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Sample records for wall motion abnormalities

  1. Wellens' syndrome with segmental wall-motion abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Bugan, Baris; Celik,Turgay; Celik,Murat; Dermikoh,Sait; Iyisoy,Atila; Serdar ,Firtina

    2010-01-01

    Turgay Celik1, Baris Bugan1, Serdar Firtina1, Murat Celik2, Sait Demirkol1, Atila Iyisoy11Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Cardiology, Ankara, Turkey; 2Van Army District Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Van, TurkeyAbstract: Wellens' syndrome is a pattern of electrocardiographic T-wave changes associated with critical, proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery stenosis. We herein report 2 cases of Wellens' syndrome with segmental wall-motion abnormalities...

  2. Pattern recognition of abnormal left ventricle wall motion in cardiac MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingli; Radau, Perry; Connelly, Kim; Dick, Alexander; Wright, Graham

    2009-01-01

    There are four main problems that limit application of pattern recognition techniques for recognition of abnormal cardiac left ventricle (LV) wall motion: (1) Normalization of the LV's size, shape, intensity level and position; (2) defining a spatial correspondence between phases and subjects; (3) extracting features; (4) and discriminating abnormal from normal wall motion. Solving these four problems is required for application of pattern recognition techniques to classify the normal and abnormal LV wall motion. In this work, we introduce a normalization scheme to solve the first and second problems. With this scheme, LVs are normalized to the same position, size, and intensity level. Using the normalized images, we proposed an intra-segment classification criterion based on a correlation measure to solve the third and fourth problems. Application of the method to recognition of abnormal cardiac MR LV wall motion showed promising results.

  3. Echocardiographic Wall Motion Abnormality in Posterior Myocardial Infarction: The Diagnostic Value of Posterior Leads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Darehzereshki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the purpose of ascertaining myocardial infarction (MI and ischemia, the sensitivity of the initial 12-lead ECG is inadequate. It is risky to diagnose posterior MI using only precordial reciprocal changes, since the other leads may be more optimally positioned for the identification of electrocardiographic changes. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between electrocardiography changes and wall motion abnormalities in patients with posterior MI for earlier and better diagnosis of posterior MI.Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, we enrolled patients with posterior MI who had come to the Emergency Department of Shariati Hospital with their first episode of chest pain. A 12-lead surface electrocardiogram using posterior leads (V7-V9 was performed for all participants. Patients with ST elevation >0.05 mV or pathologic Q wave in the posterior leads, as well as those with specific changes indicating posterior MI in V1-V2, were evaluated by echocardiography in terms of wall motion abnormalities. All data were analyzed using SPSS and p<0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: Of a total 79 patients enrolled, 48 (60.8% were men, and the mean age was 57.35±8.22 years. Smoking (54.4% and diabetes (48% were the most prevalent risk factors. In the echocardiographic evaluation, all patients had wall motion abnormalities in the left ventricle and 19 patients (24.1% had wall motion abnormalities in the right ventricle. The most frequent segment with motion abnormality among the all patients was the mid-posterior. The posterior leads showed better positive predictive value than the anterior leads for posterior wall motion abnormality.Conclusion: Electrocardiography of the posterior leads in patients with acute chest pain can help in earlier diagnosis and in time treatment of posterior MI.

  4. Automated classification of wall motion abnormalities by principal component analysis of endocardial shape motion patterns in echocardiograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Johan G.; Nijland, Francisca; Mitchell, Steven C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.; Kamp, Otto; Sonka, Milan; Reiber, Johan H. C.

    2003-05-01

    Principal Component Analysis of sets of temporal shape sequences renders eigenvariations of shape/motion, including typical normal and pathological endocardial contraction patterns. A previously developed Active Appearance Model for time sequences (AAMM) was employed to derive AAMM shape coefficients (ASCs) and we hypothesized these would allow classification of wall motion abnormalities (WMA). A set of stress echocardiograms (single-beat 4-chamber and 2-chamber sequences with expert-verified endocardial contours) of 129 infarct patients was split randomly into training (n=65) and testing (n=64) sets. AAMMs were generated from the training set and for all sequences ASCs were extracted and statistically related to regional/global Visual Wall Motion Scoring (VWMS) and clinical infarct severity and volumetric parameters. Linear regression showed clear correlations between ASCs and VWMS. Infarct severity measures correlated poorly to both ASCs and VWMS. Discriminant analysis showed good prediction from low #ASCs of both segmental (85% correctness) and global WMA (90% correctness). Volumetric parameters correlated poorly to regional VWMS. Conclusions: 1)ASCs show promising accuracy for automated WMA classification. 2)VWMS and endocardial border motion are closely related; with accurate automated border detection, automated WMA classification should be feasible. 3)ASC shape analysis allows contour set evaluation by direct comparison to clinical parameters.

  5. Apical regional wall motion abnormalities reminiscent to Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy following consumption of psychoactive fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nef, Holger M; Möllmann, Helge; Hilpert, Pirmin; Krause, Nicola; Troidl, Christian; Weber, Michael; Rolf, Andreas; Dill, Thorsten; Hamm, Christian; Elsässer, A

    2009-05-01

    Consumption of natural hallucinogenic substances continues to be a problem. In this case we report from a young male patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome with significant ST-elevation after the abuse of psychoactive fungi, commonly referred to as "magic mushrooms". Coronary angiography excludes relevant coronary artery disease. In ventriculography contractile dysfunction with hypokinesia in the apical segments could be documented reminiscent to wall motion abnormalities in Tako-Tsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging showed no pathological signal activity in the late-enhancement sequences ruling out myocardial infarction or inflammatory processes. Ventricular function normalized within several days. The active metabolite of psychoactive fungi psilocybin is known to interact with several different dopaminergic, adrenergic and serotonergic receptors. Thus, the pathomechanisms leading to contractile dysfunction after consumption of psychoactive fungi are reminiscent to those documented in TTC.

  6. Assessment of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities with the use of color kinesis: a valuable visual and training aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Y S; Puryear, J V; Gan, S C; Fowler, M B; Vagelos, R H; Popp, R L; Schnittger, I

    1997-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of left ventricular segmental wall motion by echocardiography is an important yet difficult skill to learn. Color-coded left ventricular wall motion (color kinesis) is a tool that potentially could aid in the interpretation and provide semiquantification. We studied the usefulness of color kinesis in 42 patients with a history of congestive cardiomyopathy who underwent two-dimensional echocardiograms and a color kinesis study. The expert's reading of the two-dimensional wall motion served as a reference for comparison of color kinesis studies interpreted by the expert and a cardiovascular trainee. Correlation between two-dimensional echocardiography and the expert's and trainee's color coded wall motion scores were r = 0.83 and r = 0.67, respectively. Reproducibility between reviewers and between operators was also assessed. Interobserver variability for color-coded wall motion showed a correlation of r = 0.78. Correlation between operators was also good; r = 0.84. Color kinesis is reliable and appears promising as an adjunct in the assessment of wall motion abnormalities by echocardiography. It is both a valuable visual aid, as well as a training aid for the cardiovascular trainee.

  7. Validity of acoustic quantification colour kinesis for detection of left ventricular regional wall motion abnormalities: a transoesophageal echocardiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, T; Kolev, N; Blaicher, A; Spiss, C; Zimpfer, M

    1997-10-01

    Transoesophageal echocardiography is a sensitive monitor for intraoperative myocardial ischaemia. Colour kinesis is a new technology for echocardiographic assessment of regional wall motion based on acoustic quantification. We have examined the feasibility and accuracy of quantitative segmental analysis of colour kinesis images to provide objective evaluation of systolic regional wall motion during the perioperative period using transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE). Two-dimensional echocardiograms were obtained in the transgastric short-axis and long-axis views in 60 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing noncardiac surgery. End-systolic colour overlays superimposed on the grey scale images were obtained with colour kinesis to colour encode left ventricular endocardial motion throughout systole. These colour-encoded images were divided into segments and compared with corresponding conventional two-dimensional images. Six hundred of a potential 720 left ventricular wall segments were of sufficient resolution for grading by experts; they diagnosed wall motion abnormalities in 61 of these segments by a conventional method. In comparing the conventional TOE method with colour kinesis, there were 60 true positives, 482 true negatives, 57 false positives and 1 false negative result. This yielded a sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 89%, positive predictive value of 51% and negative predictive value of 100%. Translational and rotational movement of the heart and papillary muscle interference were common problems accounting for false positive diagnoses. We conclude that colour kinesis provides a basis for objective and on-line evaluation of left ventricular regional wall motion which is a sensitive but non-specific method. It may be a useful aid for the less experienced because it can potentially direct the anaesthetist's attention towards specific segments.

  8. Clinical impact of ' in-treatment' wall motion abnormalities in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicala, S.; Simone, G. de; Wachtell, K.;

    2008-01-01

    to analyze the primary composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke and, separately, for fatal and nonfatal MI and hospitalized heart failure. Results During a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, an event was recorded in 67 ( 9%) patients. In Cox models after adjusting for age, gender, treatment, blood......, however, never been investigated. We examined whether 'in- treatment' wall motion abnormalities predicted outcome in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint ( LIFE) reduction in hypertension echocardiographic substudy. Methods We studied 749 patients without coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction...

  9. Interventricular delay measurement using equilibrium radionuclide angiography before resynchronization therapy should be performed outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtehoux, Maxime [Service EFMP CHU Trousseau, Chambray les Tours (France); Zannad, Noura; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique [Service Cardiologie B CHU Trousseau, Tours (France); Eder, Veronique [Service EFMP CHU Trousseau, Chambray les Tours (France); EA3852 University Francois Rabelais, Tours (France)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that only mechanical dyssynchrony outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities (WMA) can be reduced by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Included in the study were 28 consecutive patients with nonischaemic cardiomyopathy selected for CRT. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) was carried out before and after implantation of a multisite pacemaker. Patients were separated into two groups depending on the presence or absence of segmental WMA. A reduction in QRS duration was observed in all patients after CRT. The interventricular delay (IVD) decreased significantly after CRT only in patients without WMA (homogeneous contraction, HG group; IVD 44 {+-} 11.4 vs. 17 {+-} 3.1 , p = 0.04). In contrast, no significant decrease was observed in patients with WMA (WMA group; IVD 51 {+-} 6 vs. 38 {+-} 6 , p NS). However, when dyssynchrony was considered outside the WMA area, a significant reduction in IVD was obtained, in the same range as in the HG group (IVD 32 {+-} 3 vs. 19 {+-} 3 , p = 0.04). In 9 of 15 patients (60%) with a reduction in IVD after CRT, the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) increased by about +10%. In contrast, in 13 of 13 patients (100%) with no reduction in IVD, no modification of LVEF was obtained. In the presence of segmental WMA without significant delays outside the WMA area, no reduction in IVD was observed and LVEF did not increase (IVD 34 {+-} 5 before CRT vs. 37 {+-} 7 after CRT; LVEF 19 {+-} 4% before CRT vs. 22 {+-} 3% after CRT, p NS). ERNA can be used to predict good mechanical resynchronization (decrease in IVD) in patients after pacing. IVD has to be determined excluding the area of WMA in order to select patients who will show an increase in their left ventricle function after CRT. (orig.)

  10. Options for assessing and measuring chest wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Assessing chest wall motion is a basic and vital component in managing the child with respiratory problems, whether these are due to pathology in the lungs, airways, chest wall or muscles. Since the 1960s, clinical assessment has been supplemented with an ever-growing range of technological options for measuring chest wall motion, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. Measurements of chest wall motion can be used to: (1) Assess respiratory airflow and volume change, as a non-invasive alternative to measurement at the airway opening, (2) Monitor breathing over long periods of time, to identify apnoea and other types of sleep-disordered breathing, (3)Identify and quantify patterns of abnormal chest wall movement, whether between ribcage and abdominal components (thoracoabdominal asynchrony) or between different regions of the ribcage (eg in scoliosis and pectus excavatum). Measuring chest wall motion allows us to do things which simply cannot be done by more mainstream respiratory function techniques measuring flow at the airway opening: it allows respiratory airflow to be measured when it would otherwise be impossible, and it tells us how the different parts of the chest wall (eg ribcage vs abdomen, right vs left) are moving in order to generate that airflow. The basis of the different techniques available to assess and measure chest wall motion will be reviewed and compared, and their relevance to paediatric respiratory practice assessed.

  11. Intraventricular flow alterations due to dyssynchronous wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Audrey M.; Lai, Hong Kuan; Samaee, Milad; Santhanakrishnan, Arvind

    2015-11-01

    Roughly 30% of patients with systolic heart failure suffer from left ventricular dyssynchrony (LVD), in which mechanical discoordination of the ventricle walls leads to poor hemodynamics and suboptimal cardiac function. There is currently no clear mechanistic understanding of how abnormalities in septal-lateral (SL) wall motion affects left ventricle (LV) function, which is needed to improve the treatment of LVD using cardiac resynchronization therapy. We use an experimental flow phantom with an LV physical model to study mechanistic effects of SL wall motion delay on LV function. To simulate mechanical LVD, two rigid shafts were coupled to two segments (apical and mid sections) along the septal wall of the LV model. Flow through the LV model was driven using a piston pump, and stepper motors coupled to the above shafts were used to locally perturb the septal wall segments relative to the pump motion. 2D PIV was used to examine the intraventricular flow through the LV physical model. Alterations to SL delay results in a reduction in the kinetic energy (KE) of the flow field compared to synchronous SL motion. The effect of varying SL motion delay from 0% (synchronous) to 100% (out-of-phase) on KE and viscous dissipation will be presented. This research was supported by the Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and Technology (HR14-022).

  12. Detection of left ventricular motion abnormality via information measures and bayesian filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Ross, Ian G; Islam, Ali; Chong, Jaron; Li, Shuo

    2010-07-01

    We present an original information theoretic measure of heart motion based on the Shannon's differential entropy (SDE), which allows heart wall motion abnormality detection. Based on functional images, which are subject to noise and segmentation inaccuracies, heart wall motion analysis is acknowledged as a difficult problem, and as such, incorporation of prior knowledge is crucial for improving accuracy. Given incomplete, noisy data and a dynamic model, the Kalman filter, a well-known recursive Bayesian filter, is devised in this study to the estimation of the left ventricular (LV) cavity points. However, due to similarity between the statistical information of normal and abnormal heart motions, detecting and classifying abnormality is a challenging problem, which we investigate with a global measure based on the SDE. We further derive two other possible information theoretic abnormality detection criteria, one is based on Rényi entropy and the other on Fisher information. The proposed methods analyze wall motion quantitatively by constructing distributions of the normalized radial distance estimates of the LV cavity. Using 269 x 20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis MRI obtained from 30 subjects, the experimental analysis demonstrates that the proposed SDE criterion can lead to a significant improvement over other features that are prevalent in the literature related to the LV cavity, namely, mean radial displacement and mean radial velocity.

  13. Heart motion abnormality detection via an information measure and Bayesian filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Li, Shuo; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Ross, Ian; Islam, Ali; Chong, Jaron

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates heart wall motion abnormality detection with an information theoretic measure of heart motion based on the Shannon's differential entropy (SDE) and recursive Bayesian filtering. Heart wall motion is generally analyzed using functional images which are subject to noise and segmentation inaccuracies, and incorporation of prior knowledge is crucial in improving the accuracy. The Kalman filter, a well known recursive Bayesian filter, is used in this study to estimate the left ventricular (LV) cavity points given incomplete and noisy data, and given a dynamic model. However, due to similarities between the statistical information of normal and abnormal heart motions, detecting and classifying abnormality is a challenging problem which we proposed to investigate with a global measure based on the SDE. We further derive two other possible information theoretic abnormality detection criteria, one is based on Rényi entropy and the other on Fisher information. The proposed method analyzes wall motion quantitatively by constructing distributions of the normalized radial distance estimates of the LV cavity. Using 269 x 20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images obtained from 30 subjects, the experimental analysis demonstrates that the proposed SDE criterion can lead to significant improvement over other features that are prevalent in the literature related to the LV cavity, namely, mean radial displacement and mean radial velocity.

  14. 瓜蒌薤白半夏汤对不稳定性心绞痛心脏室壁运动的影响%The effects of gualouxiebaibanxia decoction on the cardiac ventricular wall motion abnormalities in unstable angina pectoris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林培森

    2012-01-01

    目的观察瓜蒌薤白半夏汤对不稳定性心绞痛(UAP)心脏室壁运动异常的疗效.方法将120例经心彩超证实有心脏室壁运动异常的UAP患者随机分为治疗组与对照组,每组各60例.对照组采用常规的西药治疗,治疗组在西药治疗基础上加用瓜蒌薤白半夏汤,疗程均为1个月.结果与对照组比较,治疗组在缓解心绞痛发作方面的有效率优于对照组(93.3% VS 83.3%),治疗组在胸痹证候改善方面的有效率也优于对照组(86.6% VS 73.3%),治疗组在改善心电图方面的有效率也优于对照组(81.6% VS 63.3%),治疗组在改善心脏室壁运动异常的有效率也优于对照组(78.3% VS 65%),差异均有显著性意义(P<0.05).结论应用瓜蒌薤白半夏汤治疗UAP疗效确切,可明显改善心电图及心脏室壁运动异常.%Objective: To observe the curative effects of gualouxiebaibanxia decoction on the cardiac ventricular wall motion abnormalities in unstable angina pectoris. Methods: 120 cases of patients with ustable angina pectoris and cardiac ventricular wall motion abnormalities were randomly divided into two groups, treatment group and control group, 60 cases in each group. Control group was treated with western medicine and treatment group with gualouxiebaibanxia decoction and western medicine for one month. Results: Compared with the control group, the efficacy of treatment group was better in relieving angina pectoris(81.6% VS 63.3%), improving chest syndrome(86.6% VS 73.3%), improving electrocardiograph (81.6% VS 63.3%), and improving cardiac ventricular wall motion abnormalities(78.3% VS 65%). The differences were significant (P <0.05). Conclusion: It is effective that treating unstable angina pectoris with gualouxiebaibanxia decoction, which can significantly improve electrocardiograph and cardiac ventricular wall motion abnormalities.

  15. New techniques for the assessment of regional left ventricular wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Bermejo, Javier; Perez-David, Esther; Lopez-Fernandez, Teresa; Ledesma, Maria Jesus; Caso, Pio; Malpica, Norberto; Santos, Andres; Moreno, Mar; Desco, Manuel

    2003-10-01

    The assessment of regional left ventricular (LV) function has been an important yet unresolved problem since the introduction of echocardiography as a diagnostic tool. Abnormal regional LV wall motion is an early finding in multiple cardiac pathologies and its diagnosis is of critical importance. In the last few years diagnostic procedures based on combined use of existing echocardiographic technologies were geared toward improving the accuracy of detection of baseline and/or induced regional wall motion abnormalities. One of the assumptions is that the combination of reduced LV wall thickening and reduced myocardial velocities can be used to accurately diagnose regional myocardial dysfunction. In this article we will discuss several new techniques for the quantification of regional LV function using Doppler echocardiography.

  16. Acute myocarditis with normal wall motion detected with 2D speckle tracking echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Sturmberger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 26-year-old male with acute tonsillitis who was referred for coronary angiography because of chest pain, elevated cardiac biomarkers, and biphasic T waves. The patient had no cardiovascular risk factors. Echocardiography showed no wall motion abnormalities and no pericardial effusion. 2D speckle tracking revealed distinct decreased regional peak longitudinal systolic strain in the lateral and posterior walls. Ischemic disease was extremely unlikely in view of his young age, negative family history regarding coronary artery disease, and lack of regional wall motion abnormalities on the conventional 2D echocardiogram. Coronary angiography was deferred as myocarditis was suspected. To confirm the diagnosis, cardiac magnetic resonance tomography (MRT was performed, showing subepicardial delayed hyperenhancement in the lateral and posterior walls correlating closely with the strain pattern obtained by 2D speckle tracking echocardiography. With a working diagnosis of acute myocarditis associated with acute tonsillitis, we prescribed antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The patient’s clinical signs resolved along with normalization of serum creatine kinase (CK levels, and the patient was discharged on the third day after admission. Learning points: • Acute myocarditis can mimic acute coronary syndromes. • Conventional 2D echocardiography lacks specific features for detection of subtle regional wall motion abnormalities. • 2D speckle tracking expands the scope of echocardiography in identifying myocardial dysfunction derived from edema in acute myocarditis.

  17. Power optimization for domain wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Liu, Y.; Abanov, Ar.

    2011-04-01

    The current mediated domain-wall dynamics in a thin ferromagnetic wire is investigated. We derive the effective equations of motion of the domain wall. They are used to study the possibility to optimize the power supplied by electric current for the motion of domain walls in a nanowire. We show that a certain resonant time-dependent current moving a domain wall can significantly reduce the Joule heating in the wire, and thus it can lead to a novel proposal for the most energy efficient memory devices. We discuss how Gilbert damping, nonadiabatic spin transfer torque, and the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can effect this power optimization.

  18. Power optimization for domain wall motion in ferromagnetic nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Liu, Y.; Abanov, Ar.

    2010-01-01

    The current mediated domain-wall dynamics in a thin ferromagnetic wire is investigated. We derive the effective equations of motion of the domain wall. They are used to study the possibility to optimize the power supplied by electric current for the motion of domain walls in a nanowire. We show that a certain resonant time-dependent current moving a domain wall can significantly reduce the Joule heating in the wire, and thus it can lead to a novel proposal for the most energy efficient memory...

  19. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  20. Abnormal Motion of the Interventricular Septum after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: Comprehensive Evaluation with MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seong Hoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Il; Chun, Eun Ju; Chang, Huk Jae; Park, Kay Hyun; Lim, Cheong [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Shin Jae [Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Joon Won; Lim, Tae Hwan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    To define the mechanism associated with abnormal septal motion (ASM) after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) using comprehensive MR imaging techniques. Eighteen patients (mean age, 58 {+-} 12 years; 15 males) were studied with comprehensive MR imaging using rest/stress perfusion, rest cine, and delayed enhancement (DE)-MR techniques before and after CABG. Myocardial tagging was also performed following CABG. Septal wall motion was compared in the ASM and non-ASM groups. Preoperative and postoperative results with regard to septal wall motion in the ASM group were also compared. We then analyzed circumferential strain after CABG in both the septal and lateral walls in the ASM group. All patients had normal septal wall motion and perfusion without evidence of non-viable myocardium prior to surgery. Postoperatively, ASM at rest and/or stress state was documented in 10 patients (56%). However, all of these had normal rest/stress perfusion and DE findings at the septum. Septal wall motion after CABG in the ASM group was significantly lower than that in the non- ASM group (2.1{+-}5.3 mm vs. 14.9{+-}4.7 mm in the non-ASM group; p < 0.001). In the ASM group, the degree of septal wall motion showed a significant decrease after CABG (preoperative vs. postoperative = 15.8{+-}4.5 mm vs. 2.1{+-}5.3 mm; p = 0.007). In the ASM group after CABG, circumferential shortening of the septum was even larger than that of the lateral wall (-20.89{+-}5.41 vs. -15.41{+-}3.7, p < 0.05) Abnormal septal motion might not be caused by ischemic insult. We suggest that ASM might occur due to an increase in anterior cardiac mobility after incision of the pericardium

  1. Impairment of left ventricular regional wall motion in diabetes mellitus without coronary artery disease

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    Sakamoto, Ken`ya; Shimonagata, Tuyoshi; Nanto, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Akio; Morozumi, Takakazu; Kamado, Kenji; Nagata, Seiki [Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan); Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy, dual SPECT imaging with thallium-201 (Tl-201) and I-123 beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP), a branched analogue of free fatty acid (FFA), and dipyridamole-infusion Tl-201 scintigraphy were performed in 28 NIDDM patients without coronary artery disease. Twenty eight patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of wall motion abnormalities on cineangiographic left ventriculography (LVG). Nineteen patients with normal wall motion documented on LVG (group A) out of 28 evaluated patients demonstrated normal Tl-201 and I-123 BMIPP uptake in dual SPECT imaging, whereas 9 patients with reduced wall motion (group B) demonstrated reduced I-123 BMIPP uptake when compared with Tl-201 uptake. On dipyridamole-infusion Tl-201 scintigraphy, transient perfusion defects were demonstrated in 4 patients of group B and two patients of group A (p<0.05). These results suggest that small vessel disease and the impairment of myocardial free fatty acid metabolism are etiologic or contributory factors for regional wall motion abnormality in diabetic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  2. An observer study methodology for evaluating detection of motion abnormalities in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalush, David S; Jatko, Megan K; Segars, W Paul

    2005-03-01

    To address the task of detecting nonischemic motion abnormalities from animated displays of gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography data, we performed an observer study to evaluate the difference in detection performance between gating to 8 and 16 frames. Images were created from the NCAT mathematical phantom with a realistic heart simulating hypokinetic motion in the left lateral wall. Realistic noise-free projection data were simulated for both normal and defective hearts to obtain 16 frames for the cardiac cycle. Poisson noise was then simulated for each frame to create 50 realizations of each heart, All datasets were processed in two ways: reconstructed as a 16-frame set, and collapsed to 8 frames and reconstructed. Ten observers viewed the cardiac images animated with a realistic real-time frame rate. Observers trained on 100 images and tested on 100 images, rating their confidence on the presence of a motion defect on a continuous scale. None of the observers showed a significant difference in performance between the two gating methods. The 95% confidence interval on the difference in areas under the ROC curve (Az8 - Az16) was -0.029-0.085. Our test did not find a significant difference in detection performance between 8-frame gating and 16-frame gating. We conclude that, for the task of detecting abnormal motion, increasing the number of gated frames from 8 to 16 offers no apparent advantage.

  3. Induced motion of domain walls in multiferroics with quadratic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimchuk, Victor S., E-mail: viktor.gera@gmail.com [National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Peremohy Avenue 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Shitov, Anatoliy A., E-mail: shitov@mail.ru [Donbass National Academy of Civil Engineering, Derzhavina Street 2, 86123 Makeevka, Donetsk Region (Ukraine)

    2013-10-15

    We theoretically study the dynamics of 180-degree domain wall of the ab-type in magnetic materials with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction in external alternating magnetic and electric fields. The features of the oscillatory and translational motions of the domain walls and stripe structures depending on the parameters of external fields and characteristics of the multiferroics are discussed. The possibility of the domain walls drift in a purely electric field is established. - Highlights: • We study DW and stripe DS in multiferroics with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction. • We build up the theory of oscillatory and translational (drift) DW and DS motion. • DW motion can be caused by crossed alternating electric and magnetic fields. • DW motion can be caused by alternating “pure” electric field. • DW drift velocity is formed by the AFM and Dzyaloshinskii interaction terms.

  4. Time-periodic N\\'eel wall motions

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    In thin ferromagnetic films, the predominance of the magnetic shape anisotropy leads to in-plane magnetizations. The simplest domain wall in this geometry is the one-dimensional Neel wall that connects two magnetizations of opposite sign by a planar 180 degree rotation. In this paper, we perturb the static Neel wall profile in order to construct time-periodic Neel wall motions governed by to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Our construction works within a certain parameter regime and requires the restriction to external magnetic fields with small amplitudes and suitable time averages.

  5. Rising motion of a bubble layer near a vertical wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2015-11-01

    Bubbly flows in vertical pipes and channels form a wall-peak distribution of bubbles under certain conditions. The dynamics of the bubbles near the wall is different than in an unbounded liquid. Here we report the rising motion of bubbles in a liquid near a vertical wall. In a simulation of a bubbly flow in a periodic domain with a vertical wall on one side, an average pressure gradient is applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in a shear flow which is in turn generated by rising motion of bubbles. The rise velocity of the bubbles on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Eotvos number, and the average volume fraction of bubbles near the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented.

  6. Submicrometric 2D ratchet effect in magnetic domain wall motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castán-Guerrero, C., E-mail: ccastan@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Herrero-Albillos, J. [Fundación ARAID, E-50004 Zaragoza (Spain); Centro Universitario de la Defensa, E-50090 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, J. [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, J.; Bartolomé, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Hierro-Rodriguez, A.; Valdés-Bango, F.; Martín, J.I.; Alameda, J.M. [Dpto. Física, Universidad de Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); CINN (CSIC – Universidad de Oviedo – Principado de Asturias), Asturias (Spain); García, L.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón (ICMA), CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Dpto. de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Strips containing arrays of submicrometric triangular antidots with a 2D square periodicity have been fabricated by electron beam lithography. A clear ratchet effect of 180° domain wall motion under a varying applied field parallel to the walls has been observed. The direction is determined by the direction of the triangle vertices. In contrast, no ratchet effect is observed when the antidot array is constituted by symmetric rhomb-shaped antidots.

  7. Magnetic domain wall motion triggered by electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyatakov, A P; Sergeev, A S; Sechin, D A; Meshkov, G A; Nikolaeva, E P; Nikolaev, A V; Logginov, A S [Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie gory, Moscow, 119296 (Russian Federation); Zvezdin, A K, E-mail: pyatakov@phys.msu.r [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, 38, Vavilova st., Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-01

    We propose the new approach to the problem of electrically controlled magnetic state: the electric field driven domain wall motion. The effect is demonstrated in iron garnet films in ambient conditions. The theoretical model based on inhomogenous magnetoelectric interaction provides with the necessary criteria of the effect and the way to maximize it.

  8. Linear motion feed through with thin wall rubber sealing element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. P.; Deulin, E. A.

    2017-07-01

    The patented linear motion feedthrough is based on elastic thin rubber walls usage being reinforced with analeptic string fixed in the middle part of the walls. The pneumatic or hydro actuators create linear movement of stock. The length of this movement is two times more the rubber wall length. This flexible wall is a sealing element of feedthrough. The main advantage of device is negligible resistance force that is less then mentioned one in sealing bellows that leads to positioning error decreasing. Nevertheless, the thin wall rubber sealing element (TRE) of the feedthrough is the main unreliable element that was the reason of this element longevity research. The theory and experimental results help to create equation for TRE longevity calculation under vacuum or extra high pressure difference action. The equation was used for TRE longevity determination for hydraulic or vacuum equipment realization also as it helps for gas flow being leaking through the cracks in thin walls of rubber sealing element of linear motion feedthrough calculation.

  9. Extended mesh repair with external oblique muscle reinforcement for abdominal wall contour abnormalities following TRAM flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, Ron; Hazani, Ron; Feingold, Randall S; DeNoto, George; Scheiner, Marc S

    2009-12-01

    Many patients undergoing reconstructive surgery after mastectomy opt for reconstruction with the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap. Among the morbidities related to TRAM flap reconstruction is the development of abdominal wall contour abnormalities, including bulges or hernias. Several repair techniques at the flap abdominal wall donor site have been described for use at the time of flap harvest in an attempt to reduce the risk of such abdominal wall complications. For patients that develop abdominal wall contour abnormalities, numerous reconstructive options have been reported, with mixed results. Ten patients were identified as having abdominal wall contour abnormalities after a TRAM flap and underwent an extended mesh repair with external oblique muscle reinforcement. The mesh was secured to the bony landmarks of the lower abdomen and the abdominal wall fascia. All patients achieved complete resolution of abdominal wall bulging. In the follow-up period, no recurrences, infections, or seromas were noted. One patient, who failed an earlier repair at the inferior abdominal wall, reported symptoms consistent with a scar neuroma. Symptoms were treated successfully with gabapentin and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. We propose a novel and reliable method of lower abdominal wall reconstruction for patients with post-TRAM flap abdominal wall contour abnormalities. This technique incorporates the use of a large Marlex mesh reinforced with bilateral external oblique muscle flaps. We report a series of 10 patients who have achieved resolution of their symptoms and have regained a natural, flat-appearing abdominal wall contour.

  10. Experimental Study on Current-Driven Domain Wall Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Yano, K.; Kasai, S.

    2006-06-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion for a well-defined single DW in a micro-fabricated magnetic wire with submicron width was investigated by real-space observation with magnetic force microscopy. Magnetic force microscopy visualizes that a single DW introduced in a wire is displaced back and forth by positive and negative pulsed-current, respectively. Effect of the Joule heating, reduction of the threshold current density by shape control, and magnetic ratchet effect are also presented.

  11. Current-induced domain wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS, Universite Paris-sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Boulle, O [SPINTEC, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Klaeui, M, E-mail: Klaeui@uni-mainz.de [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory of Nanomagnetism and Spin Dynamics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-28

    We review the details of domain wall (DW) propagation due to spin-polarized currents that could potentially be used in magnetic data storage devices based on domains and DWs. We discuss briefly the basics of the underlying spin torque effect and show how the two torques arising from the interaction between the spin-polarized charge carriers and the magnetization lead to complex dynamics of a spin texture such as a DW. By direct imaging we show how confined DWs in nanowires can be displaced using currents in in-plane soft-magnetic materials, and that when using short pulses, fast velocities can be attained. For high-anisotropy out-of-plane magnetized wires with narrow DWs we present approaches to deducing the torque terms and show that in these materials potentially more efficient domain wall motion could be achieved.

  12. Rashba Torque Driven Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V; Sheka, Denis D; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P; Yershov, Kostiantyn V; Makarov, Denys; Gaididei, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of the domain wall propagation in magnetic wires is a key practical task for a number of devices including racetrack memory and magnetic logic. Recently, curvilinear effects emerged as an efficient mean to impact substantially the statics and dynamics of magnetic textures. Here, we demonstrate that the curvilinear form of the exchange interaction of a magnetic helix results in an effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction with a complete set of Lifshitz invariants for a one-dimensional system. In contrast to their planar counterparts, the geometrically induced modifications of the static magnetic texture of the domain walls in magnetic helices offer unconventional means to control the wall dynamics relying on spin-orbit Rashba torque. The chiral symmetry breaking due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leads to the opposite directions of the domain wall motion in left- or right-handed helices. Furthermore, for the magnetic helices, the emergent effective anisotropy term and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction can be attributed to the clear geometrical parameters like curvature and torsion offering intuitive understanding of the complex curvilinear effects in magnetism.

  13. Assessment of left ventricular regional wall motion by color kinesis technique: comparison with angiographic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermes, E; Guyon, P; Weingrod, M; Otmani, A; Soussana, C; Halphen, C; Leroy, G; Haïat, R

    2000-08-01

    The analysis of segmental wall motion using two-dimensional (2-D) echocardiography is subjective with high interobserver variability. Color kinesis is a new technique providing a color-encoded map of endocardial motion. We evaluated the accuracy of color kinesis and 2-D for assessment of regional asynergy compared with left ventricular angiography as a reference method. Fifteen patients admitted for myocardial infarction were studied by echocardiography the day before left ventricular angiography. The left ventricle was divided into seven segments. Each segment was classified by two independent observers as normal or abnormal in 2-D and color kinesis. Accuracy of color kinesis and 2-D was evaluated and compared to left ventricular angiography. Color kinesis is significantly superior to 2-D for all seven segments (mean 0.80/0.68, P = 0.05), except for the septum (0.67/0.60, P = NS). Interobserver variability studied by chi-square statistic is lower with color kinesis (0.70) than with 2-D (0.57). We conclude that these data suggest that color kinesis is a useful method for assessing systolic wall motion in all segments, except the septum and for improving the accuracy of segmental ventricular function and interobserver variability.

  14. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  15. Current-induced domain wall motion in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hideo

    2007-03-01

    Low magnetization (˜0.05 T) and high spin-polarization in ferromagnetism of transition metal-doped GaAs allow us to explore a number of spin-dependent phenomena not readily accessible in metal ferromagnets. Spin-polarized current induced domain wall (DW) motion in (Ga,Mn)As [1, 2] reveals rich physics resulting from the interaction between spin-polarized electrons and localized spins inside a magnetic DW. By using a 30 nm thick (Ga,Mn)As layer (xMn = 0.045) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, we have measured by magneto-optical Kerr microscopy a wide range of velocity-current density curves in the sample temperature range of 97 -- 107 K. Two regimes are found in the current density dependence of the DW velocity. At high-current densities (> 2 x 10^5 A/cm^2), the domain wall velocity is approximately a linear function of the current density above a threshold current density. This result will be compared to the recent theories of DW motion. At low-current densities, the functional form of the velocity-current curves follow an empirical scaling law, obtained by modifying the one for magnetic-field induced creep. This shows that current-induced DW creep is present. We have also determined the intrinsic resistance of the DW in a similar configuration [3]. *M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, and H. Ohno, Nature 428, 539 (2004). *M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, T. Dietl and H. Ohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 096601 (2006). *D. Chiba, M. Yamanouchi, F. Matsukura, T. Dietl, and H. Ohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 096602 (2006).

  16. On-line assessment of regional ventricular wall motion by transesophageal echocardiography with color kinesis during minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotoh, K; Watanabe, G; Ueyama, K; Uozaki, M; Suzuki, M; Misaki, T; Wakasugi, M; Ito, Y

    1999-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the changes in regional ventricular wall motion during minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting by color kinesis using transesophageal echocardiography. Minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in 34 patients, during which transesophageal echocardiography was used. Thirteen patients had isolated disease of the left anterior descending artery. Regional ventricular wall motion was analyzed by color kinesis with the SONOS 2500 transesophageal echocardiograph (Hewlett-Packard Co, Andover, Mass). On-line assessment of regional wall motion was continued during the operation. Wall motion abnormalities during ischemia were present in 4 cases, left ventricular mid-anterior hypokinesis in 3 cases, and left ventricular apical-lateral hypokinesis in 1 case. In all cases, wall motion was maintained after bypass. In patients with total coronary occlusion, changes in wall motion did not occur during anastomosis. Color kinesis allowed us to evaluate the change in regional ventricular wall motion induced by myocardial ischemia during minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting both objectively and quantitatively.

  17. Controlled motion of domain walls in submicron amorphous wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Ţibu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Results on the control of the domain wall displacement in cylindrical Fe77.5Si7.5B15 amorphous glass-coated submicron wires prepared by rapid quenching from the melt are reported. The control methods have relied on conical notches with various depths, up to a few tens of nm, made in the glass coating and in the metallic nucleus using a focused ion beam (FIB system, and on the use of small nucleation coils at one of the sample ends in order to apply magnetic field pulses aimed to enhance the nucleation of reverse domains. The notch-based method is used for the first time in the case of cylindrical ultrathin wires. The results show that the most efficient technique of controlling the domain wall motion in this type of samples is the simultaneous use of notches and nucleation coils. Their effect depends on wire diameter, notch depth, its position on the wire length, and characteristics of the applied pulse.

  18. Usefulness of coronary flow reserve over regional wall motion when added to dual-imaging dipyridamole echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Fausto; Richieri, Margherita; Pasanisi, Emilio; Cutaia, Valeria; Zanella, Carlo; Della Valentina, Patrizia; Di Pede, Francesco; Raviele, Antonio; Picano, Eugenio

    2003-02-01

    Vasodilator stress echocardiography allows semi-simultaneous imaging of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary flow and regional wall function. To assess the relative (and additive?) value of regional flow and function for noninvasive identification of angiographically assessed LAD disease in patients with chest pain syndrome, we studied 230 consecutive in-hospital patients (134 men, aged 63.5 +/- 11 years) with chest pain syndrome and normal regional and global left ventricular function. All patients underwent stress echocardiography with dipyridamole (up to 0.84 mg/kg over 10 minutes), including wall motion analysis by 2-dimensional echocardiography and coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of the LAD artery by Doppler, with or without contrast injection. A new regional wall motion abnormality in >or=2 contiguous segments was required for 2-dimensional echocardiographic positivity. CFR was evaluated as the ratio of dipyridamole to peak diastolic coronary blood flow velocity at rest. All patients underwent coronary angiography within 60 days; a quantitatively assessed diameter reduction >50% of the LAD artery was considered significant. Of the 230 patients, 70 had LAD disease. A regional wall motion abnormality in LAD territory was present in 52 patients, and reduced CFR (<1.9) in 62 patients. Sensitivity for detecting LAD disease was 74% for 2-dimensional echocardiography (95% confidence interval [CI] 64% to 84%) and 81% for CFR <1.9 (95% CI 72% to 90%); specificity was 91% (95% CI 87% to 96%) for 2-dimensional echocardiography and 84% for CFR (95% CI 79% to 90%). Accuracy was 86% for 2-dimensional echocardiography (95% CI 82% to 91%) and 83.5% for CFR (95% CI 79% to 88%). When 2-dimensional echocardiography and CFR criteria were considered, sensitivity increased to 93% (95% CI 87% to 99%), with 80.6% specificity (95% CI 74.5% to 86.7%). CFR was assessed during vasodilator stress echocardiography. Its diagnostic accuracy for detecting LAD disease was comparable

  19. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  20. Electric-field-controlled suppression of Walker breakdown and chirality switching in magnetic domain wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Bo; Li, You-Quan

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of a magnetic domain wall controlled by an electric field in the presence of the spin flexoelectric interaction. We reveal that this interaction generates an effective spin torque and results in significant changes in the current-driven domain wall motion. In particular, the electric field can stabilize the domain wall motion, leading to strong suppression of the current-induced Walker breakdown and thus allowing a higher maximum wall velocity. We can furthermore use this electric-field control to efficiently switch the chirality of a moving domain wall in the steady regime.

  1. Short-term effect of volume recruitment-derecruitment manoeuvre on chest-wall motion in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric, Henri; Falaize, Line; Pradon, Didier; Lacombe, Matthieu; Petitjean, Michel; Orlikowski, David; Prigent, Hélène; Lofaso, Frédéric

    2017-05-01

    Because progressive respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased chest-wall motion with eventual ribcage stiffening, the purpose was to compare vital capacity (VC) and contributions of chest-wall compartments before and after volume recruitment-derecruitment manoeuvres (VRDM) in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We studied nine patients with DMD and VC lower than 30% of predicted. VRDM was performed using 15 insufflations-exsufflations of +30 to -30 cmH2O. VC and three-dimensional chest-wall motion were measured, as well as oxygen saturation, transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide and the rapid shallow breathing index (respiratory rate/tidal volume) before (baseline) and immediately and 1 hour after VRDM. VC increased significantly immediately after VRDM (108% ± 7% of baseline, p = 0.018) but returned to baseline within 1 hour, and the rapid shallow breathing index increased significantly. The non-dominant side systematically increased immediately after VRDM ( p = 0.0077), and in the six patients with abnormal breathing asymmetry (difference >10% of VC) at baseline, this asymmetry was corrected immediately and/or 1 hour after VRDM. VRDM improved VC and reduced chest-wall motion asymmetry, but this beneficial effect waned rapidly with respiratory muscle fatigue, suggesting that VRDM may need to be repeated during the day to produce lasting benefits.

  2. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P perception of unnatural (versus natural) motion (P perception is disrupted in DYT1

  3. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  4. Current-driven magnetic domain wall motion and its real-time detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Yoshimura, Yoko; Ono, Teruo

    2017-08-01

    Current-controlled magnetic domain wall motion has opened the possibility of a novel type of shift register memory device, which has been optimistically predicted to replace existing magnetic memories. Owing to this promising prospect, intensive work has been carried out during the last few decades. In this article, we first review the progress in the study of current-induced magnetic domain wall motion. Underlying mechanisms behind the domain wall motion, which have been discovered during last few decades, as well as technological achievements are presented. We then present our recent experimental results on the real-time detection of current-driven multiple magnetic domain wall motion, which directly demonstrates the operation of a magnetic domain wall shift register.

