WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall dynamics implications

  1. Dynamic Response of Wall Backfill Retaining System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Alampalli

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ full-scale test is conducted to measure the dynamic response of a long cantilever wall that retains backfill soil. The recorded modal parameters of this retaining wall exhibited significant similarity to those of a clamped cantilever plate (rather than those of a cantilever beam or plane-strain analysis. Such a three-dimensional (3-D response pattern is not accounted for by current analysis procedures. A simple 3-D finite element model is employed to further analyze the observed resonant configurations. The results indicate that such configurations play an important role in the seismic response of wall backfill soil systems of variable height, such as wing walls supporting highway approach ramps.

  2. Domain wall dynamics of magnetically bistable microwires

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    Ipatov M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied domain wall propagation of magnetically-bistable Fe- Co-rich microwires paying attention on effect of applied and internal stresses. We measured hysteresis loops and domain wall propagation in various magnetic Fe- Co-rich amorphous microwires with metallic nucleus diameters (from 12 □m till 22 □m using Sixtus Tonks-like experiments. Application of tensile stresses results in decreasing of domain wall velocity. We discussed magnetoelastic contribution in dynamics of domain wall propagation. We observed, that microwires with different geometries exhibit v(H dependences with different slopes. Application of stresses resulted in decrease of DW velocity, v, and DW mobility S. Quite fast DW propagation (v till 2500 m/s at H about 30 A/m has been observed in low magnetostrictive magnetically bistable Co56Fe8Ni10Si110B16 microwires. Consequently, we can assume that generally magnetoelastic energy affects DW dynamics: decreasing magnetoelastic energy, Kme, DW velocity increases.

  3. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  4. Fast domain wall dynamics in amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R., E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Klein, P.; Richter, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Zhukov, A. [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimica, UPV/EHU, San Sebastian (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    We have studied the effect of thermal treatment on the domain wall dynamics of FeSiB and FeCoMoB microwires. It was shown that annealing in transversal magnetic field increases the domain wall mobility as well as the domain wall velocity. Annealing under the tensile stress hinders the appearance of the monodomain structure but application of tensile stress leads to the magnetic bistability having the domain wall mobility twice higher that in as-cast state. Further increase of the tensile stress reduces the domain wall mobility but the domain wall velocity increases as a result of the decrease of critical propagation field. Annealing of the FeCoMoB microwire by Joule heating leads to introduction of the circular anisotropy that favors the vortex domain wall. Such treatment increases the domain wall mobility as well as the maximum domain wall velocity.

  5. Domain-wall dynamics near a quantum critical point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Miyashita, Seiji

    We study the real-time domain-wall dynamics near a quantum critical point of the one-dimensional anisotropic ferromagnetic spin 1/2 chain. By numerical simulation, we find that the domain wall is dynamically stable in the Heisenberg-Ising model. Near the quantum critical point, the width of the

  6. Gravitational waves from domain walls and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2017-07-01

    We evaluate the impact of domain-wall annihilation on the currently ongoing and planned gravitational wave experiments, including a case in which domain walls experience a frictional force due to interactions with the ambient plasma. We show the sensitivity reach in terms of physical parameters, namely, the wall tension and the annihilation temperature. We find that a Higgs portal scalar, which stabilizes the Higgs potential at high energy scales, can form domain walls whose annihilation produces a large amount of gravitational waves within the reach of the advanced LIGO experiment (O5). Domain wall annihilation can also generate baryon asymmetry if the scalar is coupled to either SU(2)L gauge fields or the (B - L) current. This is a variant of spontaneous baryogenesis, but it naturally avoids the isocurvature constraint due to the scaling behavior of the domain-wall evolution. We delineate the parameter space where the domain-wall baryogenesis works successfully and discuss its implications for the gravitational wave experiments.

  7. Gravitational waves from domain walls and their implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Nakayama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the impact of domain-wall annihilation on the currently ongoing and planned gravitational wave experiments, including a case in which domain walls experience a frictional force due to interactions with the ambient plasma. We show the sensitivity reach in terms of physical parameters, namely, the wall tension and the annihilation temperature. We find that a Higgs portal scalar, which stabilizes the Higgs potential at high energy scales, can form domain walls whose annihilation produces a large amount of gravitational waves within the reach of the advanced LIGO experiment (O5. Domain wall annihilation can also generate baryon asymmetry if the scalar is coupled to either SU(2L gauge fields or the (B−L current. This is a variant of spontaneous baryogenesis, but it naturally avoids the isocurvature constraint due to the scaling behavior of the domain-wall evolution. We delineate the parameter space where the domain-wall baryogenesis works successfully and discuss its implications for the gravitational wave experiments.

