménez MF, de Juan A, Luis Aranda J, Varela G. Reconstruction of chest wall defects after resection of large neoplasms: Ten-year experience. Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2005;4:250-5. 8. King RM, Pairolero PC, Trastek VF, Piehler JM, Payne WS, Bernatz PE. Primary chest wall ...

  3. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  4. Reconstruction of Anterior Chest Wall with Polypropylene Mesh: Two Primary Sternal Chondrosarcoma Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawana, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Maki, Yuho; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Toyooka, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2017-06-01

     Primary sternal chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor that is refractory to chemotherapy and radiation. Effective therapy is radical resection of the tumor. We present two patients with primary sternal chondrosarcoma who underwent a radical resection of the lower half of the sternum and bilateral ribs, followed by reconstruction with 2 sheets of polypropylene mesh layered orthogonally. The patients have maintained almost the same pulmonary function as preoperative values, with stability of the chest wall. Although there are various ways to reconstruct the anterior chest wall, reconstruction with polypropylene mesh layered orthogonally is an easy-to-use and sufficient method.

  5. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

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    Pauline Joy F. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect.

  6. Africa's Great Green Wall Initiative: a model for restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrahmouni, Nora; Sacande, Moctar

    2014-05-01

    The Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative was launched to address the increasing challenges of land degradation, desertification and drought, climate change, food insecurity and poverty in more than 20 countries. Restoration of agro-sylvo-pastoral landscapes and degraded lands is one of the priority interventions initiated, enabling the springing up of green nests of life. When complete, the Great Green Wall of Africa will reverse the seemingly unstoppable desertification and address the development of its drylands' inhabitant rural communities. Today's planting of modest seedlings will grow into vast mosaics of forest and agroforestry landscapes and grasslands, which will provide essential ecosystem goods and services, restore lost livelihoods and create new wealth. The ambition of reforestation efforts within this initiative - the like of which the world has never seen before - sounds like an impossible dream. However, learning from past mistakes and capitalising on current advancement in science and technology, it is a reality that is taking root. Following a successful restoration model that RBG Kew experts have devised, we are helping to mobilise, train and support communities in four border regions in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In collaboration with FAO, the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership is using its unique expertise to ensure that seeds of environmentally well-adapted and economically useful local species are collected and planted in communal gardens and village agroforestry systems managed by the communities themselves. In our first year, an estimated total of 162,000 seedlings and 61 kg of seeds from 40 useful native species, including grasses for livestock, have been planted to cover 237 ha of farmer-managed land in 19 villages. The keen interest it has created has indicated that these figures will rise five-fold in the second year. These green bricks are the foundations of the living wall that will eventually reach across the

  7. Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia restores expiratory lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Backer, Vibeke; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2017-01-01

    (horizontal fascial defect width >10 cm) were compared with 18 patients with an intact abdominal wall who underwent colorectal resection. Patients were examined pre- and 1-year postoperatively. Examined measures included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in first second, peak expiratory flow......-up, the abdominal wall reconstruction group showed significant improvement in percent predicted peak expiratory flow and maximal expiratory mouth pressure, whereas all other measurements of lung function remained unchanged. Respiratory quality of life did not change significantly. Patients who underwent abdominal...... wall reconstruction showed a significantly greater improvement of percent predicted peak expiratory flow compared with patients undergoing colorectal resection. CONCLUSION: Abdominal wall reconstruction for large incisional hernia improved long-term expiratory lung function. Respiratory quality of life...

  8. Reconstruction with a patient-specific titanium implant after a wide anterior chest wall resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Akif; Kavakli, Kuthan; Sapmaz, Ersin; Arslan, Hakan; Caylak, Hasan; Gokce, Hasan Suat; Demirkaya, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects is a challenging problem for thoracic surgeons, particularly after a wide resection of the chest wall that includes the sternum. The location and the size of the defect play a major role when selecting the method of reconstruction, while acceptable cosmetic and functional results remain the primary goal. Improvements in preoperative imaging techniques and reconstruction materials have an important role when planning and performing a wide chest wall resection with a low morbidity rate. In this report, we describe the reconstruction of a wide anterior chest wall defect with a patient-specific custom-made titanium implant. An infected mammary tumour recurrence in a 62-year old female, located at the anterior chest wall including the sternum, was resected, followed by a large custom-made titanium implant. Latissimus dorsi flap and split-thickness graft were also used for covering the implant successfully. A titanium custom-made chest wall implant could be a viable alternative for patients who had large chest wall tumours. PMID:24227881

  9. Representation and Reconstruction of Triangular Irregular Networks with Vertical Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorte, B.G.H.; Lesparre, J.

    2012-01-01

    Point clouds obtained by aerial laser scanning are a convenient input source for high resolution 2.5d elevation models, such as the Dutch AHN-2. More challenging is the fully automatic reconstruction of 3d city models. An actual demand for a combined 2.5d terrain and 3d city model for an urban

  10. [Reconstructive method after resection of chest wall, diaphragm and pericardium, mainly using Composix-mesh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Noriyuki

    2014-10-01

    This study examined utility and question about the reconstructive prostheses in 11 cases which were resected chest wall and/or diaphragm and/or pericardium. One of 3 patients, who were used metal plates after chest wall resection, was prevented from post-operative irradiation therapy by limitation and diffuse reflection of beam by the metal plates. Gore-Tex( ePTFE) sheets, which were used for coverage of diaphragm defect and pericardium defect, occurred no problems. Composix-meshes (Composix-Kugel, Hernia-patch) were used for 7 cases which had large defects due to resection of chest wall and diaphragm. These kinds of meshes (or patches) consist of double layer mesh and memory recoil ring and then have airtightness and rigidity. After reconstruction of chest wall and diaphragm there were no problems without any flail chest.

  11. MULTIMODALITY THERAPY FOR OSTEOSARCOMA OF THE STERNUM WITH RECONSTRUCTION OF COMPLEX CHEST WALL DEFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteosarcoma is a high-grade malignant bone tumor that accounts for up to 6 % of all bone neoplasms. There are only a few published cases of primary sternal osteosarcomas, reflecting the rarity of these tumors. Recently, there has been a growing interest in performing radical excisions of chest wall tumors followed by combined single-stage reconstruction of the rib cage with implants made of biologically compatible materials. Material and methods. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with osteosarcoma of the sternum. The patient received a combined modality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. Titanium nickelid implants were used for the reconstruction of chest wall defects. Results. The multimodality treatment with reconstruction of postoperative chest wall defects allowed the achievement of the optimal quality of life for 21 months in the patient with very poor prognosis. Conclusion. The chest wall reconstruction using biocompatible materials from titanium nickelid appeared to be an effective and safe technique for the treatment of chest wall tumors.

  12. Impact of Prior Unilateral Chest Wall Radiotherapy on Outcomes in Bilateral Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Thiago B; Jue Xu, Mary; Susarla, Srinivas M; Shmelev, Karen; Jiang, Wei; Pribaz, Julian J; Hergrueter, Charles; Carty, Matthew J; Caterson, Stephanie; Chun, Yoon S

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of prior unilateral chest wall radiotherapy on reconstructive outcomes among patients undergoing bilateral immediate breast reconstruction. A retrospective evaluation of patients with a history of unilateral chest wall radiotherapy was performed. In each patient, the previously irradiated and reconstructed breast was compared to the contralateral nonirradiated side, which served as an internal control. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed. Multiple regression statistics were computed to identify adjusted associations between chest wall radiotherapy and complications. Seventy patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up period was 51.8 months (range, 10 to 113 months). Thirty-eight patients underwent implant-based breast reconstruction; 32 patients underwent abdominal autologous flap reconstruction. Previously irradiated breast had a significantly higher rate of overall complications (51 percent versus 27 percent; p radiotherapy was a significant risk factor for breast-related complications (OR, 2.98; p radiotherapy is associated with a 3-fold increased risk of postoperative complications following immediate breast reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  13. Rectus Abdominis Muscle Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma Causing a Large Abdominal Wall Defect: Reconstruction with Biological Mesh

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    Evangelos Falidas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH is a common soft tissue sarcoma usually involving limbs and retroperitoneum. MFH of the rectus abdominis muscle is extremely rare. Surgery in similar cases leads to large abdominal wall defects needing reconstruction. Biological and synthetic laminar absorbable prostheses are available for the repair of hernia defects in the abdominal wall. They share the important feature of being gradually degraded in the host, resulting the formation of a neotissue. We herein report the case of an 84-year-old man with MFH of the rectus abdominis muscle which was resected and the large abdominal wall defect was successfully repaired with a biological mesh.

  14. Properties of novel composite meshes in chest wall reconstruction: A comparative animal study

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    Patrick Zardo

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We consider composite grafts a suitable alternative for chest wall reconstruction. They are characterized by good overall biointegration and limited perigraft-fibrosis, thus potentially facilitating redo-procedures, even though a hydrophilic coating per se does not appear to prevent intrathoracic adhesion formation.

  15. Automated reconstruction of neural trees using front re-initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Amit; Stepanyants, Armen

    2012-02-01

    This paper proposes a greedy algorithm for automated reconstruction of neural arbors from light microscopy stacks of images. The algorithm is based on the minimum cost path method. While the minimum cost path, obtained using the Fast Marching Method, results in a trace with the least cumulative cost between the start and the end points, it is not sufficient for the reconstruction of neural trees. This is because sections of the minimum cost path can erroneously travel through the image background with undetectable detriment to the cumulative cost. To circumvent this problem we propose an algorithm that grows a neural tree from a specified root by iteratively re-initializing the Fast Marching fronts. The speed image used in the Fast Marching Method is generated by computing the average outward flux of the gradient vector flow field. Each iteration of the algorithm produces a candidate extension by allowing the front to travel a specified distance and then tracking from the farthest point of the front back to the tree. Robust likelihood ratio test is used to evaluate the quality of the candidate extension by comparing voxel intensities along the extension to those in the foreground and the background. The qualified extensions are appended to the current tree, the front is re-initialized, and Fast Marching is continued until the stopping criterion is met. To evaluate the performance of the algorithm we reconstructed 6 stacks of two-photon microscopy images and compared the results to the ground truth reconstructions by using the DIADEM metric. The average comparison score was 0.82 out of 1.0, which is on par with the performance achieved by expert manual tracers.

  16. Structure reconstruction of TiO2-based multi-wall nanotubes: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, A V; Evarestov, R A; Lukyanov, S I

    2014-07-28

    A new method of theoretical modelling of polyhedral single-walled nanotubes based on the consolidation of walls in the rolled-up multi-walled nanotubes is proposed. Molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum mechanics methods are applied to investigate the merging of walls in nanotubes constructed from the different phases of titania. The combination of two methods allows us to simulate the structures which are difficult to find only by ab initio calculations. For nanotube folding we have used (1) the 3-plane fluorite TiO2 layer; (2) the anatase (101) 6-plane layer; (3) the rutile (110) 6-plane layer; and (4) the 6-plane layer with lepidocrocite morphology. The symmetry of the resulting single-walled nanotubes is significantly lower than the symmetry of initial coaxial cylindrical double- or triple-walled nanotubes. These merged nanotubes acquire higher stability in comparison with the initial multi-walled nanotubes. The wall thickness of the merged nanotubes exceeds 1 nm and approaches the corresponding parameter of the experimental patterns. The present investigation demonstrates that the merged nanotubes can integrate the two different crystalline phases in one and the same wall structure.

  17. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

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    Kambiz Sheikhy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result.

  18. A novel technique for reconstruction of the abdominal wall in the prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, G; Guys, J M; Bocciardi, A; Coquet, M; Chevallier, D

    1991-08-01

    There is currently widespread enthusiasm for abdominal wall reconstruction in patients with the prune belly syndrome. We have devised an operation that appears to offer some advantages over those proposed by Ehrlich and Randolph. The technique preserves the umbilicus, and thickens and strengthens the anterior abdominal wall. By narrowing the waist, it also produces a better cosmetic appearance. After full thickness resection of a varying amount of skin from the central abdomen, the anterior wall is sutured in double-breasted fashion, thus, preserving all vascularization and the umbilicus. Since 1969 we have successfully performed this procedure on 9 prune belly patients including 1 girl. The results were excellent in terms of duration and cosmetic appearance.

  19. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle CT Using Optimized Initial Image

    OpenAIRE

    Jingyu Guo; Hongliang Qi; Yuan Xu; Zijia Chen; Shulong Li; Linghong Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Limited-angle computed tomography (CT) has great impact in some clinical applications. Existing iterative reconstruction algorithms could not reconstruct high-quality images, leading to severe artifacts nearby edges. Optimal selection of initial image would influence the iterative reconstruction performance but has not been studied deeply yet. In this work, we proposed to generate optimized initial image followed by total variation (TV) based iterative reconstruction considering the feature o...

  20. Prospective cohort comparison of bioactive glass implants and conchal cartilage in reconstruction of the posterior canal wall during tympanomastoidectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramovich, S.; Hannan, S. A.; Huins, C. T.; Georgalas, C.; McGuinness, J.; Vats, A.; Thompson, I.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of bioactive glass implants and conchal cartilage in reconstructing the posterior canal wall during tympanomastoidectomy. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective cohort clinical study. SETTING: Teaching hospital. PATIENTS: Patients with clinically diagnosed chronic

  1. Reconstructing the science teaching in initial series through continuing education

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    Suzana Margarete Kurzmann Fagundes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the report of an investigation whose aim was to know the focus on Science teaching in initial series of elementary school and to understand the contributions of teacher’s participation in study groups for transformation of teaching practice in Sciences classes. It’s believed that the role of teachers is to give to their students opportunities for construction/reconstruction of knowledge. Thus, there is essential that teachers keep themselves in constant training The study was conducted with teachers of initial series (to 1st from 4th from a school from the Rio Grande do Sul (RS state in the 2006 / 2007 period. A qualitative analysis methodology was employed in this study, and data was obtained in the natural environment, namely,the school. Through Discoursive Textual Analysis (MORAES and GALIAZZI, 2007 about the data that was collected, it was concluded that the study groups can contribute to transformation and to development of pedagogical teacher’s practice, particularly in regard to Sciences classes, as well on student learning, ie the construction of their knowledge. It has been observed a growth of the group in the course of the meetings, not only by the concern of the teachers in changing their classes, but also to taking the necessary decisions to make it possible.

  2. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle CT Using Optimized Initial Image

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    Jingyu Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited-angle computed tomography (CT has great impact in some clinical applications. Existing iterative reconstruction algorithms could not reconstruct high-quality images, leading to severe artifacts nearby edges. Optimal selection of initial image would influence the iterative reconstruction performance but has not been studied deeply yet. In this work, we proposed to generate optimized initial image followed by total variation (TV based iterative reconstruction considering the feature of image symmetry. The simulated data and real data reconstruction results indicate that the proposed method effectively removes the artifacts nearby edges.

  3. Reconstruction of tracheal wall defect with a mesh patch of nickel-titanium shape-memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia-Sheng; Cui, Peng-Cheng; Gao, Peng-Fei; Nan, Hou; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yong-Zhu

    2011-03-01

    We explored the feasibility of reconstructing tracheal wall defects with a mesh patch fashioned from a nickel-titanium shape-memory alloy. A tracheal wall defect was first constructed surgically by resecting the anterior half of the tracheal wall between the second and sixth tracheal rings. The defect was reconstructed in 8 experimental animals by replacing the resected tracheal mucosa and tracheal cartilage with a pedicle skin flap, which was then enclosed in the mesh patch. In 4 control animals, only a pedicle skin flap with strap muscles was used in the reconstruction procedure. The performance of the animals was observed after surgery. At the end of the experiments, the reconstructed segment was harvested for anatomic evaluation. In the experimental group, 1 animal died 5 days after the operation. Endoscopic and anatomic examination of the 7 animals that survived the observation period showed that the reconstructed trachea was stable, with sufficient airway space for breathing. All 4 control animals died after the operation. After observing successful completion of this operation in animals, we successfully used this method to repair a tracheal wall defect in a human victim of a traffic accident. Tracheal defects can be successfully reconstructed by use of a mesh patch of nickel-titanium shape-memory alloy as an extraluminal stent--a method that avoids complications associated with intraluminal stents.

  4. Violation of the rectus complex is not a contraindication to component separation for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Patrick B; Bailey, Chad M; Baumann, Donald P; Liu, Jun; Butler, Charles E

    2012-02-01

    Component separation (CS) is an effective technique for reconstructing complex abdominal wall defects. Violation of the rectus abdominis complex is considered a contraindication for CS, but we hypothesized that patients have similar outcomes with or without rectus complex violation. We retrospectively studied all consecutive patients who underwent CS for abdominal wall reconstruction during 8 years and compared outcomes of patients with and without rectus violation. Primary outcomes measures included complications and hernia recurrence. Logistic regression analysis identified potential associations between patient, defect, and reconstructive characteristics and surgical outcomes. One hundred sixty-nine patients were included: 115 (68%) with and 54 (32%) without rectus violation. Mean follow-up was 21.3 ± 14.5 months. Patient and defect characteristics were similar, except for the rectus violation group having a higher body mass index. Overall complication rates were similar in the violation (24.3%) and nonviolation (24.0%) groups, as were the respective rates of recurrent hernia (7.8% vs 9.2%; p = 0.79), abdominal bulge (3.5% vs 5.6%; p = 0.71), skin dehiscence (20.0% vs 22.2%; p = 0.74), skin necrosis (6.1% vs 3.7%; p = 0.72), cellulitis (7.8% vs 9.2%; p = 0.75), and abscess (12.3% vs 9.2%; p = 0.58). Regression analysis demonstrated body mass index to be the only factor predictive of complications. CS surgical outcomes were similar whether or not the rectus complex was violated. To our knowledge, this study is the first to evaluate the effects of rectus violation on surgical outcomes in CS patients. Surgeons should not routinely avoid CS when the rectus complex is violated. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Economizer water-wall damages initiated by feedwater impurities

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    Vidojković Sonja M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main causes of efficiency loss in thermal power plants are boiler tube failures that diminish unit reliability and availability, and raise the cost of the electric energy. For that reason, regular examination of boiler tubes is indispensable measure for prevention future malfunctions of power units. Microscopic examination of economizer inner wall microstructure, analysis of chemical composition of deposit using x-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS has been performed in a subcritical power plant. Stress corrosion cracking, pitting corrosion, destroyed protective magnetite layer, presence of magnetite and hematite in deposit and corrosive impurities within the cracks were indicated the effect of inadequate quality of feedwater that can not entirely ensure reliable operation of the boiler. It may be stated that maintenance of present boiler does not provide its reliable operation. Extensive chemical control of water/steam cycle was recommended. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43009 i br. III 45012

  6. Assessment of the abdominal wall function after pedicled TRAM flap surgery for breast reconstruction: Use of modified mesh repair for the donor defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyriac, Chacko; Sharma, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-07-01

    The pedicled TRAM flap has been a workhorse of autologous breast reconstruction for decades. However, there has been a rising concern about the abdominal wall donor site morbidity with the use of conventional TRAM flap. This has generally been cited as one of the main reasons for resorting to "abdominal wall friendly" techniques. This study has been undertaken to assess the abdominal wall function in patients with pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction. The entire width of the muscle and the overlying wide disk of anterior rectus sheath were harvested with the TRAM flap in all our patients and the anterior rectus sheath defect was repaired by a Proline mesh. Abdominal wall function was studied in 21 patients who underwent simultaneous primary unipedicled TRAM flap reconstruction after mastectomy for cancer. In all the patients, the abdominal wall defect was repaired using wide sheet of Proline mesh both as inlay and onlay. The assessment tools included straight and rotational curl ups and a subjective questionnaire. The abdominal wall was also examined for any asymmetry, bulge, or hernia. The minimal follow-up was 6 months postoperative. The objective results were compared with normal unoperated volunteers. The harvesting the TRAM flap certainly results in changes to the anterior abdominal wall that can express themselves to a variable degree. A relatively high incidence of asymptomatic asymmetry of the abdomen was seen. There was total absence of hernia in our series even after a mean follow-up period of 15.5 months. A few patients were only able to partially initiate the sit up movement and suffered an important loss of strength. In most patients, synergists took over the functional movement but as the load increased, flexion and rotation performances decreased. The lack of correlation between exercise tests and the results of the questionnaire suggests that this statistically significant impairment was functionally not important. The patients encountered

  7. Assessment of the abdominal wall function after pedicled TRAM flap surgery for breast reconstruction: Use of modified mesh repair for the donor defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyriac Chacko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pedicled TRAM flap has been a workhorse of autologous breast reconstruction for decades. However, there has been a rising concern about the abdominal wall donor site morbidity with the use of conventional TRAM flap. This has generally been cited as one of the main reasons for resorting to "abdominal wall friendly" techniques. This study has been undertaken to assess the abdominal wall function in patients with pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction. The entire width of the muscle and the overlying wide disk of anterior rectus sheath were harvested with the TRAM flap in all our patients and the anterior rectus sheath defect was repaired by a Proline mesh. Materials and Methods: Abdominal wall function was studied in 21 patients who underwent simultaneous primary unipedicled TRAM flap reconstruction after mastectomy for cancer. In all the patients, the abdominal wall defect was repaired using wide sheet of Proline mesh both as inlay and onlay. The assessment tools included straight and rotational curl ups and a subjective questionnaire. The abdominal wall was also examined for any asymmetry, bulge, or hernia. The minimal follow-up was 6 months postoperative. The objective results were compared with normal unoperated volunteers. Results and Conclusions: The harvesting the TRAM flap certainly results in changes to the anterior abdominal wall that can express themselves to a variable degree. A relatively high incidence of asymptomatic asymmetry of the abdomen was seen. There was total absence of hernia in our series even after a mean follow-up period of 15.5 months. A few patients were only able to partially initiate the sit up movement and suffered an important loss of strength. In most patients, synergists took over the functional movement but as the load increased, flexion and rotation performances decreased. The lack of correlation between exercise tests and the results of the questionnaire suggests that this statistically

  8. [Fascia lata transplant from cadaveric donor in the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez Mata, D; Alvarez Zapico, J A; Gutiérrez Segura, C; Fernández Jiménez, I; García Saavedra, S; González Sarasúa, J; Arriaga Flórez, M J

    2001-01-01

    Abdominal wall closure is not possible in large congenital defects, even after extensively stretching in to enlarge its capacity. The skin coverage is usually adequate but the aponeurotic defect has to be closed temporally using synthetic patches. The use of these materials leads to increase complication such as infection, fistula formation and extrusion. In addition a second operation is required to remove the material and to perform a definitive closure. The role of fascia lata in reconstruction of abdominal wall is well established as free grafts, pedicled flaps or free flaps. Bank cadaveric fascia lata is used extensively in neurosurgical, ophtalmological, orthopaedic and urogynecological procedures. This is the first description of the use of cadaveric fascia lata for the closure of large abdominal wall defects. We present two cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The first patient was a newborn who presented the impossibility to close the fascia, that was salvaged by a teflón patch. Five months later the wound opened, leaving the mesh exposed that had to be removed. A cadaveric fascia lata patch was used to cover the defect, closing the skin satisfactorily. The second case was a two days newborn. We performed the diaphragmatic closure, and the aponeurotic defect was closed using cadaveric fascia lata. Cosmetic and functional appearance are satisfactory in both cases and no complications have been seen. Fascia lata patches are revascularized in the abdominal wall and incorporates into receptor tissue. They have the following advantages with respect to synthetic materials: First, the risk of complications is lower. Second, their removal is not necessary. Finally, no intraperitoneal adhesions occur. The risks of disease transmission and rejection are minimized by the Centro Comunitario de Transfusiones donor selection and processing of the cadaveric fascia lata.

  9. Anesthesia for minimally invasive chest wall reconstructive surgeries: Our experience and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagun Bhatia Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimal access procedures have revolutionized the field of surgery and opened newer challenges for the anesthesiologists. Pectus carinatum or pigeon chest is an uncommon chest wall deformity characterized by a protruding breast bone (sternum and ribs caused by an overgrowth of the costal cartilages. It can cause a multitude of problems, including severe pain from an intercostal neuropathy, respiratory dysfunction, and psychologic issues from the cosmetic disfigurement. Pulmonary function indices, namely, forced expiratory volume over 1 s, forced vital capacity, vital capacity, and total lung capacity are markedly compromised in pectus excavatum. Earlier, open surgical correction in the form of the Ravitch procedure was followed. Currently, in the era of minimally invasive surgery, Nuss technique (pectus bar procedure is a promising step in chest wall reconstructive surgery for pectus excavatum. Reverse Nuss is a corrective, minimally invasive surgery for pectus carinatum chest deformity. A tailor-made anesthetic technique for this new procedure has been described here based on the authors' personal experience and thorough review of literature based on Medline, Embase, and Scopus databases search.

  10. Anesthesia for minimally invasive chest wall reconstructive surgeries: Our experience and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Hariharan, Uma; Bhargava, Ajay Kumar; Darlong, Laleng M.

    2017-01-01

    Minimal access procedures have revolutionized the field of surgery and opened newer challenges for the anesthesiologists. Pectus carinatum or pigeon chest is an uncommon chest wall deformity characterized by a protruding breast bone (sternum) and ribs caused by an overgrowth of the costal cartilages. It can cause a multitude of problems, including severe pain from an intercostal neuropathy, respiratory dysfunction, and psychologic issues from the cosmetic disfigurement. Pulmonary function indices, namely, forced expiratory volume over 1 s, forced vital capacity, vital capacity, and total lung capacity are markedly compromised in pectus excavatum. Earlier, open surgical correction in the form of the Ravitch procedure was followed. Currently, in the era of minimally invasive surgery, Nuss technique (pectus bar procedure) is a promising step in chest wall reconstructive surgery for pectus excavatum. Reverse Nuss is a corrective, minimally invasive surgery for pectus carinatum chest deformity. A tailor-made anesthetic technique for this new procedure has been described here based on the authors’ personal experience and thorough review of literature based on Medline, Embase, and Scopus databases search. PMID:28757834

  11. A clinically relevant in vivo model for the assessment of scaffold efficacy in abdominal wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey CY Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An animal model that allows for assessment of the degree of stretching or contraction of the implant area and the in vivo degradation properties of biological meshes is required to evaluate their performance in vivo. Adult New Zealand rabbits underwent full thickness subtotal unilateral rectus abdominis muscle excision and were reconstructed with the non-biodegradable Peri-Guard®, Prolene® or biodegradable Surgisis® meshes. Following 8 weeks of recovery, the anterior abdominal wall tissue samples were collected for measurement of the implant dimensions. The Peri-Guard and Prolene meshes showed a slight and obvious shrinkage, respectively, whereas the Surgisis mesh showed stretching, resulting in hernia formation. Surgisis meshes showed in vivo biodegradation and increased collagen formation. This surgical rabbit model for abdominal wall defects is advantageous for evaluating the in vivo behaviour of surgical meshes. Implant area stretching and shrinkage were detected corresponding to mesh properties, and histological analysis and stereological methods supported these findings.

  12. Effects of cavity reconstruction on morbidity and quality of life after canal wall down tympanomastoidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluyol, Sinan; Ugur, Omer; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Yagiz, Ozlem; Gumussoy, Murat; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2017-08-19

    Canal wall down (CWD) tympanomastoidectomy is commonly used to treat advanced chronic otitis media or cholesteatoma. The advantages of CWD mastoidectomy are excellent exposure for disease eradication and postoperative control of residual disease; its disadvantages include the accumulation of debris requiring life-long otological maintenance and cleaning, continuous ear drainage, fungal cavity infections, and the occurrence of dizziness and vertigo by changing temperature or pressure. To evaluate whether cavity-induced problems can be eliminated and patient comfort can be increased with mastoid cavity reconstruction. In total, 11 patients who underwent mastoid cavity reconstruction between March 2013 and June 2013 comprised the study group, and 11 patients who had dry, epithelialized CWD cavities were recruited as the control group. The study examined three parameters: epithelial migration, air caloric testing, and the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI). Epithelial migration, air caloric testing, and the GBI were evaluated in the study and control groups. The epithelial migration rate was significantly faster in study group (1.63±0.5mm/week) than control group (0.94±0.37mm/week) (p=0.003, psocial health scores were -9.71, -21.09, and +20.35, respectively in the control group. These were +33.93, +35.59, +33.31, and +29.61, respectively in the study group. All but the social health score improved significantly (0.007, 0.008, 0.018, and 0.181, respectively). Cavity reconstruction improves epithelial migration, normalizes caloric responses and increases the quality of life. Thus, cavity rehabilitation eliminates open-cavity-induced problems by restoring the functional anatomy of the ear. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Abdominal Wall Reconstruction with Concomitant Ostomy-Associated Hernia Repair: Outcomes and Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mericli, Alexander F; Garvey, Patrick B; Giordano, Salvatore; Liu, Jun; Baumann, Donald P; Butler, Charles E

    2017-03-01

    The optimal strategy for abdominal wall reconstruction in the presence of a stomal-site hernia is unclear. We hypothesized that the rate of ventral hernia recurrence in patients undergoing a combined ventral hernia repair and stomal-site herniorraphy would not differ clinically from the ventral hernia recurrence rate in patients undergoing an isolated ventral hernia repair. We also hypothesized that bridged ventral hernia repairs result in worse outcomes compared with reinforced repairs, regardless of stomal hernia. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from consecutive abdominal wall reconstructions performed with acellular dermal matrix (ADM) at a single center between 2000 and 2015. We compared patients who underwent a ventral hernia repair alone (AWR) and those who underwent both a ventral hernia repair and ostomy-associated herniorraphy (AWR+O). We conducted a propensity score matched analysis to compare the outcomes between the 2 groups. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression models were used to study associations between potential predictive or protective reconstructive strategies and surgical outcomes. We included 499 patients (median follow-up 27.2 months; interquartile range [IQR] 12.4 to 46.6 months), 118 AWR+O and 381 AWR. After propensity score matching, 91 pairs were obtained. Ventral hernia recurrence was not statistically associated with ostomy-associated herniorraphy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.7; 95% CI 0.3 to 1.5; p = 0.34). However, the AWR+O group experienced a significantly higher percentage of surgical site occurrences (34.1%) than the AWR group (18.7%; adjusted odds ratio 2.3; 95% CI 1.4 to 3.7; p < 0.001). In the AWR group, there were significantly fewer ventral hernia recurrences when the repair was reinforced compared with bridged (5.3% vs 38.5%; p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ventral hernia recurrence between the AWR and AWR+O groups. Bridging was associated

  14. Negative-pressure wound therapy and early pedicle flap reconstruction of the chest wall after epirubicin extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed; Holschneider, Philipp; Hübner, Gunnar

    2017-05-15

    Accidental extravasation is a serious iatrogenic injury among patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. The aim of this work is to present a combination therapy for chest wall reconstruction following epirubicin extravasation. Herein, we report a 68-year-old woman with massive soft tissue necrosis of the anterolateral chest wall after epirubicin extravasation from a port implanted in the subclavicular area. The necrotic tissue was resected, the port was removed, and negative-pressure wound therapy was applied. Three weeks later, a latissimus dorsi pedicle flap was successfully used to cover the defect. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a strategy comprising the combination of negative-pressure wound therapy and a latissimus pedicle flap for reconstruction of the chest wall after soft tissue necrosis following epirubicin extravasation.

  15. Bone and bone marrow function of reconstructed chest wall after surgical correction of pectus excavatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoh; Magara, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Ichihashi, Takumi; Hikishima, Hiroshi (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-03-01

    Bone and bone marrow functions of the reconstructed chest wall after surgical correction of the funnel chest deformities were evaluated by scanning method. In our series, three kinds of operative procedures were employed; strut method for adult cases, sternal turnover method with and without muscle pedicle for infant cases. Bone function was scanned by sup(99m)Tc-methylene-diphosphonate and bone marrow function was evaluated by sup(99m)Tc-sulfur-colloid. For the cases undergone each surgical procedure, bone and bone marrow scan were done at short term after surgery (within 30 days), at intermediate stage (one month to 12 months), and at long term stage (beyond one year). The results were as follows: By the evaluation at the long term stage of the cases undergoing strut method, bone as well as bone marrow scan visualized normal view of the reconstructed sternum. Regarding the cases undergone sternal turnover method without muscle pedicle, or free graft implantation of the plastron, the bone scan at the long term follow-up stage showed abnormal finding, i.e. hypo-, or defect-visualization of the inverted sternum, in 11.5% of the cases. Furthermore, bone marrow scan showed abnormality in 33.3% of the cases. On the other hand, the cases undergone sternal turnover method with muscle pedicle, in which blood supply to the plastron were preserved by the connection from superior epigastric artery to internal mammary artery, showed no abnormality as far as at the long term follow-up study neither in bone scan nor bone marrow scan. However, in the evaluation at short term after surgery, 50% of the cases undergoing bone scan showed abnormality. In addition, in this stage 85.7% of the bone marrow scan showed abnormal finding. These abnormality, however, normalized within 6 months for bone scan and 12 months for bone marrow scan, in contrast to the results of the cases undergone sternal turnover without pedicle.

  16. Comparative study of W-shaped angular plate and reconstruction plate in treating posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the medium-term results of the reconstruction of posterior wall fractures using a W-shaped acetabular angular plate (WAAP compared to those fixed using a reconstruction plate. METHODS: Between July 2006 and March 2009, we performed a retrospective study, which collected data for any patient treated for a posterior acetabular wall fracture. At the time of treatment, patients were either treated using a WAAP or a pelvic reconstruction plate. The intraoperative fluoroscopic images for both groups were compared. The quality of reduction and radiological grading were assessed according to the criteria developed by Matta. The clinical assessment was based on a modified Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scoring. RESULTS: 53 patients met the inclusion criteria and were followed up for an average of 38 months. 25 patients were treated with a WAAP (study group, and 28 patients were treated with a pelvic reconstruction plate (control group. The intraoperative fluoroscopic images of the study group confirmed extra-articular screw placement in all cases. In the control group, intra-articular screw placement was observed intraoperatively in 5 patients (17.86%, and the definitive location of the periarticular hardware could not be determined in 4 patients (14.29% during the operation. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 0.002. In contrast, the quality of fracture reduction, clinical outcomes, and radiological grading in the study group were not significantly different from those of the control group (p>0.05. The radiographic grade was strongly associated with the clinical outcomes in both the study and control groups (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum using a WAAP can help avoid screw penetration of the hip joint, provide a stable fixation of the posterior wall, and ensure good clinical outcomes.

  17. Extended Plate and Beam Wall System: Concept Investigation and Initial Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [Partnership for Home Innovation, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [Partnership for Home Innovation, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A new and innovative High-R wall design, referred to as the Extended Plate & Beam (EP&B), is under development. The EP&B system uniquely integrates foam sheathing insulation with wall framing such that wood structural panels are installed exterior of the foam sheathing, enabling the use of standard practices for installation of drainage plane, windows and doors, claddings, cavity insulation, and the standard exterior foam sheathing installation approach prone to damage of the foam during transportation of prefabricated wall panels. As part of the ongoing work, the EP&B wall system concept has undergone structural verification testing and has been positively vetted by a group of industry stakeholders. Having passed these initial milestone markers, the advanced wall system design has been analyzed to assess cost implications relative to other advanced wall systems, undergone design assessment to develop construction details, and has been evaluated to develop representative prescriptive requirements for the building code. This report summarizes the assessment steps conducted to-date and provides details of the concept development.

  18. Reconstructing the Initial Human Occupation of the Northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, David; Brantingham, Jeffrey; Sun, Yongjuan; Rhode, David; Mingjie, Yi; Perreault, Charles

    2017-04-01

    We identified and dated 20 archaeological sites, many containing multiple occupations, above 3000 m on the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (TP) during a decade-long Sino-American Tibet Paleolithic Project. The ages of these sites are controlled by 68 AMS radiocarbon dates, as well as associated luminescence age estimates. Together these sites suggest the initial occupation of the high northern TP occurred in two phases: 1) an early phase dating to 16-8 ka, characterized by short-term hunting camps occupied by small groups of foragers likely originating from lower elevation, but relatively nearby, base camps; and 2) a later phase dating to 8-5 ka, characterized by longer-term residential camps likely occupied by larger family groups also originating from nearby lower elevations. Whether or not these later family groups were full-time foragers or were pastoralists linked to farming communities remains under investigation. This pattern closely matches genetically-based estimates of rapid population increases. Both phases appear related to major climatic episodes: a period of rapid post-glacial warming, spread of higher elevation alpine grassland/meadow environments, and enhanced populations of larger herbivores; and a period of mid-Holocene warming that allowed farming/pastoralism to develop at higher elevations. We identified no sites dating to the LGM or earlier and genetic separation of Tibetan populations likely occurred on the lower elevation plateau margins. By 5 ka essentially modern settlement/subsistence patterns were established.

  19. A new alternative for bony chest wall reconstruction using biomaterial artificial rib and pleura: animal experiment and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan-jun; Wang, Wu-ping; Li, Wei-yang; Hao, Chong-li; Li, Zhe; Wu, Qiu-liang; Wu, Rao-pan; Rong, Tie-hua

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate a new method for chest wall reconstruction using porcine-derived artificial rib and pleura in an animal experiment. Further, the clinical application was performed in five patients with large defects in the chest wall as a preliminary observation. In animal experiments, a full-thickness chest wall defect of 7 cm × 8 cm was created in 12 adult mongrel dogs. Six dogs underwent reconstruction with porcine-derived artificial ribs and pleura (test group), and six with methylmethacrylate and double polyester mesh in the form of traditional Marlex sandwich technique (control group). At follow-up of each for 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, a general performance assessment and thoracic radiography were performed. Gross and histopathological examinations were carried out following humane euthanasia at the time of last follow-up. In clinical application, five patients with wide tumor resection in the chest wall underwent reconstruction with porcine-derived artificial ribs and pleura as well. In animal experiment, no perioperative death or hyperpyrexia occurred and no difference in either infection or dyspnea was noted between the two groups. Postoperative radiography revealed good thoracic integrity with no evidence of collapse, deformation, or abnormal movement in the test group. In the control group, similar results were observed, except that two dogs had abnormal movement in the chest wall associated with respiration. Severe adhesions between the 'sandwich' complex and the host tissues were identified in the control group, but by contrast, only mild adhesions were noted in the test group. The non-degradable polyester mesh induced fibrous proliferation and rejection, whereas the artificial pleura was absorbed with mild fibrous hyperplasia after 12 months. In clinical application, no thoracic deformity, chronic pain, or respiratory discomfort were observed at 1 or 12 postoperative months. Porcine-derived ribs and pleura can be employed safely to create an

  20. Fractures of the posterior wall of the acetabulum: treatment using internal fixation of two parallel reconstruction plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng; Yang, Honghang; Wang, Dan; Xu, Yi; Min, Jikang; Xu, Xuchun; Li, Zhanchun; Yuan, Yongjian

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment method using internal fixation of parallel reconstruction plates for the posterior wall of the acetabulum fractures. Randomised, prospective. Level I trauma centre. 57 patients with posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum in our department from 2007 to 2010 were treated operatively using this technique. internal fixation of two parallel reconstruction plates was used in this study. One of the plates was near the border of acetabulum. The other was parallel to the former one and was located to stress concentrated area. The clinical outcome was evaluated using the clinical grading system and radiological outcome was evaluated according to the criteria described by Matta. In addition, complications were researched in this study. The percentages of the clinical excellent-to-good and fair-to-poor results were 93.0% and 7%, respectively. We found that clinical outcome had no correlation with age, operation time from injury to operation, nor had correlation with hip dislocation, comminuted fracture condition and marginal compression fracture. Anatomical reduction was significantly correlated with excellent-to-good clinical outcome. Necrosis of the femoral head and heterotopic ossification were prone to decline the outcome of acetabular fractures despite good fracture reduction. the internal fixation of two parallel reconstruction plates facilitated rigid fixation and avoided fracture fragment injury, was an effective and reliable alternative method to treat fractures of the posterior wall of the acetabulum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A rare case of chronic traumatic diaphragmatic hernia requiring complex abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Andrea; Jones, Amber; Syed, Javed; Skinner, Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is a rare and often under recognized complication of penetrating and blunt trauma. These injuries are often missed or there is a delay in diagnosis which can lead to enlargement of the defect and the development of abdominal or respiratory symptoms. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 37 year old male who was involved in a motor vehicle accident at age twelve. He presented 25 years later with vague lower abdominal symptoms and was found to have a large chronic left sided diaphragmatic hernia involving the majority of his intra-abdominal contents. Repair of the defect with a biologic mesh was undertaken and the patient also required complex abdominal wall reconstruction due to loss of intra-abdominal domain from the chronicity of the hernia. A staged closure of the abdomen was performed first with placement of a Wittmann patch. Medical management of intra-abdominal hypertension was successful and the midline fascia was sequentially approximated at the bedside for three days. The final closure was performed with a component separation and implantation of a fenestrated biologic fetal bovine mesh to reinforce the closure. In addition, a lightweight Ultrapro mesh was placed for additional lateral reinforcement. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. These injuries are rare and diagnosis is challenging. Mechanism and CT scan characteristics can aid clinicians. Blunt diaphragmatic injury is rare and remains a diagnostic challenge. Depending on the chronicity of the injury, repair may require complex surgical decision making. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Chest-wall reconstruction with a customized titanium-alloy prosthesis fabricated by 3D printing and rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaopeng; Gao, Shan; Feng, Jinteng; Li, Shuo; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Guangjian

    2018-01-08

    As 3D printing technology emerge, there is increasing demand for a more customizable implant in the repair of chest-wall bony defects. This article aims to present a custom design and fabrication method for repairing bony defects of the chest wall following tumour resection, which utilizes three-dimensional (3D) printing and rapid-prototyping technology. A 3D model of the bony defect was generated after acquiring helical CT data. A customized prosthesis was then designed using computer-aided design (CAD) and mirroring technology, and fabricated using titanium-alloy powder. The mechanical properties of the printed prosthesis were investigated using ANSYS software. The yield strength of the titanium-alloy prosthesis was 950 ± 14 MPa (mean ± SD), and its ultimate strength was 1005 ± 26 MPa. The 3D finite element analyses revealed that the equivalent stress distribution of each prosthesis was unifrom. The symmetry and reconstruction quality contour of the repaired chest wall was satisfactory. No rejection or infection occurred during the 6-month follow-up period. Chest-wall reconstruction with a customized titanium-alloy prosthesis is a reliable technique for repairing bony defects.

  3. Early initiation of alcohol consumption by adolescents in reconstructed families may be explained by parenting style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iakunchykova, Olena

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. Literature about risk factors of alcohol use points at the association between alcohol use and parenting style. This study investigates the relationship between family structure of adolescents in Ukraine and their initiation of alcohol use with parenting style as a mediating variable.METHODS: Pooled data from the repeated cross-sectional nationally representative survey of classes in Ukrainian secondary schools with target group of all 15-16 year old students, held in 1999, 2003, and 2007, were used for this analysis. Complete data were available for 11019 participants. Main exposures were family structure (full, single parent and reconstructed and perceptions of the relationships with mother and father, rule-setting, control, and support provided by parents. Outcome measure was age when students started consuming alcohol.RESULTS: In bivariate analysis, children in reconstructed families had higher risk for initiating alcohol use at age of 13 or younger (odds ratio 1.37, confidence interval 1,15-1,63 compared to full families. In reconstructed families, adolescents were more likely to be dissatisfied with their relationships with mother compared to intact family structure (8.7% vs. 4.7% and dissatisfied with their relationships with father compared to intact family structure (19,8% vs. 9,1%. Parental support was lacking in higher proportion of reconstructed families, compared to intact family structure (20.7% vs. 15.1%. In the multivariate analysis, controlling for relationship with mother and father, support received from parents, and socio-demographic characteristics, the association between family structure and alcohol drinking initiation was attenuated.CONCLUSIONS: Children in reconstructed families have higher risk of early drinking initiation. This study also supports the hypothesis that dissatisfaction with relationships with parents and lack of support received from parents may mediate the association between family structure

  4. Comparative study of W-shaped angular plate and reconstruction plate in treating posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Chen, Wei; Wu, Xiaobo; Su, Yanling; Hou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yingze

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to assess the medium-term results of the reconstruction of posterior wall fractures using a W-shaped acetabular angular plate (WAAP) compared to those fixed using a reconstruction plate. Between July 2006 and March 2009, we performed a retrospective study, which collected data for any patient treated for a posterior acetabular wall fracture. At the time of treatment, patients were either treated using a WAAP or a pelvic reconstruction plate. The intraoperative fluoroscopic images for both groups were compared. The quality of reduction and radiological grading were assessed according to the criteria developed by Matta. The clinical assessment was based on a modified Merle d'Aubigne and Postel scoring. 53 patients met the inclusion criteria and were followed up for an average of 38 months. 25 patients were treated with a WAAP (study group), and 28 patients were treated with a pelvic reconstruction plate (control group). The intraoperative fluoroscopic images of the study group confirmed extra-articular screw placement in all cases. In the control group, intra-articular screw placement was observed intraoperatively in 5 patients (17.86%), and the definitive location of the periarticular hardware could not be determined in 4 patients (14.29%) during the operation. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (p = 0.002). In contrast, the quality of fracture reduction, clinical outcomes, and radiological grading in the study group were not significantly different from those of the control group (p>0.05). The radiographic grade was strongly associated with the clinical outcomes in both the study and control groups (pfractures of the acetabulum using a WAAP can help avoid screw penetration of the hip joint, provide a stable fixation of the posterior wall, and ensure good clinical outcomes.

  5. Carotid Intraplaque Hemorrhage Imaging with Quantitative Vessel Wall T1 Mapping: Technical Development and Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haikun; Sun, Jie; Qiao, Huiyu; Chen, Shuo; Zhou, Zechen; Pan, Xinlei; Wang, Yishi; Zhao, Xihai; Li, Rui; Yuan, Chun; Chen, Huijun

    2017-11-08

    Purpose To develop a three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution time-efficient sequence for use in quantitative vessel wall T1 mapping. Materials and Methods A previously described sequence, simultaneous noncontrast angiography and intraplaque hemorrhage (SNAP) imaging, was extended by introducing 3D golden angle radial k-space sampling (GOAL-SNAP). Sliding window reconstruction was adopted to reconstruct images at different inversion delay times (different T1 contrasts) for voxelwise T1 fitting. Phantom studies were performed to test the accuracy of T1 mapping with GOAL-SNAP against a two-dimensional inversion recovery (IR) spin-echo (SE) sequence. In vivo studies were performed in six healthy volunteers (mean age, 27.8 years ± 3.0 [standard deviation]; age range, 24-32 years; five male) and five patients with atherosclerosis (mean age, 66.4 years ± 5.5; range, 60-73 years; five male) to compare T1 measurements between vessel wall sections (five per artery) with and without intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH). Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation coefficient, Bland-Altman analysis, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test with data permutation by subject. Results Phantom T1 measurements with GOAL-SNAP and IR SE sequences showed excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.99), with a mean bias of -25.8 msec ± 43.6 and a mean percentage error of 4.3% ± 2.5. Minimum T1 was significantly different between sections with IPH and those without it (mean, 371 msec ± 93 vs 944 msec ± 120; P = .01). Estimated T1 of normal vessel wall and muscle were 1195 msec ± 136 and 1117 msec ± 153, respectively. Conclusion High-spatial-resolution (0.8 mm isotropic) time-efficient (5 minutes) vessel wall T1 mapping is achieved by using the GOAL-SNAP sequence. This sequence may yield more quantitative reproducible biomarkers with which to characterize IPH and monitor its progression. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  6. SU-E-T-18: A Comparison of Planning Techniques for Bilateral Reconstructed Chest Wall Patients Undergoing Whole Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volpe, T; Margiasso, R; Saleh, Z; Kuo, L; Hong, L; Ballangrud, A; Gelblum, D; Zinovoy, M; Deasy, J; Tang, X [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As we continuously see more bilateral reconstructed chest wall cases, new challenges are being presented to deliver left-sided breast irradiation. We herein compare three Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) planning techniques (tangents, VMAT, and IMRT) and two free breathing techniques (VMAT and IMRT). Methods: Three left-sided chest wall patients with bilateral implants were studied. Tangents, VMAT, and IMRT plans were created for DIBH scans. VMAT and IMRT plans were created for free breathing scans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the prescription dose was delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The maximum point dose was constrained to less than 120% of the prescription dose. Since the success of DIBH delivery largely depends on patient’s ability to perform consistent breath hold during beam on time, smaller number of Monitor Units (MU) is in general desired. For each patient, the following information was collected to compare the planning techniques: heart mean dose, left and right lung V20 Gy, contra-lateral (right) breast mean dose, cord max dose, and MU. Results: The average heart mean dose over all patients are 1561, 692, 985, 1245, and 1121 cGy, for DIBH tangents, VMAT, IMRT, free breathing VMAT and IMRT, respectively. For left lung V20 are 60%, 28%, 26%, 30%, and 29%. For contra-lateral breast mean dose are 244, 687, 616, 783, 438 cGy. MU are 253, 853, 2048, 1035, and 1874 MUs. Conclusion: In the setting of bilateral chest wall reconstruction, opposed tangent beams cannot consistently achieve desired heart and left lung sparing. DIBH consistently achieves better healthy tissue sparing. VMAT appears to be preferential to IMRT for planning and delivering radiation to patients with bilaterally reconstructed chest walls being treated with DIBH.