  5. Abdominal compliance, parasternal activation, and chest wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cala, S J; Edyvean, J; Engel, L A

    1993-03-01

    We measured abdominal compliance (Cab) and rib cage displacement (delta Vrc) relative to abdominal displacement (delta Vab) during relaxation and tidal breathing in upright (U) and supine (S) postures in five normal subjects. In S, an abdominal binder was used to decrease Cab in two to five increments. We also measured the electrical activity of the parasternal muscle (EMGps) with the use of fine-wire intramuscular electrodes during CO2 rebreathing in U and in supine unbound (SU) and supine bound (SB) postures. During maximum binding (SB2), Cab decreased to 39 +/- 7% of the SU value (P = 0.01), matching Cab in U (P = 0.16). In the SB condition, the ratio of tidal delta Vrc/delta Vab to relaxation delta Vrc/delta Vab increased as Cab decreased, matching the data in U. For the group, this ratio decreased during SU to 47 +/- 10% (P = 0.02) but increased during SB2 to 86 +/- 7% (P = 0.18) of the value in U. During CO2 rebreathing, EMGps increased linearly with tidal volume (r > 0.727, P < 0.01). However, at any given tidal volume, the SU and SB2 EMGps were not significantly different (P = 0.12), and both were less than that in U (P < 0.02). The results suggest that the differences in chest wall motion between U and S may be due to the difference in Cab and not to different patterns of respiratory muscle recruitment. The mechanism may relate to changes in mechanical coupling between the diaphragm and the rib cage.

  6. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Purnama, I.; Kerk, I. S.; Lim, G J; Lew, W. S.

    2015-01-01

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current densit...

  7. Vagal control of cardiac electrical activity and wall motion during ventricular fibrillation in large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggar, Isaac; Nakase, Ko; Lazar, Jason; Salciccioli, Louis; Selesnick, Ivan; Stewart, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Vagal inputs control pacemaking and conduction systems in the heart. Anatomical evidence suggests a direct ventricular action, but functional evidence that separates direct and indirect (via the conduction system) vagal actions is less well established. We studied vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) during sinus rhythm and ventricular fibrillation (VF) in pigs and sheep to determine: 1) the range of unilateral and bilateral actions (inotropic and chronotropic) and 2) whether VNS alters left ventricular motion and/or electrical activity during VF, a model of abnormal electrical conduction of the left ventricle that excludes sinus and atrioventricular nodal function. Adult pigs (N=8) and sheep (N=10) were anesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. VNS was performed in animals at 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100Hz for 20s. VF was induced with direct current to the ventricles or occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. In 4 pigs and 3 sheep, left ventricular wall motion was assessed from endocardial excursion in epicardial echocardiography. In sheep and pigs, the best frequency among those tested for VNS during sinus rhythm to produce sustained electrical and mechanical ventricular standstill was 50Hz for unilateral or bilateral stimulation. When applied during VF, bilateral VNS increased the variability of the dominant VF frequency, indicating a direct impact on the excitability of ventricular myocytes, and decreased endocardial excursion by more than 50% during VF. We conclude that the vagus nerve directly modulates left ventricular function independently from its effects on the conduction system.

  8. Interpretation of cardiac wall motion from cine-MRI combined with parametric imaging based on the Hilbert transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benameur, Narjes; Caiani, Enrico Gianluca; Arous, Younes; Abdallah, Nejmeddine Ben; Kraiem, Tarek

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to test and validate the clinical impact of parametric amplitude images obtained using the Hilbert transform on the regional interpretation of cardiac wall motion abnormalities from cine-MR images by non-expert radiologists compared with expert consensus. Cine-MRI short-axis images obtained in 20 patients (10 with myocardial infarction, 5 with myocarditis and 5 with normal function) were processed to compute a parametric amplitude image for each using the Hilbert transform. Two expert radiologists blindly reviewed the cine-MR images to define a gold standard for wall motion interpretation for each left ventricular sector. Two non-expert radiologists reviewed and graded the same images without and in combination with parametric images. Grades assigned to each segment in the two separate sessions were compared with the gold standard. According to expert interpretation, 264/320 (82.5%) segments were classified as normal and 56/320 (17.5%) were considered abnormal. The accuracy of the non-expert radiologists' grades compared to the gold standard was significantly improved by adding parametric images (from 87.2 to 94.6%) together with sensitivity (from 64.29 to 84.4%) and specificity (from 92 to 96.9%), also resulting in reduced interobserver variability (from 12.8 to 5.6%). The use of parametric amplitude images based on the Hilbert transform in conjunction with cine-MRI was shown to be a promising technique for improvement of the detection of left ventricular wall motion abnormalities in less expert radiologists.

  9. Analysis of intracranial aneurysm wall motion and its effects on hemodynamic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubel, Estanislao; De Craene, Mathieu; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    Hemodynamics, and in particular Wall Shear Stress (WSS), is thought to play a critical role in the progression and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Wall motion is related to local biomechanical properties of the aneurysm, which in turn are associated with the amount of damage undergone by the tissue. The underlying hypothesis in this work is that injured regions show differential motion with respect to normal ones, allowing a connection between local wall biomechanics and a potential mechanism of wall injury such as elevated WSS. In a previous work, a novel method was presented combining wall motion estimation using image registration techniques with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations in order to provide realistic intra-aneurysmal flow patterns. It was shown that, when compared to compliant vessels, rigid models tend to overestimate WSS and produce smaller areas of elevated WSS and force concentration, being the observed differences related to the magnitude of the displacements. This work aims to further study the relationships between wall motion, flow patterns and risk of rupture in aneurysms. To this end, four studies containing both 3DRA and DSA studies were analyzed, and an improved version of the method developed previously was applied to cases showing wall motion. A quantification and analysis of the displacement fields and their relationships to flow patterns are presented. This relationship may play an important role in understanding interaction mechanisms between hemodynamics, wall biomechanics, and the effect on aneurysm evolution mechanisms.

  10. Unstable equilibrium point in chaotic domain-wall motion and Ott-Grebogi-Yorke control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, H.; Takemura, Y.

    2001-06-01

    A method for finding the unstable equilibrium points in Bloch wall motion is proposed, which is important for controlling the chaotic domain-wall motion by using the Ott-Grebogi-Yorke (OGY) method. The dynamics of Bloch wall motion are expressed by a nonlinear differential equation with the terms of inertia, damping, restoring, and an external magnetic drive force. An equation is transformed into the difference equations by following the OGY method, approximating linearly around an unstable equilibrium point (a saddle point), and adding a controlling input. The unstable equilibrium points are obtained by using the return map and the condition of hyperbolic fixed point. The time series of domain-wall motion successfully controlled on the unstable equilibrium points by the OGY method is shown.

  11. [Changes in left ventricular regional wall motion induced by Verapamil (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, E; Allegri, P; Morlino, T; Vincenzi, M

    1980-01-01

    28 subjects with atherosclerotic lesions of coronary arteries were studied by means of cineventriculography both before and after IV administration of verapamil Regional wall motion has been analyzed by means of two different methods. Imporvement of regional wall motion has been demonstrated in about 65% of cases. No significant result has been achieved in segments corresponding to previous infarctions. Such a response does not differ substantially from that evoked by nitroglycerin or other calcium antagonist drugs.

  12. Lower limb pneumatic compression during dobutamine stress echocardiography in patients with normal resting wall motion: will it increase diagnostic accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Zainab; Allam, Lawra; Wadie, Bassem; Enany, Bassem; Nammas, Wail

    2015-01-01

    Pneumatic compression of the lower part of the body increases systemic vascular resistance and left ventricular afterload. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) with pneumatic compression of the lower extremities, vs. standard DSE, for detection of angiographically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with normal baseline resting wall motion. We enrolled 70 consecutive patients with no resting wall motion abnormalities (WMA), who underwent DSE. DSE was repeated with pneumatic compression of the lower extremities three days after the initial standard DSE. A positive test was defined as the induction of WMA in at least two contiguous non-overlap segments at any stage of dobutamine infusion. Significant coronary stenosis was defined as ≥ 50% obstruction of ≥ 1 sizable artery by coronary angiography. The mean age of the study cohort was 54.7 ± 9.9 years; 55.7% were females. Thirty-eight (54.3%) patients had significant CAD. The mean test duration was 15.8 ± 5.1 min for standard DSE and 11.7 ± 4.1 min for DSE with pneumatic compression. Analysis of standard DSE revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 81.6%, 90.6%, 91.2%, and 80.6%, respectively; overall accuracy was 85.7%. Analysis of DSE with pneumatic compression revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 89.5%, 87.5%, 89.5%, and 87.5%, respectively; overall accuracy was 88.6%. In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD referred for evaluation by DSE, who have no resting wall motion abnormalities, pneumatic compression of the lower extremities during DSE improved the sensitivity but slightly reduced the specificity for detection of angiographically significant CAD, compared with standard DSE. Moreover, it reduced the test duration.

  13. Domain wall motion driven by spin Hall effect—Tuning with in-plane magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rushforth, A. W., E-mail: andrew.rushforth@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-21

    This letter investigates the effects of in-plane magnetic anisotropy on the current induced motion of magnetic domain walls in systems with dominant perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, where accumulated spins from the spin Hall effect in an adjacent heavy metal layer are responsible for driving the domain wall motion. It is found that that the sign and magnitude of the domain wall velocity in the uniform flow regime can be tuned significantly by the in-plane magnetic anisotropy. These effects are sensitive to the ratio of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin transfer torque parameters and are robust in the presence of pinning and thermal fluctuations.

  14. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  15. Herbicide effects on freshwater benthic diatoms: Induction of nucleus alterations and silica cell wall abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenest, T. [Ecolab UMR 5245 (INP ENSAT, CNRS, UPS), Equipe ECOGEN, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole - BP 32607 Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan Cedex (France); Cemagref, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Silvestre, J. [Ecolab UMR 5245 (INP ENSAT, CNRS, UPS), Equipe ECOGEN, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole - BP 32607 Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan Cedex (France); Coste, M.; Delmas, F. [Cemagref, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Pinelli, E. [Ecolab UMR 5245 (INP ENSAT, CNRS, UPS), Equipe ECOGEN, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole - BP 32607 Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan Cedex (France)], E-mail: pinelli@ensat.fr

    2008-06-02

    Benthic diatoms are well known bio-indicators of river pollution by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). Biological indexes, based on diatom sensitivity for non-toxic pollution, have been developed to assess the water quality. Nevertheless, they are not reliable tools to detect pollution by pesticides. Many authors have suggested that toxic agents, like pesticides, induce abnormalities of the diatom cell wall (frustule). High abnormal frustule abundances have been reported in natural diatom communities sampled in streams contaminated by pesticides. However, no direct link was found between the abundances of abnormal frustules in these communities and the pesticide concentrations in stream water. In the present study, a freshwater benthic diatom community, isolated from natural biofilm and cultured under controlled conditions, was treated with a known genotoxic herbicide, maleic hydrazide (MH). Cells were exposed to three concentrations of MH (5 x 10{sup -6}, 10{sup -6}, 10{sup -7} M) for 6 h followed by a 24 h-recovery time. After MH treatments, nucleus alterations were observed: abnormal nucleus location, micronucleus, multinuclear cell or disruption of the nuclear membrane. A dose-dependent increase of nuclear alterations was observed. The difference between the control (9.65 nuclear alterations per 1000 cells observed (9.65 per mille), S.D. = 4.23) and the highest concentrations (29.40 per mille, S.D. = 8.49 for 10{sup -6} M and 35.96 per mille , S.D. = 3.71 for 5 x 10{sup -6} M) was statistically significant (Tukey test, P < 0.05). Diatoms also exhibited frustules with deformed morphology and abnormal ornamentation. Significantly increased abundances of abnormal frustules were observed for the highest concentrations (10{sup -6} and 5 x 10{sup -6} M; Tukey test, P < 0.05). These two parameters tended to increase together (Pearson correlation = 0.702, P < 0.05). The results suggest that the induction of abnormal frustules could be associated with the genotoxic

  16. Herbicide effects on freshwater benthic diatoms: induction of nucleus alterations and silica cell wall abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenest, T; Silvestre, J; Coste, M; Delmas, F; Pinelli, E

    2008-06-02

    Benthic diatoms are well known bio-indicators of river pollution by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). Biological indexes, based on diatom sensitivity for non-toxic pollution, have been developed to assess the water quality. Nevertheless, they are not reliable tools to detect pollution by pesticides. Many authors have suggested that toxic agents, like pesticides, induce abnormalities of the diatom cell wall (frustule). High abnormal frustule abundances have been reported in natural diatom communities sampled in streams contaminated by pesticides. However, no direct link was found between the abundances of abnormal frustules in these communities and the pesticide concentrations in stream water. In the present study, a freshwater benthic diatom community, isolated from natural biofilm and cultured under controlled conditions, was treated with a known genotoxic herbicide, maleic hydrazide (MH). Cells were exposed to three concentrations of MH (5x10(-6), 10(-6), 10(-7)M) for 6h followed by a 24h-recovery time. After MH treatments, nucleus alterations were observed: abnormal nucleus location, micronucleus, multinuclear cell or disruption of the nuclear membrane. A dose-dependent increase of nuclear alterations was observed. The difference between the control (9.65 nuclear alterations per 1000 cells observed (9.65 per thousand), S.D.=4.23) and the highest concentrations (29.40 per thousand, S.D.=8.49 for 10(-6)M and 35.96 per thousand, S.D.=3.71 for 5x10(-6)M) was statistically significant (Tukey test, P<0.05). Diatoms also exhibited frustules with deformed morphology and abnormal ornamentation. Significantly increased abundances of abnormal frustules were observed for the highest concentrations (10(-6) and 5x10(-6)M; Tukey test, P<0.05). These two parameters tended to increase together (Pearson correlation=0.702, P<0.05). The results suggest that the induction of abnormal frustules could be associated with the genotoxic effects of MH. The alterations observed could be

  17. Manipulating antiferromagnets with magnetic fields: Ratchet motion of multiple domain walls induced by asymmetric field pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomonay, O.; Kläui, M.; Sinova, J.

    2016-10-01

    Future applications of antiferromagnets (AFs) in many spintronics devices rely on the precise manipulation of domain walls. The conventional approach using static magnetic fields is inefficient due to the low susceptibility of AFs. Recently proposed electrical manipulation with spin-orbit torques is restricted to metals with a specific crystal structure. Here, we propose an alternative, broadly applicable approach: using asymmetric magnetic field pulses to induce controlled ratchet motion of AF domain walls. The efficiency of this approach is based on three peculiarities of AF dynamics. First, a time-dependent magnetic field couples with an AF order parameter stronger than a static magnetic field, which leads to higher mobility of the domain walls. Second, the rate of change of the magnetic field couples with the spatial variation of the AF order parameter inside the domain, and this enables a synchronous motion of multiple domain walls with the same structure. Third, tailored asymmetric field pulses in combination with static friction can prevent backward motion of domain walls and thus lead to the desired controlled ratchet effect. The proposed use of an external field, rather than internal spin-orbit torques, avoids any restrictions on size, conductivity, and crystal structure of the AF material. We believe that our approach paves a way for the development of AF-based devices based on the controlled motion of AF domain walls.

  18. Ab initio study of edge effect on relative motion of walls in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V

    2013-01-14

    Interwall interaction energies of double-walled nanotubes with long inner and short outer walls are calculated as functions of coordinates describing relative rotation and displacement of the walls using van der Waals corrected density functional theory. The magnitude of corrugation and the shape of the potential energy relief are found to be very sensitive to changes of the shorter wall length at subnanometer scale and atomic structure of the edges if at least one of the walls is chiral. Threshold forces required to start relative motion of the short walls and temperatures at which the transition between diffusive and free motion of the short walls takes place are estimated. The edges are also shown to provide a considerable contribution to the barrier to relative rotation of commensurate nonchiral walls. For such walls, temperatures of orientational melting, i.e., the crossover from rotational diffusion to free relative rotation, are estimated. The possibility to produce nanotube-based bolt∕nut pairs and nanobearings is discussed.

  19. Usefulness of color kinesis imaging for evaluation of regional right ventricular wall motion in patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayabuchi, Y; Matsuoka, S; Kubo, M; Kuroda, Y

    1998-11-15

    We evaluated regional right ventricular wall motion during systole in patients with surgically repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) using color kinesis imaging. Color kinesis images were obtained in a subcostal sagittal view from 19 patients with repaired TOF (TOF group), aged 3 to 5 years, and 20 age-matched normal subjects (control group). For regional wall motion analysis, the endocardial motion distance and the fractional area change (FAC) were calculated for 6 segments obtained from color kinesis images. The endocardial inward excursion distances and the FACs in the upper, middle, and lower posterior segments of the TOF group were significantly greater than those of the control group (p kinesis measurements was excellent (y = 1.14x - 1.30, r = 0.87 for the endocardial inward excursion, and y = 1.03x +/- 0.56, r = 0.91 for the FAC). In conclusion, color kinesis is a useful method for assessing regional right ventricular wall motion. Segmental analysis of color kinesis images provides accurate, automated, and quantitative diagnosis of regional right ventricular wall motion abnormalities in patients with surgically repaired TOF.

  20. Abnormal Size-Dependent Modulation of Motion Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Olga V; Galuta, Ilia A; Davletshina, Maria S; Orekhova, Elena V; Stroganova, Tatiana A

    2017-01-01

    Excitation/Inhibition (E/I) imbalance in neural networks is now considered among the core neural underpinnings of autism psychopathology. In motion perception at least two phenomena critically depend on E/I balance in visual cortex: spatial suppression (SS), and spatial facilitation (SF) corresponding to impoverished or improved motion perception with increasing stimuli size, respectively. While SS is dominant at high contrast, SF is evident for low contrast stimuli, due to the prevalence of inhibitory contextual modulations in the former, and excitatory ones in the latter case. Only one previous study (Foss-Feig et al., 2013) investigated SS and SF in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Our study aimed to replicate previous findings, and to explore the putative contribution of deficient inhibitory influences into an enhanced SF index in ASD-a cornerstone for interpretation proposed by Foss-Feig et al. (2013). The SS and SF were examined in 40 boys with ASD, broad spectrum of intellectual abilities (63 ASD. The presence of abnormally enhanced SF in children with ASD was the only consistent finding between our study and that of Foss-Feig et al. While the SS and SF indexes were strongly interrelated in TD participants, this correlation was absent in their peers with ASD. In addition, the SF index but not the SS index correlated with the severity of autism and the poor registration abilities. The pattern of results is partially consistent with the idea of hypofunctional inhibitory transmission in visual areas in ASD. Nonetheless, the absence of correlation between SF and SS indexes paired with a strong direct link between abnormally enhanced SF and autism symptoms in our ASD sample emphasizes the role of the enhanced excitatory influences by themselves in the observed abnormalities in low-level visual phenomena found in ASD.

  1. Coupled Néel domain wall motion in sandwiched perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnama, I; Kerk, I S; Lim, G J; Lew, W S

    2015-03-04

    The operating performance of a domain wall-based magnetic device relies on the controlled motion of the domain walls within the ferromagnetic nanowires. Here, we report on the dynamics of coupled Néel domain wall in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanowires via micromagnetic simulations. The coupled Néel domain wall is obtained in a sandwich structure, where two PMA nanowires that are separated by an insulating layer are stacked vertically. Under the application of high current density, we found that the Walker breakdown phenomenon is suppressed in the sandwich structure. Consequently, the coupled Néel domain wall of the sandwich structure is able to move faster as compared to individual domain walls in a single PMA nanowire.

  2. Domain wall motion by the magnonic spin Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzke, D; Nowak, U

    2011-07-08

    The recently discovered spin Seebeck effect refers to a spin current induced by a temperature gradient in a ferromagnetic material. It combines spin degrees of freedom with caloric properties, opening the door for the invention of new, spin caloritronic devices. Using spin model simulations as well as an innovative, multiscale micromagnetic framework we show that magnonic spin currents caused by temperature gradients lead to spin transfer torque effects, which can drag a domain wall in a ferromagnetic nanostructure towards the hotter part of the wire. This effect opens new perspectives for the control and manipulation of domain structures.

  3. Normal left ventricular wall motion measured with two-dimensional myocardial tagging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F;

    1993-01-01

    Using a myocardial tagging technique, normal left ventricular wall motion was studied in 3 true short axis views and a double oblique 4-chamber view in 14 and 11 volunteers, respectively. Three orthogonal directions of left ventricular motion were observed throughout the systole; a concentric...... contraction towards the center of the left ventricle, a motion of the base of the heart towards the apex, and a rotation of the left ventricle around its long axis. The direction of left ventricular rotation changed from early systole to late systole. The base and middle levels of the left ventricle rotated...... that MR imaging with myocardial tagging is a method that can be used to study normal left ventricular wall motion, and that is promising for future use in patient groups....

  4. Effect of Joule heating in current-driven domain wall motion

    OpenAIRE

    A., Yamaguchi; S., Nasu; H., Tanigawa; T., Ono; K., Miyake; Ko, Mibu; T., Shinjo

    2004-01-01

    It was found that high current density needed for the current-driven domain wall motion results in the Joule heating of the sample. The sample temperature, when the current-driven domain wall motion occurred, was estimated by measuring the sample resistance during the application of a pulsed current. The sample temperature was 750 K for the threshold current density of 6.7×1011 A/m2 in a 10-nm-thick Ni81Fe19 wire with a width of 240 nm on thermally oxidized silicon substrate. The temperature ...

  5. Effect of Joule heating in current-driven domain wall motion

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Ono, T.; Nasu, S; Miyake, K.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2004-01-01

    It was found that high current density needed for the current-driven domain wall motion results in the Joule heating of the sample. The sample temperature, when the current-driven domain wall motion occurred, was estimated by measuring the sample resistance during the application of a pulsed-current. The sample temperature was 750 K for the threshold current density of 6.7 x 10^11 A/m2 in a 10 nm-thick Ni81Fe19 wire with a width of 240 nm. The temperature was raised to 830 K for the current d...

  6. MOTION AND DEFORMATION OF VISCOUS DROP IN STOKES FLOW NEAR RIGID WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hua-jian; ZHANG Hui-sheng

    2005-01-01

    A boundary integral method was developed for simulating the motion and deformation of a viscous drop in an axisymmetric ambient Stokes flow near a rigid wall and for direct calculating the stress on the wall. Numerical experiments by the method were performed for different initial stand-off distances of the drop to the wall, viscosity ratios, combined surface tension and buoyancy parameters and ambient flow parameters. Numerical results show that due to the action of ambient flow and buoyancy the drop is compressed and stretched respectively in axial and radial directions when time goes. When the ambient flow action is weaker than that of the buoyancy the drop raises and bends upward and the stress on the wall induced by drop motion decreases when time advances. When the ambient flow action is stronger than that of the buoyancy the drop descends and becomes flatter and flatter as time goes. In this case when the initial stand-off distance is large the stress on the wall increases as the drop evolutes but when the stand-off distance is small the stress on the wall decreases as a result of combined effects of ambient flow, buoyancy and the stronger wall action to the flow. The action of the stress on the wall induced by drop motion is restricted in an area near the symmetric axis, which increases when the initial stand-off distance increases.When the initial stand-off distance increases the stress induced by drop motion decreases substantially. The surface tension effects resist the deformation and smooth the profile of the drop surfaces. The drop viscosity will reduce the deformation and migration of the drop.

  7. Space and motion discomfort and abnormal balance control in patients with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, R G; Redfern, M S; Furman, J M

    2009-01-01

    Previous research suggested that panic disorder with agoraphobia is associated with abnormalities on vestibular and balance function tests. The purpose of this study was to further examine psychiatric correlates of vestibular/balance dysfunction in patients with anxiety disorders and the specific nature of the correlated vestibular abnormalities. The psychiatric variables considered included anxiety disorder versus normal control status, panic disorder versus non-panic anxiety disorder diagnosis, presence or absence of comorbid fear of heights, and degree of space and motion discomfort (SMD). The role of anxiety responses to vestibular testing was also re-examined. 104 subjects were recruited: 29 psychiatrically normal individuals and 75 psychiatric patients with anxiety disorders. Anxiety patients were assigned to four subgroups depending on whether or not they had panic disorder and comorbid fear of heights. SMD and anxiety responses were measured by questionnaires. Subjects were examined for abnormal unilateral vestibular hypofunction on caloric testing indicative of peripheral vestibular dysfunction, asymmetric responses on rotational testing as an indicator of an ongoing vestibular imbalance and balance function using Equitest dynamic posturography as an indicator of balance control. Logistic regression was used to establish the association between the psychiatric variables and vestibular or balance test abnormalities. Rotational test results were not significantly related to any of the psychiatric variables. The presence of either panic attacks or fear of heights increased the probability of having caloric hypofunction in a non-additive fashion. SMD and anxiety responses were independently associated with abnormal balance. Among specific posturography conditions, the association with SMD was significant for a condition that involved the balance platform tilting codirectionally with body sway, suggesting an abnormal dependence on somatosensory cues in the

  8. Domain wall motions in perpendicularly magnetized CoFe/Pd multilayer nanowire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Zhaoliang; Kumar, Manoj; Qiu, Jinjun;

    2014-01-01

    Current-induced domain wall (DW) motion is investigated in a 600nm wide nanowire using multilayer film with a structure of Ta(5nm)/Pd(5nm)/[CoFe(0.4nm)/Pd(1.2nm)]15/Ta(5nm) in terms of anomalous Hall effect measurements. It is found that motion of DWs can be driven by a current density as low as 1...

  9. Modulated Magnetic Nanowires for Controlling Domain Wall Motion: Toward 3D Magnetic Memories

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-05-03

    Cylindrical magnetic nanowires are attractive materials for next generation data storage devices owing to the theoretically achievable high domain wall velocity and their efficient fabrication in highly dense arrays. In order to obtain control over domain wall motion, reliable and well-defined pinning sites are required. Here, we show that modulated nanowires consisting of alternating nickel and cobalt sections facilitate efficient domain wall pinning at the interfaces of those sections. By combining electron holography with micromagnetic simulations, the pinning effect can be explained by the interaction of the stray fields generated at the interface and the domain wall. Utilizing a modified differential phase contrast imaging, we visualized the pinned domain wall with a high resolution, revealing its three-dimensional vortex structure with the previously predicted Bloch point at its center. These findings suggest the potential of modulated nanowires for the development of high-density, three-dimensional data storage devices. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Microcarrier Motion in a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI-HAO JU; TIAN-QING LIU; XUE-HU MA; ZHAN-FENG CUI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the forces of rotational wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor on small tissue pieces or microcarrier particles and to determine the tracks of microcarrier particles in RWV bioreactor. Methods The motion of the microcarrier in the rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor with both the inner and outer cylinders rotating was modeled by numerical simulation. Results The continuous trajectory of microcarrier particles, including the possible collision with the wall was obtained. An expression between the minimum rotational speed difference of the inner and outer cylinders and the microcarrier particle or aggregate radius could avoid collisions with either wall. The range of microcarrier radius or tissue size, which could be safely cultured in the RWV bioreactor, in terms of shear stress level, was determined. Conclusion The model works well in describing the trajectory of a heavier microcarrier particle in rotating wall vessel.

  11. Magnetic domain wall motion in notch patterned permalloy nanowire devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ting-Chieh; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Mishra, Amit K.; Das, Bipul; Wu, Jong-Ching, E-mail: phjcwu@cc.ncue.edu.tw

    2015-11-01

    We report a study of magnetization reversal process of notch-patterned permalloy (Py) nanowires (NWs) by using an in-situ magnetic force microscopy (MFM). Three neighboring straight NWs and an individual straight NW with discs connected to the wires ends are fabricated by standard electron beam lithography through a lift-off technique. MFM images are taken in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field applied along the wires length. As a result, the nucleation, pinning and depinning of domain walls (DWs) along the NW are observed. The artificial constraints (notch) in such symmetrical geometry of NWs indeed serve as pinning sites to pin the DWs. The nature of magnetization reversal, pinning field and depinning field for the DWs that are observed in these permalloy NWs, indicate the key roles of notch depth, the terminal connection structure of NW end and the inter-wire interaction among the NWs. The in-situ MFM measurements are examined with the micromagnetic simulations. Consequently, good agreements are obtained for the DW structures and the effect of DWs pining/depinning, however a dissimilarity in experimental and simulation observations for the direction of propagation of DWs in NWs needs further investigation.

  12. Distance-from-the-wall scaling of turbulent motions in wall-bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya, R.; Philip, J.; Hutchins, N.; Monty, J. P.; Marusic, I.

    2017-02-01

    An assessment of self-similarity in the inertial sublayer is presented by considering the wall-normal velocity, in addition to the streamwise velocity component. The novelty of the current work lies in the inclusion of the second velocity component, made possible by carefully conducted subminiature ×-probe experiments to minimise the errors in measuring the wall-normal velocity. We show that not all turbulent stress quantities approach the self-similar asymptotic state at an equal rate as the Reynolds number is increased, with the Reynolds shear stress approaching faster than the streamwise normal stress. These trends are explained by the contributions from attached eddies. Furthermore, the Reynolds shear stress cospectra, through its scaling with the distance from the wall, are used to assess the wall-normal limits where self-similarity applies within the wall-bounded flow. The results are found to be consistent with the recent prediction from the work of Wei et al. ["Properties of the mean momentum balance in turbulent boundary layer, pipe and channel flows," J. Fluid Mech. 522, 303-327 (2005)], Klewicki ["Reynolds number dependence, scaling, and dynamics of turbulent boundary layers," J. Fluids Eng. 132, 094001 (2010)], and others that the self-similar region starts and ends at z+˜O (√{δ+}) and O (δ+) , respectively. Below the self-similar region, empirical evidence suggests that eddies responsible for turbulent stresses begin to exhibit distance-from-the-wall scaling at a fixed z+ location; however, they are distorted by viscous forces, which remain a leading order contribution in the mean momentum balance in the region z+≲O (√{δ+}) , and thus result in a departure from self-similarity.

  13. Nonmonotonic effects of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on current-driven vortex wall motions in magnetic nanostripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yuan-Chang; Lei, Hai-Yang; Hu, Jing-Guo

    2015-09-01

    In a magnetic nanostripe, the effects of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) on the current-driven horizontal motion of vortex wall along the stripe and the vertical motion of the vortex core are studied by micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the horizontal and vertical motion can generally be monotonously enhanced by PMA. However, when the current is small, a nonmonotonic phenomenon for the horizontal motion is found. Namely, the velocity of the horizontal motion firstly decreases and then increases with the increase of the PMA. We find that the reason for this is that the PMA can firstly increase and then decrease the confining force induced by the confining potential energy. In addition, the PMA always enhances the driving force induced by the current. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11247026 and 11374253).

  14. Simulation and signal processing of through wall UWB radar for human being's periodic motions detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Liu, Fengshan; Xu, Penglong; Zeng, Zhaofa

    2013-05-01

    The human's Micro-Doppler signatures resulting from breathing, arm, foot and other periodic motion can provide valuable information about the structure of the moving parts and may be used for identification and classification purposes. In this paper, we carry out simulate with FDTD method and through wall experiment with UWB radar for human being's periodic motion detection. In addition, Advancements signal processing methods are presented to classify and to extract the human's periodic motion characteristic information, such as Micro-Doppler shift and motion frequency. Firstly, we apply the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with singular value decomposition (SVD) to denoise and extract the human motion signal. Then, we present the results base on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) and the S transform to classify and to identify the human's micro-Doppler shift characteristics. The results demonstrate that the combination of UWB radar and various processing methods has potential to detect human's Doppler signatures effectively.

  15. Field-driven Domain Wall Motion in Ferromagnetic Nanowires with Bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Fengjun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Field-driven domain wall (DW) motion in ferromagnetic nanowires with easy- and hard-axis anisotropies was studied theoretically and numerically in the presence of the bulk Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We propose a new trial function and offer an exact solution for DW motion along a uniaxial nanowire driven by an external magnetic field. A new strategy was suggested to speed up DW motion in a uniaxial magnetic nanowire with large DMI parameters. In the presence of hard-axis anisotropy, we find that the breakdown field and velocity of DW motion was strongly affected by the strength and sign of the DMI parameter under external fields. This work may be useful for future magnetic information storage devices based on DW motion. PMID:27118064

  16. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...

  17. Domain Wall Motion in Magnetic Nanostrips under the Influence of Rashba Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Puliafito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-orbit Rashba effect applies a torque on the magnetization of a ferromagnetic nanostrip in the case of structural inversion asymmetry, also affecting the steady domain wall motion induced by a spin-polarized current. This influence is here analytically studied in the framework of the extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, including the Rashba effect as an additive term of the effective field. Results of previous micromagnetic simulations and experiments have shown that this field yields an increased value of the Walker breakdown current together with an enlargement of the domain wall width. In order to analytically describe these results, the standard travelling wave ansatz for the steady domain wall motion is here adopted. Results of our investigations reveal the impossibility to reproduce, at the same time, the previous features and suggest the need of a more sophisticated model whose development requires, in turn, additional information to be extracted from ad hoc micromagnetic simulations.

  18. Effects of impurity transport and melt layer motion to the tungsten wall erosion during anomaly events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibano, K., E-mail: kibano@eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tsutsui, T.; Lang, T.L.; Togo, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-08-15

    Developing designs of future fusion devices, safety and soundness of the rector at anomaly events must be ensured. A computational approach is being taken by developing a homegrown integrated reactor simulation code and analyzing a loss-of-cooling-gas-puff accident (LCGA). This code currently includes simple plasma, edge, and wall models. In this study, models for the tungsten transport and melt layer motion was added and used for the analysis. It was found that this accident results significant erosion of the wall while impurities from the wall would contribute the radiation cooling for the intense heat flux. However, these effects strongly depend on an uncertain parameter of the tungsten transport as well as the tungsten melt layer motion. Thus, parametric survey for these uncertain quantities were taken and discussed.

  19. Domain wall motion and Barkhausen effect in magnetic nanoparticles for EOR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Khurram; Soleimani, Hassan; Yahya, Noorhana

    2016-11-01

    The domain wall motion in magnetic nanoparticles is a useful parameter of study. The subject of this research is to study of the phenomenon of discontinuous domain wall motion, or the Barkhausen Effect in magnetic nanoparticles. In this work hematite (Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion and characterized using X-ray diffraction, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) for crystal structure, morphology, shape, size and magnetic properties respectively. The FESEM and TEM results show that the particles are spherical in nature and average size is 60nm that is suitable for domain walls and barkhuasen effect. The VSM results show high coercivity 175 Oe and low saturation magnetization due to domain wall pinning and barkhausen effect. The size and magnetic properties reveals the existence of domain walls in the synthesized sample. The magnetic properties confirm the energy losses due to domain wall pinning, discontinuous domain rotation or barkhausen effect during magnetization which is useful for oil-water interfacial tension reduction and viscosity of oil. The high surface charge of magnetic nanoparticles and adsorption at the rock surface is useful for wettability alteration of rocks.

  20. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espejo, A. P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Institute of Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Vidal-Silva, N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); López-López, J. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K. [Institute of Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, University of Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Escrig, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  1. Micromagnetic analysis of current-driven domain wall motion of multi-bit in a nanowire with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kouta; Komine, Takashi; Sugita, Ryuji, E-mail: komine@mx.ibaraki.ac.j [4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511, Ibaraki University (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The current-driven domain wall motion of a multi-bit in a magnetic nanowire with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been analyzed by performing a micromagnetic simulation. The multi-bit motion is determined by the applied current density and the non-adiabatic spin torque parameters, which is similar to the current-driven domain wall motion of the single wall. Consequently, it was found that are two modes in the multi-bit motion: (a) the bit length remains constant and (b) the bit length varies or the bit vanishes in the nanowire. It was found that these modes of the multi-bit motion can be classified by the critical current density or Walker breakdown for the single wall motion in a magnetic nanowire with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  2. Current driven domain wall motion in rare-earth transition metal alloys with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songtian; Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimistu

    2012-09-01

    The domain wall movement behaviors under current combining with magnetic field in perpendicularly magnetized TbFeCo wire were studied by a polar magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope. The velocity for domain wall creeping along electrons flowing direction was found to be apparently higher than that of domain wall creeping against electrons flowing, which is the signature of the spin transfer torque effect. By employing the modified field-driven creep motion law, a spin transfer efficiency of 2.7 Oe cm2/10(6) A was determined for TbFeCo wire by treating the spin transfer torque as an effective field adding to the external field. The high spin transfer efficiency suggests that perpendicularly magnetized system with sharp domain walls in TbFeCo film shows high superiorities for applications in spin transfer torque based devices compared with in-plane magnetized systems.

  3. Simultaneous effects of slip and wall properties on MHD peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80257, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Nisar, Z. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, B. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80257, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Yasmin, H., E-mail: qau2011@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, G.T. Road, Wah Cantt 47040 (Pakistan)

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic transport of nanofluid in a channel with wall properties. Flow analysis is addressed in the presence of viscous dissipation, partial slip and Joule heating effects. Mathematical modelling also includes the salient features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Both analytic and numerical solutions are provided. Comparison between the solutions is shown in a very good agreement. Attention is focused to the Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Hartman number, Eckert number and Prandtl number. Influences of various parameters on skin friction coefficient, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also investigated. It is found that both the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are increasing functions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters. - Highlights: • Temperature rises when Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects intensify. • Temperature profile increases when thermal slip parameter increases. • Concentration field is a decreasing function of concentration slip parameter. • Temperature decreases whereas concentration increases for Hartman number.

  4. A method to quantitate regional wall motion in left ventriculography using Hildreth algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Mikio [Hyogo Red Cross Blood Center (Japan); Naito, Hiroaki; Sato, Yoshinobu; Tamura, Shinichi; Kurosawa, Tsutomu

    1998-06-01

    Quantitative measurement of ventricular wall motion is indispensable for objective evaluation of cardiac function associated with coronary artery disease. We have modified the Hildreth`s algorithm to estimate excursions of the ventricular wall on left ventricular images yielded by various imaging techniques. Tagging cine-MRI was carried out on 7 healthy volunteers. The original Hildreth method, the modified Hildreth method and the centerline method were applied to the outlines of the images obtained, to estimate excursion of the left ventricular wall and regional shortening and to evaluate the accuracy of these methods when measuring these parameters, compared to the values of these parameters measured actually using the attached tags. The accuracy of the original Hildreth method was comparable to that of the centerline method, while the modified Hildreth method was significantly more accurate than the centerline method (P<0.05). Regional shortening as estimated using the modified Hildreth method differed less from the actually measured regional shortening than did the shortening estimated using the centerline method (P<0.05). The modified Hildreth method allowed reasonable estimation of left ventricular wall excursion in all cases where it was applied. These results indicate that when applied to left ventriculograms for ventricular wall motion analysis, the modified Hildreth method is more useful than the original Hildreth method. (author)

  5. Analysis of Human's Motions Based on Local Mean Decomposition in Through-wall Radar Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Liu, Cai; Zeng, Zhaofa; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xuebing

    2016-04-01

    Observation of human motions through a wall is an important issue in security applications and search-and rescue. Radar has advantages in looking through walls where other sensors give low performance or cannot be used at all. Ultrawideband (UWB) radar has high spatial resolution as a result of employment of ultranarrow pulses. It has abilities to distinguish the closely positioned targets and provide time-lapse information of targets. Moreover, the UWB radar shows good performance in wall penetration when the inherently short pulses spread their energy over a broad frequency range. Human's motions show periodic features including respiration, swing arms and legs, fluctuations of the torso. Detection of human targets is based on the fact that there is always periodic motion due to breathing or other body movements like walking. The radar can gain the reflections from each human body parts and add the reflections at each time sample. The periodic movements will cause micro-Doppler modulation in the reflected radar signals. Time-frequency analysis methods are consider as the effective tools to analysis and extract micro-Doppler effects caused by the periodic movements in the reflected radar signal, such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), wavelet transform (WT), and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT).The local mean decomposition (LMD), initially developed by Smith (2005), is to decomposed amplitude and frequency modulated signals into a small set of product functions (PFs), each of which is the product of an envelope signal and a frequency modulated signal from which a time-vary instantaneous phase and instantaneous frequency can be derived. As bypassing the Hilbert transform, the LMD has no demodulation error coming from window effect and involves no negative frequency without physical sense. Also, the instantaneous attributes obtained by LMD are more stable and precise than those obtained by the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) because LMD uses smoothed local

  6. ANALYSIS OF CAUSATION OF ABNORMAL MOTION OF LANDING TROPICAL CYCLONES IN GUANGDONG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春霞

    2004-01-01

    With the 500-hPa geopotential height / SST fields and polar ice from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis source, the work discusses the relationship between abnormal motion of tropical cyclones making landfall on Guangdong province and governing factors like general circulation, polar ice, SST and circulation indexes. It determines how the years of more or fewer tropical cyclones (TCs) distribute for the general circulation, polar ice, SST, conceptual models of all circulation indexes. The results show that (1) when the middle and higher latitudes of the Eurasian continent are mainly of meridional (zonal) circulation in autumn and winter, there are more (fewer) landfalls of TCs; (2) when the SST is warm (cold) in the equatorial eastern Pacific in January - April, there are fewer (more) TCs landfall in the province in the current year but more (fewer) landfall the following year, indicating stable and obvious influence of the former on TCs; (3) when there are more (less) polar ice in summer, autumn and winter, or consistently more (less) ice in autumn and winter, there are mostly fewer (more) landfalls than usual.

  7. Dynamic radionuclide determination of regional left ventricular wall motion using a new digital imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, P.; Kirch, D.

    1975-01-01

    In 47 men with arteriographically defined coronary artery disease comparative studies of left ventricular ejection fraction and segmental wall motion were made with radionuclide data obtained from the image intensifier camera computer system and with contrast cineventriculography. The radionuclide data was digitized and the images corresponding to left ventricular end-diastole and end-systole were identified from the left ventricular time-activity curve. The left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic images were subtracted to form a silhouette difference image which described wall motion of the anterior and inferior left ventricular segments. The image intensifier camera allows manipulation of dynamically acquired radionuclide data because of the high count rate and consequently improved resolution of the left ventricular image.

  8. Current induced domain wall motion in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Su Jung; Tan, Reasmey P.; Chun, Byong Sun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Keun, E-mail: ykim97@korea.ac.k [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We report micromagnetic modeling results of current induced domain wall (DW) motion in magnetic devices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by solving the Landau-Lifschitz-Gilbert equation including adiabatic and non-adiabatic terms. A nanostripe model system with dimensions of 500 nm (L)x25 nm (W)x5 nm (H) was selected for calculating the DW motion and its width, as a function of various parameters such as non-adiabatic contribution, anisotropy constant (K{sub u}), saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), and temperature (T). The DW velocity was found to increase when the values of K{sub u} and T were increased and the M{sub s} value decreased. In addition, a reduction of the domain wall width could be achieved by increasing K{sub u} and lowering M{sub s} values regardless of the non-adiabatic constant value.

  9. Motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in low-Reynolds-number Poiseuille flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staben, Michelle E.; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2003-06-01

    A new boundary-integral algorithm for the motion of a particle between two parallel plane walls in Poiseuille flow at low Reynolds number was developed to study the translational and rotational velocities for a broad range of particle sizes and depths in the channel. Instead of the free-space Green's function more commonly employed in boundary-integral equations, we used the Green's function for the domain between two infinite plane walls [Liron and Mochon, J. Eng. Math. 10, 287 (1976)]. This formulation allows us to directly incorporate the effects of the wall interactions into the stress tensor, without discretizing the bounding walls, and use well-established iterative methods. Our results are in good agreement with previous computations [Ganatos et al., J. Fluid Mech. 99, 755 (1980)] and limiting cases, over their range of application, with additional results obtained for very small particle-wall separations of less than 1% of the particle radius. In addition to the boundary-integral solution in the mobility formulation, we used the resistance formulation to derive the near-field asymptotic forms for the translational and rotational velocities, extending the results to even smaller particle-wall separations. The decrease in translational velocity from the unperturbed fluid velocity increases with particle size and proximity of the particle to one or both of the walls. The rotational velocity exhibits a maximum magnitude between the centerline and either wall, due to the competing influences of wall retardation and the greater fluid velocity gradient near the walls. The average particle velocity for a uniform distribution of particles was generally found to exceed the average fluid velocity, due in large part to exclusion of the particle centers from the region of slowest fluid near the walls. The maximum average particle velocity is 18% greater than the average fluid velocity and occurs for particle diameters that are 42% of the channel height; particles with

  10. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (Pevaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  11. Influence of exchange coupling on current-driven domain wall motion in a nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komine, Takashi, E-mail: komine@mx.ibaraki.ac.j [Department of Media and Telecommunications Engineering, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan); Takahashi, Kota; Murakami, Hiroshi; Sugita, Ryuji [Department of Media and Telecommunications Engineering, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 316-8511 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, the effect of exchange stiffness constant on current-driven domain wall motion in nanowires with in-plane magnetic anisotropy (IMA) and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) has been investigated using micromagnetic simulation. The critical current density in a nanowire with IMA decreases as the exchange stiffness constant decreases because the domain wall width at the upper edge of the nanowire narrows according to the decrease of the exchange stiffness constant. On the other hand, the critical current density in a nanowire with PMA slightly decreases contrary to that of IMA although the domain wall width reasonably decreases as the exchange stiffness constant decreases. The slight reduction rate of the critical current density is due to the increase of the effective hard-axis anisotropy of PMA nanowire.