  8. Effects of wall condition on flow distributions in arterial modeling: comparison of rigid, dynamic, and compliant walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fan [Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Beijing (China); Hua, Lu; Gao, Li jian [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    Blood flow distributions were evaluated using various computational strategies. Three commonly used wall conditions in arterial modeling were employed, namely rigid, dynamic and compliant walls. The results show that the velocity distributions are similar under rigid and dynamic walls, developing into the Poiseuille flow, but they are blunt under compliant walls. The peak pressure under rigid walls is highest, but the model of dynamic walls has a good approximation of pressure against the model of compliant walls. The results indicate that a model of compliant walls appears to be a computationally and reasonably accurate approximation of blood velocity distributions compared with the analysis under rigid or dynamic walls. Introducing fluid-structure interaction into arterial modeling is necessary to ensure reliable results and information. However, a model of dynamic walls seems to be a computationally inexpensive yet reasonably accurate approximation for pressure.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics of domain walls with cross-ties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovik, M. N., E-mail: dubovik@imp.uran.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Zverev, V. V. [Ural Federal University (Russian Federation); Filippov, B. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The dynamic behavior of a domain wall with cross-ties is analyzed on the basis of micromagnetic simulation with exact allowance for all main (exchange, magnetoanisotropic, and magnetostatic) interactions in thin magnetically uniaxial ferromagnetic films with planar anisotropy. It is found that the peculiarities of motion of such domain walls are closely related to the behavior of topological defects in the magnetization distribution (generation, motion, and annihilation of vortex–antivortex pairs on the film surface and Bloch points). We observe three different regimes of motion (stationary, periodic, and turbulent regimes), each of which is realized in a certain range of fields oriented along the easy magnetization axis. It is shown that the experimentally observed dynamic bends of the walls with cross-ties are determined by the type of motion of vortices and antivortices. The velocities of domain walls in different regimes are calculated, and the dynamic configurations of the magnetization and existing dynamic transitions between them are investigated.

  10. Dynamic Stiffness Analysis of Curved Thin-Walled Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Y.T. Leung

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural vibration problem of curved thin-walled beams is solved by the dynamic stiffness method. The dynamic stiffness of a curved open thin-walled beam is given. The computed natural frequencies of the beam are compared with those obtained by a completely analytical method to show the high accuracy of the present method. The interaction of in-plane and out-of-plane modes is emphasized.

  11. Dynamic dependence to domain wall propagation through artificial spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, D. M.; Chadha, M.; Branford, W. R.

    2017-03-01

    Domain wall propagation dynamics has been studied in nanostructured artificial kagome spin-ice structures. A stripline circuit has been used to provide localized pulsed magnetic fields within the artificial spin-ice (ASI) structure. This provides control of the system through electrically assisted domain wall nucleation events. Synchronization of the pulsed fields with additional global magnetic fields and the use of a focused magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer allows our experiments to probe the domain wall transit through an extended ASI structure. We find that the propagation distance depends on the driving field revealing field-driven properties of domain walls below their intrinsic nucleation field.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic characteristics; multi-walled carbon nanotubes; transverse magnetic field; van der Waals force. ... Couple dynamic equations of MWNTs subjected to a transverse magnetic field are derived and solved by considering the Lorentz magnetic forces induced by a transverse magnetic field exerted on MWCNTs. Results ...

  13. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  14. Walled Carotid Bifurcation Phantoms for Imaging Investigations of Vessel Wall Motion and Blood Flow Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Adrian J Y; Ho, Chung Kit; Yiu, Billy Y S; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-18