  7. Investigation of practical initial attenuation image estimates in TOF-MLAA reconstruction for PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ju-Chieh Kevin; Salomon, Andre; Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    Time-of-flight joint attenuation and activity positron emission tomography reconstruction requires additional calibration (scale factors) or constraints during or post-reconstruction to produce a quantitative μ-map. In this work, the impact of various initializations of the joint reconstruction was investigated, and the initial average mu-value (IAM) method was introduced such that the forward-projection of the initial μ-map is already very close to that of the reference μ-map, thus reducing/minimizing the offset (scale factor) during the early iterations of the joint reconstruction. Consequently, the accuracy and efficiency of unconstrained joint reconstruction such as time-of-flight maximum likelihood estimation of attenuation and activity (TOF-MLAA) can be improved by the proposed IAM method. 2D simulations of brain and chest were used to evaluate TOF-MLAA with various initial estimates which include the object filled with water uniformly (conventional initial estimate), bone uniformly, the average μ-value uniformly (IAM magnitude initialization method), and the perfect spatial μ-distribution but with a wrong magnitude (initialization in terms of distribution). 3D gate simulation was also performed for the chest phantom under a typical clinical scanning condition, and the simulated data were reconstructed with a fully corrected list-mode TOF-MLAA algorithm with various initial estimates. The accuracy of the average μ-values within the brain, chest, and abdomen regions obtained from the MR derived μ-maps was also evaluated using computed tomography μ-maps as the gold-standard. The estimated μ-map with the initialization in terms of magnitude (i.e., average μ-value) was observed to reach the reference more quickly and naturally as compared to all other cases. Both 2D and 3D gate simulations produced similar results, and it was observed that the proposed IAM approach can produce quantitative μ-map/emission when the corrections for physical effects such

  8. Reconstruction of abdominal wall defects using small intestinal submucosa coated with gelatin hydrogel incorporating basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Lai, Dong-ming; Yang, Bin; Jiang, Zhi-peng; Zhang, Yu-chao; Zhou, Jun; Lai, Wei; Chen, Shuang

    2014-04-01

    To construct a new biomaterial-small intestinal submucosa coated with gelatin hydrogel incorporating basic fibroblast growth factor, and to evaluate the new biomaterials for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects. Thirty six Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the animal experiments and randomly divided into three groups. The new biomaterial was constructed by combining small intestinal submucosa with gelatin hydrogel for basic fibroblast growth factor release. Abdominal wall defects were created in rats, and repaired using the new biomaterials (group B), compared with small intestinal submucosa (group S) and ULTRAPROTM mesh (group P). Six rats in each group were sacrificed at three and eight weeks postoperatively to examine the gross effects, inflammatory responses, collagen deposition and neovascularization. After implantation, mild adhesion was caused in groups B and S. Group B promoted more neovascularization than group S at three weeks after implantation, and induced significantly more amount of collagen deposition and better collagen organization than groups S and P at eight weeks after implantation. Small intestinal submucosa coated with gelatin hydrogel incorporating basic fibroblast growth factor could promote better regeneration and remodeling of host tissues for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects.

  9. Thoracic wall reconstruction using ultrasound images to model/bend the thoracic prosthesis for correction of pectus excavatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, João Gomes; Moreira, Antonio H. J.; Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Pinho, A. C. M.; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior thoracic wall. The surgical correction of such deformity, using Nuss procedure, consists in the placement of a personalized convex prosthesis into sub-sternal position to correct the deformity. The aim of this work is the CT-scan substitution by ultrasound imaging for the pre-operative diagnosis and pre-modeling of the prosthesis, in order to avoid patient radiation exposure. To accomplish this, ultrasound images are acquired along an axial plane, followed by a rigid registration method to obtain the spatial transformation between subsequent images. These images are overlapped to reconstruct an axial plane equivalent to a CT-slice. A phantom was used to conduct preliminary experiments and the achieved results were compared with the corresponding CT-data, showing that the proposed methodology can be capable to create a valid approximation of the anterior thoracic wall, which can be used to model/bend the prosthesis.

  10. Evaluation of a Porcine Dermal Collagen (Permacol Implant for Abdominal Wall Reconstruction in a Pediatric Multitrauma Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Melnik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a contaminated surgical field in abdominal wall defects caused by trauma presents a challenge for surgeons. Both primary suture and synthetic meshes are strongly discouraged as surgical treatments in such cases. We describe the use of a porcine dermal collagen (Permacol implant in an eight-year-old patient with multiple injuries. Three months after discharge, the child remains well with good cosmetic results. He is free of pain and has returned to full activity levels with complete wound closure and without any evidence of residual hernia. In conclusion, our experience indicates that the use of Permacol can be considered an efficient technique for reconstructing an infected abdominal wall defect of a pediatric multitrauma patient.

  11. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Bremer Hinckel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. METHOD: The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM, apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10 and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. RESULTS: Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07. Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the

  12. Network reconstruction and systems analysis of plant cell wall deconstruction by Neurospora crassa

    OpenAIRE

    Samal, Areejit; Craig, James P; Coradetti, Samuel T.; Benz, J. Philipp; Eddy, James A.; Nathan D Price; Glass, N. Louise

    2017-01-01

    Background Plant biomass degradation by fungal-derived enzymes is rapidly expanding in economic importance as a clean and efficient source for biofuels. The ability to rationally engineer filamentous fungi would facilitate biotechnological applications for degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides. However, incomplete knowledge of biomolecular networks responsible for plant cell wall deconstruction impedes experimental efforts in this direction. Results To expand this knowledge base, a d...

  13. Virtual surgery simulation in orbital wall reconstruction: integration of surgical navigation and stereolithographic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Giorgio; Tonellini, Gabriele; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Bozzetti, Alberto; Sozzi, Davide

    2014-12-01

    Correction of post traumatic orbital and zygomatic deformity is a challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. Integration of different technologies, such as software planning, surgical navigation and stereolithographic models, opens new horizons in terms of the surgeons' ability to tailor reconstruction to individual patients. The purpose of this study was to analyze surgical results, in order to verify the suitability, effectiveness and reproducibility of this new protocol. Eleven patients were included in the study. Inclusion criteria were: unilateral orbital pathology; associated diplopia and enophthalmos or exophthalmos, and zygomatic deformities. Syndromic patients were excluded. Pre-surgical planning was performed with iPlan 3.0 CMF software and we used Vector Vision II (BrainLab, Feldkirchen, Germany) for surgical navigation. We used 1:1 skull stereolithographic models for all the patients. Orbital reconstructions were performed with a titanium orbital mesh. The results refer to: correction of the deformities, exophthalmos, enophthalmos and diplopia; correspondence between reconstruction mesh positioning and preoperative planning mirroring; and the difference between the reconstructed orbital volume and the healthy orbital volume. Correspondence between the post-operative reconstruction mesh position and the presurgical virtual planning has an average margin of error of less than 1.3 mm. In terms of en- and exophthalmos corrections, we have always had an adequate clinical outcome with a significant change in the projection of the eyeball. In all cases treated, there was a complete resolution of diplopia. The calculation of orbital volume highlighted that the volume of the reconstructed orbit, in most cases, was equal to the healthy orbital volume, with a positive or negative variation of less than 1 cm(3). The proposed protocol incorporates all the latest technologies to plan the virtual reconstruction surgery in detail. The results obtained from our experience

  14. Dynamics of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain initialized in a domain-wall state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misguich, Grégoire; Mallick, Kirone; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2017-11-01

    We study the dynamics of an isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain starting in a domain-wall initial condition where the spins are initially up on the left half-line and down on the right half-line. We focus on the long-time behavior of the magnetization profile. We perform extensive time-dependent density-matrix renormalization-group simulations (up to t =350 ) and find that the data are compatible with a diffusive behavior. Subleading corrections decay slowly blurring the emergence of the diffusive behavior. We also compare our results with two alternative scenarios: superdiffusive behavior and enhanced diffusion with a logarithmic correction. We finally discuss the evolution of the entanglement entropy.

  15. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such asperitonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient’s hospitalstay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason,a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominismuscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture,cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week afteroperation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds didnot resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation woundand dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue fromthe attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa’s fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath andmuscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially sothat the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation,no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in termsof function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic andfunctional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, itenabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  16. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIf a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.MethodsFrom 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.ResultsUpon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.ConclusionsUsing a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  17. Reconstructing Networks from Profit Sequences in Evolutionary Games via a Multiobjective Optimization Approach with Lasso Initialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuai

    2016-11-01

    Evolutionary games (EG) model a common type of interactions in various complex, networked, natural and social systems. Given such a system with only profit sequences being available, reconstructing the interacting structure of EG networks is fundamental to understand and control its collective dynamics. Existing approaches used to handle this problem, such as the lasso, a convex optimization method, need a user-defined constant to control the tradeoff between the natural sparsity of networks and measurement error (the difference between observed data and simulated data). However, a shortcoming of these approaches is that it is not easy to determine these key parameters which can maximize the performance. In contrast to these approaches, we first model the EG network reconstruction problem as a multiobjective optimization problem (MOP), and then develop a framework which involves multiobjective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA), followed by solution selection based on knee regions, termed as MOEANet, to solve this MOP. We also design an effective initialization operator based on the lasso for MOEA. We apply the proposed method to reconstruct various types of synthetic and real-world networks, and the results show that our approach is effective to avoid the above parameter selecting problem and can reconstruct EG networks with high accuracy.

  18. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  19. Abdominal wall reconstruction for incisional hernia optimizes truncal function and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K.; Munim, Kanzah; Kjaer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    flexion and extension strength, hand grip strength, leg extension power, and quality of life (SF-36 and Carolinas Comfort Scale) were assessed preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Patients were compared with a control group of patients with an intact abdominal wall undergoing colorectal resection (n...... = 0.005). There was no significant change of either hand grip strength or leg extension power. After AWR, the physical component of overall quality of life improved, whereas the mental component score remained unchanged. In the control group, surgery resulted in a decrease in both truncal flexion...... and truncal extension. Conclusions: AWR for incisional hernia specifically improved long-term abdominal wall muscular function and quality of life....

  20. A comparison of multi-view 3D reconstruction of a rock wall using several cameras and a laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, K.; Giacomini, A.; Murtagh, R.; Kniest, E.

    2014-06-01

    This work presents a comparative study between multi-view 3D reconstruction using various digital cameras and a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). Five different digital cameras were used in order to estimate the limits related to the camera type and to establish the minimum camera requirements to obtain comparable results to the ones of the TLS. The cameras used for this study range from commercial grade to professional grade and included a GoPro Hero 1080 (5 Mp), iPhone 4S (8 Mp), Panasonic Lumix LX5 (9.5 Mp), Panasonic Lumix ZS20 (14.1 Mp) and Canon EOS 7D (18 Mp). The TLS used for this work was a FARO Focus 3D laser scanner with a range accuracy of ±2 mm. The study area is a small rock wall of about 6 m height and 20 m length. The wall is partly smooth with some evident geological features, such as non-persistent joints and sharp edges. Eight control points were placed on the wall and their coordinates were measured by using a total station. These coordinates were then used to georeference all models. A similar number of images was acquired from a distance of between approximately 5 to 10 m, depending on field of view of each camera. The commercial software package PhotoScan was used to process the images, georeference and scale the models, and to generate the dense point clouds. Finally, the open-source package CloudCompare was used to assess the accuracy of the multi-view results. Each point cloud obtained from a specific camera was compared to the point cloud obtained with the TLS. The latter is taken as ground truth. The result is a coloured point cloud for each camera showing the deviation in relation to the TLS data. The main goal of this study is to quantify the quality of the multi-view 3D reconstruction results obtained with various cameras as objectively as possible and to evaluate its applicability to geotechnical problems.

  1. A comparison of multi-view 3D reconstruction of a rock wall using several cameras and a laser scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Thoeni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a comparative study between multi-view 3D reconstruction using various digital cameras and a terrestrial laser scanner (TLS. Five different digital cameras were used in order to estimate the limits related to the camera type and to establish the minimum camera requirements to obtain comparable results to the ones of the TLS. The cameras used for this study range from commercial grade to professional grade and included a GoPro Hero 1080 (5 Mp, iPhone 4S (8 Mp, Panasonic Lumix LX5 (9.5 Mp, Panasonic Lumix ZS20 (14.1 Mp and Canon EOS 7D (18 Mp. The TLS used for this work was a FARO Focus 3D laser scanner with a range accuracy of ±2 mm. The study area is a small rock wall of about 6 m height and 20 m length. The wall is partly smooth with some evident geological features, such as non-persistent joints and sharp edges. Eight control points were placed on the wall and their coordinates were measured by using a total station. These coordinates were then used to georeference all models. A similar number of images was acquired from a distance of between approximately 5 to 10 m, depending on field of view of each camera. The commercial software package PhotoScan was used to process the images, georeference and scale the models, and to generate the dense point clouds. Finally, the open-source package CloudCompare was used to assess the accuracy of the multi-view results. Each point cloud obtained from a specific camera was compared to the point cloud obtained with the TLS. The latter is taken as ground truth. The result is a coloured point cloud for each camera showing the deviation in relation to the TLS data. The main goal of this study is to quantify the quality of the multi-view 3D reconstruction results obtained with various cameras as objectively as possible and to evaluate its applicability to geotechnical problems.

  2. About Modern Graphic Reconstruction Wall Painting Of The Throne -Room Of Afrasiab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultanova Dilshoda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In article are considered bases scientifically-creative reconstruction of pre-Islamic paintings hall of ambassadors of Afrasiab executed in interior foyer of institute of Archaeology RUZ.As a result of benchmark analysis modern painting with original museum of Afrasiab possible to define not before our days of a part and fragments in holistic type that is to say in beginning what looked before destruction arabic conqueror. Afrasiab paintings as specific facility more than 16 centuries is studied in our republic and has a questions which wait their own decisions.The author presents for the first time in picturesque manner to your attention its interpretation painting coming from its scientifically-creative experience.Given exploratory work possible consider as significant contribution to science on archaeology architecture and art.

  3. Revision breast and chest wall reconstruction in Poland and pectus excavatum following implant complication using free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionyssiou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to present the case of a female patient with Poland′s syndrome and pectus excavatum deformity who underwent breast and chest wall reconstruction with a pre-shaped free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. A 57-year-old female patient with Poland′s syndrome and pectus excavatum presented with a Baker III capsular contracture following a previously performed implant-based right breast reconstruction. After a chest and abdominal CT angiography, she was staged as 2A1 chest wall deformity according to Park′s classification and underwent implant removal and capsulectomy, followed by a pre-shaped free abdominal flap transfer, providing both breast reconstruction and chest wall deformity correction in a single stage operation. Post-operative course was uneventful, and the aesthetic result remains highly satisfactory 24 months after surgery. Deep inferior epigastric free flap represents an interesting reconstructive solution when treating Poland′s syndrome female patients with chest wall and breast deformities.

  4. Skeletal muscle derived stem cells microintegrated into a biodegradable elastomer for reconstruction of the abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanari, Keisuke; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Hong, Yi; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Yoshizumi, Tomo; Gharaibeh, Burhan; Yoshida, Osamu; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Sato, Hideyoshi; Huard, Johnny; Wagner, William R

    2017-01-01

    A variety of techniques have been applied to generate tissue engineered constructs, where cells are combined with degradable scaffolds followed by a period of in vitro culture or direct implantation. In the current study, a cellularized scaffold was generated by concurrent deposition of electrospun biodegradable elastomer (poly(ester urethane)urea, PEUU) and electrosprayed culture medium + skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) or electrosprayed culture medium alone as a control. MDSCs were obtained from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic rats. The created scaffolds were implanted into allogenic strain-matched rats to replace a full thickness abdominal wall defect. Both control and MDSC-integrated scaffolds showed extensive cellular infiltration at 4 and 8 wk. The number of blood vessels was higher, the area of residual scaffold was lower, number of multinucleated giant cells was lower and area of connective tissue was lower in MDSC-integrated scaffolds (p < 0.05). GFP + cells co-stained positive for VEGF. Bi-axial mechanical properties of the MDSC-microintegrated constructs better approximated the anisotropic behavior of the native abdominal wall. GFP + cells were observed throughout the scaffold at ∼5% of the cell population at 4 and 8 wk. RNA expression at 4 wk showed higher expression of early myogenic marker Pax7, and b-FGF in the MDSC group. Also, higher expression of myogenin and VEGF were seen in the MDSC group at both 4 and 8 wk time points. The paracrine effect of donor cells on host cells likely contributed to the differences found in vivo between the groups. This approach for the rapid creation of highly-cellularized constructs with soft tissue like mechanics offers an attractive methodology to impart cell-derived bioactivity into scaffolds providing mechanical support during the healing process and might find application in a variety of settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Successful Reconstruction of Tooth Germ with Cell Lines Requires Coordinated Gene Expressions from the Initiation Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Tomooka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tooth morphogenesis is carried out by a series of reciprocal interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme in embryonic germs. Previously clonal dental epithelial cell (epithelium of molar tooth germ (emtg lines were established from an embryonic germ. They were odontogenic when combined with a dental mesenchymal tissue, although the odontogenesis was quantitatively imperfect. To improve the microenvironment in the germs, freshly isolated dental epithelial cells were mixed with cells of lines, and germs were reconstructed in various combinations. The results demonstrated that successful tooth construction depends on the mixing ratio, the age of dental epithelial cells and the combination with cell lines. Analyses of gene expression in these germs suggest that some signal(s from dental epithelial cells makes emtg cells competent to communicate with mesenchymal cells and the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments are able to progress  odontogenesis from the initiation stage.

  6. Trans-oral robotic cleft surgery (TORCS) for palate and posterior pharyngeal wall reconstruction: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khurram; Dobbs, Tom; Swan, Marc C; Weinstein, Gregory S; Goodacre, Tim E E

    2016-01-01

    Robot-assisted surgery has become increasingly routine, replacing open and laparoscopic techniques in certain domains, with recent extension to head and neck surgery through trans-oral access. Some advantages of the robot-assisted surgery include the ability to access confined spaces, enhanced dexterity instrumentation with intuitive movement, motion scaling, tremor elimination and three-dimensional (3D) endoscopic viewing with true depth perception. The aim of this study was to investigate the technical feasibility of trans-oral robotic cleft surgery (TORCS) to access the posterior pharyngeal wall and palate for potential use in the cleft population. All possible permutations of patient and robotic instrument configurations were used with the daVinci Si Surgical System® (Intuitive Surgical, USA) 0° and 30° 3D endoscopes and 8-mm training instruments to determine the optimal visualization and surgical access to the palate and posterior pharynx in a paediatric airway manikin, and to simulate posterior pharyngeal wall surgery. A full robot-assisted cadaveric Hynes pharyngoplasty was performed using 5-mm training instruments. Experiments were recorded with still and video photography. TORCS is technically feasible in the paediatric cleft population. We predict a short learning curve due to the intuitive instrumentation, easier dissection and the potential to limit secondary insult compared with traditional surgery, as well as improved ergonomics for the operating surgeon. The as-yet unreported use of robotic-assisted cleft palate surgery may considerably enhance a surgeon's ability to perform difficult procedures of the palate and posterior pharynx in selected patients with limited access as well as lay the foundation for potential novel techniques. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ELUCID—Exploring the Local Universe with the reConstructed Initial Density Field. II. Reconstruction Diagnostics, Applied to Numerical Halo Catalogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tweed, Dylan; Yang, Xiaohu; Li, Shijie; Jing, Y. P. [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Huiyuan [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Cui, Weiguang [Departamento de Física Teórica, Módulo 15, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Zhang, Youcai [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China); Mo, H. J., E-mail: dtweed@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst MA, 01003-9305 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    The ELUCID project aims to build a series of realistic cosmological simulations that reproduce the spatial and mass distributions of the galaxies as observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This requires powerful reconstruction techniques to create constrained initial conditions (ICs). We test the reconstruction method by applying it to several N -body simulations. We use two medium-resolution simulations, which each produced three additional constrained N -body simulations. We compare the resulting friend-of-friend catalogs by using the particle indexes as tracers, and quantify the quality of the reconstruction by varying the main smoothing parameter. The cross-identification method we use proves to be efficient, and the results suggest that the most massive reconstructed halos are effectively traced from the same Lagrangian regions in the ICs. A preliminary time-dependence analysis indicates that high-mass-end halos converge only at a redshift close to the reconstruction redshift. This suggests that, for earlier snapshots, only collections of progenitors may be effectively cross-identified.

  8. Initial reconstruction results from a simulated adaptive small animal C shaped PET/MR insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efthimiou, Nikos [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Kostou, Theodora; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras (Greece); Charalampos, Tsoumpas [Division of Biomedical Imaging, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Loudos, George [Technological Educational Institute of Athens (Greece)

    2015-05-18

    Traditionally, most clinical and preclinical PET scanners, rely on full cylindrical geometry for whole body as well as dedicated organ scans, which is not optimized with regards to sensitivity and resolution. Several groups proposed the construction of dedicated PET inserts for MR scanners, rather than the construction of new integrated PET/MR scanners. The space inside an MR scanner is a limiting factor which can be reduced further with the use of extra coils, and render the use of non-flexible cylindrical PET scanners difficult if not impossible. The incorporation of small SiPM arrays, can provide the means to design adaptive PET scanners to fit in tight locations, which, makes imaging possible and improve the sensitivity, due to the closer approximation to the organ of interest. In order to assess the performance of such a device we simulated the geometry of a C shaped PET, using GATE. The design of the C-PET was based on a realistic SiPM-BGO scenario. In order reconstruct the simulated data, with STIR, we had to calculate system probability matrix which corresponds to this non standard geometry. For this purpose we developed an efficient multi threaded ray tracing technique to calculate the line integral paths in voxel arrays. One of the major features is the ability to automatically adjust the size of FOV according to the geometry of the detectors. The initial results showed that the sensitivity improved as the angle between the detector arrays increases, thus better angular sampling the scanner's field of view (FOV). The more complete angular coverage helped in improving the shape of the source in the reconstructed images, as well. Furthermore, by adapting the FOV to the closer to the size of the source, the sensitivity per voxel is improved.

  9. Determination of left ventricular mass and circumferential wall thickness by three-dimensional reconstruction: in vitro validation of a new method that uses a multiplane transesophageal transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, H P; Franke, A; Frielingsdorf, J; Flaskamp, C; Krebs, W; Flachskampf, F A; Hanrath, P

    1997-03-01

    Elevated left ventricular mass and increased wall thickness have important prognostic implications in clinical medicine. However, these parameters have been incompletely characterized by one- and two-dimensional echocardiography. Therefore this study was performed to validate in vitro measurement of left ventricular mass and circumferential wall thickness with a multiplane transesophageal transducer and three-dimensional reconstruction. Results for mass measurements were also compared with a standard method for the determination of left ventricular mass, the Penn convention. Fourteen necropsied left ventricles were scanned in a water bath by a volume-rendering, three-dimensional reconstruction system. There was an excellent correlation and high agreement for determination of three-dimensional left ventricular mass (r = 0.98; standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 9.6 gm; y = 1.02x + 0.46) and wall thickness (r = 0.93; SEE = 1.4 mm; y = 0.95x + 1.64) compared with anatomic measurements. Left ventricular mass by a simulated Penn convention revealed a lower correlation and larger error compared with three-dimensional measurements (r = 0.72; SEE = 42.8 gm; y = 1.01x + 9.61). Therefore determination of left ventricular mass by three-dimensional reconstruction was validated in vitro and was superior to one-dimensional echocardiographic methods.

  10. Among 1,706 cases of abdominal wall reconstruction, what factors influence the occurrence of major operative complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, John P; Wink, Jason D; Nelson, Jonas A; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-02-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction (AWR) poses a substantial operative challenge, often in the setting of multiple failed attempts at repair in high-risk patients. Our aim was to assess risk factors for major operative morbidity after AWR using the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) patient database. A review of the ACS-NSQIP database of outcomes from 2005 to 2010 was performed to identify patients undergoing AWR utilizing Current Procedural Terminology codes for ventral hernia repair and a concomitant component separation. Independent variables included patient demographics, medical comorbidities, and operative considerations. Major operative complication (deep wound infection, graft or prosthetic loss, or unplanned return to the operating room within 30 days) was used as our dependent variable. Stepwise, multivariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate patient risk factors influencing the occurrence of major operative complications. We identified 1,706 patients with an average age of 55.9 ± 12.8 years with 30.1% undergoing concurrent intra-abdominal procedures and 57.1% undergoing mesh repair. Notable medical comorbidities included obesity (63.4%), smoking (24.9%), hypertension (53.1%), diabetes (19.9%), and anemia (22.6%). Average operative time was 211.7 ± 105.0 minutes. Regression analysis determined that prolonged operative time (odds ratio [OR], 2.7; P 2 (OR, 1.8; P = .009) were positively associated, whereas advanced age (OR, 0.5; P = .005) was negatively associated with the occurrence of major operative complications. Greater operative times and overall patient health are important prognostic factors for individuals undergoing AWR. The increased physiologic stress of a greater operative duration on patients who often have multiple comorbidities seems to play a significant role in predicting negative outcomes after AWR. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of the Accuracy of Angiography-Based Reconstructions on Velocity and Wall Shear Stress Computations in Coronary Bifurcations: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle T C Schrauwen

    Full Text Available Wall shear stress (WSS plays a key role in the onset and progression of atherosclerosis in human coronary arteries. Especially sites with low and oscillating WSS near bifurcations have a higher propensity to develop atherosclerosis. WSS computations in coronary bifurcations can be performed in angiography-based 3D reconstructions. It is essential to evaluate how reconstruction errors influence WSS computations in mildly-diseased coronary bifurcations. In mildly-diseased lesions WSS could potentially provide more insight in plaque progression.Four Plexiglas phantom models of coronary bifurcations were imaged with bi-plane angiography. The lumens were segmented by two clinically experienced readers. Based on the segmentations 3D models were generated. This resulted in three models per phantom: one gold-standard from the phantom model itself, and one from each reader. Steady-state and transient simulations were performed with computational fluid dynamics to compute the WSS. A similarity index and a noninferiority test were used to compare the WSS in the phantoms and their reconstructions. The margin for this test was based on the resolution constraints of angiography.The reconstruction errors were similar to previously reported data; in seven out of eight reconstructions less than 0.10 mm. WSS in the regions proximal and far distal of the stenosis showed a good agreement. However, the low WSS areas directly distal of the stenosis showed some disagreement between the phantoms and the readers. This was due to small deviations in the reconstruction of the stenosis that caused differences in the resulting jet, and consequently the size and location of the low WSS area.This study showed that WSS can accurately be computed within angiography-based 3D reconstructions of coronary arteries with early stage atherosclerosis. Qualitatively, there was a good agreement between the phantoms and the readers. Quantitatively, the low WSS regions directly distal to

  12. Resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de pared torácica In-bloc tumor resection and chest wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Palafox

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available La resección de una neoplasia pulmonar o mediastínica que afecta simultáneamente a la pared torácica y la reconstrucción del defecto originado por la misma, son procedimientos quirúrgicos que se pueden realizar en un mismo tiempo operatorio. Con la reconstrucción primaria se busca preservar la función respiratoria y la integridad de la caja torácica, permitiendo al paciente una buena mecánica respiratoria, a la vez que un resultado estético satisfactorio y evitando la necesidad de una nueva intervención quirúrgica. Existen diversas técnicas y disponemos de diferentes materiales protésicos para su realización. Presentamos a continuación el caso de un paciente al que se le realizó satisfactoriamente una resección tumoral en bloque y reconstrucción de la pared torácica.Resection of a pulmonary or mediastinic neoplasm which simultaneously affects chest wall and reconstruction of the defect, are surgical proceedings that can be performed in the same surgical time. The objectives of reconstructing primarily the chest wall are to preserve the respiratory function and the thoracic wall integrity, therefore offering the patient appropriate respiratory mechanics, satisfactory aesthetic result and avoiding the needding for a second surgical intervention. There are several techniques and materials available for the surgery performance. We present the case of a patient who underwent successfully tumoral resection in-bloc and chest wall reconstruction.

  13. Robotic NOTES (Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery) in reconstructive urology: initial laboratory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Georges-Pascal; Crouzet, Sebastien; Kamoi, Kazumi; Berger, Andre; Aron, Monish; Goel, Raj; Canes, David; Desai, Mihir; Gill, Inderbir S; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2008-06-01

    To present an initial experience with robotic natural orifice translumenal surgery (R-NOTES) in reconstructive urology using the da Vinci surgical system. In 10 female farm pigs (mean weight, 34.5 kg), 10 pyeloplasties (right 5, left 5), 10 partial nephrectomies (right 5, left 5), and 10 radical nephrectomies (right 5, left 5) were performed. The robot telescope and the first robotic arm were placed through a single 2-cm umbilical incision, and the second robotic arm was placed through the vagina. All 30 R-NOTES procedures were performed successfully without any addition of laparoscopic port or open conversion. Mean length of the umbilical incision was 2.6 cm. Mean operative time was 154 minutes, and mean estimated total blood loss was 72 mL. Mean warm ischemia time in the partial nephrectomy group was 25.4 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications. There were no robotic system failures during the entire experiment. We did not find any significant difference when comparing right-side and left-side procedures. When analyzing the learning curve, only robot preparation time reached a statistically significant inverse correlation with increasing number of cases (r = -0.72, P = .018). Robotic NOTES pyeloplasty, partial nephrectomy, and radical nephrectomy are feasible and safe in the porcine model. This approach has the potential for a less morbid and scarless outcome. Intracorporeal suturing is significantly enhanced using the robot, especially through the challenging translumenal natural orifice approach. Further development of robots adaptive to NOTES would boost efforts toward clinical NOTES applications.

  14. ["Onlay" mesh provides significantly better results than "sublay" reconstruction. Prospective randomized multicenter study of abdominal wall reconstruction with sutures only, or with surgical mesh--results of a five-years follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wéber, György; Baracs, József; Horváth, Ors Péter

    2010-10-01

    There are several well-known procedures to treat abdominal wall hernias, but the results are quite controversial. The aim of study was to compare the results of different surgical modalities - mesh (onlay vs. sublay position) and suture repair - in the treatment of abdominal wall hernias. A five-year randomized, multicentric, internet-based, clinical trial was started in 2002. 953 patients were included in the study and divided into two groups according to the size of hernia orifice. In group 'A' ( n = 494) the surface of hernia orifice was between 5-25 cm 2 (small hernia), and in group 'B' ( n = 459) it was above 25 cm 2 (large hernia). Patients of these two groups were randomized according to surgery: group 'A' (suture vs. mesh) and in group 'B' (mesh in onlay vs. sublay position). In group 'A' suture repair was performed in 247, and sublay mesh implantation in 247 cases. In group 'B' sublay ( n = 235) and onlay ( n = 224) mesh reconstruction was performed. The patients were followed-up for five years. 734 patients - 77% of all randomized cases - have completed the study. In the small hernia group significantly ( p suture repair ( n = 50-27%) than in mesh repair ( n = 15-8%). In the large hernia group onlay mesh reconstruction provided significantly better ( p suture repair. In case of large hernias the recurrence rate is higher after sublay reconstruction. The randomized trial was registered on www.ClinicalTrials.gov - ID number: NCT01018524.

  15. Superthin Abdominal Wall Glove-Like Flap Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Severely Burned Hands or With Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Le; Ma, Ben; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-Jie; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Severe burn and infection to hands always involves the deep structures, such as tendons, joints, and bones. These wounds cannot be closed immediately and therefore creates a high risk for complication. We presented 9 cases with deep dermal burns to the dorsal of the hand (6 electrical burns and 3 thermal crush injuries) with wound infections in 2 cases. The vacuum-assisted closure system was used continuously until the flap reconstruction was performed. A random pattern and superthin abdominal wall skin flap-like glove was designed. The flap was transferred to the defected portion of the dorsum of the hand and resected from the abdominal wall about 3 weeks later. The flaps in 8 of the patients treated by this technique survived completely and partial necrosis of the distal flap occurred in 1 patient. The defect resolved after operative treatment and the function of the hands and fingers were successfully salvaged. All patients resulted in having a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no or minor discomfort at the abdominal donor area. Integration of the vacuum-assisted closure system and the superthin abdominal wall glove-like flap reconstruction appeared to be successful and should be considered in patients with severely burned hands.

  16. Effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation on root canal wall dentin with different laser initiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Kimura, Y; Matsumoto, K; Harashima, T; Zhou, H

    1998-05-01

    The effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation with different laser initiators on the permeability and ultrastructure of the root canal wall dentin were investigated in vitro. Forty extracted human single-rooted teeth were randomly assigned to four groups. Group 1 teeth were not lased as a control. Group 2 specimens received four 10-s duration laser exposures for a total exposure of 40 s/canal. In group 3 specimens, the root canals were painted with black ink and then lased by the same method as group 2 teeth. In group 4 specimens, root canals were treated with 38% Ag(NH3)2F and then lased by the same method as group 2 teeth. Laser parameters were set at 2 W, 20 pps. After being placed in 0.6% rhodamine B solution for 48 h, the teeth were sectioned for study by stereoscope and scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis showed there were significant differences (p permeability in the apical areas between groups 3 and 1, 4 and 1, and 4 and 2. Scanning electron microscopic examination showed that laser treatment alone had no obvious effects on the root canal wall. The root canal surfaces prepared for by laser irradiation with black ink or 38% Ag(NH3)2F revealed melting, smear layer evaporation, and open dentinal tubules. Black ink was more effective than 38% Ag(NH3)2F as a Nd:YAG laser initiator.

  17. Effects of different initial bundle tensioning strategies on the outcome of double-bundle ACL reconstruction: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneta Takeshi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to investigate the effects of different strategies and initial tension applied to each one of the bundles, antero-medial (AM and postero-lateral (PL, on clinical outcome in double bundle (DB ACL reconstruction. Methods One hundred fifty-one primary unilateral DB ACL reconstructions performed by a single surgeon from 1994 through 2002 were included in the study with a follow-up of at least 24 months. They were divided in the following 3 groups: Group I - Higher initial tension applied manually in the AM bundle compared to PL. II - Higher tension applied in the PL bundle compared to AM. III - The 2 bundles were attempted to be equally tensioned. All fixations were performed in 30 degrees of flexion. Group I = 59 patients, group II = 53 patients and group III = 39 patients. The groups had no statistical differences concerning demographic distribution. Clinical outcome was retrospectively evaluated by use of knee range of motion, manual knee laxity tests, KT-1000, Lysholm knee scale, subjective recovery scale and sports performance recovery scale. The differences of data were analyzed among the three groups. Results Group I showed a significant extension deficit compared with groups II and III. ANOVA revealed a significant difference of anterior laxity measured by the KT-1000 (average KT difference of 2.1, 2.1 and 1.2 mm in Group I, II and III, respectively. A statistical difference was found among the three groups regarding subjective and sports performance recovery scales with Group II showing higher scores in recovery than Group I. Conclusions The current clinical study does not recommend manual maximum of initial tension applied to the anteromedial or posterolateral bundles with graft tension imbalance at 30 degrees of flexion in double-bundle ACL reconstruction to achieve a better clinical outcome.

  18. Initial Survey Instructions for a spatial inventory of native sod, reconstructed prairie, and seeded introduced grasslands at Kulm Wetland Management District

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial Survey Instructions for a spatial inventory of native sod, reconstructed prairie, and seeded introduced grasslands at Kulm Wetland Management District....

  19. Reconstructing Laomedon’s Reign in Homer: Olympiomachia, Poseidon’s Wall, and the Earlier Trojan War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Porter

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeric allusions to Laomedon, the walls of Troy, and the first Trojan War reflect a backstory of previous fighting among the Olympians, which helps to explain the Iliadic portrait of Zeus’s fear of insubordination among the other gods.

  20. Enhanced temporal resolution at cardiac CT with a novel CT image reconstruction algorithm: Initial patient experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: paul.apfaltrer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoendube, Harald, E-mail: harald.schoendube@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Allmendinger, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.allmendinger@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Tricarico, Francesco, E-mail: francescotricarico82@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, “A. Gemelli” Hospital, Largo A. Gemelli 8, Rome (Italy); Schindler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.schindler@campus.lmu.de [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Vogt, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.vogt@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Sunnegårdh, Johan, E-mail: johan.sunnegardh@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); and others

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a temporal resolution improvement method (TRIM) for cardiac CT on diagnostic image quality for coronary artery assessment. Materials and methods: The TRIM-algorithm employs an iterative approach to reconstruct images from less than 180° of projections and uses a histogram constraint to prevent the occurrence of limited-angle artifacts. This algorithm was applied in 11 obese patients (7 men, 67.2 ± 9.8 years) who had undergone second generation dual-source cardiac CT with 120 kV, 175–426 mAs, and 500 ms gantry rotation. All data were reconstructed with a temporal resolution of 250 ms using traditional filtered-back projection (FBP) and of 200 ms using the TRIM-algorithm. Contrast attenuation and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were measured in the ascending aorta. The presence and severity of coronary motion artifacts was rated on a 4-point Likert scale. Results: All scans were considered of diagnostic quality. Mean BMI was 36 ± 3.6 kg/m{sup 2}. Average heart rate was 60 ± 9 bpm. Mean effective dose was 13.5 ± 4.6 mSv. When comparing FBP- and TRIM reconstructed series, the attenuation within the ascending aorta (392 ± 70.7 vs. 396.8 ± 70.1 HU, p > 0.05) and CNR (13.2 ± 3.2 vs. 11.7 ± 3.1, p > 0.05) were not significantly different. A total of 110 coronary segments were evaluated. All studies were deemed diagnostic; however, there was a significant (p < 0.05) difference in the severity score distribution of coronary motion artifacts between FBP (median = 2.5) and TRIM (median = 2.0) reconstructions. Conclusion: The algorithm evaluated here delivers diagnostic imaging quality of the coronary arteries despite 500 ms gantry rotation. Possible applications include improvement of cardiac imaging on slower gantry rotation systems or mitigation of the trade-off between temporal resolution and CNR in obese patients.

  1. Reconstruction of Initial Wave Field of a Nonsteady-State Wave Propagation from Limited Measurements at a Specific Spatial Point Based on Stochastic Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies an inverse problem that can be used for reconstructing initial wave field of a nonsteady-state wave propagation. The inverse problem is ill posed in the sense that small changes in the input data can greatly affect the solution of the problem. To address the difficulty, the problem is formulated in the form of an inference problem in an appropriately constructed stochastic model. It is shown that the stochastic inverse model enables the initial surface disturbance to be reconstructed, including its confidence intervals given the noisy measurements. The reconstruction procedure is illustrated through applications to some simulated data for two- and three-dimensional problem.

  2. Reconstrucción de las secuelas de la pared abdominal en pacientes con extrofia de cloaca Reconstruction of abdominal wall sequelae in patients with cloacal extrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Iwanyk

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Los defectos abdominales congénitos de la línea media inferior, como la extrofia cloacal, se producen por fallos en el mesodermo entre la región umbilical y la membrana cloacal provocando severos defectos viscerales, musculares y óseos. Los reiterados intentos para la reconstrucción de los tractos intestinal y génitourinario en este tipo de malformaciones, pueden ocasionar secuelas graves en la pared malformada. La complejidad de esta malformación y los numerosos procedimientos a los que deben ser sometidos estos pacientes, requieren de un abordaje interdisciplinario desde el inicio del tratamiento y en cada una de las etapas reconstructivas a fin de evitar, al máximo, las lesiones de los tejidos abdominales para lograr, al final, una pared adecuada. Presentamos 2 casos de reconstrucción de la pared abdominal en sendos pacientes de sexo femenino con secuelas importantes de extrofia cloacal, utilizando tejidos expandidos, colgajos musculares y complementando el tratamiento en una de las pacientes con una malla protésica. En ambos casos, y a pesar de la falta de tejido provocada por la malformación y las secuelas de múltiples cirugías, obtuvimos un buen resultado funcional y estético.Abdominal congenital defects of the middle line have their origin in developmental faults of mesoderm between the umbilical region and the cloacal membrane, originating visceral, muscular and osseous defects in the abdominal wall. Repeated attempts to reconstruct the intestinal and genitourinary tract here and in other malformations, can cause serious sequeals in the previously deformed abdominal wall. We present 2 cases of abdominal wall reconstruction in patients with serious sequelae of cloacal extrophy. Complexity of this malformation calls for an interdisciplinary treatment to avoid the severe damage that may be caused during reconstructive attempts. In spite of lack of tissue because of the malformation and the sequelae of multiple surgeries we

  3. Complex Reconstruction of a Massive Shoulder and Chest Wall Defect: De-Bone Appétit Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee GK

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of a fillet of upper arm pedicled flap, which has not been previously reported in the literature. The fillet of upper arm flap follows the principle of “spare parts” surgery, and can provide vascularized soft tissue coverage for defects of the shoulder and the chest wall when the upper extremity cannot otherwise be salvaged, such as in cases of radical tumor excision.

  4. Long-Term Data Reveal Rate and Risk Factors for Subsequent Surgeries Following Initial ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Language Publications Portal en espanol Community Outreach Initiative Menu Menu Close Health Topics Grants & Funding Labs @ NIAMS ... Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy Open Source Data Public Data Listing NIH... ...

  5. Initial experience in primal-dual optimization reconstruction from sparse-PET patient data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Ye, Jinghan; Chen, Buxin; Perkins, Amy E.; Rose, Sean; Sidky, Emil Y.; Kao, Chien-Min; Xia, Dan; Tung, Chi-Hua; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    There exists interest in designing a PET system with reduced detectors due to cost concerns, while not significantly compromising the PET utility. Recently developed optimization-based algorithms, which have demonstrated the potential clinical utility in image reconstruction from sparse CT data, may be used for enabling such design of innovative PET systems. In this work, we investigate a PET configuration with reduced number of detectors, and carry out preliminary studies from patient data collected by use of such sparse-PET configuration. We consider an optimization problem combining Kullback-Leibler (KL) data fidelity with an image TV constraint, and solve it by using a primal-dual optimization algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock. Results show that advanced algorithms may enable the design of innovative PET configurations with reduced number of detectors, while yielding potential practical PET utilities.

  6. The Grief and Meaning Reconstruction Inventory (GMRI): Initial Validation of a New Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, James M; Neimeyer, Robert A; Milman, Evgenia

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of grief theorists, researchers, and therapists have begun to focus on the quest for meaning in lives disrupted by loss, no convenient and psychometrically validated measure of meanings made specifically in bereavement has been available to guide their efforts. To construct such a measure, the authors began with a systematic content analysis of sense-making, benefit finding, and identity reconstruction themes gleaned from the narrative responses of a sample of 162 adults who were diverse in their age, ethnicity, relationship to the decedent, cause of death, and severity of their grief response. These were then formulated into a set of 65 candidate items in a Likert scale format representing the level of the respondent's endorsement of the item in the past week. Subsequent administration to a second sample of 300 bereaved respondents permitted factor analysis of this pilot version of the Grief and Meaning Reconstruction Inventory (GMRI), and reduced the items to 29, which loaded on 5 distinct factors, labeled Continuing Bonds, Personal Growth, Sense of Peace, Emptiness and Meaninglessness, and Valuing Life. Both the overall GMRI and its constituent factors showed good internal consistency and strong convergent validity in the form of negative correlations with established measures of bereavement-related negative emotions, symptoms of complicated grief, and more general psychological distress and mental health symptomatology, and positive correlations with grief related personal growth. The authors close by noting several specific research and clinical applications of the measure, which could play a useful role in testing and refining contemporary models of meaning made in the wake of loss.

  7. Submillisievert CT using model-based iterative reconstruction with lung-specific setting: An initial phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hata, Akinori; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Honda, Osamu; Gyobu, Tomoko; Ueda, Ken; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To assess image quality of filtered back-projection (FBP) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) with a conventional setting and a new lung-specific setting on submillisievert CT. A lung phantom with artificial nodules was scanned with 10 mA at 120 kVp and 80 kVp (0.14 mSv and 0.05 mSv, respectively); images were reconstructed using FBP and MBIR with conventional setting (MBIR{sub Stnd}) and lung-specific settings (MBIR{sub RP20/Tx} and MBIR{sub RP20}). Three observers subjectively scored overall image quality and image findings on a 5-point scale (1 = worst, 5 = best) compared with reference standard images (50 mA-FBP at 120, 100, 80 kVp). Image noise was measured objectively. MBIR{sub RP20/Tx} performed significantly better than MBIR{sub Stnd} for overall image quality in 80-kVp images (p < 0.01), blurring of the border between lung and chest wall in 120p-kVp images (p < 0.05) and the ventral area of 80-kVp images (p < 0.001), and clarity of small vessels in the ventral area of 80-kVp images (p = 0.037). At 120 kVp, 10 mA-MBIR{sub RP20} and 10 mA-MBIR{sub RP20/Tx} showed similar performance to 50 mA-FBP. MBIR{sub Stnd} was better for noise reduction. Except for blurring in 120 kVp-MBIR{sub Stnd}, MBIRs performed better than FBP. Although a conventional setting was advantageous in noise reduction, a lung-specific setting can provide more appropriate image quality, even on submillisievert CT. (orig.)

  8. Obesidad mórbida: caso excepcional de reconstrucción de pared abdominal Morbid obesity: an exceptional patient. Apronectomy and new abdominal wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.J. Gabilondo Zubizarreta

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos una nueva técnica para la reconstrucción de la pared abdominal, con material sintético en una paciente que padeciendo un cuadro de obesidad mórbida sin cirugía ni traumatismo previo, sufre una diástasis de músculos rectos de su pared abdominal por la que se produce una evisceración intestinal que al alojarse en el faldón abdominal y añadirse un proceso de acumulación de líquidos en el intersticio semejante al linfedema, supuso como tratamiento una resección superior a los 60 Kg. entre sólidos y líquidos y una estrategia y técnica nuevas de reconstrucción del defecto de la pared abdominal.The aim of this work is to show a new technique for reconstruction of the abdominal wall with synthetic matherial in a patient with morbid obesity. The disease has no relation with antecedents of previous surgery or trauma and is asociated with a dyasthasis of the rectus abdomini muscles which has conditionated a intestinal evisceration.This evisceration is accommodated in the abdominal apron and is associated with a great accumulation of fluid (liquid in the interstitium, which seems a linphedema. Taking account the combination of liquid and soft tissues the resection is larger than 60 Kg. and this has forced us to develop new strategies for the menagement of the patient and techniques for the reconstruction of the abdominal wall defect.