  12. Heart wall motion analysis by dynamic 3D strain rate imaging from tissue Doppler echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenteufel, Mark; Wolf, Ivo; de Simone, Raffaele; Mottl-Link, Sibylle; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2002-04-01

    The knowledge about the complex three-dimensional (3D) heart wall motion pattern, particular in the left ventricle, provides valuable information about potential malfunctions, e.g., myocardial ischemia. Nowadays, echocardiography (cardiac ultrasound) is the predominant technique for evaluation of cardiac function. Beside morphology, tissue velocities can be obtained by Doppler techniques (tissue Doppler imaging, TDI). Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new technique to diagnose heart vitality. It provides information about the contraction ability of the myocardium. Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography is still the most important clinical method for estimation of morphology and function. Two-dimensional methods leads to a lack of information due to the three-dimensional overall nature of the heart movement. Due to this complex three-dimensional motion pattern of the heart, the knowledge about velocity and strain rate distribution over the whole ventricle can provide more valuable diagnostic information about motion disorders. For the assessment of intracardiac blood flow three-dimensional color Doppler has already shown its clinical utility. We have developed methods to produce strain rate images by means of 3D tissue Doppler echocardiography. The tissue Doppler and strain rate images can be visualized and quantified by different methods. The methods are integrated into an interactively usable software environment, making them available in clinical everyday life. Our software provides the physician with a valuable tool for diagnosis of heart wall motion.

  13. Simultaneous effects of slip and wall properties on MHD peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Nisar, Z.; Ahmad, B.; Yasmin, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic transport of nanofluid in a channel with wall properties. Flow analysis is addressed in the presence of viscous dissipation, partial slip and Joule heating effects. Mathematical modelling also includes the salient features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Both analytic and numerical solutions are provided. Comparison between the solutions is shown in a very good agreement. Attention is focused to the Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Hartman number, Eckert number and Prandtl number. Influences of various parameters on skin friction coefficient, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also investigated. It is found that both the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are increasing functions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  14. Evaluation of regional wall motion in myocardial infarction using animation ECG gated cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takahiko; Hyodo, Haruo; Hayashi, Terumi; Yamamoto, Hideo; Yagi, Shigeru

    1984-08-01

    Regional wall motion of the left ventricle was evaluated in 21 patients with myocardial infarction using an animation system of gated cardiac computed tomographic (CT) images (animation gated CCT). The results obtained were compared with data by two-dimensional echocardiography (2-DE). 1. Evaluation of the asynergic area by animation gated CCT and 2-DE: Animation gated CCT detected the following specific regions with asynergy established by 2-DE; 10/10 cases (100%) at the anterior wall of the left ventricle, 14/14 cases (100%) at the interventricular septum, and 9/11 cases (81.8%) at the infero-posterior wall. In addition, one false positive case and one negative case were observed at the lateral wall and the apex, respectively. Of 37 instances with asynergic areas established by 2-DE, 21 cases or 89.2% were detected by animation gated CCT; the sensitivity was 91.9%. 2. Evaluation of severity of asynergy by animation gated CCT and 2-DE: The degree of asynergy evaluated by both methods was compared with each other, and the agreement was as follows: 10/10 cases (100%) at the left-ventricular anterior wall, 13/13 cases (100%) at the interventricular septum, and 7/9 cases (77.8%) at the infero-posterior wall. 3. Evaluation of the asynergic area by nonanimation gated CCT and 2-DE: Nonanimation gated CCT detected asynergic areas ascertained by 2-DE at the following areas; 8/10 cases (80%) at the left-ventricular anterior wall, 12/14 cases (85.7%) at the interventricular septum, and 4/11 cases (36.4%) at the infero-posterior wall. The difference between animation and nonanimation gated CCT was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The severity of asynergy could not be evaluated by nonanimation gated CCT. (J.P.N.).

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Left Ventricular Wall Motion in Patient with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Using Magnetic Resonance Tagging Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Tadashi; Nakano, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Tokuda, Masataka

    Left ventricular wall motions during systole were investigated from a mechanical perspective by using a magnetic resonance tagging technique. Subjects were 7 patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). First, by analyzing strain in the left ventricular wall, cardiac contractility was evaluated in the patients with CABG. Next, by calculating displacement in the myocardial wall, paradoxical movements following CABG were quantitatively evaluated. Strain analysis showed local decreases in circumferential strain in 4 of 7 subjects. The results of displacement analysis clarified that following CABG, the degree of radial displacement was small in the septal wall and large in the lateral wall, and circumferential displacement towards the septal wall occurred in the anterior and posterior walls. Since this behavior was seen in both reduced and normal cardiac contractility groups, paradoxical movements in the present patients were not caused by reduced cardiac contractility, but rather by rigid-body motion of the entire heart.

  16. [Asynchronous wall motion in patients with ischemic heart disease assessed by higher-order harmonics of the Fourier series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, S; Tamaki, N; Mukai, T; Yonekura, Y; Torizuka, K; Suzuki, Y; Tamaki, S; Nohara, R; Kambara, H; Kawai, C

    1986-01-01

    To assess regional cardiac function in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD), multigated blood-pool studies using higher-order harmonics of the Fourier series were performed for 14 normal persons and 37 patients with IHD. IHD was further divided into IHD (I) (EF greater than or equal to 50%) and IHD (II) (EF less than 50%). A pixel-by-pixel volume curve was simulated using second order harmonics of the Fourier series to create functional images of the following parameters: time to endosystole (TES), peak ejection rate (PER), time to PER (TPE), peak filling rate (PFR), and time to PFR (TPF). TES (SD), TPE (SD), and TPF (SD) were calculated as the standard deviations of left ventricular (LV) histograms of each phase, representing indexes of asynchronous wall motion. An LV volume curve was simulated using third order harmonics to calculate PFR, PFR/PER, and TPF/TPE, representing indexes of diastolic function. TES (SD) was abnormal in 10 cases (50%), and TPE (SD) was abnormal in seven cases (35%) of IHD (II). On the contrary, TPF (SD) was abnormal in three cases (18%) of IHD (I) and 15 cases (75%) of IHD (II), indicating that diastolic asynchronous indexes are more sensitive than systolic asynchronous indexes in detecting IHD. IHD (I) and IHD (II) showed lower PFR (2.32 +/- 0.55, 1.64 +/- 0.46 EDV/sec) and lower PFR/PER (0.84 +/- 0.15, 0.68 +/- 0.26) than those in normals (3.25 +/- 0.98 EDV/sec, 0.99 +/- 0.19), respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Unstable equilibrium point in chaotic domain-wall motion and Ott{endash}Grebogi{endash}Yorke control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, H.; Takemura, Y.

    2001-06-01

    A method for finding the unstable equilibrium points in Bloch wall motion is proposed, which is important for controlling the chaotic domain-wall motion by using the Ott{endash}Grebogi{endash}Yorke (OGY) method. The dynamics of Bloch wall motion are expressed by a nonlinear differential equation with the terms of inertia, damping, restoring, and an external magnetic drive force. An equation is transformed into the difference equations by following the OGY method, approximating linearly around an unstable equilibrium point (a saddle point), and adding a controlling input. The unstable equilibrium points are obtained by using the return map and the condition of hyperbolic fixed point. The time series of domain-wall motion successfully controlled on the unstable equilibrium points by the OGY method is shown. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Magnetic domain-wall motion twisted by nanoscale probe-induced spin transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Xie, L. S.; Wang, C. S.; Zhang, H. Z.; Shu, L.; Bai, J.; Chai, Y. S.; Zhao, X.; Nie, J. C.; Cao, C. B.; Gu, C. Z.; Xiong, C. M.; Sun, Y.; Shi, J.; Salahuddin, S.; Xia, K.; Nan, C. W.; Zhang, J. X.

    2014-12-01

    A method for deterministic control of magnetism using an electrical stimulus is highly desired for the new generation of magnetoelectronic devices. Much effort has been focused on magnetic domain-wall (DW) motion manipulated by a successive injection of spin-polarized current into a magnetic nanostructure. However, an integrant high-threshold current density of 1011˜1012A /m2 inhibits the integration with low-energy-cost technology. Here, we report an approach to manipulate a single magnetic domain wall with a perpendicular anisotropy in a manganite/dielectric/metal capacitor using a probe-induced spin displacement. A spin-transfer torque (STT) occurs in the strongly correlated manganite film during the spin injection into the capacitor from the nanoscale magnetized tip with an ultralow voltage of 0.1 V, where a lower bound of the estimated threshold spin-polarized current density is ˜108A /m2 at the tip/manganite interface. The dynamic of DW motions are analyzed using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert method. This probe-voltage-controlled DW motion, at an ambient condition, demonstrates a critical framework for the fundamental understanding of the manipulation of the nanomagnet systems with low-energy consumption.

  19. Temperature dependence of carrier spin polarization determined from current-induced domain wall motion in a Co/Ni nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, K.; Koyama, T.; Hiramatsu, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Chiba, D. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 322-0012 (Japan); Fukami, S. [Green Innovation Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Center for Spintronics Integrated Systems, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Tanigawa, H.; Suzuki, T. [RENESAS Electronics Corporation, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Ohshima, N. [NEC Energy Device Ltd., 1120 Shimokuzawa, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Ishiwata, N. [Green Innovation Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8501 (Japan); Nakatani, Y. [University of Electro-communications, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan)

    2012-05-14

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the current-induced magnetic domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni nanowire at various temperatures and with various applied currents. The carrier spin polarization was estimated from the measured domain wall velocity. We found that it decreased more with increasing temperature from 100 K to 530 K than the saturation magnetization did.

  20. Pectoralis Muscle Flap Repair Reduces Paradoxical Motion of the Chest Wall in Complex Sternal Wound Dehiscence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitani, Jacob; Russo, Marco; Pompeo, Eugenio; Sergiacomi, Gian Luigi; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with chronic complex sternum dehiscence, the use of muscle flap repair minimizes the occurrence of paradoxical motion of the chest wall (CWPM) when compared to sternal rewiring, eventually leading to better respiratory function and clinical outcomes during follow-up. Methods In a propensity score matching analysis, out of 94 patients who underwent sternal reconstruction, 20 patients were selected: 10 patients underwent sternal reconstruction with bilateral pectoralis muscle flaps (group 1) and 10 underwent sternal rewiring (group 2). Eligibility criteria included the presence of hemisternum diastases associated with multiple (≥3) bone fractures and radiologic evidence of synchronous chest wall motion (CWSM). We compared radiologically assessed (volumetric computed tomography) ventilatory mechanic indices such as single lung and global vital capacity (VC), diaphragm excursion, synchronous and paradoxical chest wall motion. Results Follow-up was 100% complete (mean 85±24 months). CWPM was inversely correlated with single lung VC (Spearman R=−0.72, p=0.0003), global VC (R=−0.51, p=0.02) and diaphragm excursion (R=−0.80, p=0.0003), whereas it proved directly correlated with dyspnea grade (Spearman R=0.51, p=0.02) and pain (R=0.59, p=0.005). Mean CWPM and single lung VC were both better in group 1, whereas there was no difference in CWSM, diaphragm excursion and global VC. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with complex chronic sternal dehiscence, pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction guarantees lower CWPM and greater single-lung VC when compared with sternal rewiring and it is associated with better clinical outcomes with less pain and dyspnea. PMID:27733997

  1. Solution of Two-Dimensional Viscous Flow Driven by Motion of Flexible Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gad-el-Hak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An exact solution of the Navier–Stokes equations for a flow driven by motion of flexible wall is developed. A simple two-dimensional channel with deforming walls is considered as domain. The governing equations are linearized for low Reynolds number and large Womersley number Newtonian flows. Appropriate boundary conditions for general deformation are decomposed into harmonic excitations in space by Fourier series decomposition. A model of harmonic boundary deformation is considered and results are compared with computational fluid dynamics predictions. The results of velocity profiles across the channel and the centerline velocities of the channel are in good agreement with CFD solution. The analytical model developed provides quantitative descriptions of the flow field for a wide spectrum of actuating frequnecy and boundary conditions. The presented model can be used as an effective framework for preliminary design and optimization of displacement micropumps and other miniature applications.

  2. Influence of wall motion on particle sedimentation using hybrid LB-IBM scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Mussie A.; Wu, ChuiJie

    2017-03-01

    We integrate the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and immersed boundary method (IBM) to capture the coupling between a rigid boundary surface and the hydrodynamic response of an enclosed particle laden fluid. We focus on a rigid box filled with a Newtonian fluid where the drag force based on the slip velocity at the wall and settling particles induces the interaction. We impose an external harmonic oscillation on the system boundary and found interesting results in the sedimentation behavior. Our results reveal that the sedimentation and particle locations are sensitive to the boundary walls oscillation amplitude and the subsequent changes on the enclosed flow field. Two different particle distribution analyses were performed and showed the presence of an agglomerate structure of particles. Despite the increase in the amplitude of wall motion, the turbulence level of the flow field and distribution of particles are found to be less in quantity compared to the stationary walls. The integrated LBM-IBM methodology promised the prospect of an efficient and accurate dynamic coupling between a non-compliant bounding surface and flow field in a wide-range of systems. Understanding the dynamics of the fluid-filled box can be particularly important in a simulation of particle deposition within biological systems and other engineering applications.

  3. Two-dimensional simulation of red blood cell motion near a wall under a lateral force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2014-11-01

    The motion of a red blood cell suspended in a linear shear flow adjacent to a fixed boundary subject to an applied lateral force directed toward the boundary is simulated. A two-dimensional model is used that represents the viscous and elastic properties of normal red blood cells. Shear rates in the range of 100 to 600 s-1 are considered, and the suspending medium viscosity is 1 cP. In the absence of a lateral force, the cell executes a tumbling motion. With increasing lateral force, a transition from tumbling to tank-treading is predicted. The minimum force required to ensure tank-treading increases nonlinearly with the shear rate. Transient swinging motions occur when the force is slightly larger than the transition value. The applied lateral force is balanced by a hydrodynamic lift force resulting from the positive orientation of the long axis of the cell with respect to the wall. In the case of cyclic tumbling motions, the orientation angle takes positive values through most of the cycle, resulting in lift generation. These results are used to predict the motion of a cell close to the outer edge of the cell-rich core region that is generated when blood flows in a narrow tube. In this case, the lateral force is generated by shear-induced dispersion, resulting from cell-cell interactions in a region with a concentration gradient. This force is estimated using previous data on shear-induced dispersion. The cell is predicted to execute tank-treading motions at normal physiological hematocrit levels, with the possibility of tumbling at lower hematocrit levels.

  4. Energy-efficient writing scheme for magnetic domain-wall motion memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Yoshimura, Yoko; Ham, Woo Seung; Ernst, Rick; Hirata, Yuushou; Li, Tian; Kim, Sanghoon; Moriyama, Takahiro; Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Ono, Teruo

    2017-04-01

    We present an energy-efficient magnetic domain-writing scheme for domain wall (DW) motion-based memory devices. A cross-shaped nanowire is employed to inject a domain into the nanowire through current-induced DW propagation. The energy required for injecting the magnetic domain is more than one order of magnitude lower than that for the conventional field-based writing scheme. The proposed scheme is beneficial for device miniaturization because the threshold current for DW propagation scales with the device size, which cannot be achieved in the conventional field-based technique.

  5. Automated grading of left ventricular segmental wall motion by an artificial neural network using color kinesis images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.O. Murta Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of left ventricular (LV segmental wall motion (WM abnormalities based on color-coded echocardiographic WM images. An artificial neural network (ANN was developed and validated for grading LV segmental WM using data from color kinesis (CK images, a technique developed to display the timing and magnitude of global and regional WM in real time. We evaluated 21 normal subjects and 20 patients with LVWM abnormalities revealed by two-dimensional echocardiography. CK images were obtained in two sets of viewing planes. A method was developed to analyze CK images, providing quantitation of fractional area change in each of the 16 LV segments. Two experienced observers analyzed LVWM from two-dimensional images and scored them as: 1 normal, 2 mild hypokinesia, 3 moderate hypokinesia, 4 severe hypokinesia, 5 akinesia, and 6 dyskinesia. Based on expert analysis of 10 normal subjects and 10 patients, we trained a multilayer perceptron ANN using a back-propagation algorithm to provide automated grading of LVWM, and this ANN was then tested in the remaining subjects. Excellent concordance between expert and ANN analysis was shown by ROC curve analysis, with measured area under the curve of 0.975. An excellent correlation was also obtained for global LV segmental WM index by expert and ANN analysis (R² = 0.99. In conclusion, ANN showed high accuracy for automated semi-quantitative grading of WM based on CK images. This technique can be an important aid, improving diagnostic accuracy and reducing inter-observer variability in scoring segmental LVWM.

  6. Automated grading of left ventricular segmental wall motion by an artificial neural network using color kinesis images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murta, L O; Ruiz, E E S; Pazin-Filho, A; Schmidt, A; Almeida-Filho, O C; Simões, M V; Marin-Neto, J A; Maciel, B C

    2006-01-01

    The present study describes an auxiliary tool in the diagnosis of left ventricular (LV) segmental wall motion (WM) abnormalities based on color-coded echocardiographic WM images. An artificial neural network (ANN) was developed and validated for grading LV segmental WM using data from color kinesis (CK) images, a technique developed to display the timing and magnitude of global and regional WM in real time. We evaluated 21 normal subjects and 20 patients with LVWM abnormalities revealed by two-dimensional echocardiography. CK images were obtained in two sets of viewing planes. A method was developed to analyze CK images, providing quantitation of fractional area change in each of the 16 LV segments. Two experienced observers analyzed LVWM from two-dimensional images and scored them as: 1) normal, 2) mild hypokinesia, 3) moderate hypokinesia, 4) severe hypokinesia, 5) akinesia, and 6) dyskinesia. Based on expert analysis of 10 normal subjects and 10 patients, we trained a multilayer perceptron ANN using a back-propagation algorithm to provide automated grading of LVWM, and this ANN was then tested in the remaining subjects. Excellent concordance between expert and ANN analysis was shown by ROC curve analysis, with measured area under the curve of 0.975. An excellent correlation was also obtained for global LV segmental WM index by expert and ANN analysis (R2 = 0.99). In conclusion, ANN showed high accuracy for automated semi-quantitative grading of WM based on CK images. This technique can be an important aid, improving diagnostic accuracy and reducing inter-observer variability in scoring segmental LVWM.

  7. Effect of Joule heating in current-driven domain wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nasu, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Ono, T.; Miyake, K.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2005-01-01

    It was found that high current density needed for the current-driven domain wall motion results in the Joule heating of the sample. The sample temperature, when the current-driven domain wall motion occurred, was estimated by measuring the sample resistance during the application of a pulsed current. The sample temperature was 750 K for the threshold current density of 6.7×1011A/m2 in a 10-nm-thick Ni81Fe19 wire with a width of 240 nm on thermally oxidized silicon substrate. The temperature was raised to 830 K for the current density of 7.5×1011A/m2, which is very close to the Curie temperature of bulk Ni81Fe19. When the current density exceeded 7.5×1011A/m2, an appearance of a multidomain structure in the wire was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting that the sample temperature exceeded the Curie temperature.

  8. Congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities in adults detected by gated cardiac multidetector computed tomography: Clefts, aneurysms, diverticula and terminology problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erol, Cengiz, E-mail: drcengizerol@yahoo.com [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Alaeddin Keykubat Central Campus, Selcuklu, 42250 Konya (Turkey); Koplay, Mustafa, E-mail: koplaymustafa@hotmail.com [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Alaeddin Keykubat Central Campus, Selcuklu, 42250 Konya (Turkey); Olcay, Ayhan, E-mail: drayhanolcay@gmail.com [29 May Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Vatan Street, Fatih, 34150 Istanbul (Turkey); Kivrak, Ali Sami, E-mail: alisamikivrak@hotmail.com [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Alaeddin Keykubat Central Campus, Selcuklu, 42250 Konya (Turkey); Ozbek, Seda, E-mail: dsadr@hotmail.com [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Alaeddin Keykubat Central Campus, Selcuklu, 42250 Konya (Turkey); Seker, Mehmet, E-mail: hikmet.irfan@hotmail.com [29 May Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vatan Street, Fatih, 34150 Istanbul (Turkey); Paksoy, Yahya, E-mail: yahyapaksoy@yahoo.com [Selcuk University, Selcuklu Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Alaeddin Keykubat Central Campus, Selcuklu, 42250 Konya (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities (clefts, aneurysms and diverticula), describe and illustrate imaging features, discuss terminology problems and determine their prevalence detected by cardiac CT in a single center. Materials and methods: Coronary CT angiography images of 2093 adult patients were evaluated retrospectively in order to determine congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities. Results: The incidence of left ventricular clefts (LVC) was 6.7% (141 patients) and statistically significant difference was not detected between the sexes regarding LVC (P = 0.5). LVCs were single in 65.2% and multiple in 34.8% of patients. They were located at the basal to mid inferoseptal segment of the left ventricle in 55.4%, the basal to mid anteroseptal segment in 24.1%, basal to mid inferior segment in 17% and septal-apical septal segment in 3.5% of cases. The cleft length ranged from 5 to 22 mm (mean 10.5 mm) and they had a narrow connection with the left ventricle (mean 2.5 mm). They were contractile with the left ventricle and obliterated during systole. Congenital left ventricular septal aneurysm that was located just under the aortic valve was detected in two patients (0.1%). No case of congenital left ventricular diverticulum was detected. Conclusion: Cardiac CT allows us to recognize congenital left ventricular wall abnormalities which have been previously overlooked in adults. LVC is a congenital structural variant of the myocardium, is seen more frequently than previously reported and should be differentiated from aneurysm and diverticulum for possible catastrophic complications of the latter two.

  9. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N., E-mail: izumi2@llnl.gov; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 9212 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  10. Observation of hohlraum-wall motion with spectrally selective x-ray imaging at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, N.; Meezan, N. B.; Divol, L.; Hall, G. N.; Barrios, M. A.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Vonhof, S. A.; Nikroo, A.; Jaquez, J.; Bailey, C. G.; Hardy, C. M.; Ehrlich, R. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-11-01

    The high fuel capsule compression required for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion requires careful control of the X-ray drive symmetry throughout the laser pulse. When the outer cone beams strike the hohlraum wall, the plasma ablated off the hohlraum wall expands into the hohlraum and can alter both the outer and inner cone beam propagations and hence the X-ray drive symmetry especially at the final stage of the drive pulse. To quantitatively understand the wall motion, we developed a new experimental technique which visualizes the expansion and stagnation of the hohlraum wall plasma. Details of the experiment and the technique of spectrally selective x-ray imaging are discussed.

  11. Role of spin diffusion in current-induced domain wall motion for disordered ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2015-03-12

    Current-induced spin transfer torque and magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin diffusion in disordered magnetic textures is studied theoretically. We demonstrate using tight-binding calculations that weak, spin-conserving impurity scattering dramatically enhances the nonadiabaticity. To further explore this mechanism, a phenomenological drift-diffusion model for incoherent spin transport is investigated. We show that incoherent spin diffusion indeed produces an additional spatially dependent torque of the form ∼∇2[m×(u⋅∇)m]+ξ∇2[(u⋅∇)m], where m is the local magnetization direction, u is the direction of injected current, and ξ is a parameter characterizing the spin dynamics (precession, dephasing, and spin-flip). This torque, which scales as the inverse square of the domain wall width, only weakly enhances the longitudinal velocity of a transverse domain wall but significantly enhances the transverse velocity of vortex walls. The spatial-dependent spin transfer torque uncovered in this study is expected to have significant impact on the current-driven motion of abrupt two-dimensional textures such as vortices, skyrmions, and merons.

  12. Effect of microwaves on domain wall motion in thin Ni wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kimin; Giordano, N.

    1996-03-01

    We report new results on domain wall motion in thin (width and thickness ~ 300 ÅNi wires. The magnetoresistance exhibits discontinuities which we believe are associated with pinning and de-pinning of walls from structural defects, such as variations in the width of the sample. Upon repeated measurement, the de-pinning is found to occur over a narrow range of fields. The distribution of de-pinning fields, P(H), varies with temperature in a manner which suggests that de-pinning occurs via thermal activation at high temperatures, and quantum tunneling at low temperatures, with crossover between these two regimes at T ~ 2 - 6 K. We have also investigated the effect of a 30 GHz microwave field on P(H). In the thermal activation regime, microwaves have no effect on P(H), except through Joule heating. However, in the tunneling regime microwaves cause P(H) to split into several separate peaks. This behavior cannot be explained in terms of Joule heating, but suggests that the energy levels of a domain wall in a pinning well are quantized.

  13. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  14. Micromagnetic modeling of domain wall motion in sub-100-nm-wide wires with individual and periodic edge defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dutta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the switching energy of devices that rely on magnetic domain wall motion requires scaling the devices to widths well below 100 nm, where the nanowire line edge roughness (LER is an inherent source of domain wall pinning. We investigate the effects of periodic and isolated rectangular notches, triangular notches, changes in anisotropy, and roughness measured from images of fabricated wires, in sub-100-nm-wide nanowires with in-plane and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using micromagnetic modeling. Pinning fields calculated for a model based on discretized images of physical wires are compared to experimental measurements. When the width of the domain wall is smaller than the notch period, the domain wall velocity is modulated as the domain wall propagates along the wire. We find that in sub-30-nm-wide wires, edge defects determine the operating threshold and domain wall dynamics.

  15. Easy moment direction and antiferromagnetic domain wall motion in Mn2Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthem, Vitoria M. T. S.; Colin, Claire V.; Haettel, Richard; Dufeu, Didier; Givord, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The interest of giving active functions to antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials in spintronics devices has been realized recently. Mn2Au is a high-Néel temperature antiferromagnet with large Mn moment, lying in plane of the tetragonal structure. To determine the direction of the moments in Mn2Au, an original approach is demonstrated, which should be generic to planar AFM materials. It involves the rotation of the granular sample around an axis perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The family of easy moment directions is . For grains prevented from rotating, the dominant magnetization process is AFM domain wall motion. Textured Mn2Au nanoelements could be introduced in spintronics devices, in which the Mn moments would be switched under modest external excitation.

  16. Miniature Hall sensor integrated on a magnetic thin film for detecting domain wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, M.; Tokunaga, Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Kagawa, F.; Tokura, Y.; Kawasaki, M.

    2013-08-01

    We have fabricated a cross-bar Hall sensor made of 50-nm-wide and 100-nm-thick bismuth wires patterned by an electron-beam lithography and lift-off. The Hall coefficient at 300 K is as large as -0.44 cm3/C, yielding in a high product sensitivity of about 5 V/(A T). The series resistance was reduced as low as 1.7 kΩ with a short bar configuration, resulting in a high signal-to-noise ratio of 38.5 dB. These characteristics are far better than those reported with similar dimensions. The Hall element was successfully demonstrated for detecting the domain wall motion in an iron garnet film employed as the substrate.

  17. Ring-shaped Racetrack memory based on spin orbit torque driven chiral domain wall motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xueying; Hu, Jingtong; Nan, Jiang; Zheng, Zhenyi; Zhang, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Vernier, Nicolas; Ravelosona, Dafine; Zhao, Weisheng

    2016-10-01

    Racetrack memory (RM) has sparked enormous interest thanks to its outstanding potential for low-power, high-density and high-speed data storage. However, since it requires bi-directional domain wall (DW) shifting process for outputting data, the mainstream stripe-shaped concept certainly suffers from the data overflow issue. This geometrical restriction leads to increasing complexity of peripheral circuits or programming as well as undesirable reliability issue. In this work, we propose and study ring-shaped RM, which is based on an alternative mechanism, spin orbit torque (SOT) driven chiral DW motions. Micromagnetic simulations have been carried out to validate its functionality and exhibit its performance advantages. The current flowing through the heavy metal instead of ferromagnetic layer realizes the “end to end” circulation of storage data, which remains all the data in the device even if they are shifted. It blazes a promising path for application of RM in practical memory and logic.

  18. Easy moment direction and antiferromagnetic domain wall motion in Mn{sub 2}Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthem, Vitoria M.T.S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Colin, Claire V.; Haettel, Richard; Dufeu, Didier [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Givord, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.givord@neel.cnrs.fr [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut NEEL, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut NEEL, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2016-05-15

    The interest of giving active functions to antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials in spintronics devices has been realized recently. Mn{sub 2}Au is a high-Néel temperature antiferromagnet with large Mn moment, lying in plane of the tetragonal structure. To determine the direction of the moments in Mn{sub 2}Au, an original approach is demonstrated, which should be generic to planar AFM materials. It involves the rotation of the granular sample around an axis perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The family of easy moment directions is 〈110〉. For grains prevented from rotating, the dominant magnetization process is AFM domain wall motion. Textured Mn{sub 2}Au nanoelements could be introduced in spintronics devices, in which the Mn moments would be switched under modest external excitation.

  19. Magnetic domain wall motion in Co/Ni nanowires induced by a sloped electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Keisuke; Murayama, Soh; Nakatani, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    We report the sloped-electric-field (SEF)-driven motion of a magnetic domain wall (DW) in a Co/Ni nanowire with a perpendicular anisotropy using micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the DW velocity increases in proportion to the modulation ratio of the SEF, and rapidly decreases above a threshold ratio of SEF (i.e., the breakdown). We derived the analytical equation of the effective magnetic field caused by the SEF, and show the resultant DW velocity. Also, we found that the maximum DW velocity is three times faster when the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction is 0.06 erg/cm2. The results presented here offer a promising route for the design of non-volatile memory and logic devices using only the electric-field.

  20. Transient motion of and heat transfer in a rarefied gas between plane parallel walls with different surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    Transient motion of and heat transfer in a rarefied gas between plane parallel walls with different surface properties are studied based on kinetic theory. It is assumed that one wall is a diffuse reflection boundary and the other wall is a Maxwell-type boundary, and the transient behavior of the gas caused by a sudden heating of one of the walls is studied. The linearized Boltzmann equation for a hard-sphere molecular gas is numerically studied using the modified hybrid scheme of the characteristic coordinate and finite difference methods, to correctly describe the discontinuities in the velocity distribution function. The transient motion of the gas from an early time stage to the final time-independent state is studied over a wide range of the mean free path and the accommodation coefficient of the boundary. Between the two transient flows caused by the heating of the respective walls, the values of the heat flow on the heated wall are different, whereas those on the unheated wall coincide identically. This property, which is a consequence of the symmetric relation of the linearized Boltzmann equation, is numerically confirmed over a wide range of the mean free path. The long time behavior of the heat flow on the walls is quite similar to that of the shear stress in the Couette flow problem, whereas a distinct wavy behavior is observed in an early time stage.

  1. Direct observation of current-induced motion of a 3D vortex domain wall in cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2017-05-08

    The current-induced dynamics of 3D magnetic vortex domain walls in cylindrical Co/Ni nanowires are revealed experimentally using Lorentz microscopy and theoretically using micromagnetic simulations. We demonstrate that a spin-polarized electric current can control the reversible motion of 3D vortex domain walls, which travel with a velocity of a few hundred meters per second. This finding is a key step in establishing fast, high-density memory devices based on vertical arrays of cylindrical magnetic nanowires.

  2. Steady motion of skyrmions and domains walls under diffusive spin torques

    KAUST Repository

    Elías, Ricardo Gabriel

    2017-03-09

    We explore the role of the spin diffusion of conducting electrons in two-dimensional magnetic textures (domain walls and skyrmions) with spatial variation of the order of the spin precession length λex. The effect of diffusion reflects in four additional torques that are third order in spatial derivatives of magnetization and bilinear in λex and in the nonadiabatic parameter β′. In order to study the dynamics of the solitons when these diffusive torques are present, we derive the Thiele equation in the limit of steady motion and we compare the results with the nondiffusive limit. When considering a homogenous current these torques increase the longitudinal velocity of transverse domain walls of width Δ by a factor (λex/Δ)2(α/3), α being the magnetic damping constant. In the case of single skyrmions with core radius r0 these new contributions tend to increase the Magnus effect in an amount proportional to (λex/r0)2(1+2αβ′).

  3. Intramedullary spinal cord ganglioglioma presenting with abnormal abdominal wall movement. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanabadi, Saeid; Azhough, Ramin; Motlagh, Parviz Samad; Hadidchi, Shahram; Tabrizi, Ali Dastranj; Zonouzy, Keivan Kashy

    2004-10-15

    The authors present a case of intramedullary ganglioglioma in a 6-year-old girl. Since the age of 4 months the patient had experienced a spontaneous wavy undulating movement of her anterior abdominal wall resembling a severe peristalsis. The movement was continuous even during sleep, and this symptom was named "belly dance." Magnetic resonance images revealed an intramedullary tumor with ill-defined borders, and the lesion was partially resected. The patient made a good recovery, although 4 years postsurgery her scoliosis had progressed.

  4. [Reaction of the uterine wall on IUD of abnormal positioning and size].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesit, V

    1973-05-01

    The reliability of an IUD was examined in 9 women 1-7 days prior to hysterectomy or supracervical amputation of the uterus. An extra large Dana, Dana super, or Dana cor was inserted. All the women complained of hypogastric pains; in 2 cases, the IUD was removed after only a few hours. After the surgery, the uterus was prepared for histological verification of the effects of the IUD. Significant deformation of the uterine wall was found, especially in the region of the cervix and corpus uteri. This was particularly marked with the Dana super, which also caused a rotary deformation. There were changes seen in the IUD itself as well. The results show that an excessively large or incorrectly positioned IUD will cause pronounced deformation of the corpus, uterine cavity and of the cervix with subsequent pains, staining, and expulsion.

  5. Theory of domain wall motion mediated magnetoelectric effects in a multiferroic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, V. M.; Srinivasan, G.

    2014-10-01

    A model is discussed for magnetoelectric (ME) interactions originating from the motion of magnetic domain walls (DWs) in a multiferroic composite of orthoferrites RFeO3 (RFO) with magnetic stripe domains and a piezoelectric such as lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT). The DWs in RFO can be set in motion with an ac magnetic field up to a critical speed of 20 km/s, the highest for any magnetic system, leading to the excitation of bulk and shear magnetoacoustic waves. Thus, the ME coupling will arise from flexural deformation associated with DW motion (rather than the Joule magnetostriction mediated coupling under a static or quasistatic condition). A c plane orthoferrite with a single Néel-type DW in the bc plane and an ac magnetic field H along the c axis is assumed. The deflection in the bilayer due to DW motion is obtained when the DW velocity is a linear function H and the resulting induced voltage across PMN-PT is estimated. It is shown that a combination of spatial and time harmonics of the bending deformation leads to (i) a linear ME coefficient defined by αE=E/H and (ii) a quadratic ME coefficient αEQ=E/H2. The model is applied to yttrium orthoferrites (YFO) and a PMN-PT bilayer since YFO has one of the highest DW mobility amongst the orthoferrites. The coefficient αE is dependent on the DW position, and it is maximum when the DW equilibrium position is at the center of the sample. In YFO/PMN-PT the estimated low-frequency αE ˜ 30 mV/cm Oe and resonance value is 1.5 V/(cm Oe). Since orthoferrites (and PMN-PT) are transparent in the visible region and have a large Faraday rotation, the DW dynamics and the ME coupling could be studied simultaneously. The theory discussed here is of interest for studies on ME coupling and for applications such as magnetically controlled electro-optic devices.

  6. Physiological Motion and Registration of Abnormalities in Liver During Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Rh, Abhilash

    Continuous deformation and dislocation of soft tissues in the abdominal and thoracic region presents a major issue for effective targeting of all non-invasive ablative modalities such as radiotherapy/surgery and Focused Ultrasound Surgery. Most significant among these is the movement of the target organs due to physiological processes such as respiration. The movement is found to be most significant for liver and kidneys. We studied movement and compensation strategies with the aim to implement them during ultrasound ablation using our robotic system for targeted FUS dose delivery. The motion pattern of the liver can be assumed to be in a single plane as it closely follows the movement of the diaphragm. However, the movement of kidneys is three dimensional and follows complicated patterns. Kidney motion is highly subject specific and has poor repeatability. In our research, we quantify the relation of liver movement and the breathing pattern so as to achieve real-time movement compensation using a prediction-correlation approach.

  7. Spatio-temporal characteristics of large scale motions in a turbulent boundary layer from direct wall shear stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Rommel; Barnard, Casey; Ukeiley, Lawrence; Sheplak, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and fluctuating wall shear stress experiments were performed on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL) under zero pressure gradient conditions. The fluctuating wall shear stress was measured using a microelectromechanical 1mm × 1mm floating element capacitive shear stress sensor (CSSS) developed at the University of Florida. The experiments elucidated the imprint of the organized motions in a TBL on the wall shear stress through its direct measurement. Spatial autocorrelation of the streamwise velocity from the PIV snapshots revealed large scale motions that scale on the order of boundary layer thickness. However, the captured inclination angle was lower than that determined using the classic method by means of wall shear stress and hot-wire anemometry (HWA) temporal cross-correlations and a frozen field hypothesis using a convection velocity. The current study suggests the large size of these motions begins to degrade the applicability of the frozen field hypothesis for the time resolved HWA experiments. The simultaneous PIV and CSSS measurements are also used for spatial reconstruction of the velocity field during conditionally sampled intense wall shear stress events. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1315138.

  8. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bang, Do

    2016-05-23

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ∼15MA/cm2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ∼26MA/cm2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  9. Cases of limb-body wall complex: Early amnion rupture, vascular disruption, or abnormal splitting of the embryo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Frank; Pinar, Halit; Kostadinov, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    We report two cases of limb-body wall complex (LBWC), also known as body stalk anomaly, a rare form of body wall defect incompatible with life. The first case was identified during a level II ultrasound examination performed at 7 wk gestational age. The delivery was by breech extraction at 39 wk and 4 days. The second case was delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery at 35 wk and 5 days. Karyotype analysis was normal in both fetuses. The phenotype of LBWC is variable, but commonly identified features include: exencephaly, limb defects, and either facial clefts or thoraco-abdominoschisis. The exact etiology remains uncertain, as the disorder has been regarded as sporadic with low recurrence. Vascular disruption during early embryogenesis, early amnion rupture, abnormal splitting of the embryo, and failure of amnion fusion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of LBWC. A role for possible gene mutation and maternal use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs has also been suggested. Detailed ultrasonography along with biochemical screening may allow for early detection.

  10. Leaflet motion abnormality after TAVI: genuine threat or much ado about nothing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Tarun; Abramowitz, Yigal; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Makkar, Raj R

    2016-09-18

    Symptomatic transcatheter heart valve (THV) thrombosis is noted in up to 1% of patients after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Recently, hypoattenuated leaflet thickening and reduced leaflet motion of bioprosthetic aortic valves associated with normal transvalvular gradients (and possibly related to subclinical leaflet thrombosis) have been reported. While trans-thoracic echocardiography is a useful initial screening imaging modality for the detection of symptomatic THV thrombosis associated with elevated transvalvular gradients, it has limited utility in the detection of subclinical THV thrombosis. In the present article, we describe the incidence, clinical presentation and strategies for the prevention and treatment of THV thrombosis, as well as the role of imaging modalities in the diagnosis and management of this phenomenon.

  11. Domain wall motion and precursor dynamics in PbZrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchberger, S.; Soprunyuk, V.; Majchrowski, A.; Roleder, K.; Schranz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of PbZrO3 have been studied by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements in the low-frequency range f =0.02 -50 Hz. The complex Young's modulus exhibits a quite rich behavior and depends strongly on the direction of the applied dynamic force. In pseudocubic [100] c direction, we found intrinsic elastic behavior as expected from the Landau theory; at the antiferroelectric transition Tc≈510 K, a downwards cusp anomaly in Y' accompanied by a peak in Y'' points to a quadratic/linear order parameter/strain coupling in the Landau free energy. Both anomalies are increasing with decreasing frequency showing that the measurements are performed in the limit ω τth>1 . Frequency scans around Tc show energy dissipation, which could result from interphase boundary motion and/or heat diffusion. Above Tc, we observe a pronounced precursor softening, quite similar as it was found in other perovskites, which can be perfectly fitted including isotropic order parameter fluctuations. The low-frequency elastic response in [110] c direction is different. Below Tc, we find in addition to the intrinsic anomaly a strong contribution from ferroelastic domains, which leads to an additional softening in Y'. With decreasing temperatures this superelastic softening gradually disappears, due to an increasing relaxation time τDW for domain wall motion, indicating glassy behavior of domain freezing in PbZrO3. In contrast to the [100] c direction, for forces along [110] c, we found a pronounced precursor hardening, starting at about 60 K above Tc. Since this anomaly is of dynamic nature, starting at the same temperature as the observed birefringence and piezoelectric anomalies [Ko et al. Phys. Rev. B 87, 184110 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.184110], we conclude that it originates from slow dynamic polar clusters, which freeze at T*≈550 K>Tc .

  12. Ultrawideband through-wall radar for detecting the motion of people in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Soumya; Barnes, Mark A.; Payment, Tim; Holladay, Gary

    2002-07-01

    Law enforcement officers and search-and-rescue workers often face the difficult task of determining the locations of people inside a building or obscured by smoke and debris. To address this problem, Time Domain Corporation (TDC) has developed a real-time, hand-held radar to detect the motion of persons in range and azimuth through non-metallic walls. This radar is a time modulated ultra-wide band (TM-UWB) impulse radar that generates a two-dimensional (2D) representation of moving targets in real time. The intentional transmit power emitted from the radar is comparable to the FCC Part 15, Class B limits. It has the following benefits: (1) covertness because of its ultra-low power noise-like signal, (2) high resolution at low radio frequencies for penetrating building materials, (3) reduced range ambiguities and clutter fold-over because of pseudo-random time modulation, and (4) clutter rejection because of the ultra-wide bandwidth of the signal. In this paper, an outline of the key parameters of the TDC prototype radar RadarVision2000 (RV2000) and a brief description of the algorithm that generates a motion map showing the range and direction of the moving people are presented. Some typical radar images of multiple targets for a variety of building materials and cluttered environment obtained using the prototype are shown. Finally, the paper presents some preliminary results for resolving the targets in the elevation plane along with a processing technique for reducing the intensity of multi-path responses in the images.