    As a major application domain of vascular ultrasound, the carotid artery has long been the subject of anthropomorphic phantom design. It is nevertheless not trivial to develop walled carotid phantoms that are compatible for use in integrative imaging of carotid wall motion and flow dynamics. In this paper, we present a novel phantom design protocol that can enable efficient fabrication of walled carotid bifurcation phantoms with: (i) high acoustic compatibility, (ii) artery-like vessel elasticity, and (iii) stenotic narrowing feature. Our protocol first involved direct fabrication of the vessel core and an outer mold using computer-aided design tools and 3-D printing technology; these built parts were then used to construct an elastic vessel tube through investment casting of a polyvinyl alcohol containing mixture, and an agar-gelatin tissue mimicking slab was formed around the vessel tube. For demonstration, we applied our protocol to develop a set of healthy and stenosed (25%, 50%, 75%) carotid bifurcation phantoms. Plane wave imaging experiments were performed on these phantoms using an ultrasound scanner with channel-level configurability. Results show that the wall motion dynamics of our phantoms agreed with pulse wave propagation in an elastic vessel (pulse wave velocity of 4.67±0.71 m/s measured at the common carotid artery), and their flow dynamics matched the expected ones in healthy and stenosed bifurcation (recirculation and flow jet formation observed). Integrative imaging of vessel wall motion and blood flow dynamics in our phantoms was also demonstrated, from which we observed fluid-structure interaction differences between healthy and diseased bifurcation phantoms. These findings show that the walled bifurcation phantoms developed with our new protocol are useful in vascular imaging studies that individually or jointly assess wall motion and flow dynamics.

  15. Curvature Perturbation and Domain Wall Formation with Pseudo Scaling Scalar Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological dynamics of scalar field with a monomial potential $\\phi^{n}$ with a general background equation of state is revisited. It is known that if $n$ is smaller than a critical value, the scalar field exhibits a coherent oscillation and if $n$ is larger it obeys a scaling solution without oscillation. We study in detail the case where $n$ is equal to the critical value, and find a peculiar scalar dynamics which is neither oscillating nor scaling solution, and we call it a pseudo scaling solution. We also discuss cosmological implications of a pseudo scaling scalar dynamics, such as the curvature perturbation and the domain wall problem.

  16. ‘Occupy Wall Street’ and IPE: Insights and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Cobbett

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The academic discipline of International Political Economy (IPE is a hard-nosed and empirically-oriented field of study. The usual subjects of IPE often include the organization of international trade, global finance, transnational production, national welfare and competitiveness, productivity levels and of course state actions and expenditures. The actions of a handful of protestors such as the ‘Occupy Wall Street’(OWS movement rarely attract academic attention. In this case, however, we should take note. In our view, the actions of OWS provide further clues that we are entering an era of significant transformation in the organization and structure of world order. The insights generated by reflecting on this movement suggest that the inter-subjective mentality at the heart of global capitalism is no longer coherent, with the implication thatwe are at long last about to leave behind a half century of American hegemony.

  17. Delayed dynamic abdominal wall closure following multi-visceral transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iype, Satheesh; Butler, Andrew; Jamieson, Neville; Middleton, Stephen; Jah, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Primary closure of the abdominal wall following intestinal transplantation or multivisceral transplantation could become a challenging problem in a significant number of patients. A 38-year-old woman with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) underwent a multi-visceral transplantation for short gut syndrome. She subsequently developed acute graft rejection that proved resistant to conventional treatment. She was relisted and underwent re-transplantation along with kidney transplantation. Abdominal wall closure could not be achieved because of the large size of the graft and bowel oedema. The wound was initially managed with laparostomy followed by insertion of the delayed dynamic abdominal closure (DDAC) device (Abdominal Retraction Anchor - ABRA(®) system). Continuous dynamic traction to the wound edges resulted in gradual approximation and complete closure of the abdominal wound was achieved within 3 weeks. Successful abdominal closure after multivisceral transplantation or isolated intestinal transplantation often requires biological mesh, vascularised flaps or abdominal wall transplantation. DDAC eliminated the need for a prosthetic mesh or skin graft and provided an excellent cosmetic result. Adjustment of the dynamic traction at the bedside minimised the need for multiple returns to the operating theatre. It resulted in a well-healed linear scar without a hernia. Dynamic traction allows delayed closure of laparotomy resulting in strong and cosmetically sound wound healing with native tissue. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, See-Hun

    It was reported that the domain walls in nanowires can be moved efficiently by electrical currents by a new type of torque, chiral spin torque (CST), the combination of spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Recently we domonstrated that ns-long current pulses can move domain walls at extraordinarily high speeds (up to ~750 m s -1) in synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) nanowires that have almost zero net magnetization, which is much more efficient compared with similar nanowires in which the sub-layers are coupled ferromagnetically (SF). This high speed is found to be due to a new type of powerful torque, exchange coupling torque (ECT) that is directly proportional to the strength of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two sub-layers, showing that the ECT is effective only in SAF not in SF. Moreover, it is found that the dependence of the wall velocity on the magnetic field applied along the nanowire is non-monotonic. Most recently we predict an Walker-breakdown-like domain wall precession in SAF nanowires in the presence of in-plane field based on the model we develop, and this extraordinary precession has been observed. In this talk I will discuss this in details by showing a unique characteristics of SAF sublayers' DW boost-and-drag mechanism along with CST and ECT. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets.