  9. Iterative reconstruction techniques for computed tomography part 2: initial results in dose reduction and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Jong, Pim A. de; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J.; Schilham, Arnold M.R. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heer, Linda M. de [Cardiothoracic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Utrecht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gelre Hospital, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15

    To present the results of a systematic literature search aimed at determining to what extent the radiation dose can be reduced with iterative reconstruction (IR) for cardiopulmonary and body imaging with computed tomography (CT) in the clinical setting and what the effects on image quality are with IR versus filtered back-projection (FBP) and to provide recommendations for future research on IR. We searched Medline and Embase from January 2006 to January 2012 and included original research papers concerning IR for CT. The systematic search yielded 380 articles. Forty-nine relevant studies were included. These studies concerned: the chest(n = 26), abdomen(n = 16), both chest and abdomen(n = 1), head(n = 4), spine(n = 1), and no specific area (n = 1). IR reduced noise and artefacts, and it improved subjective and objective image quality compared to FBP at the same dose. Conversely, low-dose IR and normal-dose FBP showed similar noise, artefacts, and subjective and objective image quality. Reported dose reductions ranged from 23 to 76 % compared to locally used default FBP settings. However, IR has not yet been investigated for ultra-low-dose acquisitions with clinical diagnosis and accuracy as endpoints. Benefits of IR include improved subjective and objective image quality as well as radiation dose reduction while preserving image quality. Future studies need to address the value of IR in ultra-low-dose CT with clinically relevant endpoints. (orig.)

  10. A Rare Case of Giant Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Abdominal Wall: Excision and Immediate Reconstruction with a Pedicled Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP) Flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Sara; Zabbia, Giovanni; Corradino, Bartolo; Tripoli, Massimiliano; Pirrello, Roberto; Cordova, Adriana

    2017-12-04

    BACKGROUND Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) greater than 5 cm in diameter is called giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC), or super giant basal cell carcinoma if it has a diameter larger than 20 cm. Giant BCC only accounts for 0.5% of BCCs and super giant BCC is exceedingly rare. On account of their rarity, there are no established guidelines for GBCC treatment. CASE REPORT We describe a peculiar case of an 82-year-old woman with a GBCC carcinoma of the lower abdominal wall. The tumor was surgically removed with ipsilateral inguinal lymph nodes and the abdominal wall was reconstructed immediately with a pedicled deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of giant basal cell carcinoma is often difficult, especially in elderly patients with poor general health and multiple pathologies. The pedicled DIEP flap is rotated to cover the loss of substance without tension, and it is easy to harvest and transfer. This flap allowed a good result without local or systemic complication. We present this report as a reminder of the occasional occurrence of extremely aggressive BCCs. We believe that, especially for rare tumors like these, it is very useful for the entire scientific community to publish these cases and the therapeutic strategies used to treat them.

  11. Radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy with ileal conduit urinary diversion and abdominal wall reconstruction: an interesting case of multidisciplinary management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofos SS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratos S Sofos,1 Ciaran Walsh,2 Nigel J Parr,2 Kevin Hancock11Whiston Hospital, Prescot, 2Arrowe Park Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UKAbstract: The ileal conduit for urinary diversion after radical cystectomy is a well-described procedure. Furthermore, parastomal hernias, prolapse, stenosis, and retraction of the stoma have been reported as some of the more common complications of this procedure. The subsequent repair of parastomal hernias with a biological mesh and the potential of the conduit to “tunnel” through it has also been described. In this case report, we present a combined repair of a large incisional hernia with a cystectomy and a pelvic lymphadenectomy for invasive bladder cancer, with the use of a biological mesh for posterior component abdominal wall primary repair as well as for support to the ileal conduit used for urinary diversion.Keywords: incisional hernia, posterior component separation, biological mesh 

  12. Coronal ultra-thick multiplanar CT reconstructions (MPR) of the pelvis in the multiple trauma patient: an alternative for the initial conventional radiograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschka, S.; Alkadhi, H.; Boehm, T.; Marincek, B.; Wildermuth, S. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, UniversitaetsSpital Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: multiple trauma patients with clinically suspected pelvic fractures often directly undergo a CT scan. However, the initial portable pelvis film (PPF) for further follow-up is then not available. This study examines whether coronal ultra-thick multiplanar reconstructions from CT data are similar when compared with the initial PPF, thus having the potential to serve as an alternative baseline image. Materials and methods: initial PPF and coronal ultra-thick multiplanar CT reconstructions of 33 multiple trauma patients with pelvic fractures were retrospectively analyzed by two independent radiologists with regard to image quality, visualization of anatomical landmarks, and diagnostic accuracy. The primary diagnosis of pelvic fractures was made by using thin axial CT images and thin slice coronal and sagittal reconstructions and served as the standard of reference. Results: coronal ultra-thick multiplanar CT reconstructions were superior to PPF regarding image adjustment (p < 0.02), absence of overlaying structures (p < 0.05), and overall image quality (p < 0.01). Visualization of most anatomical landmarks was similar with both modalities, except of the iliosacral joint and acetabular lines which were more accurately depicted on ultrathick multiplanar CT reconstructions (p < 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy of coronal ultra-thick CT reconstructions was similar to PPF regarding most fracture types, except of a higher accuracy of coronal ultra-thick CT reconstructions for iliosacral joint and acetabular column fractures (p < 0.05). Conclusion: coronal ultrathick multiplanar CT reconstructions of the pelvis provide similar image quality and diagnostic accuracy compared to PPF and are therefore suited as alternative baseline image in multiple trauma patients who directly undergo CT. (orig.)

  13. Usefulness of Ultralow-Dose (Submillisievert) Chest CT Using Iterative Reconstruction for Initial Evaluation of Sharp Fish Bone Esophageal Foreign Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Min, Young Gi; Bista, Anjali Basnyat; Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyoung; Sun, Joo Sung

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate the usefulness of ultralow-dose chest CT as an initial imaging study for evaluation of sharp fish bone esophageal foreign body (FB). A total of 57 subjects who underwent ultralow-dose chest CT were included in this retrospective study. All subjects had a history of ingestion and symptoms of esophageal FB. All ultralow-dose chest CT data were reconstructed twice, once with filtered back projection (FBP) and once with iterative reconstruction, and three observers reviewed the images independently. ROC analysis was used to evaluate diagnostic performance of ultralow-dose chest CT. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated for analysis of interobserver agreement. Among 57 patients, 42 were confirmed as having esophageal FB. Significant objective noise reduction of mediastinum was achieved using an iterative reconstruction technique. Subjective image noise of iterative reconstruction was significantly better than that of FBP. Overall diagnostic performance of ultralow-dose chest CT for esophageal FB of iterative reconstruction (AUC = 0.999) was significantly better than that of FBP (AUC = 0.95) (p = 0.02). Interobserver agreement was greater for iterative reconstruction (ICC = 0.944) than for FBP (ICC = 0.778). Ultralow-dose chest CT using iterative reconstruction provided satisfactory diagnostic image quality for identifying fish bone esophageal FB with reduced radiation dose and high observer accuracy. Therefore, ultralow-dose chest CT would be adequate as a first-line imaging modality for fish bone esophageal FB.

  14. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korfer Reiner

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 × 37.7 × 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Conclusion Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the

  15. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  16. Initial phantom study comparing image quality in computed tomography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and new adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction v.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyungjae; Kwon, Heejin; Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyoung; Yoon, Seongkuk; Kang, Myungjin; Ha, Dongho; Lee, Jinhwa; Kang, Eunju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the image quality of a novel advanced iterative reconstruction (IR) method called as "adaptive statistical IR V" (ASIR-V) by comparing the image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution from those of filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) on computed tomography (CT) phantom image. We performed CT scans at 5 different tube currents (50, 70, 100, 150, and 200 mA) using 3 types of CT phantoms. Scanned images were subsequently reconstructed in 7 different scan settings, such as FBP, and 3 levels of ASIR and ASIR-V (30%, 50%, and 70%). The image noise was measured in the first study using body phantom. The CNR was measured in the second study using contrast phantom and the spatial resolutions were measured in the third study using a high-resolution phantom. We compared the image noise, CNR, and spatial resolution among the 7 reconstructed image scan settings to determine whether noise reduction, high CNR, and high spatial resolution could be achieved at ASIR-V. At quantitative analysis of the first and second studies, it showed that the images reconstructed using ASIR-V had reduced image noise and improved CNR compared with those of FBP and ASIR (P reconstructed using ASIR-V had significantly improved spatial resolution than those of FBP and ASIR (P ASIR-V provides a significant reduction in image noise and a significant improvement in CNR as well as spatial resolution. Therefore, this technique has the potential to reduce the radiation dose further without compromising image quality.

  17. Monitoring project impact on biomass increase in the context of the Great Green Wall for the Sahara and Sahel Initiative in Senegal

    OpenAIRE

    SCHUCKNECHT ANNE; MERONI MICHELE; REMBOLD Felix

    2016-01-01

    Land degradation and desertification represent a major threat to the population and ecosystems of (semi)-arid regions like the Sahel and the Sahara. In 2007, the African Union launched a pan-African programme, the Great Green Wall for the Sahara and the Sahel Initiative (GGWSSI) to reverse land degradation and desertification in the region, improve food security and support local people to adapt to climate change. Within the GGWSSI different kinds of projects have been implemented. In order t...

  18. High-resolution multiproxy climate reconstruction for southern South America since 1000 AD: LOTRED-SA, a new IGBP-PAGES initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, T.

    2006-12-01

    Regional high-resolution multi-proxy climate reconstructions and associated uncertainties for the last ca. 1000 years is a priority area of future research within the Past Global Changes project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme (IGBP-PAGES). Considerable progress has been made in the reconstruction techniques, in the handling of a wide range of high- and low-frequency proxy data, and in the quantity and quality of proxy data sets available at continental and northern hemispheric or global scale. Regional reconstructions are particularly important since regional climate change and extremes exhibit much larger amplitudes than hemispherical and global reconstructions. LOTRED-SA (Long-Term climate REconstruction and Dynamics of southern South America is a new collaborative long-term initiative under the umbrella of PAGES and will involve many research groups from different countries. The initiative seeks (i) to collate the large number of disperse already existing and new paleoclimate data sets (documentary data, early instrumental data, data from tree rings, glaciers and ice cores, high resolution marine and lake sediments, pollen data of peat cores etc.) for the last ca. 1000 years available for South America, and (ii) to use the Mann et al. (1998, Nature), Luterbacher et al. (2004, Science) and Moberg et al. (2005, Nature) methodologies to work towards a regional reconstruction at different temporal and spatial resolution with associated uncertainties for southern South America. This contribution reports on the state-of-the-art and the scientific highlights of the first LOTRED-SA science conference (October 2006 in Mendoza, Argentina).

  19. The versatility of propeller flaps for lower limb reconstruction in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiga, Lucian P; Barac, Sorin; Taranu, Georgel; Blidisel, Alexandru; Dornean, Vlad; Nistor, Alexandru; Stoichitoiu, Teodora; Geishauser, Max; Ionac, Mihai

    2010-02-01

    In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of propeller flaps, for soft tissue reconstruction in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). Five patients (average age, 72 years old), presenting with necrosis of several foot units, were diagnosed with stage IV PAOD and diabetes mellitus. All underwent revascularization, followed by soft tissue reconstruction using propeller flaps. A total of 6 flaps were performed, with dimensions ranging from 4 x 7 cm to 8 x 31 cm. Perforator origin was the peroneal (5 flaps) or the tibial posterior artery (1 flap). Average operative time was 190 minutes. Overall patency was 83.3%; 1 case was complicated with total flap loss followed by below-knee amputation; 1 case developed partial necrosis necessitating skin grafting. All flaps developed mild postoperative edema, which resolved spontaneously. Propeller flaps prove to be useful tools for soft tissue reconstruction in patients with PAOD because of low operative morbidity, easy technique with fast learning curve, and low complications rate.

  20. Lower-dose CT urography (CTU) with iterative reconstruction technique in children - initial experience and examination protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombiński, Przemysław; Warchoł, Stanisław; Brzewski, Michał; Biejat, Agnieszka; Dudek-Warchoł, Teresa; Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Conventional X-ray urography is one of the basic imaging techniques in urinary tract diseases in children. CT urography (CTU) employing standard Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithms is connected with higher radiation dose. Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques enable lowering the radiation dose to the level comparable with conventional X-ray urography with better visualization of the urinary tract. Study protocol and indications for this modified technique should be discussed. Introduction of iterative image reconstruction techniques allowed to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered during examinations performed at our Department, including CT examinations of urinary tract in children. During the last two years, CT urography replaced conventional X-ray urography and became the basic imaging technique in our Department. We discuss the study protocol regarding pediatric CTU examinations. The main goal is to receive an optimal image quality at reduced radiation dose. CTU examinations performed using the standard filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction technique are associated with radiation doses about 1.5 times higher than those in conventional X-ray urography. Implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms in advanced CT scanners allow to reduce the radiation dose to a level comparable or even lower than that in X-ray urography. In addition, urinary tract can be evaluated more precisely in multiplanar reformatted (MPR) and volume rendered (VR) images. 1. Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques allow to reduce radiation dose in CT examinations and to extend indications for CT urography in children. 2. Urinary tract can be evaluated more precisely in multiplanar reformatted and volume rendered images. 3. CTU may replace conventional X-ray urography in children.

  1. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents imaging: Initial evaluation of the optimal reconstruction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xiaoming, E-mail: mmayzy2008@126.com; Li, Tao, E-mail: litaofeivip@163.com; Li, Xin, E-mail: lx0803@sina.com.cn; Zhou, Weihua, E-mail: wangxue0606@gmail.com

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • High-resolution scan mode is appropriate for imaging coronary stent. • HD-detail reconstruction algorithm is stent-dedicated kernel. • The intrastent lumen visibility also depends on stent diameter and material. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo performance of four image reconstruction algorithms in a high-definition CT (HDCT) scanner with improved spatial resolution for the evaluation of coronary artery stents and intrastent lumina. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine consecutive patients with a total of 71 implanted coronary stents underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) on a HDCT (Discovery CT 750 HD; GE Healthcare) with the high-resolution scanning mode. Four different reconstruction algorithms (HD-stand, HD-detail; HD-stand-plus; HD-detail-plus) were applied to reconstruct the stented coronary arteries. Image quality for stent characterization was assessed. Image noise and intrastent luminal diameter were measured. The relationship between the measurement of inner stent diameter (ISD) and the true stent diameter (TSD) and stent type were analysed. Results: The stent-dedicated kernel (HD-detail) offered the highest percentage (53.5%) of good image quality for stent characterization and the highest ratio (68.0 ± 8.4%) of visible stent lumen/true stent lumen for luminal diameter measurement at the expense of an increased overall image noise. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the ISD and TSD measurement and spearman correlation coefficient between the ISD measurement and stent type were 0.83 and 0.48, respectively. Conclusions: Compared with standard reconstruction algorithms, high-definition CT imaging technique with dedicated high-resolution reconstruction algorithm provides more accurate stent characterization and intrastent luminal diameter measurement.

  2. Uso de placas de ácido poli-L-láctico en reconstrucción de pared torácica Use of poly-L-lactic plates in chest wall reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vilà Poyatos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La reconstrucción de la pared torácica exige un amplio conocimiento de las técnicas reconstructivas y un buen plan operatorio. Por una parte es necesario mantener la estabilidad de la caja torácica y por otro proporcionar una buena base para la cobertura dérmica o musculocutánea que confiera buenos resultados funcionales y plásticos. En este trabajo describimos 2 casos clínicos en los que la reconstrucción de la pared torácica anterior se realizó con placas de ácido poli-L-láctico sobre las que se colocaron sendos colgajos musculocutáneos.Chest wall reconstruction requires an extensive knowledge of reconstructive techniques and a good surgical plan. On one hand, it is necessary to maintain stability of the rib cage and, on the other, provide a good foundation for dermal coverage or musculocutaneous flaps which confers good functional and plastic results. In this article we describe 2 cases in which anterior chest wall reconstruction was performed with plates of poly-L-lactic acid, on which were placed the musculocutaneous flaps.

  3. Trabeculated right ventricular free wall in the chicken heart forms by ventricularization of the myocardium initially forming the outflow tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rana, M. Sameer; Horsten, Noortje C. A.; Tesink-Taekema, Sabina; Lamers, Wout H.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.; van den Hoff, Maurice J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Recent molecular lineage analyses in mouse have demonstrated that the right ventricle is recruited from anterior mesoderm in later stages of cardiac development. This is in contrast to current views of development in the chicken heart, which suggest that the initial heart tube contains a subset of

  4. Reconstruction of 4-D dynamic SPECT images from inconsistent projections using a Spline initialized FADS algorithm (SIFADS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalah, Mahmoud; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Gullberg, Grant T

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and validate an algorithm of extracting voxel-by-voxel time activity curves directly from inconsistent projections applied in dynamic cardiac SPECT. The algorithm was derived based on factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) approach and imposes prior information by applying several regularization functions with adaptively changing relative weighting. The anatomical information of the imaged subject was used to apply the proposed regularization functions adaptively in the spatial domain. The algorithm performance is validated by reconstructing dynamic datasets simulated using the NCAT phantom with a range of different input tissue time-activity curves. The results are compared to the spline-based and FADS methods. The validated algorithm is then applied to reconstruct pre-clinical cardiac SPECT data from canine and murine subjects. Images, generated from both simulated and experimentally acquired data confirm the ability of the new algorithm to solve the inverse problem of dynamic SPECT with slow gantry rotation.

  5. [Initial therapeutic evaluation of arthroscopic reconstruction of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament injury with anterior tibialis tendon allograft].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Meng, Chunqing; Duan, Deyu; Yang, Shuhua; Ye, Shunan; Shao, Zengwu

    2009-05-01

    To study the operative procedure and effect of arthroscopic reconstruction of both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) with anterior tibialis tendon allograft. From February 2005 to July 2006, 10 cases of both ACL and PCL rupture were reconstructed with anterior tibialis tendon allograft, including 7 men and 3 women, aging 18-45 years with an average of 30.2 years. The locations were left knee in 6 cases and right knee in 4 cases. All of them had identified trauma history. The disease course was about 1-3 weeks (mean 1.8 weeks). Both ACL and PCL were reconstructed under arthroscope with allograft anterior tibialis tendon of 26-28 cm in length and immobilization with extention position brace was given for 4 weeks after operation. The active flex knee exercise was done from 0-90 degrees at 4 weeks and more than 90 degrees at 6 weeks. All operations were finished successfully, there were no blood vessel and nerve injury. The operative time was 90-110 minutes (mean 100 minutes). The wound healed by first intention and no early complication occurred. Ten cases were followed up for 12 months to 15 months with an average of 13.5 months. Thier gait was normal, knee activity degree was 0-135 degrees. The anterior drawing tests and media and lateral stress tests were negative after operation in 10 cases; and the posterior drawing tests were negative in 8 cases and 2 cases was at grade I. Hydra arthrosis of knee occurred in 2 cases and was cured after remove of fluid and injection of sodium hyaluronate. The Lysholm knee function score was increases from 24.89 +/- 5.39 before operation to 96.00 +/- 4.59 at 12 months after operation, showing significant difference (P anterior tibialis tendon allograft has the advantages of short operation time, less complications and good clinical effects.

  6. Degeneration in ACL Injured Knees with and without Reconstruction in Relation to Muscle Size and Fat Content-Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M; Baum, Thomas; Nevitt, Michael C; Nardo, Lorenzo; Gersing, Alexandra S; Lane, Nancy E; McCulloch, Charles E; Rummeny, Ernst J; Link, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) injuries represent a major risk factor for early osteoarthritis (OA). To evaluate the prevalence and 4-year progression of knee OA measured with 3T MR-imaging in individuals with ruptured, reconstructed or normal ACL and to assess the impact of thigh muscle characteristics. A total of 54 knees (23/54 male, 31/54 female) were recruited from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI). At baseline, 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL ruptures and 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL reconstruction (24/54 normal ACL). Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, Physical Activity Scores of the Elderly (PASE) and thigh muscle characteristics including strength, fat infiltration (Goutallier score) and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) MR measurements were obtained at baseline. Whole-organ MR-imaging Scores (WORMS) were obtained at baseline and at a 4-year follow-up time-point. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, body mass index), were used for statistical analysis. At baseline, subjects with prevalent ACL ruptures had worse WORMS total scores (mean±SEM, 44.1±3.5) than subjects with ACL reconstruction (30.8±4.0; P = 0.015) and worse than subjects with normal ACL (21.3±3.0; Pprevention of early OA.

  7. Use of tissue expanders in the repair of complex abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Matthew S; Heiss, Kurt F; Keating, Jane J; Mackay, Greg; Ricketts, Richard R

    2011-02-01

    Closure of abdominal wall defects in children poses a challenge for pediatric surgeons. We describe a technique using tissue expanders placed either intraperitoneally or in the abdominal wall to aid in the reconstruction of a variety of complex abdominal wall defects. The tissue expanders are inserted under general anesthesia. Initial expansion is done in the operating room with attention to peak airway pressure, urine output, and end-tidal carbon dioxide. The expanders are inflated in the outpatient setting via percutaneous access until the calculated inflation volume is achieved. They are then removed; and definitive closure is accomplished using a combination of native tissue flaps, abdominal component separation techniques, biomaterials, and synthetic material. Six children underwent tissue expansion for treatment of abdominal wall defects (omphalocele, n = 3), trauma (n = 1), and thoracopagus twins (n = 1 pair). One to 4 expanders were used per patient, with all having a successful reconstruction of their abdominal walls. Two to 3 operations were required to restore abdominal domain and consisted of expander insertion, removal with reconstruction, and possible revision of the reconstruction. Tissue expanders possess a broad range of applications for abdominal wall reconstruction and can be used in patients of all ages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Reconstruction of superficial defects from the crossroad of nasal subunits, tip, alar lobule and lateral side wall: Study of 36 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpierre, X; Sartre, J Y; Duteille, F

    2016-08-01

    Conventionally, articles dealing with nasal defects plan reconstructions regarding the aesthetic subunits, imposing their systematic respect. We propose to study the reconstruction of a crossroad region of three subunits, tip, alar lobule and lateral sidewall, where that full compliance is not possible, in our experience of 36 patients. Our retrospective study from January 2011 to December 2012 focused on patients with a defect in this crossroad region that was repaired by skin graft or flap. We described the population of the study, histological type of the lesions, surgical procedures and complications. We evaluated the reconstructions performed with a photographic review 1 year post-surgery according to the criteria of symmetry, discoloration, thickness, shrinkage, and rating on the Vancouver Scar Scale, which helped create an overall aesthetic score for the reconstruction. Of 144 patients with a nasal defect, 36 of them (25%) were included, presenting a defect in our study area. The reconstruction was made by eight hatchet flaps, eight frontal flaps, seven bilobed flaps, five advanced-rotated lateronasal flaps, four nasolabial flaps, two Rybka flaps and two total skin grafts. The advanced-rotated flap, hatchet flap and bilobed flap had the highest results and scores, according to the criteria assessed. Rybka flap and total skin grafts had the lowest results. The occurrence of a defect in the crossroads seems common. In this indication, specific local flaps had a favourable outcome, including review of the overall esthetic score which was created to standardize the assessment of reconstructions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Early reconstruction of bone defect created after initial surgery of a large keratocystic odontogenic tumor: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijević Stevo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT is defined as a benign cystic neoplasm of the jaws of odontogenic origin with a high rate of recurrence. The most lesions occur in the posterior part of the mandible. Treatment of KCOT remains controversial, but the goals of treatment should involve eliminating the potential for recurrence while minimizing surgical morbidity. However, another significant therapeutic problem related to the management of KCOT is an adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect, as well as appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of a patient, especially in cases of a very large destruction of the jaws bone. Case report. We presented a 65-year-old female patient with very large KCOT of the mandible. Orthopantomographic radiography showed a very large elliptical multilocular radiolucency, located on the right side of the mandible body and the ascending ramus of the mandible, with radiographic evidence of cortical perforation at the anterior border of the mandibular ramus and the superior border of the alveolar part of the mandible. The surgical treatment included two phases. In the first phase, the tumor was removed by enucleation and additional use of Carnoy solution, performing peripheral ostectomy and excision of the affected overlying mucosa, while in the second phase, restorative surgery of the existing mandibular defect was performed 6 months later. Postoperatively, we did not register any of postoperative complications, nor recurrence within 2 years of the follow-up. Conclusion. Adequate and early reconstruction of the existing jaw defect and appropriate aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of the patient should be the primary goal in the treatment of KCOT, having in mind the need for a long-term post-surgical follow-up.

  10. Degeneration in ACL Injured Knees with and without Reconstruction in Relation to Muscle Size and Fat Content-Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M Jungmann

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL injuries represent a major risk factor for early osteoarthritis (OA.To evaluate the prevalence and 4-year progression of knee OA measured with 3T MR-imaging in individuals with ruptured, reconstructed or normal ACL and to assess the impact of thigh muscle characteristics.A total of 54 knees (23/54 male, 31/54 female were recruited from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI. At baseline, 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL ruptures and 15/54 subjects had prevalent ACL reconstruction (24/54 normal ACL. Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC scores, Physical Activity Scores of the Elderly (PASE and thigh muscle characteristics including strength, fat infiltration (Goutallier score and thigh muscle cross-sectional area (CSA MR measurements were obtained at baseline. Whole-organ MR-imaging Scores (WORMS were obtained at baseline and at a 4-year follow-up time-point. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for covariates (age, gender, body mass index, were used for statistical analysis.At baseline, subjects with prevalent ACL ruptures had worse WORMS total scores (mean±SEM, 44.1±3.5 than subjects with ACL reconstruction (30.8±4.0; P = 0.015 and worse than subjects with normal ACL (21.3±3.0; P<0.001. Cartilage scores were worse in both femorotibial compartments in ACL injured knees than in knees with normal ACL (P<0.05. Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased degeneration of the medial meniscus (P = 0.036, cartilage degeneration at the medial femoral condyle (P = 0.011. In a multivariate regression model, including both ACL groups and total muscle characteristics as influence parameters, high thigh muscle CSA, high muscle/ fat ratio and low Goutallier scores were associated with less degenerative changes at the knee, independent of ACL status. Knees with ACL reconstruction showed an increased progression of cartilage degeneration at the medial tibia compared to the normal ACL group

  11. Printed Three-dimensional Anatomic Templates for Virtual Preoperative Planning Before Reconstruction of Old Pelvic Injuries: Initial Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Bao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Old pelvis fractures are among the most challenging fractures to treat because of their complex anatomy, difficult-to-access surgical sites, and the relatively low incidence of such cases. Proper evaluation and surgical planning are necessary to achieve the pelvic ring symmetry and stable fixation of the fracture. The goal of this study was to assess the use of three-dimensional (3D printing techniques for surgical management of old pelvic fractures. Methods: First, 16 dried human cadaveric pelvises were used to confirm the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models printed based on radiographic data. Next, nine clinical cases between January 2009 and April 2013 were used to evaluate the surgical reconstruction based on the 3D printed models. The pelvic injuries were all type C, and the average time from injury to reconstruction was 11 weeks (range: 8-17 weeks. The workflow consisted of: (1 Printing patient-specific bone models based on preoperative computed tomography (CT scans, (2 virtual fracture reduction using the printed 3D anatomic template, (3 virtual fracture fixation using Kirschner wires, and (4 preoperatively measuring the osteotomy and implant position relative to landmarks using the virtually defined deformation. These models aided communication between surgical team members during the procedure. This technique was validated by comparing the preoperative planning to the intraoperative procedure. Results: The accuracy of the 3D printed models was within specification. Production of a model from standard CT DICOM data took 7 hours (range: 6-9 hours. Preoperative planning using the 3D printed models was feasible in all cases. Good correlation was found between the preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up X-ray in all nine cases. The patients were followed for 3-29 months (median: 5 months. The fracture healing time was 9-17 weeks (mean: 10 weeks. No delayed incision healing, wound infection, or nonunions occurred. The

  12. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I.N.O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia.

  13. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  14. New directions in hydro-climatic histories: observational data recovery, proxy records and the atmospheric circulation reconstructions over the earth (ACRE) initiative in Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Fiona; Allan, Rob; Switzer, Adam D.; Chan, Johnny C. L.; Wasson, Robert James; D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Gartner, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The value of historic observational weather data for reconstructing long-term climate patterns and the detailed analysis of extreme weather events has long been recognized (Le Roy Ladurie, 1972; Lamb, 1977). In some regions however, observational data has not been kept regularly over time, or its preservation and archiving has not been considered a priority by governmental agencies. This has been a particular problem in Southeast Asia where there has been no systematic country-by-country method of keeping or preserving such data, the keeping of data only reaches back a few decades, or where instability has threatened the survival of historic records. As a result, past observational data are fragmentary, scattered, or even absent altogether. The further we go back in time, the more obvious the gaps. Observational data can be complimented however by historical documentary or proxy records of extreme events such as floods, droughts and other climatic anomalies. This review article highlights recent initiatives in sourcing, recovering, and preserving historical weather data and the potential for integrating the same with proxy (and other) records. In so doing, it focuses on regional initiatives for data research and recovery - particularly the work of the international Atmospheric Circulation Reconstructions over the Earth's (ACRE) Southeast Asian regional arm (ACRE SEA) - and the latter's role in bringing together disparate, but interrelated, projects working within this region. The overarching goal of the ACRE SEA initiative is to connect regional efforts and to build capacity within Southeast Asian institutions, agencies and National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHS) to improve and extend historical instrumental, documentary and proxy databases of Southeast Asian hydroclimate, in order to contribute to the generation of high-quality, high-resolution historical hydroclimatic reconstructions (reanalyses) and, to build linkages with humanities researchers

  15. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J.J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I.N.O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Suprasubduction zone ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere formed at suprasubduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event and are today distribut...

  16. A mathematically assisted reconstruction of the initial focus of the yellow fever outbreak in Buenos Aires (1871

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Fernández

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the historic mortality record corresponding to the initial focus of the yellow fever epidemic outbreak registered in Buenos Aires during the year 1871 as compared to simulations of a stochastic population dynamics model. This model incorporates the biology of the urban vector of yellow fever, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, the stages of the disease in the human being as well as the spatial extension of the epidemic outbreak. After introducing the historical context and the restrictions it puts on initial conditions and ecological parameters, we discuss the general features of the simulation and the dependence on initial conditions and available sites for breeding the vector. We discuss the sensitivity, to the free parameters, of statistical estimators such as: final death toll, day of the year when the outbreak reached half the total mortality and the normalized daily mortality, showing some striking regularities. The model is precise and accurate enough to discuss the truthfulness of the presently accepted historic discussions of the epidemic causes, showing that there are more likely scenarios for the historic facts.Received: 9 October 2012, Accepted: 1 March 2013; Edited by: G. Mindlin; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.050002Cite as: M L Fernández, M Otero, N Schweigmann, H G Solari, Papers in Physics 5, 050002 (2013

  17. Reconstructing the last British-Irish Ice Sheet from continental shelf records: initial results from BRITICE-CHRONO

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Cofaigh, Colm; Benetti, Sara; Callard, S. Louise; Chiverell, Richard; Clark, Chris D.; Livingstone, Stephen; Praeg, Daniel; Saher, Margot; Scourse, James; van Landeghem, Katrien

    2015-04-01

    BRITICE-CHRONO is a large UK NERC-funded project that aims to constrain the timing and rate of retreat of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). Although the pattern of ice sheet retreat is reasonably well established the retreat chronology remains poorly constrained for many areas, particularly offshore. In BRITICE-CHRONO marine and terrestrial samples are being collected for dating along a series of 8 transects extending from the continental shelf edge to a few tens of kilometres onshore. The transects will yield over 800 new dates, which will be combined with existing age and landform information to undertake an ice-sheet wide empirical reconstruction of the demise of the BIIS as it underwent the transition from marine-terminating margins to being entirely land-based. This talk will present an overview of the project and highlight some of the key scientific findings from the first of two research cruises that form a central part of the project. Cruise JC106 of the RRS James Cook took place in 2014 and circumnavigated Ireland, surveying and sampling in the Celtic Sea, Irish Sea, Malin Sea, Donegal Bay and the shelf offshore of western Ireland, including the Porcupine Bank. During the 38 day cruise over 220 cores were collected as well as extensive geophysical datasets (sub-bottom profiles and swath bathymetry). Analysis of these data is now underway and is yielding important new insights into the extent, retreat style, chronology and depositional environments associated with the BIIS during and following the Last Glacial Maximum. A second cruise, planned for the summer 2015, will survey and sample the continental shelf north of Scotland and the North Sea.

  18. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; de Gelder, Giovanni; van der Goes, Freek; Morris, Antony

    2017-04-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Supra-subduction zone (SSZ) ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere accreted at supra-subduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event, and are today distributed in the eastern Mediterranean region along three E-W trending ophiolitic belts. Current models associate these ophiolite belts to simultaneous initiation of multiple, E-W trending subduction zones at 95 Ma. Here we report paleospreading direction data obtained from paleomagnetic analysis of sheeted dyke sections from seven Neo-Tethyan ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria, demonstrating that these ophiolites formed at NNE-SSW striking ridges parallel to the newly formed subduction zones. This subduction system was step-shaped and composed of NNE-SSW and ESE-WNW segments. The eastern subduction segment invaded the SW Mediterranean, leading to a radial obduction pattern similar to the Banda arc. Emplacement age constraints indicate that this subduction system formed close to the Triassic passive and paleo-transform margins of the Anatolide-Tauride continental block. Because the original Triassic-Jurassic Neo-Tethyan spreading ridge must have already subducted below the Pontides before the Late Cretaceous, we infer that the Late Cretaceous Neo-Tethyan subduction system started within ancient lithosphere, along NNE-SSW oriented fracture zones and faults parallel to the E-W trending passive margins. This challenges current concepts suggesting that subduction initiation occurs along active intra-oceanic plate boundaries.

  19. Kinematics of Late Cretaceous subduction initiation in the Neo-Tethys Ocean reconstructed from ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffione, Marco; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; de Gelder, Giovanni I. N. O.; van der Goes, Freek C.; Morris, Antony

    2017-05-01

    Formation of new subduction zones represents one of the cornerstones of plate tectonics, yet both the kinematics and geodynamics governing this process remain enigmatic. A major subduction initiation event occurred in the Late Cretaceous, within the Neo-Tethys Ocean between Gondwana and Eurasia. Suprasubduction zone ophiolites (i.e., emerged fragments of ancient oceanic lithosphere formed at suprasubduction spreading centers) were generated during this subduction event and are today distributed in the eastern Mediterranean region along three E-W trending ophiolitic belts. Several models have been proposed to explain the formation of these ophiolites and the evolution of the associated intra-Neo-Tethyan subduction zone. Here we present new paleospreading directions from six Upper Cretaceous ophiolites of Turkey, Cyprus, and Syria, calculated by using new and published paleomagnetic data from sheeted dyke complexes. Our results show that NNE-SSW subduction zones were formed within the Neo-Tethys during the Late Cretaceous, which we propose were part of a major step-shaped subduction system composed of NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE segments. We infer that this subduction system developed within old (Triassic?) lithosphere, along fracture zones and perpendicular weakness zones, since the Neo-Tethyan spreading ridge formed during Gondwana fragmentation would have already been subducted at the Pontides subduction zone by the Late Cretaceous. Our new results provide an alternative kinematic model of Cretaceous Neo-Tethyan subduction initiation and call for future research on the mechanisms of subduction inception within old (and cold) lithosphere and the formation of metamorphic soles below suprasubduction zone ophiolites in the absence of nearby spreading ridges.

  20. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K; Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-11-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ~ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development were studied, using amira reconstruction and cinema 4D remodeling software for visualization. Initially, vertebrae and ribs had formed medially, and primordia of sternum and hypaxial flank muscle primordium laterally in the body wall at Carnegie Stage (CS)15 (5.5 weeks). The next week, ribs and muscle primordium expanded in ventrolateral direction only. At CS18 (6.5 weeks), separate intercostal and abdominal wall muscles differentiated, and ribs, sterna, and muscles began to expand ventromedially and caudally, with the bilateral sternal bars fusing in the midline after CS20 (7 weeks) and the rectus muscles reaching the umbilicus at CS23 (8 weeks). The near-constant absolute distance between both rectus muscles and approximately fivefold decline of this distance relative to body circumference between 6 and 10 weeks identified dorsoventral growth in the dorsal body wall as determinant of the 'closure' of the ventral body wall. Concomitant with the straightening of the embryonic body axis after the 6th week, the abdominal muscles expanded ventrally and caudally to form the infraumbilical body wall. Our data, therefore, show that the ventral body wall is formed by differential dorsoventral growth in the dorsal part of the body. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  1. Nonlinear reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Yu, Hao-Ran

    2017-12-01

    We present a direct approach to nonparametrically reconstruct the linear density field from an observed nonlinear map. We solve for the unique displacement potential consistent with the nonlinear density and positive definite coordinate transformation using a multigrid algorithm. We show that we recover the linear initial conditions up to the nonlinear scale (rδrδL>0.5 for k ≲1 h /Mpc ) with minimal computational cost. This reconstruction approach generalizes the linear displacement theory to fully nonlinear fields, potentially substantially expanding the baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions information content of dense large scale structure surveys, including for example SDSS main sample and 21 cm intensity mapping initiatives.

  2. Polypropylene-based composite mesh versus standard polypropylene mesh in the reconstruction of complicated large abdominal wall hernias: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, M I; El-Haddad, H M

    2016-10-01

    To compare polypropylene mesh positioned onlay supported by omentum and/or peritoneum versus inlay implantation of polypropylene-based composite mesh in patients with complicated wide-defect ventral hernias. This was a prospective randomized study carried out on 60 patients presenting with complicated large ventral hernia in the period from January 2012 to January 2016 in the department of Gastrointestinal Surgery unit and Surgical Emergency of the Main Alexandria University Hospital, Egypt. Large hernia had an abdominal wall defect that could not be closed. Patients were divided into two groups of 30 patients according to the type of mesh used to deal with the large abdominal wall defect. The study included 38 women (63.3 %) and 22 men (37.7 %); their mean age was 46.5 years (range, 25-70). Complicated incisional hernia was the commonest presentation (56.7 %).The operative and mesh fixation times were longer in the polypropylene group. Seven wound infections and two recurrences were encountered in the propylene group. Mean follow-up was 28.7 months (2-48 months). Composite mesh provided, in one session, satisfactory results in patients with complicated large ventral hernia. The procedure is safe and effective in lowering operative time with a trend of low wound complication and recurrence rates.

  3. SU-E-T-280: Reconstructed Rectal Wall Dose Map-Based Verification of Rectal Dose Sparing Effect According to Rectum Definition Methods and Dose Perturbation by Air Cavity in Endo-Rectal Balloon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J [Dept. of Pediatrics, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, H [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S; Lee, M; Suh, T [Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B [Dept. of Bio-Convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric effect and discrepancy according to the rectum definition methods and dose perturbation by air cavity in an endo-rectal balloon (ERB) were verified using rectal-wall (Rwall) dose maps considering systematic errors in dose optimization and calculation accuracy in intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: When the inflated ERB having average diameter of 4.5 cm and air volume of 100 cc is used for patient, Rwall doses were predicted by pencil-beam convolution (PBC), anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA), and AcurosXB (AXB) with material assignment function. The errors of dose optimization and calculation by separating air cavity from the whole rectum (Rwhole) were verified with measured rectal doses. The Rwall doses affected by the dose perturbation of air cavity were evaluated using a featured rectal phantom allowing insert of rolled-up gafchromic films and glass rod detectors placed along the rectum perimeter. Inner and outer Rwall doses were verified with reconstructed predicted rectal wall dose maps. Dose errors and extent at dose levels were evaluated with estimated rectal toxicity. Results: While AXB showed insignificant difference of target dose coverage, Rwall doses underestimated by up to 20% in dose optimization for the Rwhole than Rwall at all dose range except for the maximum dose. As dose optimization for Rwall was applied, the Rwall doses presented dose error less than 3% between dose calculation algorithm except for overestimation of maximum rectal dose up to 5% in PBC. Dose optimization for Rwhole caused dose difference of Rwall especially at intermediate doses. Conclusion: Dose optimization for Rwall could be suggested for more accurate prediction of rectal wall dose prediction and dose perturbation effect by air cavity in IMRT for prostate cancer. This research was supported by the Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea

  4. Reconstrucción de defectos torácicos de espesor total: Presentación de 8 casos de especial complejidad Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall: Presentation of 8 complex cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Lasso

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Las lesiones de gran tamaño en el tórax, requieren casi siempre para su reparación plastias complejas, que en algunos casos han de combinar el uso de tejidos autólogos y/o materiales sintéticos. Por tanto, la reconstrucción de la pared torácica supone un desafío desde el punto de vista reconstructivo en el que es fundamental el papel de los cirujanos plásticos. Los grandes defectos torácicos suelen ser secundarios a exéresis tumoral (tumores parietales de origen primario o secundario, infecciones, radionecrosis, traumatismos y malformaciones congénitas. Si bien los principios de la reconstrucción del tórax exigen una escisión amplia de la lesión, desbridamiento de los tejidos desvitalizados o irradiados y control de la infección local, dichas actuaciones no podrían abordarse con seguridad si no dispusiéramos de un amplio arsenal de técnicas reconstructivas, capaces de aportar tejidos sanos y bien vascularizados o voluminosos y amplios en superficie, junto con soportes rígidos mediante materiales aloplásticos. Gracias a estos avances, en la mayoría de los casos conseguimos el objetivo con sólo una intervención, cuando hace unos años necesitábamos varios procedimientos quirúrgicos. Presentamos una muestra variada de la experiencia de nuestro Servicio en el tratamiento de grandes defectos del tórax, en el que resumimos las distintas posibilidades que podemos encontrar en la práctica clínica diaria, y las soluciones que mejor se adaptan a las mismas.Reconstruction of full thickness defects on the chest wall is controversial and require the use of complex techniques that combine autologous tissue and/or alloplastic materials. Thus it is a challenge for plastic surgeons since it needs a suitable and functional reconstruction. The aethiology for these defects include tumoral surgery (primary wall tumors, or recurrences or metastasis, infections, radiation injury, trauma and congenital defects. Otherwise, first surgical

  5. Use of the amniotic membrane to cover the peritoneal cavity in the reconstruction of the abdominal wall with polypropylene mesh in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Calvão Barbuto

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the efficacy of the amniotic membrane used with polypropylene mesh against the formation of adhesions and its influence on healing. METHODS: twenty five female Wistar rats were anesthetized for creating a parietal defect in the anterior abdominal wall. Its correction was made with polypropylene mesh alone and associated with amniotic membrane. In the control group (n=11, the screen was inserted alone. In group A (n=7 we interposed the amniotic membrane between the screen and the abdominal wall. In group B, the amniotic membrane was placed on the mesh, covering it. After seven days, the animals were euthanized for macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of healing. RESULTS: adhesions were observed in all animals except one in the control group. Severe inflammation was observed in all animals in groups A and B and in three of the control group, with significant difference between them (A and B with p=0.01. Pronounced angiogenic activity was noted in one animal in the control group, six in group A and four in group B, with a significant difference between the control group and group A (p=0.002 and group B (p=0.05. The scar collagen was predominantly mature, except in five animals of the control group, with significant difference between the control group and group A (p=0.05 and group B (p=0.05. CONCLUSION: The amniotic membrane did not alter the formation of adhesions in the first postoperative week. There were also pronounced inflammation, high angiogenic activity and predominance of mature collagen fibers, regardless of the anatomical plane that it was inserted in.

  6. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  7. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  8. Unusual combination of posterior femoral head dislocation with anterior and posterior wall fractures in the ipsilateral acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Su, Yanling; Zhang, Yingze; Zhang, Qi; Zheng, Zhanle; Pan, Jinshe

    2010-06-09

    Although hip dislocation combined with acetabular fracture is not an uncommon injury, anterior acetabular wall fractures rarely occur in patients who have posterior fracture-dislocations of the hip. This article presents a unique case of anterior and posterior wall fractures of the ipsilateral acetabulum in a patient who sustained traumatic posterior hip dislocation that resulted from a high-speed motor vehicle accident. The initial imaging evaluation, which did not include the obturator oblique view, revealed no concomitant anterior acetabular wall fracture. Repeated manipulative reductions were unsuccessful in reducing the displaced hip joint. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans revealed the initially missed anterior acetabular wall fracture fragments incarcerated in the left hip joint in addition to the hip dislocation and the posterior acetabular wall fracture. The incarcerated bone fragments lay between the anterior wall and the femoral head, and between the posterior wall and the femoral head, which appeared to derive from both anterior and posterior acetabular walls, respectively. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed to manage the posterior dislocation and associated acetabular fractures. Intraoperatively, the major anterior wall fragment was used to reconstruct the defected posterior wall. This case highlights the necessity of suspicion and pre- and postoperative monitoring of the obturator oblique view and CT scans to detect the potentially existing anterior acetabular wall fracture. Early surgical intervention is important to guarantee satisfactory outcomes of such complex fracture-dislocation injuries. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis from dislodged percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Alexandra A; Miller, George; Bamboat, Zubin M; Hiotis, Karen

    2004-09-01

    We report three cases of abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis that occurred as a result of leakage from displaced percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes. This is the first report of such a series. Patients underwent extensive operative excisions of their abdominal walls down to their posterior fascia. All patients tolerated their initial surgery, however, two patients ultimately expired from respiratory complications. The surviving patient underwent multiple repeat debridements and reconstructive abdominal wall surgery. We review the epidemiology of patients at risk for this complication and discuss its presentation, as well as the appropriate workup and management. We also address the issues of closure of large abdominal wall defects and future alimentation in this patient group. Finally, abdominal wall necrotizing faciitis from gastrostomy tube leakage is a devastating complication, and the development of preventative strategies for patients at risk is of paramount importance.

  10. Soil life in reconstructed ecosystems: initial soil food web responses after rebuilding a forest soil profile for a climate change experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul T. Rygiewicz; Vicente J. Monleon; Elaine R. Ingham; Kendall J. Martin; Mark G. Johnson

    2010-01-01

    Disrupting ecosystem components, while transferring and reconstructing them for experiments can produce myriad responses. Establishing the extent of these biological responses as the system approaches a new equilibrium allows us more reliably to emulate comparable native systems. That is, the sensitivity of analyzing ecosystem processes in a reconstructed system is...

  11. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  12. Vacuum-assisted closure for defects of the abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFranzo, Anthony J; Pitzer, Keith; Molnar, Joseph A; Marks, Malcolm W; Chang, Michael C; Miller, Preston R; Letton, Robert W; Argenta, Louis C

    2008-03-01

    Reconstruction of the abdominal wall poses a problem common to many surgical specialties. Abdominal wall defects may be caused by trauma and/or prior surgery, with dehiscence or infection. Several options to repair the structural integrity of the abdominal wall exist, including primary closure, flaps, mesh, and skin grafts. Complications of these procedures include recurrent infection of the abdominal wall, infection of mesh, dehiscence, flap death, and poor skin graft take. Risk factors predisposing to these complications include tissue edema, preoperative tissue infection, and patient debilitation, with poor wound healing potential. Ideally, reconstruction should be performed on a nonedematous, clean tissue bed with bacterial levels less than 10 bacteria/cm in a well-nourished patient. Vacuum-assisted closure was used in a series of patients in an attempt to prepare the abdominal wall for reconstruction and reduce the risk of complications. Charts were reviewed for 100 patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction after vacuum-assisted closure therapy. Their wound cause, reconstruction technique, complications, and number of days on the vacuum-assisted closure device are reported. The ability of vacuum-assisted closure to reduce edema, increase blood flow, potentially decrease bacterial colonization, and reduce wound size greatly facilitated abdominal wall reconstruction. The vacuum-assisted closure device served as a temporary dressing with which to control dehiscence and to maintain abdominal wall integrity when bowel wall edema prevented abdominal closure. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy frequently shortened time to abdominal wall reconstruction and simplified the method of reconstruction.