  13. Structure, stability, and motion of dislocations in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Kai-Wang; Li Zhong-Qiu; Wu Jian; Peng Xiang-Yang; Tan Xin-Jun; Sun Li-Zhong; Zhong Jian-Xin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,a novel double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with both edge and screw dislocations is studied by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The differences between two adjacent tubule indexes of armchair and zigzag nanotubes are determined to be 5 and 9,respectively,by taking into account the symmetry,integrality,and thermal stability of the composite structures. It is found that melting first occurs near the dislocations,and the melting temperatures of the dislocated armchair and zigzag DWCNTs are around 2600 K-2700 K.At the premelting temperatures,the shrink of the dislocation loop,which is comprised of edge and screw dislocations,implies that the composite dislocation in DWCNTs has self-healing ability.The dislocated DWCNTs first fracture at the edge dislocations,which induces the entire break in axial tensile test. The dislocated DWCNTs have a smaller fracture strength compared to the perfect DWCNTs.Our results not only match with the dislocation glide of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in experiments,but also can free from the electron beam radiation under experimental conditions observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM),which is deemed to cause the motion of dislocation loop.

  14. Structure, stability, and motion of dislocations in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Wang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Jian; Peng, Xiang-Yang; Tan, Xin-Jun; Sun, Li-Zhong; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with both edge and screw dislocations is studied by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The differences between two adjacent tubule indexes of armchair and zigzag nanotubes are determined to be 5 and 9, respectively, by taking into account the symmetry, integrality, and thermal stability of the composite structures. It is found that melting first occurs near the dislocations, and the melting temperatures of the dislocated armchair and zigzag DWCNTs are around 2600 K—2700 K. At the pre-melting temperatures, the shrink of the dislocation loop, which is comprised of edge and screw dislocations, implies that the composite dislocation in DWCNTs has self-healing ability. The dislocated DWCNTs first fracture at the edge dislocations, which induces the entire break in axial tensile test. The dislocated DWCNTs have a smaller fracture strength compared to the perfect DWCNTs. Our results not only match with the dislocation glide of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in experiments, but also can free from the electron beam radiation under experimental conditions observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), which is deemed to cause the motion of dislocation loop.

  15. Feasibility and Reproducibility of Two-Dimensional Wall Motion Tracking (WMT) in Fetal Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzensberger, Christian; Achterberg, Friederike; Degenhardt, Jan; Wolter, Aline; Graupner, Oliver; Herrmann, Johannes; Axt-Fliedner, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Objective The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and reproducibility of 2-dimensional speckle tracking imaging based on the wall motion tracking (WMT) technique in fetal echocardiography. The secondary objective was to compare left and right ventricular global and segmental longitudinal peak strain values. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study was performed. Global and segmental longitudinal peak strain values of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) were assessed prospectively. Based on apical 4-chamber views, cine loops were acquired and digitally stored. Strain analysis was performed offline. Intra- and interobserver variabilities were analyzed. Results A total of 29 healthy fetuses with an echocardiogram performed between 19 and 37 weeks of gestation were included. Analysis was performed with a temporal resolution of 60 frames per second (fps). For both examiners, in all cases Cronbach’s alpha was>0.7. The interobserver variability showed a strong agreement in 50% of the segments (ICC 0.71–0.90). The global strain values for LV and RV were −16.34 and −14.65%, respectively. Segmental strain analysis revealed a basis to apex gradient with the lowest strain values in basal segments and the highest strain values in apical segments. Conclusion The assessment of fetal myocardial deformation parameters by 2D WMT is technically feasible with good reproducibility. PMID:28210715

  16. Classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI using kernel Dictionary Learning with a parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan; Paredes, Jose; Bellanger, Jean-J; Donal, Erwan; Leclercq, Christophe; Medina, Ruben; Garreau, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a parametric approach for the assessment of wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Time-signal intensity curves (TSICs) are identified in Spatio-temporal image profiles extracted from different anatomical segments in a cardiac MRI sequence. Different parameters are constructed from specific TSICs that present a decreasing then increasing shape reflecting dynamic information of the LV contraction. The parameters extracted from these curves are related to: 1) an average curve based on a clustering process, 2) curve skewness and 3) cross correlation values between each average clustered curve and a patient-specific reference. Several tests are performed in order to construct different vectors to train a sparse classifier based on kernel Dictionary Learning (DL). Results are compared with other classifiers like Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Discriminative Dictionary Learning. The best classification performance is obtained with information of skewness and the average curve with an accuracy about 94% using the mentioned sparse based kernel DL with a radial basis function kernel.

  17. A cellular scale numerical study of the effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Qiao; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2014-04-01

    The effect of mechanical properties of erythrocytes on the near-wall motion of platelets was numerically studied with the immersed boundary method. Cells were modeled as viscous-fluid-filled capsules surrounded by hyper-elastic membranes with negligible thickness. The numerical results show that with the increase of hematocrit, the near-wall approaching of platelets is enhanced, with which platelets exhibit larger deformation and orientation angle of its near-wall tank-treading motion, and the lateral force pushing platelets to the wall is increased with larger fluctuation amplitude. Meanwhile the near-wall approaching is reduced by increasing the stiffness of erythrocytes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Current-induced domain wall motion in Co/Ni nano-wires with different Co and Ni thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, K; Chiba, D; Koyama, T; Yamada, G; Ono, T [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan); Tanigawa, H; Fukami, S; Suzuki, T; Ohshima, N; Ishiwata, N [NEC Corporation, 1120 Shimokuzawa, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5298 (Japan); Nakatani, Y, E-mail: ono@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [University of Electro-communications, Chofu, Tokyo, 182-8585 (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    The authors have investigated magnetic domain wall motion induced by electric currents in ferromagnetic nano-wires made of Co/Ni multilayers. The thicknesses of Co and Ni layers were changed, whereas the numbers of layer stacks of Co and Ni were the same in all samples. The sample with thinner total Co/Ni thickness showed the lower threshold current density for the domain wall motion as an overall trend, which is qualitatively in agreement with the expectation by the theory based on the adiabatic spin-transfer model. The lowest threshold current density was 2.9x10{sup 11} A/m{sup 2} obtained in the sample with the total Co/Ni thickness of 3.4 nm and the wire width of 110 nm.

  19. Injection and controlled motion of conducting domain walls in improper ferroelectric Cu-Cl boracite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Raymond G. P.; Campbell, Michael P.; Whatmore, Roger W.; Kumar, Amit; Gregg, J. Marty

    2017-05-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls constitute a completely new class of sheet-like functional material. Moreover, since domain walls are generally writable, erasable and mobile, they could be useful in functionally agile devices: for example, creating and moving conducting walls could make or break electrical connections in new forms of reconfigurable nanocircuitry. However, significant challenges exist: site-specific injection and annihilation of planar walls, which show robust conductivity, has not been easy to achieve. Here, we report the observation, mechanical writing and controlled movement of charged conducting domain walls in the improper-ferroelectric Cu3B7O13Cl. Walls are straight, tens of microns long and exist as a consequence of elastic compatibility conditions between specific domain pairs. We show that site-specific injection of conducting walls of up to hundreds of microns in length can be achieved through locally applied point-stress and, once created, that they can be moved and repositioned using applied electric fields.

  20. Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, A; Hirohata, A; Ono, T; Miyajima, H

    2012-01-18

    We observed a magnetic domain wall (DW) motion induced by the spin-polarized pulsed current in a nanoscale Fe(19)Ni(81) wire using a magnetic force microscope. High current density, which is of the order of 10(11) A m(-2), was required for the DW motion. A simple method to estimate the temperature of the wire was developed by comparing the wire resistance measured during the DW motion with the temperature dependence of the wire resistance. Using this method, we found the temperature of the wire was proportional to the square of the current density and became just beneath at the threshold Curie temperature. Our experimental data qualitatively support this analytical model that the temperature is proportional to the resistivity, thickness, width of the wire and the square of the current density, and also inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity.

  1. Identification and Assessment of Paradoxical Ventricular Wall Motion Using ECG Gated Blood Pool Scan - Comparison of cine Loop , Phase Analysis and Paradox Image -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Tae; Kim, Gwang Weon; Lee, Kyu Bo; Chung, Byung Chun; Whang, Kee Suk; Chae, Sung Chul; Paek, Wee Hyun; Cheon, Jae Eun [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Woo; Chung, Jin Hong [Yeongnam National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Sixty-four patients with paradoxical ventricular wall motion noticed both in angiocardiography or 2-dimensional echocardiography were assessed by ECG gated blood pool scan (GBPS). Endless cine loop image, phase and amplitude images and paradox image obtained by visual inspection of each cardiac beat or Fourier transformation of acquired raw data were investigated to determine the incremental value of GBPS with these processing methods for identification of paradoxical ventricular wall motion. The results were as follows:1) Paradoxical wall motions were observed on interventricular septum in 34 cases, left ventricular free wall in 26 and right ventricular wall in 24. Underlying heart diseases were is chemic (23 cases) valvular(9), congenital heart disease (12), cardiomyopathy (5), pericardial effusion(5), post cardiac surgery(3), corpulmonale (2), endocarditis (l) and right ventricular tumor(l). 2) Left ventricular ejection fractions of patients with paradoxical left ventricular wall motion were significantly lower than those with paradoxical septal motion (p <0.005). 3) The sensitivity of each processing methods for detecting paradoxical wall motion was 76.9% by phase analysis, 74.6% by endless cine loop mapping and 68.4% by paradox image manipulation respectively. Paradoxial motions visualized only in phase, paradox or both images were appeared as hypokinesia or akinesia in cine loop image. 4) All events could be identified by at least one of above three processing methods, however only 34 cases (48.4%) showed the paradoxical motions in all of the three images. By these findings, we concluded that simultaneous inspection of all above three processing methods-endless cine loop, phase analysis and paradox image is necessary for accurate identification and assessment of paradoxical ventricular wall motion when performing GBPS.

  2. Paralytic strabismus compensatory head position and abnormal cervical motion%麻痹性斜视代偿头位与颈椎异常运动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭文华

    2016-01-01

    在眼科临床诊疗过程中,眼性斜颈比较常见。麻痹斜视与颈椎异常运动相互联系,相互影响。颈椎是脊椎的带头“大哥”,颈椎的异常运动引发整个脊柱的运动异常,出现全身姿势异常。%In the clinical diagnosis and treatment process of the ophthalmology,the ocular torticollis is more common.The paralytic strabismus and abnormal cervical motion have mutual connection and mutual influence.Cervical spine is the lead "big brother" of spine,and the abnormal movement of the cervical spine causes the abnormal movement of the entire spine,appears abnormal body posture.

  3. 晕动病平衡功能检查%Vestibular testing abnormalities in individuals with motion sickness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马燕; 区永康; 陈玲; 郑亿庆

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the vestibular function of motion sickness. Method:VNG, which tests the vestibular function of horizontal semicircular canal,and CPT, which tests vestibulospinal reflex and judge proprio-ceptive,visual and vestibular status, were performed in 30 motion sickness pations and 20 healthy volunteers(control group). Graybiel score was recorded at the same time. Result:Two groups' Graybiel score (12. 67±11. 78 vs 2. 10±6. 23;rank test P<0. 05),caloric test labyrinth value [(19. 02±8. 59)°/s vs (13. 58±5. 25)°/s ;t test P< 0. 05],caloric test labyrinth value of three patients in motion sickness group exceeded 75°/s. In computerized pos-tourgrphy testing(CPT) , motion sickness patients were central type(66. 7%) and disperse type(23.3%);all of contral group were central type. There was statistical significance in two groups' CTP area, and motion sickness group was obviously higher than control group. While stimulating vestibulum in CPT, there was abnormality (35%-50%)in motion sickness group and none in contral group. Generally evaluating CPT,there was only 2 pro-prioceptive hypofunction,3 visual hypofunction, and no vestibular hypofunction, but none hypofunction in contral group. Conclusions Motion sickness patients have high vestibular susceptible, some with vestibular hyperfunction. In posturography,a large number of motion sickness patients are central type but no vestibular hypofunction, but it is hard to keep balance when stimulating vestibulum.%目的:评估晕动病患者的平衡功能状况.方法:运用冷热试验通过视频眼震图检查30例晕动病患者(晕动病组)和20例非晕动病受试者(对照组)的前庭功能,用计算机化姿势图试验(CPT)检查两组的前庭脊髓反射功能,判断前庭、本体、视觉三者功能状态,并采用Graybiel晕动病症状体征评分系统对两组进行评分.结果:晕动病组和对照组Graybiel评分分别为12.67±11.78和2.10±6.23,秩和检验P<0.05;冷热试验

  4. Clinical Study of the Ascending Aorta Wall Motion by Velocity Vector Imaging in Patients with Primary Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei WANG; Jing WANG; Mingxing XIE; Xinfang WANG; Qing LV; Ming CHEN; Shaoping ZHENG

    2009-01-01

    We studied the wall motion characteristics of the ascending aorta by velocity vector im-aging (VVI) in primary hypertension patients.The ascending aortas both in 30 patients with primary hypertension and 30 normal controls were examined by Acuson sequoia 512 equiped with VVI.The maximum velocity (Vs,Ve) of every point on the anterior wall of ascending aorta both in systole and diastole was measured.The aortic diameter was wider in the hypertension patients than that in the healthy subjects (P0.05).The velocity curves of the anterior wall of ascending aorta both in the hypertension and healthy subjects were regular,and the curve in systole was named S wave and that in diastole named E wave.The velocity of S wave and E wave was slower in the hypertension pa-tients than that in the healthy subjects (P<0.05).The time to peak of S wave on the anterior wall of ascending aorta in systole was shorter in the hypertension patients than in the healthy subjects (P<0.05).VVI could be used to accurately and directly observe the movement character of the as-cending aorta walls,which would help us understand the elasticity of great arteries in patients with hypertension.

  5. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  6. Carotid artery longitudinal wall motion is associated with local blood velocity and left ventricular rotational, but not longitudinal, mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J; Stöhr, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have identified a predictable movement pattern of the common carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction. While there is evidence that the magnitude of this carotid artery longitudinal wall motion (CALM) is sensitive to cardiovascular health status, little is known about the determinants of CALM The purpose of this integrative study was to evaluate the contribution of left ventricular (LV) cardiac motion and local blood velocity to CALM Simultaneous ultrasound measurements of CALM, common carotid artery mean blood velocity (MBV), and left ventricular motion were performed in ten young, healthy individuals (6 males; 22 ± 1 years). Peak anterograde CALM occurred at a similar time as peak MBV (18.57 ± 3.98% vs. 18.53 ± 2.81% cardiac cycle; t-test: P = 0.94; ICC: 0.79, P longitudinal displacement was not associated with peak CALM (r = 0.11, P = 0.77). These results suggest that the rotational mechanical movement of the LV base may be closely associated with longitudinal mechanics in the carotid artery. This finding may have important implications for interpreting the complex relationship between ventricular and vascular function.

  7. Construction of a two-parameter empirical model of left ventricle wall motion using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Jack J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A one-parameter model was previously proposed to characterize the short axis motion of the LV wall at the mid-ventricle level. The single parameter of this model was associated with the radial contraction of myocardium, but more comprehensive model was needed to account for the rotation at the apex and base levels. The current study developed such model and demonstrated its merits and limitations with examples. Materials and methods The hearts of five healthy individuals were visualized using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI covering the contraction and relaxation phases. Based on the characteristics of the overall dynamics of the LV wall, its motion was represented by a combination of two components - radial and rotational. Each component was represented by a transformation matrix with a time-dependent variable α or β. Image preprocessing step and model fitting algorithm were described and applied to estimate the temporal profiles of α and β within a cardiac cycle at the apex, mid-ventricle and base levels. During this process, the tagged lines of the acquired images served as landmark reference for comparing against the model prediction of the motion. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed for testing the performance of the model and thus its validation. Results The α and β estimates exhibited similarities in values and temporal trends once they were scaled by the radius of the epicardium (repiand plotted against the time scaled by the period of the cardiac cycle (Tcardiac of each heart measured during the data acquisition. α/repi peaked at about Δt/Tcardiac=0.4 and with values 0.34, 0.4 and 0.3 for the apex, mid-ventricle and base level, respectively. β/repi similarly maximized in amplitude at about Δt/Tcardiac=0.4, but read 0.2 for the apex and - 0.08 for the base level. The difference indicated that the apex twisted more than the base. Conclusion It is feasible to empirically model

  8. The reliability of echocardiographic left ventricular wall motion index to identify high-risk patients for multicenter studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Gunnar H; Gadsbøll, Niels; Quinones, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    overall agreement for identifying patients with severe impairment of LV function. This not only underscores the value of LV-WMI as a useful tool for selecting high-risk patients to be included in multicenter studies but also serves to warn against the use of rigid cutoff values for WMI in the treatment......OBJECTIVE: To study whether the use of echocardiographic left ventricular (LV) wall motion index (WMI) is a dependable parameter for identifying patients with LV dysfunction to be enrolled in multicenter trials. METHODS: Videotaped echocardiographic examinations from 200 randomly selected patients...

  9. Collective coordinate models of domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetized systems under the spin hall effect and longitudinal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasseri, S. Ali; Moretti, Simone; Martinez, Eduardo; Serpico, Claudio; Durin, Gianfranco

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies on heterostructures of ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal layer and an oxide have highlighted the importance of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and broken inversion symmetry in domain wall (DW) motion. Specifically, chiral DWs are stabilized in these systems due to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). SOC can also lead to enhanced current induced DW motion, with the Spin Hall effect (SHE) suggested as the dominant mechanism for this observation. The efficiency of SHE driven DW motion depends on the internal magnetic structure of the DW, which could be controlled using externally applied longitudinal in-plane fields. In this work, micromagnetic simulations and collective coordinate models are used to study current-driven DW motion under longitudinal in-plane fields in perpendicularly magnetized samples with strong DMI. Several extended collective coordinate models are developed to reproduce the micromagnetic results. While these extended models show improvements over traditional models of this kind, there are still discrepancies between them and micromagnetic simulations which require further work.

  10. Quantification of the relative contribution of the different right ventricular wall motion components to right ventricular ejection fraction: the ReVISION method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Bálint; Tősér, Zoltán; Tokodi, Márton; Doronina, Alexandra; Kosztin, Annamária; Muraru, Denisa; Badano, Luigi P; Kovács, Attila; Merkely, Béla

    2017-03-27

    Three major mechanisms contribute to right ventricular (RV) pump function: (i) shortening of the longitudinal axis with traction of the tricuspid annulus towards the apex; (ii) inward movement of the RV free wall; (iii) bulging of the interventricular septum into the RV and stretching the free wall over the septum. The relative contribution of the aforementioned mechanisms to RV pump function may change in different pathological conditions.Our aim was to develop a custom method to separately assess the extent of longitudinal, radial and anteroposterior displacement of the RV walls and to quantify their relative contribution to global RV ejection fraction using 3D data sets obtained by echocardiography.Accordingly, we decomposed the movement of the exported RV beutel wall in a vertex based manner. The volumes of the beutels accounting for the RV wall motion in only one direction (either longitudinal, radial, or anteroposterior) were calculated at each time frame using the signed tetrahedron method. Then, the relative contribution of the RV wall motion along the three different directions to global RV ejection fraction was calculated either as the ratio of the given direction's ejection fraction to global ejection fraction and as the frame-by-frame RV volume change (∆V/∆t) along the three motion directions.The ReVISION (Right VentrIcular Separate wall motIon quantificatiON) method may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of RV mechanical adaptations to different loading conditions and diseases.

  11. Magnet Fall inside a Conductive Pipe: Motion and the Role of the Pipe Wall Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, G.; Ladera, C. L.; Martin, P.

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical models and experimental results are presented for the retarded fall of a strong magnet inside a vertical conductive non-magnetic tube. Predictions and experimental results are in good agreement modelling the magnet as a simple magnetic dipole. The effect of varying the pipe wall thickness on the retarding magnetic drag is studied for…

  12. Assessment of myocardial segmental function with coronary artery stenosis in multi-vessel coronary disease patients with normal wall motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M-Y; Lv, Q; Wang, J; Yin, J-B

    2016-04-01

    To discover the impact of the various degrees of coronary artery stenosis (CAD) on the left ventricular systolic dysfunction in steady state with quantitative analysis of the regional systolic myocardium in longitudinal, radial and circumferential direction in patients with coronary artery disease by two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (STI). Forty-three normal wall motion-multi vessel coronary artery disease (NWM-MVD) patients labeled as the experimental groups and forty-two subjects with little risk of CAD marked as the control group were enrolled in this study. The two-dimensional STI was obtained in the apical long axis and three levels of the short axis of the left ventricle. The left ventricular wall was divided into 18 segments. The affected myocardia were divided into three groups: group B (coronary stenosis degree ≤50%), group C (coronary stenosis degree 50%-99%)and group D (coronary stenosis degree ≥99%). Using the Q-analysis software, the longitudinal, radial and circumferential systolic strain (SL, SR, SC) and strain ratio (SrL, SrR, SrC) of the myocardium were analyzed. The bradycardia in the NWM-MVD group is greater than that in the control group (16/43 vs. 7/42, p coronary stenosis degree ≤50%), group C (coronary stenosis degree 50%-99%)and group D (coronary stenosis degree ≥99%), especially the longitudinal and radial systolic function, even though they had normal wall motion. The SrL equaled 1.085 for the cut-off value, and the sums (1.348) of sensitivity (0.673) and specificity (0.675) were the greatest. Bradycardia might be a compensatory mechanism in NWM-MVD patients.

  13. Speed limit in internal space of domain walls via all-order effective action of moduli motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Minoru; Hashimoto, Koji

    2016-03-01

    We find that motion in internal moduli spaces of generic domain walls has an upper bound for its velocity. Our finding is based on our generic formula for all-order effective actions of internal moduli parameter of domain wall solitons. It is known that the Nambu-Goldstone mode Z associated with spontaneous breaking of translation symmetry obeys a Nambu-Goto effective Lagrangian √{1 -(∂0Z )2 } detecting the speed of light (|∂0Z |=1 ) in the target spacetime. Solitons can have internal moduli parameters as well, associated with a breaking of internal symmetries such as a phase rotation acting on a field. We obtain, for generic domain walls, an effective Lagrangian of the internal moduli ɛ to all orders in (∂ɛ ). The Lagrangian is given by a function of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian: L =g (√{1 +(∂μɛ )2 }). This shows generically the existence of an upper bound on ∂0ɛ , i.e., a speed limit in the internal space. The speed limit exists even for solitons in some nonrelativistic field theories, where we find that ɛ is a type I Nambu-Goldstone mode that also obeys a nonlinear dispersion to reach the speed limit. This offers a possibility of detecting the speed limit in condensed matter experiments.

  14. Speed limit in internal space of domain walls via all-order effective action of moduli motion

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    We find that motion in internal moduli spaces of generic domain walls has an upper bound for its velocity. Our finding is based on our generic formula for all-order effective actions of internal moduli parameter of domain wall solitons. It is known that the Nambu-Goldstone mode $Z$ associated with spontaneous breaking of translation symmetry obeys a Nambu-Goto effective Lagrangian $\\sqrt{1 - (\\partial_0 Z)^2}$ detecting the speed of light ($|\\partial_0 Z|=1$) in the target spacetime. Solitons can have internal moduli parameters as well, associated with a breaking of internal symmetries such as a phase rotation acting on a field. We obtain, for generic domain walls, an effective Lagrangian of the internal moduli $\\epsilon$ to all order in $(\\partial \\epsilon)$. The Lagrangian is given by a function of the Nambu-Goto Lagrangian: $L = g(\\sqrt{1 + (\\partial_\\mu \\epsilon)^2})$. This shows generically the existence of an upper bound on $\\partial_0 \\epsilon$, i.e. a speed limit in the internal space. The speed limit...

  15. Linear modeling of turbulent skin-friction reduction due to spanwise wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque-Daza, Carlos; Baig, Mirza; Lockerby, Duncan; Chernyshenko, Sergei; Davies, Christopher; University of Warwick Team; Imperial College Team; Cardiff University Team

    2012-11-01

    We present a study on the effect of streamwise-travelling waves of spanwise wall velocity on the growth of near-wall turbulent streaks using a linearized formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The changes in streak amplification due to the travelling waves induced by the wall velocity are compared to published results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions of the turbulent skin-friction reduction over a range of parameters; a clear correlation between these two sets of results is observed. Additional linearized simulations but at a much higher Reynolds numbers, more relevant to aerospace applications, produce results that show no marked differences to those obtained at low Reynolds number. It is also observed that a close correlation exists between DNS data of drag reduction and a very simple characteristic of the ``generalized'' Stokes layer generated by the streamwise-travelling waves. Carlos.Duque-Daza@warwick.ac.uk - School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK caduqued@unal.edu.co - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  16. Nanoparticle stochastic motion in the inertial regime and hydrodynamic interactions close to a cylindrical wall

    OpenAIRE

    Vitoshkin, Helena; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M.; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equation together with the particle equations governing the motion of a nanosized particle or nanoparticle (NP) in a cylindrical tube. The effects of the confining boundary, its curvature, particle size, and particle density variations have all been investigated. To reveal how the nature of the temporal correlations (hydrodynamic memory) in the inertial regime is altered by the full hydrodynamic interactio...

  17. The Transient MHD Flow Generated by a PeriodicWall Motion in a Porous Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulhameed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of transient flow of incompressible third grade fluid on the two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow in a porous space is analyzed. The flow is generated due to the motion of the plate in its plane with a periodic velocity. Under the flow assumptions, the governing nonlinear partial differential equation is transformed into steady-state and transient nonlinear equations. The reduced equation for the transient flow is solved analytically using symmetry approach while the nonlinear steady-state equation is solved using a modified version of He’s homotopy perturbation method. The effect of several operating parameters on the flow hydromagnetic is discussed. The results indicated that for the considered case, t = 1:5 is the moment after which the time-dependent transient motion of the fluid can be approximated with the steady-state motion, described by the steady-state solution. It is clear that, after this value of time t the time-dependent transient solution can be neglected.

  18. The contribution of 180° domain wall motion to dielectric properties quantified from in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fancher, C.M.; Brewer, S.; Chung, C.C.; Röhrig, S.; Rojac, T.; Estevesa, G.; Deluca, M.; Bassiri-Gharb, N.; Jones, J.L. (Mat. Cent. Leoben); (NCSU); (Joseph Stefan Inst.); (GIT)

    2017-03-01

    The contribution of 180° domain wall motion to polarization and dielectric properties of ferroelectric materials has yet to be determined experimentally. In this paper, an approach for estimating the extent of (180°) domain reversal during application of electric fields is presented. We demonstrate this method by determining the contribution of domain reversal to polarization in soft lead zirconate titanate during application of strong electric fields. At the maximum applied field, domain reversal was determined to account for >80% of the measured macroscopic polarization. We also apply the method to quantify the contribution of domain reversal to the weak-field dielectric permittivity of BaTiO3. The results of this analysis determined that domain reversal accounts for up to ~70% of the macroscopic dielectric permittivity in BaTiO3. These results demonstrate the predominance of domain reversal to high and low-field dielectric response in ferroelectric polycrystalline materials.

  19. The unsteady flow of a third-grade fluid caused by the periodic motion of an infinite wall with transpiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdulhameed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the unidirectional flow of an incompressible electrically conducting third-grade fluid past a vertical transpiration wall through a porous medium with time-dependent periodic motion is presented. The nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed to ordinary differential equation by means of symmetry reductions. The reduced equation is then solved analytically for steady-state and time-dependent transient parts. The time series of the transient flow velocity for different pertinent parameters are examined through plots. During the course of computation, it was observed that the time-dependent transient and steady-state solutions agree very well at large value of time when the ratio is related to fluid parameters γ∗γ>1.

  20. Small-scale deflagration cylinder test with velocimetry wall-motion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooks, Daniel E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pierce, Timothy H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the likelihood and effects of outcomes resultant from thermal initiation of explosives remains a significant challenge. For certain explosive formulations, the general outcome can be broadly predicted given knowledge of certain conditions. However, there remain unexplained violent events, and increased statistical understanding of outcomes as a function of many variables, or 'violence categorization,' is needed. Additionally, the development of an equation of state equivalent for deflagration would be very useful in predicting possible detailed event consequences using traditional hydrodynamic detonation moders. For violence categorization, it is desirable that testing be efficient, such that it is possible to statistically define outcomes reliant on the processes of initiation of deflagration, steady state deflagration, and deflagration to detonation transitions. If the test simultaneously acquires information to inform models of violent deflagration events, overall predictive capabilities for event likelihood and consequence might improve remarkably. In this paper we describe an economical scaled deflagration cylinder test. The cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) based explosive formu1lation PBX 9501 was tested using different temperature profiles in a thick-walled copper cylindrical confiner. This test is a scaled version of a recently demonstrated deflagration cylinder test, and is similar to several other thermal explosion tests. The primary difference is the passive velocimetry diagnostic, which enables measurement of confinement vessel wall velocities at failure, regardless of the timing and location of ignition.

  1. Field-induced domain wall motion of amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers with perpendicular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Y. H.; Lee, K. J.; Jung, M. H., E-mail: mhjung@sogang.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J. B.; Cho, J. H.; You, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T. W. [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-14

    Amorphous CoSiB/Pt multilayer is a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy material to achieve high squareness, low coercivity, strong anisotropy, and smooth domain wall (DW) motion, because of the smoother interface compared with crystalline multilayers. For [CoSiB(6 Å)/Pt (14 Å)]{sub N} multilayers with N = 3, 6, and 9, we studied the field-induced DW dynamics. The effective anisotropy constant K{sub 1}{sup eff} is 1.5 × 10{sup 6} erg/cm{sup 3} for all the N values, and the linear increment of coercive field H{sub c} with N gives constant exchange coupling J. By analyzing the field dependence of DW images at room temperature, a clear creep motion with the exponent μ = 1/4 could be observed. Even though the pinning field H{sub dep} slightly increases with N, the pinning potential energy U{sub c} is constant (=35 k{sub B}T) for all the N values. These results imply that the amorphous [CoSiB/Pt]{sub N} multilayers are inherently homogeneous compared to crystalline multilayers. For N ≤ 6, the pinning site density ρ{sub pin} is less than 1000/μm{sup 2}, which is about 1 pinning site per the typical device junction size of 30 × 30 nm{sup 2}. Also, the exchange stiffness constant A{sub ex} is obtained to be 0.48 × 10{sup −6} erg/cm, and the domain wall width is expected to be smaller than 5.5 nm. These results may be applicable for spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory and DW logic device applications.

  2. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  3. Analysis of Peristaltic Motion of a Nanofluid with Wall Shear Stress, Microrotation, and Thermal Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dhanapal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the peristaltic flow of an incompressible micropolar nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel in the presence of thermal radiation and heat sources parameters. The rotation of the nanoparticles is incorporated in the flow model. The equations governing the nanofluid flow are modeled and exact solutions are managed under long wavelength and flow Reynolds number and long wavelength approximations. Explicit expressions of axial velocity, stream function, microrotation, nanoparticle temperature, and concentration have been derived. The phenomena of shear stress and trapping have also been discussed. Finally, the influences of various parameters of interest on flow variables have been discussed numerically and explained graphically. Besides, the results obtained in this paper will be helpful to those who are working on the development of various realms like fluid mechanics, the rotation, Brownian motion, thermophoresis, coupling number, micropolar parameter, and the nondimensional geometry parameters.

  4. Analysis of Peristaltic Motion of a Nanofluid with Wall Shear Stress, Microrotation, and Thermal Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanapal, C.; Kamalakkannan, J.; Prakash, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the peristaltic flow of an incompressible micropolar nanofluid in a tapered asymmetric channel in the presence of thermal radiation and heat sources parameters. The rotation of the nanoparticles is incorporated in the flow model. The equations governing the nanofluid flow are modeled and exact solutions are managed under long wavelength and flow Reynolds number and long wavelength approximations. Explicit expressions of axial velocity, stream function, microrotation, nanoparticle temperature, and concentration have been derived. The phenomena of shear stress and trapping have also been discussed. Finally, the influences of various parameters of interest on flow variables have been discussed numerically and explained graphically. Besides, the results obtained in this paper will be helpful to those who are working on the development of various realms like fluid mechanics, the rotation, Brownian motion, thermophoresis, coupling number, micropolar parameter, and the nondimensional geometry parameters. PMID:27688703

  5. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  6. Effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Ayaka; Fujimura, Yuma; Takahashi, Kota; Komine, Takashi; Sugita, Ryuji

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the effect of a pinning field on the critical current density for current-induced domain wall motion in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated using micromagnetic simulations. In order to estimate the pinning field in notched nanowires, we conducted wall energy calculations for nanowires with various saturation magnetizations. The pinning field increased as the notch size increased. The pinning field decreased as the saturation magnetization decreased. As a result, the decreased in the pinning field causes the reduction of the critical current density. Therefore, a significant reduction of the critical current density can be obtained by decreasing the saturation magnetization, even if wall pinning occurs.

  7. Interaction of Streamwise and Wall-Normal Velocities in Combined Wave-Current Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Qing YANG; In-Soo KIM; Daniel S. KOH; Young-Chae SONG

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an analytical expression for the streamwise velocity distribution in a non-uniform flow in the presence of waves; the correlation between the horizontal and vertical velocity components has been comprehensively examined. Different from previous researches which attributed the deviation of velocity from the classical log-law to the wave Reynolds stress, i.e. -ρ(uv)only, this study demonstrates that the momentum flux caused by mean velocities, i.e.,(u)and(v) , is also responsible for the velocity deviation, and it is found that the streamwise velocity for a flow in the presence of non-zero wall-normal velocity does not follow the classical log-law, but the modified log-law proposed in this study based on simplified mixing-length theorem. The validity of the modified log-law has been verified by use of available experimental data from published sources for combined wave-current flows, and good agreement between the predicted and observed velocity profiles has been achieved.

  8. Separating spin torque and heating effects in current-induced domain wall motion probed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F.; Klaeui, M.; Backes, D.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of domain wall motion and transformations due to injected current pulses in permalloy zigzag structures using off-axis electron holography and Lorentz microscopy are reported. Heating on membranes leads to thermally activated random behavior at low current densities and by backcoating...

  9. Detection of postischemic regional left ventricular delayed outward wall motion or diastolic stunning after exercise-induced ischemia in patients with stable effort angina by using color kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuhisa; Miwa, Kunihisa; Sakurai, Takahiro; Kataoka, Kazuaki; Imai, Makoto; Kintaka, Aya; Aoyama, Takeshi; Kawanami, Masaki

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether postischemic diastolic stunning could be detected using color kinesis, we evaluated regional left ventricular (LV) diastolic wall motion in 36 patients with stable effort angina and a coronary stenosis (> or = 70% of luminal diameter), and in 30 control subjects. Regional LV filling fraction in the short-axis view during the first 30% of the LV filling time (color kinesis diastolic index) was determined before, 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 24 hours after the treadmill exercise test. In 33 of the 36 patients (92%), new regional LV delayed outward motion during early diastole (color kinesis diastolic index < or = 40%) was detected at 20 minutes after exercise. The regional LV delayed diastolic wall motion showed significant improvement but persisted 1 hour afterward in 20 of 36 patients (56%), and disappeared 24 hours after exercise. Detection of regional stunned myocardium with impaired diastolic function may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease.

  10. Role of collateral blood flow in the apparent disparity between the extent of abnormal wall thickening and perfusion defect size during acute myocardial infarction and demand ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong-Poi, Howard; Coggins, Matthew P; Sklenar, Jiri; Jayaweera, Ananda R; Wang, Xin-Qun; Kaul, Sanjiv

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of abnormal wall thickening (WT) and that of infarct size (IS) at rest or size of ischemic zone (IZ) during demand ischemia (DI) is principally due to the effects of collateral blood flow (CollBF). A disparity has been reported between the circumferential extent of abnormal WT and that of IS at rest or IZ size during DI. Wall thickening and CollBF were measured in 18 dogs: at 6 h after coronary occlusion (Group 1, n = 6), and during 40 microg x kg x min(-1) of dobutamine in the presence of either one-vessel (Group 2, n = 6) or two-vessel stenosis (Group 3, n = 6). The apparent overestimation of the IS by the circumferential extent of abnormal WT was due to intermediate levels of CollBF in border zones within the risk area that had escaped necrosis. Although reduced, WT in these regions was commensurate with the level of flow. Similarly, during DI, regions within the IZ exhibiting the worst WT in Group 2 and 3 dogs were those not supplied by CollBF. The regions supplied by CollBF had intermediate WT, which was also commensurate with the level of flow. Only in two Group 3 dogs was tethering seen in small, normally perfused regions that were interspersed between two large IZ. Excluding these few tethered regions, data from different myocardial regions (infarcted, ischemic, CollBF dependent, and normal) were described by a single relation: y = 57(1 - e([-0.72(x - 0.06)])) (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Myocardial regions at the margins of ischemic territories contribute to the apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of abnormal WT and IS or IZ during DI. In most circumstances, these regions are supplied by collaterals and their WT is commensurate with the degree of myocardial blood flow. The apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of WT and ischemia is rarely due to myocardial tethering, which is seen only in some instances of multi

  11. Abnormal physiological properties and altered cell wall composition in Streptococcus pneumoniae grown in the presence of clavulanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, A; Severina, E; Tomasz, A

    1997-01-01

    Subinhibitory concentrations of clavulanate caused premature induction of stationary-phase autolysis, sensitization to lysozyme, and reductions in the MICs of deoxycholate and penicillin for Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the range of clavulanate concentrations producing these effects, this beta-lactam compound was selectively bound to PBP 3. Cell walls isolated from pneumococci grown in the presence of clavulanate showed increased sensitivity to the hydrolytic action of purified pneumococcal autolysin in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the peptidoglycan isolated from the clavulanate-grown cells showed major qualitative and quantitative changes in stem peptide composition, the most striking feature of which was the accumulation of peptide species carrying intact D-alanyl-D-alanine residues at the carboxy termini. The altered biological and biochemical properties of the clavulanate-grown pneumococci appear to be the consequences of suppressed D,D-carboxypeptidase activity. PMID:9055983

  12. Controlling magnetic domain wall motion in the creep regime in He{sup +}-irradiated CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera Diez, L., E-mail: liza.herrera-diez@ief.u-psud.fr; García-Sánchez, F.; Adam, J.-P.; Devolder, T.; Eimer, S.; El Hadri, M. S.; Ravelosona, D. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Université Paris-Sud, UMR CNRS 8622, 91405 Orsay (France); Lamperti, A.; Mantovan, R. [Laboratorio MDM, IMM-CNR, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20864 Agrate (MB) (Italy); Ocker, B. [Singulus Technology AG, Hanauer Landstrasse 103, 63796 Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2015-07-20

    This study presents the effective tuning of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB/MgO thin films by He{sup +} ion irradiation and its effect on domain wall motion in a low field regime. Magnetic anisotropy and saturation magnetisation are found to decrease as a function of the irradiation dose which can be related to the observed irradiation-induced changes in stoichiometry at the CoFeB/MgO interface. These changes in the magnetic intrinsic properties of the film are reflected in the domain wall dynamics at low magnetic fields (H) where irradiation is found to induce a significant decrease in domain wall velocity (v). For all irradiation doses, domain wall velocities at low fields are well described by a creep law, where Ln(v) vs. H{sup −1∕4} behaves linearly, up to a maximum field H*, which has been considered as an approximation to the value of the depinning field H{sub dep}. In turn, H* ≈ H{sub dep} is seen to increase as a function of the irradiation dose, indicating an irradiation-induced extension of the creep regime of domain wall motion.

  13. Roles of the magnetic field and electric current in thermally activated domain wall motion in a submicrometer magnetic strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emori, Satoru; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2012-01-18

    We have experimentally studied micrometer-scale domain wall (DW) motion driven by a magnetic field and an electric current in a Co/Pt multilayer strip with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The thermal activation energy for DW motion, along with its scaling with the driving field and current, has been extracted directly from the temperature dependence of the DW velocity. The injection of DC current resulted in an enhancement of the DW velocity independent of the current polarity, but produced no measurable change in the activation energy barrier. Through this analysis, the observed current-induced DW velocity enhancement can be entirely and unambiguously attributed to Joule heating.

  14. Longitudinal peak strain detects a smaller risk area than visual assessment of wall motion in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brudin Lars

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opening of an occluded infarct related artery reduces infarct size and improves survival in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. In this study we performed tissue Doppler analysis (peak strain, displacement, mitral annular movement (MAM and compared with visual assessment for the study of the correlation of measurements of global, regional and segmental function with final infarct size and transmurality. In addition, myocardial risk area was determined and a prediction sought for the development of infarct transmurality ≥50%. Methods Twenty six patients with STEMI submitted for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI were examined with echocardiography on the catheterization table. Four to eight weeks later repeat echocardiography was performed for reassessment of function and magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of final infarct size and transmurality. Results On a global level, wall motion score index (WMSI, ejection fraction (EF, strain, and displacement all showed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001, p ≤ 0.001, p ≤ 0.001 and p = 0.03 between the two study visits, but MAM did not (p = 0.17. On all levels (global, regional and segmental and both pre- and post PCI, WMSI showed a higher correlation with scar transmurality compared to strain. We found that both strain and WMSI predicted the development of scar transmurality ≥50%, but strain added no significant information to that obtained with WMSI in a logistic regression analysis. Conclusions In patients with acute STEMI, WMSI, EF, strain, and displacement showed significant changes between the pre- and post PCI exam. In a ROC-analysis, strain had 64% sensitivity at 80% specificity and WMSI around 90% sensitivity at 80% specificity for the detection of scar with transmurality ≥50% at follow-up.

  15. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana M. Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are unknown. Objectives 1 To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2 to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV. Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19L (p=0.04. No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05L/s (p<0.01, and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06L/s (p<0.01, increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13 versus 69 (SD=10 (p=0.02. Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  16. Current-driven domain wall motion due to volume spin transfer torque in Co/Ni multilayer systems on Au underlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kwang-Su; Yang, See-Hun; Thomas, Luc; Parkin, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the current-induced domain wall (CIDW) dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized Co/Ni multilayers deposited on Au underlayer, where the conventional spin transfer torque governs the domain wall dynamics, by the Kerr microscope. It is found that the DW angle tilting following Oersted field profile plays an important role in domain wall (DW) motion at high current density J by decreasing DW velocity with the increasing J, while distorting its DW morphology. Also we find that the DW pinning becomes pronounced as the anisotropy decreases by increasing number of Co/Ni repeats. Most remarkably, the DW tilting angle changes its sign by inserting ultrathin Pt layer between Au and Co layer, which suggests that the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and spin Hall effect induces opposite effect in DW tilting. Our findings can be of use for application of CIDW to spintronics with perpendicularly magnetized systems.

  17. The dynamics of the asymmetric motion of domain walls of sandwich domain structure in a Fe-based amorphous ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhmetko, D.N., E-mail: sergey.zhmetko@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Zaporizhzhya National University, 66 Zhukovsky Street, 69063 Zaporizhzhya (Ukraine); Zhmetko, S.D. [Department of Physics, Zaporizhzhya National University, 66 Zhukovsky Street, 69063 Zaporizhzhya (Ukraine); Troschenkov, Y.N. [Institute for Magnetism, 36-b Vernadsky Boulevard, 03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Matsura, A.V. [Department of Physics, Zaporizhzhya National University, 66 Zhukovsky Street, 69063 Zaporizhzhya (Ukraine)

    2013-08-15

    The frequency dependence of asymmetry of the domain walls velocity relative to the middle plane of amorphous ribbon is investigated. An additional pressure of the same direction acting on each domain wall caused by dependence of eddy current damping on the coordinate of the domain wall is revealed. The microscopic mechanisms of this additional pressure are considered. - Highlights: ► Additional pressure on the domain wall, caused by inhomogeneity of its damping. ► Asymmetry of the coordinate of the nucleation of domain walls and their damping. ► Connection between the components of additional pressure and its direction. ► Interaction of domain walls with the surface defects of the amorphous ribbon.