  19. Localization of vector field on dynamical domain wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Higuchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and arXiv:1402.1346, the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five dimensional space–time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099 for the U(1 gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali–Shifman mechanism (arXiv:hep-th/9612128, where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza–Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall–Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the (5,μ components (μ=0,1,2,3 of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from the bulk extra dimension if the domain wall universe is expanding.

  20. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B. F.; Gayme, D. F.; Ioannou, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or `band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.

  2. Domain-Wall Spin Dynamics in Kagome Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotel, E.; Simonet, V.; Ortloff, J.; Canals, B.; Paulsen, C.; Suard, E.; Hansen, T.; Price, D. J.; Wood, P. T.; Powell, A. K.; Ballou, R.

    2011-12-01

    We report magnetization and neutron scattering measurements down to 60 mK on a new family of Fe based kagome antiferromagnets, in which a strong local spin anisotropy combined with a low exchange path network connectivity lead to domain walls intersecting the kagome planes through strings of free spins. These produce unfamiliar slow spin dynamics in the ordered phase, evolving from exchange-released spin flips towards a cooperative behavior on decreasing the temperature, probably due to the onset of long-range dipolar interaction. A domain structure of independent magnetic grains is obtained that could be generic to other frustrated magnets.

  3. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ryusuke Yokoyama; Hiroaki Kuki; Takeshi Kuroha; Kazuhiko Nishitani

    2016-01-01

    The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a uni...

  4. The Dynamic Similitude Design Method of Thin Walled Structures and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the applicability of dynamic similitude models of thin walled structures, such as engine blades, turbine discs, and cylindrical shells, the dynamic similitude design of typical thin walled structures is investigated. The governing equation of typical thin walled structures is firstly unified, which guides to establishing dynamic scaling laws of typical thin walled structures. Based on the governing equation, geometrically complete scaling law of the typical thin walled structure is derived. In order to determine accurate distorted scaling laws of typical thin walled structures, three principles are proposed and theoretically proved by combining the sensitivity analysis and governing equation. Taking the thin walled annular plate as an example, geometrically complete and distorted scaling laws can be obtained based on the principles of determining dynamic scaling laws. Furthermore, the previous five orders’ accurate distorted scaling laws of thin walled annular plates are presented and numerically validated. Finally, the effectiveness of the similitude design method is validated by experimental annular plates.

  5. Spatiotemporal Patterns in Ultraslow Domain Wall Creep Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Ezequiel E; Foini, Laura; Giamarchi, Thierry; Kolton, Alejandro B; Rosso, Alberto

    2017-04-07

    In the presence of impurities, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain walls slide only above a finite external field. Close to this depinning threshold, they proceed by large and abrupt jumps called avalanches, while, at much smaller fields, these interfaces creep by thermal activation. In this Letter, we develop a novel numerical technique that captures the ultraslow creep regime over huge time scales. We point out the existence of activated events that involve collective reorganizations similar to avalanches, but, at variance with them, display correlated spatiotemporal patterns that resemble the complex sequence of aftershocks observed after a large earthquake. Remarkably, we show that events assemble in independent clusters that display at large scales the same statistics as critical depinning avalanches. We foresee these correlated dynamics being experimentally accessible by magnetooptical imaging of ferromagnetic films.

  6. New Model of Wood Cell Wall Microfibril and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph; Rick S. Reiner; Carlos Baez

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally it has been accepted that the cell walls are made up of microfibrils which are partly crystalline. However, based on the recently obtained Raman evidence that showed that the interior of the microfibril was significantly disordered and water accessible, a new model is proposed. In this model, the molecular chains of cellulose are still organized along the...

  7. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryusuke Yokoyama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to investigate the de novo construction process of the cell wall. This review deals with sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall through the use of protoplasts, a methodology that will provide the basis for further exploration of cell wall proteins and cell wall dynamics.