  13. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  14. Hydroxylation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Enhanced biocompatibility through reduction of oxidative stress initiated cell membrane damage, cell cycle arrestment and extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenbao; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2016-10-01

    Modification of CNTs with hydroxyl group promotes their applications in biomedical area. However, the impact of hydroxylation on their biocompatibility is far from being completely understood. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive evaluation of hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-OH) on the human normal liver L02 cell line, and compared it with that of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs). Results demonstrated that compared with p-MWCNTs, MWCNTs-OH induced significantly lower oxidative stress as indicated by the level of intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH), subsequently lead to less cell membrane damage as demonstrated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay, and showed slightly decreased arrestment of cell cycle distribution at G0/G1. More interestingly, MWCNTs-OH exhibited significantly lower tendency to activate caspase-8, a key molecule involved in the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. All these in vitro results demonstrated that hydroxylation of MWCNTs enhanced their biocompatibility compare with p-MWCNTs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K; Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ∼ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development were studied, using amira® reconstruction and cinema 4D® remodeling software for visualization. Initially, vertebrae and ribs had formed medially, and primordia of sternum and hypaxial flank muscle primordium laterally in the body wall at Carnegie Stage (CS)15 (5.5 weeks). The next week, ribs and muscle primordium expanded in ventrolateral direction only. At CS18 (6.5 weeks), separate intercostal and abdominal wall muscles differentiated, and ribs, sterna, and muscles began to expand ventromedially and caudally, with the bilateral sternal bars fusing in the midline after CS20 (7 weeks) and the rectus muscles reaching the umbilicus at CS23 (8 weeks). The near-constant absolute distance between both rectus muscles and approximately fivefold decline of this distance relative to body circumference between 6 and 10 weeks identified dorsoventral growth in the dorsal body wall as determinant of the ‘closure’ of the ventral body wall. Concomitant with the straightening of the embryonic body axis after the 6th week, the abdominal muscles expanded ventrally and caudally to form the infraumbilical body wall. Our data, therefore, show that the ventral body wall is formed by differential dorsoventral growth in the dorsal part of the body. PMID:26467243

  16. Abdominal CT with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR): initial results of a prospective trial comparing ultralow-dose with standard-dose imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickhardt, Perry J; Lubner, Meghan G; Kim, David H; Tang, Jie; Ruma, Julie A; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to report preliminary results of an ongoing prospective trial of ultralow-dose abdominal MDCT. Imaging with standard-dose contrast-enhanced (n = 21) and unenhanced (n = 24) clinical abdominal MDCT protocols was immediately followed by ultralow-dose imaging of a matched series of 45 consecutively registered adults (mean age, 57.9 years; mean body mass index, 28.5). The ultralow-dose images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Standard-dose series were reconstructed with FBP (reference standard). Image noise was measured at multiple predefined sites. Two blinded abdominal radiologists interpreted randomly presented ultralow-dose images for multilevel subjective image quality (5-point scale) and depiction of organ-based focal lesions. Mean dose reduction relative to the standard series was 74% (median, 78%; range, 57-88%; mean effective dose, 1.90 mSv). Mean multiorgan image noise for low-dose MBIR was 14.7 ± 2.6 HU, significantly lower than standard-dose FBP (28.9 ± 9.9 HU), low-dose FBP (59.2 ± 23.3 HU), and ASIR (45.6 ± 14.1 HU) (p standard-dose FBP. Pooled lesion detection was higher for low-dose MBIR (79.3% [169/213]) compared with low-dose FBP (66.2% [141/213]) and ASIR (62.0% [132/213]) (p < 0.05). MBIR shows great potential for substantially reducing radiation doses at routine abdominal CT. Both FBP and ASIR are limited in this regard owing to reduced image quality and diagnostic capability. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal dose level for MBIR that maintains adequate diagnostic performance. In general, objective and subjective image quality measurements do not necessarily correlate with diagnostic performance at ultralow-dose CT.

  17. Abdominal CT With Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR): Initial Results of a Prospective Trial Comparing Ultralow-Dose With Standard-Dose Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickhardt, Perry J.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Ruma, Julie A.; del Rio, Alejandro Muñoz; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report preliminary results of an ongoing prospective trial of ultralow-dose abdominal MDCT. SUBJECTS AND METHODS Imaging with standard-dose contrast-enhanced (n = 21) and unenhanced (n = 24) clinical abdominal MDCT protocols was immediately followed by ultralow-dose imaging of a matched series of 45 consecutively registered adults (mean age, 57.9 years; mean body mass index, 28.5). The ultralow-dose images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). Standard-dose series were reconstructed with FBP (reference standard). Image noise was measured at multiple predefined sites. Two blinded abdominal radiologists interpreted randomly presented ultralow-dose images for multilevel subjective image quality (5-point scale) and depiction of organ-based focal lesions. RESULTS Mean dose reduction relative to the standard series was 74% (median, 78%; range, 57–88%; mean effective dose, 1.90 mSv). Mean multiorgan image noise for low-dose MBIR was 14.7 ± 2.6 HU, significantly lower than standard-dose FBP (28.9 ± 9.9 HU), low-dose FBP (59.2 ± 23.3 HU), and ASIR (45.6 ± 14.1 HU) (p ASIR (1.8 ± 0.7) (p ASIR (62.0% [132/213]) (p ASIR are limited in this regard owing to reduced image quality and diagnostic capability. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal dose level for MBIR that maintains adequate diagnostic performance. In general, objective and subjective image quality measurements do not necessarily correlate with diagnostic performance at ultralow-dose CT. PMID:23169718

  18. Morphological characteristics of tissues of anterior abdominal wall of rats after implantation of alloplastic material, processed with collagen, in the initially infected wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Svisenko O.V.

    2010-01-01

    A research purpose was to investigate the tissue reactions on implantation of polypropylene mesh, processed with collagen, after the plastic of experimental defect at rats at underaponevrotic localization of prosthesis in the initially infected wounds. Research was performed in two experimental groups. Group 1 – at 27 rats in the conditions of the infected wound the monofilamentous polypropylene mesh of size 1×1,5 sm was fixed under aponevrosis. Group 2 – at 27 rats at analogous conditions wi...

  19. Laparoscopic assisted modification of the firlit abdominal wall plication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Israel

    2005-07-01

    We describe a modification of the Firlit abdominal wall plication procedure for abdominal wall reconstruction in the prune-belly syndrome. Five boys with the prune-belly syndrome and 1 with congenital atrophy or hypotrophy of the internal and external oblique muscles underwent laparoscopic assisted abdominal wall reconstruction. All 6 patients had excellent cosmetic results, with no weakness or sagging of the abdominal wall. Laparoscopy appears to add to the Firlit procedure an increased measure of safety and a possible decrease in morbidity associated with opening the abdomen, and improved precision that enhances the results achieved with the original procedure and other abdominal wall repairs.

  20. Recurrent desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall | Toughrai | Pan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Desmoid tumors most often occur in abdominal wall. Their tendency to recur lead to repeated operations which can make the abdominal wall reconstruction difficult. We report a 28-year-old female history. The patient was referred to our hospital for a recurrent desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall. The tumor was totally ...

  1. Low-tube-voltage, high-tube-current multidetector abdominal CT: improved image quality and decreased radiation dose with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm--initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Daniele; Nelson, Rendon C; Schindera, Sebastian T; Richard, Samuel; Youngblood, Richard S; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm improves the image quality at low-tube-voltage (80-kVp), high-tube-current (675-mA) multidetector abdominal computed tomography (CT) during the late hepatic arterial phase. This prospective, single-center HIPAA-compliant study was institutional review board approved. Informed patient consent was obtained. Ten patients (six men, four women; mean age, 63 years; age range, 51-77 years) known or suspected to have hypervascular liver tumors underwent dual-energy 64-section multidetector CT. High- and low-tube-voltage CT images were acquired sequentially during the late hepatic arterial phase of contrast enhancement. Standard convolution FBP was used to reconstruct 140-kVp (protocol A) and 80-kVp (protocol B) image sets, and ASIR (protocol C) was used to reconstruct 80-kVp image sets. The mean image noise; contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) relative to muscle for the aorta, liver, and pancreas; and effective dose with each protocol were assessed. A figure of merit (FOM) was computed to normalize the image noise and CNR for each protocol to effective dose. Repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons was used to compare differences in mean CNR, image noise, and corresponding FOM among the three protocols. The noise power spectra generated from a custom phantom with each protocol were also compared. When image noise was normalized to effective dose, protocol C, as compared with protocols A (P = .0002) and B (P = .0001), yielded an approximately twofold reduction in noise. When the CNR was normalized to effective dose, protocol C yielded significantly higher CNRs for the aorta, liver, and pancreas than did protocol A (P = .0001 for all comparisons) and a significantly higher CNR for the liver than did protocol B (P = .003). Mean effective doses were 17.5 mSv +/- 0.6 (standard error) with protocol A and 5.1 mSv +/- 0.3 with protocols B and C

  2. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  3. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Sydney, Australia. December 6, 1990. Lumley, J. L. A dynamical-systems-theory approach to the wall region. Environmental Engineering Laboratory, CSIRO...Nonlinear Science. Holmes, P. Editor in Chief, Nonlinear Scinece Today. Holmes, P. Reviewer for Physica D, J. Sound Vib., J. Phys., Q. Appl. Math, Phys...Spring, 1994; Organizing committee member. Holmes, P. Editorial Board Member: Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis; Journal of Nonlinear Scinece

  4. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  5. Correlations of coronary plaque wall thickness with wall pressure and wall pressure gradient: a representative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Biyue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two major hemodynamic stresses imposed at the blood arterial wall interface by flowing blood: the wall shear stress (WSS acting tangentially to the wall, and the wall pressure (WP acting normally to the wall. The role of flow wall shear stress in atherosclerosis progression has been under intensive investigation, while the impact of blood pressure on plaque progression has been under-studied. Method The correlations of wall thickness (WT with wall pressure (WP, blood pressure on the lumen wall and spatial wall pressure gradient (WPG in a human atherosclerotic right coronary artery were studied. The pulsatile blood flow was simulated using a three dimensional mathematical model. The blood was treated as an incompressible viscous non-Newtonian fluid. The geometry of the artery was re-constructed using an in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS 44-slice dataset obtained from a patient with consent obtained. The WT, the WP and the WPG were averaged on each slice, respectively, and Pearson correlation analysis was performed on slice averaged base. Each slice was then divided into 8 segments and averaged vessel WT, WP and WPG were collected from all 352 segments for correlation analysis. Each slice was also divided into 2 segments (inner semi-wall of bend and outer semi-wall of bend and the correlation analysis was performed on the 88 segments. Results Under mean pressure, the Pearson coefficient for correlation between WT and WP was r = − 0.52 (p  Conclusions Results from this representative case report indicated that plaque wall thickness correlated negatively with wall pressure (r = −0.81 by slice and positively with wall pressure gradient (r = 0.45. The slice averaged WT has a strong linear relationship with the slice averaged WP. Large-scale patient studies are needed to further confirm our findings.

  6. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  7. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  8. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, terracing is a common element of agricultural lands. Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are used to conserve arable soil, delay erosion processes and retain rainfall runoff. Currently, agricultural land abandonment is widespread in the Mediterranean region leading to terrace wall failure due to lack of maintenance and consequently an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to test the applicability of digital 3D documentation on mountainous agricultural areas for assessing changes in terrace wall geometry, including terrace wall failures and associated soil erosion. The study area is located at 800-1100 m above sea level, in the Ophiolite complex of the Troodos Mountains in Cyprus. Average annual precipitation is 750 mm. Two sites with dry-stone terraces were selected for this study. The first site had a sequence of three terrace walls that were surveyed. The uppermost terrace wall was collapsed at several locations; the middle at few locations; and the lowest was still intact. Three fieldwork campaigns were conducted at this site: during the dry season (initial conditions), the middle and end of the wet season. The second site had one terrace wall that was almost completely collapsed. This terrace was restored during a communal terrace rehabilitation event. Two fieldwork campaigns were conducted for this terrace: before and after the terrace wall restoration. Terrace walls were documented with a set of digital images, and transformed into a 3D point cloud (using web-based services and commercial software - Autodesk 123D catch and Menci Software uMap, respectively). A set of points, registered with the total station and geo-referenced with a GPS, enabled the scaling of the 3D model and aligning the terrace walls within the same reference system. The density (distance between each point) of the reconstructed point clouds is 0.005 m by Umap and 0.025 m by 123D Catch. On the first site, the model analysis identified wall

  9. Implications for Rodinia reconstructions for the initiation of Neoproterozoic subduction at ~ 860 Ma on the western margin of the Yangtze Block: Evidence from the Guandaoshan Pluton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lilin; Guo, Jinghui; Nutman, Allen P.; Wyman, Derek; Geng, Yuansheng; Yang, Chonghui; Liu, Fulai; Ren, Liudong; Zhou, Xiwen

    2014-05-01

    Neoproterozoic igneous rocks are widespread along the western margin of the Yangtze Block, but their petrogenesis and tectonic setting is debated. The Guandaoshan pluton is located at the southwestern margin of the Yangtze Block and is mainly composed of diorite and subordinate gabbro, with quartz diorite in its margin. Hornblende is an ubiquitous mineral in different phases of the pluton. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating of quartz diorite, gabbroic diorite, and gabbro from the pluton yielded 206Pb/238U ages of 857 ± 7 Ma, 856 ± 6 Ma, and 856 ± 8 Ma, respectively. Guandaoshan pluton samples show a large range of SiO2 (47.02-67.66%), MgO (1.12-7.5%), Fe2O3T (2.8-12.22%) and CaO (2.95-11.88%), low rare earth element (REE) contents from 22 to 49 ppm, and enrichment of Sr, Ba and Rb and depletion of Nb, Zr and Ti with characteristics of island arc magma. They also exhibit low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7030-0.7033, and positive ɛNd(t) values from + 4.8 to + 5.2. These features suggest that the parental magma of the Guandaoshan pluton originated at a convergent plate boundary from a depleted mantle source modified by slab fluids, and underwent the fractional crystallization of amphibole and magnetite, without significant crustal assimilation, during the formation from gabbro-diorite to quartz diorite. Neoproterozoic magmas with age of 860-740 Ma are abundant on the western Yangtze Block, and there is a gap of magmatism in early Neoproterozoic (from about 1000 Ma to 870 Ma). Therefore, it can be deduced that the ~ 860 Ma Guandaoshan pluton and the contemporary magmatism represent initial subduction at the western margin of the Yangtze Block. Based on the Neoproterozoic paleomagnetic data, detrital zircon ages, magmas with low δ18O values in South China and our new data, we prefer that the South China Block was located at the margin of Rodinia in the Neoproterozoic, and not at the center of the supercontinent.

  10. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  11. [Eyebrow reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraër, F; Darsonval, V; Lejeune, F; Bochot-Hermouet, B; Rousseau, P

    2013-10-01

    The eyebrow is an essential anatomical area, from a social point of view, so its reconstruction, in case of skin defect, must be as meticulous as possible, with the less residual sequela. Capillary density extremely varies from one person to another and the different methods of restoration of this area should absolutely take this into consideration. We are going to review the various techniques of reconstruction, according to the sex and the surface to cover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Award Fee Process for Contractors Involved in Iraq Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-25

    Support PMO Project Management Office SIGIR Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction TO Task Order 14 Appendix C. Contract Files... Management Office (PMO) to execute the Iraq infrastructure reconstruction program. During its initial planning stages for the reconstruction of...relief, rehabilitation, and reconstruction projects in Iraq funded through the IRRF. The Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) established the Project

  13. Vaginal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  14. [BIOMECHANICS STUDY ON ACETABULAR POSTERIOR WALL FRACTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yang; Hu Xiaopeng; Lu, Xiongwei; Zhang, Yuntong; Zhang, Chuncai; Wang, Panfeng; Zhao, Xue

    2015-08-01

    To study the experimental biomechanics of acetabular posterior wall fractures so as to provide theoretical basis for its clinical treatment. Six formalin-preserved cadaveric pelvises were divided into groups A and B (n=3). The fracture models of superior-posterior wall and inferior-posterior wall of the acetabulum were created on both hips in group A; fractures were fixed with two interfragmentary screws and a locking reconstruction plate. The fracture models of superior-posterior wall of acetabulum were created on both hips in group B; fractures were fixed with two interfragmentary screws and a locking reconstruction plate at one side, and with acetabular tridimensional memory fixation system (ATMFS) at the other side. The biomechanical testing machine was used to load to 1 500 N at 10 mm/min speed for 30 seconds. The displacement of superior and inferior fracture sites was analyzed with the digital image correlation technology. No fracture or internal fixation breakage occurred during loading and measuring; the displacement valuess of the upper and lower fracture lines were below 2 mm (the clinically tolerable maximum value) in 2 groups. In group A, the displacement values of the upper and lower fracture lines at superior-posterior wall fracture site were significantly higher than those at inferior-posterior wall fracture site (P fracture line were significantly higher than those of lower fracture line (P fracture types. In group B, the displacement values of the upper and lower fracture lines at the side fixed with screws and a locking reconstruction plate were similar to the values at the side fixed with ATMFS, all being close to 2 mm; the displacement values of the upper fracture line were significantly higher than those of lower fracture line (P acetabulum is much greater than that of the inferior-posterior wall of acetabulum and they should be discriminated, which might be the reasons of reduction loss, femoral head subluxation, and traumatic arthritis

  15. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually ... Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our ... recent time but high cost and initial non-availability of the mesh limit its use in our.

  16. Risk Assessment of Energy-Efficient Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallin, Simon B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hun, Diana E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jackson, Roderick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kehrer, Manfred [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This multi-year project aims to provide the residential construction industry with energy-efficient wall designs that are moisture durable. The present work focused on the initial step of this project, which is to develop a moisture durability protocol that identifies energy efficient wall designs that have a low probability of experiencing moisture problems.

  17. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  18. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  19. Causal Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    suitable source of core events supporting causal reconstruction in a range of domains might be a combination of bodily - kinesthetic and simple...suggested in the previ- ous section, a good place to start might be with causal situations involving bodily - kinesthetic events or simple mechanical events...ANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(LS) tý PJIfORMIN’, CRGANIZATION !.LPDRT NUMBEK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 545 Technology Square AIM 1403 Cambridge

  20. Inferior vena cava leiomyosarcoma: vascular reconstruction is not ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leiomyosarcoma (LMS) of inferior vena cava is a rare and aggressive tumor, arising from the smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. A large complete surgical resection is the essential treatment. The need of vascular reconstruction is not always mandatory. It's above all to understand the place of the reconstruction with ...

  1. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    The theory for concrete structures strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer materials has been developing for approximately two decades, and there are at the present time numerous guidelines covering strengthening of many commonly encountered structural building elements. Strengthening of in......-plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...... that describes a unit width strip of a strengthened disk. The unit width strip is named a strengthened concrete tension member and contains a single tensile crack and four debonding cracks. Analysis of the member results in closed form expressions for the load-crack opening relationship. Further analysis...

  2. The State of the GeoWall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P. J.; Leigh, J.; van Keken, P.; Johnson, A.

    2003-12-01

    The GeoWall stereo projection technology has been widely adopted within Earth Science. Over 20,000 undergraduate students per year use a GeoWall in classroom and lab settings at over 80 institutions around the world using over 200 GeoWalls. We believe that critical mass for this technology has been reached in the Earth Science. Many collaborations have been initiated. With Iris, GeoWall is exploring new ways to monitor seismic networks in real-time and to visualize extremely large, whole Earth seismic simulations. We are also working with a number of drilling organizations including JOI, DOSECC and LacCore to bring modern visualization technology to core interpretation and drill site selection. Also, over 15 museums now have or are building GeoWalls for informal education. Much of the science that is being performed on the GeoWall is finding its way directly into the classroom and science museum. One of the success stories has been the GeoWall Consortium's interaction with industry. The basic hardware for the GeoWall has been spun off to companies that now sell variations of the hardware. In addition, many software companies including ESRI and Dynamic Graphics have added support for the GeoWall in their products. The future of GeoWall is four fold. Curriculum development will bring more material to all GeoWall users. Assessment of the curriculum and educational psychology will give us GeoWall best practices. In technology development, the GeoWall 2 is a 20+ million pixel, tiled display which brings more resolution to the Earth Sciences than ever. To support research the consortium is developing a volume rendering application to visualize extremely large datasets.

  3. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal...... interviews, and seven semistructured interviews. The findings show that staff interaction is typified by the use of trust and relationship-enabling care, which is characterized by the establishment and maintenance of an informal, trusting relationship through a repeated reconstruction of normality...

  4. Breaching Walls in Urban Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    Jewish forces, each struggling for dominance "■" - ■ ■ wmmtti**, : A3 as the British relinquished control of Palestine. Jewish forces bottled ...rebel forces held much of the city and threatened to topple the government. The stated mission of the initial elements deployed, the U.S. Army’s...8217 When five round« were fired at angles to the target wall rather than at zero degrees obliquity, a larger hole was obtained, but

  5. Charged Domain Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Fogli, G. L.; Tedesco, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate Charged Domain Walls (CDW's), topological defects that acquire surface charge density $Q$ induced by fermion states localized on the walls. The presence of an electric and magnetic field on the walls is also discussed. We find a relation in which the value of the surface charge density $Q$ is connected with the existence of such topological defects.

  6. Symmetry and Non-empirical Calculations of Structure and Properties of Single- and Double-Wall SrTiO3 Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarestov, R. A.; Bandura, A. V.

    A large-scale first-principles simulation of the structure and stability of SrTiO3 single- and double-wall nanotubes with different chiralities has been performed for the first time using the periodic PBE0 LCAO method. The initial structures of nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up slabs consisting of two and four alternating (001) SrO and TiO2 planes. In the majority of the considered cases the inner or outer TiO2 shells of 4-layer nanotubes undergo a considerable reconstruction due to shrinkage or stretching of interatomic distances. Double-wall nanotubes constructed from 2-layer single-wall nanotubes with the intertube distance less than 4.5-5.0 Å merge to stable polyhedron-shaped tubular objects consisting of blocks with a distorted cubic perovskite structure.

  7. The extended abdominal wall flap for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, S T; Senghaas, A; Turley, R; Ravindra, K V; Zenn, M R; Levin, L S; Erdmann, D

    2011-06-01

    Patients with extensive loss of the abdominal wall tissue have few options for restoring the abdominal cavity. Composite tissue allotransplantation has been used for limited abdominal wall reconstruction in the setting of visceral transplantation, yet replacement of the entire abdominal wall has not been described. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal abdominal skin surface available through an external iliac/femoral cuff-based pedicle. Five human cadaveric abdominal walls were injected with methylene blue to analyze skin perfusion based on either the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA; n = 5) or a cuff of external iliac/femoral artery (n = 5) containing the deep circumflex iliac, deep inferior epigastric, and superficial inferior epigastric, and superficial circumflex iliac arteries. Abdominal wall flaps were taken full thickness from the costal margin to the midaxillary line and down to the pubic tubercle and proximal thigh. In all specimens, the deep inferior epigastric, deep circumflex iliac, superficial inferior epigastric, and superficial circumflex iliac arteries were found to originate within a 4-cm cuff of the external iliac/femoral artery. Abdominal wall flaps injected through a unilateral external iliac/femoral segment had a significantly greater degree of total flap perfusion than those injected through the DIEA alone (76.5% ± 4% vs 57.2% ± 5%; Student t test, P DIEA vessel alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Holes in the walls: Primordial black holes as a solution to the cosmological domain wall problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Dejan; Freese, Katherine; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2005-08-01

    We propose a scenario in which the cosmological domain wall and monopole problems are solved without any fine tuning of the initial conditions or parameters in the Lagrangian of an underlying filed theory. In this scenario domain walls sweep out (unwind) the monopoles from the early universe, then the fast primordial black holes perforate the domain walls, change their topology and destroy them. We find further that the (old vacuum) energy density released from the domain walls could alleviate but not solve the cosmological flatness problem.

  9. Reconstructive Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Fatih Önol

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of urethral stricture, Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG and reconstruction is applied with different patch techniques. Recently often prefered, this approach is, in bulber urethra strictures of BMG’s; by “ventral onley”, in pendulous urethra because of thinner spingiosis body, which provides support and nutrition of graft; by means of “dorsal inley” being anastomosis. In the research that Cordon et al. did, they compared conventional BMJ “onley” urethroplast and “pseudo-spongioplasty” which base on periurethral vascular tissues to be nourished by closing onto graft. In repairment of front urethras that spongiosis supportive tissue is insufficient, this method is defined as peripheral dartos [çevre dartos?] and buck’s fascia being mobilized and being combined on BMG patch. Between the years 2007 and 2012, assessment of 56 patients with conventional “ventral onley” BMG urethroplast and 46 patients with “pseudo-spongioplasty” were reported to have similar success rates (80% to 84% in 3.5 year follow-up on average. While 74% of the patients that were applied pseudo-spongioplasty had disease present at distal urethra (pendulous, bulbopendulous, 82% of the patients which were applied conventional onley urethroplast had stricture at proximal (bulber urethra yet. Also lenght of the stricture at the pseudo-spongioplasty group was longer in a statistically significant way (5.8 cm to 4.7 cm on average, p=0.028. This study which Cordon et al. did, shows that conditions in which conventional sponjiyoplasti is not possible, periurethral vascular tissues are adequate to nourish BMG. Even it is an important technique in terms of bringing a new point of view to today’s practice, data especially about complications that may show up after pseudo-spongioplasty usage on long distal strictures (e.g. appearance of urethral diverticulum is not reported. Along with this we think that, providing an oppurtinity to patch directly

  10. Vessel wall characterization using quantitative MRI: what's in a number?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Calcagno, Claudia; van Ooij, Pim; Fayad, Zahi A; Strijkers, Gustav J; Nederveen, Aart J

    2018-02-01

    The past decade has witnessed the rapid development of new MRI technology for vessel wall imaging. Today, with advances in MRI hardware and pulse sequences, quantitative MRI of the vessel wall represents a real alternative to conventional qualitative imaging, which is hindered by significant intra- and inter-observer variability. Quantitative MRI can measure several important morphological and functional characteristics of the vessel wall. This review provides a detailed introduction to novel quantitative MRI methods for measuring vessel wall dimensions, plaque composition and permeability, endothelial shear stress and wall stiffness. Together, these methods show the versatility of non-invasive quantitative MRI for probing vascular disease at several stages. These quantitative MRI biomarkers can play an important role in the context of both treatment response monitoring and risk prediction. Given the rapid developments in scan acceleration techniques and novel image reconstruction, we foresee the possibility of integrating the acquisition of multiple quantitative vessel wall parameters within a single scan session.

  11. Orbital reconstruction: prefabricated implants, data transfer, and revision surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittermann, Gido; Metzger, Marc Christian; Schlager, Stefan; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Gross, Nikolai; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Schmelzeisen, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    External impact to the orbit may cause a blowout or zygomatico-maxillary fractures. Diagnosis and treatment of orbital wall fractures are based on both physical examination and computed tomography scan of the orbit. Injuries of the orbit often require a reconstruction of its orbital walls. Using computer-assisted techniques, anatomically preformed orbital implants, and intraoperative imaging offers precise and predictable results of orbital reconstructions. Secondary reconstruction of the orbital cavity is challenging due to fractures healed in malposition, defects, scarring, and lack of anatomic landmarks, and should be avoided by precise primary reconstruction. The development of preformed orbital implants based on topographical analysis of the orbital cavity was a milestone for the improvement of primary orbital reconstruction. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  13. Evading the cosmological domain wall problem

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Sebastian E.; Sarkar, Subir; White, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    Discrete symmetries are commonplace in field theoretical models but pose a severe problem for cosmology since they lead to the formation of domain walls during spontaneous symmetry breaking in the early universe. However if one of the vacuua is favoured over the others, either energetically, or because of initial conditions, it will eventually come to dominate the universe. Using numerical methods, we study the evolution of the domain wall network for a variety of field configurations in two ...

  14. Application of Support Vector Machines for Estimating Wall Parameters in Through-Wall Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Mei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In through-wall radar imaging (TWRI, ambiguities in wall characteristics including the thickness and the relative permittivity will distort the image and shift the imaged target position. To quickly and accurately estimate the wall parameters, an approach based on a support vector machine (SVM is proposed. In TWRI problem, the nonlinearity is embodied in the relationship between backscatter data and the wall parameters, which can be obtained through the SVM training process. Measurement results reveal that once the training phase is completed, the technique only needs no more than one second to estimate wall parameters with acceptable errors. Then through-wall images are reconstructed using a back-projection (BP algorithm by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD simulation. Noiseless and noisy measurements are discussed; the simulation results demonstrate that noisy contamination has little influence on the imaging quality. Furthermore, the feasibility and the validity are tested by a more realistic situation. The results show that high-quality and focused images are obtained regardless of the errors in the wall parameter estimates.

  15. Investigation of various reconstruction parameters for algebraic reconstruction technique in a newly developed chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Park, H.-S.; Lee, Y.; Seo, C.-W.; Kim, H.-J.

    2017-08-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a promising new modality that provides 3D information by reconstructing limited projection views. CDT systems have been developed to improve the limitations of conventional radiography such as image degradation and low sensitivity. However, the development of reconstruction methods is challenging because of the limited projection views within various angular ranges. Optimization of reconstruction parameters for various reconsturction methods in CDT system also is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) method, and to evaluate the effect of the reconstruction parameters for our newly developed CDT system. We designed ART method with 41 projection views over an angular range of ±20°. To investigate the effect of reconstruction parameters, we measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), artifact spread function (ASF), and quality factor (QF) using LUNGMAN phantom included tumors. We found that the proper choice of reconstruction parameters such as relaxation parameter, initial guess, and number of iterations improved the quality of reconstructed images from the same projection views. Optimal values of ART relaxation parameter with uniform (UI) and back-projection (BP) initial guesses were 0.4 and 0.6, respectively. BP initial guess improved image quality in comparison with UI initial guess, in terms of providing a higher CNR and QF values with a faster speed. CNR and QF values improved with increasing number of iteration. Particularly, ART method with BP initial guess (when β = 0.6) after 3-terations provide satisfactory reconstructed image. In conclusion, the use of ART method with proper reconstruction parameters provided better image quality than FBP method as well as conventional radiography. These results indicated that the ART method with optimal reconstruction parameters could improve image quality for nodule detection using the CDT system.

  16. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Quantitative analysis of emphysema and airway measurements according to iterative reconstruction algorithms: comparison of filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ji Yung; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chang Min; Park, Sang Joon; Shim, Mi-Suk

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate filtered back projection (FBP) and two iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms and their effects on the quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airway measurements on computed tomography (CT) images. Low-dose chest CT obtained in 281 adult patients were reconstructed using three algorithms: FBP, adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) and model-based IR (MBIR). Measurements of each dataset were compared: total lung volume, emphysema index (EI), airway measurements of the lumen and wall area as well as average wall thickness. Accuracy of airway measurements of each algorithm was also evaluated using an airway phantom. EI using a threshold of -950 HU was significantly different among the three algorithms in decreasing order of FBP (2.30 %), ASIR (1.49 %) and MBIR (1.20 %) (P algorithms with FBP (2.09 mm) demonstrating thicker walls than ASIR (2.00 mm) and MBIR (1.88 mm) (P analysis revealed that MBIR showed the most accurate value for airway measurements. The three algorithms presented different EIs and wall thicknesses, decreasing in the order of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Thus, care should be taken in selecting the appropriate IR algorithm on quantitative analysis of the lung. • Computed tomography is increasingly used to provide objective measurements of intra-thoracic structures. • Iterative reconstruction algorithms can affect quantitative measurements of lung and airways. • Care should be taken in selecting reconstruction algorithms in longitudinal analysis. • Model-based iterative reconstruction seems to provide the most accurate airway measurements.

  18. Abdominal wall reconstruction in the prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, J; Cavett, C; Eng, G

    1981-12-01

    In our institution, 12 patients have been encountered with prune belly syndrome. Eight children have undergone evaluation of their abdominal musculature by electromyography. Results of their studies show that major functioning or recoverable muscle exists in the lateral and upper sector of the abdomen, but that little or no muscle exists in the lower central abdomen. Based in part on these findings, an operation has been devised which spares all potentially functioning musculature and corresponding motor nerves, and disposes of nonfunctioning and nonrecoverable muscle. In terms of cosmetic appearance and gross motor testing, these growing boys show significant improvement.

  19. Collagen/Polypropylene composite mesh biocompatibility in abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasiewicz, Aleksander; Skopinska-Wisniewska, Joanna; Marszalek, Andrzej; Molski, Stanislaw; Drewa, Tomasz

    2013-05-01

    Intraperitoneal placement of polypropylene mesh leads to extensive visceral adhesions and is contraindicated. Different coatings are used to improve polypropylene mesh properties. Collagen is a protein with unique biocompatibility and cell ingrowth enhancement potential. A novel acetic acid extracted collagen coating was developed to allow placement of polypropylene mesh in direct contact with viscera. The authors' aim was to evaluate the long-term influence of acetic acid extracted collagen coating on surgical aspects and biomechanical properties of polypropylene mesh implanted in direct contact with viscera, including complications, adhesions with viscera, strength of incorporation, and microscopic inflammatory reaction. Forty adult Wistar rats were divided into two groups: experimental (polypropylene mesh/acetic acid extracted collagen coating) and control (polypropylene mesh only). Astandardized procedure of mesh implantation was performed. Animals were killed 3 months after surgery and analyzed for complications, mesh area covered by adhesions, type of adhesions, strength of incorporation, and intensity of inflammatory response. The mean adhesion area was lower for polypropylene mesh/acetic acid extracted collagen coating (14.5 percent versus 69.9 percent, p polypropylene mesh are significantly reduced because of acetic acid extracted collagen coating. The collagen coating does not increase complications or induce alterations of polypropylene mesh incorporation.

  20. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  1. Substitution of the wall of the trachea by absorbable synthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, H

    1988-02-01

    Synthetic, absorbable tissue proved to supply a valuable "interim support" for an orderly reconstruction of the wall of the trachea during the first three months following surgery. This is in general the result of experiments in which the use of implanted Polyglactin 910 as a substitute material for the tracheal wall of rats and rabbits was tested. Additionally the possibilities for satisfactory stabilization of the tracheal wall by means of Polydioxanon, another synthetic substance, which is absorbed more slowly, were investigated. The experiments were performed in a total of 30 rats and 70 rabbits. Initial attempts to substitute the entire circumference of the tracheal wall in the area of the neck by synthetics resulted in excessive difficulties post-surgically. Frequently substantial stenoses, obstructing respiration, developed. Consequently, patches of substitute material, covering more than half of the circumference of the trachea, were applied. The periods of survival of the animals ranged from one to 23 weeks. Following autopsy and macroscopical inspection, selected specimens were examined histologically by means of light microscopes and scanning electron microscopes. Evaluation of the samples showed progressive lining of the inner surface of the prosthetic patches with connective tissue and subsequent covering with squamous cell epithelium. On the average, approximately six weeks after surgery, ciliated columnar epithelium resembling normal respiratory mucosa developed. Gradually the synthetic fabric was replaced by dense connective tissue, which finally contained newly generated hyaline cartilage also. The very slow rate of dissolution of the polydioxanone material provided sufficient time for the formation of a new, stratified wall of the trachea, maintaining sufficient clearance in the tracheal lumen.

  2. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  3. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  4. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  5. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  6. Radial Corrugations of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Driven by Inter-Wall Nonbonding Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We perform large-scale quasi-continuum simulations to determine the stable cross-sectional configurations of free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. We show that at an inter-wall spacing larger than the equilibrium distance set by the inter-wall van der Waals (vdW interactions, the initial circular cross-sections of the MWCNTs are transformed into symmetric polygonal shapes or asymmetric water-drop-like shapes. Our simulations also show that removing several innermost walls causes even more drastic cross-sectional polygonization of the MWCNTs. The predicted cross-sectional configurations agree with prior experimental observations. We attribute the radial corrugations to the compressive stresses induced by the excessive inter-wall vdW energy release of the MWCNTs. The stable cross-sectional configurations provide fundamental guidance to the design of single MWCNT-based devices and shed lights on the mechanical control of electrical properties.

  7. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  8. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction ...

  9. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or reshape deformities ...

  10. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...

  11. Rare abdominal wall hernias in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If no prosthesis is used,. Rare abdominal wall hernias in South Sudan. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor Giuseppe Meo who died in January and who initiated, and devoted many years to, the surgical missions in South Sudan (see obituary page 46). Elena Codognottoa, alberto Kissa, Giuseppe Meoa, ...

  12. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  13. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Transgluteal Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for a Patient with Complex Urogenital Reconstruction and Ectopic Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Megan S; Zumberge, Nicholas A; Jayanthi, Venkata R

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with urolithiasis and complex reconstructed genitourinary anatomy pose a significant surgical challenge. We describe a technique utilized to treat an obstructing calculus in the ectopic kidney of a patient with a history of cloacal exstrophy, bladder augmentation, Monti catheterizable channel, and reconstructed abdominal wall. Case and Technique: A 5-year-old female with a history of cloacal exstrophy, pelvic kidney, and reconstructed urologic and abdominal wall anatomy presented after prior shockwave lithotripsy with an obstructing ureteropelvic junction calculus with signs of sepsis. Because of the patient's previous abdominal wall reconstruction with polytetrafluoroethylene mesh and the location of her pelvic kidney, traditional methods of percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement could not be performed. Transgluteal percutaneous nephrostomy tube was placed by interventional radiology. Subsequently, a percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) was performed through this tract. Transgluteal PCNL is a feasible option in children with complex congenital genitourinary anomalies with a history of reconstructed anatomy.

  15. A practical local tomography reconstruction algorithm based on known subregion

    CERN Document Server

    Paleo, Pierre; Mirone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new method to reconstruct data acquired in a local tomography setup. This method uses an initial reconstruction and refines it by correcting the low frequency artifacts known as the cupping effect. A basis of Gaussian functions is used to correct the initial reconstruction. The coefficients of this basis are iteratively optimized under the constraint of a known subregion. Using a coarse basis reduces the degrees of freedom of the problem while actually correcting the cupping effect. Simulations show that the known region constraint yields an unbiased reconstruction, in accordance to uniqueness theorems stated in local tomography.

  16. Thermographic image reconstruction using ultrasound reconstruction from virtual waves

    CERN Document Server

    Burgholzer, Peter; Gruber, Jürgen; Mayr, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of subsurface features from ultrasound signals measured on the surface is widely used in medicine and non-destructive testing. In this work, we introduce a concept how to use image reconstruction methods known from ultrasonic imaging for thermographic signals, i.e. on the measured temperature evolution on a sample surface. Before using these imaging methods a virtual signal is calculated by applying a transformation to the measured temperature evolution. The virtual signal is calculated locally for every detection point and has the same initial temperature distribution as the measured signal, but is a solution of the wave equation. The introduced transformation can be used for every shape of the detection surface and in every dimension. It describes all the irreversibility of the heat diffusion, which is responsible that the spatial resolution gets worse with increasing depth. Up to now, for thermographic imaging mostly one-dimensional methods, e.g., for depth-profiling were used, which are sui...

  17. Manufacture of reconstruction-bricks in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Valencia, Ma. Neftalí; Penagos, Armando Aguilar; Rojas, Denise Y. Fernández; López, Alberto López; Gálves, David Morillón

    2017-12-01

    In Mexico, around 33.600 tons of construction wastes are generated every day, Mexico City contributing for around tons/day, with fewer than 1.000 tons/day being sent to be recycled. For that reason the purpose of this study was to manufacture sustainable bricks, based on three types of wastes generated in the building industry: wood cutting residues, wastes from the excavation process (From Coapa and Cuautlancingo, Puebla, Mexico) and recycled aggregates. Water was added as kneading material, and Opuntia ficus-indica (mucilage) was supplemented as natural additive to improve the workability of the mixtures. Conventional firing process was substituted by drying in a solar drying chamber. Nine mixtures were prepared using 62% excavation wastes, 4% wood cutting residues and 11%, 17% and 34% recycled aggregates. These mixtures were classified in two groups depending on their granulometry: the first one denominated cementitious recycled aggregates only having granulometry from 25.4 mm, 9.52 mm to 6.35 mm to fines and the second group denominated all in one recycled aggregates having granulometry of 6.35 mm to fines. The quality of the sustainable bricks was evaluated according to compressive strength and water absorption parameters. The results of nine mixtures showed that the reconstruction-bricks manufactured with the mixture seven consisting of 9.52 mm and 6.35 mm construction residues (all in one) fines presented the highest strength values, lowest maximum initial absorption (4 g/min) compared to the norm NMX-C-037-ONNCCE-2013 which establishes that the maximum limit for walls exposed to the outside is 5 g/min. Using a solar desiccator made from construction residues, the bricks were dried in 11 days, the maximum temperature was 76 °C and the maximum solar radiation captured was 733.4 W/m2.

  18. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  19. The cell wall of the human pathogen Candida glabrata: differential incorporation of novel adhesin-like wall proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P.W.J.; Kraneveld, E.A.; Yin, Q.Y.; Dekker, H.L.; Groß, U.; Crielaard, W.; de Koster, C.G.; Bader, O.; Klis, F.M.; Weig, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cell wall of the human pathogen Candida glabrata governs initial host-pathogen interactions that underlie the establishment of fungal infections. With the aim of identifying species-specific features that may directly relate to its virulence, we have investigated the cell wall of C. glabrata

  20. Laparoscopic Harvest of the Rectus Abdominis for Perineal Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nneamaka Agochukwu, MD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. The rectus abdominis is a workhorse flap for perineal reconstruction, in particular after abdominoperineal resection (APR. Laparoscopic and robotic techniques for abdominoperineal surgery are becoming more common. The open harvest of the rectus abdominis negates the advantages of these minimally invasive approaches. (Sentence relating to advantages of laparoscopic rectus deleted here. We present our early experience with laparoscopic harvest of the rectus muscle for perineal reconstruction. Three laparoscopic unilateral rectus abdominis muscle harvests were performed for perineal reconstruction following minimally invasive colorectal and urological procedures. The 2 patients who underwent APR also had planned external perineal skin reconstruction with local flaps. (Sentence deleted here to shorten abstract. All rectus muscle harvests were performed laparoscopically. Two were for perineal reconstruction following laparoscopic APR, and 1 was for anterior vaginal wall reconstruction. This was done with 4 ports positioned on the contralateral abdomen. The average laparoscopic harvest time was 60–90 minutes. The rectus muscle remained viable in all cases. One patient developed partial necrosis of a posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap after cancer recurrence. There were no pelvic abscesses, or abdominal wall hernias. Laparoscopic harvest of the rectus appears to be a cost-effective, reliable, and reproducible procedure for perineal with minimal donor-site morbidity. Larger clinical studies are needed to further establish the efficacy and advantages of the laparoscopic rectus for perineal reconstruction.

  1. Breast reconstruction by pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarski Jefta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the amputated breast in female patients after surgical management of breast carcinoma is possible with the use of autologous tissue, synthetic implants, or by combining autologous tissue and synthetic materials. Autologous tissue provides soft and sufficiently elastic tissue which is usable for breast reconstruction and eventually obtains original characteristics of the surrounding tissue on the chest wall. The use of the TRAM flap for breast reconstruction was introduced in 1982 by Hartrampf Scheflan, and Black. The amount of the TRAM flap tissue allows breast reconstruction in the shape most adequate to the remaining breast. The possibilities of using the TRAM flap as pedicled myocutaneous flap or as free TRAM flap make this flap a superior choice for breast reconstruction in comparison with other flaps.

  2. 3D Building Reconstruction Using Dense Photogrammetric Point Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Malihi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional models of urban areas play an important role in city planning, disaster management, city navigation and other applications. Reconstruction of 3D building models is still a challenging issue in 3D city modelling. Point clouds generated from multi view images of UAV is a novel source of spatial data, which is used in this research for building reconstruction. The process starts with the segmentation of point clouds of roofs and walls into planar groups. By generating related surfaces and using geometrical constraints plus considering symmetry, a 3d model of building is reconstructed. In a refinement step, dormers are extracted, and their models are reconstructed. The details of the 3d reconstructed model are in LoD3 level, with respect to modelling eaves, fractions of roof and dormers.

  3. Emergency assistance for farmers affected by the Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saed Essawi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Construction of the Wall in the occupied Palestinian territorieshas had a harsh impact on Palestinian farmers, separatingmany from their land. Catholic Relief Services Palestine1has initiated a project to try to mitigate the impact.

  4. Three-dimensional, three-component wall-PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthe, Andre; Christensen, Carolyn; Goubergrits, Leonid; Affeld, Klaus; Kertzscher, Ulrich [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Biofluid Mechanics Laboratory, Berlin (Germany); Kondermann, Daniel; Garbe, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Digital Image Processing Research Group, Heidelberg Collaboratory for Image Processing, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    This paper describes a new time-resolved three-dimensional, three-component (3D-3C) measurement technique called wall-PIV. It was developed to assess near wall flow fields and shear rates near non-planar surfaces. The method is based on light absorption according to Beer-Lambert's law. The fluid containing a molecular dye and seeded with buoyant particles is illuminated by a monochromatic, diffuse light. Due to the dye, the depth of view is limited to the near wall layer. The three-dimensional particle positions can be reconstructed by the intensities of the particle's projection on an image sensor. The flow estimation is performed by a new algorithm, based on learned particle trajectories. Possible sources of measurement errors related to the wall-PIV technique are analyzed. The accuracy analysis was based on single particle experiments and a three-dimensional artificial data set simulating a rotating sphere. (orig.)

  5. Adsorbate induced domain-wall ordering on silicon(111); Adsorbatinduzierte Domaenenwandordnung auf Silizium(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, C.

    2006-09-14

    The gold-induced (5 x 2)-reconstruction on the Si(111) surface has been investigated in detail. Investigations with scanning tunneling microscopy, electron diffraction and simple electron diffraction simulation as combining element are presented. The defect density in the (5 x 2)-reconstructed areas has been analysed in dependency on temperature and gold density on the surface. One important result is the categorization of this reconstruction as domain-wall reconstruction like the other gold induced reconstructions on this surface in the submonolayer-coverage regime. The correlation of the adatoms on the (5 x 2)-reconstructed areas is analysed and the silicon coverage in the areas is determined from the growth dynamics of the reconstruction. Based on this, a new model, which has been developed in cooperation with Steve Erwin from the Naval Research Center, Washington, is presented. (orig.)

  6. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  7. An alternative technique for immediate breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenaka, Ian K; Maffi, Terry R; Davis, Karole M; Klemens, Anne E; Bouton, Marcia E; Pennington, Robert E

    2011-06-01

    Immediate reconstruction has demonstrated superior cosmesis compared with delayed reconstruction, however, unexpected final pathology may necessitate post mastectomy radiation. We describe an alternative technique for immediate breast reconstruction. Twelve patients underwent 14 skin-sparing mastectomies from July 2006 to December 2009. The skin-sparing mastectomies and sentinel node biopsies were performed through a periareolar incision. At the completion of the operation the incision was closed in a transverse fashion. No simultaneous reconstruction was performed. No drains were placed. After 3 days seroma developed, which maintained the integrity of the skin envelope and appearance of a breast. Nine patients (75%) had a contraindication to breast conservation. All patients were clinically node negative and 67 per cent were clinical stage 0. The majority (75%) experienced an adverse change from clinical stage to final pathologic stage. Four patients (33%) required postmastectomy radiation. The mean time from oncologic procedure to initial reconstruction procedure was 14 days. Two patients (17%) developed postoperative infections. This technique allows immediate reconstruction and avoids the fear of adverse final pathology indicating radiation to the reconstructed breast. In addition, it provides flexibility in scheduling for the surgeons and allows the patient to maintain the appearance of the breast.