  18. Validation of a novel modified wall motion score for estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholl, David, E-mail: David.Scholl@utoronto.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Kim, Han W., E-mail: hanwkim@gmail.com [Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, Division of Cardiology, Duke University, NC (United States); Shah, Dipan, E-mail: djshah@tmhs.org [The Methodist DeBakey Heart Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fine, Nowell M., E-mail: nowellfine@gmail.com [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Tandon, Shruti, E-mail: standon4@uwo.ca [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Thompson, Terry, E-mail: thompson@lawsonimaging.ca [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Drangova, Maria, E-mail: mdrangov@imaging.robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); White, James A., E-mail: jwhite@imaging.robarts.ca [Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-08-15

    Background: Visual determination of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by segmental scoring may be a practical alternative to volumetric analysis of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The accuracy and reproducibility of this approach for has not been described. The purpose of this study was to validate a novel segmental visual scoring method for LVEF estimation using cine MRI. Methods: 362 patients with known or suspected cardiomyopathy were studied. A modified wall motion score (mWMS) was used to blindly score the wall motion of all cardiac segments from cine MRI imaging. The same datasets were subjected to blinded volumetric analysis using endocardial contour tracing. The population was then separated into a model cohort (N = 181) and validation cohort (N = 181), with the former used to derive a regression equation of mWMS versus true volumetric LVEF. The validation cohort was then used to test the accuracy of this regression model to estimate the true LVEF from a visually determined mWMS. Reproducibility testing of mWMS scoring was performed upon a randomly selected sample of 20 cases. Results: The regression equation relating mWMS to true LVEF in the model cohort was: LVEF = 54.23 - 0.5761 Multiplication-Sign mWMS. In the validation cohort this equation produced a strong correlation between mWMS-derived LVEF and true volumetric LVEF (r = 0.89). Bland and Altman analysis showed no systematic bias in the LVEF estimated using the mWMS (-0.3231%, 95% limits of agreement -12.22% to 11.58%). Inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility was excellent (r = 0.93 and 0.97, respectively). Conclusion: The mWMS is a practical tool for reporting regional wall motion and provides reproducible estimates of LVEF from cine MRI.

  19. Manipulation of multiple 360o domain wall structures and its current-driven motion in a magnetic nanostripe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Dong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of multiple transverse walls (TWs in a magnetic nanostripe is studied by micromagnetic simulations. It shows that, when TWs are arranged in a stripe with same orientation, they will attract each other and finally annihilate. However, when adjacent TWs are arranged with opposite orientation, a metastable complex wall can be formed, e.g., two TWs lead to 360o wall. For three or more TWs, the formed complex wall includes a number of 360o substructures, which is called multiple 360o structure (M360S here. The M360S itself may be used to store multiple logical data since each 360o substructure can act as logical ”0” or ”1”. On the other hand, the M360S may behave like single TW under an applied current, namely, the M360S can be driven steadily by current like that of single TW. A parity effect of the number of 360o substructures on the critical current for the annihilation is found. Namely, when the number is odd or even, the critical current increase or decrease with the increasing of the number, respectively. The parity effect is relevant to the out-of-plane magnetic moment of the M360S.

  20. Analytical solution of the strain-controlled magnetic domain wall motion in bilayer piezoelectric/magnetostrictive nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The one-dimensional propagation of magnetic domain walls in an isotropic, linearly elastic, magnetostrictive material is investigated in the framework of the extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation where the effects of a spin-polarized current and a rate-independent dry-friction dissipation are taken into account. In our analysis, it is assumed that the ferromagnet is subject to a spatially uniform biaxial in-plain stress generated by a piezoelectric substrate combined with the former in a multiferroic heterostructure. Moreover, a possible connection between the dry-friction mechanism and the piezo-induced strains is conjectured. By adopting the traveling waves ansatz, the effect of such a stress on the domain wall dynamics is explored in both steady and precessional regimes. In particular, it is proved that the magnetoelastic contribution, while it does not formally modify the classical solution, affects both the propagation threshold and the Walker Breakdown conditions involved in the steady regime, in agreement with recent experimental results. In the precessional regime, it is shown that the existence of a correlation between the piezo-induced strains and dry-friction leads to an upward shift of the domain wall velocity.

  1. Slow Motion of a Sphere Away from a Wall: Effect of Surface Roughness on the Viscous Force

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunil Datta; Manju Shukla

    2002-11-01

    An asymptotic analysis is given for the effect of roughness exhibited through the slip parameter on the motion of the sphere, moving away from a plane surface with velocity . The method replaces the no-slip condition at the rough surface by slip condition and employs the method of inner and outer regions on the sphere surface. For > 0, we have the classical slip boundary condition and the results of the paper are then of interest in the microprocessor industry.

  2. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 CA (Netherlands); Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100 (France); Sérusclat, André [Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon 69500 (France); Moulin, Philippe [Department of Endocrinology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100, France and INSERM UMR 1060, Lyon 69500 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  3. Abnormal response to mental stress in patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy detected by gated single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciagra, Roberto; Genovese, Sabrina; Pupi, Alberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Florence (Italy); Parodi, Guido; Bellandi, Benedetta; Antoniucci, David [Careggi Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Florence (Italy); Del Pace, Stefano; Zampini, Linda; Gensini, Gian Franco [Careggi Hospital, Department of Heart and Vessels, Unit of General Cardiology, Florence (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Persistent abnormalities are usually not detected in patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC). Since sympathetically mediated myocardial damage has been proposed as a causative mechanism of TTC, we explored whether mental stress could evoke abnormalities in these patients. One month after an acute event, 22 patients fulfilling all TTC diagnostic criteria and 11 controls underwent resting and mental stress gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Perfusion, wall motion, transient ischaemic dilation (TID) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) were evaluated. None of the controls showed stress-induced abnormalities. Mental stress evoked regional changes (perfusion defects and/or wall motion abnormality) in 16 TTC subjects and global abnormalities (LVEF fall >5% and/or TID >1.10) in 13; 3 had a completely negative response. TID, delta LVEF and delta wall motion score were significantly different in TTC vs control patients: 1.08 {+-} 0.20 vs 0.95 {+-} 0.11 (p < 0.05), -1.7 {+-} 6% vs 4 {+-} 5% (p < 0.02) and 2.5 (0, 4.25) vs 0 (0, 0) (p < 0.002), respectively. Mental stress may evoke regional and/or global abnormalities in most TTC patients. The abnormal response to mental stress supports the role of sympathetic stimulation in TTC. Mental stress could thus be helpful for TTC evaluation. (orig.)

  4. An in vitro comparative study of intracanal fluid motion and wall shear stress induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files in a simulated root canal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software.

  5. The Effect of Abnormal Speed Motion Picture Films on a Child's Spatio-Temporal Recognition. Part 1: On the Deviation of Estimated Time of a Falling Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ichio; Tadang, Nikom

    1973-01-01

    Reports the effects of exposing both kindergarten and elementary school children to high and low speed motion pictures on children's estimation of time. Concluded the children's judgment is dependent upon their chronological ages and daily experiences of visual perception. (CC)

  6. Avaliação quantitativa da movimentação parietal regional do ventrículo esquerdo na endomiocardiofibrose Quantitative assessment of left ventricular regional wall motion in endomyocardial fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mady

    2005-03-01

    motion in patients with endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF. METHODS: The study comprised 88 patients, 59 of the female sex, with a mean age of 39±13 years (range, 9 to 65 and with echocardiographic and angiographic evidence of left ventricular EMF. The intensity of fibrous tissue buildup on contrast cineventriculography was classified as mild, moderate, or severe. The overall left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was determined by using the area-length method on ventriculography. The motion was measured in 100 equidistant chords perpendicular to the centerline drawn in the middle of the final diastolic and systolic contours and normalized to cardiac size. Five left ventricular segments were analyzed: A - apical; AL - anterolateral; AB - anterobasal; IA - inferoapical; IB - inferobasal. Abnormality was expressed in units of standard deviation of the mean motion in a normal population of reference, comprised of 103 patients with normal LV according to clinical and electrocardiographic data, and angiographic standards. RESULTS: Mean LVEF was 0.47±0.12. Fibrous tissue buildup in the left ventricle was mild in 12 patients, moderate in 40, and severe in 36. The regions with the poorest ventricular wall motion were A (-1.4±1.6 standard deviation/chords and IA (-1.6±1.8 standard deviation/chords compared with that in AB (-0.3±1.9 standard deviation/chords, AL (-0.5±1.8 standard deviation/chords and IB (-0.9±1.3 standard deviation/chords. No relation was observed between the intensity of fibrous tissue buildup and regional ventricular wall motion. CONCLUSION: A change in LV regional wall motion exists in EMF, and it is independent of the intensity of fibrous tissue buildup qualitatively assessed. Nonuniform involvement of the LV should be considered when planning surgery for this disease.

  7. Contributions of domain wall motion to complex electromechanical coefficients of 0.62Pb(Mg1∕3Nb2∕3)O3–0.38PbTiO3 crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Enwei; Cao, Wenwu

    2010-01-01

    The loss behavior of 0.62Pb(Mg1∕3Nb2∕3)O3–0.38PbTiO3 (PMN-38%PT) ferroelectric single crystal poled along [001]c was investigated. It was found that the complex electromechanical coefficients and loss factors change dramatically at the coercive field Ec around 250 V∕mm, representing the intrinsic switching barrier. Since the energy loss is related to the domain wall motion, the imaginary parts of the electromechanical coefficients can be used to study the degree of domain wall motions in relaxor-based ferroelectric single crystals. Experimental results indicate that for this system, domain wall motion contributes significantly to the imaginary parts of electromechanical coefficients. In addition, [001]c poled PMN-38%PT single crystals have much larger mechanical loss factor compared to that of conventional single crystal like LiNbO3. This phenomenon is proved to be closely related to 90° domain wall motion in this crystal system. PMID:20145700

  8. 基于运动特征的人体异常行为识别%Human abnormal behavior recognition based on motion characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑海峰; 郭昊; 徐超

    2014-01-01

    为了提高监控视频中人体异常行为识别的实时性和准确率,提出了基于运动特征的人体异常行为识别方法。利用分块更新的背景差法从图像中提取出完整的人体轮廓,通过区域关联结合颜色直方图实现人体目标跟踪,解决了非线性运动时漏跟和误跟的问题。通过人体运动轨迹、运动姿态及运动时间3个参数,对人的5种异常行为进行分析判断。实验结果表明,所提算法不仅能实时地对人体进行检测和跟踪,还能快速、准确地识别出异常行为,具有简单实用的特点。%A characteristics-based human abnormal behavior detection method is proposed to improve accuracy and real-time per-formance of human abnormal behavior detection in surveillance video.Chunked update-based background subtraction technique is used to extract complete human silhouette from the image.The regional association is combined with color histogram to track hu-man target to solve the miss tracking and target-missing problems in nonlinear movement.Three parameters of human movement trajectory,moving posture and time of movement areselected to identify five human abnormal behaviors.In the experiments,the human body is detected and tracked in real time,and the abnormal behaviors could be identified quickly and accurately using pro-posed algorithm.

  9. M型超声检测腹主动脉前后壁运动的初步研究%Primary studies of anteroposterior abdominal aortic wall motion with M-mode ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛群; 蔡珠虹; 包俊敏; 梅志军; 景在平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To find out the characteristics of anteroposterior abdominal aortic wall motion and to consider the potential implications of such variations. Methods M-mode ultrasound was used to measure abdominal aortic wall motion in human (n=20) and 2 animal species [dogs (n=8), and pigs (n=5)]. Anterior wall displacement (da),posterior wall displacement (dp), and diastolic diameter (Da) were measured. The ratio of displacement to the diameter was calculated (da/Dd. and dp/Dd). Results Aortic diameter varied from to (6.34±0.84) mm (dog) to (13.76±1.11) mm (human).Anterior wall displacement was about 3 times greater than the posterior among the species studied. The ratio of wall displacement to diastolic diameter were similar for the anterior and posterior walls. Wall displacement increased linearly with the diameter. Conclusions Abdominal aortic wall dynamics are similar in humans and animals regardless of the aortic size, with more anterior than posterior wall motion. These data suggest increased .dynamic strain of the anterior wall,which may help explain why human abdominal aortic aneurysms initially develop anteriorly. Haemodynamies plays an important role in the abdominal aortic aneurysm pathogenesis.%目的:应用M型超声观测正常腹主动脉前后壁运动的特征.方法:采集健康人组、健康犬组、健康猪组腹主动脉的M型超声图像,测量动脉前壁和后壁振幅(da和dP)、舒张期动脉直径(Dd),取其平均值;并分别计算各组数值:前壁振幅/舒张期动脉直径(da/Dd),后壁振幅/舒张期动脉直径(dp/Dd).结果:三组结果显示腹主动脉前壁振幅高于后壁振幅,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).各组中管壁振幅与管径呈正相关.da/Dd和dp/Dd组间比较,差异无统计学意义.结论:正常腹主动脉前、后壁的运动差异与腹主动脉瘤的形成有一定关系,提示血液动力学因素在腹主动脉瘤发病机制中起着重要作用.

  10. Abnormal Expressions of Age, RAGE, TGF- b1 and TGF- b1 Receptor in Colonic Wall Contributed to STZ-Induced Diabetic Colon Remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim: Diabetic colon dysfunction is common in longstanding diabetes. Previously the histomorphological and biomechanical remodeling of colon has been demonstrated in the diabetic rat model (1). However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. It was reported that advanced...... in different layers were up-regulated in the DM group (Figure 1). Glucose level and wall area mainly correlated with AGE and RAGE expressions. Outer residual strain correlated with all proteins expressions in the mucosa layer and with RAGE expressions in the muscle and submucosa layers. Opening angle...

  11. Effect of Electric Field and Temperature on Average Structure and Domain Wall Motion in 0.93Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.07BaTiO3 Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ neutron powder diffraction patterns and dielectric spectra of 0.93Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.07BaTiO3 ceramic were investigated under different electrical fields and temperatures. An electric-field-induced phase transition from metrically cubic to metrically tetragonal, associated with strong domain wall motion, occurs. Such induced phase and domain wall motion are unchanged until the high-temperature phase transition occurs from metrically tetragonal to metrically cubic. All these changes are irrelevant to the observed depolarization temperature (75°C. The depolarization behaviour is thus suggested to be associated with the local structure caused by the octahedral tilt twinning disorder.

  12. Interpretation of scrape-off layer profile evolution and first-wall ion flux statistics on JET using a stochastic framework based on fillamentary motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkden, N. R.; Wynn, A.; Militello, F.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G.; Guillemaut, C.; Harrison, J.; Moulton, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the use of a novel modelling technique based around intermittent transport due to filament motion, to interpret experimental profile and fluctuation data in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of JET during the onset and evolution of a density profile shoulder. A baseline case is established, prior to shoulder formation, and the stochastic model is shown to be capable of simultaneously matching the time averaged profile measurement as well as the PDF shape and autocorrelation function from the ion-saturation current time series at the outer wall. Aspects of the stochastic model are then varied with the aim of producing a profile shoulder with statistical measurements consistent with experiment. This is achieved through a strong localised reduction in the density sink acting on the filaments within the model. The required reduction of the density sink occurs over a highly localised region with the timescale of the density sink increased by a factor of 25. This alone is found to be insufficient to model the expansion and flattening of the shoulder region as the density increases, which requires additional changes within the stochastic model. An example is found which includes both a reduction in the density sink and filament acceleration and provides a consistent match to the experimental data as the shoulder expands, though the uniqueness of this solution can not be guaranteed. Within the context of the stochastic model, this implies that the localised reduction in the density sink can trigger shoulder formation, but additional physics is required to explain the subsequent evolution of the profile.

  13. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance of late gadolinium enhancement and diastolic wall thickness to predict recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udompunturak Suthipol

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to compare the value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in predicting recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG. Methods We enrolled patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular ejection fraction Results We studied 46 men and 4 women with an average age of 61 years. Baseline left ventricular ejection fraction was 37 ± 13%. A total of 2,020 myocardial segments were analyzed. Abnormal wall motion and the LGE area were detected in 1,446 segments (71.6% and 1,196 segments (59.2% respectively. Wall motion improvement was demonstrated in 481 of 1,227 segments (39.2% that initially had wall motion abnormalities at baseline. Logistic regression analysis showed that the LGE area, EDWT and resting wall motion grade predicted wall motion improvement. Comparison of Receiver-Operator-Characteristic (ROC curves demonstrated that the LGE area was the most important predictor (p Conclusion LGE and EDWT are independent predictors for functional recovery after revascularization. However, LGE appears to be a more important factor and independent of EDWT.

  16. What Is the Critical Value of Glenoid Bone Loss at Which Soft Tissue Bankart Repair Does Not Restore Glenohumeral Translation, Restricts Range of Motion, and Leads to Abnormal Humeral Head Position?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Koh, Yong Won; Bui, Christopher; Jeong, Woong Kyo; Akeda, Masaki; Cho, Nam Su; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-11-01

    A general consensus has been formed that glenoid bone loss greater than 20% to 25% is the critical amount at which bony augmentation procedures are needed; however, recent clinical results suggest that the critical levels must be reconsidered to lower values. This study aimed to find the critical value of anterior glenoid bone loss when a soft tissue repair is not adequate to restore anterior-inferior glenohumeral translation, rotational range of motion, or humeral head position using a biomechanical anterior shoulder instability model. Controlled laboratory study. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested with a customized shoulder testing system. Range of motion, translation, and humeral head position were measured at 60° of glenohumeral abduction in the scapular plane under a total of 40-N rotator cuff muscle loading in the following 11 conditions: intact; soft tissue Bankart lesion and repair; Bankart lesion with 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% glenoid bone defects based on the largest anteroposterior width of the glenoid; and soft tissue Bankart repair for each respective glenoid defect. Serial osteotomies for each percentage of bone loss were made parallel to the long axis of the glenoid. There was significantly decreased external rotation (121.2° ± 2.8° to 113.5° ± 3.3°; P = .004), increased anteroinferior translation with an externally applied load (3.0 ± 1.2 mm to 7.5 ± 1.1 mm at 20 N; P = .008), and increased posterior (0.2 ± 0.6 mm to 2.7 ± 0.8 mm; P = .049) and inferior shift (2.9 ± 0.7 mm to 6.6 ± 1.1 mm; P = .018) of the humeral head apex in the position of maximum external rotation after soft tissue Bankart repair of a 15% glenoid defect compared with the repair of a Bankart lesion without a glenoid defect, respectively. Glenoid defects of 15% or more of the largest anteroposterior glenoid width should be considered the critical bone loss amount at which soft tissue repair cannot restore glenohumeral translation, restricts rotational range of motion

  17. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  18. Cilia walls influence on peristaltically induced motion of magneto-fluid through a porous medium at moderate Reynolds number: Numerical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E. Abo-Elkhair

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses, effects of a magneto-fluid through a Darcy flow model with oscillatory wavy walled whose inner surface is ciliated. The equations that governing the flow are modeled without using any approximations. Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM is used to evaluate the solution of our system of nonlinear partial differential equations. Stream function, velocity and pressure gradient components are obtained by using the vorticity formula. The effects for our arbitrary physical parameters on flow characteristics are analyzed by plotting diagrams and discussed in details. With the help of stream lines the trapping mechanism has also been discussed. The major outcomes for the ciliated channel walls are: The axial velocity is higher without a ciliated walls than that for a ciliated walls and an opposite behaviour is shown near the ciliated channel walls. The pressure gradients in both directions are higher for a ciliated channel walls. More numbers of the trapped bolus in the absent of the eccentricity of the cilia elliptic path.

  19. 运动幅度曲线直观评价心肌梗死患者左心室局域舒张功能%Evaluation of regional left ventricular diastolic function in patients with myocardial infarction by the curve of ventricular wall motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世宏

    2008-01-01

    Objective To detect the curve of ventricular wall motion features of regional wall abnor-malities in patients with coronary artery disease during each diastolic period, and its possibility to evaluate re-gional left ventricular diastolic function. Methods Fifty-four patients with anterior myocardial infarction (MI group) and 78 normal subjects (NOR group) underwent Doppler tissue imaging, which were performed in 2-chamber-view by the tracing technology of ventrieular wall motion synchronously. Isovolumic relax-ation period, rapid flow period, slow filling phase, atrial systole period were measured. Results In NOR group, distant value of 76 patients (97.44%) showed a gradually decreasing positive value from the apex to middle and from middle to base of left ventricle. While in MI group, such rules disappeared, 52 patients (96.30%) were negative in infarction area. In isevolumic relaxation period in NOR group, 76 patients (97.44%) showed palliative downward wave, but in MI group, 27 patients (50.00%) showed palliative downward wave(P<0.05). In rapid flow period, both NOR and MI group showed downward and steep waves,but in MI group, the gradient rule disappeared and distance of ventricular wall motion was negative in infarc-tion area. In slow filling phase, compared with NOR group, which had horizontal wave, MI group had no obvi-ously horizontal waves. Conclusion Regional myocardial ischemia and infarction can cause significant ab-normalities of regional ventricular wall motion in active diastolic phase, and it can be evaluated quantitatively and synchronously with high sensitivity by the curve of ventricular wall motion which has the potential value in regional left ventricular diastolic function.%目的 探讨冠心病患者左心室舒张各期局部心肌运动幅度曲线特点及其评价左心室局域舒张功能的可能性.方法 对54例前壁心肌梗死患者(MI组)和78例健康对照者(NOR组)左心室心肌进行组织多普勒成像检查.记录心

  20. Field-driven domain wall motion under a bias current in the creep and flow regimes in Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y H; Yoshimura, Y; Kim, K-J; Lee, K; Kim, T W; Ono, T; You, C-Y; Jung, M H

    2016-03-31

    The dynamics of magnetic domain wall (DW) in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy Pt/[CoSiB/Pt]N nanowires was studied by measuring the DW velocity under a magnetic field (H) and an electric current (J) in two extreme regimes of DW creep and flow. Two important findings are addressed. One is that the field-driven DW velocity increases with increasing N in the flow regime, whereas the trend is inverted in the creep regime. The other is that the sign of spin current-induced effective field is gradually reversed with increasing N in both DW creep and flow regimes. To reveal the underlying mechanism of new findings, we performed further experiment and micromagnetic simulation, from which we found that the observed phenomena can be explained by the combined effect of the DW anisotropy, Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, spin-Hall effect, and spin-transfer torques. Our results shed light on the mechanism of DW dynamics in novel amorphous PMA nanowires, so that this work may open a path to utilize the amorphous PMA in emerging DW-based spintronic devices.

  1. The effects of cervical joint manipulation, based on passive motion analysis, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture, and cervical ROM in university students with abnormal posture of the cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Wontae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cervical posture manipulation, based on passive motion analysis (MBPMA) and general mobilization, on cervical lordosis, forward head posture (FHP), and cervical ROM in university students with problems in cervical posture and range of motion (ROM). [Subjects] The Subjects were 40 university students in their 20s who displayed problems in cervical posture and ROM; they were divided into an MBPMA group (n=20) and a mobilization grou...

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ095 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is abnormal bleeding more ...

  3. Classifying Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  4. Rectangular Blocks vs Polygonal Walls in Archaeoseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus-G. Hinzen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Collapsed or deformed walls in ancient structures constitute important evidence in archaeoseismology, where damage is interpreted in terms of earthquake ground motion. A large variety of wall types have been developed during the millennia in different cultural backgrounds. Often walls with polygonal-shaped building blocks are regarded as more earthquake-resistant than a wall consisting of rectangular elements and, as is sometimes speculated, that the irregular wall types were intentionally developed for that purpose. We use simply structured discrete element models of four walls with different block geometries, perfect rectangular, an Inka-type structure and two polygonal designs, to test their dynamic behavior. In addition to an analytic calculation of ground motion, we use measured strong motion signals as boundary conditions for the 3D wall models with varying height to width ratios. At peak ground accelerations between 1.0 and 9.0 m/s2 and major frequencies of 0.5 to 3 Hz, numeric experiments with the horizontally applied analytic ground motions result in clear differences in the resistance of the four wall types with the rectangular block wall being most vulnerable. For more complex measured 3D motions the Inka-type wall proves more stable than the rectangular block wall; however, height to width ratio still has equally strong influence on the stability. Internal deformation of non-collapsed walls shows some correlation with the parameters of the driving motion. For simple impulsive ground motions, a peak ground displacement threshold exists between toppling and remaining upright for all four models but peak acceleration cannot be reliably back calculated.

  5. A Study of Regional Wall Motion Abnormalities by Color Kinesis in Coronary Artery Disease%彩色室壁运动技术评价冠心病节段性室壁运动的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏红梅; 高云华; 杨成业

    2000-01-01

    目的:探讨彩色室壁运动技术(CK)在定量评价室壁节段性运动异常(RWMA)方面的应用价值.方法:分别以常规二维超声(2DE)及CK技术对70例冠心病患者及30例正常人乳头肌水平左室短轴切面室壁节段性运动进行评价.结果:正常组未发现节段性室壁运动异常, 收缩期心内膜位移连续、均匀, 正常节段位移时间范围为280~360ms, 平均值320ms,位移幅度范围为7~12mm,平均值9.5mm; 缺血组24例患者出现节段运动异常, 缺血节段的位移时间与位移幅度均减小(P<0.005,P<0.005);梗塞组40例患者均有节段性运动异常, 梗塞节段的位移时间与位移幅度均明显减小(P<0.005,P<0.005);2DE检出的运动异常节段数120, 以心内膜位移时间<280ms检出的运动异常节段数120, 敏感性100%、特异性100%;以心内膜位移幅度<7mm检出的运动异常节段数118, 敏感性98%、特异性99%.结论:CK技术在评价冠心病患者RWMA方面具有较好的准确性、可行性, 为快速、客观、定量评价室壁节段性运动异常提供了新的途径.

  6. [Segmental wall movement of the left ventricle in healthy persons and myocardial infarct patients studied by a catheter-less nuclear medical method (camera-cinematography of the heart)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffers, H; Sigel, H; Bitter, F; Kampmann, H; Stauch, M; Adam, W E

    1976-08-01

    Camera-Kinematography is a nearly noninvasive method to investigate regional motion of the myocard, and allows evaluation of the function of the heart. About 20 min after injection of 15-20 mCi of 99mTC-Human-Serum-Albumin, when the tracer is distributed homogenously within the bloodpool, data acquisition starts. Myocardial wall motion is represented in an appropriate quasi three-dimensional form. In this representation scars can be revealed as "silent" (akinetic) regions, aneurysms by asynchronic motion. Time activity curves for arbitrarily chosen regions can be calculated and give an equivalent for regional volume changes. 16 patients with an old infarction have been investigated. In fourteen cases the location and extent of regions with abnormal motion could be evaluated. Only two cases of a small posterior wall infarction did not show deviations from normal contraction pattern.

  7. Structure of axionic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  8. Structure of axionic domain walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, M.C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-15

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  9. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device (IUD) can also cause ... this type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell ...

  10. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  11. Prediction of left ventricular remodeling in patients with acute myocardial infarction by speckle tracking imaging with wall motion score index:a clinical follow-up study%斑点追踪成像联合室壁运动评分预测急性心肌梗死患者左心室重构的随访研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡波; 周青; 陈金玲; 姚雪; 宋宏宁; 谭团团; 郭瑞强

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the prognostic value of speckle tracking imaging (STI) for left ventricular remodeling(LVR) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with the analysis of the relation between regional wall motion abnormality after AMI and LVR by STI in association with wall motion score index (WMSI).Methods Eighty-three patients with first onset AMI were enrolled from January 2012 to May 2015 and underwent echocardiography within 24 h of the onset and at 6-month follow-up.LVR was defined as more than 20% of the percentage change of left ventricular end-diastolic volume (△LVEDV%) from baseline to 6-month follow-up (divided as LVR and non-LVR group).Standard long-axis and shortaxis views were stored and analyzed for longitudinal (LS),radial (RS) and circumferential (CS) strain of STI metrics as well as scores of WMSI.Segments of WMSI≥2 were selected and calculated for the mean values of LS (LS_WMSI),RS (RS_WMSI) and CS (CS_WMSI).Results LVR occurred in twenty-seven AMI patients at 6-month follow-up.No difference has shown for demographics,electrocardiogram,lab tests,coronary angiography as well as the measurements of two-dimensional echocardiography between the two groups from baseline,while all STI metrics had statistical difference when the comparisons (P <0.05,all),especially the WMSI selected STI metrics (P <0.001,all).Linear regression analysis demonstrated that CS_WMSI (r =0.716,P <0.001) was best correlated to △LVEDV% among all STI metrics and also the best predictor of LVR by receive operator curve analysis (sensitivity of 92.6%,specificity of 87.5 % and area under the curve of 0.9563).Conclusions Baseline STI metrics can precisely predict LVR at 6-month follow-up.Among the STI metrics,CS_WMSI has shown preferable predictive and diagnostic value,which indicates that the impairment of segmental circumferential wall motion is closely correlated to LVR after myocardial infarction.%目的 应用斑点追踪成像(STI)技术联合

  12. 利用定量组织速度成像技术评价心肌梗死患者局部心肌不同时相的纵向运动%Assessing longitudinal wall motion characteristics at different phases in regional myocardial in patients with myocardial infarction by quantitative tissue velocity imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张涓; 杨新春; 曾定尹; 吴雅峰

    2005-01-01

    suggests the presence of postsystolic shortening and abnormal wall motion in regional myocardium.chemic myocardium.%背景:目前,组织多普勒成像技术广泛应用于定量评价左室局部心肌功能.收缩后收缩是局部心肌急性缺血后的舒张延迟.目的:观察左室局部心肌在各时期的纵向运动特点,评价在等容舒张期出现的收缩后收缩的临床意义.设计:病例对照观察.单位:北京朝阳医院心脏中心.对象:选择2003-04/09在北京朝阳医院心脏中心住院的心肌梗死患者30例作为心肌梗死组,另外选择无心脏疾患者30例作为对照组,两组观察对象均自愿参加观察.方法:收集动态图像,进行脱机分析.获得纵向上不同壁的基底段和中间段同步多普勒速度、时间速度积分曲线,测量其等容收缩期、射血期、等容舒张期、快速充盈期、心房收缩期的峰值速度和最大时间速度积分.主要观察指标:①两组观察对象心肌不同节段纵向上各期组织多普勒平均峰值速度.②两组观察对象心肌不同节段最大时间速度积分.③两组观察对象心肌不同节段等容舒张期峰值速度的数值分布情况. 结果:纳入心肌梗死组和对照组各30例,全部进入结果分析,无脱落.①心肌梗死组患者纵向心肌各节段运动峰值速度均较对照组下降,梗死节段更明显,提示心肌梗死患者心肌收缩及舒张功能均下降.②心肌梗死组心肌等容舒张期多个节段出现异常正向波,提示收缩后收缩.③心肌梗死组多个节段时间速度积分出现收缩期末和等容舒张期两个波峰,最大时间速度积分较对照组明显下降.结论:①3支病变的心肌梗死患者心肌收缩和舒张功能明显减低.②等容舒张期的异常活动,提示收缩后收缩,存在局部心肌的室壁运动异常.③等容舒张期的峰值速度是局部心肌室壁运动异常和心肌缺血的标志.

  13. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF NEAR-FAULT PULSE GROUND MOTION ON FRAME-SHEAR WALL STRUCTURE%不同类型近断层脉冲型地震动对框架-剪力墙结构的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 刘勇; 孙哲哲; 袁赫

    2015-01-01

    近断层脉冲型地震动对结构有很大的潜在破坏作用.为分析不同类型该类地震动对框架剪力墙结构地震反应的影响,搜集了近断层双脉冲和多脉冲型地震动,计算了这些地震动的加速度反应谱,及其引起的一个22层钢筋混凝土框架-剪力墙结构的时程反应.对比了双脉冲和多脉冲型地震动的平均弹性加速度反应谱,及其引起框架-剪力墙结构的平均基底剪力、平均最大层间位移角、平均顶层位移和平均结构整体破坏指数.结果表明:近断层双脉冲型地震动的平均弹性加速度反应谱谱值均接近或大于近断层多脉冲型地震动;近断层双脉冲型地震动引起的框架-剪力墙结构平均基底剪力、平均最大层间位移角、平均顶层位移和平均结构整体破坏指数均不小于近断层多脉冲型地震动.由此说明,在统计意义上,当分析近断层脉冲型地震动对框架-剪力墙结构破坏作用的影响时,输入地震动可近似仅考虑双脉冲型地震动.%Near-fault pulse ground motion has large potential damage effect on structure.In order to analyze the effect of this kind of ground motion on frame-shear wall structures,near-fault double-pulse-type and multi-pulse-type ground motion are collected.Their elastic acceleration response spectra and the time history response of a 22-floor concrete reinforced frame-shear wall structure induced by them are calculated.The average elastic acceleration response spectra of the near-fault double-pulse-type ground motion is compared with that of the multi-pulse-type ground motion.The average base shear,the average maximum storey-drift-angle,the average top floor displacement,and the average whole structure damage index induced by the near-fault double-pulse-type ground motion are also compared with those induced by the multi-pulse-type ground motion.The results show:the average elastic acceleration response spectra of the near-fault double

  14. Relation between QT dispersion and regional wall thickness abnormality of ventricle in patients with acute myocardial infarction%急性心肌梗死患者QT离散度变化 与室壁厚度异常的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴德; 赵绮芳; 刘珂

    2001-01-01

    目的 观察急性心肌梗死(AMI)患者QT间期离散度变化与室壁厚度异常的关系。方法 观察35例AMI患者和31例劳力型心绞痛患者QT离散度与室壁收缩厚度改变百分率的变化。结果 (1)AMI后第1天、第4周的QTd值较对照组明显延长。对照组和AMI组区域性收缩厚度改变百分率之间差异有显著性(t=6.77,P<0.01)。(2)AMI后第1天和第4周QTd值与区域性收缩厚度改变百分率呈显著负相关(r=-0.85,r=-0.72,P值均<0.01)。结论 AMI后QTcd显著延长,并与收缩时室壁厚度改变密切相关。%Objective To explore the relation between increased QT dispersion (QTcd) and regional wall thickness change abnormality in patients with acute myocardial infarction(AMI).Methods The QTcd and the wall thickness change in systole in 35 patients of early AMI and in 31 cases of exertional angina(control group) were measured.Results 1.The QTcd in AMI group was longer than those in control group.There had significant difference of regional wall thickness change percent in systole between AMI group and the control group(P<0.01). 2. The QTcd of AMI group had significantly negative correlation with the region wall thickness change percent in systole(P<0.01).Conclusion The results showed that the QTcd in early AMI is longer than in exertional angina and the QTcd change is closely correlation with the wall thickness change in systole.

  15. Fractional motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo I., E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il [Holon Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Shlesinger, Michael F., E-mail: mike.shlesinger@navy.mil [Office of Naval Research, Code 30, 875 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Brownian motion is the archetypal model for random transport processes in science and engineering. Brownian motion displays neither wild fluctuations (the “Noah effect”), nor long-range correlations (the “Joseph effect”). The quintessential model for processes displaying the Noah effect is Lévy motion, the quintessential model for processes displaying the Joseph effect is fractional Brownian motion, and the prototypical model for processes displaying both the Noah and Joseph effects is fractional Lévy motion. In this paper we review these four random-motion models–henceforth termed “fractional motions” –via a unified physical setting that is based on Langevin’s equation, the Einstein–Smoluchowski paradigm, and stochastic scaling limits. The unified setting explains the universal macroscopic emergence of fractional motions, and predicts–according to microscopic-level details–which of the four fractional motions will emerge on the macroscopic level. The statistical properties of fractional motions are classified and parametrized by two exponents—a “Noah exponent” governing their fluctuations, and a “Joseph exponent” governing their dispersions and correlations. This self-contained review provides a concise and cohesive introduction to fractional motions.

  16. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  17. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  18. Domain Wall Evolution in Phase Transforming Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-14

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES AND ADDRESSES 8. PERFORMI:N’G ORGANIZATION REPORT University ofFioridaOffice ofEngineering NUMBER 339 Wei I Hall ...surveillance, navigation, tlrreat identification, target acquisition, and missile guidance. Domain wall motion, or the planar defects separating regions of...surveillance, navigation, threat identification, target acquisition, and missile guidance. Domain wall motion, or the planar defects separating regions of

  19. Hydrodynamics of ultra-relativistic bubble walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Leitao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In cosmological first-order phase transitions, gravitational waves are generated by the collisions of bubble walls and by the bulk motions caused in the fluid. A sizeable signal may result from fast-moving walls. In this work we study the hydrodynamics associated to the fastest propagation modes, namely, ultra-relativistic detonations and runaway solutions. We compute the energy injected by the phase transition into the fluid and the energy which accumulates in the bubble walls. We provide analytic approximations and fits as functions of the net force acting on the wall, which can be readily evaluated for specific models. We also study the back-reaction of hydrodynamics on the wall motion, and we discuss the extrapolation of the friction force away from the ultra-relativistic limit. We use these results to estimate the gravitational wave signal from detonations and runaway walls.

  20. Domain Wall Propagation through Spin Wave Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.S.; Yan, P.; Shen, Y.H.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Wang, X.R.

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically study field-induced domain wall motion in an electrically insulating ferromagnet with hard- and easy-axis anisotropies. Domain walls can propagate along a dissipationless wire through spin wave emission locked into the known soliton velocity at low fields. In the presence of damping

  1. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  2. CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES IN INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smogavec

    2009-08-01

    Conclusions Chromosomal analysis is an important method in diagnostic procedures of infertility, because chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions. Sex chromosome aneuploidies are highly correlated to infertility of females and males.

  3. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  4. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  5. Abnormal menstrual periods (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have a variety of causes, such as endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, and abnormal thyroid or ... the endometrium becomes unusually thick it is called endometrial ... Hyperplasia may cause profuse or extended menstrual bleeding.

  6. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  7. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  8. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  9. Analysis of myocardial motion using generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Rose, Stephen E.; Wilson, Stephen J.; Veidt, Martin; Bennett, Cameron J.; Doddrell, David M.

    2000-06-01

    Heart wall motion abnormalities are the very sensitive indicators of common heart diseases, such as myocardial infarction and ischemia. Regional strain analysis is especially important in diagnosing local abnormalities and mechanical changes in the myocardium. In this work, we present a complete method for the analysis of cardiac motion and the evaluation of regional strain in the left ventricular wall. The method is based on the generalized spline models and tagged magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the left ventricle. The whole method combines dynamical tracking of tag deformation, simulating cardiac movement and accurately computing the regional strain distribution. More specifically, the analysis of cardiac motion is performed in three stages. Firstly, material points within the myocardium are tracked over time using a semi-automated snake-based tag tracking algorithm developed for this purpose. This procedure is repeated in three orthogonal axes so as to generate a set of one-dimensional sample measurements of the displacement field. The 3D-displacement field is then reconstructed from this sample set by using a generalized vector spline model. The spline reconstruction of the displacement field is explicitly expressed as a linear combination of a spline kernel function associated with each sample point and a polynomial term. Finally, the strain tensor (linear or nonlinear) with three direct components and three shear components is calculated by applying a differential operator directly to the displacement function. The proposed method is computationally effective and easy to perform on tagged MR images. The preliminary study has shown potential advantages of using this method for the analysis of myocardial motion and the quantification of regional strain.

  10. Abnormal protein aggregationand neurodegenerativediseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal protein aggregation or amyloid is the major cause ofmany neurodegenerative disorders. The present review focuses on the correlation between sequence and structure features of proteins related to the diseases and abnormal protein aggregation. Recent progress has improved our knowledge on understand-ing the mechanism of amyloid formation. We suggest a nucleation model for ordered protein aggregation, which can also explain pathogenesis mechanisms of these neurodegenerative diseases in vivo.

  11. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  12. MRI水成像序列在眼运动神经麻痹病因诊断中的应用%The value of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of the ophthalmic motion nerves and its abnormal adjacent relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江万里; 梁长虎; 乌大尉; 柳澄

    2013-01-01

    目的 应用3D-CISS(3-D Constructive Interference in Steady State)序列对脑池段眼运动神经的异常毗邻组织结构进行显示与研究,为临床诊断及手术获得详尽的MR影像资料.方法 对23名眼运动障碍患者进行3D-CISS序列MR成像,应用MPR技术在最佳方位层面观察眼运动神经与其异常毗邻组织的压迫关系.结果 23例单侧眼运动障碍患者的3D-CISS序列MR成像均显示相应眼运动神经明显受压变形:动眼神经受压11例,其中大脑后动脉(PCA)血管压迫5例,小脑上动脉(SCA)压迫1例,基底动脉(BA)压迫2例,肿瘤压迫3例;展神经受压10例,其中基底动脉(BA)血管压迫4例,小脑前下动脉(AICA)压迫2例,肿瘤压迫4例;滑车神经受压2例,均为小脑上动脉(SCA)分支血管压迫.结论 3D-CISS序列结合MPR技术能够准确显示眼运动神经的毗邻关系,具有重要的临床意义.%Objective To obtain the detailed anatomical data of image for clinic through the application of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of the ophthalmic motion nerves and its abnormal adjacent relationships. Methods 23 patients with palsy of the ophthalmic motion nerves underwent 3D-CISS MR imaging, the syntopy of the ophthalmic motion nerves to its related pathological changes were observed from the different angles on multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images. Results 23 patients with palsy of the unilateral ophthalmic motion nerves were all displayed with the corresponding apparent distortion caused by press: 11 oculomotor nerves were pressed, among them 5, were pressed by PCA, 1 by SCA, 2 by BA, 3 by tumor in the pontine cistern; 10 abducent nerves were pressed, among them 4 were pressed by BA, 2 by AICA and 4 by tumor in the pontine cistern; 2 trochlear nerves were all pressed by the branch of SCA. Conclusion 3D-CISS sequence and MPR technique are the optimal imaging methods for the display of the syntopy of the ophthalmic motion nerve to its related

  13. ON WALL SHEAR STRESS OF ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhao-rong; Liu Bao-yu; Qin Kai-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that the wall shear stress of artery could be determined by measuring the centerline axial velocity and radial motion of arterial wall simultaneously.The method is simple in application and can get higher precision when it is used to determine the shear stress of arterial wall in vivo.As an example, the shear stress distribution in periodic oscillatory flow of human carotid was calculated and discussed.The computed results show that the shear stress distribution at any given instant is almost uniform and will be zero at the centerline and tends to maximum at the vessel wall.

  14. Great attractor really a great wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stebbins, A.; Turner, M.S.

    1988-11-01

    Some of the cosmological consequences are discussed of a late time phase transition which produces light domain walls. The observed peculiar velocity field of the Universe and the observed isotropy of the microwave background radiation severely constrain the wall surface density in such a scenario. The most interesting consequence of such a phase transition is the possibility that the local, coherent streaming motion reported by the Seven Samurai could be explained by the repulsive effect of a relic domain wall with the Hubble volume (the Great Wall).

  15. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  16. Abnormal visual motion processing is not a cause of dyslexia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olulade, Olumide A; Napoliello, Eileen M; Eden, Guinevere F

    2013-01-01

    ... for dyslexic children compared to age-matched controls. However, when dyslexics were matched to younger controls on reading ability, no differences emerged, suggesting that weakness in V5/MT may not be causal to dyslexia...

  17. Scaling analysis on filtered near wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Prakash; Moser, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Large Eddy Simulations (LES) directly represent larger scale turbulent motions and model the effects of small scale motions. However in the near wall region the large dynamically important eddies scale in viscous wall units, which makes resolving them in a high Reynolds number LES very expensive. This motivates the use of wall-modeled LES, in which these near-wall eddies are modeled. To aid in the development of new wall models, we pursue an asymptotic analysis of the filtered Navier-Stokes equations, in the limit in which the horizontal filter scale is large compared to the thickness of the wall layer. It will be shown that in this limit the filtered velocities u and subgrid stresses τ in the near-wall layer are determined to zeroth order by filtered velocities at the boundary of the wall layer. Further the asymptotics suggest that there is a scaled universal velocity profile f and subgrid stress profile g in the near-wall region. The validity of this result will be tested and the profiles f and g will be evaluated through analysis of DNS data from channel flow at Reτ = 5200 .