  8. "Acute postoperative open abdominal wall": Nosological concept and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cano, Manuel; Pereira, José A; Armengol-Carrasco, Manuel

    2013-12-27

    The so-called "burst abdomen" has been described for many years and is a well-known clinical condition, whereas the concept of the "open abdomen" is relatively new. In clinical practice, both nosological entities are characterized by a complex spectrum of symptoms apparently disconnected, which in many cases poses a great challenge for surgical repair. In order to assess the management of these disorders in a more comprehensive and integral fashion, the concept of "acute postoperative open abdominal wall" (acute POAW) is presented, which in turn can be divided into "intentional" or planned acute POAW and "unintentional" or unplanned POAW. The understanding of the acute POAW as a single clinical process not only allows a better optimization of the therapeutic approach in the surgical repair of abdominal wall-related disorders, but also the stratification and collection of data in different patient subsets, favoring a better knowledge of the wide spectrum of conditions involved in the surgical reconstruction of the abdominal wall.

  9. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    OpenAIRE

    Wiele, Ben Van de; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J A; Dijken, Sebastiaan van

    2016-01-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which ...

  10. The plant cell wall: A dynamic barrier against pathogen invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eUnderwood

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Prospective plant pathogens must overcome the physical barrier presented by the plant cell wall. In addition to being a preformed, passive barrier limiting access of pathogens to plant cells, the cell wall is actively remodeled and reinforced specifically at discrete sites of interaction with potentially pathogenic microbes. Active reinforcement of the cell wall through the deposition of call wall appositions, referred to as papillae, is an early response to perception of numerous categories of pathogens including fungi and bacteria. Rapid deposition of papillae is generally correlated with resistance to fungal pathogens that attempt to penetrate plant cell walls for the establishment of feeding structures. Despite the ubiquity and apparent importance of this early defense response, relatively little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms and cellular processes involved in the targeting and assembly of papillae. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of call wall-associated defenses induced by pathogen perception as well as the impact of changes in cell wall polymers on interactions with pathogens and highlights significant unanswered questions driving future research in the area.

  11. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    walled carbon nanotubes; transverse magnetic field; van der Waals force. 1. Introduction. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) (Iijima. 1991), extensive research related to the carbon nanotubes in the fields of chemistry, physics, ...

  12. Static and dynamic thermal characterisation of a hollow brick wall: Tests and numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, J.M.; Urresti, A. [Thermal Engineering Department, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Martin, K.; Flores, I.; Apaolaza, A. [Construction Quality Control Laboratory of the Basque Government, C/Aguirrelanda n 10, 01013 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    This article explains the adjustment procedure of a calibrated hot-box unit and the execution of the corresponding tests to measure the dynamic thermal properties of walls needed to calculate the thermal load of buildings. The results of a test for a heterogeneous wall are also presented, in a dynamic temperature rating. These results are compared with those obtained from a simulation carried out on the performance of the same wall through the application of a finite volume software. Subsequently, the error introduced by assuming one-dimensional heat flow through a nonhomogeneous wall is discussed. This is equivalent to considering the heterogeneous layer of the wall as an equivalent homogeneous layer, which is done in several whole building simulation programs. It is concluded that the error committed may be appreciable, even when the heterogeneities are not excessive. (author)

  13. Dynamic conductivity of ferroelectric domain walls in BiFeO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Peter; Seidel, Jan; Chu, Ying Hao; Wu, Pingping; Baddorf, Arthur P; Chen, Long-Qing; Kalinin, Sergei V; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2011-05-11

    Topological walls separating domains of continuous polarization, magnetization, and strain in ferroic materials hold promise of novel electronic properties, that are intrinsically localized on the nanoscale and that can be patterned on demand without change of material volume or elemental composition. We have revealed that ferroelectric domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO(3) are inherently dynamic electronic conductors, closely mimicking memristive behavior and contrary to the usual assumption of rigid conductivity. Applied electric field can cause a localized transition between insulating and conducting domain walls, tune domain wall conductance by over an order of magnitude, and create a quasicontinuous spectrum of metastable conductance states. Our measurements identified that subtle and microscopically reversible distortion of the polarization structure at the domain wall is at the origin of the dynamic conductivity. The latter is therefore likely to be a universal property of topological defects in ferroelectric semiconductors.