  8. Radar Imaging of Building Interiors using Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Wit, J.J.M. de; Tan, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    At TNO an innovative concept to obtain inside building awareness with stand-off, through-the-wall radar has been developed: SAPPHIRE. The system concept exploits particular phase behavior in the 3D radar data to extract dominant scatterers inside a building. These scatterers can be reconstructed

  9. Structure Assisted Compressed Sensing Reconstruction of Undersampled AFM Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxvig, Christian Schou; Arildsen, Thomas; Larsen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    of the full image of it, and then use advanced computational techniques to reconstruct the remaining part of the image whenever this is possible. Our initial experiments have shown that it is possible to leverage inherent structure in acquired AFM images to improve image reconstruction. Thus, we have studied...... structure in the discrete cosine transform coefficients of typical AFM images. Based on this study, we propose a generic support structure model that may be used to improve the quality of the reconstructed AFM images. Furthermore, we propose a modification to the established iterative thresholding...... reconstruction algorithms that enables the use of our proposed structure model in the reconstruction process. Through a large set of reconstructions, the general reconstruction capability improvement achievable using our structured model is shown both quantitatively and qualitatively. Specifically, our...

  10. History of reconstructive rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Isabella C; Mazzola, Riccardo F

    2014-06-01

    Amputation of the nose was practiced as a sign of humiliation to adulterers, thieves, and prisoners of war by certain ancient populations. To erase this disfigurement, numerous techniques were invented over the centuries. In India, where this injury was common, advancement cheek flaps were performed (around 600 BC). The forehead flap was introduced much later, probably around the 16th century. The Venetian adventurer Manuzzi, in writing a report about the Mughal Empire in the second half of the 17th century gave the description of the forehead rhinoplasty. Detailed information concerning the Indian forehead flap reached the Western world in 1794, thanks to a letter to the editor that appeared in the Gentleman's Magazine. From this episode, one can date the beginning of a widespread interest in rhinoplasty and in plastic surgery in general. In Europe, nasal reconstruction started in the 15th century in Sicily with the Brancas, initially with cheek flaps and then with arm flaps. At the beginning of the 16th century, rhinoplasty developed in Calabria (Southern Italy) with the Vianeos. In 1597, Gaspare Tagliacozzi, Professor of Surgery at Bologna, improved the arm flap technique and published a book entirely devoted to this art. He is considered the founder of plastic surgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Reoperative midface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Julio; García, Eloy

    2011-02-01

    Reoperative reconstruction of the midface is a challenging issue because of the complexity of this region and the severity of the aesthetic and functional sequela related to the absence or failure of a primary reconstruction. The different situations that can lead to the indication of a reoperative reconstructive procedure after previous oncologic ablative procedures in the midface are reviewed. Surgical techniques, anatomic problems, and limitations affecting the reoperative reconstruction in this region of the head and neck are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Among Patients Seeking Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Drew B; Duggal, Claire S; Gabriel, Allen; Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Carlson, Grant W; Losken, Albert

    2014-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a preoccupation with a slight or imagined defect in physical appearance. It has significant implications for patients who desire breast reconstruction, because patient satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome is a substantial contributor to the success of the procedure. The authors estimated the prevalence of BDD among women seeking breast reconstruction by surveying patients with the previously validated Dysmorphic Concerns Questionnaire (DCQ). One hundred eighty-eight women who presented for immediate or delayed breast reconstruction completed the DCQ anonymously, during initial consultation with a plastic surgeon. Two groups of respondents were identified: those who desired immediate reconstruction and those who planned to undergo delayed reconstruction. The prevalence of BDD among breast reconstruction patients was compared between the 2 groups, and the overall prevalence was compared with published rates for the general public. Body dysmorphic disorder was significantly more prevalent in breast reconstruction patients than in the general population (17% vs 2%; P < .001). It also was much more common among patients who planned to undergo delayed (vs immediate) reconstruction (34% vs 13%; P = .004). Relative to the general public, significantly more women who sought breast reconstruction were diagnosed as having BDD. Awareness of the potential for BDD will enable clinicians to better understand their patients' perspectives and discuss realistic expectations at the initial consultation. Future studies are warranted to examine the implications of BDD on patient satisfaction with reconstructive surgery. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  13. 3D cardiac wall thickening assessment for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Chan, B. T.; Lim, E.; Liew, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the most severe form of coronary artery disease leading to localized myocardial injury and therefore irregularities in the cardiac wall contractility. Studies have found very limited differences in global indices (such as ejection fraction, myocardial mass and volume) between healthy subjects and AMI patients, and therefore suggested regional assessment. Regional index, specifically cardiac wall thickness (WT) and thickening is closely related to cardiac function and could reveal regional abnormality due to AMI. In this study, we developed a 3D wall thickening assessment method to identify regional wall contractility dysfunction due to localized myocardial injury from infarction. Wall thickness and thickening were assessed from 3D personalized cardiac models reconstructed from cine MRI images by fitting inscribed sphere between endocardial and epicardial wall. The thickening analysis was performed in 5 patients and 3 healthy subjects and the results were compared against the gold standard 2D late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images for infarct localization. The notable finding of this study is the highly accurate estimation and visual representation of the infarct size and location in 3D. This study provides clinicians with an intuitive way to visually and qualitatively assess regional cardiac wall dysfunction due to infarction in AMI patients.

  14. Multi-Detector CT Findings of Palpable Chest Wall Masses in Children: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Young Tong [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    A wide variety of diseases manifest as palpable chest wall masses in children. These include normal variation, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, axillary lymphadenopathies, soft tissue tumors and bone tumors. Given that most of these diseases are associated with chest wall deformity, diagnosis is difficult by physical examination or ultrasonography alone. However, multi-detector CT with three dimensional reconstruction is useful in the characterization and differential diagnosis of palpable chest wall lesions. In this article, we review the spectrum of palpable chest wall diseases and illustrate their multi-detector CT presentation.

  15. THE POSSIBILITY OF APPLICATION OF ALLOPLASTICS OF ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL IN CANCER PATIENTS: CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sidorov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of large defects of the anterior abdominal wall in patients operated for cancer diseases is mainly performed in the presence of concomitant ventral hernia or by direct ingrowth of the tumor in the tissue of the anterior abdominal wall. Currently in the treatment of this category of patients, the method of choice is the use of alloplastics with reticular endoprosthesis, performed in a variety of ways. In this article, we present clinical cases that perform the alloplastics of extensive defects of the anterior abdominal wall in two cancer patients with extensive defects of the abdominal wall.

  16. [Breast reconstruction after mastectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Quoc, C; Delay, E

    2013-02-01

    The mutilating surgery for breast cancer causes deep somatic and psychological sequelae. Breast reconstruction can mitigate these effects and permit the patient to help rebuild their lives. The purpose of this paper is to focus on breast reconstruction techniques and on factors involved in breast reconstruction. The methods of breast reconstruction are presented: objectives, indications, different techniques, operative risks, and long-term monitoring. Many different techniques can now allow breast reconstruction in most patients. Clinical cases are also presented in order to understand the results we expect from a breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction provides many benefits for patients in terms of rehabilitation, wellness, and quality of life. In our mind, breast reconstruction should be considered more as an opportunity and a positive choice (the patient can decide to do it), than as an obligation (that the patient would suffer). The consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction is an important step to give all necessary informations. It is really important that the patient could speak again with him before undergoing reconstruction, if she has any doubt. The quality of information given by medical doctors is essential to the success of psychological intervention. This article was written in a simple, and understandable way to help gynecologists giving the best information to their patients. It is maybe also possible to let them a copy of this article, which would enable them to have a written support and would facilitate future consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  18. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  19. Anatomical Individualized ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ata Rahnemai-Azar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is composed of two bundles, which work together to provide both antero-posterior and rotatory stability of the knee. Understanding the anatomy and function of the ACL plays a key role in management of patients with ACL injury. Anatomic ACL reconstruction aims to restore the function of the native ACL. Femoral and tibial tunnels should be placed in their anatomical location accounting for both the native ACL insertion site and bony landmarks. One main component of anatomical individualized ACL reconstruction is customizing the treatment according to each patient’s individual characteristics, considering preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of the native ACL and knee bony anatomy. Anatomical individualized reconstruction surgery should also aim to restore the size of the native ACL insertion as well. Using this concept, while single bundle ACL reconstruction can restore the function of the ACL in some patients, double bundle reconstruction is indicated in others to achieve optimal outcome.

  20. A Novel Technique for Anterior Vaginal Wall Prolapse Repair: Anterior Vaginal Wall Darn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Köse

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to introduce a new technique, anterior vaginal wall darn (AVWD, which has not been used before to repair the anterior vaginal wall prolapse, a common problem among women. Materials and Methods. Forty-five women suffering from anterior vaginal wall prolapse were operated on with a new technique. The anterior vaginal wall was detached by sharp and blunt dissection via an incision beginning from the 1 cm proximal aspect of the external meatus extending to the vaginal apex, and the space between the tissues that attach the lateral walls of the vagina to the arcus tendineus fascia pelvis (ATFP was then darned. Preoperation and early postoperation evaluations of the patients were conducted and summarized. Results. Data were collected six months after operation. Cough stress test (CST, Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q evaluation, Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7, and Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6 scores indicated recovery. According to the early postoperation results, all patients were satisfied with the operation. No vaginal mucosal erosion or any other complications were detected. Conclusion. In this initial series, our short-term results suggested that patients with grade II-III anterior vaginal wall prolapsus might be treated successfully with the AVWD method.

  1. Partial domain wall partition functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foda, O; Wheeler, M

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on an (n × N) lattice, n ≤ N, that satisfy a variation on domain wall boundary conditions that we define and call partial domain wall boundary conditions...

  2. Quantitative analysis of emphysema and airway measurements according to iterative reconstruction algorithms: comparison of filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Ji Yung [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan-si, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min; Park, Sang Joon [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Hyun; Shim, Mi-Suk [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate filtered back projection (FBP) and two iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms and their effects on the quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airway measurements on computed tomography (CT) images. Low-dose chest CT obtained in 281 adult patients were reconstructed using three algorithms: FBP, adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) and model-based IR (MBIR). Measurements of each dataset were compared: total lung volume, emphysema index (EI), airway measurements of the lumen and wall area as well as average wall thickness. Accuracy of airway measurements of each algorithm was also evaluated using an airway phantom. EI using a threshold of -950 HU was significantly different among the three algorithms in decreasing order of FBP (2.30 %), ASIR (1.49 %) and MBIR (1.20 %) (P < 0.01). Wall thickness was also significantly different among the three algorithms with FBP (2.09 mm) demonstrating thicker walls than ASIR (2.00 mm) and MBIR (1.88 mm) (P < 0.01). Airway phantom analysis revealed that MBIR showed the most accurate value for airway measurements. The three algorithms presented different EIs and wall thicknesses, decreasing in the order of FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Thus, care should be taken in selecting the appropriate IR algorithm on quantitative analysis of the lung. (orig.)

  3. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  4. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  5. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  6. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  7. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  8. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin P Clark

    Full Text Available Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID. In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM. Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with

  9. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P; Badea, Cristian T

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  10. Information Communications Technology Support to Reconstruction and Development: Some Observations from Afghanistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kramer, Frank; Starr, Stuart; Wentz, Larry

    2007-01-01

    ...) and information technology (IT) reconstruction initiatives continue to suffer from a lack of adequate understanding of the affected nation information culture and telecoms and IT business cultures...

  11. Domain walls on the brane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; van der Schaar, JP; Papadopoulos, G

    1998-01-01

    We show that all branes admit worldvolume domain wall solutions. We find one class of solutions for which the tension of the brane changes discontinuously along the domain wall. These solutions are not supersymmetric. We argue that there is another class of domain wall solutions which is

  12. Build an Interactive Word Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Word walls visually display important vocabulary covered during class. Although teachers have often been encouraged to post word walls in their classrooms, little information is available to guide them. This article describes steps science teachers can follow to transform traditional word walls into interactive teaching tools. It also describes a…

  13. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  14. Indoor climbing walls in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the indoor climbing walls in climbing centers for the public in Prague. It creates an overview of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of indoor climbing walls in Prague. Thesis allowing ordinary users and the general public interested in climbing easier selection of the appropriate climbing wall according on their level, the safety requirements, background, but also the place of residence.

  15. Head and Neck Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Shannon; Melin, Alyson; Reilly, Debra

    2017-10-01

    Management of head and neck burns involves acute and intermediate phases. Acutely, the goals are establish a secure airway and treat life-threatening injuries. Then, optimize nutrition, assess extent of the burn, perform local wound care, and provide eye protection. Management depends on the degree of the head and neck burn. Postinjury splinting and rehabilitation are vital to healing. After the acute inflammation has resolved and the scars have matured, reconstruction begins with the goals of restoring both function and aesthetics. Reconstruction ranges from simple scar release, to skin grafting, and possibly free flap reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cell wall biology: perspectives from cell wall imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-03-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth, are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon, and, in addition, impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants, polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  17. WITHDRAWN: The extended abdominal wall flap for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, S T; Senghaas, A; Turley, R; Ravindra, K V; Zenn, M R; Levin, L S; Erdmann, D

    2011-11-01

    Patients with extensive loss of abdominal wall tissue have few options for restoring the abdominal cavity. Composite tissue allotransplantation has been used for limited abdominal wall reconstruction in the setting of visceral transplantation, yet replacement of the entire abdominal wall has not been described. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal abdominal skin surface available through an external iliac/femoral cuff-based pedicle. Five human cadaver abdominal walls were injected with methylene blue to analyze skin perfusion based on either the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA; n = 5) or a cuff of external iliac/femoral artery (n = 5) containing the deep circumflex iliac, deep inferior epigastric, superficial inferior epigastric, and the superficial circumflex iliac arteries. Abdominal wall flaps were taken full thickness from the costal margin to the mid-axial line and down to the pubic tubercle and proximal thigh. In all specimens, the deep inferior epigastric, deep circumflex iliac, superficial inferior epigastric, and the superficial circumflex iliac arteries were found to originate within a 4-cm cuff of the external iliac/femoral artery. Abdominal wall flaps injected through a unilateral external iliac/femoral segment had a significantly greater degree of total flap perfusion than those injected through the DIEA alone (76.5 +/- 4% versus 57.2 +/- 5%; Student t test, P DIEA vessel alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic Indoor Building Reconstruction from Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, L.; Wang, R.

    2017-09-01

    Indoor reconstruction from point clouds is a hot topic in photogrammetry, computer vision and computer graphics. Reconstructing indoor scene from point clouds is challenging due to complex room floorplan and line-of-sight occlusions. Most of existing methods deal with stationary terrestrial laser scanning point clouds or RGB-D point clouds. In this paper, we propose an automatic method for reconstructing indoor 3D building models from mobile laser scanning point clouds. The method includes 2D floorplan generation, 3D building modeling, door detection and room segmentation. The main idea behind our approach is to separate wall structure into two different types as the inner wall and the outer wall based on the observation of point distribution. Then we utilize a graph cut based optimization method to solve the labeling problem and generate the 2D floorplan based on the optimization result. Subsequently, we leverage an ?-shape based method to detect the doors on the 2D projected point clouds and utilize the floorplan to segment the individual room. The experiments show that this door detection method can achieve a recognition rate at 97% and the room segmentation method can attain the correct segmentation results. We also evaluate the reconstruction accuracy on the synthetic data, which indicates the accuracy of our method is comparable to the state-of-the art.

  19. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Based Numerical Simulation of Machining of Thin-Wall Components with Varying Wall Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shrikrishna Nandkishor; Bolar, Gururaj

    2017-06-01

    Control of part deflection and deformation during machining of low rigidity thin-wall components is an important aspect in the manufacture of desired quality products. This paper presents a comparative study on the effect of geometry constraints on the product quality during machining of thin-wall components made of an aerospace alloy aluminum 2024-T351. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element (FE) based simulations of machining of thin-wall parts were carried out by considering three variations in the wall constraint viz. free wall, wall constrained at one end, and wall with constraints at both the ends. Lagrangian formulation based transient FE model has been developed to simulate the interaction between the workpiece and helical milling cutter. Johnson-Cook material and damage model were adopted to account for material behavior during machining process; damage initiation and chip separation. A modified Coulomb friction model was employed to define the contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece. The numerical model was validated with experimental results and found to be in good agreement. Based on the simulation results it was noted that deflection and deformation were maximum in the thin-wall constrained at one end in comparison with those obtained in other cases. It was noted that three dimensional finite element simulations help in a better way to predict the product quality during precision manufacturing of thin-wall components.

  20. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  1. Forging Provincial Reconstruction Teams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Honore, Russel L; Boslego, David V

    2007-01-01

    The Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) training mission completed by First U.S. Army in April 2006 was a joint Service effort to meet a requirement from the combatant commander to support goals in Afghanistan...

  2. Reconstructions of eyelid defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Subramanian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Eyelids are the protective mechanism of the eyes. The upper and lower eyelids have been formed for their specific functions by Nature. The eyelid defects are encountered in congenital anomalies, trauma, and postexcision for neoplasm. The reconstructions should be based on both functional and cosmetic aspects. The knowledge of the basic anatomy of the lids is a must. There are different techniques for reconstructing the upper eyelid, lower eyelid, and medial and lateral canthal areas. Many a times, the defects involve more than one area. For the reconstruction of the lid, the lining should be similar to the conjunctiva, a cover by skin and the middle layer to give firmness and support. It is important to understand the availability of various tissues for reconstruction. One layer should have the vascularity to support the other layer which can be a graft. A proper plan and execution of it is very important.

  3. Tessellation reconstruction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weygaert, RV; Schaap, W; Banday, AJ; Zaroubi, S; Bartelmann, M

    2001-01-01

    The application of Voronoi and Delaunay tessellation based methods for reconstructing continuous fields from discretely sampled data sets is discussed. The succesfull operation as "multidimensional interpolation" method is corroborated through their ability to reproduce even intricate statistical

  4. Evolution of thick domain walls in de Sitter universe

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D; Rudenko, A S

    2016-01-01

    We consider thick domain walls in a de Sitter universe following paper by Basu and Vilenkin. However, we are interested not only in stationary solutions found therein, but also investigate the general case of domain wall evolution with time. When the wall thickness parameter, $\\delta_0$, is smaller than $H^{-1}/\\sqrt{2}$, where $H$ is the Hubble parameter in de Sitter space-time, then the stationary solutions exist, and initial field configurations tend with time to the stationary ones. However, there are no stationary solutions for $\\delta_0 \\geq H^{-1}/\\sqrt{2}$. We have calculated numerically the rate of the wall expansion in this case and have found that the width of the wall grows exponentially fast for $\\delta_0 \\gg H^{-1}$. An explanation for the critical value $\\delta_{0c} = H^{-1}/\\sqrt{2}$ is also proposed.

  5. Gravitational waves from domain walls in the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, T.; Lalak, Z.; Lewicki, M.; Olszewski, P.

    2017-07-01

    We study domain walls interpolating between the physical electroweak vacuum and the global minimum of the Standard Model scalar potential appearing at very high field strengths. Such domain walls could be created in the early Universe under the assumption of validity of the Standard Model up to very high energy scales. The creation of the network of domain walls which ends up in the electroweak vacuum percolating through the Universe is not as difficult to obtain as one may expect, although it requires certain tuning of initial conditions. Our numerical simulations confirm that such domain walls would swiftly decay. Moreover we have found that for the standard cosmology the energy density of gravitational waves emitted from domain walls is too small to be observed in present and planned detectors.

  6. 3D heart reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Roxo, Diogo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to achieve a 3D reconstruction of the four heart chambers using 2D echocardiographic images. A level set algorithm based on the phase symmetry approach and on a new logarithmic based stopping function was used to extract simultaneously the four heart cavities from these images in a fully automatic way. However to proceed to the 3D reconstruction using the segmented images, it was first necessary to satisfy clinical practise requirements. This means that the algo...

  7. Functional Reconstruction of Sarcoma Defects Utilising Innervated Free Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Grinsell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft-tissue reconstruction following preoperative radiotherapy and wide resection of soft tissue sarcoma remains a challenge. Pedicled and free tissue transfers are an essential part of limb sparing surgery. We report 22 cases of sarcoma treated with radiotherapy and wide excision followed by one-stage innervated free or pedicled musculocutaneous flap transfers. The resection involved the upper limb in 3 cases, the lower limb in 17, and the abdominal wall in 2. The flaps used for the reconstruction were mainly latissimus dorsi and gracilis. The range of motion was restored fully in 14 patients. The muscle strength of the compartment reconstructed was of grades 4 and 5 in all patients except one. The overall function was excellent in all the cases with functional scores of 71.2% in the upper limb and 84% in the lower limb. The only 2 major complications were flap necrosis, both revised with another flap, one of which was innervated with restoration of function. Innervated flaps are valuable alternatives for reconstruction after sarcoma resection in the extremity and in the abdominal wall. The excellent functional results are encouraging, and we believe that innervated muscle reconstruction should be encouraged in the treatment of sarcoma after radiotherapy and wide resection.

  8. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  9. Extremity reconstruction using nonreplantable tissue ("spare parts").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Robert C; Neumeister, Michael W; Ostric, Srdjan Andrei; Engineer, Nitin J

    2007-04-01

    After a severe digital or extremity injury, the replantation surgeon should always seek to make the best use out of what tissue is available for reconstruction. Exercising sound surgical judgment and being creative allow the surgeon to restore function to critical areas of the hand or extremity by the judicious use of available tissues that would otherwise be discarded. The use of "spare parts" should, therefore, always be considered to facilitate digital or extremity reconstruction when routine replantation is not possible or is likely to produce a poor functional result. The surgeon should always try to use available nonreplantable tissue to preserve length, obtain soft tissue coverage, or most importantly improve the function of remaining less injured digits. This article presents several case studies that illustrate the principals of spare parts reconstruction performed at the time of the initial debridement using nonreplantable tissue to provide coverage or improve function.

  10. Seismic behavior and design of wall-EDD-frame systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren eLavan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Walls and frames have different deflection lines and, depending on the seismic mass they support, may often poses different natural periods. In many cases, wall-frame structures present an advantageous behavior. In these structures the walls and the frames are rigidly connected. Nevertheless, if the walls and the frames were not rigidly connected, an opportunity for an efficient passive control strategy would arise: Connecting the two systems by energy dissipation devices (EDDs to result in wall-EDD-frame systems. This, depending on the parameters of the system, is expected to lead to an efficient energy dissipation mechanism.This paper studies the seismic behavior of wall-EDD-frame systems in the context of retrofitting existing frame structures. The controlling non-dimensional parameters of such systems are first identified. This is followed by a rigorous and extensive parametric study that reveals the pros and cons of the new system versus wall-frame systems. The effect of the controlling parameters on the behavior of the new system are analyzed and discussed. Finally, tools are given for initial design of such retrofitting schemes. These enable both choosing the most appropriate retrofitting alternative and selecting initial values for its parameters.

  11. Autologous reconstruction of the inguinal ligament using pedicled fascia lata flap: A new technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Alasdair R; Chummun, Shaheel; Rickard, Rory F; Kingsnorth, Andrew N

    2013-01-01

    A technique of reconstructing the inguinal ligament using a pedicled fascia lata flap is described. A 62-year-old man was referred with massive bilateral abdominal wall hernias, following numerous attempts at repair and subsequent recurrences. There was complete absence of the right inguinal ligament. The inguinal ligament was reconstructed using a strip of fascia lata, pedicled on the anterior superior iliac spine. This was transposed to cover the external iliac vessels, and sutured to the pubic tubercle. The musculoaponeurotic abdominal wall was reconstructed with two 20cm×20cm sheets of porcine acellular dermal matrix and an overlying sheet of polypropylene mesh, sutured to the remaining abdominal wall muscles laterally, and to both inguinal ligaments. The cutaneous abdominal wall was closed with an abdominoplasty technique. The reconstruction has remained intact nine months following surgery. Complete destruction of the inguinal ligament is rare but can occur following multiple operative procedures or trauma. To date, the only published reports of inguinal ligament reconstruction have been performed using synthetic mesh. The use of autologous tissue should reduce the risk of erosion into the neurovascular bundle, seroma formation, and enhance integration into surrounding tissues. This new technique for autologous reconstruction of the inguinal ligament provides a safe alternative to the use of synthetic mesh in the operative armamentarium of plastic and hernia surgeons. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac-gated parametric images from82Rb PET from dynamic frames and direct 4D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Mary; Carson, Richard E

    2018-02-01

    function of iteration. Convergence of direct reconstruction was slow with uniform initialization; lower bias was achieved in fewer iterations by initializing with the filtered indirect iteration 1 images. For most parameters and regions evaluated, the direct method achieved the same or lower absolute bias at matched iteration as the indirect method, with 23%-65% lower noise. Additionally, the direct method gave better contrast between the perfusion defect and surrounding normal tissue than the indirect method. Gated parametric images from the human dataset had comparable relative performance of indirect and direct, in terms of mean parameter values per iteration. Changes in myocardial wall thickness and blood pool size across gates were readily visible in the gated parametric images, with higher contrast between myocardium and left ventricle blood pool in parametric images than gated SUV images. Direct reconstruction can produce parametric images with less noise than the indirect method, opening the potential utility of gated parametric imaging for perfusion PET. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Splinting of penis following microvascular reconstruction- A simple inexpensive method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Abhishek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple method of splintage following microvascular reconstruction of penis. The splint is made by removing the bases of two thermocol glasses and joining them with paper adhesive tapes to form a hollow cylinder to protect and support the penis and keep it vertical. The splint is slid over the catheter and the reconstructed penis and fixed to the lower abdominal wall and the thighs with paper tapes for stability. A window at the base of the splint is made for the purpose of observation, while the tip is monitored from the open end at the top.

  14. Finite element method framework for RF-based through-the-wall mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Rafael Saraiva; Lovisolo, Lisandro; de Campos, Marcello Luiz R.

    2017-05-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) Through-the-Wall Mapping (TWM) employs techniques originally applied in X-Ray Computerized Tomographic Imaging to map obstacles behind walls. It aims to provide valuable information for rescuing efforts in damaged buildings, as well as for military operations in urban scenarios. This work defines a Finite Element Method (FEM) based framework to allow fast and accurate simulations of the reconstruction of floors blueprints, using Ultra High-Frequency (UHF) signals at three different frequencies (500 MHz, 1 GHz and 2 GHz). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of FEM in a TWM scenario. This framework allows quick evaluation of different algorithms without the need to assemble a full test setup, which might not be available due to budgetary and time constraints. Using this, the present work evaluates a collection of reconstruction methods (Filtered Backprojection Reconstruction, Direct Fourier Reconstruction, Algebraic Reconstruction and Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction) under a parallel-beam acquisition geometry for different spatial sampling rates, number of projections, antenna gains and operational frequencies. The use of multiple frequencies assesses the trade-off between higher resolution at shorter wavelengths and lower through-the-wall penetration. Considering all the drawbacks associated with such a complex problem, a robust and reliable computational setup based on a flexible method such as FEM can be very useful.

  15. Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Hsueh, Pei-ling; Chen, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Operative intervention is recommended for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation to restore AC stability, but the best operative technique is still controversial. Twelve fresh-frozen male cadaveric shoulders (average age, 62.8 ± 7.8 years) were equally divided into endobutton versus the modified Weaver-Dunn groups. Each potted scapula and clavicle was fixed in a custom made jig to allow translation and load to failure testing using a Zwick BZ2.5/TS1S material testing machine (Zwick/Roell Co, Germany). A systematic review of 21 studies evaluating reconstructive methods for coracoclavicular or AC joints using a cadaveric model was also performed. From our biomechanical study, after ligament reconstruction, the triple endobutton technique demonstrated superior, anterior, and posterior displacements similar to that of the intact state (P > 0.05). In the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction group, however, there was significantly greater anterior (P ligament reconstruction. In addition, there was no significant difference after reconstruction between failure load of the triple endobutton group and that of the intact state (686.88 vs 684.9 N, P > 0.05), whereas the failure load after the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction was decreased compared with the intact state (171.64 vs 640.86 N, P ligament is superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction in controlling both superior and anteroposterior displacements with a failure load that approximates the intact ligament. PMID:25526435

  16. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartley, Laura [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology; Wu, Y. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Zhu, L. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Brummer, E. C. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Saha, M. [Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  17. Treatment of posterior wall fractures of acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Liu, Jian-Guo; Gong, Yu-Bao; Yang, Chen; Li, Shu-Qiang; Feng, Wei

    2009-04-01

    To explore the treatment methods and outcome of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum. The data of 31 patients (25 males and 6 females, aged 19-59 years, mean: 40.5 years) with posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum hospitalized in our department from 2002 to 2006 were analyzed retrospectively in this study. The types of fractures, number of fragments, combined dislocations, and sciatic nerve function were documented before admission. All the fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation. Based on the fracture type and site, either screws alone or reconstructive plates were used. The patients were immobilized for an average of 12 weeks before partial weight bearing was permitted. After follow-up for 12-70 months (43.6 months on average), modified Merle d'Aubigne score was adopted to evaluate the outcomes of the operations. The percentages of the excellent, good, fair and poor results were 48.4%, 41.9%, 6.5%, and 3.3%, respectively, with a good to excellent rate of 90.2%. Idiopathic sciatic nerve injury occurred in only one case. The sciatic nerve should be routinely exposed and protected during the surgery. The type of fixation should be based on the fracture type and site. Prolonged immobilization may be helpful in improving the final outcomes.

  18. Mortality and life-threatening events after vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib surgery in children with hypoplastic chest wall deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Randal R; Mulcahey, Mary Jane; Ramirez, Norman; Flynn, John M; Smith, John T; St Hilaire, Tricia; Campbell, Robert M

    2008-12-01

    Severe complex hypoplastic chest wall and spine deformity with thoracic insufficiency syndrome may be associated with premature death secondary to multisystem involvement. The vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) reconstructs the chest wall to address the thoracic insufficiency seen in this patient population. The purpose of this study is to report the mortality and life-threatening adverse events in a cohort of subjects with severe hypoplastic chest wall deformity, specifically with Jeune syndrome and Jarcho-Levin syndrome, after treatment with the VEPTR device. A cohort of 43 patients with either Jeune syndrome or Jarcho-Levin syndrome was extracted from a multicenter Investigational Device Exemption study of 214 patients who had surgery with the VEPTR device. Of the 43 patients, 19 had Jeune syndrome and 24 had Jarcho-Levin syndrome. Fatal and life-threatening adverse events were analyzed, including an assessment of time postsurgery, etiology, and the relationship of the adverse event to the surgical procedure. Four (9%) of the 43 patients died during the follow-up period. All 4 (100%) of these patients had Jeune syndrome. After the initial surgery, 2 died within 6 months, and the remaining 2 within 1 year. Causes of death included respiratory complications in 2, renal failure in 1, and liver failure in 1. An additional 4 (9%) of the 43 patients had life-threatening adverse events. Two (50%) patients were diagnosed with Jeune syndrome and the remaining 2 (50%) with Jarcho-Levin syndrome. Two of the 4 life-threatening events were related to the surgery perioperatively: necrotizing enterocolitis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The other two events included cardiac arrest secondary to central line placement and Demerol overdose. Surgeons should be aware of the potential for fatality and life-threatening events that occur in patients with hypoplastic chest wall and spine deformity undergoing surgical treatment. The majority of these events

  19. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Studies of complications following reconstructive surgery with implants among women with breast cancer are needed. As the, to our knowledge, first prospective long-term study we evaluated the occurrence of complications following delayed breast reconstruction separately for one- and two-stage pro......Studies of complications following reconstructive surgery with implants among women with breast cancer are needed. As the, to our knowledge, first prospective long-term study we evaluated the occurrence of complications following delayed breast reconstruction separately for one- and two......-stage procedures. From the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast, which has prospectively registered data for women undergoing breast implantations since 1999, we identified 559 women without a history of radiation therapy undergoing 592 delayed breast reconstructions following breast cancer during...... the period 1999 to 2006; 239 one-stage procedures and 353 two-stage procedures. The postoperative course through November 2009 was evaluated by cumulative incidence adjusting for competing risks for the selected outcomes; hematoma, infection, seroma, implant rupture, severe capsular contracture (modified...

  20. Permutationally invariant state reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moroder, Tobias; Hyllus, Philipp; Tóth, Géza

    2012-01-01

    Feasible tomography schemes for large particle numbers must possess, besides an appropriate data acquisition protocol, an efficient way to reconstruct the density operator from the observed finite data set. Since state reconstruction typically requires the solution of a nonlinear large-scale opti...... optimization, which has clear advantages regarding speed, control and accuracy in comparison to commonly employed numerical routines. First prototype implementations easily allow reconstruction of a state of 20 qubits in a few minutes on a standard computer.......-scale optimization problem, this is a major challenge in the design of scalable tomography schemes. Here we present an efficient state reconstruction scheme for permutationally invariant quantum state tomography. It works for all common state-of-the-art reconstruction principles, including, in particular, maximum...... likelihood and least squares methods, which are the preferred choices in today's experiments. This high efficiency is achieved by greatly reducing the dimensionality of the problem employing a particular representation of permutationally invariant states known from spin coupling combined with convex...

  1. Near wall turbulence: An experimental view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislas, Michel

    2017-10-01

    The present paper draws upon the experience of the author to illustrate the potential of advanced optical metrology for understanding near-wall-turbulence physics. First the canonical flat plate boundary layer problem is addressed, initially very near to the wall and then in the outer region when the Reynolds number is high enough to generate an outer turbulence peak. The coherent structure organization is examined in detail with the help of stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV). Then the case of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to a mild adverse pressure gradient is considered. The results obtained show the great potential of a joint experimental-numerical approach. The conclusion is that the insight provided by today's optical metrology opens the way for significant improvements in turbulence modeling in upcoming years.

  2. Fluid-Structure Simulations of a Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm: Constant versus Patient-Specific Wall Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Voß

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational Fluid Dynamics is intensively used to deepen the understanding of aneurysm growth and rupture in order to support physicians during therapy planning. However, numerous studies considering only the hemodynamics within the vessel lumen found no satisfactory criteria for rupture risk assessment. To improve available simulation models, the rigid vessel wall assumption has been discarded in this work and patient-specific wall thickness is considered within the simulation. For this purpose, a ruptured intracranial aneurysm was prepared ex vivo, followed by the acquisition of local wall thickness using μCT. The segmented inner and outer vessel surfaces served as solid domain for the fluid-structure interaction (FSI simulation. To compare wall stress distributions within the aneurysm wall and at the rupture site, FSI computations are repeated in a virtual model using a constant wall thickness approach. Although the wall stresses obtained by the two approaches—when averaged over the complete aneurysm sac—are in very good agreement, strong differences occur in their distribution. Accounting for the real wall thickness distribution, the rupture site exhibits much higher stress values compared to the configuration with constant wall thickness. The study reveals the importance of geometry reconstruction and accurate description of wall thickness in FSI simulations.

  3. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: HoA1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  4. Great Wall of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface

  5. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    gauge record and makes the reconstruction much less prone to drifting away over time.Unfortunately, many of the Russian-sector tide gauge records end around 1990,leaving a fairly sparse record after this. This project examines the effect of introducing a subset of the altimetric dataset as “virtual tide......Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...

  6. Cell wall evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ulrik Fangel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls display a considerable degree of diversity in their compositions and molecular architectures. In some cases the functional significance of a particular cell wall type appears to be easy to discern: secondary cells walls are often heavy reinforced with lignin that provides the required durability; the thin cell walls of pollen tubes have particular compositions that enable their tip growth; lupin seed cell walls are characteristically thickened with galactan used as a storage polysaccharide. However, more frequently the evolutionary mechanisms and selection pressures that underpin cell wall diversity and evolution are unclear. The rapidly increasing availability of transcriptome and genome data sets, development of high-throughput methods for cell wall analyses, and expansion of molecular probe sets, are providing new insights into the diversity and occurrence of cell wall polysaccharides and associated biosynthetic genes. Such research is important for refining our understanding of some of the fundamental processes that enabled plants to colonise land and subsequently radiate so comprehensively. The study of cell wall structural diversity is also an important aspect of the industrial utilization of global polysaccharide bio-resources.

  7. Transitional Flow in an Arteriovenous Fistula: Effect of Wall Distensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Transitional flow and the subsequent pressure and shear stress fluctuations are thought to be causative in the fistula failure. Since 50% of fistulae require surgical intervention before year one, understanding the altered hemodynamic stresses is an important step toward improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of a patient-specific model of a functioning fistula reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans. Rigid wall simulations and fluid-structure interaction simulations using an in-house finite element solver for the wall deformations were performed and compared. In both the rigid and distensible wall cases, transitional flow is computed in fistula as evidenced by aperiodic high frequency velocity and pressure fluctuations. The spectrum of the fluctuations is much more narrow-banded in the distensible case, however, suggesting a partial stabilizing effect by the vessel elasticity. As a result, the distensible wall simulations predict shear stresses that are systematically 10-30% lower than the rigid cases. We propose a possible mechanism for stabilization involving the phase lag in the fluid work needed to deform the vessel wall. Support from an NIDDK R21 - DK08-1823.

  8. Radical resection of giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Vojkan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chondrosarcomas represent approximately 30% of primary malignant bone tumors, the most frequent of which is on anterior thoracic wall. Case report. We presented a case of 50-year-old man suffering from a slowgrowing, painless giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall. A wide resection was performed to excise the tumor including attached skin, right breast, ribs, sternum, soft tissues and parietal pleura. Mediastinum was not affected by the tumor. After resecting a 26 × 20 × 22 cm segment, the chest wall defect was reconstructed with a Marlex mesh and extensive latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap pedicled on the right thoracodorsal vessels. Histopatology diagnosis was chondrosarcoma G 2−3. The mechanics of ventilation was not altered and respiratory function was normal from the immediate postoperative period. Three years after the operation postoperative results showed no local recurrence and excellent functional and aesthetic results were evident. Respiratory function remained unaltered. Conclusion. According to the results it can be concluded that the use of Marlex mash and myocutaneous flap is good method for stabilization of the chest wall and enough to avoid paradoxical respiratory movements in managing giant chondrosarcoma of the anterior chest wall.

  9. Breast reconstruction with the denervated latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychta, Pawel; Butterworth, Mark; Dixon, Mike; Kulkarni, Dhananjay; Stewart, Ken; Raine, Cameron

    2013-10-01

    To analyze clinical implications of the thoracodorsal nerve division in the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap breast reconstruction. Prospective cohort study was conducted on 29 patients. Breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap was performed unilaterally in 20 patients or bilaterally in 9 women (38 breasts). Thoracodorsal nerve was divided during reconstruction of 20 breasts (group 1) and was preserved for 18 breasts (group 2). Height, width, projection, area of the covering skin and volume of the reconstructed and healthy breasts were measured on the 3D images of the anterior chest wall, taken 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively with the Di3D 3D camera. Data regarding tissue consistency, painfulness and animation of the reconstructed breast, symmetry of both breasts and overall satisfaction after the surgery were collected at 6 months. The reconstructed and healthy breasts decreased in volume in group 1 (-45.85 cm(3) ± 48.41 cm(3), p = 0.0004; -29.13 cm(3) ± 14.98 cm(3), p = 0.0009) and in group 2 (-31.5 cm(3) ± 25.35 cm(3), p = 0.0001; -15.4 cm(3) ± 21.96 cm(3), p = 0.0537). There were no differences in decrease in volume between groups 1 and 2 (p > 0.05). Respondents in group 1 in comparison to group 2 showed similar satisfaction of the tissue consistency of the reconstructed breast (p > 0.05) and the level of symmetry between both breasts (p > 0.05), gave lower scores for painfulness (p breast (p = 0.0001). We suggest that division of the thoracodorsal nerve during latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap breast reconstruction is a useful undertaking to minimize unnatural animation of the reconstructed breast. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vertex Reconstruction in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Chabanat, E; D'Hondt, J; Vanlaer, P; Prokofiev, K; Speer, T; Frühwirth, R; Waltenberger, W

    2005-01-01

    Because of the high track multiplicity in the final states expected in proton collisions at the LHC experiments, novel vertex reconstruction algorithms are required. The vertex reconstruction problem can be decomposed into a pattern recognition problem ("vertex finding") and an estimation problem ("vertex fitting"). Starting from least-square methods, ways to render the classical algorithms more robust are discussed and the statistical properties of the novel methods are shown. A whole set of different approaches for the vertex finding problem is presented and compared in relevant physics channels.

  11. [Diagnostics and surgical correction of postoperative myofascial defects of lateral abdominal wall and lumbar region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekhov, E I; Iurasov, A V; Gribunov, Iu P; Repin, I G; Alekseev, A K; Cherniaeva, N A; Zhitnikov, G V

    2009-01-01

    Myofascial defects of lateral abdominal wall and lumbar region occur chiefly after lumbotomy--the most popular access in urosurgery. Meanwhile lumbotomy remains one of the most traumatic accesses through the lateral abdominal wall. Myofascial defects were diagnosed in 48,9% of operated patients with lumbotomy. Of them true postoperative hernias were found in 35,3%; neuropathic hernias - in 13,6%. Since 2002 the originally developed method of lateral abdominal wall reconstruction had been used for the treatment of such patients. The immediate and long-term results (maximal follow-up period 5 years) showed no hernia recurrence or complications in 26 operated patients.

  12. Template Assembly for Detailed Urban Reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Nan, Liangliang

    2015-05-04

    We propose a new framework to reconstruct building details by automatically assembling 3D templates on coarse textured building models. In a preprocessing step, we generate an initial coarse model to approximate a point cloud computed using Structure from Motion and Multi View Stereo, and we model a set of 3D templates of facade details. Next, we optimize the initial coarse model to enforce consistency between geometry and appearance (texture images). Then, building details are reconstructed by assembling templates on the textured faces of the coarse model. The 3D templates are automatically chosen and located by our optimization-based template assembly algorithm that balances image matching and structural regularity. In the results, we demonstrate how our framework can enrich the details of coarse models using various data sets.

  13. Reconstruction of Anacostia wetlands: success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, R.S.; Perry, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    . Revegetation, which is a product of direct plantings (16 species comprised of 350,000 plants) and by establishment of volunteer plants, must be considered successful. Remarkably, full vegetation cover was achieved by the end of the first year (1993). Species diversity is high with 100-130 wetland species occupying portions of the wetland. Good species differentiation (incipient plant communities) can be noted at areas of sediment elevation differences. There is a good range of predominant species (five to eight) with rice cutgrass (Leersia oryzoides) initially being dominant but in later years becoming codominant. Even the native wild rice (Zizania aquatica) is making a substantive comeback. Invasive plants such as purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and phragmites (Phragmites australis) are being watched and dealt with as appropriate. There has been important habitat creation, and a resulting increase in fauna can be expected, particularly as the acreage reconstructed at Kenilworth has more than doubled with similarly reconstructed wetlands at Kingman Lake (42 acres), which were completed during the summer of 2000, just a quarter of a mile down river. One of the challenges with the Kingman marsh reconstruction has been protecting against the grazing pressure of native Canada geese (Branm canadensis). In the long run, these revived Anacostia wetlands are bound to improve local conditions and will contribute to a rejuvenated Chesapeake Bay system.

  14. Chondrosarcoma of the chest wall: single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Refaie, Reda E; Amer, Sameh; Ismail, Mohammed F; Al-Shabrawy, Mohammed; Al-Gamal, Galal; Mokbel, Ehab

    2014-09-01

    chondrosarcoma is the most common primary tumor of the chest wall. We analyzed cases of chest wall chondrosarcoma to establish the presentation, diagnostic tools, surgical treatment, and outcome. this was a retrospective observational analysis of 45 patients who underwent surgery for chondrosarcoma. the mean age was 42.3 ± 8.5 years, and 57.8% patients were male. Symptoms were a painful chest wall mass in 91.1% of patients. Chest radiography and computed tomography, and biopsy were the diagnostic tools. The tumor was right-sided in 57.8% of patients. It was located in the lateral (71.1%), anterior (26.7%), or posterior (2.2%) chest wall. The mean tumor diameter was 7.6 ± 3.3 cm. Radical en-bloc excision was performed in all patients. Chest wall reconstruction was carried out using methylmethacrylate and Prolene mesh (42.2%), Prolene mesh alone (37.8%), and direct closure (20%). A muscle flap was used for soft tissue reconstruction in 11.1%. Complications were encountered in 6.7%. There was no operative mortality. Follow-up was complete in 66.7% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 3.7 ± 2.1 years. Local recurrences and late mortality occurred in 4.4%. surgery for chondrosarcoma can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Proper selection of patients and radical en-block excision of the tumor are the keys for successful treatment and better outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Reconstruction of Peripelvic Oncologic Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichman, Katie E; Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J

    2017-10-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the anatomy of the peripelvic area. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of performing peripelvic reconstruction in patients undergoing oncologic resection. 3. Select the appropriate local, pedicled, or free-flap reconstruction based on the location of the defect and donor-site characteristics. Peripelvic reconstruction most commonly occurs in the setting of oncologic ablative surgery. The peripelvic area contains several distinct reconstructive regions, including vagina, vulva, penis, and scrotum. Each area provides unique reconstructive considerations. In addition, prior or future radiation therapy or chemotherapy along with cancer cachexia can increase the complexity of reconstruction.

  16. [Obstetric damage to the perineum and the anal sphincters. Reconstruction surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kościński, Tomasz

    2014-08-01

    Damage to the perineum, vulva, anal sphincters, rectal wall and the fascial structures of the pelvic floor may be caused by obstetric trauma. Emergency surgical treatment aims at control of the bleeding, anatomical reconstruction of the disrupted tissues and minimization of the risk of infection. Suturing of the rectal wall and mucosa of the anal canal is followed by reconstruction of the perineal body internal and external anal sphincters, vulva and the perineum. Delayed surgery is undertaken after the complete healing of the obstetric tear. All cicatricial fibers must be saved to reinforce sphincters and perineal body muscles suturing. Anal levators and perineal transvers muscles suturing is used for the rectovaginal septum and pelvic floor reconstruction. Anal sphincters are reconstructed by the 'overlapping' technique. X en Z suturing is used for a perineal skin plasty.

  17. Indoor Modelling from Slam-Based Laser Scanner: Door Detection to Envelope Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Verbree, E.; Zlatanova, S.; Diakité, A.

    2017-09-01

    Updated and detailed indoor models are being increasingly demanded for various applications such as emergency management or navigational assistance. The consolidation of new portable and mobile acquisition systems has led to a higher availability of 3D point cloud data from indoors. In this work, we explore the combined use of point clouds and trajectories from SLAM-based laser scanner to automate the reconstruction of building indoors. The methodology starts by door detection, since doors represent transitions from one indoor space to other, which constitutes an initial approach about the global configuration of the point cloud into building rooms. For this purpose, the trajectory is used to create a vertical point cloud profile in which doors are detected as local minimum of vertical distances. As point cloud and trajectory are related by time stamp, this feature is used to subdivide the point cloud into subspaces according to the location of the doors. The correspondence between subspaces and building rooms is not unambiguous. One subspace always corresponds to one room, but one room is not necessarily depicted by just one subspace, for example, in case of a room containing several doors and in which the acquisition is performed in a discontinue way. The labelling problem is formulated as combinatorial approach solved as a minimum energy optimization. Once the point cloud is subdivided into building rooms, envelop (conformed by walls, ceilings and floors) is reconstructed for each space. The connectivity between spaces is included by adding the previously detected doors to the reconstructed model. The methodology is tested in a real case study.