  18. Spectrum of esophageal abnormality seen on thoracic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu; Jeon, Yong Sun; Jeong, Seok [Inha university Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jin [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    A variety of diseases involve the esophagus including esophagitis, benign or malignant tumors, varices, and esophageal perforation. We reviewed the thoracic CT of these various esophageal diseases, and classified them by similar CT findings. The CT findings were circumferential wall thickening, nodular wall thickening, abnormal luminal dilatation, fistula formation, and mass or mass like lesion. Although CT alone has limited diagnostic ability in esophageal disease, it may have an important role in diagnosing submucosal dissection, fistula, perforation, and intramural abscess.

  19. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  20. Assessment of vascular contrast and wall motion of the aortic root and ascending aorta on MDCT angiography: dual-source high-pitch vs non-gated single-source acquisition schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Jared D.; Seaman, Danielle M.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Hurwitz, Lynne M.; Boll, Daniel T. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-15

    This retrospective study assessed whether dual-source high-pitch computed tomographic angiography (CTA) offered advantages over single-source standard-pitch techniques in the evaluation of the ascending aorta. Twenty patients who received both thoracic dual-source high-pitch and single-source standard-pitch CTAs within 1 year were assessed. Dual-source CTAs were performed; standard-pitch imaging used dose-modulated 120 kVp/150 mAs and 0.8 pitch compared with high-pitch protocols employing dose-modulated 120 kVp/250 mAs and 2.4 target pitch. Radiation dose was documented. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) at sinuses of the Valsalva (CNR{sub Valsalva}) and ascending aorta (CNR{sub Aorta}) were calculated. Dose/CNR for each technique was compared with paired t-tests. Motion at aortic valve, aortic root and ascending aorta were assessed with four-point scales and Mann-Whitney U tests; longitudinal extension of motion was compared with paired t-tests. Significantly lower motion scores for high-pitch, compared with standard-pitch acquisitions for aortic annulus, 0 vs. 2, aortic root, 0 vs. 3, and ascending aorta, 0 vs. 2, were achieved. Significantly reduced longitudinal extension of motion at aortic root, 4.9 mm vs 15.7 mm, and ascending aorta, 4.9 mm vs 21.6 mm, was observed. Contrast was not impacted: CNR{sub Valsalva}, 45.6 vs 46.3, and CNR{sub Aorta}, 45.3 vs 47.1. CTDI{sub vol} was significantly decreased for high-pitch acquisitions, 13.9 mGy vs 15.8 mGy. Dual-source high-pitch CTAs significantly decreased motion artefact without negatively impacting vascular contrast and radiation dose. circle Dual-source high-pitch CTA significantly decreased motion artefact of the ascending aorta. circle Dual-source high-pitch CTA did not negatively impact on vascular contrast. circle Dual-source high-pitch CTA significantly decreased radiation dose compared with single-source standard-pitch acquisitions. (orig.)

  1. Volumetric motion quantification by 3D tissue phase mapped CMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Anja

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was the quantification of myocardial motion from 3D tissue phase mapped (TPM CMR. Recent work on myocardial motion quantification by TPM has been focussed on multi-slice 2D acquisitions thus excluding motion information from large regions of the left ventricle. Volumetric motion assessment appears an important next step towards the understanding of the volumetric myocardial motion and hence may further improve diagnosis and treatments in patients with myocardial motion abnormalities. Methods Volumetric motion quantification of the complete left ventricle was performed in 12 healthy volunteers and two patients applying a black-blood 3D TPM sequence. The resulting motion field was analysed regarding motion pattern differences between apical and basal locations as well as for asynchronous motion pattern between different myocardial segments in one or more slices. Motion quantification included velocity, torsion, rotation angle and strain derived parameters. Results All investigated motion quantification parameters could be calculated from the 3D-TPM data. Parameters quantifying hypokinetic or asynchronous motion demonstrated differences between motion impaired and healthy myocardium. Conclusions 3D-TPM enables the gapless volumetric quantification of motion abnormalities of the left ventricle, which can be applied in future application as additional information to provide a more detailed analysis of the left ventricular function.

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... Received 19 April 2015; accepted 11 May 2015 ... Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Child Psychiatry Clinic, ... Males are affected more than females, only one case had ... communication, repetitive behavior, abnormal movement ... course, age, sex and consanguinity of the patients.

  3. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  4. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...

  5. Lacrimal system abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B D

    1994-03-01

    This report outlines several of the more important abnormalities of the lacrimal system in infants and young children. Although rare, alacrima can be a very difficult clinical problem to treat. The most common cause of alacrima is the Riley-Day syndrome. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a very common anomaly in children. The clinical appearance and treatment of this disorder are discussed.

  6. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  7. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  8. Domain wall motion and electromechanical strain in lead-free piezoelectrics: Insight from the model system (1 − x)Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}–x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} using in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutuncu, Goknur [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Li, Binzhi [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Bowman, Keith [Illinois Institute of Technology, Armour College of Engineering, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: JacobJones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-04-14

    The piezoelectric compositions (1 − x)Ba(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}–x(Ba{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3})TiO{sub 3} (BZT-xBCT) span a model lead-free morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) between room temperature rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at approximately x = 0.5. In the present work, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements during electric field application are used to elucidate the origin of electromechanical strain in several compositions spanning the tetragonal compositional range 0.6 ≤ x ≤ 0.9. As BCT concentration decreases towards the MPB, the tetragonal distortion (given by c/a-1) decreases concomitantly with an increase in 90° domain wall motion. The increase in observed macroscopic strain is predominantly attributed to the increased contribution from 90° domain wall motion. The results demonstrate that domain wall motion is a significant factor in achieving high strain and piezoelectric coefficients in lead-free polycrystalline piezoelectrics.

  9. Comparative Study on Automated Segmental Motion Analysis (ASMA) with Free Angle Model (FAM)in Diagnosis of Regional Wall Motion Abnormality(RWMA)%自动室壁分区运动分析技术与全方位M型超声心动图对冠心病节段性室壁运动异常的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李璞; 徐长新; 迟斌

    2002-01-01

    目的:应用自动室壁分区运动分析技术(ASMA)及全方位M型超声心动图(FAM)对比分析冠心病室壁节段性运动异常(RWMA),探讨ASMA在RWMA中的应用价值.方法:冠心病组63例,正常对照组30例,应用ASMA及FAM对左室壁各节段运动情况进行对比分析.结果:冠心病组ASMA及FAM检测RWMA与对照组比较,差异非常显著(P<0.001).结论:ASMA更方便、快捷、直观、准确,提供高质量的心脏图像,可作为评价RWMA的一种新方法.

  10. Method for aortic wall strain measurement with three-dimensional ultrasound speckle tracking and fitted finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatolios, Konstantinos; Wittek, Andreas; Nwe, Thet Htar; Bihari, Peter; Shelke, Amit; Josef, Dennis; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Geks, Josef; Maisch, Bernhard; Blase, Christopher; Moosdorf, Rainer; Vogt, Sebastian

    2013-11-01

    Aortic wall strains are indicators of biomechanical changes of the aorta due to aging or progressing pathologies such as aortic aneurysm. We investigated the potential of time-resolved three-dimensional ultrasonography coupled with speckle-tracking algorithms and finite element analysis as a novel method for noninvasive in vivo assessment of aortic wall strain. Three-dimensional volume datasets of 6 subjects without cardiovascular risk factors and 2 abdominal aortic aneurysms were acquired with a commercial real time three-dimensional echocardiography system. Longitudinal and circumferential strains were computed offline with high spatial resolution using a customized commercial speckle-tracking software and finite element analysis. Indices for spatial heterogeneity and systolic dyssynchrony were determined for healthy abdominal aortas and abdominal aneurysms. All examined aortic wall segments exhibited considerable heterogenous in-plane strain distributions. Higher spatial resolution of strain imaging resulted in the detection of significantly higher local peak strains (p ≤ 0.01). In comparison with healthy abdominal aortas, aneurysms showed reduced mean strains and increased spatial heterogeneity and more pronounced temporal dyssynchrony as well as delayed systole. Three-dimensional ultrasound speckle tracking enables the analysis of spatially highly resolved strain fields of the aortic wall and offers the potential to detect local aortic wall motion deformations and abnormalities. These data allow the definition of new indices by which the different biomechanical properties of healthy aortas and aortic aneurysms can be characterized. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  13. Motion-Corrected Real-Time Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart: Initial Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Saybasili, Haris; Ghasemiesfe, Ahmadreza; Dolan, Ryan S; Shehata, Monda L; Botelho, Marcos P; Markl, Michael; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2017-08-29

    Free-breathing real-time (RT) imaging can be used in patients with difficulty in breath-holding; however, RT cine imaging typically experiences poor image quality compared with segmented cine imaging because of low resolution. Here, we validate a novel unsupervised motion-corrected (MOCO) reconstruction technique for free-breathing RT cardiac images, called MOCO-RT. Motion-corrected RT uses elastic image registration to generate a single heartbeat of high-quality data from a free-breathing RT acquisition. Segmented balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) cine images and free-breathing RT images (Cartesian, TGRAPPA factor 4) were acquired with the same spatial/temporal resolution in 40 patients using clinical 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanners. The respiratory cycle was estimated using the reconstructed RT images, and nonrigid unsupervised motion correction was applied to eliminate breathing motion. Conventional segmented RT and MOCO-RT single-heartbeat cine images were analyzed to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function and volume measurements. Two radiologists scored images for overall image quality, artifact, noise, and wall motion abnormalities. Intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess the reliability of MOCO-RT measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficient showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥ 0.95) of MOCO-RT with segmented cine in measuring LV function, mass, and volume. Comparison of the qualitative ratings indicated comparable image quality for MOCO-RT (4.80 ± 0.35) with segmented cine (4.45 ± 0.88, P = 0.215) and significantly higher than conventional RT techniques (3.51 ± 0.41, P cine (1.51 ± 0.90, P = 0.088 and 1.23 ± 0.45, P = 0.182) were not different. Wall motion abnormality ratings were comparable among different techniques (P = 0.96). The MOCO-RT technique can be used to process conventional free-breathing RT cine images and provides comparable quantitative assessment of LV function and volume

  14. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  15. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  16. Prenatal MRI evaluation of limb-body wall complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre-Pascual, Elisa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital Universitario Doce de Octubre, Department of Radiology, Madrid (Spain); Epelman, Monica [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Orlando, FL (United States); Johnson, Ann M.; Chauvin, Nancy A.; Coleman, Beverly G.; Victoria, Teresa [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The sonographic (US) features of limb-body wall complex have been well documented; however the literature regarding the findings on MRI in limb-body wall complex is scant. To characterize the prenatal MRI features of limb-body wall complex. We performed a retrospective review of all MRI scans of fetuses diagnosed with limb-body wall complex at our institution from 2001 to 2011. Fetuses without correlating US scans or follow-up information were excluded. Three pediatric radiologists blinded to the specific US findings reviewed the prenatal MRIs. Images were evaluated for the organ location and attachment, the body part affected, characterization of the body wall defect, and spinal, limb and umbilical cord abnormalities. Ten subjects met inclusion criteria. MRI was able to detect and characterize the body part affected and associated abnormalities. All fetuses had ventral wall defects, a small thorax and herniated liver and bowel. The kidneys were extracorporeal in three cases. The extruded organs were attached to the placenta or the uterine wall in all cases. Abnormal spinal curvatures of various degrees of severity were present in all cases. Eight cases had a short, uncoiled cord. Limb anomalies were present in 6 of the 10 cases. We illustrate the common fetal MRI findings of limb-body wall complex. The prenatal diagnosis of limb-body wall complex and the differentiation of this defect from treatable abdominal wall defects are crucial to providing appropriate guidance for patient counseling and management. (orig.)

  17. In-situ observation of domain wall motion in Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Dabin; Cai, Changlong [Laboratory of Thin Film Techniques and Optical Test, Xi' an Technological University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li, Zhenrong, E-mail: zhrli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Fei; Xu, Zhuo [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhang, Shujun, E-mail: soz1@psu.edu [Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Cheng, Yaojin [Science and Technology on Low-Light-Level Night Vision Laboratory, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Various domain structures, including wave-like domains, mixed needle-like and laminar domains, typical embedded 90° and 180° domains, have been observed in unpoled rhombohedral, monoclinic, and tetragonal Pb(In{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2})O{sub 3}-Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} (PIN-PMN-PT) crystals by polarizing light microscope; while in poled tetragonal crystals, the parallel 180° domains were reversed and only vertical 90° domain walls were observed. For 0.24PIN-0.42PMN-0.34PT crystals with morphotropic phase boundary composition, the domain wall motion was in-situ observed as a function of applied electric field along crystallographic [100] direction. With increasing the electric field from 0 to 12 kV/cm, the rhombohedral (R) domains were found to change to monoclinic (M) domains and then to tetragonal (T) domains. The electric field-induced phase transition was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent dielectric behavior.

  18. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of domain walls with cross-ties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovik, M. N., E-mail: dubovik@imp.uran.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Zverev, V. V. [Ural Federal University (Russian Federation); Filippov, B. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of a domain wall with cross-ties is analyzed on the basis of micromagnetic simulation with exact allowance for all main (exchange, magnetoanisotropic, and magnetostatic) interactions in thin magnetically uniaxial ferromagnetic films with planar anisotropy. It is found that the peculiarities of motion of such domain walls are closely related to the behavior of topological defects in the magnetization distribution (generation, motion, and annihilation of vortex–antivortex pairs on the film surface and Bloch points). We observe three different regimes of motion (stationary, periodic, and turbulent regimes), each of which is realized in a certain range of fields oriented along the easy magnetization axis. It is shown that the experimentally observed dynamic bends of the walls with cross-ties are determined by the type of motion of vortices and antivortices. The velocities of domain walls in different regimes are calculated, and the dynamic configurations of the magnetization and existing dynamic transitions between them are investigated.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of domain walls with cross-ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovik, M. N.; Zverev, V. V.; Filippov, B. N.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of a domain wall with cross-ties is analyzed on the basis of micromagnetic simulation with exact allowance for all main (exchange, magnetoanisotropic, and magnetostatic) interactions in thin magnetically uniaxial ferromagnetic films with planar anisotropy. It is found that the peculiarities of motion of such domain walls are closely related to the behavior of topological defects in the magnetization distribution (generation, motion, and annihilation of vortex-antivortex pairs on the film surface and Bloch points). We observe three different regimes of motion (stationary, periodic, and turbulent regimes), each of which is realized in a certain range of fields oriented along the easy magnetization axis. It is shown that the experimentally observed dynamic bends of the walls with cross-ties are determined by the type of motion of vortices and antivortices. The velocities of domain walls in different regimes are calculated, and the dynamic configurations of the magnetization and existing dynamic transitions between them are investigated.

  1. Do Stops Slow Down Electroweak Bubble Walls?

    CERN Document Server

    John, P

    2001-01-01

    We compute the wall velocity in the MSSM. We therefore generalize the SMequations of motion for bubble walls moving through a hot plasma at theelectroweak phase transition and calculate the friction terms which describethe viscosity of the plasma. We give the general expressions and apply them toa simple model where stops, tops and W bosons contribute to the friction. In awide range of parameters including those which fulfil the requirements ofbaryogenesis we find a wall velocity of order v = 0.001-0.01 much below the SMvalue.

  2. Pathology of the thoracic wall: congenital and acquired

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pena, Pilar; Barber, Ignasi [Hospital Materno-Infantil, Pediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-06-15

    This review aims to cover the main congenital and acquired lesions that arise in the thoracic wall of infants and children. Imaging often plays an essential role in the evaluation of symptomatic and asymptomatic thoracic wall abnormalities. The use of appropriate imaging modalities for each condition will be addressed, as well as the range of benign and malignant conditions that can occur. (orig.)

  3. Russia: An Abnormal Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Rosefielde

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman recently rendered a summary verdict on the post Soviet Russian transition experience finding that the Federation had become a normal country with the west's assistance, and predicting that it would liberalize and develop further like other successful nations of its type. This essay demonstrates that they are mistaken on the first count, and are likely to be wrong on the second too. It shows factually, and on the norms elaborated by Pareto, Arrow and Bergson that Russia is an abnormal political economy unlikely to democratize, westernize or embrace free enterprise any time soon

  4. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  5. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  6. Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  7. [Frequency of external congenital abnormalities in abortions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo de Arreola, G; López-Serna, N; Treviño-Alanís, M G; Russildi, J M; Arreola-Arredondo, B; Borrego, S A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate the incidence of external birth defects found in 1,650 aborted fetuses studied from September 1978 to February 1983 at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the University Hospital "Dr. José Eleuterio González" of the U.A.N.L. Medical School. Ninety five of fetuses had external birth defects and 85 had abnormalities in annexes. The Fisher exact test was applied to find the relationship between these abnormalities; no relationship was found. 67.4% had only one birth defect; 32.1% showed several defects. Those defects which were lethal constituted 67%, the majority being of the central nervous system. Defects found in the abdominal wall took second place in frequency followed by abnormalities in either extremity and ear defects. The birth defects seen in early gestational ages differ from those seen in live newborn babies. It is important to carry out morphological and teratological studies, not only in newborns but also during the embrion and fetal periods.

  8. Development of Motion Processing in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaz, Dagmara; Remington, Anna; Milne, Elizabeth; Coleman, Mike; Campbell, Ruth; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Swettenham, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that children with autism may be impaired in the perception of biological motion from moving point-light displays. Some children with autism also have abnormally high motion coherence thresholds. In the current study we tested a group of children with autism and a group of typically developing children aged 5 to 12 years of…

  9. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scen...

  10. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  11. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Berger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  12. Collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  13. Motion control report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a short discount publication. In today's manufacturing environment, Motion Control plays a major role in virtually every project.The Motion Control Report provides a comprehensive overview of the technology of Motion Control:* Design Considerations* Technologies* Methods to Control Motion* Examples of Motion Control in Systems* A Detailed Vendors List

  14. Dynamic response of flexible retaining walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younan, A.H.; Veletsos, A.S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of an extension of a recently proposed, relatively simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible walls retaining a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semiinfinite extent in the horizontal direction. Both cantilever and top-supported walls are examined. Following a detailed description of the method and of its rate of convergence, comprehensive numerical solutions are presented that elucidate the action of the system and the effects of the various parameters involved. The parameters varied include the flexibility of the wall, the condition of top support, and the characteristics of the ground motion. The effects of both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are examined. Special attention is paid to the effects of long-period, effectively static excitations. A maximum dynamic response is then expressed as the product of the corresponding static response and an appropriate amplification or deamplification factor. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the dynamic wall pressures, and the total wall force, base shear and base moment.

  15. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the endo

  16. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the endo

  17. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the

  18. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  19. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  20. Direct observation of massless domain wall dynamics in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J; Bonfim, M; Rougemaille, N; Boulle, O; Miron, I M; Auffret, S; Rodmacq, B; Gaudin, G; Cezar, J C; Sirotti, F; Pizzini, S

    2012-06-15

    Domain wall motion induced by nanosecond current pulses in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Pt/Co/AlO(x)) is shown to exhibit negligible inertia. Time-resolved magnetic microscopy during current pulses reveals that the domain walls start moving, with a constant speed, as soon as the current reaches a constant amplitude, and no or little motion takes place after the end of the pulse. The very low "mass" of these domain walls is attributed to the combination of their narrow width and high damping parameter α. Such a small inertia should allow accurate control of domain wall motion by tuning the duration and amplitude of the current pulses.

  1. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  2. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. combined spatially and temporally structured walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Riahi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Benney's theory of evolution of disturbances in shear flows over smooth and flat boundary is extended to study for shear flows over combined spatially and temporally corrugated walls. Perturbation and multiple-scales analyses are employed for the case where both amplitude of the corrugations and the amplitude of wave motion are small. Analyses for instability of modulated mean shear flows with respect to spanwise-periodic disturbance rolls and for the subsequent vortex formation and vortex stability are presented, and the effects of the corrugated walls on the resulting flow and vortices are determined. It is found that particular corrugated walls can originate and control the longitudinal vortices, while some other types of corrugated walls can enhance instability of such vortices.

  4. Motion Detection for PC based on Security System by using Optical Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hawari Ghazali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This system is designed aims to detect and analyze the motion of people that have been recorded on PC, which response rapidly to the abnormal motion based on  optical flow method. Horn-Schunck technique  is one of optical flow method which has ability to detect the motion in image sequences by examining the velocities of the motion objects. It will response to abnormal motion and triggered the alarm in order to alert the people beware to their surroundings.

  5. Brownian motion as a new probe of wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianyong; Simha, Akarsh; Raizen, Mark G.

    2017-04-01

    Understanding wettability is crucial for optimizing oil recovery, semiconductor manufacturing, pharmaceutical industry, and electrowetting. In this letter, we study the effects of wettability on Brownian motion. We consider the cases of a sphere in an unbounded fluid medium, as well as a sphere placed in the vicinity of a plane wall. For the first case, we show the effects of wettability on the statistical properties of the particles' motion, such as velocity autocorrelation, velocity, and thermal force power spectra over a large range of time scales. We also propose a new method to measure wettability based on the particles' Brownian motion. In addition, we compare the boundary effects on Brownian motion imposed by both no-slip and perfect-slip flat walls. We emphasize the surprising boundary effects on Brownian motion imposed by a perfect-slip wall in the parallel direction, such as a higher particle mobility parallel to a perfect flat wall compared to that in the absence of the wall, as well as compared to a particle near a no-slip flat wall.

  6. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  7. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami Minemura; Kazuto Tajiri; Yukihiro Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  8. Gravitational field of spherical domain wall in higher dimension

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farook Rahaman; Mehedi Kalam

    2002-01-01

    An exact solution of Einstein’s equations is found describing the gravitational field of a spherical domain wall with nonvanishing stress component in the direction perpendicular to the plane of the wall. Also we have studied the motion of test particle around the domain wall.

  9. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPET...

  10. Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities in Chronic Alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.D. Attar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Alcohol is most commonly abused drug worldwide. It has been shown to produce toxic effects in almost every organ system in the body. Many of these medical conditions can be attributed to direct effects of alcohol whereas others are indirect sequelae that may result from nutritional deficiencies or predisposition to trauma. Alcohol consumption has been associated with a variety of cardio vascular disorders this study was thus undertaken to know the Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic abnormalities in asymptomatic chronic alcoholic patients. Materials and Methods: 50 Patients attending the out-patient clinic & who were admitted in Al Ameen Medical College Hospital and District hospital, Bijapur were selected for the study. It was a prospective study design subjects in age group 20-40, having history of chronic alcoholism as defined, for more than 5 years were evaluated by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Patients with known diabetics, hypertensive and cardiovascular disorders were excluded from the study group. Results: The prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities in patients of chronic alcoholism is 37% in our study. Most common ECG changes are sinus tachycardia (18%, and Non specific ST-T changes (9%. Most common 2D ECHO changes was increased posterior wall thickness (11% and followed by increased interventricular septum thickness and decreased ejection fraction (<40%. The prevalence of cardio vascular abnormalities are more with increased duration of alcohol consumption and also high in advanced age group. Conclusions: This study confirms that many electrocardiographic as well as echocardiographic changes occur prior to symptomatic cardiac disorders established to be caused by chronic alcohol intake such as alcoholic cardiomyopathy .which probably are early indictors of ongoing effects of alcohol and are reversible during the early stages detected by non invasive investigations like Electrocardiography and

  11. Comparative study of Trombe wall, water wall and trans wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sodha, M.S.; Bansal, N.K.; Singh, S.; Ram, S.; Annamalai, M.; Iyer, M.V.; Nirmala, K.A.; Venkatesh, P.; Prasad, C.R.; Subramani, C.

    1982-01-01

    The thermal performances of three systems viz. Trombe wall: (1) without; and (2) with vents (forced air circulation), water wall and Transwall have been studied analytically interms of heat flux entering the living space (Maintained at 20/sup 0/C) corresponding to the meteriological data on January 19, 1981 at New Delhi (India), a typical cold winter day. Subsequent parametric studies using the simulation indicated that the Transwall system is the more efficient system for the passive heating of buildings.

  12. Detectability of motions in AAA with ECG-gated CTA: A quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Almar; Oostveen, Luuk J.; Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne; Schultze Kool, Leo J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Renema, W. Klaas Jan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated CT enables the visualization of motions caused by the beating of the heart. Although ECG gating is frequently used in cardiac CT imaging, this technique is also very promising for evaluating vessel wall motion of the aortic artery and the motions of (stent grafts inside) abdominal

  13. Detectability of motions in AAA with ECG-gated CTA: a quantitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.; Oostveen, L.J.; Greuter, M.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Kool, L.J.; Slump, C.H.; Renema, W.K.J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: ECG-gated CT enables the visualization of motions caused by the beating of the heart. Although ECG gating is frequently used in cardiac CT imaging, this technique is also very promising for evaluating vessel wall motion of the aortic artery and the motions of (stent grafts inside) abdominal

  14. Detectability of motions in AAA with ECG-gated CTA : A quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Almar; Oostveen, Luuk J.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Hoogeveen, Yvonne; Kool, Leo J. Schultze; Slump, Cornelis H.; Renema, W. Klaas Jan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated CT enables the visualization of motions caused by the beating of the heart. Although ECG gating is frequently used in cardiac CT imaging, this technique is also very promising for evaluating vessel wall motion of the aortic artery and the motions of (stent grafts inside) abdominal

  15. Abnormal events detection in crowded scenes by trajectory cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shifu; Zhang, Zhijiang; Zeng, Dan; Shen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal events detection in crowded scenes has been a challenge due to volatility of the definitions for both normality and abnormality, the small number of pixels on the target, appearance ambiguity resulting from the dense packing, and severe inter-object occlusions. A novel framework was proposed for the detection of unusual events in crowded scenes using trajectories produced by moving pedestrians based on an intuition that the motion patterns of usual behaviors are similar to these of group activity, whereas unusual behaviors are not. First, spectral clustering is used to group trajectories with similar spatial patterns. Different trajectory clusters represent different activities. Then, unusual trajectories can be detected using these patterns. Furthermore, behavior of a mobile pedestrian can be defined by comparing its direction with these patterns, such as moving in the opposite direction of the group or traversing the group. Experimental results indicated that the proposed algorithm could be used to reliably locate the abnormal events in crowded scenes.

  16. Mixed pattern matching-based traffic abnormal behavior recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Zhiming; Sheng, Victor S; Shi, Yujie; Zhao, Pengpeng

    2014-01-01

    A motion trajectory is an intuitive representation form in time-space domain for a micromotion behavior of moving target. Trajectory analysis is an important approach to recognize abnormal behaviors of moving targets. Against the complexity of vehicle trajectories, this paper first proposed a trajectory pattern learning method based on dynamic time warping (DTW) and spectral clustering. It introduced the DTW distance to measure the distances between vehicle trajectories and determined the number of clusters automatically by a spectral clustering algorithm based on the distance matrix. Then, it clusters sample data points into different clusters. After the spatial patterns and direction patterns learned from the clusters, a recognition method for detecting vehicle abnormal behaviors based on mixed pattern matching was proposed. The experimental results show that the proposed technical scheme can recognize main types of traffic abnormal behaviors effectively and has good robustness. The real-world application verified its feasibility and the validity.

  17. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Gimenez, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Alegret, X. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Rivas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  18. Deficits of motion transparency perception in adult developmental dyslexics with normal unidirectional motion sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gary T; Raymond, Jane E

    2002-04-01

    We assessed motion integration ability in seven adult developmental dyslexics using unidirectional and bidirectional (transparent) random dot kinematograms (RDKs) that varied in the number of frames. All adult dyslexics performed as well as normally reading age-matched controls with unidirectional RDKs, regardless of frame number. However, using orthogonal motion transparent stimuli, deficits were obvious in six dyslexics and depended on frame number. Whereas controls needed on average only 4.4 frames (144 ms) to identify both directions correctly on 75% of presentations, dyslexics needed on average 14.6 frames (483 ms) to achieve this level of performance. Even though a unidirectional motion task failed to reveal processing abnormalities in adult dyslexics, the motion transparency task was effective at revealing significant perceptual dysfunction, suggesting that performance on this task is a better psychophysical indicator of visual motion deficits in dyslexia. This finding provides little support for the magnocellular deficit hypothesis and, rather, points to abnormality within dorsal extrastriate cortical areas that subserve the integration and segmentation of complex motion signals.

  19. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. These tests may include a detailed ultrasound, amniocentesis (to check for chromosomal abnormalities) and in some ... the provider may recommend additional tests, such as amniocentesis and a detailed ultrasound, to diagnose or rule ...

  20. Scaling law for bubbles rising near vertical walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the rising motion of a layer of gas bubbles next to a vertical wall in a liquid in the presence of an upward flow parallel to the wall to help with the understanding of the fluid dynamics in a bubbly upflow in vertical channels. Only the region near the wall is simulated with an average pressure gradient applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in the shear layer near the wall. The rise velocity of the bubbles sliding on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Ar, Eötvös number, Eo, and the average volume fraction of bubbles on the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented. A scaling argument is presented based on viscous dissipation analysis that matches the numerical findings. Viscous dissipation rates are found to be high in a thin film region between the bubble and the wall. A scaling of the viscous dissipation and steady state film thickness between the bubble and the wall with Archimedes number is presented.

  1. Wall-induced path variation of a large deformable rising bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungmin; Jeong, Hyeonju

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we experimentally investigate the wall-induced path variation of a large deformable bubble (Re ~ O (103)) rising near a vertical wall in quiescent water. To change the wall effect, we consider different wall materials (acrylic, PTFE and sponge) and vary the initial distance between the bubble and the wall. Depending on the conditions, various motions like a periodic bouncing, sliding, migrating away, and non-periodic oscillation without collisions are captured. Analysis on the energy balance shows that, contrary to a low- Re bubble, the surface deformation plays a great role in bubble's rising behaviour. Especially, across the bubble-wall collision, the excessive surface energy compensates the deficit of kinetic energy, which enables the bubble to maintain a constant bouncing kinematics, despite the wall effect. The wall effect, appearing as a energy loss, decreases as the distance to the wall increases. Compared to the no-slip surface, the hydrophobic surface enhances or reduces the wall effect with the wall distance, whereas the porous surface reduces the energy loss due to the wall. The dependence of near-wall bubble motion on a wall configuration may give us an idea about how to predict or model the near-wall gas void-fraction. Supported by the NRF Programs (NRF-2012M2A8A4055647, NRF-2013R1A1A1008373) of Korean government.

  2. Domain Walls on Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Halyo, Edi

    2009-01-01

    We describe domain walls that live on $A_2$ and $A_3$ singularities. The walls are BPS if the singularity is resolved and non--BPS if it is deformed and fibered. We show that these domain walls may interpolate between vacua that support monopoles and/or vortices.

  3. The Lamportian cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. (Michigan State Univ. Plant Research Lab., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  4. Halogenation of microcapsule walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. R.; Schaab, C. K.; Scott, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedure for halogenation of confining walls of both gelatin and gelatin-phenolic resin capsules is similar to that used for microencapsulation. Ten percent halogen content renders capsule wall nonburning; any higher content enhances flame-retardant properties of selected internal phase material. Halogenation decreases permeability of wall material to encapsulated materials.

  5. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  6. Spin torque and interactions in ferromagnetic semiconductor domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatski, Elizabeth Ann

    The motion of domain walls due to the spin torque generated by coherent carrier transport is of considerable interest for the development of spintronic devices. We model the charge and spin transport through domain walls in ferromagnetic semiconductors for various systems. With an appropriate model Hamiltonian for the spin-dependent potential, we calculate wavefunctions inside the domain walls which are then used to calculate transmission and reflection coefficients, which are then in turn used to calculate current and spin torque. Starting with a simple approximation for the change in magnetization inside the domain wall, and ending with a sophisticated transfer matrix method, we model the common pi wall, the less-studied 2pi wall, and a system of two pi walls separated by a variable distance. We uncover an interesting width dependence on the transport properties of the domain wall. 2pi walls in particular, have definitive maximums in resistance and spin torque for certain domain wall widths that can be seen as a function of the spin mistracking in the system---when the spins are either passing straight through the domain wall (narrow walls) or adiabatically following the magnetization (wide walls), the resistance is low as transmission is high. In the intermediate region, there is room for the spins to rotate their magnetization, but not necessarily all the way through a 360 degree rotation, leading to reflection and resistance. We also calculate that there are widths for which the total velocity of a 2pi wall is greater than that of a same-sized pi wall. In the double-wall system, we model how the system reacts to changes in the separation of the domain walls. When the domain walls are far apart, they act as a spin-selective resonant double barrier, with sharp resonance peaks in the transmission profile. Brought closer and closer together, the number and sharpness of the peaks decrease, the spectrum smooths out, and the domain walls brought together have a

  7. Abnormal magnetization behaviors in Sm–Ni–Fe–Cu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W.Y.; Zhang, Y.F.; Zhao, H.; Chen, G.F.; Zhang, Y.; Du, H.L.; Liu, S.Q.; Wang, C.S.; Han, J.Z.; Yang, Y.C. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, J.B. [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-01

    The magnetization behaviors in Sm–Ni–Fe–Cu alloys at low temperatures have been investigated. It was found that the hysteresis loops show wasp-waisted character at low temperatures, which has been proved to be related to the existence of multi-phases, the Fe/Ni soft magnetic phases and the CaCu{sub 5}-type hard magnetic phase. A smooth-jump behavior of the magnetization is observed at T>5 K, whereas a step-like magnetization process appears at T<5 K. The CaCu{sub 5}-type phase is responsible for such abnormal magnetization behavior. The magnetic moment reversal model with thermal activation is used to explain the relation of the critical magnetic field (H{sub cm}) to the temperature (T>5 K). The reversal of the moment direction has to cross over an energy barrier of about 6.6×10{sup −15} erg. The step-like jumps of the magnetization below 5 K is proposed to be resulted from a sharp increase of the sample temperature under the heat released by the irreversible domain wall motion. - Highlights: • Two different magnetization mechanisms, controlled by temperature, have been found in the Sm–Ni–Fe–Cu alloys. The smooth-jump behavior of the magnetization is observed at T>5 K and the step-like magnetization process appears at T<5 K. • The magnetic moment reversal model with thermal activation has been successfully used to explain the relation of the critical magnetic field (H{sub cm}) to the temperature (T>5 K). The energy barrier for the reversal of the moment direction has been found to be about 6.6×10{sup −15} erg. • The transition field for the step-like jumps is very strict, independent from the magnetic sweep rate. This is remarkably different from the similar step-like jump behavior in reference [20]. • According to the SEM images and EDX analysis, two kinds of regions are found in the alloys. The Fe–Ni–Cu regions are surrounded by the 1:5 Sm–Ni–Fe–Cu regions and shows fish-bone like structure. An interesting thing is that the Fe

  8. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    OpenAIRE

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which ...

  9. A Wall of Funnels Concentrates Swimming Bacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galajda, Peter; Keymer, Juan; Chaikin, Paul; Austin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Randomly moving but self-propelled agents, such as Escherichia coli bacteria, are expected to fill a volume homogeneously. However, we show that when a population of bacteria is exposed to a microfabricated wall of funnel-shaped openings, the random motion of bacteria through the openings is rectified by tracking (trapping) of the swimming bacteria along the funnel wall. This leads to a buildup of the concentration of swimming cells on the narrow opening side of the funnel wall but no concentration of nonswimming cells. Similarly, we show that a series of such funnel walls functions as a multistage pump and can increase the concentration of motile bacteria exponentially with the number of walls. The funnel wall can be arranged along arbitrary shapes and cause the bacteria to form well-defined patterns. The funnel effect may also have implications on the transport and distribution of motile microorganisms in irregular confined environments, such as porous media, wet soil, or biological tissue, or act as a selection pressure in evolution experiments. PMID:17890308

  10. Origin of stationary domain wall enhanced ferroelectric susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi; Cohen, R. E.

    2017-03-01

    Ferroelectrics usually adopt a multidomain state with domain walls separating domains with polarization axes oriented differently. It has long been recognized that domain walls can dramatically impact the properties of ferroelectric materials. The enhancement of low-field susceptibility/permittivity under subswitching conditions is usually attributed to reversible domain wall vibration. Recent experiments highlight the stationary domain wall contribution to the dielectric susceptibility irrespective of any lateral displacements or deformations of the wall. We study the effects of domain walls on the low-field permittivity of PbTiO3 with density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations. The static dielectric constant is calculated as a function of increasing domain wall density and temperature. We find an increase of dielectric permittivity with increasing domain wall density, which is expected to occur at a low driving field where the lateral motion of domain walls is forbidden. Real-space decomposition of the dielectric response reveals that frustrated dipoles within the finite width of the domain walls are responsible for the enhanced low-field permittivity. We explain the 100 % enhancement of the dielectric susceptibility form domain walls, which arises from the softer potential wells within them.

  11. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  12. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  13. Near-wall diffusion tensor of an axisymmetric colloidal particle

    CERN Document Server

    Lisicki, Maciej; Wajnryb, Eligiusz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions with confining boundaries often lead to drastic changes in the diffusive behaviour of microparticles in suspensions. For axially symmetric particles, earlier numerical studies have suggested a simple form of the near-wall diffusion matrix which depends on the distance and orientation of the particle with respect to the wall, which is usually calculated numerically. In this work, we derive explicit analytical formulae for the dominant correction to the bulk diffusion tensor of an axially symmetric colloidal particle due to the presence of a nearby no-slip wall. The relative correction scales as powers of inverse wall-particle distance and its angular structure is represented by simple polynomials in sines and cosines of the particle's inclination angle to the wall. We analyse the correction for translational and rotational motion, as well as the translation-rotation coupling. Our findings provide a simple approximation to the anisotropic diffusion tensor near a wall, which completes a...

  14. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  15. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Dizziness and Motion Sickness Dizziness and Motion Sickness Patient ... vision or speech, or hearing loss. What is dizziness? Dizziness can be described in many ways, such ...

  16. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  17. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi K Mishra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome.

  18. A model-based time-reversal of left ventricular motion improves cardiac motion analysis using tagged MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Larry T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial motion is an important observable for the assessment of heart condition. Accurate estimates of ventricular (LV wall motion are required for quantifying myocardial deformation and assessing local tissue function and viability. Harmonic Phase (HARP analysis was developed for measuring regional LV motion using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI data. With current computer-aided postprocessing tools including HARP analysis, large motions experienced by myocardial tissue are, however, often intractable to measure. This paper addresses this issue and provides a solution to make such measurements possible. Methods To improve the estimation performance of large cardiac motions while analyzing tMRI data sets, we propose a two-step solution. The first step involves constructing a model to describe average systolic motion of the LV wall within a subject group. The second step involves time-reversal of the model applied as a spatial coordinate transformation to digitally relax the contracted LV wall in the experimental data of a single subject to the beginning of systole. Cardiac tMRI scans were performed on four healthy rats and used for developing the forward LV model. Algorithms were implemented for preprocessing the tMRI data, optimizing the model parameters and performing the HARP analysis. Slices from the midventricular level were then analyzed for all systolic phases. Results The time-reversal operation derived from the LV model accounted for the bulk portion of the myocardial motion, which was the average motion experienced within the overall subject population. In analyzing the individual tMRI data sets, removing this average with the time-reversal operation left small magnitude residual motion unique to the case. This remaining residual portion of the motion was estimated robustly using the HARP analysis. Conclusion Utilizing a combination of the forward LV model and its time reversal improves the performance of

  19. A substantial and unexpected enhancement of motion perception in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Tadin, Duje; Schauder, Kimberly B; Cascio, Carissa J

    2013-05-08

    Atypical perceptual processing in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented. In addition, growing evidence supports the hypothesis that an excitatory/inhibitory neurochemical imbalance might underlie ASD. Here we investigated putative behavioral consequences of the excitatory/inhibitory imbalance in the context of visual motion perception. As stimulus size increases, typical observers exhibit marked impairments in perceiving motion of high-contrast stimuli. This result, termed "spatial suppression," is believed to reflect inhibitory motion-processing mechanisms. Motion processing is also affected by gain control, an inhibitory mechanism that underlies saturation of neural responses at high contrast. Motivated by these behavioral correlates of inhibitory function, we investigated motion perception in human children with ASD (n = 20) and typical development (n = 26). At high contrast, both groups exhibited similar impairments in motion perception with increasing stimulus size, revealing no apparent differences in spatial suppression. However, there was a substantial enhancement of motion perception in ASD: children with ASD exhibited a consistent twofold improvement in perceiving motion. Hypothesizing that this enhancement might indicate abnormal weakening of response gain control, we repeated our measurements at low contrast, where the effects of gain control should be negligible. At low contrast, we indeed found no group differences in motion discrimination thresholds. These low-contrast results, however, revealed weaker spatial suppression in ASD, suggesting the possibility that gain control abnormalities in ASD might have masked spatial suppression differences at high contrast. Overall, we report a pattern of motion perception abnormalities in ASD that includes substantial enhancements at high contrast and is consistent with an underlying excitatory/inhibitory imbalance.

  20. Objects in Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  3. Analysis of particle-wall interactions during particle free fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chein, Reiyu; Liao, Wenyuan

    2005-08-01

    In this study, the vertical motion of a particle in a quiescent fluid falling toward a horizontal plane wall is analyzed, based on simplified models. Using the distance between the particle and wall as a parameter, the effects of various forces acting on the particle and the particle motion are examined. Without the colloidal and Brownian forces being included, the velocity of small particles is found to be approximately equal to the inverse of the drag force correction function used in this study as the particle approaches the near-wall region. Colloidal force is added to the particle equation of motion as the particle moves a distance comparable to its size. It is found that the particle might become suspended above or deposited onto the wall, depending on the Hamaker constant, the surface potentials of the particle and wall, and the thickness of the electrical double layer (EDL). For strong EDL repulsive force and weaker van der Waals (VDW) attractive force, the particle will become suspended above the wall at a distance at which the particle velocity is zero. This location is referred to as the equilibrium distance. The equilibrium distance is found to increase with increased in EDL thickness when a repulsive force barrier appears in the colloidal force interaction. For the weak EDL repulsive force and strong VDW attractive force case, the particle can become deposited onto the wall without the Brownian motion effect. The Brownian jump length was found to be very small. Many Brownian jumps would be required in a direction toward the wall for a suspended particle to become deposited.

  4. Smoothing Motion Estimates for Radar Motion Compensation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Simple motion models for complex motion environments are often not adequate for keeping radar data coherent. Eve n perfect motion samples appli ed to imperfect models may lead to interim calculations e xhibiting errors that lead to degraded processing results. Herein we discuss a specific i ssue involving calculating motion for groups of pulses, with measurements only available at pulse-group boundaries. - 4 - Acknowledgements This report was funded by General A tomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Mission Systems under Cooperative Re search and Development Agre ement (CRADA) SC08/01749 between Sandia National Laboratories and GA-ASI. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI), an affilia te of privately-held General Atomics, is a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and rel ated mission systems, includin g the Predator(r)/Gray Eagle(r)-series and Lynx(r) Multi-mode Radar.

  5. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algorithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  6. Solar heating wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenfelder, J.L.

    1983-08-16

    A solar heating wall is disclosed including a water pipe circulation system having a plurality of separate tubes, each formed as a loop, connected between a water supply and a return. The separate tubes are arranged in a single vertical plane at the approximate center of the wall. The wall is formed within a frame which is packed with a material suited for use as a thERMAL RESERVOIR, SUCH AS concrete. The frame provides extra support by having a series of horizontally disposed cross supports on one surface of the wall and a series of vertically disposed cross supports on the opposite surface A pressure relief valve may be provided between the water supply to the separate tubes and the water supply to the building or structure containing the solar wall, so that the solar wall can be adapted for use with a city water system.