  14. Thermal dynamic simulation of wall for building energy efficiency under varied climate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejin; Zhang, Yujin; Hong, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at different kind of walls in five cities of different zoning for thermal design, using thermal instantaneous response factors method, the author develops software to calculation air conditioning cooling load temperature, thermal response factors, and periodic response factors. On the basis of the data, the author gives the net work analysis about the influence of dynamic thermal of wall on air-conditioning load and thermal environment in building of different zoning for thermal design regional, and put forward the strategy how to design thermal insulation and heat preservation wall base on dynamic thermal characteristic of wall under different zoning for thermal design regional. And then provide the theory basis and the technical references for the further study on the heat preservation with the insulation are in the service of energy saving wall design. All-year thermal dynamic load simulating and energy consumption analysis for new energy-saving building is very important in building environment. This software will provide the referable scientific foundation for all-year new thermal dynamic load simulation, energy consumption analysis, building environment systems control, carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy -saving walls building. Based on which, we will not only expediently design system of building energy, but also analyze building energy consumption and carry through scientific energy management. The study will provide the referable scientific foundation for carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy saving walls building.

  15. Exploring game dynamics in padel. Implications for assessment and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courel-Ibáñez, Javier; Sánchez-Alcaraz Martinez, Bernardino J; Marín, Diego Muñoz

    2017-07-17

    A better understanding of in-game competition demands potentially improves coaching strategy and quality. However, there is very limited information about game patterns in padel, a very modern racket sport born in the 70'. The purpose of this study was therefore to quantify and classify game dynamics during the match in professional padel players through a multivariate decision tree approach including technical, spatial and effectiveness indicators. The results determined three main game styles strongly defined by the court zone (net, middle and baseline). Additionally, particular technical, spatial and effectiveness indicators were identified in each zone. In net and middle areas (offence) stood the use of volleys and over-head strokes on the center lane to both keep a positional advantage and solve the point. Conversely in the baseline (defense), the use of corner side walls and the domain of lobs showed to be relevant. It is also remarkable the high rate of backhand groundstrokes, involving over four out of ten actions. This information may have relevant implications for coaches working in padel by providing a novel hierarchically organization of game dynamics, which helps in designing training and conditioning programs close to real competitive situations.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulations for wall-flow dynamics in porous ceramic diesel particulate filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Lee, Gi Wook; Yoon, Kyu; Chun, Byoungjin; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-01-01

    Flows through porous filter walls of wall-flow diesel particulate filter are investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The microscopic model of the realistic filter wall is represented by randomly overlapped arrays of solid spheres. The LB simulation results are first validated by comparison to those from previous hydrodynamic theories and constitutive models for flows in porous media with simple regular and random solid-wall configurations. We demonstrate that the newly designed randomly overlapped array structures of porous walls allow reliable and accurate simulations for the porous wall-flow dynamics in a wide range of solid volume fractions from 0.01 to about 0.8, which is beyond the maximum random packing limit of 0.625. The permeable performance of porous media is scrutinized by changing the solid volume fraction and particle Reynolds number using Darcy's law and Forchheimer's extension in the laminar flow region.

  17. Quantum Dynamics of Spin Wave Propagation through Domain Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, S.; Raedt, H. De; Miyashita, S.

    Through numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we demonstrate that magnetic chains with uniaxial anisotropy support stable structures, separating ferromagnetic domains of opposite magnetization. These structures, domain walls in a quantum system, are shown to remain stable if

  18. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Yeob Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs, has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of low-level in the open area and high-level in the enclosed area. The main objectives of this paper are to study the effects of applying different load applications and compare the dynamic responses of the blast wall. To do so, various kinds of blast pressures were measured by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations on the target area. Nonlinear finite element analyses of the blast wall under two types of identified dynamic loadings were also conducted.

  19. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-01

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation. PMID:24621815

  20. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement by dynamic corrugated heat exchanger wall: Numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Schmidmayer, K.; Topin, F.; Miscevic, M.

    2016-09-01

    A new concept of heat exchanger at sub-millimeter scale is proposed for applications in cooling on-board electronics devices, in which the quality of the exchanges between fluid and wall is very critical. In the proposed system, the upper wall of the channel is deformed dynamically to obtain a sinusoidal wave on this surface. The lower wall is exposed to constant heat flux simulating the imprint of an electronic component. A systematic 3-D numerical study in transient regime on the different deformation parameters allowed obtaining both the pumping characteristics and the heat transfer characteristics of the system. It was observed that the dynamic deformation of the wall induces a significant pumping effect. The intensification of the heat transfer is very important even for highly degraded waveforms, although the pumping efficiency is reduced in this case.