  18. INDOOR MODELLING FROM SLAM-BASED LASER SCANNER: DOOR DETECTION TO ENVELOPE RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Díaz-Vilariño

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Updated and detailed indoor models are being increasingly demanded for various applications such as emergency management or navigational assistance. The consolidation of new portable and mobile acquisition systems has led to a higher availability of 3D point cloud data from indoors. In this work, we explore the combined use of point clouds and trajectories from SLAM-based laser scanner to automate the reconstruction of building indoors. The methodology starts by door detection, since doors represent transitions from one indoor space to other, which constitutes an initial approach about the global configuration of the point cloud into building rooms. For this purpose, the trajectory is used to create a vertical point cloud profile in which doors are detected as local minimum of vertical distances. As point cloud and trajectory are related by time stamp, this feature is used to subdivide the point cloud into subspaces according to the location of the doors. The correspondence between subspaces and building rooms is not unambiguous. One subspace always corresponds to one room, but one room is not necessarily depicted by just one subspace, for example, in case of a room containing several doors and in which the acquisition is performed in a discontinue way. The labelling problem is formulated as combinatorial approach solved as a minimum energy optimization. Once the point cloud is subdivided into building rooms, envelop (conformed by walls, ceilings and floors is reconstructed for each space. The connectivity between spaces is included by adding the previously detected doors to the reconstructed model. The methodology is tested in a real case study.

  19. Occupy Wall Street

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez,Francisca

    2011-01-01

    В статье рассматривается организованная антипотребительскими сообществами и направленная против негативных форм глобализации акция «Occupy Wall Street». Движение возникло осенью 2011 г. в США и стремительно распространилось по всему миру. Акции в поддержку движения были проведены еще в 82 странах. Автор, исследуя причины возникновения движения и источники его финансирования, приходит к выводу, что проект «Occupy Wall Street» может быть очередной уловкой глобалистов, цель которой «обезвредить»...

  20. Craniofacial reconstruction - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Craniofacial reconstruction - series—Normal anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/ ...

  1. Reconstructing Community History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Amy

    2004-01-01

    History is alive and well in Lebanon, Missouri. Students in this small town in the southwest region of the state went above and beyond the community's expectations on this special project. This article describes this historical journey which began when students in a summer mural class reconstructed a mural that was originally created by a…

  2. 'grass roots' reconstructive action

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses a two year action research investigation of conceptual, evaluation and adoption tensions that led to a revised approach to environmental ... a sustained dialogue around the prevailing science curriculum, local environmental issues and everyday classroom activities fostered reconstructive change at a ...

  3. Urogenital Reconstructive Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte Kaasgaard

    Urogenital reconstructive surgery Lotte Kaasgaard Jakobsen1 Professor Henning Olsen1 Overlæge Gitte Hvistendahl1 Professor Karl-Erik Andersson2 1 – Dept. of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital 2 – Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University hospital Background: Congenital obstruction...

  4. Reconstructing Progressive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The work of Colonel Francis W. Parker, the man whom Dewey called "the father of progressive education," provides a starting point for reconstructing the loose ambiguities of progressive education into a coherent social and educational philosophy. Although progressives have claimed their approach is more humane and sensitive to children, we need…

  5. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  6. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  7. Bacterial cell-wall recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC β-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both β-lactamase and β-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of β-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors. PMID:23163477

  8. Congenital breast deformity reconstruction using perforator flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Abhinav K; Allen, Robert J; LoTempio, Maria M; Mountcastle, Timothy S; Levine, Joshua L; Allen, Robert J; Chiu, Ernest S

    2007-04-01

    Congenital breast deformities such as Poland syndrome, unilateral congenital hypoplasia, tuberous breast anomaly, and amastia pose a challenging plastic surgical dilemma. The majority of patients are young, healthy individuals who seek esthetic restoration of their breast deformities. Currently, both implant and autologous reconstructive techniques are used. This study focuses on our experience with congenital breast deformity patients who underwent reconstruction using a perforator flap. From 1994 to 2005, a retrospective chart review was performed on women who underwent breast reconstruction using perforator flaps to correct congenital breast deformities and asymmetry. Patient age, breast deformity type, perforator flap type, flap volume, recipient vessels, postoperative complications, revisions, and esthetic results were determined. Over an 11-year period, 12 perforator flaps were performed. All cases were for unilateral breast deformities. The patients ranged from 16 to 43 years of age. Six patients had undergone previous correctional surgeries. Eight (n = 8) flaps were used for correction of Poland syndrome and its associated chest wall deformities. Four (n = 4) flaps were used for correction of unilateral breast hypoplasia. In all cases, the internal mammary vessels were the recipient vessels of choice. No flaps were lost. No vein grafts were used. All patients were discharged on the fourth postoperative day. Complications encountered included seroma, hematoma, and nipple malposition. Revisional surgery was performed in 30% of the cases. Esthetic results varied from poor to excellent. Perforator flaps are an acceptable choice for patients with congenital breast deformities seeking autologous breast reconstruction. Deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEP) or superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flaps are performed when adequate abdominal tissue is available; however, many young patients have inadequate abdominal tissue, thus a GAP flap can be used

  9. Patch esophagoplasty: esophageal reconstruction using biologic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieponice, Alejandro; Ciotola, Franco F; Nachman, Fabio; Jobe, Blair A; Hoppo, Toshitaka; Londono, Ricardo; Badylak, Stephen; Badaloni, Adolfo E

    2014-01-01

    Standard techniques for surgical reconstruction of the esophagus remain suboptimal. Primary closure of diseased or injured esophagus has been associated with high morbidity, primarily due to leak and stricture, and synthetic materials are contraindicated due to the high risk of erosion and infection. Degradable bioscaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have recently shown promising results in both pre-clinical and clinical settings to prevent stricture after extended endoscopic mucosal resection. We propose a novel surgical technique that utilizes an ECM scaffold as a reconstructive patch to augment the esophageal diameter during primary repair. Four patients requiring esophageal reconstruction underwent a patch esophagoplasty using an ECM scaffold composed of porcine urinary bladder ECM. The full thickness wall of the esophagus was replaced with an ECM patch that was sutured to the edges of the remaining esophagus, similar to the patch angioplasty performed in vascular procedures. All patients had a favorable clinical outcome with immediate recovery from the procedure and reinstated oral intake after 7 days. One patient had a micro leak at day 5 that closed spontaneously 2 days after drainage. Follow-up studies including barium swallow and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed adequate esophageal emptying through the surgical segment in all patients. The EGD showed complete mucosal remodeling at 2 months, with approximately 20% area contraction at the patch level. The area of the defect was indistinguishable from surrounding healthy tissue. Biopsy of the patch area showed normal squamous epithelium. One of the patients had a separate intrathoracic stricture that required further surgery. Clinical outcomes were otherwise favorable in all cases. An alternative for the treatment of esophageal stenosis is presented which uses a biological scaffold and an innovative surgical procedure. Additional work, including prospective studies and long-term follow

  10. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  11. Reconstruction of boundary conditions from internal conditions using viability theory

    KAUST Repository

    Hofleitner, Aude

    2012-06-01

    This article presents a method for reconstructing downstream boundary conditions to a HamiltonJacobi partial differential equation for which initial and upstream boundary conditions are prescribed as piecewise affine functions and an internal condition is prescribed as an affine function. Based on viability theory, we reconstruct the downstream boundary condition such that the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with the prescribed initial and upstream conditions and reconstructed downstream boundary condition satisfies the internal value condition. This work has important applications for estimation in flow networks with unknown capacity reductions. It is applied to urban traffic, to reconstruct signal timings and temporary capacity reductions at intersections, using Lagrangian sensing such as GPS devices onboard vehicles.

  12. [Hydroxyapatite for experimental laryngotracheal reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Y; Yu, M; Han, D

    2001-08-01

    The porous hydroxyapatite (HA) tubiform prosthesis was employed for reconstruction of large circumferential defect of the larynx and cervical trachea. The biocompatibility, bioactivity and biofunctionality of the HA prosthesis were evaluated, and the feasibility for laryngotracheal reconstruction was discussed. Twelve healthy canines were used to establish the experimental models, a large portion of cricoid cartilage and upper ten-ring segment of cervical trachea were resected and substituted with a corresponding 5 cm HA prosthesis by end-to-end anastomosis. Six months later, the eight survival canines were sacrificed and the HA prostheses with surrounding tissues were removed. They were observed in decalcified sections by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Two canines died in the immediate postoperative period with unknown reason and another two deaths were attributed to obstruction caused by the complete dislocation of the HA prostheses owing to rupture of the sutures within three weeks after operation. Eight canines survived up to six months. The implanted HA prostheses were tolerated in all cases without any rejection and dislocation or shift. An excellent airway was obtained and no signs of dyspnea and suffocation were found though there were hypergranulation and scar formation occurred at the site of anastomosis. Morphologic examination revealed that collagen fibers, new vessels and plenty of cells penetrated deeply into the pores of HA, and occupying the outer two third of HA wall. HA prostheses were surrounded by connective tissues and anchored firmly to the neighboring tissues, including the ends of the cricoid and tracheal cartilage by ingrowths of cartilaginous tissue into the macropores of the HA. However, the luminal surface of HA prosthesis was not covered at all section levels by respiratory mucosa. The implantation of the porous HA tubiform prosthesis can maintain the normal respiratory function of the experimental canines, but the

  13. Breast reconstruction: Correlation between different procedures, reconstruction timing and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelkov Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Improved psychophysical condition after breast reconstruction in women has been well documented Objective. To determine the most optimal technique with minimal morbidity, the authors examined their results and complications based on reconstruction timing (immediate and delayed reconstruction and three reconstruction methods: TRAM flap, latissimus dorsi flap and reconstruction with tissue expanders and implants. Methods. Reconstruction was performed in 60 women of mean age 51.1 years. We analyzed risk factors: age, body mass index (BMI, smoking history and radiation therapy in correlation with timing and method of reconstruction. Complications of all three methods of reconstruction were under 1.5-2-year follow-up after the reconstruction. All data were statistically analyzed. Results. Only radiation had significant influence on the occurrence of complications both before and after the reconstruction, while age, smoking and BMI had no considerable influence of the development of complications. There were no statistically significant correlation between the incidence of complications, time and method of reconstruction. Conclusion. Any of the aforementioned breast reconstruction techniques can yield good results and a low rate of re-operations. To choose the best method, the patient needs to be as well informed as possible about the options including the risks and benefits of each method.

  14. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  15. Can clinical CT data improve forensic reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, P; Scheurer, E; Fritz, K; Pavlic, M; Hassler, E; Rienmüller, R; Yen, K

    2013-05-01

    In accidents resulting in severe injuries, a clinical forensic examination is generally abandoned in the initial phase due to high-priority clinical needs. However, in many cases, data from clinical computed tomography (CT) examinations are available. The goals of this prospective study were (a) to evaluate clinical CT data as a basis for forensic reconstruction of the sequence of events, (b) to assess if forensic radiological follow-up reading improves the forensic diagnostic benefit compared to the written clinical radiological reports, and (c) to evaluate if full data storage including additional reconstructed 0.6-mm slices enhances forensic analysis. Clinical CT data of 15 living individuals with imaging of at least the head, thorax, and abdomen following polytrauma were examined regarding the forensic evaluation of the sequence of events. Additionally, 0.6-mm slices and 3D images were reconstructed for forensic purposes and used for the evaluation. At the forensic radiological readings, additional traumatic findings were observed in ten of the 15 patients. The main weakness of the clinical reports was that they were not detailed enough, particularly regarding the localization of injuries and description of wound morphology. In seven cases, however, forensic conclusions were possible on the basis of the written clinical reports, whereas in five cases forensic reconstruction required specific follow-up reading. The additional 0.6-mm slices were easily available and with improved 3D image quality and forensic diagnostics. In conclusion, the use of clinical CT data can considerably support forensic expertise regarding reconstruction issues. Forensic follow-up reading as well as the use of additional thin slices for 3D analysis can further improve its benefit for forensic reconstruction purposes.

  16. "Components separation technique" for the repair of large abdominal wall hernias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilingh, TSD; Goor ,van Harry; Rosman, C; Bemelmans, MHA; de Jong, D; van Nieuwenhoven, EJ; Bleichrodt, RP

    BACKGROUND: The "components separation technique" is a method for abdominal wall reconstruction in patients with large midline hernias that cannot be closed primarily. The early and late results of this technique were evaluated in 43 patients. METHODS: Records of 43 patients, 11 women and 32 men,

  17. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments requirement become more important. Shear walls (Structural walls contribute significant lateral stiffness, strength, and overall ductility and energy dissipation capacity. In many structural walls a regular pattern of openings has to be provided due to various functional requirements such as to accommodate doors, windows and service ducts. Such type of openings reduces the stiffness of the shear wall to some extent depending on the shape and size of the opening. In the present parametric study, efforts are made to investigate and critically assess the effects of various size of openings in shear walls on the responses and behaviors of multi-storey buildings. The 30 storey Prototype buildings with different types of openings in shear wall with and without incorporating the volume of shear wall reduced in the boundary elements are analyzed using software E-TABS using Response spectrum method (1893(Part-1-2002 and Time history method.

  18. Dry wall Kras 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Zupančič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the modesty of hiska, they show a simple understanding of corbelling technique. One could say they are all examples of human landscape cultivation. Although there is no evident common line when comparing all types of hiska, the cunning eye may observe one shared feature: the positioning of the entrance. More or less all the documented shelters have south or south-western facing entrances. The burja is a cold northerly wind; from the south (Adriatic Sea the winds are warmer. When resting, the setting sun is taken as a sign of the ending of the working day and a reward for the whole day’s efforts. Entrances are the only openings to these structures, and they should serve as well as possible - to watch over the crops, to wait when hunting, to enjoy the calm of evening light, to breathe the sea wind.The syntax of the architectural language of layering stone and shaping the pattern of the landscape remain an inventive realisation of spatial ideas from the past until today. Not only ideas of shaping space - these ideas are basic interventions in the natural habitat which contribute to survival. Culture and an awareness of its values are the origins of local development and reasonable heritage preservation. The next step are tutorial days with workshops on how to build dry stone structures, walls and other stone architecture, as the DSWA organisation in the UK is doing.

  19. Cine-MRI swallowing evaluation after tongue reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, Dana M. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)], E-mail: dmhartl@aol.com; Kolb, Frederic; Bretagne, Evelyne [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Institute Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Bidault, Francois; Sigal, Robert [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2010-01-15

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of cine-MRI for non-invasive swallowing evaluation after surgery for lingual carcinoma with reconstruction using microvascular free flaps. Methods: Ten patients with stage IV carcinoma of the mobile tongue and/or tongue base treated by surgical resection and reconstruction with a free flap were evaluated after an average of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-11 years), using cine-MRI in 'single-shot fast spin echo' (SSFSE) mode. Fiberoptic laryngoscopy of swallowing was performed before MRI to detect aspiration. The tolerance and ability to complete the exam were noted. The mobilities of the oral and pharyngeal structures visualized were evaluated as normal, reduced or increased. Results: Cine-MRI was well tolerated in all cases; 'dry' swallow was performed for the 2 patients with clinical aspiration. Tongue base-pharyngeal wall contact was observed in 5 cases. An increased anterior tongue recoil, increased mandibular recoil, increased posterior oropharyngeal wall advancement and an increased laryngeal elevation were observed in 4 cases. One case of a passive 'slide' mechanism was observed. Conclusions: Cine-MRI is a safe, non-invasive technique for the evaluation of the mobility of oral and oropharyngeal structures after free-flap reconstruction of the tongue. For selected cases, it may be complementary to clinical examination for evaluation of dysphagia after surgery and free-flap reconstruction. Further technical advances will be necessary before cine-MRI can replace videofluoroscopy, however.

  20. Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

    2009-02-16

    Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

  1. Solar walls in tsbi3 user's guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  2. Shear modulus reconstruction by ultrasonically measured strain ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Chikayoshi; Matsuzawa, Hidenori

    2007-12-01

    In addition to a description of our three previously developed one-dimensional (1D) methods from the viewpoint of shear modulus reconstruction using the strain ratio, two new methods for stabilizing the 1D methods are described, together with their limitations. As confirmed using human in vivo breast tissues, method 1 for evaluating the strain ratio itself is useful when the measurement accuracy of the strain distribution is high. However, because tissues having high shear moduli, such as scirrhous carcinoma, often form singular points/regions, both methods 2 and 3 using the strain ratio (initial estimate) and a regularization method are effective for realizing a unique, stable, useful shear modulus reconstruction. Because method 3 carries out implicit integration only at singular points/regions, whereas method 2 carries out implicit integration throughout the region of interest (ROI), the smaller number of singular points enables more rapid shear modulus reconstruction by method 3 than by method 2. Like method 1, method 3 is also useful when the measurement accuracy of the strain distribution is high. However, when evaluating strain distribution in an ROI with a high spatial resolution to obtain a shear modulus reconstruction having a high spatial resolution, shear modulus reconstructions obtained by methods 1, 2, and 3 often become laterally unstable due to the instability and low accuracy of the strains in the reference regions (reference strains), i.e., regularization in methods 2 and 3 cannot reduce the instability in the initial estimate. To cope with this instability, (i) the reconstruction obtained by calculating the strain ratio should be low-pass filtered; for breast tissues, in particular, the reconstruction of the inverse shear modulus should be low-pass filtered, not the reconstruction of the shear modulus. (ii) Otherwise, when using homogeneous regions as a reference, such as a block of reference material, fatty tissue, or parenchyma, evaluation of

  3. A Qualitative Assessment of the Journey to Delayed Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ho Man; McMillan, Catherine; Lipa, Joan E; Snell, Laura

    2017-08-01

    Canada has low immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) rates compared to the United States and Europe. Breast cancer survivors live with mastectomy defects sometimes for years, and this represents an area for improvement in cancer care. This study qualitatively assessed (1) information provided about breast reconstruction at the time of cancer diagnosis among women seeking delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) and (2) referral practices for plastic surgery consultation for DBR. Fifty-two consecutive patients seen in consultation for DBR at a single Canadian tertiary care centre completed questionnaires regarding their experience in seeking breast reconstruction. Seven semi-structured interviews were conducted to further explore themes identified through questionnaires. Questionnaire responses and interview transcripts were analyzed for recurring themes using standard qualitative techniques. A significant portion of women (43%) was interested in reconstruction prior to mastectomy, yet IBR was infrequently discussed (14%) or discouraged by their oncologic surgeons (33%). Common patient reasons for not pursuing IBR were referring physician objection and not having adequate knowledge. Women expressed wanting to discuss reconstruction at the time of cancer diagnosis. Half of the patients had attended another consultation, but the initial plastic surgeon either did not offer procedures for which these women were candidates or had prohibitively long surgical wait times. Lack of information about reconstructive options at the time of cancer diagnosis and perceived access barriers to plastic surgeons may contribute to underutilization of IBR in Canada. Access to breast reconstruction can be improved by reducing inefficiencies in plastic surgery referrals.

  4. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  5. Initial Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    increased. In the initial study presented here, the time it takes to pass an intersection is studied in details. Two major signal-controlled four-way intersections in the center of the city Aalborg are studied in details to estimate the congestion levels in these intersections, based on the time it takes...

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Howell, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common procedures in sports medicine. Several areas of controversy exist in ACL tear management which have engaged surgeons and researchers in debates towards identifying an ideal approach for these patients. This instructional review discusses the principles of ACL reconstruction in an attempt to provide guidelines and initiate a critical thinking approach on the most common areas of controversy regarding ACL reconstruction. Using high-level evidence from the literature, as presented in randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, operative versus conservative treatment, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation are discussed. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of the most common types of autografts, such as patellar tendon and hamstrings as well as allografts are presented. Key considerations for the anatomical, histological, biomechanical and clinical data (‘IDEAL’) graft positioning are reviewed. Cite this article: Paschos NK, Howell SM. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment. EFORT Open Rev 2016;398-408. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160032. PMID:28461919

  7. Biomechanics and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vercillo Fabio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For years, bioengineers and orthopaedic surgeons have applied the principles of mechanics to gain valuable information about the complex function of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. The results of these investigations have provided scientific data for surgeons to improve methods of ACL reconstruction and postoperative rehabilitation. This review paper will present specific examples of how the field of biomechanics has impacted the evolution of ACL research. The anatomy and biomechanics of the ACL as well as the discovery of new tools in ACL-related biomechanical study are first introduced. Some important factors affecting the surgical outcome of ACL reconstruction, including graft selection, tunnel placement, initial graft tension, graft fixation, graft tunnel motion and healing, are then discussed. The scientific basis for the new surgical procedure, i.e., anatomic double bundle ACL reconstruction, designed to regain rotatory stability of the knee, is presented. To conclude, the future role of biomechanics in gaining valuable in-vivo data that can further advance the understanding of the ACL and ACL graft function in order to improve the patient outcome following ACL reconstruction is suggested.

  8. Reconstructing complex networks without time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chuang; Zhang, Hai-Feng; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2017-08-01

    In the real world there are situations where the network dynamics are transient (e.g., various spreading processes) and the final nodal states represent the available data. Can the network topology be reconstructed based on data that are not time series? Assuming that an ensemble of the final nodal states resulting from statistically independent initial triggers (signals) of the spreading dynamics is available, we develop a maximum likelihood estimation-based framework to accurately infer the interaction topology. For dynamical processes that result in a binary final state, the framework enables network reconstruction based solely on the final nodal states. Additional information, such as the first arrival time of each signal at each node, can improve the reconstruction accuracy. For processes with a uniform final state, the first arrival times can be exploited to reconstruct the network. We derive a mathematical theory for our framework and validate its performance and robustness using various combinations of spreading dynamics and real-world network topologies.

  9. An experimental investigation for external RC shear wall applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltakci, M. Y.; Ozturk, M.; Arslan, M. H.

    2010-09-01

    The strength and rigidity of most reinforced concrete (RC) buildings in Turkey, which are frequently hit by destructive earthquakes, is not at a sufficient level. Therefore, the result of earthquakes is a significant loss of life and property. The strengthening method most commonly preferred for these type of RC buildings is the application of RC infilled walls (shear walls) in the frame openings of the building. However, since the whole building has to be emptied and additional heavy costs arise during this type of strengthening, users prefer not to strengthen their buildings despite the heavy risk they are exposed to. Therefore, it is necessary to develop easier-to-apply and more effective methods for the rapid strengthening of housing and the heavily-used public buildings which cannot be emptied during the strengthening process (such as hospitals and schools). This study empirically analyses the different methods of a new system which can meet this need. In this new system, named "external shear wall application", RC shear walls are applied on the external surface of the building, along the frame plane rather than in the building. To this end, 7 test samples in 1/2 and 1/3 geometrical scale were designed to analyse the efficiency of the strengthening technique where the shear wall leans on the frame from outside of the building (external shear wall application) and of the strengthening technique where a specific space is left between the frame and the external shear wall by using a coupling beam to connect elements (application of external shear wall with coupling beam). Test results showed that the maximum lateral load capacity, initial rigidity and energy dissipation behaviours of the samples strengthened with external shear wall were much better than those of the bare frames.

  10. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  11. Domain walls riding the wave.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the

  12. The evolving breast reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to give an update on the use of the propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP/TDAP-flap) within the field of breast reconstruction. The TAP-flap can be dissected by a combined use of a monopolar cautery and a scalpel. Microsurgical instruments are generally...... not needed. The propeller TAP-flap can be designed in different ways, three of these have been published: (I) an oblique upwards design; (II) a horizontal design; (III) an oblique downward design. The latissimus dorsi-flap is a good and reliable option for breast reconstruction, but has been criticized...... for morbidity and complications. The TAP-flap does not seem to impair the function of the shoulder or arm and the morbidity appears to be scarce. However, an implant is often needed in combination with the TAP-flap, which results in implant related morbidity over time. The TAP-flap seems to be a promising tool...

  13. Iraq: Reconstruction Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-22

    Effectiveness..., October 18, 2007, p. x. 51 Shawn Dorman, “Iraq PRTs: Pins on a Map,” Foreign Service Journal, March 2007; Testimony of Ginger Cruz, Deputy... Blood Money, Little, Brown, and Company, 2006; SIGIR, Iraq Reconstruction: Lessons in Program and Project Management, March 2007; and Glenn Zorpette...local participation that would have made projects more effective. Among widely circulated reasons were a failure to anticipate post-invasion security

  14. Reconstructing relational information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horecka, Kevin M; Dulas, Michael R; Schwarb, Hillary; Lucas, Heather D; Duff, Melissa; Cohen, Neal J

    2018-02-01

    Hippocampal involvement in learning and remembering relational information has an extensive history, often focusing specifically on spatial information. In humans, spatial reconstruction (SR) paradigms are a powerful tool for evaluating an individuals' spatial-relational memory. In SR tasks, participants study locations of items in space and subsequently reconstruct the studied display after a short delay. Previous work has revealed that patients with hippocampal damage are impaired both in overall placement accuracy as well as on a specific measure of relational memory efficacy, "swaps" (i.e., when the relative location of two items is reversed). However, the necessity of the hippocampus for other types of spatial-relational information involved in reconstruction behaviors (e.g., where in the environment and relative to which other items an item was located) have not yet been investigated systematically. In this work, three patients with hippocampal damage and nine healthy matched comparison participants performed an SR task. An analysis framework was developed to independently assess three first-order types of relations: (1) memory for the binding of specific item identities to locations, (2) memory for arrangement of items in relation to each other or the environment bounds, regardless of memory for the item identity, and (3) higher-order, compound relational errors (i.e., errors involving multiple pieces of relational information). Reconstruction errors were evaluated to determine the degree to which patients and comparisons differed (or not) on each type of spatial-relational information. Data revealed that the primary group difference in performance was for identity-location information. However, when the locations of items were evaluated without regarding the identities, no group difference was found in the number of item placements to studied locations. The present work provides a principled approach to analysis of SR data and clarifies our understanding of

  15. ATLAS Muon Reconstruction Efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Spearman, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the LHC will be operated in a mode leading to up to 40 inelastic pp collisions per bunch crossing, so-called "pile-up". The reconstruction and identification of muons produced in a hard collisions is difficult in this challenging environment. Di-muon decays of J/ψ mesons and Z bosons have been used to study the muon reconstruction and identification efficiency of the ATLAS detector as a function of the muon transverse momentum from pT=4 GeV to pT=100 GeV and the number of inelastic collisions per event. The results show a steep efficiency turn-on curve reaching its plateau value of 100% at pT ~ 6 GeV and no dependence of the muon reconstruction efficiency on the amount pile-up. The studies also reveal that the use of inner detector tracks allows us to distinguish between isolated muons and non-isolated muons produced in jets with high separation power even at the highest pile-up levels.

  16. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  17. Plastic Response of Thin-Walled Tubes to Detonation

    OpenAIRE

    Karnesky, J.; Damazo, J.; Shepherd, J. E.; Rusinek, A.

    2010-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformation of tubes to internal detonations and the shock waves produced by their reflection were investigated. The study included experimental measurements as well as computational modeling. Tests with stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen mixtures were performed at various initial pressures and strain was measured on thin-walled mild-steel tubes. The range of initial pressures covered the span from entirely elastic to fully plastic deformation modes. A mod...

  18. Reconstruction of Sound Source Pressures in an Enclosure Using the Phased Beam Tracing Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Ih, Jeong-Guon

    2009-01-01

    Source identification in an enclosure is not an easy task due to complicated wave interference and wall reflections, in particular, at mid-high frequencies. In this study, a phased beam tracing method was applied to the reconstruction of source pressures inside an enclosure at medium frequencies......-directional sphere and a cubic source in a rectangular enclosure were taken as examples in the simulation tests. A reconstruction error was investigated by Monte Carlo simulation in terms of field point locations. When the source information was reconstructed by the present method, it was shown that the sound power...

  19. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-01-01

    The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  20. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Luo

    Full Text Available The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation.A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD. In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°.A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  1. Bayesian Cosmic Web Reconstruction: BARCODE for Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, E. G. Patrick; van de Weygaert, Rien; Kitaura, Francisco; Cautun, Marius

    2016-10-01

    We describe the Bayesian \\barcode\\ formalism that has been designed towards the reconstruction of the Cosmic Web in a given volume on the basis of the sampled galaxy cluster distribution. Based on the realization that the massive compact clusters are responsible for the major share of the large scale tidal force field shaping the anisotropic and in particular filamentary features in the Cosmic Web. Given the nonlinearity of the constraints imposed by the cluster configurations, we resort to a state-of-the-art constrained reconstruction technique to find a proper statistically sampled realization of the original initial density and velocity field in the same cosmic region. Ultimately, the subsequent gravitational evolution of these initial conditions towards the implied Cosmic Web configuration can be followed on the basis of a proper analytical model or an N-body computer simulation. The BARCODE formalism includes an implicit treatment for redshift space distortions. This enables a direct reconstruction on the basis of observational data, without the need for a correction of redshift space artifacts. In this contribution we provide a general overview of the the Cosmic Web connection with clusters and a description of the Bayesian BARCODE formalism. We conclude with a presentation of its successful workings with respect to test runs based on a simulated large scale matter distribution, in physical space as well as in redshift space.

  2. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  3. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring — perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data. PMID:27821901

  4. Super Wall Graphics for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne; Vlastos, George

    1985-01-01

    Steps for organizing and implementing a program that involves elementary students in beautifying their school with large-scale wall graphics are outlined. Sources of design, drawing hints, painting methods, application techniques, and follow-up activities are discussed. (RM)

  5. Restrained shrinkage of masonry walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Rots, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    State of the art computational rnechanics, in combination with experimental programmes have a lot to offer in providing insight, characterization of total behaviour and predictive ability of structural masonry. Here numerical research towards rationalizing masonry wall movement joint positioning and

  6. Reconstruction of the perineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David Sau-Yan

    2014-09-01

    The pelvic and perineal regions are affected by a heterogeneous spectrum of pathologies, many with a tendency to recur. Extensive mutilation carries physical, sexual, and psychological sequelae. Primary reconstruction reduces morbidity and shortens recovery. Modern management calls for a multidisciplinary approach. Not uncommonly, patients come with previous surgery and/or chemoirradiation. They may also be elderly and debilitated. The literature on reconstruction of the perineum can be confusing because knowledge has evolved by an accumulation of isolated short reports of individual methods. This led to the lack of a unifying basis for nomenclature and a failure to relate specific techniques to their roles in repairing particular types of defects. This article gives an overall summary of the approaches in a structured and rational manner. Defects of the external pelvis and perineal lining are usually amenable to coverage with local or regional fasciocutaneous flaps, if primary closure or skin graft is not appropriate. These flaps depend on the integrity of the vascular territories of the internal pudendal, the upper medial thigh plexus, or the descending branches of the inferior gluteal. The location and extent of the resection usually determine the requirements of the reconstruction and may dictate the choice of options. When defects are pelviperineal, particularly when the vagina needs to be reconstructed, myocutaneous flaps are of proven advantage in dealing with both the resurfacing as well as providing the bulk needed to fill the pelvic cavity after extensive resections. The rectus, gluteus, and gracilis are the best known options. Owing to the intrinsic limitations with the gracilis flap, the rectus and gluteus flaps have largely superseded its role in most situations. The rectus flap, in particular, provides good bulk as well as reliable skin. The use of muscle sparing flaps based on the perforator principle in suitable instances has increasingly been

  7. Successful pregnancy "during" pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap for breast reconstruction with normal vaginal delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Cheng Chai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM flap is a popular choice for breast reconstruction. Pregnancies in women following a TRAM flap present concerns regarding both safety and the integrity of the abdominal wall. We report a case of a patient who was pregnant during immediate breast reconstruction with pedicled TRAM flap and had a successful spontaneous vaginal delivery. We also conducted a literature review using PubMed on pregnancy post TRAM flap, type of reconstruction, timing of pregnancy after TRAM flap, complication, and mode of delivery, which are summarised in this report. We concluded that patients may have safe pregnancies and normal deliveries following TRAM flap breast reconstruction regardless of the time frame of pregnancy after the procedure. Therefore, TRAM flaps can continue to be a reconstruction option, even in women of childbearing age.

  8. Persistent conductive footprints of 109o domain walls in bismuth ferrite films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolichnov, I.; Iwanowska, M.; Colla, E.; Ziegler, B.; Gaponenko, I.; Paruch, P.; Huijben, Mark; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Setter, N.

    2014-01-01

    Using conductive and piezoforce microscopy, we reveal a complex picture of electronic transport at weakly conductive 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films. Even once initial ferroelectric stripe domains are changed/erased, persistent conductive paths signal the original domain wall position.

  9. Interactive digital education aid in breast reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Lior; Parker, Patricia A; Youssef, Adel; Miller, Michael J

    2008-09-01

    An interactive digital education aid for breast reconstruction patients was developed because of a perceived need to provide patients with more education regarding the treatment so that they can make better informed treatment decisions. A prospective randomized study was conducted to assess its effectiveness. Breast cancer patients who were candidates for breast reconstruction were recruited and randomized into a control group and a study group. Both groups received routine assessment and education in the plastic surgery clinic, but the study group also watched the interactive digital education aid. Questionnaires assessing knowledge, anxiety, and satisfaction were administered (1) before the initial plastic surgery consultation, (2) immediately before surgery, and (3) 1 month after surgery. A total of 133 women participated, 66 in the control group and 67 in the study group. Women in both groups showed decreased anxiety, increased knowledge, and enhanced satisfaction with their decision-making ability associated with preoperative instructions about reconstructive surgery. However, the study group was significantly more satisfied than the control group with the method of receiving information and showed a less steep learning curve regarding the different techniques of breast reconstruction. They also tended to have a reduced mean level of anxiety and increased satisfaction with the treatment choice compared with the control group. An interactive digital education aid is a beneficial educational adjunct for patients contemplating breast reconstruction. Patients who use an interactive digital education aid demonstrate greater factual knowledge, reduced anxiety, and increased postoperative satisfaction compared with patients given preoperative instructions using standard methods alone. The benefit of an interactive digital education aid is expected to be higher in a broad-based practice setting outside of a comprehensive cancer center.

  10. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng [Mississippi State University; Ronald, Palmela [UC-Davis; Wang, Guo-Liang [The Ohio State University

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  11. 78 FR 22268 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panels (SEP): Initial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and HIV/AIDS, FOA GH13-006, initial review... Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and HIV/AIDS, FOA GH13-006. Matters To Be... Assistance for Public Health Interventions in Haiti to Support Post-earthquake Reconstruction, Cholera and...

  12. LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

    2013-10-01

    The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

  13. Optimization of the volume reconstruction for classical Tomo-PIV algorithms (MART, BIMART and SMART): synthetic and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L.; Tremblais, B.; David, L.

    2014-03-01

    Optimization of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART), simultaneous MART and block iterative MART reconstruction techniques was carried out on synthetic and experimental data. Different criteria were defined to improve the preprocessing of the initial images. Knowledge of how each reconstruction parameter influences the quality of particle volume reconstruction and computing time is the key in Tomo-PIV. These criteria were applied to a real case, a jet in cross flow, and were validated.

  14. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cavallo, James [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-09-25

    Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

  15. Modification of antioxidant systems in cell walls of maize roots by different nitrogen sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadži-Tašković Šukalović V; Vuletić, M.; Marković, K.; Željko, Vučinić; Kravić, N.

    2016-07-01

    Antioxidant systems of maize root cell walls grown on different nitrogen sources were evaluated. Plants were grown on a medium containing only NO3- or the mixture of NO3-+NH4+, in a 2:1 ratio. Eleven-day old plants, two days after the initiation of lateral roots, were used for the experiments. Cell walls were isolated from lateral roots and primary root segments, 2-7 cm from tip to base, representing zones of intense or decreased growth rates, respectively. Protein content and the activity of enzymes peroxidase, malate dehydrogenase and ascorbate oxidase ionically or covalently bound to the walls, as well as cell wall phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, were determined. Cell walls of plants grown on mixed N possess more developed enzymatic antioxidant systems and lower non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses than cell walls grown on NO3-. Irrespective of N treatment, the activities of all studied enzymes and protein content were higher in cell walls of lateral compared to primary roots. Phenolic content of cell walls isolated from lateral roots was higher in NO3--grown than in mixed N grown plants. No significant differences could be observed in the isozyme patterns of cell wall peroxidases isolated from plants grown on different nutrient solution. Our results indicate that different N treatments modify the antioxidant systems of root cell walls. Treatment with NO3- resulted in an increase of constitutive phenolic content, while the combination of NO3-+NH4+ elevated the redox enzyme activities in root cell walls.

  16. Optimization of reduced-dose MDCT of thoracic aorta using iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töre, Hüseyin Gürkan; Entezari, Pegah; Chalian, Hamid; Gonzalez-Guindalini, Fernanda Dias; Botelho, Marcos Paulo Ferreira; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of iterative reconstruction on image quality of reduced-dose multidetector computed tomography of the thoracic aorta. A torso phantom was scanned using two tube potentials (80 and 120 kVp) and five different tube currents (110, 75, 40, 20, and 10 mAs). All images were reconstructed with both filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction. Aortic attenuation, image noise within the thoracic aorta, signal-to-noise ratio, and sharpness of the aortic wall were quantified in the phantom for the two reconstruction algorithms. Data were analyzed using paired t test. A value of P iterative reconstruction (P > 0.05). Image noise level was lower (P iterative reconstruction. Signal-to-noise ratios were higher with iterative reconstruction compared with those with FBP (P iterative reconstruction (9.8 ± 4.4) was similar to the signal-to-noise ratio at 120 kVp with FBP (8.4 ± 3.3) (P = 0.196). Less image noise and higher image sharpness may be achieved with iterative reconstruction in reduced-dose multidetector computed tomography of the thoracic aorta.

  17. City Walls as Historic Urban Landscape: a Case study on Participatory Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Bonadei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Historic Urban Landscape, which now guides the conservation and promotion of numerous heritage sites across the world, is based on the recognition of the complexity of the urban environment, seen as a dynamic system of cultural and natural features. This paper aims at presenting an ongoing reassessment of the meaning of a historic artefact in the city of Bergamo, Italy, which is part of a broader system of defence built by the Venetian Republic between the 15th and 17th centuries. Among the many related initiatives, one was launched by the University of Bergamo and involved nearly a hundred primary school children in a series of multidisciplinary workshops. Children worked to produce a guidebook and a short animated film aimed at reconstructing the meanings and the values embodied by the Venetian Walls, an enduring cultural icon surrounding the medieval upper town. This project is triggering both downscaling and upscaling dynamics in the regeneration process of this historic urban infrastructure. It also contributes to the creation and sharing of new meanings around this heritage, which are strongly related to its value for the citizenship as well as for the visitors.

  18. Cultural Heritage Through Time: a Case Study at Hadrian's Wall, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieber, K. D.; Mills, J. P.; Peppa, M. V.; Haynes, I.; Turner, S.; Turner, A.; Douglas, M.; Bryan, P. G.

    2017-02-01

    Diachronic studies are central to cultural heritage research for the investigation of change, from landscape to architectural scales. Temporal analyses and multi-temporal 3D reconstruction are fundamental for maintaining and safeguarding all forms of cultural heritage. Such studies form the basis for any kind of decision regarding intervention on cultural heritage, helping assess the risks and issues involved. This article introduces a European-wide project, entitled "Cultural Heritage Through Time", and the case study research carried out as a component of the project in the UK. The paper outlines the initial stages of the case study of landscape change at three locations on Hadrian's Wall, namely Beckfoot Roman Fort, Birdoswald Roman Fort and Corbridge Roman Station, all once part of the Roman Empire's north-west frontier. The main aim of the case study is to integrate heterogeneous information derived from a range of sources to help inform understanding of temporal aspects of landscape change. In particular, the study sites are at risk from natural hazards, notably erosion and flooding. The paper focuses on data collection and collation aspects, including an extensive archive search and field survey, as well as the methodology and preliminary data processing.

  19. On Stack Reconstruction Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Аkeliev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes analytical investigations that study relation of fuel combustion regimes with concentration values of sulphur anhydride in flue gases and acid dew point. Coefficients of convective heat transfer at internal and external surfaces of stacks have been determined in the paper. The paper reveals the possibility to reconstruct stacks while using gas discharging channel made of composite material on the basis of glass-reinforced plastic which permits to reduce thermo-stressed actions on reinforced concrete and increase volume of released gases due to practically two-fold reduction of gas-dynamic pressure losses along the pipe length.

  20. Improvement in fast particle track reconstruction with robust statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eisch, J.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grandmont, D. T.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Macías, O.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.; Recht, B.; Ré, C.

    2014-02-01

    The IceCube project has transformed 1 km3 of deep natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. Muon neutrinos are detected and their direction is inferred by mapping the light produced by the secondary muon track inside the volume instrumented with photomultipliers. Reconstructing the muon track from the observed light is challenging due to noise, light scattering in the ice medium, and the possibility of simultaneously having multiple muons inside the detector, resulting from the large flux of cosmic ray muons. This paper describes work on two problems: (1) the track reconstruction problem, in which, given a set of observations, the goal is to recover the track of a muon; and (2) the coincident event problem, which is to determine how many muons are active in the detector during a time window. Rather than solving these problems by developing more complex physical models that are applied at later stages of the analysis, our approach is to augment the detector's early reconstruction with data filters and robust statistical techniques. These can be implemented at the level of on-line reconstruction and, therefore, improve all subsequent reconstructions. Using the metric of median angular resolution, a standard metric for track reconstruction, we improve the accuracy in the initial reconstruction direction by 13%. We also present improvements in measuring the number of muons in coincident events: we can accurately determine the number of muons 98% of the time.

  1. Resection and reconstruction following recurrent malignant phyllodes–Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Rajesh

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Treatment of phyllodes tumor necessitates adequate excision of the tumor and adjacent tissues to ensure tumor free margins. Pathological evolution from intermediate to malignant histology may be exhibited. A full-thickness chest wall resection and reconstruction although radical is a feasible option as these tumors rarely respond to other modalities of cancer management.

  2. The effect of iterative reconstruction on computed tomography assessment of emphysema, air trapping and airway dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mets, Onno M.; Willemink, Martin J.; de Kort, Freek P. L.; Mol, Christian P.; Leiner, Tim; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Prokop, Mathias; de Jong, Pim A.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR) on quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, air trapping, and airway wall and lumen dimensions, compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). Inspiratory and expiratory chest CTs of 75 patients (37 male, 38 female;

  3. The effect of iterative reconstruction on computed tomography assessment of emphysema, air trapping and airway dimensions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mets, O.M.; Willemink, M.J.; Kort, F.P. de; Mol, C.P.; Leiner, T.; Oudkerk, M.; Prokop, M.; Jong, P.A. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the influence of iterative reconstruction (IR) on quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements of emphysema, air trapping, and airway wall and lumen dimensions, compared to filtered back-projection (FBP). METHODS: Inspiratory and expiratory chest CTs of 75 patients (37

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction of intracoronary ultrasound images. Rationale, approaches, problems, and directions

    OpenAIRE

    Roelandt, Jos; Mario, Carlo; Pandian, Natesa; Wenguang, L.; Keane, David; Slager, Cornelis; Feyter, Pim; Serruys, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAlthough intracoronary ultrasonography allows detailed tomographic imaging of the arterial wall, it fails to provide data on the structural architecture and longitudinal extent of arterial disease. This information is essential for decision making during therapeutic interventions. Three-dimensional reconstruction techniques offer visualization of the complex longitudinal architecture of atherosclerotic plaques in composite display. Progress in computer hardware and software techno...

  5. Comparison of transtibial and transportal techniques in drilling femoral tunnels during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using 3D-CAD models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashiro Y

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Yasutaka Tashiro,1 Ken Okazaki,1 Munenori Uemura,2 Kazutaka Toyoda,2 Kanji Osaki,1 Hirokazu Matsubara,1 Makoto Hashizume,2 Yukihide Iwamoto1 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 2Department of Advanced Medical Initiatives, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the differences in bone tunnel apertures between the trans-accessory medial portal (trans-AMP technique and the transtibial (TT technique in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The extent of ovalization and the frequency of overlap of the two tunnel apertures were compared. Methods: The simulation of femoral tunnel drilling with the TT and the trans-AMP techniques was performed using three-dimensional computer aided design models from two volunteers. The incidence angle of drilling against the intercondylar wall, the femoral tunnel position, the ovalization, and the overlap were analyzed. The aperture and location of the tunnels were also examined in real anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction cases (n=36. Results: The surgical simulation showed that a lower drill incident angle induced by the TT technique made the apertures of two tunnels more ovalized, located anteromedial tunnels in a shallower position to prevent posterior wall blow out, and led to a higher frequency of tunnel overlap. The trans-AMP group had tunnel places within the footprint and had less ovalization and overlap. The results of analysis for tunnels in the clinical cases were consistent with results from the surgical simulation. Conclusion: In the TT technique, the shallow anteromedial tunnel location and more ovalized tunnel aperture can lead to a higher frequency of tunnel overlap. Compared with the TT technique, the trans-AMP technique was more useful in preparing femoral tunnels anatomically and avoiding tunnel ovalization and overlapping in double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Keywords: anterior cruciate ligament

  6. Regulation of auxin on secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis in developing cotton fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers are unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules. Mature fibers exhibit thickened secondary walls composed of nearly pure cellulose. Cotton fiber development is divided into four overlapping phases, 1) initiation sta...

  7. Non-microsurgical breast reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Sheel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Breast reconstruction after mastectomy should aim at resulting in an aesthetic outcome that matches the patient′s expectations and without interfering in the oncologic treatment. Whether the reconstruction is performed immediately or in a delayed fashion depends on various factors, which needs detailed attention. Autologous tissue, implants or both are used in the reconstruction. This article reviews the current concepts in these, with emphasis on non-microsurgical methods of using the autologous tissue for reconstruction. Breast conservation has become an accepted practice of treatment. Reconstruction in these situations as well as in an occasion when the surgery is done for failed breast conservation is discussed in detail. The article also reviews the various methods for nipple reconstruction available.

  8. Compressed Sensing Inspired Image Reconstruction from Overlapped Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The key idea discussed in this paper is to reconstruct an image from overlapped projections so that the data acquisition process can be shortened while the image quality remains essentially uncompromised. To perform image reconstruction from overlapped projections, the conventional reconstruction approach (e.g., filtered backprojection (FBP algorithms cannot be directly used because of two problems. First, overlapped projections represent an imaging system in terms of summed exponentials, which cannot be transformed into a linear form. Second, the overlapped measurement carries less information than the traditional line integrals. To meet these challenges, we propose a compressive sensing-(CS- based iterative algorithm for reconstruction from overlapped data. This algorithm starts with a good initial guess, relies on adaptive linearization, and minimizes the total variation (TV. Then, we demonstrated the feasibility of this algorithm in numerical tests.

  9. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  10. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  11. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  12. LHCb; LHCb Jet Reconstruction

    CERN Multimedia

    Augusto, O

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than $4 \\times 10^{32} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test pertubative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space $\\eta \\times \\phi$ and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the calo...

  13. The feasibility of removable prefab diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaarouk, R.; De Gijt, J.G.; Braam, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A diaphragm wall is a cast in-situ reinforced concrete retaining wall applied in, among others, quay walls. The main advantages of this type of retaining wall are that it can be made in almost every preferred length and that it can resist high structural loads. However, there are several

  14. The BABAR Prompt Reconstruction System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glanzman, Thomas

    1998-10-20

    BABAR is an experiment designed to explore the nature of CP violation and other physics in the B B-bar system starting in the Spring of 1999. The experiment is situated at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center where the former PEP electron-positron storage ring has been upgraded to an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} asymmetric storage facility. The electrons at 9 GeV/c and positrons at 3.1 GeV/c will collide at the Y(4S) with a luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The BABAR detector will record the B and B-bar decays resulting from the Y(4S). With careful vertexing, particle ID and other measurements, asymmetries between the B and B-bar decays will be analyzed. The expected data rate reaches 100 Hz of {approximately}32 kByte events recorded to mass storage. This results in {approximately}10{sup 9} logged events per year of operation. The raw data, combined with reconstructed and simulated data, is expected to yield {approximately}300 TB of stored data per year. With this large flow of data, it becomes essential to optimize the automation and reliability associated with the initial phases of data processing.