  7. Eye-head coordination abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eye-movement abnormalities in schizophrenia are a well-established phenomenon that has been observed in many studies. In such studies, visual targets are usually presented in the center of the visual field, and the subject's head remains fixed. However, in every-day life, targets may also appear in the periphery. This study is among the first to investigate eye and head movements in schizophrenia by presenting targets in the periphery of the visual field. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two different visual recognition tasks, color recognition and Landolt orientation tasks, were presented at the periphery (at a visual angle of 55° from the center of the field of view. Each subject viewed 96 trials, and all eye and head movements were simultaneously recorded using video-based oculography and magnetic motion tracking of the head. Data from 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 controls were considered. The patients had similar saccadic latencies in both tasks, whereas controls had shorter saccadic latencies in the Landolt task. Patients performed more head movements, and had increased eye-head offsets during combined eye-head shifts than controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Patients with schizophrenia may not be able to adapt to the two different tasks to the same extent as controls, as seen by the former's task-specific saccadic latency pattern. This can be interpreted as a specific oculomotoric attentional dysfunction and may support the hypothesis that schizophrenia patients have difficulties determining the relevance of stimuli. Patients may also show an uneconomic over-performance of head-movements, which is possibly caused by alterations in frontal executive function that impair the inhibition of head shifts. In addition, a model was created explaining 93% of the variance of the response times as a function of eye and head amplitude, which was only observed in the controls, indicating abnormal eye-head coordination in patients

  8. Structural motion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This innovative volume provides a systematic treatment of the basic concepts and computational procedures for structural motion design and engineering for civil installations. The authors illustrate the application of motion control to a wide spectrum of buildings through many examples. Topics covered include optimal stiffness distributions for building-type structures, the role of damping in controlling motion, tuned mass dampers, base isolation systems, linear control, and nonlinear control. The book's primary objective is the satisfaction of motion-related design requirements, such as restrictions on displacement and acceleration. The book is ideal for practicing engineers and graduate students. This book also: ·         Broadens practitioners' understanding of structural motion control, the enabling technology for motion-based design ·         Provides readers the tools to satisfy requirements of modern, ultra-high strength materials that lack corresponding stiffness, where the motion re...

  9. Cell Wall Proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Boudart, Georges; Minic, Zoran; Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2007-01-01

    In this chapter, we will focus on the contribution of proteomics to the identification and determination of the structure and function of CWPs as well as discussing new perspectives in this area. The great variety of proteins found in the plant cell wall is described. Some families, such as glycoside hydrolases, proteases, lectins, and inhibitors of cell wall modifying enzymes, are discussed in detail. Examples of the use of proteomic techniques to elucidate the structure of various cell wall...

  10. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  11. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  12. Electric field induced domain-wall dynamics: Depinning and chirality switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Dusad, Ritika; Hoffman, Silas; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Alzate, Juan G.; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically study the equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and magnetic wires, in which an electric field controls the magnetic anisotropy through spin-orbit coupling. By performing micromagnetic simulations, we construct a rich phase diagram and find that, in particular, the equilibrium magnetic textures can be tuned between Néel and Bloch domain walls in an elliptical MTJ. Furthermore, we develop a phenomenological model of a quasi-one-dimensional domain wall confined by a parabolic potential and show that, near the Néel-to-Bloch-wall transition, a pulsed electric field induces precessional domain-wall motion which can be used to reverse the chirality of a Néel wall and even depin it. This domain-wall motion controlled by electric fields, in lieu of applied current, may provide a model for ultralow-power domain-wall memory and logic devices.

  13. Motion contrast using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingler, Jeffrey Paul

    Diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases like age-related macular degeneration is very important for treatment of the disease as well as the development of future treatments. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an optical interference technique which can measure the three-dimensional structural information of the reflecting layers within a sample. In retinal imaging, OCT is used as the primary diagnostic tool for structural abnormalities such as retinal holes and detachments. The contrast within the images of this technique is based upon reflectivity changes from different regions of the retina. This thesis demonstrates the developments of methods used to produce additional contrast to the structural OCT images based on the tiny fluctuations of motion experienced by the mobile scatterers within a sample. Motion contrast was observed for motions smaller than 50 nm in images of a variety of samples. Initial contrast method demonstrations used Brownian motion differences to separate regions of a mobile Intralipid solution from a static agarose gel, chosen in concentration to minimize reflectivity contrast. Zebrafish embryos in the range of 3-4 days post fertilization were imaged using several motion contrast methods to determine the capabilities of identifying regions of vascular flow. Vasculature identification was demonstrated in zebrafish for blood vessels of all orientations as small as 10 microns in diameter. Mouse retinal imaging utilized the same motion contrast methods to determine the contrast capabilities for motions associated with vasculature within the retina. Improved contrast imaging techniques demonstrated comparable images to fluorescein angiography, the gold standard of retinal vascular imaging. Future studies can improve the demonstrated contrast analysis techniques and apply them towards human retinal motion contrast imaging for ophthalmic diagnostic purposes.

  14. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao; Hu, Wei-Fan; Farutin, Alexander; Rafaï, Salima; Lai, Ming-Chih; Peyla, Philippe; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system, as well as cancer cells, migrating in confined environment of tissues undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward through these porous media without the assistance of adhesion sites. In other words, they perform amoeboid swimming (AS) while using extracellular matrices and cells of tissues as support. We introduce a simple model of AS in a confined geometry solved by means of 2D numerical simulations. We find that confinement promotes AS, unless being so strong that it restricts shape change amplitude. A straight AS trajectory in the channel is found to be unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. This is a spontaneous symmetry-breaking bifurcation. We find that there exists an optimal confinement for migration. We provide numerical results as...

  15. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syn

  16. Congenital abnormalities in methylmercury poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, S.H.

    1975-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the teratogenic potential of methylmercury on chick embryogenesis. Methylmercuric chloride was dissolved in sodium bicarbonate (0.2%) and administered to the chick embryos at doses ranging from 0.0009 to 0.010 mg per egg. The injections were made at days 2 and 3 on incubation (Groups A and B). All the embryos including controls were examined on the 7th day of incubation. Methylmercury poisoning was observed to be both embryolethal and teratogenic. Within the two groups, embryolethality was higher in Group A. The following congenital abnormalities were observed: exencephaly, shortened and twisted limbs, microphthalmia, shortened and twisted neck, beak abnormalities, everted viscera, reduced body size and hemorrhage all over the body. Exencephaly and limb abnormalities were very common. No differences in the incidence and types of gross abnormalities within both the groups (A and B) were noted. The incidence of malformations among the controls was low. The results of present investigation show that methylmercury poisoning is both embryolethal and teratogenic to early chick embryogenesis. (auth)

  17. Coexistence of bounded and unbounded motions in a bouncing ball model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marò, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    We consider the model describing the vertical motion of a ball falling with constant acceleration on a wall and elastically reflected. The wall is supposed to move in the vertical direction according to a given periodic function f. We apply the Aubry-Mather theory to the generating function in order to prove the existence of bounded motions with prescribed mean time between the bounces. As the existence of unbounded motions is known, it is possible to find a class of functions f that allow both bounded and unbounded motions.

  18. Lateral abdominal wall hernia following blunt trauma - a rare case

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Walsh; Antony Pittathankal; Nnamdi Nwaejike

    2009-01-01

    The presence of superficial bruising, no abnormal signs on abdominal examination and a negative FAST scan of the abdomen may not be enough to rule out intra-abdominal pathology. We report on the usefulness of CT in diagnosing a post-traumatic abdominal wall hernia.

  19. Genetic analysis of Hedgehog signaling in ventral body wall development and the onset of omphalocele formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumaru, D.; Haraguchi, R.; Miyagawa, S.; Motoyama, J.; Nakagata, N.; Meijlink, F.; Yamada, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In

  20. Genetic Analysis of Hedgehog Signaling in Ventral Body Wall Development and the Onset of Omphalocele Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumaru, Daisuke; Haraguchi, Ryuma; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Motoyama, Jun; Nakagata, Naomi; Meijlink, Frits; Yamada, Gen

    2011-01-01

    Background: An omphalocele is one of the major ventral body wall malformations and is characterized by abnormally herniated viscera from the body trunk. It has been frequently found to be associated with other structural malformations, such as genitourinary malformations and digit abnormalities. In

  1. Airway wall stiffening increases peak wall shear stress: a fluid-structure interaction study in rigid and compliant airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Guohua; Tawhai, Merryn H; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-05-01

    The airflow characteristics in a computed tomography (CT) based human airway bifurcation model with rigid and compliant walls are investigated numerically. An in-house three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method is applied to simulate the flow at different Reynolds numbers and airway wall stiffness. As the Reynolds number increases, the airway wall deformation increases and the secondary flow becomes more prominent. It is found that the peak wall shear stress on the rigid airway wall can be five times stronger than that on the compliant airway wall. When adding tethering forces to the model, we find that these forces, which produce larger airway deformation than without tethering, lead to more skewed velocity profiles in the lower branches and further reduced wall shear stresses via a larger airway lumen. This implies that pathologic changes in the lung such as fibrosis or remodeling of the airway wall-both of which can serve to restrain airway wall motion-have the potential to increase wall shear stress and thus can form a positive feed-back loop for the development of altered flow profiles and airway remodeling. These observations are particularly interesting as we try to understand flow and structural changes seen in, for instance, asthma, emphysema, cystic fibrosis, and interstitial lung disease.

  2. Spin torque and domain wall velocity in ferromagnetic semiconductor π and 2π N'eel walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovatski, E. A.; Flatté, M. E.

    2010-03-01

    The motion of a domain wall under an applied spin-polarized current[1] has interesting device applications for the development of spintronic devices. We model 2π N'eel walls (energetically favorable in thin films) in ferromagnetic semiconductors, and compare the results to those for the more-frequently studied π walls. Under coherent transport conditions, analytic solutions for spin-dependent reflection and transmission coefficients are possible[2,3]. We calculate charge resistance, spin torque, and domain wall velocity. We find the peak spin torque is more than twice as large for a 2π wall than for a π wall. We also find that the peak velocity of a 2π wall is larger than that of a π wall, but the peak velocities of 3π and 4π walls are smaller than those of both π and 2π walls. This work was supported by an ARO MURI.[4pt] [1] M. Yamanouchi, D. Chiba, F. Matsukura, and H. Ohno, Nature 428, 539 (2004).[0pt] [2] G. Vignale and M. Flatt'e, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89 (2002).[0pt] [3] D. Ralph and M. Stiles, Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 320, 1190 (2008).

  3. Interactions between domain walls and spin currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaui, M.; Laufenberg, M.; Backes, D.; Buhrer, W.; Rudiger, U.; Vila, L.; Vouille, C.; Faini, G.

    2006-03-01

    A promising novel approach for switching magnetic nanostructures is current-induced domain wall propagation (CIDP), where due to a spin torque effect, electrons transfer angular momentum to a head-to-head domain wall and thereby push it in the direction of the electron flow without any externally applied fields. This effect has been observed with a variety of techniques including MFM [1] and spin polarized scanning electron microscopy [2] to directly observe current-induced domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic nanostructures and magnetoresistance measurements to systematically probe the critical current densities as a function of the geometry [3]. The observed wall velocities and critical current densities, where wall motion sets in at room temperature, do not agree well with theoretical 0K calculations [4]. We have therefore measured the critical current densities as a function of the sample temperature. We find that the spin torque effect becomes more efficient at low temperatures, which could account for some of the observed discrepancies between the 300K experiment and the 0K simulation. [1] A. Yamaguchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 77205 (2004); [2] M. Klaui et al., PRL 95, 26601 (2005); [3] M. Klaui et al., PRL 94, 106601 (2005); [4] A. Thiaville et al., EPL 69, 990 (2005); G. Tatara et al., APL 86, 252509 (2005);

  4. Evolution of domain wall networks: the PRS algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, L

    2011-01-01

    The Press-Ryden-Spergel (PRS) algorithm is a modification to the field theory equations of motion, parametrized by two parameters ($\\alpha$ and $\\beta$), implemented in numerical simulations of cosmological domain wall networks, in order to ensure a fixed comoving resolution. In this paper we explicitly demonstrate that the PRS algorithm provides the correct domain wall dynamics in $N+1$-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universes if $\\alpha+\\beta/2=N$, fully validating its use in numerical studies of cosmic domain evolution. We further show that this result is valid for generic thin featureless domain walls, independently of the Lagrangian of the model.

  5. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful, a

  6. Domain wall filters

    CERN Document Server

    Bär, O; Neuberger, H; Witzel, O; Baer, Oliver; Narayanan, Rajamani; Neuberger, Herbert; Witzel, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    We propose using the extra dimension separating the domain walls carrying lattice quarks of opposite handedness to gradually filter out the ultraviolet fluctuations of the gauge fields that are felt by the fermionic excitations living in the bulk. This generalization of the homogeneous domain wall construction has some theoretical features that seem nontrivial.

  7. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  8. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  9. Relation between subendocardial myocardial blood flow reserve and regional wall motion abnormalities at rest and during stress in dogs with chronic coronary stenoses%慢性冠状动脉狭窄犬静息和负荷时室壁运动异常与心内膜下心肌血流储备的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宾建平; Kevin Wei; Robert A.Pelberg; 刘伊丽; 查道刚; Elizabeth Le; Sanjiv Kaul

    2000-01-01

    目的 评价静息和多巴酚丁胺负荷时室壁增厚百分率(%WT)与心内膜下心肌血流(MBF)储备的关系.方法 以安放缩窄器的方法建立11只慢性多支冠状动脉狭窄闭胸犬.术后7~10 d,在静息和不同剂量多巴酚丁胺作用下以二维超声测定%WT.同时,在静息和峰值多巴酚丁胺时,以放射性微球测定心内膜下MBF和MBF储备.结果 静息状态下,40个室壁运动异常(RWMA)心肌节段与42个非RWMA间的心内膜下MBF无明显差异.然而,RWMA的心内膜下MBF储备明显低于非RWMA,且静息状态%WT与心内膜下MBF储备密切相关.所有心肌节段在20 μg·kg-1·min-1以下剂量的多巴酚丁胺作用时,%WT随剂量增加而增加;当大于该剂量后,%WT的变化受心内膜下MBF储备的影响,当储备能力异常时,则出现多巴酚丁胺的"双向反应".结论 在慢性冠状动脉狭窄中,静息和负荷时RWMA与心内膜下MBF储备有关.

  10. 彩色室壁运动分析技术多巴酚丁胺负荷超声心动图对冠心病节段性室壁运动异常的诊断%The Diagnostic Value of Color Kinesis-Dobutamine Stress Echocardiograph DetectingRegional Wall Motion Abnormality in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雍永宏; 陆凤翔; 顾翔; 许迪; 陈莉; 杨志健; 马根山

    2001-01-01

    目的:为评估彩色室壁运动(CK)分析技术多巴酚丁胺负荷超声心动图(CK-DES)对冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病(CHD)节段性室壁运动异常的诊断价值.方法:采用CK-DSE检测50例可疑CHD患者,分别于静息,多巴酚丁胺低剂量,峰剂量及停药后5 min时获取CK图像,每个时间段4个标准切面16个节段的CK图像进行分析,室壁运动异常以静息和负荷试验期间出现的室壁运动减弱为标志,并与冠状动脉造影(CAG)结果相对照.结果:显示CK-DES诊断CHD的敏感性为92.6%,特异性为78.3%,准确性为86.0%,试验中未发现严重不良反应.结论:CK-DSE对冠心病节段性室壁运动异常有较高的诊断价值.

  11. Hard and soft walls

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand divergences which occur when quantum fields are confined by bounding surfaces, we investigate local energy densities (and the local energy-momentum tensor) in the vicinity of a wall. In this paper, attention is largely confined to a scalar field. If the wall is an infinite Dirichlet plane, well known volume and surface divergences are found, which are regulated by a temporal point-splitting parameter. If the wall is represented by a linear potential in one coordinate $z$, the divergences are softened. The case of a general wall, described by a potential of the form $z^\\alpha$ for $z>0$ is considered. If $\\alpha>2$, there are no surface divergences, which in any case vanish if the conformal stress tensor is employed. Divergences within the wall are also considered.

  12. Saliency-based abnormal event detection in crowded scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yanjiao; Liu, Yunxiang; Zhang, Qing; Yi, Yugen; Li, Wenju

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal event detection plays a critical role for intelligent video surveillance, and detection in crowded scenes is a challenging but more practical task. We present an abnormal event detection method for crowded video. Region-wise modeling is proposed to address the inconsistent detected motion of the same object due to different depths of field. Comparing to traditional block-wise modeling, the region-wise method not only can reduce heavily the number of models to be built but also can enrich the samples for training the normal events model. In order to reduce the computational burden and make the region-based anomaly detection feasible, a saliency detection technique is adopted in this paper. By identifying the salient parts of the image sequences, the irrelevant blocks are ignored, which removes the disturbance and improves the detection performance further. Experiments on the benchmark dataset and comparisons with the state-of-the-art algorithms validate the advantages of the proposed method.

  13. Measurement of visual motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildreth, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the measurement of visual motion and the use of relative movement to locate the boundaries of physical objects in the environment. It investigates the nature of the computations that are necessary to perform this analysis by any vision system, biological or artificial. Contents: Introduction. Background. Computation of the Velocity Field. An Algorithm to Compute the Velocity Field. The Computation of Motion Discontinuities. Perceptual Studies of Motion Measurement. The Psychophysics of Discontinuity Detection. Neurophysiological Studies of Motion. Summary and Conclusions. References. Author and Subject Indexes.

  14. Brain Image Motion Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In order to use such devices...... offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype...

  15. Skyrmion domain wall collision and domain wall-gated skyrmion logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiangjun; Pong, Philip W. T.; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Skyrmions and domain walls are significant spin textures of great technological relevance to magnetic memory and logic applications, where they can be used as carriers of information. The unique topology of skyrmions makes them display emergent dynamical properties as compared with domain walls. Some studies have demonstrated that the two topologically inequivalent magnetic objects could be interconverted by using cleverly designed geometric structures. Here, we numerically address the skyrmion domain wall collision in a magnetic racetrack by introducing relative motion between the two objects based on a specially designed junction. An electric current serves as the driving force that moves a skyrmion toward a trapped domain wall pair. We see different types of collision dynamics depending on the driving parameters. Most importantly, the modulation of skyrmion transport using domain walls is realized in this system, allowing a set of domain wall-gated logical NOT, NAND, and NOR gates to be constructed. This work provides a skyrmion-based spin-logic architecture that is fully compatible with racetrack memories.

  16. Nail abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C; Cribier, B; Sibilia, J; Kuntz, J L; Grosshans, E

    1997-12-01

    Many nail abnormalities have traditionally been described in association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their specificity has never been assessed in a controlled study. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency and the specificity of nail changes associated with RA in a case-controlled study including 50 patients suffering from RA and 50 controls. For each patient, a general skin examination was performed and the 20 nails were examined. The nail features were noted and classified. A chi 2 test or a Fisher test was used to compare the two groups. The only nail abnormalities significantly associated with RA were longitudinal ridging on nine or 10 finger nails (29 patients in the RA group vs. three in the controls, chi 2: P nail (24 patients vs. 10, chi 2: P nail changes were noticed but were not frequent enough to be significant. The presence of longitudinal ridging on the finger nails was significantly associated with RA.

  17. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  18. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  19. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  20. MR evaluation of fetal abnormalities by SSFP sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amanuma, Makoto; Hasegawa, Makoto; Enomoto, Kyoko; Watabe, Tsuneya; Heshiki, Atsuko (Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    We examined the feasibility of fast steady-state free precession (SSFP) MR imaging with time-reversed free induction decay (FID) signal for detecting fetal abnormality. Its strong T[sub 2]-weighted contrast enabled to clearly differentiate fetal part from the amniotic fluid and detect some fluid-filled organs. Although the sequence is very sensitive to motion, short imaging time (20 seconds) with breath-holding minimized motion-related artifacts and provided high quality images. It was also possible to image repeatedly in arbitrary slice orientations within a reasonable examination time. This technique was particularly useful to demonstrate gross fetal anomalies of the body surface and central nervous system without need for a potentially harmful fetal anesthesia. However, due to poor soft tissue contrast supplemental T[sub 1]-weighted images were mandatory. (author).

  1. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  2. Optimal surface segmentation using flow lines to quantify airway abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Nielsen, Mads; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2014-01-01

    .5%, the alternative approach in 11.2%, and in 20.3% no method was favoured. Airway abnormality measurements obtained with the method on 490 scan pairs from a lung cancer screening trial correlate significantly with lung function and are reproducible; repeat scan R(2) of measures of the airway lumen diameter and wall...

  3. Chest wall, lung, and pleural space trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa A

    2006-03-01

    Chest radiographs frequently underestimate the severity and extent of chest trauma and, in some cases, fail to detect the presence of injury. CT is more sensitive than chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary, pleural, and osseous abnormalities in the patient who has chest trauma. With the advent of multidetector CT (MDCT), high-quality multiplanar reformations are obtained easily and add to the diagnostic capabilities of MDCT. This article reviews the radiographic and CT findings of chest wall, pleural, and pulmonary injuries that are seen in the patient who has experienced blunt thoracic trauma.

  4. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  5. Dynamic Time Warping Distance Method for Similarity Test of Multipoint Ground Motion Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmin Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The reasonability of artificial multi-point ground motions and the identification of abnormal records in seismic array observations, are two important issues in application and analysis of multi-point ground motion fields. Based on the dynamic time warping (DTW distance method, this paper discusses the application of similarity measurement in the similarity analysis of simulated multi-point ground motions and the actual seismic array records. Analysis results show that the DTW distance method not only can quantitatively reflect the similarity of simulated ground motion field, but also offers advantages in clustering analysis and singularity recognition of actual multi-point ground motion field.

  6. "I Climbed the Great Wall"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    I finally climbed the Great Wall, A dream of my childhood; my heart is filled with pleasure at the indescribable beauty of the Wall. China’s ancient civilization is best documented by the grandeur of the Wall.

  7. Body Motion and Graphing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  8. Teaching Projectile Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  9. Ultrasound-induced acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in three dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Muller, Peter B; Marin, Alvaro G; Barnkob, Rune; Augustsson, Per; Laurell, Thomas; Kaehler, Christian J; Bruus, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the three-dimensional (3D) acoustophoretic motion of spherical microparticles in rectangular microchannels. The motion is generated by the acoustic radiation force and the acoustic streaming-induced drag force. In contrast to the classical theory of Rayleigh streaming in shallow, infinite, parallel-plate channels, our theory does include the effect of the microchannel side walls. The resulting predictions agree well with numerics and experimental measurements of the acoustophoretic motion of polystyrene spheres with nominal diameters of 0.537 um and 5.33 um. The 3D particle motion was recorded using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry under controlled thermal and acoustic conditions in a long, straight, rectangular microchannel actuated in one of its transverse standing ultrasound-wave resonance modes with one or two half-wavelengths. The acoustic energy density is calibrated in situ based on measurements of the radiation dominated motion of large 5-um-diam particles...

  10. Motion control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sabanovic, Asif

    2011-01-01

    "Presents a unified approach to the fundamental issues in motion control, starting from the basics and moving through single degree of freedom and multi-degree of freedom systems In Motion Control Systems, Šabanovic and Ohnishi present a unified approach to very diverse issues covered in motion control systems, offering know-how accumulated through work on very diverse problems into a comprehensive, integrated approach suitable for application in high demanding high-tech products. It covers material from single degree of freedom systems to complex multi-body non-redundant and redundant systems. The discussion of the main subject is based on original research results and will give treatment of the issues in motion control in the framework of the acceleration control method with disturbance rejection technique. This allows consistent unification of different issues in motion control ranging from simple trajectory tracking to topics related to haptics and bilateral control without and with delay in the measure...

  11. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  12. Creep of current-driven domain-wall lines: intrinsic versus extrinsic pinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duine, R.A.; de Morais Smith, C.

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for current-driven motion of a magnetic domain-wall line, in which the dynamics of the domain wall is equivalent to that of an overdamped vortex line in an anisotropic pinning potential. This potential has both extrinsic contributions due to, e.g., sample inhomogeneities, and an

  13. The drift of ab-type domain walls in the weak ferromagnetic

    CERN Document Server

    Gerasimchuk, V S

    2002-01-01

    The drift motion of a ab-type 180-degree domain wall in a weak ferromagnetic is studied in elastic stress fields, generated by a sound wave. Parallel or perpendicularly to the domain wall plane. The dependences of the drift velocity on direction, polarization and amplitude of the acoustic wave are obtained. The drift conditions of the band domain structure are defined.

  14. Cardiac abnormalities in diabetic patients with mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)}Gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Hiroshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Shiotani, Hideyuki

    1999-11-01

    An A-to-G transition at position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA is known to be a pathogenic factor for mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), diabetes and cardiomyopathy. This mutation causes dysfunction of the central nervous system in MELAS. Because the heart, as well as the brain and nervous system, is highly dependent on the energy produced by mitochondrial oxidation, these tissues are more vulnerable to mitochondrial defects. Cardiac abnormalities were assessed in 10 diabetic patients associated with this mutation using echocardiography and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, and compared with 19 diabetic patients without the mutation. Duration of diabetes, therapy, control of blood glucose and diabetic complications, such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, were not different between the 2 groups. Diabetic patients with the mutation had a significantly thicker interventricular septum (16.8{+-}3.7 vs 11.0{+-}1.6 mm, p<0.001) than those without the mutation. Fractional shortening was lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than those without it (30.7{+-}7.0 vs 42.5{+-}6.6, p<0.001). MIBG uptake on the delayed MIBG image was significantly lower in diabetic patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation (mean value of the heart to mediastinum ratio: 1.6{+-}0.2 vs 2.0{+-}0.4, p>0.05). In conclusion, left ventricular hypertrophy with or without abnormal wall motion and severely reduced MIBG uptake may be characteristic in diabetic patients with a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA {sup Leu(UUR)} gene. (author)

  15. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  16. Nonadiabatic spin torque investigated using thermally activated magnetic domain wall dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eltschka, M.; Wötzel, M.; Rhensius, J.; Krzyk, S.; Nowak, U.; Kläui, M.; Kasama, T.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Heyderman, L. J.; van Driel, H.J.; Duine, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions in Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanowires at room temperature. We show that this purely thermal motion is well described by an Arrhenius law, allowing for a description of the DW

  17. Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Woetzel, Mathias; Rhensius, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions in Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanowires at room temperature. We show that this purely thermal motion is well described by an Arrhenius law, allowing for a description...

  18. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  19. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... conditions: Abnormal folds or location of the pinna Low-set ears No opening to the ear canal ...

  20. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy individuals with background of diabetic sibling. ... As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of ... Article Metrics.

  1. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • ...

  2. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  3. [Phenomenology of abnormal body perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M L

    1983-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problematic nature of the phenomenological grasping of the consciousness of the body and its pathological modifications. The reasoning is oriented by the doctrine of Husserl of the so-called sentiments as the fundamentals of the experience of the own body. This basic approach does not only seem to be basically for a psychology of the consciousness of the body, but also to give the theoretical-conceptual structure for a great number of psychopathological modifications. Subsequent to a criticism of the conventional use of the term 'hallucination of the body' we attempt to chart elements of a scheme of the abnormal consciousness of the body.

  4. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  5. Interaction between a domain wall and spin supercurrent in easy-cone magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-12-01

    A domain wall and spin supercurrent can coexist in magnets with easy-cone anisotropy owing to simultaneous spontaneous breaking of Z2 and U(1) symmetries. Their interaction is theoretically investigated in quasi-one-dimensional ferromagnets within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology. Specifically, the spin supercurrent can exert the torque on a domain wall and thereby drive it. We also show, as a reciprocal phenomenon, a field-induced motion of a domain wall can generate spin supercurrent.

  6. Vortex dynamics of particle-wall collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leweke, Thomas; Thompson, Mark C.; Hourigan, Kerry

    2003-11-01

    We present results from an experimental and numerical study of the flow generated by a particle impacting onto a solid wall at low Reynolds numbers. Experimentally, a 3/4" bronze sphere attached to an inelastic string was lowered onto a Plexiglas plate inside a glass tank, using a stepper motor. Direct Numerical Simulations were carried out using either an axisymmetric or a fully 3D spectral-element code. The parameters varied were the running distance before impact, the sphere Reynolds number during motion, and the stopping distance away from the wall. For running lengths less than 7.5 diameters, the sphere wake remains axisymmetric in the form of an attached vortex ring. At impact, this ring overtakes the sphere and spreads out along the wall. When the sphere stops more than 0.3 diameters away from the wall, the secondary vorticity generated at the sphere surface rolls up into a second vortex ring persisting over a long time. At Reynolds number above 1000, the flow after impact exhibits a 3D instability with azimuthal wave numbers of around 20. Flow visualizations, vorticity fields, and quantitative information on the flow topology will be shown to illustrate the different regimes. The effect of a rebound of the sphere is also discussed.

  7. SIMULATION OF SUDDEN-EXPANSION AND SWIRLING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS USING A TWO-FLUID PARTICLE-WALL COLLISION MODEL WITH CONSIDERATION OF THE WALL ROUGHNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lixing; ZHANG Xia

    2004-01-01

    A two-fluid particle-wall collision model with consideration of wall roughness is proposed. It takes into account the effects of the friction, restitution and in particular the wall roughness,and hence the redistribution of Reynolds stress in different directions, the absorption of turbulent energy from the mean motion and the attenuation of particle motion by the wall. The proposed model is used to simulate sudden-expansion and swirling gas-particle flows and is validated by comparing with experimental results. The results show that the proposed model gives better results than those obtained by the presently used zero-gradient condition. Hence, it is suggested that the proposed model should be used as the wall boundary condition for the particle phase in place of the presently used boundary condition.

  8. Hypertensive heart disease versus hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance discriminators when end-diastolic wall thickness ≥ 15 mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C.L. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences (United Kingdom); Rohan, Stephen [University of Bristol, Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Ghosh Dastidar, Amardeep; Harries, Iwan; Lawton, Christopher B. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Ratcliffe, Laura E.; Burchell, Amy E.; Nightingale, Angus K. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, CardioNomics Research Group, Clinical Research and Imaging Centre, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Hart, Emma C.; Paton, Julian F.R. [University of Bristol, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, CardioNomics Research Group, Clinical Research and Imaging Centre, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); Hamilton, Mark C.K. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Manghat, Nathan E. [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, NIHR Bristol Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Department, Bristol Heart Institute (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    European guidelines state left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT) ≥15 mm suggests hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), but distinguishing from hypertensive heart disease (HHD) is challenging. We identify cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) predictors of HHD over HCM when EDWT ≥15 mm. 2481 consecutive clinical CMRs between 2014 and 2015 were reviewed. 464 segments from 29 HCM subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without other cardiac abnormality, hypertension or renal impairment were analyzed. 432 segments from 27 HHD subjects with EDWT ≥15 mm but without concomitant cardiac pathology were analyzed. Magnitude and location of maximal EDWT, presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE), LV asymmetry (>1.5-fold opposing segment) and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve (SAM) were measured. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Significance was defined as p<0.05. HHD and HCM cohorts were age-/gender-matched. HHD had significantly increased indexed LV mass (110±27 g/m{sup 2} vs. 91±31 g/m{sup 2}, p=0.016) but no difference in site or magnitude of maximal EDWT. Mid-wall LGE was significantly more prevalent in HCM. Elevated indexed LVM, mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM were significant multivariate predictors of HHD, but LV asymmetry was not. Increased indexed LV mass, absence of mid-wall LGE and absence of SAM are better CMR discriminators of HHD from HCM than EDWT ≥15 mm. circle Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is often diagnosed with end-diastolic wall thickness ≥15 mm. (orig.)

  9. Scalable motion vector coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  10. On Regularity of Abnormal Subriemannian Geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Kanghai

    2012-01-01

    We prove the smoothness of abnormal minimizers of subriemannian manifolds of step 3 with a nilpotent basis. We prove that rank 2 Carnot groups of step 4 admit no strictly abnormal minimizers. For any subriemannian manifolds of step less than 7, we show all abnormal minimizers have no corner type singularities, which partly generalize the main result of Leonardi-Monti.

  11. Abnormal visuomotor processing in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân E. Robson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtle disturbances of visual and motor function are known features of schizophrenia and can greatly impact quality of life; however, few studies investigate these abnormalities using simple visuomotor stimuli. In healthy people, electrophysiological data show that beta band oscillations in sensorimotor cortex decrease during movement execution (event-related beta desynchronisation (ERBD, then increase above baseline for a short time after the movement (post-movement beta rebound (PMBR; whilst in visual cortex, gamma oscillations are increased throughout stimulus presentation. In this study, we used a self-paced visuomotor paradigm and magnetoencephalography (MEG to contrast these responses in patients with schizophrenia and control volunteers. We found significant reductions in the peak-to-peak change in amplitude from ERBD to PMBR in schizophrenia compared with controls. This effect was strongest in patients who made fewer movements, whereas beta was not modulated by movement in controls. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of visual gamma between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that clear abnormalities in basic sensorimotor processing in schizophrenia can be observed using a very simple MEG paradigm.

  12. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  13. Inflation and Cyclotron Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Greensite, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that conditions on the flatness of the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field.

  14. Wall effect on fluid-structure interactions of a tethered bluff body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumant; Raghav, Vrishank; Komerath, Narayanan; Smith, Marilyn

    2013-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have shown an unexplained amplification of the free motion of a tethered bluff body in a small wind tunnel relative to that in a large wind tunnel. The influence of wall proximity on fluid-structure interaction is explored using a compound pendulum motion in the plane orthogonal to a steady freestream with a doublet model for aerodynamic forces. Wall proximity amplifies a purely symmetric single degree of freedom oscillation with the addition of an out-of-phase force. The success of this simple level of simulation enables progress to develop metrics for unsteady wall interference in dynamic testing of tethered bluff bodies.

  15. The constancy of the contact angle in viscous liquid motions with pinned contact lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Shankar; R Kidambi

    2005-07-01

    Consider motion initiated in a viscous liquid in a smooth walled container. The liquid is initially at rest under uniform pressure from an inert gas of negligible inertia. We show that if the contact line is pinned and the interface is single valued, the contact angle has to remain constant throughout the motion. This is true even for motions of finite amplitude. Some implications of the result are discussed.

  16. Incipient motion of gravel and coal beds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhasish Dey; Uddaraju V Raju

    2002-10-01

    An experimental study on incipient motion of gravel and coal beds under unidirectional steady-uniform flow is presented. Experiments were carried out in a flume with various sizes of gravel and coal samples. The critical bed shear stresses for the experimental runs determined using side-wall correction show considerable disagreement with the standard curves. The characteristic parameters affecting the incipient motion of particles in rough-turbulent regime, identified based on physical reasoning and dimensional analysis, are the Shields parameter, particle Froude number, non-dimensional particle diameter and non-dimensional flow depth. Equations of critical bed shear stress for the initial movement of gravel and coal beds were obtained using experimental data. The method of application of critical bed shear stress equations is also mentioned.

  17. Ground motion improvements in SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safranek, James A.; Yan, Yiton T.; Dell’Orco, Domenico; Gassner, Georg; Sunilkumar, Nikita

    2016-09-01

    SPEAR3 is a third-generation synchrotron light source storage ring, about 234 meters in circumference. To meet the beam stability requirement, our goal is to ultimately achieve an orbit variation (relative to the photon beam lines) of less than 10% of the beam size, which is about 1 micron in the vertical plane. Hydrostatic leveling system (HLS) measurements show that the height of the SPEAR3 tunnel floor can vary by tens of microns daily without thermal insulation improvements. We present an analysis of the HLS data that shows that adding thermal insulation to the concrete walls of the storage ring tunnel dramatically decreased diurnal tunnel floor motion.

  18. Modulation of energetic coherent motions by large-scale topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing; Hamed, Ali M.; Troolin, Dan; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2016-11-01

    The distinctive characteristics and dynamics of the large-scale coherent motions induced over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls were explored experimentally with time-resolved volumetric PIV, and selected wall-normal high-resolution stereo PIV in a refractive-index-matching channel. The 2D wall consists of a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05, while the 3D wall has an additional wave in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The ?ow was characterized at Re 8000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. The walls are such that the amplitude to boundary layer thickness ratio is a/ δ99 0.1, which resemble geophysical-like topography. Insight on the dynamics of the coherent motions, Reynolds stress and spatial interaction of sweep and ejection events will be discussed in terms of the wall topography modulation.

  19. Projectile Motion Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  20. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  1. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  2. Mathisson's helical motions demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, L Filipe O; Zilhão, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The motion of spinning test particles in general relativity is described by Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, which are undetermined up to a spin supplementary condition, the latter being today still an open question. The Mathisson-Pirani (MP) condition is known to lead to rather mysterious helical motions which have been deemed unphysical, and for this reason discarded. We show that these assessments are unfounded and originate from a subtle (but crucial) misconception. We discuss the kinematical explanation of the helical motions, and dynamically interpret them through the concept of hidden momentum, which has an electromagnetic analogue. We also show that, contrary to previous claims, the frequency of the helical motions coincides exactly with the zitterbewegung frequency of the Dirac equation for the electron.

  3. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Directory Resources Resources for Travelers Adventure Travel Animal Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold ... motion sickness. Adding distractions—controlling breathing, listening to music, or using aromatherapy scents such as mint or ...

  4. Toying with Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  5. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  6. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Where are the Walls?

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, Keith A; Peterson, Adam J

    2012-01-01

    The reported spatial variation in the fine-structure constant at high redshift, if physical, could be due to the presence of dilatonic domains, and one or more domain walls inside our horizon. An absorption spectrum of an object in a different domain from our own would be characterized by a different value of alpha. We show that while a single wall solution is statically comparable to a dipole fit, and is a big improvement over a weighted mean (despite adding 3 parameters), a two-wall solution is a far better fit (despite adding 3 parameters over the single wall solution). We derive a simple model accounting for the two-domain wall solution. The goodness of these fits is however dependent on the extra random error which was argued to account for the large scatter in most of the data. When this error is omitted, all the above solutions are poor fits to the data. When included, the solutions that exhibit a spatial dependence agree with the data much more significantly than the Standard Model; however, the Stand...

  8. Soft wall effects on interacting particles in billiards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, H A; Manchein, C; Beims, M W

    2008-10-01

    The effect of physically realizable wall potentials (soft walls) on the dynamics of two interacting particles in a one-dimensional (1D) billiard is examined numerically. The 1D walls are modeled by the error function and the transition from hard to soft walls can be analyzed continuously by varying the softness parameter sigma . For sigma-->0 the 1D hard wall limit is obtained and the corresponding wall force on the particles is the delta function. In this limit the interacting particle dynamics agrees with previous results obtained for the 1D hard walls. We show that the two interacting particles in the 1D soft walls model is equivalent to one particle inside a soft right triangular billiard. Very small values of sigma substantiously change the dynamics inside the billiard and the mean finite-time Lyapunov exponent decreases significantly as the consequence of regular islands which appear due to the low-energy double collisions (simultaneous particle-particle-1D wall collisions). The rise of regular islands and sticky trajectories induced by the 1D wall softness is quantified by the number of occurrences of the most probable finite-time Lyapunov exponent. On the other hand, chaotic motion in the system appears due to the high-energy double collisions. In general we observe that the mean finite-time Lyapunov exponent decreases when sigma increases, but the number of occurrences of the most probable finite-time Lyapunov exponent increases, meaning that the phase-space dynamics tends to be more ergodiclike. Our results suggest that the transport efficiency of interacting particles and heat conduction in periodic structures modeled by billiards will strongly be affected by the smoothness of physically realizable walls.

  9. Audiovisual biofeedback improves motion prediction accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Sean; Lee, Danny; Keall, Paul; Kim, Taeho

    2013-04-01

    The accuracy of motion prediction, utilized to overcome the system latency of motion management radiotherapy systems, is hampered by irregularities present in the patients' respiratory pattern. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been shown to reduce respiratory irregularities. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that AV biofeedback improves the accuracy of motion prediction. An AV biofeedback system combined with real-time respiratory data acquisition and MR images were implemented in this project. One-dimensional respiratory data from (1) the abdominal wall (30 Hz) and (2) the thoracic diaphragm (5 Hz) were obtained from 15 healthy human subjects across 30 studies. The subjects were required to breathe with and without the guidance of AV biofeedback during each study. The obtained respiratory signals were then implemented in a kernel density estimation prediction algorithm. For each of the 30 studies, five different prediction times ranging from 50 to 1400 ms were tested (150 predictions performed). Prediction error was quantified as the root mean square error (RMSE); the RMSE was calculated from the difference between the real and predicted respiratory data. The statistical significance of the prediction results was determined by the Student's t-test. Prediction accuracy was considerably improved by the implementation of AV biofeedback. Of the 150 respiratory predictions performed, prediction accuracy was improved 69% (103/150) of the time for abdominal wall data, and 78% (117/150) of the time for diaphragm data. The average reduction in RMSE due to AV biofeedback over unguided respiration was 26% (p biofeedback improves prediction accuracy. This would result in increased efficiency of motion management techniques affected by system latencies used in radiotherapy.

  10. Coupled transverse motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field in an accelerator or a storage ring is usually so designed that the horizontal (x) and the vertical (y) motions of an ion are uncoupled. However, because of imperfections in construction and alignment, some small coupling is unavoidable. In this lecture, we discuss in a general way what is known about the behaviors of coupled motions in two degrees-of-freedom. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  11. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  12. Left ventricular regional contraction abnormalities by echocardiographic speckle tracking in combined right bundle branch with left anterior fascicular block compared to left bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeters, Irene P M; Davis, Ashlee; Zusterzeel, Robbert

    2016-01-01

    and anterior LV walls, similar to abnormalities between septal and lateral walls in LBBB. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers with no-BBB, 28 LBBB and 28 RBBB+LAFB heart failure patients were included in this retrospective study. Two-dimensional regional-strains were obtained by speckle-tracking. Scar...

  13. Perpetual Motion Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tsaousis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the first century A.D. there have been relative descriptions of known devices as well as manufactures for the creation of perpetual motion machines. Although physics has led, with two thermodynamic laws, to the opinion that a perpetual motion machine is impossible to be manufactured, inventors of every age and educational level appear to claim that they have invented something «entirely new» or they have improved somebody else’s invention, which «will function henceforth perpetually»! However the fact of the failure in manufacturing a perpetual motion machine till now, it does not mean that countless historical elements for these fictional machines become indifferent. The discussion on every version of a perpetual motion machine on the one hand gives the chance to comprehend the inventor’s of each period level of knowledge and his way of thinking, and on the other hand, to locate the points where this «perpetual motion machine» clashes with the laws of nature and that’s why it is impossible to have been manufactured or have functioned. The presentation of a new «perpetual motion machine» has excited our interest to locate its weak points. According to the designer of it the machine functions with the work produced by the buoyant force

  14. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  15. CFD Study on Wall/Nanoparticle Interaction in Nanofluids Convective Heat Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Tarybakhsh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Brownian motion of the nanoparticles in nanofluid is one of the potential contributors to enhance effective thermal conductivity and the mechanisms that might contribute to this enhancement are the subject of considerable discussion and debate. In this paper, the mixing effect of the base fluid in the immediate vicinity of the nanoparticles caused by the Brownian motion was analyzed, modeled, and compared with existing experimental data available in the literature. CFD was developed to study the effect of wall/nanoparticle interaction on forced convective heat transfer in a tube under constant wall temperature condition. The results showed that the motion of the particle near the wall which can decrease boundary layer and the hydrodynamics effects associated with the Brownian motion have a significant effect on the convection heat transfer of nanofluid.