  2. Influence of surface anisotropy on domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usov, N. A.; Serebryakova, O. N.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that surface domain structure arises in magnetic nanotube with uniaxial anisotropy if surface anisotropy constant is negative and sufficiently high in absolute value. The surface magnetic anisotropy affects also the structure and dynamics of a head-to-head domain wall propagating along the nanotube axis in applied magnetic field. The hopping mode is observed for stationary movement of a head-to-head domain wall. The average speed of the domain wall in the hopping mode is found to be several times less than the stationary velocity of the wall in the absence of surface anisotropy. This effect is important for various applications where fast propagation of the domain wall along the sample is essential.

  3. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Eduardo, E-mail: edumartinez@usal.es [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de los Caídos s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Alejos, Óscar [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén, 7, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-07-14

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  4. Structural constraints and dynamics of bacterial cell wall architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel De Pedro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The peptidoglycan wall (PG is a unique structure which confers physical strength and defined shape to bacteria. It consists of a net-like macromolecule of peptide interlinked glycan chains overlying the cell membrane. The structure and layout of the PG dictates that the wall has to be continuously modified as bacteria go through division, morphological differentiation and adaptive responses. The PG is poorly known in structural terms. However, to understand morphogenesis a precise knowledge of glycan strand arrangement and of local effects of the different kinds of subunits is essential. The scarcity of data led to a conception of the PG as a regular, highly ordered structure which strongly influenced growth models. Here, we review the structure of the PG to define a more realistic conceptual framework. We discuss the consequences of the plasticity of murein architecture in morphogenesis and try to define a set of minimal structural constraints that must be fulfilled by any model to be compatible with present day information.

  5. Dynamics of cell wall assembly during early embryogenesis in the brown alga Fucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torode, Thomas A; Siméon, Amandine; Marcus, Susan E; Jam, Murielle; Le Moigne, Marie-Anne; Duffieux, Delphine; Knox, J Paul; Hervé, Cécile

    2016-11-01

    Zygotes from Fucus species have been used extensively to study cell polarization and rhizoid outgrowth, and in this model system cell wall deposition aligns with the establishment of polarity. Monoclonal antibodies are essential tools for the in situ analysis of cell wall glycans, and here we report the characteristics of six monoclonal antibodies to alginates (BAM6-BAM11). The use of these, in conjunction with monoclonal antibodies to brown algal sulfated fucans, has enabled the study of the developmental dynamics of the Fucus zygote cell walls. Young zygotes are spherical and all alginate epitopes are deposited uniformly following cellulose deposition. At germination, sulfated fucans are secreted in the growing rhizoid wall. The redistribution of cell wall epitopes was investigated during treatments that cause reorientation of the growth axis (change in light direction) or disrupt rhizoid development (arabinogalactan-protein-reactive Yariv reagent). Alginate modeling was drastically impaired in the latter, and both treatments cause a redistribution of highly sulfated fucan epitopes. The dynamics of cell wall glycans in this system have been visualized in situ for the first time, leading to an enhanced understanding of the early developmental mechanisms of Fucus species. These sets of monoclonal antibodies significantly extend the available molecular tools for brown algal cell wall studies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Chest wall dynamics and muscle recruitment during professional flute playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Isabelle; Monaco, Pierpaolo; Aliverti, Andrea; Macklem, Peter T

    2008-02-01

    Respiratory parameters and sound were recorded during professional flute playing in order to assess what physiological processes were associated with the control of sound production that results in 'breath support' which in turn is associated with high quality playing. Four standing young professional flautists played flute excerpts with and without breath support. Recordings included optoelectronic plethysmographic measurements of chest wall volume (V(cw)) and its compartments, surface electromyography of the scalene, lateral abdominal, rectus abdominus, parasternal and sternocleidomastoid muscles, mouth pressure, and sound. Flow was estimated from differentiating V(cw) during playing. Results showed that flute support entails antagonistic contraction of non-diaphragmatic inspiratory muscles that tends to hold the rib cage at higher lung volume. This relieves the expiratory muscles from the task of producing the right mouth pressure, especially at the end of the phrases, so they can contribute more to the finer control of mouth pressure modulations required for high quality playing.