  15. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  16. Unfavourable results in thumb reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumta, Samir M.

    2013-01-01

    The history of thumb reconstruction parallels the history of hand surgery. The attributes that make the thumb unique, and that the reconstructive surgeon must assess and try to restore when reconstructing a thumb, are: Position, stability, strength, length, motion, sensibility and appearance. Deficiency in any of these attributes can reduce the utility of the reconstructed thumb. A detailed assessment of the patient and his requirements needs to be performed before embarking on a thumb reconstruction. Most unsatisfactory results can be attributed to wrong choice of procedure. Component defects of the thumb are commonly treated by tissue from adjacent fingers, hand or forearm. With refinements in microsurgery, the foot has become a major source of tissue for component replacement in the thumb. Bone lengthening, osteoplastic reconstruction, pollicisation, and toe to hand transfers are the commonest methods of thumb reconstruction. Unfavourable results can be classified as functional and aesthetic. Some are common to all types of procedures. However each type of reconstruction has its own unique set of problems. Meticulous planning and execution is essential to give an aesthetic and functionally useful thumb. Secondary surgeries like tendon transfers, bone grafting, debulking, arthrodesis, may be required to correct deficiencies in the reconstruction. Attention needs to be paid to the donor site as well. PMID:24501466

  17. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  18. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  19. EFFECT OF 2,6-DICHLOROBENZONITRILE (DCB ON SECONDARY WALL DEPOSITION AND LIGNIFICATION IN THE STEM OF HIBISCUS CANNABINUS L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRAMOD Sivan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out on the secondary xylem of actively growing shoots of Hibiscus cannabinus treated with cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB. Treatment with 20µM DCB induced differentiation of xylem fibres with thin secondary walls and parenchyma cells with abnormal wall thickening and lignification. At concentration above 50 µM resulted in the disappearance of cambial zone, inhibition of secondary wall deposition, lignification of primary walls, deformed vessel walls and dispersed lignin distribution in secondary walls. Transmission electron microscopic study revealed the initiation and formation of large intercellular spaces between the walls of differentiating xylem elements. Abnormal pattern of wall deposition and inhomogeneous lignin distribution was evident in fibres and vessel. The length and width of both fibres and vessel elements were reduced significantly even with lower concentrations of DCB.

  20. Acalculous Diffuse Gallbladder Wall Thickening in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Haeng; No, Young Eun; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Park, Jae Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gallbladder (GB) wall thickening can be found in various conditions unrelated to intrinsic GB disease. We investigated the predisposing etiologies and the outcome of acalculous GB wall thickening in children. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 67 children with acalculous GB wall thickening who had visited our institute from June 2010 to June 2013. GB wall thickening was defined as a GB wall diameter >3.5 mm on abdominal ultrasound examination or computed tomography. Underlying diseas...

  1. Reconstruction of the pediatric midface following oncologic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfein, Evan; Doscher, Matthew; Tepper, Oren; Gill, Jonathan; Gorlick, Richard; Smith, Richard V

    2015-06-01

    Sarcoma is the most common midface malignancy in children. While first-line treatment in adults is resection, the challenges associated with resection and reconstruction of these tumors in children often lead to radiation therapy as primary treatment. This report highlights the feasibility and efficacy of midface reconstruction in the pediatric population after resection. In most cases, the same principles utilized in reconstructing midface defects in adults hold for the pediatric population. From 2008 to 2013 seven pediatric patients underwent resection and reconstruction for maxillary sarcomas. These patients ranged in age from 18 months to 20 years. Five patients were reconstructed with six microvascular free flaps. Two patients received pedicled flaps. Follow-up ranged from 15 months to 4.5 years. Reconstructive, oncological, and functional outcomes were analyzed. Seven patients underwent eight reconstructions for sarcomas of the maxilla. Flaps utilized included vertical rectus abdominis, anterolateral thigh, fibula, and temporoparietal fascia. One flap was complicated by venous thrombosis but was successfully salvaged after thrombectomy and revision using vein graft. One patient developed recurrence after initial flap placement and required salvage resection and a second free flap. Six patients were judged to have good facial symmetry and tolerated a regular oral diet with normal or near-normal dental occlusion. Standard primary therapy for sarcomas of the maxilla in the pediatric population consists of nonsurgical management. However, a radiation-first approach is associated with significant morbidity and makes surgical salvage more difficult. Based on our experience, microsurgical reconstruction of the pediatric midface is safe and effective, and should be considered a first-line treatment option for midface sarcomas in children. In general, there is no significant area of departure between the principles that govern midface reconstruction in adults and

  2. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea......This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results...

  3. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  4. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  5. Qualitative Reliability Issues for Solid and Liquid Wall Fusion Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    2001-01-31

    This report is an initial effort to identify issues affecting reliability and availability of solid and liquid wall designs for magnetic fusion power plant designs. A qualitative approach has been used to identify the possible failure modes of major system components and their effects on the systems. A general set of design attributes known to affect the service reliability has been examined for the overview solid and liquid wall designs, and some specific features of good first wall design have been discussed and applied to these designs as well. The two generalized designs compare well in regard to these design attributes. The strengths and weaknesses of each design approach are seen in the comparison of specific features.

  6. Qualitative Reliability Issues for Solid and Liquid Wall Fusion Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    2001-01-01

    This report is an initial effort to identify issues affecting reliability and availability of solid and liquid wall designs for magnetic fusion power plant designs. A qualitative approach has been used to identify the possible failure modes of major system components and their effects on the systems. A general set of design attributes known to affect the service reliability has been examined for the overview solid and liquid wall designs, and some specific features of good first wall design have been discussed and applied to these designs as well. The two generalized designs compare well in regard to these design attributes. The strengths and weaknesses of each design approach are seen in the comparison of specific features.

  7. Domain walls and gravitational waves in the Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, Tomasz; Lalak, Zygmunt; Lewicki, Marek; Olszewski, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    We study domain walls which can be created in the Standard Model under the assumption that it is valid up to very high energy scales. We focus on domain walls interpolating between the physical electroweak vacuum and the global minimum appearing at very high field strengths. The creation of the network which ends up in the electroweak vacuum percolating through the Universe is not as difficult to obtain as one may expect, although it requires certain tuning of initial conditions. Our numerical simulations confirm that such domain walls would swiftly decay and thus cannot dominate the Universe. We discuss the possibility of detection of gravitational waves produced in this scenario. We have found that for the standard cosmology the energy density of these gravitational waves is too small to be observed in present and planned detectors.

  8. Current management of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moed, Berton R; Kregor, Philip J; Reilly, Mark C; Stover, Michael D; Vrahas, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The general goals for treating an acetabular fracture are to restore congruity and stability of the hip joint. These goals are no different from those for the subset of fractures of the posterior wall. Nevertheless, posterior wall fractures present unique problems compared with other types of acetabular fractures. Successful treatment of these fractures depends on a multitude of factors. The physician must understand their distinctive radiologic features, in conjunction with patient factors, to determine the appropriate treatment. By knowing the important points of posterior surgical approaches to the hip, particularly the posterior wall, specific techniques can be used for fracture reduction and fixation in these often challenging fractures. In addition, it is important to develop a complete grasp of potential complications and their treatment. The evaluation and treatment protocols initially developed by Letournel and Judet continue to be important; however, the surgeon also should be aware of new information published and presented in the past decade.

  9. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  10. CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Korolev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of meniscal repair during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction.Materials and methods: 45 patients who underwent meniscal repair during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between 2007 and 2013 by the same surgeon were included in the study. In total, fifty meniscus were repaired (26 medial and 24 lateral. Procedures included use of one up to four Fast-Fix implants (Smith & Nephew. In five cases both medial and lateral meniscus were repaired. Cincinnati, IKDC and Lysholm scales were used for long-term outcome analysis.Results: 19 male and 26 female patients were included in the study aging from 15 to 59 years (mean age 33,2±1,5. Median time from injury to surgical procedure was zero months (ranging zero to one. Mean time from surgery to scale analysis was 55,9±3 months (ranged 20-102. Median Cincinnati score was 97 (ranged 90-100, with excellent results in 93% of cases (43 patients and good results in 7% (3 patients. Median IKDC score was 90,8 (ranged 86,2-95,4, with excellent outcomes in 51% of cases (23 patients, good in 33% (15 patients and satisfactory in 16% (7 patients. Median Lysholm score was 95 (ranged 90-100, with excellent outcomes in 76% of cases (34 patients and good in 24% (11 patients. Authors identified no statistical differences when comparing survey results in age, sex and time from trauma to surgery.Conclusions: Results of the present study match the data from orthopedic literature that prove meniscal repair as a safe and efficient procedure with good and excellent outcomes. All-inside meniscal repair can be used irrespectively of patients' age and is efficient even in case of delayed procedures.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction complicated by pyoderma gangrenosum

    OpenAIRE

    Bagouri, E; Smith, Jon; Geutjens, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of pyoderma gangrenosum as a complication of an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease, which was misdiagnosed initially as a post-operative wound infection. An early dermatology opinion and skin biopsy should be considered in cases of suspected infection where thorough surgical debridement and antimicrobial therapy has failed to improve the clinical picture.

  12. Overlap/Domain-wall reweighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, H.; Aoki, S.; Cossu, G.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Noaki, J.

    We investigate the eigenvalues of nearly chiral lattice Dirac operators constructed with five-dimensional implementations. Allowing small violation of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, the HMC simulation is made much faster while the eigenvalues are not significantly affected. We discuss the possibility of reweighting the gauge configurations generated with domain-wall fermions to those of exactly chiral lattice fermions.

  13. The Influence of Wall Binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the thermal bridge effects that occur in wall binders in masonry buildings. The effects are analyzed using a numerical calculation programme.The results are compared to the values given in the danish standard, DS418....

  14. Retrofitting Systems for External Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report, 9 different external and internal retrofitting systems are analyzed using numerical calculations. The analysis focuses on the thermal bridge effects in the different systems, and on this basis it is discussed whether internal or external retrofitting has the most advantages....... The different systems are evaluated using 5 different types of existing walls....

  15. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P.P. Oprel (Pim); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a

  16. Fandom and the fourth wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I use the Teen Wolf fandom as an example to examine the ways social media has created a more complicated, nuanced relationship with fans. The collapse of the fourth wall between fans and The Powers That Be can have both positive and negative impacts, depending on the willingness of participants to maintain mutual respect and engage in meaningful dialogue.

  17. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research...

  18. Chapter 3 Cell Wall Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Roger Pettersen; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2012-01-01

    Wood is best defined as a three-dimensional biopolymer composite composed of an interconnected network of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin with minor amounts of extractives, and inorganics. The major chemical component of a living tree is water, but on a dry weight basis, all wood cell walls consist mainly of sugar-based polymers (carbohydrates, 65-75%) that are...

  19. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  20. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  1. Segmentation-DrivenTomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas

    ), the classical reconstruction methods suffer from their inability to handle limited and/ or corrupted data. Form any analysis tasks computationally demanding segmentation methods are used to automatically segment an object, after using a simple reconstruction method as a first step. In the literature, methods...... such that the segmentation subsequently can be carried out by use of a simple segmentation method, for instance just a thresholding method. We tested the advantages of going from a two-stage reconstruction method to a one stage segmentation-driven reconstruction method for the phase contrast tomography reconstruction...... problem. The tests showed a clear improvement for realistic materials simulations and that the one-stage method was clearly more robust toward noise. The noise-robustness result could be a step toward making this method more applicable for lab-scale experiments. We have introduced a segmentation...

  2. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  3. "Acute postoperative open abdominal wall": Nosological concept and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cano, Manuel; Pereira, José A; Armengol-Carrasco, Manuel

    2013-12-27

    The so-called "burst abdomen" has been described for many years and is a well-known clinical condition, whereas the concept of the "open abdomen" is relatively new. In clinical practice, both nosological entities are characterized by a complex spectrum of symptoms apparently disconnected, which in many cases poses a great challenge for surgical repair. In order to assess the management of these disorders in a more comprehensive and integral fashion, the concept of "acute postoperative open abdominal wall" (acute POAW) is presented, which in turn can be divided into "intentional" or planned acute POAW and "unintentional" or unplanned POAW. The understanding of the acute POAW as a single clinical process not only allows a better optimization of the therapeutic approach in the surgical repair of abdominal wall-related disorders, but also the stratification and collection of data in different patient subsets, favoring a better knowledge of the wide spectrum of conditions involved in the surgical reconstruction of the abdominal wall.

  4. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  5. Porcelain three-dimensional shape reconstruction and its color reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoyang; Wu, Haibin; Yang, Xue; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Beiyi; Chen, Deyun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, structured light three-dimensional measurement technology was used to reconstruct the porcelain shape, and further more the porcelain color was reconstructed. So the accurate reconstruction of the shape and color of porcelain was realized. Our shape measurement installation drawing is given. Because the porcelain surface is color complex and highly reflective, the binary Gray code encoding is used to reduce the influence of the porcelain surface. The color camera was employed to obtain the color of the porcelain surface. Then, the comprehensive reconstruction of the shape and color was realized in Java3D runtime environment. In the reconstruction process, the space point by point coloration method is proposed and achieved. Our coloration method ensures the pixel corresponding accuracy in both of shape and color aspects. The porcelain surface shape and color reconstruction experimental results completed by proposed method and our installation, show that: the depth range is 860 ˜ 980mm, the relative error of the shape measurement is less than 0.1%, the reconstructed color of the porcelain surface is real, refined and subtle, and has the same visual effect as the measured surface.

  6. Traction reveals mechanisms of wall effects for microswimmers near boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xinhui; Marcos, Fu, Henry C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of a plane boundary on low-Reynolds-number swimmers has frequently been studied using image systems for flow singularities. However, the boundary effect can also be expressed using a boundary integral representation over the traction on the boundary. We show that examining the traction pattern on the boundary caused by a swimmer can yield physical insights into determining when far-field multipole models are accurate. We investigate the swimming velocities and the traction of a three-sphere swimmer initially placed parallel to an infinite planar wall. In the far field, the instantaneous effect of the wall on the swimmer is well approximated by that of a multipole expansion consisting of a force dipole and a force quadrupole. On the other hand, the swimmer close to the wall must be described by a system of singularities reflecting its internal structure. We show that these limits and the transition between them can be independently identified by examining the traction pattern on the wall, either using a quantitative correlation coefficient or by visual inspection. Last, we find that for nonconstant propulsion, correlations between swimming stroke motions and internal positions are important and not captured by time-averaged traction on the wall, indicating that care must be taken when applying multipole expansions to study boundary effects in cases of nonconstant propulsion.

  7. Development of helium electron cyclotron wall conditioning on TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douai, D.; Goodman, T.; Isayama, A.; Fukumoto, M.; Wauters, T.; Sozzi, C.; Coda, S.; Blanchard, P.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Miyata, Y.; Moro, A.; Ricci, D.; Silva, M.; Theiler, C.; Vartanian, S.; Verhaegh, K.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; the TCV Team

    2018-02-01

    JT-60SA envisions electron cyclotron wall conditioning (ECWC), as wall conditioning method in the presence of the toroidal field to control fuel and impurity recycling and to improve plasma performance and reproducibility. This paper reports on Helium ECWC experiments on TCV in support of JT-60SA operation. Nearly sixty Helium conditioning discharges have been successfully produced in TCV, at a toroidal field B T  =  1.3 or 1.54 T, with gyrotrons at 82.7 GHz in X2 mode, mimicking ECWC operation in JT-60SA at the second harmonic of the EC wave. Discharge parameters were tuned in order to (i) minimize the time for the onset of ECWC plasmas, thus minimizing absorption of stray radiation by in-vessel components, (ii) improve discharge homogeneity by extending the discharge vertically and radially, and wall coverage, in particular of inboard surfaces where JT-60SA plasmas will be initiated, (iii) assess the efficiency of He-ECWC to deplete carbon walls from fuel. An optimized combination of vertical and radial magnetic fields, with amplitudes typically 0.1 to 0.6% of that of B T, has been determined, which resulted in lowest breakdown time, improved wall coverage and enhanced fuel removal. A standard ohmic D 2-plasma could be then sustained, whereas it would not have been possible without He-ECWC.

  8. Highly Efficient Domain Walls Injection in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S F; Gan, W L; Kwon, J; Luo, F L; Lim, G J; Wang, J B; Lew, W S

    2016-04-21

    Electrical injection of magnetic domain walls in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowire is crucial for data bit writing in domain wall-based magnetic memory and logic devices. Conventionally, the current pulse required to nucleate a domain wall is approximately ~10(12) A/m(2). Here, we demonstrate an energy efficient structure to inject domain walls. Under an applied electric potential, our proposed Π-shaped stripline generates a highly concentrated current distribution. This creates a highly localized magnetic field that quickly initiates the nucleation of a magnetic domain. The formation and motion of the resulting domain walls can then be electrically detected by means of Ta Hall bars across the nanowire. Our measurements show that the Π-shaped stripline can deterministically write a magnetic data bit in 15 ns even with a relatively low current density of 5.34 × 10(11) A/m(2). Micromagnetic simulations reveal the evolution of the domain nucleation - first, by the formation of a pair of magnetic bubbles, then followed by their rapid expansion into a single domain. Finally, we also demonstrate experimentally that our injection geometry can perform bit writing using only about 30% of the electrical energy as compared to a conventional injection line.

  9. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SINGLE FLAP APPROACH WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE WALL FOR PERIODONTAL REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The destructive periodontal diseases are among the most prevalent in the human population. In some cases, bony defects are formed during the disease progression, thus sustaining deep periodontal pockets. The reconstruction of these defects is usually done with the classical techniques of bone substitutes placement and guided tissue regeneration. The clinical and histological data from the recent years, however, demonstrate the relatively low regenerative potential of these techniques. The contemporary approaches for periodontal regeneration rely on minimally invasive surgical protocols, aimed at complete tissue preservation in order to achieve and maintain primary closure and at stimulating the natural regenerative potential of the periodontal tissues. AIM: This presentation demonstrates the application of a new, minimally invasive, single flap surgical technique for periodontal regeneration in a clinical case with periodontitis and a residual deep intrabony defect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 37 years old patient presented with chronic generalised periodontitis. The initial therapy led to good control of the periodontal infection with a single residual deep periodontal pocket medially at 11 due to a deep intrabony defect. A single flap approach with an enamel matrix derivate application and a connective tissue wall technique were performed. The proper primary closure was obtained. RESULT: One month after surgery an initial mineralisation process in the defect was detected. At the third month, a complete clinical healing was observed. The radiographic control showed finished bone mineralisation and periodontal space recreation. CONCLUSION: In the limitation of the presented case, the minimally invasive surgical approach led to complete clinical healing and new bone formation, which could be proof for periodontal regeneration.

  10. High Performance Walls in Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeschele, Marc [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, Bill [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); German, Alea [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High performance walls represent a high priority measure for moving the next generation of new homes to the Zero Net Energy performance level. The primary goal in improving wall thermal performance revolves around increasing the wall framing from 2x4 to 2x6, adding more cavity and exterior rigid insulation, achieving insulation installation criteria meeting ENERGY STAR's thermal bypass checklist. To support this activity, in 2013 the Pacific Gas & Electric Company initiated a project with Davis Energy Group (lead for the Building America team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation) to solicit builder involvement in California to participate in field demonstrations of high performance wall systems. Builders were given incentives and design support in exchange for providing site access for construction observation, cost information, and builder survey feedback. Information from the project was designed to feed into the 2016 Title 24 process, but also to serve as an initial mechanism to engage builders in more high performance construction strategies. This Building America project utilized information collected in the California project.

  11. Spherical Domain Wall Collapse in a Dust Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    To clarify observational consequence of bubble nucleations in inflationary era, we analyse dynamics of a spherical domain wall in an expanding universe. We consider a spherical shell of the domain wall with tension $\\sigma$ collapsing in a spherically-symmetric dust universe, which is initially separated into the open Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker universe inside the shell and the Einstein-de Sitter universe outside. The domain wall shell collapses due to the tension, and sweeps the dust fluid. The universe after the collapse becomes inhomogeneous and is described by the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi model. We construct solutions describing this inhomogeneous universe by solving dynamical equations obtained from Israel's junction conditions applied to this system. We find that a black hole forms after the domain wall collapse for any initial condition, and that the black hole mass at the moment of its formation is universally given by $M_{\\rm BH}\\simeq 17 \\sigma/H_{\\rm hc}$, where $H_{\\rm hc}$ is the Hubble...

  12. Two-Year Follow-up on the Use of Absorbable Mesh Plates in the Treatment of Medial Orbital Wall Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Pil You

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAbsorbable materials offer many advantages in the reconstruction of orbital walls; however, the possibility of postoperative enophthalmos after complete absorption cannot be excluded. We evaluated the postoperative results of absorbable mesh plates used as onlay implanting on the medial orbital wall to determine whether they are suitable for medial orbital wall reconstruction.MethodsThe study included 20 patients with medial orbital wall fractures who were followed up for more than 2 years postoperatively. We used absorbable mesh plates in all of the patients. We measured the following: the changes in the expanded orbital volume by comparing the preoperative and postoperative computed tomography (CT scans and the degree of clinical enophthalmos.ResultsThere were no major complications associated with the use of absorbable materials such as infection, migration, or extrusion of mesh plates during the long-term follow-up. The orbital volumetric changes between the preoperative and postoperative CT scans were not statistically significant. However, the expanded orbital volume was not related to the degree of clinical enophthalmos.ConclusionsThe reconstructed orbital wall may provide supportive scar tissue to the orbital contents even after the absorbable materials have dissolved completely. Absorbable mesh plates could be another option for the reconstruction of the medial orbital wall.

  13. Through-the-wall radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness G

    2011-01-01

    Wall Attenuation and Dispersion, A. Hussein Muqaibel, M.A. Alsunaidi, Nuruddeen M. Iya, and A. Safaai-JaziAntenna Elements, Arrays, and Systems for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, A. Hoorfar and A. FathyBeamforming for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, G. Alli and D. DiFilippoImage and Localization of Behind-the-Wall Targets Using Collocated and Distributed Apertures, Y.D. Zhang and A. HuntConventional and Emerging Waveforms for Detection and Imaging of Targets behind Walls, F. Ahmad and R.M. NarayananInverse Scattering Approaches in Through-the-Wall Imaging, K. Sarabandi, M. Thiel, M. Dehmollai

  14. Improvements for real-time magnetic equilibrium reconstruction on ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, L.; Fischer, R. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); McCarthy, P.J. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Odstrcil, T.; Zammuto, I.; Bock, A.; Conway, G.; Fuchs, J.C.; Gude, A.; Igochine, V.; Kallenbach, A.; Lackner, K.; Maraschek, M.; Rapson, C. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Ruan, Q. [National Instruments, Austin, TX 78759-3504 (United States); Schuhbeck, K.H.; Suttrop, W. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wenzel, L. [National Instruments, Austin, TX 78759-3504 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Spline basis current functions with second-order linear regularisation. • Perturbations of magnetic probe measurements due to ferromagnetic tiles on the inner wall and from oscillations in the fast position coil current are corrected. • A constraint of the safety factor on the magnetic axis is introduced. Soft X-ray tomography is used to assess the quality of the real-time magnetic equilibrium reconstruction. • External loop voltage measurements and magnetic probe pairs inside and outside the vessel wall were used to measure the vacuum vessel wall resistivity. - Abstract: Real-time magnetic equilibria are needed for NTM stabilization and disruption avoidance experiments on ASDEX Upgrade. Five improvements to real-time magnetic equilibrium reconstruction on ASDEX Upgrade have been investigated. The aim is to include as many features of the offline magnetic equilibrium reconstruction code in the real-time equilibrium reconstruction code. Firstly, spline current density basis functions with regularization are used in the offline equilibrium reconstruction code, CLISTE [1]. It is now possible to have the same number of spline basis functions in the real-time code. Secondly, in the presence of edge localized modes, (ELM's), it is found to be necessary to include the low pass filter effect of the vacuum vessel on the fast position control coil currents to correctly compensate the magnetic probes for current oscillations in these coils. Thirdly, the introduction of ferromagnetic tiles in ASDEX Upgrade means that a real-time algorithm for including the perturbations of the magnetic equilibrium generated by these tiles is required. A methodology based on tile surface currents is described. Fourthly, during current ramps it was seen that the difference between fitted and measured magnetic measurements in the equilibrium reconstruction were larger than in the constant current phase. External loop voltage measurements and magnetic probe pairs inside

  15. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos RODRIGUEZ-MERCHAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACLreconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1 Bone patellar tendon bone (BPTB reconstruction or hamstring reconstruction (HR; 2 Double bundle or single bundle; 3 Allograft or authograft; 4 Early or late reconstruction; 5 Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6 Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analysesfocused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years.

  16. RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY 133

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    initial nutrition of composite grafts is enhanced through contact of capillaries of a nasolabial flap bed with those of an intact perichondrion in the composite graft. .... skin in regional aesthetic units. Br. J ' ast. Surg 1956; 9: 212-221. . liinshaw JR, Miller Histology of healing split thickness, full thickness autogenous skin grafts.

  17. Image artefact propagation in motion estimation and reconstruction in interventional cardiac C-arm CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.; Maier, A. K.; Schwemmer, C.; Lauritsch, G.; De Buck, S.; Wielandts, J.-Y.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of data for cardiac imaging using a C-arm computed tomography system requires several seconds and multiple heartbeats. Hence, incorporation of motion correction in the reconstruction step may improve the resulting image quality. Cardiac motion can be estimated by deformable three-dimensional (3D)/3D registration performed on initial 3D images of different heart phases. This motion information can be used for a motion-compensated reconstruction allowing the use of all acquired data for image reconstruction. However, the result of the registration procedure and hence the estimated deformations are influenced by the quality of the initial 3D images. In this paper, the sensitivity of the 3D/3D registration step to the image quality of the initial images is studied. Different reconstruction algorithms are evaluated for a recently proposed cardiac C-arm CT acquisition protocol. The initial 3D images are all based on retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data. ECG-gating of data from a single C-arm rotation provides only a few projections per heart phase for image reconstruction. This view sparsity leads to prominent streak artefacts and a poor signal to noise ratio. Five different initial image reconstructions are evaluated: (1) cone beam filtered-backprojection (FDK), (2) cone beam filtered-backprojection and an additional bilateral filter (FFDK), (3) removal of the shadow of dense objects (catheter, pacing electrode, etc) before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection (cathFDK), (4) removal of the shadow of dense objects before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection and a bilateral filter (cathFFDK). The last method (5) is an iterative few-view reconstruction (FV), the prior image constrained compressed sensing combined with the improved total variation algorithm. All reconstructions are investigated with respect to the final motion-compensated reconstruction quality. The algorithms were tested on a mathematical

  18. Total airway reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Reconstructing human evolution

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074069

    1999-01-01

    One can reconstruct human evolution using modern genetic data and models based on the mathematical theory of evolution and its four major factors : mutation, natural selection, statistical fluctuations in finite populations (random genetic drift), and migration. Archaeology gives some help on the major dates and events of the process. Chances of studying ancient DNA are very limited but there have been a few successful results. Studying DNA instead of proteins, as was done until a few years ago, and in particular the DNA of mitochondria and of the Y chromosome which are transmitted, respectively, by the maternal line and the paternal line, has greatly simplified the analysis. It is now possible to carry the analysis on individuals, while earlier studies were of necessity based on populations. Also the evolution of ÒcultureÓ (i.e. what we learn from others), in particular that of languages, gives some help and can be greatly enlightened by genetic studies. Even though it is largely based on mechanisms of mut...

  20. Orthotopic neobladder reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne T. S. Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthotopic neobladder reconstruction is becoming an increasingly common urinary diversion following cystectomy for bladder cancer. This is in recognition of the potential benefits of neobladder surgery over creation of an ileal conduit related to quality of life (QoL, such as avoiding the need to form a stoma with its cosmetic, psychological and other potential complications. The PubMed database was searched using relevant search terms for articles published electronically between January 1994 and April 2014. Full-text articles in English or with English translation were assessed for relevance to the topic before being included in the review. Patients with neobladders have comparable or better post-operative sexual function than those with ileal conduits. They also have comparable QoL to those with ileal conduits. Orthotopic neobladder is a good alternative to ileal conduit in suitable patients who do not want a stoma and are motivated to comply with neobladder training. However, the selection of a neobladder as the urinary diversion of choice requires that patients have good renal and liver functions and are likely to be compliant with neobladder training. With benefits also come potential risks of neobladder formation. These include electrolyte abnormalities and nocturnal incontinence. This short review highlights current aspects of neobladder formation and its potential advantages.

  1. Creating universes with thick walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a "thick wall", which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the "Farhi-Guth-Guven" (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The ADM mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  2. Primary chest wall lymphoma: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binay Kumar Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall lymphoma is a rare but curable condition. This paper reports a case of a 52-year-old female patient who presented with a primary chest wall diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  3. Flap reconstruction and interstitial brachytherapy in nonextremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vineeta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is an integral component of management of high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. Interstitial brachytherapy is used to deliver a boost or radical dose with several advantages over external beam radiotherapy. There has always been a concern to use brachytherapy with flap reconstruction of skin defects after wide excision. We preset our initial experience with interstitial brachytherapy in two patients of recurrent high-grade non-extremity sarcomas treated with surgical excision and soft tissue reconstruction of surgical defect.

  4. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  5. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  6. Cells, walls, and endless forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-12-01

    A key question in biology is how the endless diversity of forms found in nature evolved. Understanding the cellular basis of this diversity has been aided by advances in non-model experimental systems, quantitative image analysis tools, and modeling approaches. Recent work in plants highlights the importance of cell wall and cuticle modifications for the emergence of diverse forms and functions. For example, explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta depends on the asymmetric localization of lignified cell wall thickenings in the fruit valve. Similarly, the iridescence of Hibiscus trionum petals relies on regular striations formed by cuticular folds. Moreover, NAC transcription factors regulate the differentiation of lignified xylem vessels but also the water-conducting cells of moss that lack a lignified secondary cell wall, pointing to the origin of vascular systems. Other novel forms are associated with modified cell growth patterns, including oriented cell expansion or division, found in the long petal spurs of Aquilegia flowers, and the Sarracenia purpurea pitcher leaf, respectively. Another good example is the regulation of dissected leaf shape in C. hirsuta via local growth repression, controlled by the REDUCED COMPLEXITY HD-ZIP class I transcription factor. These studies in non-model species often reveal as much about fundamental processes of development as they do about the evolution of form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal Load Calculations of Multilayered Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir M. Suleiman

    2012-01-01

    Thermal load calculations have been performed for multi-layered walls that are composed of three different parts; a common (sand and cement) plaster, and two types of locally produced soft and hard bricks. The masonry construction of these layered walls was based on concrete-backed stone masonry made of limestone bricks joined by mortar. These multilayered walls are forming the outer walls of the building envelope of a typical Libyan house. Based on the periodic seasonal ...

  8. Thermal control wall prototype and test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, M.; Ohshima, K.; Jitsukawa, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a heat exchanger prototype and test results. The heat exchanger, called a thermal control wall, functions as a skin wall and as a means to vary the exterior wall thermal resistance of a building. Test results confirm that the capacity of the TCW is influenced by solar radiation. Furthermore, this TCW capacity can be evaluated by an overall heat transmission coefficient defined using the same sol air temperature difference as for a conventional wall.

  9. A comparison of modelling techniques for computing wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGloughlin Timothy M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aneurysms, in particular abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA, form a significant portion of cardiovascular related deaths. There is much debate as to the most suitable tool for rupture prediction and interventional surgery of AAAs, and currently maximum diameter is used clinically as the determining factor for surgical intervention. Stress analysis techniques, such as finite element analysis (FEA to compute the wall stress in patient-specific AAAs, have been regarded by some authors to be more clinically important than the use of a "one-size-fits-all" maximum diameter criterion, since some small AAAs have been shown to have higher wall stress than larger AAAs and have been known to rupture. Methods A patient-specific AAA was selected from our AAA database and 3D reconstruction was performed. The AAA was then modelled in this study using three different approaches, namely, AAA(SIMP, AAA(MOD and AAA(COMP, with each model examined using linear and non-linear material properties. All models were analysed using the finite element method for wall stress distributions. Results Wall stress results show marked differences in peak wall stress results between the three methods. Peak wall stress was shown to reduce when more realistic parameters were utilised. It was also noted that wall stress was shown to reduce by 59% when modelled using the most accurate non-linear complex approach, compared to the same model without intraluminal thrombus. Conclusion The results here show that using more realistic parameters affect resulting wall stress. The use of simplified computational modelling methods can lead to inaccurate stress distributions. Care should be taken when examining stress results found using simplified techniques, in particular, if the wall stress results are to have clinical importance.

  10. Dynamic relaxation in algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) for breast tomosynthesis imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, N; Mota, A M; Matela, N; Janeiro, L; Almeida, P

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is handling image noise since the 3D reconstructed images are obtained from low dose projections and limited angular range. The use of the iterative reconstruction algorithm Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) in clinical context depends on two key factors: the number of iterations needed (time consuming) and the image noise after iterations. Both factors depend highly on a relaxation coefficient (λ), which may give rise to slow or noisy reconstructions, when a single λ value is considered for the entire iterative process. The aim of this work is to present a new implementation for the ART that takes into account a dynamic mode to calculate λ in DBT image reconstruction. A set of initial reconstructions of real phantom data was done using constant λ values. The results were used to choose, for each iteration, the suitable λ value, taking into account the image noise level and the convergence speed. A methodology to optimize λ automatically during the image reconstruction was proposed. Results showed we can dynamically choose λ values in such a way that the time needed to reconstruct the images can be significantly reduced (up to 70%) while achieving similar image quality. These results were confirmed with one clinical dataset. With simple methodology we were able to dynamically choose λ in DBT image reconstruction with ART, allowing a shorter image reconstruction time without increasing image noise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The plant cell wall in the feeding sites of cyst nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eBohlmann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant parasitic cyst nematodes (genera Heterodera and Globodera are serious pests for many crops. They enter the host roots as migratory second stage juveniles (J2 and migrate intracellularly towards the vascular cylinder using their stylet and a set of cell wall degrading enzymes produced in the pharyngeal glands. They select an initial syncytial cell (ISC within the vascular cylinder or inner cortex layers to induce the formation of a multicellular feeding site called a syncytium, which is the only source of nutrients for the parasite during its entire life. A syncytium can consist of more than hundred cells whose protoplasts are fused together through local cell wall dissolutions. While the nematode produces a cocktail of cell wall degrading and modifying enzymes during migration through the root, the cell wall degradations occurring during syncytium development are due to the plants own cell wall modifying and degrading proteins. The outer syncytial cell wall thickens to withstand the increasing osmotic pressure inside the syncytium. Furthermore, pronounced cell wall ingrowths can be formed on the outer syncytial wall at the interface with xylem vessels. They increase the surface of the symplast-apoplast interface, thus enhancing nutrient uptake into the syncytium. Processes of cell wall degradation, synthesis and modification in the syncytium are facilitated by a variety of plant proteins and enzymes including expansins, glucanases, pectate lyases and cellulose synthases, which are produced inside the syncytium or in cells surrounding the syncytium.

  12. The plant cell wall in the feeding sites of cyst nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlmann, Holger; Sobczak, Miroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Plant parasitic cyst nematodes (genera Heterodera and Globodera) are serious pests for many crops. They enter the host roots as migratory second stage juveniles (J2) and migrate intracellularly toward the vascular cylinder using their stylet and a set of cell wall degrading enzymes produced in the pharyngeal glands. They select an initial syncytial cell (ISC) within the vascular cylinder or inner cortex layers to induce the formation of a multicellular feeding site called a syncytium, which is the only source of nutrients for the parasite during its entire life. A syncytium can consist of more than hundred cells whose protoplasts are fused together through local cell wall dissolutions. While the nematode produces a cocktail of cell wall degrading and modifying enzymes during migration through the root, the cell wall degradations occurring during syncytium development are due to the plants own cell wall modifying and degrading proteins. The outer syncytial cell wall thickens to withstand the increasing osmotic pressure inside the syncytium. Furthermore, pronounced cell wall ingrowths can be formed on the outer syncytial wall at the interface with xylem vessels. They increase the surface of the symplast-apoplast interface, thus enhancing nutrient uptake into the syncytium. Processes of cell wall degradation, synthesis and modification in the syncytium are facilitated by a variety of plant proteins and enzymes including expansins, glucanases, pectate lyases and cellulose synthases, which are produced inside the syncytium or in cells surrounding the syncytium. PMID:24678316

  13. Experimental investigation of the Trombe wall. Final report, October 1977-March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casperson, R.L.; Hocevar, C.J.

    1979-05-15

    A variable geometry test facility was constructed and an experimental program conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of the Trombe wall, passive solar heating system. The principal objective met in the research project was the determination of representative values of wall gap thermocirculation parameters for various wall geometries. Velocity and temperature profiles in the wall gap were obtained for 2, 4, and 6-inch gap widths. Maximum values for the Grashof number under measured flow conditions ranged approximately from 6 x 10/sup 5/ for the 2-inch gap to 1.5 x 10/sup 7/ for the 6-inch gap, indicating laminar flow and possibly the initiation of transitional flow regimes at the higher Grashof numbers. Turbulent flow behavior was not exhibited within the relatively broad range of test conditions studied in this research, conditions typical of one-story Trombe walls employing practical geometries. A second objective accomplished in this research was the characterization of the Trombe wall thermal efficiency for a variety of operating conditions and wall geometries. Using data collected under essentially clear-sky conditions, collector efficiency curves similar to those commonly used to describe the performance of flat-plate solar collectors were developed for the Trombe wall. The efficiency plots were determined for 2, 4, and 6-inch gap widths using linear regression fits. These regression fits were sufficiently good to validate the applicability of this approach in describing Trombe wall performance.

  14. Morphological changes in femoral tunnels after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei; Kanamoto, Takashi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Few studies investigated the enlargement inside the tunnel as well as the morphological change at the aperture after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, whereas the tunnel enlargement has been well documented. The purposes were to evaluate the change in the cross-sectional area along the femoral tunnel and to morphologically clarify the enlargement at the femoral tunnel aperture after anatomic triple-bundle (ATB) ACL reconstruction. The study included 15 patients with unilateral ACL rupture. ATB ACL reconstruction was performed using semitendinosus tendon autografts. Three-dimensional computer models of the femur and bone tunnels were reconstructed from computed tomography images obtained 3 weeks and 1 year postoperatively. The cross-sectional area at the aperture as well as inside the tunnel was compared between the two periods. Likewise, the location of tunnel walls and center in the tunnel footprint were evaluated. The cross-sectional area enlarged by 22.7 % for anteromedial/intermediate graft (P = 0.002) and 28.6 % for posterolateral graft (P = 0.002) at the aperture, while decreased by 36.2 % at 10 mm from the aperture for anteromedial/intermediate graft (P = 0.004). Both the anterior and posterior walls shifted anteriorly, while the distal wall shifted distally in both tunnels. Consequently, the center in the footprint significantly shifted anteriorly (4.9-6.6 %) and distally (2.2-2.6 %) in both tunnels. The femoral tunnel enlargement occurred at the aperture after ATB ACL reconstruction, but did not occur in the middle of the femoral tunnel. The morphology at the aperture changed with time after surgery as the tunnel walls translated anteriorly and distally. Case series, Level IV.

  15. Patient-centred decision making in breast reconstruction utilising the delayed-immediate algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Louw, Ryan P; Patel, Ketan M; Sosin, Michael; Weissler, Jason M; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2014-04-01

    Delayed-immediate reconstruction is an increasingly valuable algorithm for patients anticipating post-mastectomy radiation therapy. Despite the cosmetic and long-term advantages of autologous tissue repair, a subset of patients choose implant-based reconstruction after their initial preference for autologous reconstruction. A critical evaluation of patients who initially planned to undergo delayed-immediate reconstruction but later chose to continue with implant-based reconstruction has not been previously reported. A retrospective analysis of the senior author's (M.Y.N.) patients who initially intended to undergo delayed-immediate autologous breast reconstruction following mastectomy and chose to abandon autologous reconstruction in favour of prosthetic reconstruction was completed from 2005 to 2011. Seven patients (10 breasts) met inclusion criteria. The mean patient age and body mass index were 50.2 years and 32.1 kg m(-2), respectively. Expansion required an average of 4.4 office visits to achieve adequate expansion volume, mean 483 ml (240-600 ml). The mean time from expander placement to definitive reconstruction was 14.6 months. Mean follow-up time was 20.4 months. Complications included infection (1/7), incisional dehiscence (1/7) and capsular contracture (2/7), and late revision surgery was performed in two patients. Successful reconstruction was achieved in 100% of patients (7/7) with a patient-reported satisfaction of 100%. Patient motivations for changing the reconstructive algorithm included a faster post-operative recovery in four patients (4/7) and potential donor-site morbidity in three patients (3/7). Depression or cancer-related fatigue symptoms were self-reported in 4/7. Avoiding donor-site morbidity and a simpler recovery are the main factors that influence patients to change their desire for autologous reconstruction to an implant-based reconstruction. Cancer-related fatigue and depression are prevalent in this population and may be implicated

  16. Rational reconstructions of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittelstaedt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Newton’s classical physics and its underlying ontology are loaded with several metaphysical hypotheses that cannot be justified by rational reasoning nor by experimental evidence. Furthermore, it is well known that some of these hypotheses are not contained in the great theories of Modern Physics, such as the theory of Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. This book shows that, on the basis of Newton’s classical physics and by rational reconstruction, the theory of Special Relativity as well as Quantum Mechanics can be obtained by partly eliminating or attenuating the metaphysical hypotheses. Moreover, it is shown that these reconstructions do not require additional hypotheses or new experimental results. In the second edition the rational reconstructions are completed with respect to General Relativity and Cosmology. In addition, the statistics of quantum objects is elaborated in more detail with respect to the rational reconstruction of quantum mechanics. The new material completes the approach of t...

  17. Theory of topological edges and domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, F.A.; Slingerland, J.K.; Haaker, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate domain walls between topologically ordered phases in two spatial dimensions. We present a method which allows for the determination of the superselection sectors of excitations of such walls and which leads to a unified description of the kinematics of a wall and the two phases to

  18. To detect anomalies in diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm walls are potentially ideal retaining walls for deep excavations in densely built-up areas, as they cause no vibrations during their construction and provide structural elements with high strength and stiffness. In the recent past, however, several projects using diaphragm walls as soil

  19. Integrating Building Functions into Massive External Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafez, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Well into the twentieth century, brick and stone were the materials used in external walls. Bricklaying and stonemasonry were the construction technologies employed for the exterior walls of virtually all major structures. However, with the rise in quality of life, the massive walls alone became

  20. Steel Sheet Pile Walls in Soft Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century, steel sheet pile walls are applied worldwide as earth retaining structures for excavations and quay walls. Within the framework of the development of European structural codes for Civil Engineering works, the Eurocodes, Eurocode 3 Part 5 for design of steel sheet pile walls was

  1. Static domain wall in braneworld gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdalla, M.C.B.; Carlesso, P.F. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Instituto de Fisica Teiorica, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra-Funda, Caixa Postal 70532-2, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hoff da Silva, J.M. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we consider a static domain wall inside a 3-brane. Different from the standard achievement obtained in General Relativity, the analysis performed here gives a consistency condition for the existence of static domain walls in a braneworld gravitational scenario. Also the behavior of the domain wall's gravitational field in the newtonian limit is shown. (orig.)

  2. Tau reconstruction and identification algorithm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-15

    Nov 15, 2012 ... 13.35.Dx. 1. Introduction. Tau is the heaviest known lepton (Mτ = 1.78 GeV) which decays into lighter leptons. (BR ∼ 35%) or hadrons τh (BR ∼ 65%) in the presence of up to two neutrinos. The τ reconstruction algorithms are using decay mode identification techniques which allow one to reconstruct τh with ...

  3. Reconstructive challenges in war wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Mrinal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    War wounds are devastating with extensive soft tissue and osseous destruction and heavy contamination. War casualties generally reach the reconstructive surgery centre after a delayed period due to additional injuries to the vital organs. This delay in their transfer to a tertiary care centre is responsible for progressive deterioration in wound conditions. In the prevailing circumstances, a majority of war wounds undergo delayed reconstruction, after a series of debridements. In the recent m...

  4. Domain wall displacement by remote spin-current injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skirdkov, P. N.; Zvezdin, K. A.; Belanovsky, A. D.; Zvezdin, A. K. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilova 38, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskiy per. 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Grollier, J.; Cros, V. [Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Université Paris-Sud, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Ross, C. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate numerically the ability to displace a magnetic domain wall (DW) by remote spin current injection. We consider a long and narrow magnetic nanostripe with a single DW. The spin-polarized current is injected perpendicularly to the film plane through a small nanocontact which is located at certain distance from the DW initial position. We show that the DW motion can be initiated not only by conventional spin-transfer torque but also by indirect spin-torque, created by remote spin-current injection and then transferred to the DW by the exchange-spring mechanism. An analytical description of this effect is proposed.

  5. Breast reconstruction after breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletti, Joseph M; Fosnot, Joshua; Nelson, Jonas A; Disa, Joseph J; Bucky, Louis P

    2011-06-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the mental, emotional, and physical benefits of reconstruction in breast cancer patients. 2. Compare the most common techniques of reconstruction in patients and detail benefits and risks associated with each. 3. Outline different methods of reconstruction and identify the method considered best for the patient based on timing of the procedures, body type, adjuvant therapies, and other coexisting conditions. 4. Distinguish between some of the different flaps that can be considered for autologous reconstruction. Breast cancer is unfortunately a common disease affecting millions of women, often at a relatively young age. Reconstruction following mastectomy offers women an opportunity to mollify some of the emotional and aesthetic effects of this devastating disease. Although varying techniques of alloplastic and autologous techniques are available, all strive to achieve the same goal: the satisfactory reformation of a breast mound that appears as natural as possible without clothing and at the very least is normal in appearance under clothing. This article summarizes the various approaches to breast reconstruction and offers a balanced view of the risks and benefits of each, all of which in the end offer the opportunity for excellent and predictable results with a high degree of patient satisfaction.

  6. Holographic Imaging Reveals the Mechanism of Wall Entrapment in Swimming Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Silvio; Saglimbeni, Filippo; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Self-propelled particles, both biological and synthetic, are stably trapped by walls and develop high concentration peaks over bounding surfaces. In swimming bacteria, like E. coli, the physical mechanism behind wall entrapment is an intricate mixture of hydrodynamic and steric interactions with a strongly anisotropic character. The building of a clear physical picture of this phenomenon demands direct and full three-dimensional experimental observations of individual wall entrapment events. Here, we demonstrate that, by using a combination of three-axis holographic microscopy and optical tweezers, it is possible to obtain volumetric reconstructions of individual E. coli cells that are sequentially released at a controlled distance and angle from a flat solid wall. We find that hydrodynamic couplings can slow down the cell before collision, but reorientation only occurs while the cell is in constant contact with the wall. In the trapped state, all cells swim with the average body axis pointing into the surface. The amplitude of this pitch angle is anticorrelated to the amplitude of wobbling, thus indicating that entrapment is dominated by near-field couplings between the cell body and the wall. Our approach opens the way to three-dimensional quantitative studies of a broad range of fast dynamical processes in motile bacteria and eukaryotic cells.