  16. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  17. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  18. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    forms of ordered phases such as antiferromagnetism and ferroelectricity. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who happily agreed to contribute their latest results to this special issue, and the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter staff for their help, patience and professionalism. In such a fast-moving field it is not possible to give a definitive account, and this special issue can be no more than a snapshot of the current state of knowledge regarding this topic. Nevertheless, we hope that this collection of papers is a useful resource for experienced workers in the field, forms a useful introduction to researchers early in their careers and inspires others in related areas of nanotechnology to enter into the study of domain dynamics in nanostructures. Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures contents Temperature estimation in a ferromagnetic Fe-Ni nanowire involving a current-driven domain wall motionA Yamaguchi, A Hirohata, T Ono and H Miyajima Magnetization reversal in magnetic nanostripes via Bloch wall formation M Zeisberger and R Mattheis Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowiresMi-Young Im, Lars Bocklage, Guido Meier and Peter Fischer Domain wall propagation in meso- and nanoscale ferroelectrics R G P McQuaid, M McMillen, L-W Chang, A Gruverman and J M Gregg Transverse and vortex domain wall structure in magnetic nanowires with uniaxial in-plane anisotropyM T Bryan, S Bance, J Dean, T Schrefl and D A Allwood The stochastic nature of the domain wall motion along high perpendicular anisotropy strips with surface roughness Eduardo Martinez Temperature-dependent dynamics of stochastic domain-wall depinning in nanowiresClemens Wuth, Peter Lendecke and Guido Meier Controlled pinning and depinning of domain walls in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropyTheo Gerhardt, André Drews and Guido Meier The interaction of transverse domain wallsBenjamin Krüger The increase of the

  19. Spatial distribution of near-fault ground motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘启方; 袁一凡; 金星

    2004-01-01

    Near-fault strong ground motion of strike-slip and dip-slip of vertical and inclined rectangular fault in half-space and layered half-space is analyzed by dislocation source model. The Fourier spectra ratio of ground motion is adopted to study the characteristics of near-fault ground motion. For both slip models, near-fault strong ground motion with high amplitude is located in a narrow belt area along the projection of the fault on the ground and mainly controlled by the sub-faults nearby. Directivity of strike-slip fault is more dominant in long period for components perpendicular to the fault, and more dominant in long period for components parallel to the fault for dip-slip fault. The deeper the location of the source is, the more slowly the amplitude of ground motion attenuates.There is obvious hanging wall effect in ground motion of inclined fault, and the spatial distribution of ground motion is asymmetric which coincides with observational data. Finally, a fitting function of spatial distribution for near-fault ground motion is proposed and compared with near source factors of the 1997 Uniform Building Code of USA.

  20. 3D cardiac wall thickening assessment for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Chan, B. T.; Lim, E.; Liew, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the most severe form of coronary artery disease leading to localized myocardial injury and therefore irregularities in the cardiac wall contractility. Studies have found very limited differences in global indices (such as ejection fraction, myocardial mass and volume) between healthy subjects and AMI patients, and therefore suggested regional assessment. Regional index, specifically cardiac wall thickness (WT) and thickening is closely related to cardiac function and could reveal regional abnormality due to AMI. In this study, we developed a 3D wall thickening assessment method to identify regional wall contractility dysfunction due to localized myocardial injury from infarction. Wall thickness and thickening were assessed from 3D personalized cardiac models reconstructed from cine MRI images by fitting inscribed sphere between endocardial and epicardial wall. The thickening analysis was performed in 5 patients and 3 healthy subjects and the results were compared against the gold standard 2D late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images for infarct localization. The notable finding of this study is the highly accurate estimation and visual representation of the infarct size and location in 3D. This study provides clinicians with an intuitive way to visually and qualitatively assess regional cardiac wall dysfunction due to infarction in AMI patients.

  1. Congenital Abdominal Wall Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risby, Kirsten; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    complications were seen in five (15%) children: four had detachment of the mesh and one patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Mesh related clinical infection was observed in five children. In hospital mortality occurred in four cases (2 gastroschisis and 2 omphalocele) and was not procedure......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical utility of GORE® DUALMESH (GDM) in the staged closure of large congenital abdominal wall defects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of patients with congenital abdominal wall defects managed with GDM was analyzed for outcome regarding complete fascial closure; mesh...

  2. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  3. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  4. Motion Belts: Visualization of Human Motion Data on a Timeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Kaihara, Ryota; Saito, Suguru; Nakajima, Masayuki

    Because motion capture system enabled us to capture a number of human motions, the demand for a method to easily browse the captured motion database has been increasing. In this paper, we propose a method to generate simple visual outlines of motion clips, for the purpose of efficient motion data browsing. Our method unfolds a motion clip into a 2D stripe of keyframes along a timeline that is based on semantic keyframe extraction and the best view point selection for each keyframes. With our visualization, timing and order of actions in the motions are clearly visible and the contents of multiple motions are easily comparable. In addition, because our method is applicable for a wide variety of motions, it can generate outlines for a large amount of motions fully automatically.

  5. Domain wall energy landscapes in amorphous magnetic films with asymmetric arrays of holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alija, A; Perez-Junquera, A; RodrIguez-RodrIguez, G; Velez, M; Alameda, J M; MartIn, J I [Depto. Fisica, Fac. Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, Av. Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Marconi, V I; Kolton, A B; Parrondo, J M R [Depto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, and GISC, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Anguita, J V [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, CNM-CSIC, Isaac Newton 8, PTM, Tres Cantos, 28760 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-02-21

    Arrays of asymmetric holes have been defined in amorphous Co-Si films by e-beam lithography in order to study domain wall motion across the array subject to the asymmetric pinning potential created by the holes. Experimental results on Kerr effect magnetooptical measurements and hysteresis loops are compared with micromagnetic simulations in films with arrays of triangular holes. These show that the potential asymmetry favours forward wall propagation for flat walls but, if the wall contains a kink, net backward wall propagation is preferred at low fields, in agreement with minor loop experiments. The difference between the fields needed for forward and backward flat wall propagation increases as the size of the triangular holes is reduced, becoming maximum for 1 {mu}m triangles, which is the characteristic length scale set by domain wall width.

  6. Athermal domain-wall creep near a ferroelectric quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Fumitaka; Minami, Nao; Horiuchi, Sachio; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-02-16

    Ferroelectric domain walls are typically stationary because of the presence of a pinning potential. Nevertheless, thermally activated, irreversible creep motion can occur under a moderate electric field, thereby underlying rewritable and non-volatile memory applications. Conversely, as the temperature decreases, the occurrence of creep motion becomes less likely and eventually impossible under realistic electric-field magnitudes. Here we show that such frozen ferroelectric domain walls recover their mobility under the influence of quantum fluctuations. Nonlinear permittivity and polarization-retention measurements of an organic charge-transfer complex reveal that ferroelectric domain-wall creep occurs via an athermal process when the system is tuned close to a pressure-driven ferroelectric quantum critical point. Despite the heavy masses of material building blocks such as molecules, the estimated effective mass of the domain wall is comparable to the proton mass, indicating the realization of a ferroelectric domain wall with a quantum-particle nature near the quantum critical point.

  7. MACHINE MOTION EQUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the dynamic, original, machine motion equations. The equation of motion of the machine that generates angular speed of the shaft (which varies with position and rotation speed is deduced by conservation kinetic energy of the machine. An additional variation of angular speed is added by multiplying by the coefficient dynamic D (generated by the forces out of mechanism and or by the forces generated by the elasticity of the system. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft with inertial masses, while the dynamic coefficient introduces the variation of w with forces acting in the mechanism. Deriving the first equation of motion of the machine one can obtain the second equation of motion dynamic. From the second equation of motion of the machine it determines the angular acceleration of the shaft. It shows the distribution of the forces on the mechanism to the internal combustion heat engines. Dynamic, the velocities can be distributed in the same way as forces. Practically, in the dynamic regimes, the velocities have the same timing as the forces. Calculations should be made for an engine with a single cylinder. Originally exemplification is done for a classic distribution mechanism, and then even the module B distribution mechanism of an Otto engine type.

  8. Ultrasound-induced acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Rossi, M.; Marín, Á. G.;

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the three-dimensional (3D) acoustophoretic motion of spherical microparticles in rectangular microchannels. The motion is generated by the acoustic radiation force and the acoustic streaming-induced drag force. In contrast to the classical theory of Rayleigh...... streaming in shallow, infinite, parallel-plate channels, our theory does include the effect of the microchannel side walls. The resulting predictions agree well with numerics and experimental measurements of the acoustophoretic motion of polystyrene spheres with nominal diameters of 0.537 and 5.33 μm. The 3......D particle motion was recorded using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry under controlled thermal and acoustic conditions in a long, straight, rectangular microchannel actuated in one of its transverse standing ultrasound-wave resonance modes with one or two half-wavelengths. The acoustic...

  9. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  10. Ultrafast domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanotubes and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, R.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic properties of magnetic domain walls in nanotubes and in cylindrical nanowires can be significantly different from the well known domain wall dynamics in thin films and in flat thin strips. The main differences are the occurrence of chiral symmetry breaking and, perhaps more importantly, the possibility to obtain magnetic domain walls that are stable against the usual Walker breakdown. This stability enables the magnetic field-driven propagation of the domain walls in nanotubes and nanocylinders at constant velocities which are significantly higher than the usual propagation speeds of the domain walls. Simulations predict that the ultrafast motion of magnetic domain walls at velocities in a range above 1000 m s-1 can lead to the spontaneous excitation of spin waves in a process that is the magnetic analog of the Cherenkov effect. In the case of solid cylindrical wires, the domain wall can contain a micromagnetic point singularity. We discuss the current knowledge on the ultrafast dynamics of such Bloch points, which remains still largely unexplored.

  11. The use of dual vacuum stabilization device to reduce kidney motion for stereotactic radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Styles, Colin; Whitaker, May; Bressel, Mathias; Foroudi, Farshad; Schneider, Michal; Devereux, Thomas; Dang, Kim; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    Abdominal stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is aided by motion management strategies to ensure accurate dose delivery as targets such as the kidney are easily influenced by breathing motion. Commercial devices such as compression plates and dual vacuum technology have been demonstrated to reduce the motion of lung and liver tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dual vacuum system in reducing kidney motion as well to investigate any relationship between abdominal wall motions with kidney motion. Ten healthy volunteers were set up with and without vacuum compression (Elekta BodyFIX(TM)) to simulate free and dampened breathing. Ultrasound imaging was used to visualize kidney motion at the same time an abdominal surface marker was monitored using infrared imaging (Varian, Real Time Position Management). The resulting kidney and abdominal motion tracks were imported into motion analysis (Physmo(TM)) and custom built software (Matlab) to calculate amplitude of motion independent of shifting baselines. Thirty-four kidney datasets were available for analysis, with six datasets unable to be retrieved. With vacuum compression six out of nine participants showed a mean reduction of kidney motion ranging between 1.6 and 8 mm (p vacuum compression. Two participants showed no significant change (Vacuum compression reduced kidney motion in the majority of participants; however larger breathing motion can also result from its use. No pattern emerged regarding which patients may benefit from vacuum immobilization as abdominal wall motion was not found to be an adequate surrogate for kidney motion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  13. Failure Analysis of 600 MW Supercritical Boiler Water Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Huilin; Cai Zhengchun; Yan Xiaozhong; He Jinqiao; Zhou Yucai

    2013-01-01

    Boiler tube often causes abnormal boiler outage, bringing greater economic losses. This thesis mainly comes from the dynamics of boiler water, boiler furnace accident location of wall temperature distribution to explore the cause of the accident boiler. Calculation results show that the deformation will seriously reduce the boiler allowable maximum temperature difference between the screens. And the boiler is not over-temperature, low temperature difference between the screens, which have bur...

  14. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems.

  16. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  17. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  18. Wall shear stress evolution in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The steady flow in an anatomically realistic human carotid bifurcation was simulated numerically. Main parameters such as wall shear stress (WSS), velocity profiles and pressure distributions are investigated in the carotid artery, namely in bifurcation and sinusoidal enlargement regions. Flow in the carotid sinus is dominated by a single secondary vortex motion accompanied by a strong helical flow. This type of flow is induced primarily by the curvature and asymmetry of the in vivo geometry. Low wall shear stress concentration occurs at both the anterior and posterior aspects of the proximal internal bulb.

  19. Domain walls collision in Fe-rich and Co-rich glass covered microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez J.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of the investigation of domain walls propagation in Fe-rich and Co-rich microwires performed using Sixtus-Tonks and magneto-optical Kerr effect techniques. It was found that under certain experimental conditions we are able to create the regime of the motion of two domain walls moving to opposite directions which terminates by the collision of the domain walls. Also the domain walls collision was visualized using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope when the surface giant Barkhausen jump induced by circular magnetic field has been observed.

  20. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Meier, Guido; Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-18

    Full-field magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy at high spatial resolution down to 20 nm is used to directly observe field-driven domain wall motion in notch-patterned permalloy nanowires. The depinning process of a domain wall around a notch exhibits a stochastic nature in most nanowires. The stochasticity of the domain wall depinning sensitively depends on the geometry of the nanowire such as the wire thickness, the wire width, and the notch depth. We propose an optimized design of the nanowire for deterministic domain wall depinning field at a notch.

  1. Ship Roll Motion Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Tristan; Blanke, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    The technical feasibility of roll motion control devices has been amply demonstrated for over 100 years. Performance, however, can still fall short of expectations because of deciencies in control system designs, which have proven to be far from trivial due to fundamental performance limitations....... This tutorial paper presents an account of the development of various ship roll motion control systems and the challenges associated with their design. The paper discusses how to assess performance, the applicability of dierent models, and control methods that have been applied in the past....

  2. Method through motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary scenography often consists of video-projected motion graphics. The field is lacking in academic methods and rigour: descriptions and models relevant for the creation as well as in the analysis of existing works. In order to understand the phenomenon of motion graphics in a scenographic...... construction as a support to working systematically practice-led research project. The design model is being developed through design laboratories and workshops with students and professionals who provide feedback that lead to incremental improvements. Working with this model construction-as-method reveals...

  3. Perpetual Motion Machine

    OpenAIRE

    D. Tsaousis

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the first century A.D. there have been relative descriptions of known devices as well as manufactures for the creation of perpetual motion machines. Although physics has led, with two thermodynamic laws, to the opinion that a perpetual motion machine is impossible to be manufactured, inventors of every age and educational level appear to claim that they have invented something «entirely new» or they have improved somebody else’s invention, which «will function henceforth perpetuall...

  4. Leap Motion development essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegelmock, Mischa

    2013-01-01

    This book is a fast-paced guide with practical examples that aims to help you understand and master the Leap Motion SDK.This book is for developers who are either involved in game development or who are looking to utilize Leap Motion technology in order to create brand new user interaction experiences to distinguish their products from the mass market. You should be comfortable with high-level languages and object-oriented development concepts in order to get the most out of this book.

  5. Penetration through a wall: Is it reality?

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B

    2011-01-01

    A tennis ball is not expected to penetrate through a brick wall since a motion under a barrier is impossible in classical mechanics. With quantum effects a motion of a particle through a barrier is allowed due to quantum tunneling. According to usual theories of tunneling, the particle density decays inside a classical barrier resulting in an extremely slow pentration process. However, there are no general laws forbidding fast motion through classical barriers. The problem addressed is investigation of unusual features o quantum tunneling through a classic static barrier which is at least two-dimensional. Here we show that penetration through such barrier can be not slow. When the barrier satisfies the certain conditions, a regime of quantum lens is possible with formation of caustics. De Broglie waves are reflected from the caustics, interfere, and result in a not small flux from under the barrier. This strongly contrasts to the usual scenario with a decaying under-barrier density. We construct a particular ...

  6. Hand in motion reveals mind in motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eFreeman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have measured hand movements en route to choices on a screen to understand the dynamics of a broad range of psychological processes. We review this growing body of research and explain how manual action exposes the real-time unfolding of underlying cognitive processing. We describe how simple hand motions may be used to continuously index participants’ tentative commitments to different choice alternatives during the evolution of a behavioral response. As such, hand-tracking can provide unusually high-fidelity, real-time motor traces of the mind. These motor traces cast novel theoretical and empirical light onto a wide range of phenomena and serve as a potential bridge between far-reaching areas of psychological science—from language, to high-level cognition and learning, to social cognitive processes.

  7. Solutions of the Maxwell viscoelastic equations for displacement and stress distributions within the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, S; Zamir, M

    2008-08-01

    Mechanical events within the thickness of the vessel wall caused by pulsatile blood flow are considered, with focus on axial dynamics of the wall, driven by the oscillatory drag force exerted by the fluid on the endothelial layer of the wall. It is shown that the focus on the axial direction makes it possible to derive simplified equations of motion which, combined with a viscoelastic model of the wall material, makes it possible in turn to obtain solutions in closed form for the displacement and stress of material elements within the wall. The viscoelastic model allows a study of the dynamics of the wall with different ratios of viscosity to elasticity of the wall material, to mimic changes in the properties of the arterial wall caused by disease or aging. It is found that when the wall is highly viscous the displacements and stresses caused by the flow are confined to a thin layer close to the inner boundary of the wall, while as the wall material becomes less viscous and more rigid the displacements and stresses spread deeper into the thickness of the wall to affect most of its elements.

  8. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  9. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  10. A human motion model based on maps for navigation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-mounted indoor positioning systems work remarkably well when using additionally the knowledge of floor-plans in the localization algorithm. Walls and other structures naturally restrict the motion of pedestrians. No pedestrian can walk through walls or jump from one floor to another when considering a building with different floor-levels. By incorporating known floor-plans in sequential Bayesian estimation processes such as particle filters (PFs, long-term error stability can be achieved as long as the map is sufficiently accurate and the environment sufficiently constraints pedestrians' motion. In this article, a new motion model based on maps and floor-plans is introduced that is capable of weighting the possible headings of the pedestrian as a function of the local environment. The motion model is derived from a diffusion algorithm that makes use of the principle of a source effusing gas and is used in the weighting step of a PF implementation. The diffusion algorithm is capable of including floor-plans as well as maps with areas of different degrees of accessibility. The motion model more effectively represents the probability density function of possible headings that are restricted by maps and floor-plans than a simple binary weighting of particles (i.e., eliminating those that crossed walls and keeping the rest. We will show that the motion model will help for obtaining better performance in critical navigation scenarios where two or more modes may be competing for some of the time (multi-modal scenarios.

  11. Motion analysis of both ventricles using tagged MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Cengizhan; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2000-04-01

    Although several methods exist for the analysis of tagged MRI images of the left ventricle (LV), analysis of the right ventricle (RV) remains challenging due to its complex anatomy and significant through plane motion. We present here preliminary results of our new motion analysis method, both for RV and LV, in healthy human volunteers. In this method, following standard myocardial and tag segmentation of cardiac gated cine tagged MR images; a 4D B-spline based parametric motion field was computed for a volume of interest encompassing both ventricles. Using this motion field, 3D displacements and strains were calculated on the RV and LV. We observed that for both chambers the circumferential strain (Ecc) decreased with a constant rate throughout systole. The systolic strain rate displayed spatial similarity not only for the LV but also for the RV. For RV free wall, mean systolic Ecc was -0.19 +/- 0.05 with an average coefficient of variability of 20%. The 4D B-spline based motion analysis technique for tagged MRI yields compatible results for the LV and gives consistent circumferential strain measures for the RV free wall. Tagged MRI based RV mechanical analysis can be used along with LV results for a more complete cardiac evaluation.

  12. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of fetal growth abnormalities in

  13. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  15. Flow field around a sphere colliding against a wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenit, R.; Hunt, M. L.

    1998-11-01

    This study investigates the flow field and the fluid agitation generated by particle collisions. The motion of a particle towards a wall, or towards another particle, will result in a collision if the Reynolds number of the flow is large. As the particle approaches the wall, the fluid in the gap between the particle and the wall will be displaced. When the particle touches the wall and rebounds, the direction of the flow will reverse. This process produces a considerable agitation in the fluid phase. To study this process an immersed pendulum experiment was built to produce controlled collisions of particles. A fine string is attached to a particle, which is positioned at rest from some initial angle. Once released, the particle accelerates towards a wall, or to another suspended particle, resulting in a collision. The fluid is seeded with neutrally buoyant micro-spheres, which illuminated by a laser sheet serve as flow tracers. The motion of the particles and tracers is recorded using a high speed digital camera. The images are digitally processed to calculate displacements and velocities for different times before and after the collision. Flow fields are obtained for different impact velocities, particle diameters and solid-fluid density ratios, as well as for particle-wall and particle-particle collisions. Preliminary results show that for the flow conditions tested, the rebound of the particle is dependent on the shape of the wake behind the particle at the moment of collision, and not only on the flow in the gap between the particle and the wall. The amount of collision-generated agitation appears to increase with impact velocity and density ratio.

  16. Occupy Wall Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael J.; Bang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional oppositio......This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional...... oppositional social movement alongside a legitimizing countermovement, but also a new notion of political community as an ensemble of discursive practices that are endogenous to the constitution of political regimes from the “inside out.” These new political identities are bound by thin ties of political...

  17. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... were removed in some of the elements to simulate damaged vapour barriers. The condition of the wind barriers of elements with intact vapour barriers was inspected from the inside after four years of exposure. This paper presents results with emphasis on the moisture conditions behind the wind barrier....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  18. Markerless Motion Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis; Czarowicz, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the Associated Technologies aspect of the ICDVRAT event. Two industry leading markerless motion capture systems are examined that offer advancement in the field of rehabilitation. Residing at each end of the cost continuum, technical differences such as 3D versus 360 ...

  19. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  20. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  1. MotionsFloorball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup, Jacob; Seidelin, Kåre

    Med denne "opskriftsbog" er I nu klar til at begynde med MotionsFloorball. Ingen vellykket middagsret tilbereder som bekendt sig selv - de vigtigste ingredienser til et succesfuldt forløb er vilje og handlingskraft. Tilsættes værktøjerne og vidensdelen fra denne bog, er der dog ikke langt fra tanke...

  2. Nuclear motion is classical

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    The notion from ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations that nuclear motion is best described by classical Newton dynamics instead of the time-dependent Schr{\\"o}dinger equation is substantiated. In principle a single experiment should bring clarity. Caution is however necessary, as temperature dependent effects must be eliminated when trying to determine the existence of a zero-point energy.

  3. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  4. Noncommutative Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Willien O; Souza, Andre M C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Brownian motion of a particle in a two-dimensional noncommutative (NC) space. Using the standard NC algebra embodied by the sympletic Weyl-Moyal formalism we find that noncommutativity induces a non-vanishing correlation between both coordinates at different times. The effect itself stands as a signature of spatial noncommutativity and offers further alternatives to experimentally detect the phenomena.

  5. Markerless Motion Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis; Czarowicz, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This contribution focuses on the Associated Technologies aspect of the ICDVRAT event. Two industry leading markerless motion capture systems are examined that offer advancement in the field of rehabilitation. Residing at each end of the cost continuum, technical differences such as 3D versus 360 ...

  6. Space, composition, vertical wall ...

    OpenAIRE

    Despot, Katerina; Sandeva, Vaska

    2016-01-01

    The space in which it is an integral segment of our life is nourished with many functional and decorative elements. One aspect for consideration of vertical walls or The vertical gardens and their aesthetic impact in space called function. Vertical gardens bordering the decoration to totally functional garden in areas where there is little oxygen and space, ideal for residential buildings and public spaces where missing greenery, special place occupies in interior design where their expres...

  7. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  8. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  9. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  10. Normal and abnormal US findings at the mastectomy site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Mi; Park, Jeong Mi

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of a mastectomy site is more effective with ultrasonography (US) than with either mammography or chest computed tomography because abnormalities are usually small and close to the skin surface. US does not involve the use of ionizing radiation and has a multiplanar scanning capability. The technique is readily available and inexpensive, and it allows real-time monitoring of needle tip placement during biopsy of a lesion. Normal US anatomy of the chest wall after mastectomy usually consists of four layers: skin, subcutaneous fat, pectoral muscles, and rib and intercostal muscle. The axilla is changed in appearance after lymph node dissection, but it remains the same in patients who have undergone simple mastectomy. US can accurately depict benign and malignant conditions in the mastectomy site, including fluid collection, fibrosis, local recurrent tumor, and metastatic lymphadenopathy, and can enable accurate diagnosis based on findings at fine needle aspiration biopsy.

  11. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  12. Conditions for the sliding-bouncing transition for the interaction of a bubble with an inclined wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, C.; Legendre, D.; Zenit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this study we analyze the interaction of a single rising bubble with an inclined wall. We conduct experiments considering different liquids and bubble sizes, to cover a wide range of Reynolds and Weber numbers, with wall angles from nearly horizontal to nearly vertical. For all cases, the bubble initially collides with the wall; after the initial interaction, in accord with previous studies, the bubble either steadily slides on the wall or ascends, colliding repeatedly with it. Considering a force balance for the bubble motion on the wall, we propose a set of conditions for the transition from sliding to bouncing that is validated with the present and previous data.

  13. Pebble bed pebble motion: Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cogliati, Joshua J

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation presents a method for simulation of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. A new mechanical motion simulator, PEBBLES, efficiently simulates the key elements of motion of the pebbles in a PBR. This model simulates gravitational force and contact forces including kinetic and true static friction. It's used for a variety of tasks including simulation of the effect of earthquakes on a PBR, calculation of packing fractions, Dancoff factors, pebble wear and the pebble force on the walls. The simulator includes a new differential static friction model for the varied geometries of PBRs. A new static friction benchmark was devised via analytically solving the mechanics equations to determine the minimum pebble-to-pebble friction and pebble-to-surface friction for a five pebble pyramid. This pyramid check as well as a comparison to the Janssen formula was used to test the new static friction equations. Because larger pebble bed simulations involve hundreds of thousands of pebbles and long periods of time, P...

  14. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  15. An Abnormal Vibrational Mode of Torsion Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 涂英; 顾邦明; 胡忠坤; 罗俊

    2003-01-01

    In the experiment for the determination of the gravitational constant G, we found an abnormal vibrational mode of the torsion pendulum. The abnormal mode disappeared as a magnetic damper was introduced to the torsion pendulum system. Our experimental results also show that the magnetic damper can be used to suppress the high frequency vibrational noises to torsion pendulums effectively.

  16. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  17. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  18. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients.

  19. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  20. Cell Wall Biology: Perspectives from Cell Wall Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kieran J.D.Lee; Susan E.Marcus; J.Paul Knox

    2011-01-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth,are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon,and,in addition,impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose,hemicelluloses,and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants,polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  1. Canal Wall Reconstruction Mastoidectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantages of canal wall reconstruction (CWR) mastoidectomy, a single-stage technique for cholesteatoma removal and posterior external canal wall reconstruction, over the open and closed procedures in terms of cholesteatoma recurrence. Methods: Between June 2002 and December 2005, 38 patients (40 ears) with cholesteatoma were admited to Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital and received surgical treatments. Of these patients, 25 were male with ages ranging between 11 and 60 years (mean = 31.6 years) and 13 were female with ages ranging between 20 and 65 years (mean = 38.8 years). Canal wall reconstruction (CWR)mastoidectomy was performed in 31 ears and canal wall down (CWD) mastoidectomy in 9 ears. Concha cartilage was used for ear canal wall reconstruction in 22 of the 31 CWR procedures and cortical mastoid bone was used in the remaining 9 cases. Results At 0.5 to 4 years follow up, all but one patients remained free of signs of cholesteatoma recurrence, i.e., no retraction pocket or cholesteatoma matrix. One patient, a smoker, needed revision surgery due to cholesteatoma recurrence 1.5 year after the initial operation. The recurrence rate was therefore 3.2% (1/31). Cholesteatoma recurrence was monitored using postoperative CT scans whenever possible. In the case that needed a revision procedure, a retraction pocket was identified by otoendoscopy in the pars flacida area that eventually evolved into a cholesteatoma. A pocket extending to the epitympanum filled with cholesteatoma matrix was confirmed during the revision operation, A decision to perform a modified mastoidectomy was made as the patient refused to quit smoking. The mean air-bone gap in pure tone threshold was 45 dB before surgery and 25 dB after (p < 0.05). There was no difference between using concha cartilage and cortical mastoid bone for the reconstruction regarding air-bone gap improvement, CT findings and otoendoscopic results. Conclusion CWR mastoidectomy can be used for

  2. Animating with Stop Motion Pro

    CERN Document Server

    Sawicki, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Animating with Stop Motion Pro is comprehensive, hands-on guide to achieving professional results with Stop Motion Pro 7.0 software. Gone are the days of stop motion guesswork and waiting to see the finalized result of your meticulous, labor intensive animations. With the push of a mouse button and the Stop Motion Pro software, animators have ten times the capability of simple camera stop motion capture. Re-visualize stop motion character movements, graph these movements and composite characters into a flawless animations with the techniques and step by step tutorials featured in Animating wit

  3. Endocrine abnormalities in dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Progress has been made in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of hormone action and its effects on the cardiac tissue. There is evidence from observational studies that patients with postpartum cardiomyopathy improve after inhibition of release of prolactin from the pituitary by bromocriptine. This has renewed interest in the role of hormones in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, especially in women. We intended to assess the hormonal changes in female patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Methods: Twenty female patients aged 20-40 years old (mean age 29 ΁ 5.6 years with a diagnosis of idiopathic DCMP with left ventricular ejection fraction [EF] <35% and a stable clinical course in the last 3 months were included in the study. All the patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II or III. All the patients underwent clinical evaluation followed by blood sampling for hormonal analysis. Blood was taken after overnight fasting and analyzed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, T3, T4, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, prolactin, insulin, parathyroid hormone (PTH, and 25 (OH Vitamin D. The results were compared with twenty age and sex matched controls. Results: The mean EF of the twenty patients was 24.4 ΁ 5.3% and duration of symptoms was 29.1 ΁ 24 months. Insulin growth factor 1 levels were significantly lower than normal. Fifty percent of the patients had levels lower than normal, but there was no correlation of IGF-I with NYHA class and EF. Testing of the thyroid hormones revealed that TSH levels were similar between patient and controls though 40% of the patients had elevated TSH levels. Of these patients, 5% (1 had hypothyroid. In addition to this, 10% (2 had isolated low T3, suggestive of the low T3 syndrome. None of the thyroid abnormalities showed a correlation with NYHA class or EF. All other hormone concentrations were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: In this cohort of female

  4. Liver abnormalities and endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Patrizia

    2013-08-01

    The liver and its pleotropic functions play a fundamental role in regulating metabolism, and is also an inevitable target of multiple metabolic disorders. The numerous and constant relationships and feedback mechanisms between the liver and all endocrine organs is reflected by the fact that an alteration of one oftentimes results in the malfunction of the other. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism are frequently associated with hepatic alterations, and thyroid diseases must be excluded in transaminase elevation of unknown cause. Drugs such as propylthiouracil, used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism, may induce liver damage, and other drugs such as amiodarone, carbamazepine, and several chemotherapeutic agents can lead to both thyroid and liver abnormalities. Liver diseases such as hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cirrhosis may cause altered levels of thyroid hormones, and alcoholic liver disease, both due to the noxious substance ethanol as well as to the hepatic damage it causes, may be responsible for altered thyroid function. Both excess and insufficiency of adrenal function may result in altered liver function, and adrenocortical dysfunction may be present in patients with cirrhosis, especially during episodes of decompensation. Again an important player which affects both the endocrine system and the liver, alcohol may be associated with pseudo-Cushing syndrome. Sex hormones, both intrinsic as well as extrinsically administered, have an important impact on liver function. While oestrogens are related to cholestatic liver damage, androgens are the culprit of adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others. Chronic liver disease, on the other hand, has profound repercussions on sex hormone metabolism, inducing feminization in men and infertility and amenorrhoea in women. Lastly, metabolic syndrome, the pandemia of the present and future centuries, links the spectrum of liver damage ranging from steatosis to cirrhosis, to the array of endocrine alterations

  5. Assessment of global und regional left ventricular function with a 16-slice spiral-CT using two different software tools for quantitative functional analysis and qualitative evaluation of wall motion changes in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging; Moeglichkeiten der 16-Schicht-CT bei der linksventrikulaeren Funktionsbestimmung: Beurteilung zweier unterschiedlicher Software-Tools zur quantitativen Funktionsanalyse sowie qualitative Bewertung von Wandbewegungsstoerungen im Vergleich zur Magnetresonanztomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, K.; Oellig, F.; Kunz, P.; Bender, P.; Oberholzer, K.; Mildenberger, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Thelen, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany); Hake, U. [Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Mainz (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To determine global and regional left ventricular (LV) function from retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography (CT) by using two different semiautomated analysis tools and to correlate the results with those of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Nineteen patients (5 females, 14males, mean age 69 years) underwent 16-slice spiral-CT (MS-CT) with standard technique without administration of {beta}-blockers for a decrease in the cardiac rate. Ten series of images were reconstructed at every 10% of the RR-interval. With commercially available software capable of semiautomated contour detection, end-diastolic and end-systolic LV volumes (EDV and ESV) were determined from short-axis multiplanar CT reformations (MPR). Axial images of the end-systolic and end-diastolic cardiac phase were transformed to 3D volumes (3D) to determine EDV and ESV by using a threshold-supported reconstruction algorithm dependent on the contrast enhancement of the left ventricle. Steady-state free-precession cine MR images were acquired in short-axis orientation on the same day in all but one patient. Regional wall motion was assessed qualitatively in 17 left ventricular segments and classified as normo-, hypo-, a- or dyskinetic. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to calculate limits of agreement and systematic errors between CT and MRI. Results: For MPR/3D, mean end-diastolic (144.4/142.8 mL {+-} 67.5/67.1) and end-systolic (66.4/68.7 mL {+-} 52.1/49.9) LV volumes as determined with MS-CT correlated well with MRI measurements (147.6 mL {+-} 67.6 [r = 0.98/0.96] and 73.3 mL {+-} 55.5 [r = 0.98/0.98], respectively [p <.001]). LV stroke volume (77.6/74.1 {+-} 19.2/23.4 mL for CT vs. 74.4 mL {+-} 13.4 for MRI, r = 0.92/0.74) and LV ejection fraction (58.6/55.9% {+-} 13.5/13.7 for CT vs. 55.6% {+-} 13.5 for MRI, r = 0.95/0.91) also showed good correlation (p<.001). Regional wall motion analysis revealed agreement between CT and MRI in 316/323 (97

  6. Deformation Measurements of Gabion Walls Using Image Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Fraštia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The image based modeling finds use in applications where it is necessary to reconstructthe 3D surface of the observed object with a high level of detail. Previous experiments showrelatively high variability of the results depending on the camera type used, the processingsoftware, or the process evaluation. The authors tested the method of SFM (Structure fromMotion to determine the stability of gabion walls. The results of photogrammetricmeasurements were compared to precise geodetic point measurements.

  7. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  8. The role of the second heart field in pulmonary vein development : new insights in the origin of clinical abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, Yvonne Louise

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we describe normal and abnormal pulmonary vein development in human and mouse hearts, and focus on the histo(patho)logy of the pulmonary venous and left atrial dorsal wall, in order to elucidate the role of the posterior heart field in the formation and differentiation of the pulmonar

  9. Tomographic index as auxiliary criteria for surgery indication in fracture dislocation of acetabulum posterior wall

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiki, Edison N; Yamaguchi, Eduardo N; Miachiro, Edison; Chikude, Takechi; Ikemoto,Roberto Y.; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia [UNESP; Rodrigues, Luciano M. R.; Monteiro, Carlos B; Milani, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    There are situations which the tomographic exam is done on the affected hip or situations where the contralateral hip presents abnormalities that make it impossible to compare. In this study we aimed to evaluate a tomographic index that does not require comparison between the both hips. Twenty two patients with unilateral acetabular fracture dislocation with fracture of posterior wall were studied. We established the relationship between the remaining posterior wall and the femoral head diame...

  10. Gastric Duplication: A Rare Cause of Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage, Chest Wall Mass, and Enterocutaneous Fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Emeka B. Kesieme; Dongo, Andrew E; Osime, Clement O.; Olomu, Sylvia C.; Awe, Oluwafemi O.; Gerald I Eze; Sylvester U. Eluehike

    2012-01-01

    Gastric duplications are uncommon developmental abnormality reported to present with different clinical scenarios. We present a 2-1/2-year-old Nigerian female who started having intermittent massive lower gastrointestinal haemorrhage at 5 months of age. She subsequently developed a lower chest wall mass and enterocutaneous fistula. She was found to have gastric duplication with fistulous communication with the descending colon, spleen, and lower chest wall. To the best of our knowledge, this...

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  12. Fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in absence of CT abnormality on PET-CT: What is it?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiyan; Liu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a pictorial review of the findings and interpretative pitfalls about focal fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)uptake in the absence of corresponding computer tomography(CT)lesion or abnormality on an integrated positron emission tomography(PET)-CT.The integrated CT images in the PET-CT scanner allow correct co-registration and fused imaging of anatomical and functional data.On FDG PET-CT imaging,a real pathologic process often demonstrates abnormal uptake associated with a visible corresponding CT lesion or abnormality.When focal uptake is seen on PET imaging but no corresponding anatomic abnormality is visualized on the integrated CT,one should always be aware of possible mis-registration or mismatch of the PET and CT images due to the patient’s respiratory or body motion.While most of the hot spots in the absence of corresponding anatomic abnormalities are artefactual or secondary to benign etiologies,some may represent small sized or early staged neoplasm or metastases,especially in the gastrointestinal tract and skeletons.Caution should be exercised to simply diagnose a pathology based on the presence of the uptake only,or exclude the disease based on the absence of anatomic abnormality.

  13. Age- and gender-specific changes of tricuspid annular motion velocities in normal hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shuji; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Nishio, Susumu; Hotchi, Junko; Bando, Mika; Takagawa, Yuriko; Saijo, Yoshihito; Hirata, Yukina; Sata, Masataka

    2015-05-01

    Mitral annular motion (MAM) and tricuspid annular motion (TAM) velocities obtained by pulsed tissue Doppler echocardiography have been used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) functions. Although TAM velocity has been clinically applied for evaluating various cardiac diseases, the effects of age and gender remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of age and gender on TAM velocity in normal hearts. We randomly selected 265 subjects (mean age, 59 years; range, 20-89 years) without abnormal clinical, electrocardiographic, and echocardiographic findings from a pool of subjects who had undergone transthoracic echocardiography. They were classified into four age groups: 20-39, 40-59, 60-79, and >80 years. Pulsed wave Doppler was applied to obtain MAM velocity of the lateral side and TAM velocity of the RV free wall side. The peak systolic (s'), early diastolic (e'), and atrial systolic (a') velocities of MAM and TAM were measured in all subjects. While MAM-s' (r=-0.267, p<0.001) correlated with age, TAM-s' did not (p=0.755). TAM-s' in any age groups had no significant gender differences. TAM-e' (r=-0.447, p<0.001) and MAM-e' (r=-0.724, p<0.001) correlated with age, respectively. In those aged 40-59 years, both TAM-e' (p=0.002) and MAM-e' (p=0.048) in females were significantly higher than those in males. The gender differences diminished in the ≥60 years age groups. There was no age-associated decline in TAM-s', while TAM-e' varied with age and gender as did MAM-e'. Although the same criteria for the TAM-s' can be used for identifying abnormal RV systolic function regardless of age and gender, age and gender differences must be considered when one utilizes the TAM-e' for the diagnosis or management of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, L A; Sodt, P C; Hutcheon, N; Arcilla, R A

    1990-11-01

    The cardiac status of 64 children (ages 0.2 to 18 yr) with sickle cell anemia documented by hemoglobin electrophoresis was evaluated by echocardiography. Left atrial, left ventricular and aortic root dimensions were significantly increased in over 60 percent of these children at all ages compared to values for 99 normal black (non-SCA) control subjects. Left ventricular wall thickness was increased in only 20 percent of older children with sickle cell anemia. Estimated LV mass/m2 and left ventricular cardiac index were increased compared to control subjects (p less than 0.001). Left heart abnormalities expressed as a single composite function, derived from multivariate regression analysis, correlated well with severity of anemia expressed as grams of hemoglobin (r = -0.52, p = less than 0.001) and with percentage of hemoglobin S (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not to the same extent with age. Echocardiographically assessed left ventricular function at rest was comparable to that of control subjects. These data suggest that the major cardiac abnormalities in children are related to the volume overload effects of chronic anemia, and that in this age group, there is no evidence for a distinct "sickle cell cardiomyopathy" or cardiac dysfunction.

  15. Motion segmentation method for hybrid characteristic on human motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Newman; Wong, Ben; Chow, Daniel

    2009-03-11

    Motion segmentation and analysis are used to improve the process of classification of motion and information gathered on repetitive or periodic characteristic. The classification result is useful for ergonomic and postural safety analysis, since repetitive motion is known to be related to certain musculoskeletal disorders. Past studies mainly focused on motion segmentation on particular motion characteristic with certain prior knowledge on static or periodic property of motion, which narrowed method's applicability. This paper attempts to introduce a method to tackle human joint motion without having prior knowledge. The motion is segmented by a two-pass algorithm. Recursive least square (RLS) is firstly used to estimate possible segments on the input human-motion set. Further, period identification and extra segmentation process are applied to produce meaningful segments. Each of the result segments is modeled by a damped harmonic model, with frequency, amplitude and duration produced as parameters for ergonomic evaluation and other human factor studies such as task safety evaluation and sport analysis. Experiments show that the method can handle periodic, random and mixed characteristics on human motion, which can also be extended to the usage in repetitive motion in workflow and irregular periodic motion like sport movement.

  16. Near-wall diffusion tensor of an axisymmetric colloidal particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisicki, Maciej; Cichocki, Bogdan; Wajnryb, Eligiusz

    2016-07-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions with confining boundaries often lead to drastic changes in the diffusive behaviour of microparticles in suspensions. For axially symmetric particles, earlier numerical studies have suggested a simple form of the near-wall diffusion matrix which depends on the distance and orientation of the particle with respect to the wall, which is usually calculated numerically. In this work, we derive explicit analytical formulae for the dominant correction to the bulk diffusion tensor of an axially symmetric colloidal particle due to the presence of a nearby no-slip wall. The relative correction scales as powers of inverse wall-particle distance and its angular structure is represented by simple functions in sines and cosines of the particle's inclination angle to the wall. We analyse the correction for translational and rotational motion, as well as the translation-rotation coupling. Our findings provide a simple approximation to the anisotropic diffusion tensor near a wall, which completes and corrects relations known from earlier numerical and theoretical findings.

  17. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Y.; Ouyang, J.; Zhu, X.; Huang, C.; Reese, T. G.; Chun, S. Y.; Li, Q.; El Fakhri, G.

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion ‘deblurring’ and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion detectability

  18. Quantitative analysis of airway abnormalities in CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-01-01

    A coupled surface graph cut algorithm for airway wall segmentation from Computed Tomography (CT) images is presented. Using cost functions that highlight both inner and outer wall borders, the method combines the search for both borders into one graph cut. The proposed method is evaluated on 173 ...

  19. Negotiation in Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    2010-01-01

    related to interaction, mobility, and transit that focus on notions of the “mobile with,” “negotiation in motion,” “mobile sense making,” and “temporary congregations.” The theoretical approach aims at seeing public transit spaces as sites where cars, pedestrians, mopeds, and bikes on a regular basis...... “negotiate” not only routes in and across the space but also express dynamic flows of interaction in motion. The claim is that what seems like ordinary urban movement patterns are more than this. By moving in the city among buildings, objects, and people, one interacts with the “environment,” making sense...

  20. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L. [Design and Accelerator Operations Consulting, 568 Wintergreen Ct Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Breitfeller, M. [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.