  7. Biomechanical comparison of different stabilization constructs for unstable posterior wall fractures of acetabulum. A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuntong; Tang, Yang; Wang, Panfeng; Zhao, Xue; Xu, Shuogui; Zhang, Chuncai

    2013-01-01

    Operative treatment of unstable posterior wall fractures of acetabulum has been widely recommended. This laboratory study was undertaken to evaluate static fixation strength of three common fixation constructs: interfragmentary screws alone, in combination with conventional reconstruction plate, or locking reconstruction plate. Six formalin-preserved cadaveric pelvises were used for this investigation. A posterior wall fracture was created along an arc of 40-90 degree about the acetabular rim. Three groups of different fixation constructs (two interfragmentary screws alone; two interfragmentary screws and a conventional reconstruction plate; two interfragmentary screws and a locking reconstruction) were compared. Pelvises were axial loaded with six cycles of 1500 N. Dislocation of superior and inferior fracture site was analysed with a multidirectional ultrasonic measuring system. No statistically significant difference was found at each of the superior and inferior fracture sites between the three types of fixation. In each group, the vector dislocation at superior fracture site was significantly larger than inferior one. All those three described fixation constructs can provide sufficient stability for posterior acetabular fractures and allow early mobilization under experimental conditions. Higher posterior acetabular fracture line, transecting the weight-bearing surface, may indicate a substantial increase in instability, and need more stable pattern of fixation.

  8. Biomechanical comparison of different stabilization constructs for unstable posterior wall fractures of acetabulum. A cadaveric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuntong Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Operative treatment of unstable posterior wall fractures of acetabulum has been widely recommended. This laboratory study was undertaken to evaluate static fixation strength of three common fixation constructs: interfragmentary screws alone, in combination with conventional reconstruction plate, or locking reconstruction plate. METHODS: Six formalin-preserved cadaveric pelvises were used for this investigation. A posterior wall fracture was created along an arc of 40-90 degree about the acetabular rim. Three groups of different fixation constructs (two interfragmentary screws alone; two interfragmentary screws and a conventional reconstruction plate; two interfragmentary screws and a locking reconstruction were compared. Pelvises were axial loaded with six cycles of 1500 N. Dislocation of superior and inferior fracture site was analysed with a multidirectional ultrasonic measuring system. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference was found at each of the superior and inferior fracture sites between the three types of fixation. In each group, the vector dislocation at superior fracture site was significantly larger than inferior one. CONCLUSIONS: All those three described fixation constructs can provide sufficient stability for posterior acetabular fractures and allow early mobilization under experimental conditions. Higher posterior acetabular fracture line, transecting the weight-bearing surface, may indicate a substantial increase in instability, and need more stable pattern of fixation.

  9. Analysis of reconstructive methods in surgical treatment of nasal skin defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Marko S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Surgeons often face with the problem when selecting a reconstructive method for nasal skin defects. The aim of this study was to determine functional and aesthetic character-istics of different reconstructive methods used for skin defects in different regions of the nose. Methods. The study involved 44 patients with basocellular carcinoma in nasal area. The nasal skin was divided into four subunits: the tip, the alar lobules, the side-walls and the dorsum. The average skin defect size was 10 mm in diameter. Local flaps and full thickness skin grafts were used in the study. We analyzed the functional and esthetic results of dif-ferent reconstructive methods used for nasal defects in different regions of the nose 12 months after the surgery. Results. The study shows that different reconstructive methods produce dif-ferent functional and esthetic results in the same nasal subunits and that the same reconstructive method produces different re-sults in different nasal subunits. Conclusions. Estimation the postoperative functional and esthetic characteristics of different reconstructive methods is one of the basic preconditions of suc-cessful reconstruction.

  10. An Algorithmic Approach for the Reconstruction of Nasal Skin Defects: Retrospective Analysis of 130 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Akşam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most of the malignant cutaneous carcinomas are seen in the nasal region. Reconstruction of nasal defects is challenging because of the unique anatomic properties and complex structure of this region. In this study, we present our algorithm for the nasal skin defects that occurred after malignant skin tumor excisions. Material and Methods: Patients whose nasal skin was reconstructed after malignant skin tumor excision were included in the study. These patients were evaluated by their age, gender, comorbities, tumor location, tumor size, reconstruction type, histopathological diagnosis, and tumor recurrence. Results: A total of 130 patients (70 female, 60 male were evaluated. The average age of the patients was 67.8 years. Tumors were located mostly at the dorsum, alar region, and tip of the nose. When reconstruction methods were evaluated, primary closure was preferred in 14.6% patients, full thickness skin grafts were used in 25.3% patients, and reconstruction with flaps were the choice in 60% patients. Different flaps were used according to the subunits. Mostly, dorsal nasal flaps, bilobed flaps, nasolabial flaps, and forehead flaps were used. Conclusion: The defect-only reconstruction principle was accepted in this study. Previously described subunits, such as the dorsum, tip, alar region, lateral wall, columella, and soft triangles, of the nose were further divided into subregions by their anatomical relations. An algorithm was planned with these sub regions. In nasal skin reconstruction, this algorithm helps in selection the methods for the best results and minimize the complications.

  11. Shaping the breast in aesthetic and reconstructive breast surgery: an easy three-step principle. Part II--Breast reconstruction after total mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeel, Phillip N; Hijjawi, John; Depypere, Herman; Roche, Nathalie; Van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2009-03-01

    This is Part II of four parts describing the three-step principle being applied in reconstructive and aesthetic breast surgery. Part I explains how to analyze a problematic breast by understanding the main anatomical features of a breast and how they interact: the footprint, the conus of the breast, and the skin envelope. This part describes how one can optimize results with breast reconstructions after complete mastectomy. For both primary and secondary reconstructions, the authors explain how to analyze the mastectomized breast and the deformed chest wall, before giving step-by-step guidelines for rebuilding the entire breast with either autologous tissue or implants. The differences in shaping unilateral or bilateral breast reconstructions with autologous tissue are clarified. Regardless of timing or method of reconstruction, it is shown that by breaking down the surgical strategy into three easy (anatomical) steps, the reconstructive surgeon will be able to provide more aesthetically pleasing and reproducible results. Throughout these four parts, the three-step principle will be the red line on which to fall back to define the problem and to propose a solution.

  12. Seismic retrofitting of timber framed walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalves, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After the 1755 earthquake that destroyed Lisbon, an innovative anti-seismic structural system was developed consisting of a timber skeleton, that included timber framed masonry walls. After more than 250 years these structures need rehabilitation to face the present demands. The research presented in this paper aimed at experimentally characterizing the cyclic behaviour of timber framed walls reinforced with three different methods, namely: (i elastic-plastic dampers on diagonal braces, (ii reinforcement of timber connections with steel plates, (iii application of a reinforced rendering. The elastic-plastic damper showed an unsymmetrical behaviour and some difficulties to implement in practice. The strengthening with reinforced render led to an initial stiffness increase but showed a limited deformation capacity. The walls with reinforcing steel plates at the timber connections showed the best behaviour in terms of strength, stiffness and energy dissipation.Después del terremoto de 1755 que destruyó Lisboa, un sistema estructural antisísmico muy innovador fue desarrollado. El sistema consistió en un esqueleto de madera, que incluyó la construcción de muros de mampostería con un entramado de madera. Transcurridos más de 250 años, estas estructuras necesitan rehabilitación para poder hacer frente a los requisitos estructurales actuales. La investigación presentada en este trabajo tiene como objetivo caracterizar experimentalmente el comportamiento cíclico de los muros con entramado de madera reforzados con tres métodos diferentes: (i amortiguadores elasto-plásticos, (ii refuerzo de las conexiones de madera con placas de acero, (iii aplicación de un mortero reforzado. El amortiguador elasto-plástico mostró un comportamiento asimétrico y algunas dificultades para aplicarlo en la práctica. El refuerzo con mortero reforzado condujo a un aumento de la rigidez inicial, pero reveló una capacidad de deformación limitada. Los muros con

  13. RECONSTRUCTING BUILDINGS WITH DISCONTINUITIES AND ROOF OVERHANGS FROM OBLIQUE AERIAL IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Frommholz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a two-stage method for the reconstruction of city buildings with discontinuities and roof overhangs from oriented nadir and oblique aerial images. To model the structures the input data is transformed into a dense point cloud, segmented and filtered with a modified marching cubes algorithm to reduce the positional noise. Assuming a monolithic building the remaining vertices are initially projected onto a 2D grid and passed to RANSAC-based regression and topology analysis to geometrically determine finite wall, ground and roof planes. If this should fail due to the presence of discontinuities the regression will be repeated on a 3D level by traversing voxels within the regularly subdivided bounding box of the building point set. For each cube a planar piece of the current surface is approximated and expanded. The resulting segments get mutually intersected yielding both topological and geometrical nodes and edges. These entities will be eliminated if their distance-based affiliation to the defining point sets is violated leaving a consistent building hull including its structural breaks. To add the roof overhangs the computed polygonal meshes are projected onto the digital surface model derived from the point cloud. Their shapes are offset equally along the edge normals with subpixel accuracy by detecting the zero-crossings of the second-order directional derivative in the gradient direction of the height bitmap and translated back into world space to become a component of the building. As soon as the reconstructed objects are finished the aerial images are further used to generate a compact texture atlas for visualization purposes. An optimized atlas bitmap is generated that allows perspectivecorrect multi-source texture mapping without prior rectification involving a partially parallel placement algorithm. Moreover, the texture atlases undergo object-based image analysis (OBIA to detect window areas which get reintegrated

  14. [Reconstruction of the inguinal ligament with fascia lata sling. First reported case in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bognár, Gábor; Barabás, Loránd; Tóth, Enikő; Schöller, Andrea; István, Gábor

    2017-06-01

    A technique of reconstructing the inguinal ligament using pedicled fascia lata flap is described. A 66-year-old woman was referred with massive incarcerated left inguinal hernia, following acute surgery on a femoral vein leasion and numerous attempts at repair and subsequent recurrences. There was complete absence of the left inguinal ligament. The inguinal ligament was reconstructed using a strip of fascia lata, pedicled on the anterior superior iliac spine. This was transposed to cover the external iliac vessels, and sutured to the pubic tubercle. The musculoaponeurotic abdominal wall was reconstructed with 15×13 cm sheet of polypropylene mesh, placed preperitoneal and sutured to the remaining abdominal wall muscles and to the neo-Pouoart ligament. Complete destruction of the inguinal ligament is rare but can occur following multiple operative procedures or trauma. Published reports of inguinal ligament reconstruction have been performed using synthetic mesh. The use of autologous tissue should reduce the risk of erosion into the neurovascular bundle, seroma formation, and enhance integration into surrounding tissues. This new technique for autologous reconstruction of the inguinal ligament provides a safe alternative to the use of synthetic mesh in the operative armamentarium of plastic and general surgeons. This is the first reported case in Hungary.

  15. Thoraco-epigastric flap for breast reconstruction in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Zikiryakhodzhayev,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructive surgery for breast cancer are an integral method of rehabilitation of cancer patients. Breast reconstruction may be delayed and instantaneous. The article presents a description of the thoraco-epigastric flap for breast reconstruction in cancer. The operation involves the replacement of the remote volume (after radical resection of the breast and the breast skin adjacent tissues adjacent to the inframammary crease from the side of the anterior abdominal wall. Surgery is indicated when the tumor in the lower parts of the breast, closest to the skin, in combination with small size breast cancer. The article presents a clinical example of this operation. Described in detail the operation, received a good cosmetic result. The advantage of the application of thoraco-epigastric flap is in the simplicity of the technique of its execution, good blood supply, donor wound is easily sutured due to the possible wide separating cellular adjacent skin and subcutaneous tissue. The disadvantage of this method is limited and the need for careful monitoring of perforating branches of the upper epigastric artery. Thus, thoraco-epigastric flap, can be applicable when performing reconstructive operations for breast cancer in compliance with the necessary requirements for the formation of the flap and the correct attitude to feeding the flap vessels, and virtually eliminates possible complications with the healing of the flap. Undoubtedly, reconstructive plastic surgery for breast cancer, during the testimony and technical capabilities, are an essential component of surgical treatment.

  16. On $\\mathfrak{I}$-reconstruction Property

    OpenAIRE

    Vashisht, L. K.; Khattar, Geetika

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction property in Banach spaces introduced and studied by Casazza and Christensen in [1]. In this paper we introduce reconstruction property in Banach spaces which satisfy $\\mathfrak{I}$-property. A characterization of reconstruction property in Banach spaces which satisfy $\\mathfrak{I}$-property in terms of frames in Banach spaces is obtained. Banach frames associated with reconstruction property are discussed.

  17. 2D granular flows with the μ(I) rheology and side walls friction: A well-balanced multilayer discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Nieto, E. D.; Garres-Díaz, J.; Mangeney, A.; Narbona-Reina, G.

    2018-03-01

    We present here numerical modelling of granular flows with the μ (I) rheology in confined channels. The contribution is twofold: (i) a model to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations with the μ (I) rheology through an asymptotic analysis; under the hypothesis of a one-dimensional flow, this model takes into account side walls friction; (ii) a multilayer discretization following Fernández-Nieto et al. (2016) [20]. In this new numerical scheme, we propose an appropriate treatment of the rheological terms through a hydrostatic reconstruction which allows this scheme to be well-balanced and therefore to deal with dry areas. Based on academic tests, we first evaluate the influence of the width of the channel on the normal profiles of the downslope velocity thanks to the multilayer approach that is intrinsically able to describe changes from Bagnold to S-shaped (and vice versa) velocity profiles. We also check the well-balanced property of the proposed numerical scheme. We show that approximating side walls friction using single-layer models may lead to strong errors. Secondly, we compare the numerical results with experimental data on granular collapses. We show that the proposed scheme allows us to qualitatively reproduce the deposit in the case of a rigid bed (i.e. dry area) and that the error made by replacing the dry area by a small layer of material may be large if this layer is not thin enough. The proposed model is also able to reproduce the time evolution of the free surface and of the flow/no-flow interface. In addition, it reproduces the effect of erosion for granular flows over initially static material lying on the bed. This is possible when using a variable friction coefficient μ (I) but not with a constant friction coefficient.

  18. The influence of hemodynamic forces on biomarkers in the walls of elastase-induced aneurysms in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Ding, Yong-Hong; Dai, Daying; Danielson, Mark A.; Lewis, Debra A.; Cloft, Harry J.; Kallmes, David F. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Zakaria, Hasballah; Robertson, Anne M. [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Biological and biophysical factors have been shown to play an important role in the initiation, progression, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between hemodynamic forces and markers of vascular remodeling in elastase-induced saccular aneurysms in rabbits. Elastase-induced aneurysms were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in rabbits. Hemodynamic parameters were estimated using computational fluid dynamic simulations based on 3-D-reconstructed models of the vasculature. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), their inhibitors (TIMPs) and markers of vascular remodeling were measured in different spatial regions within the aneurysms. Altered expression of biological markers relative to controls was correlated with the locations of subnormal time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS) but not with the magnitude of pressure. In the aneurysms, WSS was low and expression of biological markers was significantly altered in a time-dependent fashion. At 2 weeks, an upregulation of active-MMP-2, downregulation of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, and intact endothelium were found in aneurysm cavities. However, by 12 weeks, endothelial cells were absent or scattered, and levels of pro- and active-MMP-2 were not different from those in control arteries, but pro-MMP-9 and both TIMPs were upregulated. These results reveal a strong, spatially localized correlation between diminished WSS and differential expression of biological markers of vascular remodeling in elastase-induced saccular aneurysms. The ability of the wall to function and maintain a healthy endothelium in a low shear environment appears to be significantly impaired by chronic exposure to low WSS. (orig.)

  19. Reconstruction from divergent ray projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, C. S.; Singh, Santosh

    2012-03-01

    Despite major advances in x-ray sources, detector arrays, gantry mechanical design and special computer performances, computed tomography (CT) enjoys the filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm as its first choice for the CT image reconstruction in the commercial scanners [1]. Over the years, a lot of fundamental work has been done in the area of finding the sophisticated solutions for the inverse problems using different kinds of optimization techniques. Recent literature in applied mathematics is being dominated by the compressive sensing techniques and/or sparse reconstruction techniques [2], [3]. Still there is a long way to go for translating these newly developed algorithms in the clinical environment. The reasons are not obvious and seldom discussed [1]. Knowing the fact that the filtered back projection is one of the most popular CT image reconstruction algorithms, one pursues research work to improve the different error estimates at different steps performed in the filtered back projection. In this paper, we present a back projection formula for the reconstruction of divergent beam tomography with unique convolution structure. Using such a proposed approximate convolution structure, the approximation error mathematically justifies that the reconstruction error is low for a suitable choice of parameters. In order to minimize the exposure time and possible distortions due to the motion of the patient, the fan beam method of collection of data is used. Rebinning [4] transformation is used to connect fan beam data into parallel beam data so that the well developed methods of image reconstruction for parallel beam geometry can be used. Due to the computational errors involved in the numerical process of rebinning, some degradation of image is inevitable. However, to date very little work has been done for the reconstruction of fan beam tomography. There have been some recent results [5], [6] on wavelet reconstruction of divergent beam tomography. In this paper

  20. Matching Biological Mesh and Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Reconstructing an Open Abdomen Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caviggioli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of open abdominal defects is a clinical problem which general and plastic surgeons have to address in cooperation. We report the case of a 66-year-old man who presented an abdominal dehiscence after multiple laparotomies for a sigmoid-rectal adenocarcinoma that infiltrated into the abdominal wall, subsequently complicated by peritonitis and enteric fistula. A cutaneous dehiscence and an incontinent abdominal wall resulted after the last surgery. The abdominal wall was reconstructed using a biological porcine cross-linked mesh Permacol (Covidien Inc., Norwalk, CT. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT, instead, was used on the mesh in order to reduce wound dimensions, promote granulation tissue formation, and obtain secondary closure of cutaneous dehiscence which was finally achieved with a split-thickness skin graft. Biological mesh behaved like a scaffold for the granulation tissue that was stimulated by the negative pressure. The biological mesh was rapidly integrated in the abdominal wall restoring abdominal wall continence, while the small dehiscence, still present in the central area, was subsequently covered with a split-thickness skin graft. The combination of these different procedures led us to solve this complicated case obtaining complete wound closure after less than 2 months.

  1. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  3. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  4. Codimension three bifurcation of streamline patterns close to a no-slip wall: A topological description of boundary layer eruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balci, Adnan; Andersen, Morten; Thompson, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    A vortex close to a no-slip wall gives rise to the creation of new vorticity at the wall. This vorticity may organize itself into vortices that erupt from the separated boundary layer. We study how the eruption process in terms of the streamline topology is initiated and varies in dependence of t...

  5. Improved Conjugate Gradient Bundle Adjustment of Dunhuang Wall Painting Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, K.; Huang, X.; You, H.

    2017-09-01

    Bundle adjustment with additional parameters is identified as a critical step for precise orthoimage generation and 3D reconstruction of Dunhuang wall paintings. Due to the introduction of self-calibration parameters and quasi-planar constraints, the structure of coefficient matrix of the reduced normal equation is banded-bordered, making the solving process of bundle adjustment complex. In this paper, Conjugate Gradient Bundle Adjustment (CGBA) method is deduced by calculus of variations. A preconditioning method based on improved incomplete Cholesky factorization is adopt to reduce the condition number of coefficient matrix, as well as to accelerate the iteration rate of CGBA. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results comparison with conventional method indicate that, the proposed method can effectively conquer the ill-conditioned problem of normal equation and improve the calculation efficiency of bundle adjustment with additional parameters considerably, while maintaining the actual accuracy.

  6. IMPROVED CONJUGATE GRADIENT BUNDLE ADJUSTMENT OF DUNHUANG WALL PAINTING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bundle adjustment with additional parameters is identified as a critical step for precise orthoimage generation and 3D reconstruction of Dunhuang wall paintings. Due to the introduction of self-calibration parameters and quasi-planar constraints, the structure of coefficient matrix of the reduced normal equation is banded-bordered, making the solving process of bundle adjustment complex. In this paper, Conjugate Gradient Bundle Adjustment (CGBA method is deduced by calculus of variations. A preconditioning method based on improved incomplete Cholesky factorization is adopt to reduce the condition number of coefficient matrix, as well as to accelerate the iteration rate of CGBA. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results comparison with conventional method indicate that, the proposed method can effectively conquer the ill-conditioned problem of normal equation and improve the calculation efficiency of bundle adjustment with additional parameters considerably, while maintaining the actual accuracy.

  7. Anesthesia Approach in Endovascular Aortic Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşin Alagöl

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We have analyzed our initial results of our anesthesia techniques in our new-onset endovascular aortic reconstruction cases.Patients and Methods: The perioperative data of 15 elective and emergent endovascular aortic reconstruction cases that were operated in 2010-2011 were collected in a database. The choice of anesthesia was made by the risk factors, surgical team’s preferences, type and location of the aortic pathology and by the predicted operation duration. The data of local and general anesthesia cases were compared.Results: Thirteen (86.7% cases were male and 2 (13.3% female. Eleven patients were in ASA Class III. The demographic parameters, ASA classifications, concurrent diseases were similar in both groups. Thirteen (86.7% cases had infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and 2 (13.3% had Type III aortic dissection. The diastolic arterial pressures were lower in general anesthesia group in 20th and 40th minutes’ measurements just like the mean arterial pressure measurements at the 40th, 100th minutes and during the deployment of the graft. Postoperative mortality occurred in 3 (20.0% patients and they all had general anesthesia and they were operated on emergency basis. Postoperative morbidity occurred in four patients that had general anesthesia (acute renal failure, multi-organ failure and pneumonia. The other patient had atrial fibrillation on the 1st postoperative day and was converted to sinus rhythm with amiodarone infusion.Conclusion: Edovascular aortic reconstruction procedures can safely be performed with both general and local anesthesia less invasively compared to open surgery. General anesthesia may be preferred for the better hemodynamic control.

  8. Water Walls for Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T. (Inventor); Gormly, Sherwin J. (Inventor); Hammoudeh, Mona (Inventor); Richardson, Tra-My Justine (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method and associated system for processing waste gases, liquids and solids, produced by human activity, to separate (i) liquids suitable for processing to produce potable water, (ii) solids and liquids suitable for construction of walls suitable for enclosing a habitat volume and for radiation shielding, and (iii) other fluids and solids that are not suitable for processing. A forward osmosis process and a reverse osmosis process are sequentially combined to reduce fouling and to permit accumulation of different processable substances. The invention may be used for long term life support of human activity.

  9. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  10. Near-field interaction of colloid near wavy walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yimin; Serra, Francesca; Wong, Denise; Steager, Edward; Stebe, Kathleen

    Anisotropic media can be used to manipulate colloids, in tandem with carefully designed boundary conditions. For example, in bulk nematic liquid crystal, a wall with homeotropic anchoring repels a colloid with the same anchoring; yet by changing the surface topography from planar to concave, one can turn repulsion into attraction. We explore the behaviors of micro-particles with associated topological defects (hedgehogs or Saturn rings) near wavy walls. The walls locally excite disturbance, which decays into bulk. The range of influence is related to the curvature. The distortion can be used to position particles, either directly on the structure or at a distance away, based on the ``splay-matching'' rules. When distortion becomes stronger through the deepening of the well, the splay field created by the wall can prompt transformation from a Saturn ring to a hedgehog. We combine wells of different wavelength and depth to direct colloid movement. We apply a magnetic field to reset the initial position of ferromagnetic colloids and subsequently release them to probe the elastic energy landscape. Our platform enables manipulation, particle selection, and a detailed study of defect structure under the influence of curvature. Army Research Office.

  11. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Som S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Desjarlais, Andre Omer [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  12. GNSS troposphere tomography based on two-step reconstructions using GPS observations and COSMIC profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Xia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, balloon-based radiosonde soundings are used to study the spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapour. However, this approach cannot be frequently employed due to its high cost. In contrast, GPS tomography technique can obtain water vapour in a high temporal resolution. In the tomography technique, an iterative or non-iterative reconstruction algorithm is usually utilised to overcome rank deficiency of observation equations for water vapour inversion. However, the single iterative or non-iterative reconstruction algorithm has their limitations. For instance, the iterative reconstruction algorithm requires accurate initial values of water vapour while the non-iterative reconstruction algorithm needs proper constraint conditions. To overcome these drawbacks, we present a combined iterative and non-iterative reconstruction approach for the three-dimensional (3-D water vapour inversion using GPS observations and COSMIC profiles. In this approach, the non-iterative reconstruction algorithm is first used to estimate water vapour density based on a priori water vapour information derived from COSMIC radio occultation data. The estimates are then employed as initial values in the iterative reconstruction algorithm. The largest advantage of this approach is that precise initial values of water vapour density that are essential in the iterative reconstruction algorithm can be obtained. This combined reconstruction algorithm (CRA is evaluated using 10-day GPS observations in Hong Kong and COSMIC profiles. The test results indicate that the water vapor accuracy from CRA is 16 and 14% higher than that of iterative and non-iterative reconstruction approaches, respectively. In addition, the tomography results obtained from the CRA are further validated using radiosonde data. Results indicate that water vapour densities derived from the CRA agree with radiosonde results very well at altitudes above 2.5 km. The average RMS value of their

  13. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then moving along it

  14. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaro Akiyama

    Full Text Available The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and

  15. Convex optimization for nonrigid stereo reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shuhan; Ma, Wenjuan; Shi, Wenhuan; Liu, Yuncai

    2010-03-01

    We present a method for recovering 3-D nonrigid structure from an image pair taken with a stereo rig. More specifically, we dedicate to recover shapes of nearly inextensible deformable surfaces. In our approach, we represent the surface as a 3-D triangulated mesh and formulate the reconstruction problem as an optimization problem consisting of data terms and shape terms. The data terms are model to image keypoint correspondences which can be formulated as second-order cone programming (SOCP) constraints using L(infinity) norm. The shape terms are designed to retaining original lengths of mesh edges which are typically nonconvex constraints. We will show that this optimization problem can be turned into a sequence of SOCP feasibility problems in which the nonconvex constraints are approximated as a set of convex constraints. Thanks to the efficient SOCP solver, the reconstruction problem can then be solved reliably and efficiently. As opposed to previous methods, ours neither involves smoothness constraints nor need an initial estimation, which enables us to recover shapes of surfaces with smooth, sharp and other complex deformations from a single image pair. The robustness and accuracy of our approach are evaluated quantitatively on synthetic data and qualitatively on real data.

  16. Sternal reconstruction after post-sternotomy mediastinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kaul

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sternal wound complications are uncommon after cardiac surgery. They comprise sternal dehiscence, deep sternal wound infections and mediastinitis, which will be treated as varying expressions of a singular pathology for reasons explained in the text. Methodology and review This article reviews the definition, prevalence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, microbiology and management of deep sternal wound infections and mediastinitis after cardiac surgery. The role of negative pressure wound therapy and initial and delayed surgical management is discussed with special emphasis on plastic techniques with muscle and omental flaps. Recent advances in reconstructive surgery are presented. Conclusions Deep sternal wound complications no longer spell debilitating morbidity and high mortality. Better understanding of risk factors that predispose to deep sternal wound complications and general improvement in theatre protocols for asepsis have dramatically reduced the incidence of deep sternal wound complications. Negative pressure wound therapy and appropriately timed and staged muscle or omental flap reconstruction have transformed the outcomes once these complications occur.

  17. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  18. An expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-autologous aortic hybrid valve for right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction in the Ross procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takako; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Shuntoh, Keisuke; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2007-04-01

    Although the Ross procedure is a well-established approach to aortic valve disease in pediatric patients and young adults, there still is no ideal method of right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) reconstruction, especially in children. To achieve improved RVOT reconstruction with long-term valve function and growth potential, we have developed a hybrid valve which combines the autologous aortic valve and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) valves. The posterior wall of RVOT was reconstructed using the autologous aortic wall with a noncoronary cusp, and the anterior wall was reconstructed using a patch made of bovine pericardium or ePTFE with bicuspid ePTFE valves. We implanted hybrid valves in 14 patients (age 5-18 years). During the follow-up period (2.4-8.8 years), there were no mortalities or morbidities, and no patients required reoperation. Echocardiography showed no significant stenosis and regurgitation, and preserved valve motion in all patients. The z-value of the diameters of the pulmonary annulus in early and late follow-up was -1.4 and -1.8, respectively, the difference not being significant. Creation of a hybrid valve was associated with excellent mid- to long-term results. Given its theoretical growth potential, we speculate that this valve could be a good choice for RVOT reconstruction in the Ross procedure, especially for young children.

  19. Submilisievert ultralow-dose CT colonography using iterative reconstruction technique: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Lukas; Danes, Jan; Jahoda, Jiri; Masek, Martin; Lisy, Jiri; Ourednicek, Petr

    2015-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) colonography is a well established modality for the examination of symptomatic patients as well as in screening. Recent technical advances in improving image quality by iterative reconstruction contribute to the reduction of the radiation dose which is a major concern in CT imaging. To evaluate image quality of ultralow-dose submilisievert CT colonography using hybrid iterative reconstruction technique. Sixteen patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT colonography with standard protocol in supine position and ultralow-dose protocol in prone position. Ultralow-dose datasets were reconstructed with filtered back projection and an advanced hybrid iterative reconstruction technique. Two radiologists independently evaluated 96 colonic segments for image quality in the endoluminal view and axial thin sections. Colonic distension, smoothness of colonic wall and distortion of folds in the endoluminal view, sharpness of colonic wall delineation, perceived image noise, and presence of photon starvation artifact were rated on a five-point scale. Intraluminal noise expressed as standard deviation of Hounsfield density was measured in all segments. The mean radiation dose was 0.42 mSv and 5.48 mSv in prone and supine scans, respectively. All distended segments were rated evaluable in standard dose and ultralow-dose series reconstructed with the iterative reconstruction technique, whereas in 61% segments image quality was rated poor or unacceptable in ultralow-dose series where filtered back projection was used with worst ratings in the rectum and the sigmoid colon. This pilot study shows that iterative reconstruction technique is a feasible method to decrease the radiation dose from CT colonography for both positions below 1mSv. Further investigations of larger scale need to be done to clarify, whether such a low radiation dose would influence the detection of polyps. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Scattered and Fluorescent Photon Track Reconstruction in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria N. Kholodtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate analysis of biological tissue deep regions is important for tumor targeting. This paper is concentrated on photons’ paths analysis in such biotissue as brain, because optical probing depth of fluorescent and excitation radiation differs. A method for photon track reconstruction was developed. Images were captured focusing on the transparent wall close and parallel to the source fibres, placed in brain tissue phantoms. The images were processed to reconstruct the photons most probable paths between two fibres. Results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation. It was shown that the excitation radiation optical probing depth is twice more than for the fluorescent photons. The way of fluorescent radiation spreading was discussed. Because of fluorescent and excitation radiation spreads in different ways, and the effective anisotropy factor, geff, was proposed for fluorescent radiation. For the brain tissue phantoms it were found to be 0.62±0.05 and 0.66±0.05 for the irradiation wavelengths 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. These calculations give more accurate information about the tumor location in biotissue. Reconstruction of photon paths allows fluorescent and excitation probing depths determination. The geff can be used as simplified parameter for calculations of fluorescence probing depth.

  1. [Tracheal reconstruction with memory alloy prosthesis coated with collagen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hai-ping; Cao, Zi-ang; Gu, Xu-dong; Pan, Wen-biao; Wu, Xue-jun; Zhang, Gu-lan

    2007-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of tracheal reconstruction with a prosthesis made of memory alloy coated with collagen sponge in mongrel dogs. The basic skeleton of the prosthesis was knitted with Ni-Ti memory alloy wires. The tubular mesh was sealed with polyurethane membrane and then inner and external walls of the lumen were coated with collagen sponge. Cervical trachea segmental reconstruction was performed in 8 mongrel dogs with these prostheses. The efficacy of the implanted prostheses were periodically evaluated after operation using x-ray, tracheoscopy and specimen microscope examinations. One dog died of prosthesis dislocation 10 days after operation, another was killed 45 days later because of anastomotic stenosis. 6 dogs survived more than 90 days and the longest one lived for 150 days. Its implanted prosthesis was completely incorporated with the recipient tissue, where re-epithelialization occluded on anastomotic sites. The tracheal lumen was patent. This memory alloy tracheal prosthesis has been proved useful for reconstruction of large, circumferential tracheal defects, although its long-term safety and efficiency need to be confirmed.

  2. Surgical reconstruction of a frontonasal orbital-etmoidal fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Cavalieri-Pereira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontal sinus fractures are originated from high intensity accidents, including automobile accidents, altercations, sports accidents and falls. Normally, they are associated with fractures of the middle third of the face, including maxillary, nasal-orbital-etmoidal and zygomatic fractures. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to reconstruct fronto-nasal-orbital-etmoidal fractures, including fixation of bone fragments with plates and screws, reconstruction with bone grafts and titanium mesh implants. In the case here presented, bicoronal access was used to reconstruct the anterior wall of the frontal sinus and to reestablish the fronto-nasal-orbital-etmoidal contour, using a bone graft from the cranial cap for this purpose. The integrity of fronto-nasal duct was verified, and there was no need to canalize it. This procedure is an important guideline in the treatment plan, since it determines obliteration or canalization of the duct. After one year of follow-up, no complication or sequela was observed. Long periods of post-operative follow up are very important to evaluate possible complications.

  3. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  4. Synthetic ferrimagnet nanowires with very low critical current density for coupled domain wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepadatu, Serban; Saarikoski, Henri; Beacham, Robert; Benitez, Maria Jose; Moore, Thomas A; Burnell, Gavin; Sugimoto, Satoshi; Yesudas, Daniel; Wheeler, May C; Miguel, Jorge; Dhesi, Sarnjeet S; McGrouther, Damien; McVitie, Stephen; Tatara, Gen; Marrows, Christopher H

    2017-05-09

    Domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires are potential building-blocks of future technologies such as racetrack memories, in which data encoded in the domain walls are transported using spin-polarised currents. However, the development of energy-efficient devices has been hampered by the high current densities needed to initiate domain wall motion. We show here that a remarkable reduction in the critical current density can be achieved for in-plane magnetised coupled domain walls in CoFe/Ru/CoFe synthetic ferrimagnet tracks. The antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the layers leads to simple Néel wall structures, imaged using photoemission electron and Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, with a width of only ~100 nm. The measured critical current density to set these walls in motion, detected using magnetotransport measurements, is 1.0 × 10(11) Am(-2), almost an order of magnitude lower than in a ferromagnetically coupled control sample. Theoretical modelling indicates that this is due to nonadiabatic driving of anisotropically coupled walls, a mechanism that can be used to design efficient domain-wall devices.

  5. Growth mechanisms of perturbations in boundary layers over a compliant wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M.; Skote, Martin; Bouffanais, Roland

    2018-01-01

    The temporal modal and nonmodal growth of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer flow over an infinite compliant flat wall is considered. Using a wall-normal velocity and wall-normal vorticity formalism, the dynamic boundary condition at the compliant wall admits a linear dependence on the eigenvalue parameter, as compared to a quadratic one in the canonical formulation of the problem. As a consequence, the continuous spectrum is accurately obtained. This enables us to effectively filter the pseudospectra, which is a prerequisite to the transient growth analysis. An energy-budget analysis for the least-decaying hydroelastic (static divergence, traveling wave flutter, and near-stationary transitional) and Tollmien-Schlichting modes in the parameter space reveals the primary routes of energy flow. Moreover, the maximum transient growth rate increases more slowly with the Reynolds number than for the solid wall case. The slowdown is due to a complex dependence of the wall-boundary condition with the Reynolds number, which translates into a transition of the fluid-solid interaction from a two-way to a one-way coupling. Unlike the solid-wall case, viscosity plays a pivotal role in the transient growth. The initial and optimal perturbations are compared with the boundary layer flow over a solid wall; differences and similarities are discussed.

  6. Improvement of wall condensation modeling with suction wall functions for containment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmkuhl, Jan, E-mail: j.lehmkuhl@fz-juelich.de [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Kelm, Stephan, E-mail: s.kelm@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany); Bucci, Matteo [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Paris (France); Allelein, Hans-Josef [RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich (Germany)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of wall functions for single phase condensation models for large scale application. • Identification of modeling errors related to standard log-law due to buoyancy and wall normal mass transfer (suction). • Modeling of wall normal mass transfer by literature formulation (Sucec, 1999) and in-house approach (FIBULA). • Validation against isothermal Favre experimental data. • Comparison against reference fine grid solution for condensing conditions. - Abstract: To simulate wall condensation on containment scale with CFD methods at reasonable computational cost, a single phase approach has to be applied and wall functions have to be used. However, standard wall functions were derived for flows without heat and mass transfer and their fundamental simplifications are not appropriate to deal with condensation. This paper discusses the limitations of standard wall functions and proposes two wall functions for the momentum equation dealing with mass transfer normal to the sheared wall (suction). The first proposed suction wall function is an algebraic modification based on the standard wall function concept. The second proposed wall function is an in-house developed suction wall function with the potential to cover also heat and mass transfer effects by storing the complex solutions of the RANS-Equations in a lookup table. The wall function approaches are compared to experimental results for boundary layer flows with suction and to the reference results obtained using a refined grid in order to resolve the condensing boundary layer.

  7. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddie H. Fu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Current Concepts in ACL Reconstruction is a complete reference text composed of the most thorough collection of topics on the ACL and its surgical reconstruction compiled, with contributions from some of the world's experts and most experienced ACL surgeons. Various procedures mentioned throughout the text are also demonstrated in an accompanying video CD-ROM. PURPOSE Composing a single, comprehensive and complete information source on ACL including basic sciences, clinical issues, latest concepts and surgical techniques, from evaluation to outcome, from history to future, editors and contributors have targeted to keep the audience pace with the latest concepts and techniques for the evaluation and the treatment of ACL injuries. FEATURES The text is composed of 27 chapters in 6 sections. The first section is mostly about basic sciences, also history of the ACL, imaging, clinical approach to adolescent and pediatric patients are subjected. In the second section, Graft Choices and Arthroscopy Portals for ACL Reconstruction are mentioned. The third section is about the technique and the outcome of the single-bundle ACL reconstruction. The fourth chapter includes the techniques and outcome of the double-bundle ACL reconstruction. In the fifth chapter revision, navigation technology, rehabilitation and the evaluation of the outcome of ACL reconstruction is subjected. The sixth/the last chapter is about the future advances to reach: What We Have Learned and the Future of ACL Reconstruction. AUDIENCE Orthopedic residents, sports traumatology and knee surgery fellows, orthopedic surgeons, also scientists in basic sciences or clinicians who are studying or planning a research on ACL forms the audience group of this book. ASSESSMENT This is the latest, the most complete and comprehensive textbook of ACL reconstruction produced by the editorial work up of two pioneer and masters "Freddie H. Fu MD and Steven B. Cohen MD" with the contribution of world

  8. Polaron-Driven Surface Reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reticcioli, Michele; Setvin, Martin; Hao, Xianfeng; Flauger, Peter; Kresse, Georg; Schmid, Michael; Diebold, Ulrike; Franchini, Cesare

    2017-07-01

    Geometric and electronic surface reconstructions determine the physical and chemical properties of surfaces and, consequently, their functionality in applications. The reconstruction of a surface minimizes its surface free energy in otherwise thermodynamically unstable situations, typically caused by dangling bonds, lattice stress, or a divergent surface potential, and it is achieved by a cooperative modification of the atomic and electronic structure. Here, we combined first-principles calculations and surface techniques (scanning tunneling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy) to report that the repulsion between negatively charged polaronic quasiparticles, formed by the interaction between excess electrons and the lattice phonon field, plays a key role in surface reconstructions. As a paradigmatic example, we explain the (1 ×1 ) to (1 ×2 ) transition in rutile TiO2 (110 ) .

  9. Polaron-Driven Surface Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Reticcioli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Geometric and electronic surface reconstructions determine the physical and chemical properties of surfaces and, consequently, their functionality in applications. The reconstruction of a surface minimizes its surface free energy in otherwise thermodynamically unstable situations, typically caused by dangling bonds, lattice stress, or a divergent surface potential, and it is achieved by a cooperative modification of the atomic and electronic structure. Here, we combined first-principles calculations and surface techniques (scanning tunneling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy to report that the repulsion between negatively charged polaronic quasiparticles, formed by the interaction between excess electrons and the lattice phonon field, plays a key role in surface reconstructions. As a paradigmatic example, we explain the (1×1 to (1×2 transition in rutile TiO_{2}(110.

  10. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papapavlou Leonidas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia.

  11. Inverse measurement of wall pressure field in flexible-wall wind tunnels using global wall deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Julian; Patil, Mayuresh; Devenport, William

    2018-02-01

    The Kevlar-wall anechoic wind tunnel offers great value to the aeroacoustics research community, affording the capability to make simultaneous aeroacoustic and aerodynamic measurements. While the aeroacoustic potential of the Kevlar-wall test section is already being leveraged, the aerodynamic capability of these test sections is still to be fully realized. The flexibility of the Kevlar walls suggests the possibility that the internal test section flow may be characterized by precisely measuring small deflections of the flexible walls. Treating the Kevlar fabric walls as tensioned membranes with known pre-tension and material properties, an inverse stress problem arises where the pressure distribution over the wall is sought as a function of the measured wall deflection. Experimental wall deformations produced by the wind loading of an airfoil model are measured using digital image correlation and subsequently projected onto polynomial basis functions which have been formulated to mitigate the impact of measurement noise based on a finite-element study. Inserting analytic derivatives of the basis functions into the equilibrium relations for a membrane, full-field pressure distributions across the Kevlar walls are computed. These inversely calculated pressures, after being validated against an independent measurement technique, can then be integrated along the length of the test section to give the sectional lift of the airfoil. Notably, these first-time results are achieved with a non-contact technique and in an anechoic environment.

  12. A 277 year cool season dam inflow reconstruction for Tasmania, southeastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K. J.; Nichols, S. C.; Evans, R.; Allie, S.; Carson, G.; Ling, F.; Cook, E. R.; Lee, G.; Baker, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal variability is a significant source of uncertainty in projected changes to precipitation across southeastern Australia (SEA). While existing instrumental records provide seasonal data for recent decades, most proxy records (e.g., tree rings, corals, speleothems) offer only annual reconstructions of hydroclimate. We present the first cool-season (July-August) reconstruction of dam inflow (Lake Burbury) for western Tasmania in SEA based on tree-ring width (Athrotaxis selaginoides) and mean latewood cell wall thickness (Phyllocladus aspleniifolius) chronologies. The reconstruction, produced using principal component regression, verifies back to 1731 and is moderately skillful, explaining around 23% of the variance. According to the reconstruction, relatively low inflow periods occurred around 1860, the early 1900s and 1970, while relatively high inflows occurred in the 1770s and 1810s. Highest reconstructed inflows occurred in 1816, and lowest in 1909. Comparison with available documentary and instrumental records indicates that the reconstruction better captures high rather than low flow events. There is virtually no correlation between our reconstruction and another for December-January inflow for the same catchment, a result consistent with the relationship between seasonal instrumental data. This suggests that conditions in one season have not generally reflected conditions in the other season over the instrumental record, or for the past 277 years. This illustrates the value of obtaining reconstructions of regional hydroclimatic variability for multiple individual seasons in regions where dry and wet seasons are not strongly defined. The results also indicate that the hydroclimate of the southeastern Australian region cannot be adequately represented by a single regional reconstruction.

  13. Takayasu Arteritis Initially Mimicking Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytekin Alcelik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu’s arteritis (TA is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects large vessels, predominantly the aorta and main branches, leading to vessel wall thickening, fibrosis and stenosis. Cardiac and vascular symptoms are also commonly present at disease onset. In TA with thoracic or abdominal involvement, although murmur can be present as a physical examination finding, the pulse difference may be absent. Here, we mention a case of TA who initially looked like infective endocarditis and had widespread thoracic murmur.

  14. Rational Reconstructions of Modern Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mittelstaedt, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Newton’s classical physics and its underlying ontology are loaded with several metaphysical hypotheses that cannot be justified by rational reasoning nor by experimental evidence. Furthermore, it is well known that some of these hypotheses are not contained in the great theories of modern physics, such as the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. This book shows that, on the basis of Newton’s classical physics and by rational reconstruction, the theory of relativity as well as quantum mechanics can be obtained by partly eliminating or attenuating the metaphysical hypotheses. Moreover, it is shown that these reconstructions do not require additional hypotheses or new experimental results.

  15. Model-based tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David H; Lehman, Sean K; Goodman, Dennis M

    2012-06-26

    A model-based approach to estimating wall positions for a building is developed and tested using simulated data. It borrows two techniques from geophysical inversion problems, layer stripping and stacking, and combines them with a model-based estimation algorithm that minimizes the mean-square error between the predicted signal and the data. The technique is designed to process multiple looks from an ultra wideband radar array. The processed signal is time-gated and each section processed to detect the presence of a wall and estimate its position, thickness, and material parameters. The floor plan of a building is determined by moving the array around the outside of the building. In this paper we describe how the stacking and layer stripping algorithms are combined and show the results from a simple numerical example of three parallel walls.

  16. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  17. Chest wall myositis in a patient with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Laila; Al-Rawi, Harith

    2014-10-13

    We describe a case of a 42-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with severe left-sided chest pain and chest tenderness of 1-day duration. The pain was episodic and was aggravated by any chest wall movement. His initial blood tests and ECG were suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, his pattern of pain, lack of response to opiates, raised creatine kinase and signs of pleurisy on chest radiograph raised a suspicion of an alternative diagnosis. The patient showed a dramatic response in pain relief to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. He was suspected to have chest wall myositis with pleural involvement in the form of pleurodynia. His serology test was positive for coxsackie virus antibodies. We will discuss in this case report the pathognomonic features, diagnosis and treatment of a rare infectious condition known as Bornholm disease. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Towards the mechanical characterization of abdominal wall by inverse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Allué, R; Calvo, B; Oberai, A A; Barbone, P E

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the passive mechanical behaviour of abdominal wall in vivo in an animal model using only external cameras and numerical analysis. The main objective lies in defining a methodology that provides in vivo information of a specific patient without altering mechanical properties. It is demonstrated in the mechanical study of abdomen for hernia purposes. Mechanical tests consisted on pneumoperitoneum tests performed on New Zealand rabbits, where inner pressure was varied from 0mmHg to 12mmHg. Changes in the external abdominal surface were recorded and several points were tracked. Based on their coordinates we reconstructed a 3D finite element model of the abdominal wall, considering an incompressible hyperelastic material model defined by two parameters. The spatial distributions of these parameters (shear modulus and non linear parameter) were calculated by inverse analysis, using two different types of regularization: Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) and Tikhonov (H 1 ). After solving the inverse problem, the distribution of the material parameters were obtained along the abdominal surface. Accuracy of the results was evaluated for the last level of pressure. Results revealed a higher value of the shear modulus in a wide stripe along the craneo-caudal direction, associated with the presence of linea alba in conjunction with fascias and rectus abdominis. Non linear parameter distribution was smoother and the location of higher values varied with the regularization type. Both regularizations proved to yield in an accurate predicted displacement field, but H 1 obtained a smoother material parameter distribution while TVD included some discontinuities. The methodology here presented was able to characterize in vivo the passive non linear mechanical response of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective way to reconstruct arch bridges using concrete walls and transverse strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusáček, Ladislav; Pěkník, Robin; Nečas, Radim

    2017-09-01

    There are more than 500 masonry arch bridges in the Czech Road system and about 2500 in the Czech Railway system. Many of them are cracked in the longitudinal (span) direction. The barrel vaults are separated by the cracks into partial masonry arches without load bearing connection in transverse direction. These constructions are about 150 years old and they are also too narrow for the current road system. This paper presents a strengthening method for masonry arch bridges using transverse post-tensioning. This method is very useful not only for strengthening in the transverse direction, but widening of masonry arches can be taken as secondary effect especially in case of road bridges. Several bridges were successfully repaired with the use of this system which seems to be effective and reliable.

  20. In the Shadow of the Peace Walls: Art, Education, and Social Reconstruction in Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Tom; Conlon, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Northern Ireland's well-known civil strife between Catholics and Protestants had enjoyed an uneasy peace, but a recent outbreak of new violence in 2010 caused disappointment to these authors. Bernard Conlon and Tom Anderson collaborated on creating a new children's peace mural with the Kids' Guernica Peace Mural Project in West Belfast. This Kids'…