  7. Electric-field-driven domain wall dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego López González

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on reversible electric-field-driven magnetic domain wall motion in a Cu/Ni multilayer on a ferroelectric BaTiO3 substrate. In our heterostructure, strain-coupling to ferroelastic domains with in-plane and perpendicular polarization in the BaTiO3 substrate causes the formation of domains with perpendicular and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively, in the Cu/Ni multilayer. Walls that separate magnetic domains are elastically pinned onto ferroelectric domain walls. Using magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy, we demonstrate that out-of-plane electric field pulses across the BaTiO3 substrate move the magnetic and ferroelectric domain walls in unison. Our experiments indicate an exponential increase of domain wall velocity with electric field strength and opposite domain wall motion for positive and negative field pulses. The application of a magnetic field does not affect the velocity of magnetic domain walls, but independently tailors their internal spin structure, causing a change in domain wall dynamics at high velocities.

  8. Dynamical corrections to the anomalous holographic soft-wall model: the pomeron and the odderon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capossoli, Eduardo Folco [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Colegio Pedro II, Departamento de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Li, Danning [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (ITP, CAS), Beijing (China); Boschi-Filho, Henrique [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-06-15

    In this work we use the holographic soft-wall AdS/QCD model with anomalous dimension contributions coming from two different QCD beta functions to calculate the masses of higher spin glueball states for both even and odd spins and their Regge trajectories, related to the pomeron and the odderon, respectively. We further investigate this model taking into account dynamical corrections due to a dilaton potential consistent with the Einstein equations in five dimensions. The results found in this work for the Regge trajectories within the anomalous soft-wall model with dynamical corrections are consistent with those present in the literature. (orig.)

  9. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Alejos, Ó., E-mail: oscaral@ee.uva.es [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martínez, E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37011 Salamanca (Spain); Muñoz, J.M. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current. - Highlights: • The asymmetric response of domain walls in bilayer strips with PMA is studied. • Out-of-plane fields and SHE longitudinal currents are applied. • The response is associated to the rotation of the domain wall inner magnetization. • Clockwise and counter-clockwise magnetization rotations are not equivalent. • The asymmetry results in different travelled distances and/or terminal speeds.

  10. Dynamics and Friction in Double Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Servantie, James

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this PhD thesis was the study of friction in carbon nanotubes by analytical methods and molecular dynamics simulations. The goal of this research was to characterize the properties of friction in nanotubes and from a more general point of view the understanding of the microscopic origin of friction. Indeed, the relative simplicity of the system allows us to interpret more easily the physical phenomenon observed than in larger systems. In order to achieve this goal, non-equili...

  11. Characterizing the dynamic property of the vortex tail in a gas cyclone by wall pressure measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Cuizhi; Sun, Guogang; Dong, Ruiqian; Fu, Shuangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, 102249 (China)

    2010-08-15

    To explore a determination method for cyclone vortex tail, the wall pressures at different axial and radial positions of a cylinder-on-cone cyclone were measured and analyzed by the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and probability density analyses in this paper. The cyclone vortex tail was also visualized by a red ink tracer. The results show that the cyclone wall pressure does not change in the cylindrical section and gradually decreases in the conical section. The magnitudes of wall pressure at different azimuths are almost identical, indicating an axisymmetrical wall pressure radial profile in these parts of the cyclone. Whereas in the lower part of the cone and/or the upper part of dipleg, there is a sudden fall of wall pressure and non-axisymmetrical pressure radial profile. The minimum wall pressure occurs at about 270 azimuth in this region. Underneath in the next part of the dipleg, the wall pressure rapidly rises and returns to axisymmetry. These characteristics indicate that the vortex tail is bended to wall, turns around in this region, and can be used as evidences of the vortex tail. The position determined by the pressure measurement is close to the position of the rotating ring observed in the tracing experiment. It is also found that the frequency of the inner vortex is different from that of the outer vortex. The inner vortex flow fluctuates stronger and faster than its outer partner. At the vortex tail zone, the vortex breaks and the inner vortex fluctuation is involved in the wall pressure signal. Therefore, the position and dynamic property of the vortex tail can be well identified from the wall pressure measurement. The pressure measurement could provide some solid experimental basis for assessing relations of natural vortex length. (author)

  12. Dynamic and Implications of Football Fans' Club and Fans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    /afrrev.v10i4.12. Dynamic and Implications of Football Fans' Club and Fans'. Fanaticism for School Violence Among Tertiary Students in. Lagos, Nigeria. Ayorinde, Samuel Agbonna. Department of Educational Foundations and Administration.

  13. Moisture dynamics in wall paintings monitored by single-sided NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschläger, D; Waldow, S; Haber, A; Zia, W; Blümich, B

    2015-01-01

    The durability of historic wall paintings is highly dependent on environmental influences such as moisture ingress, salt crystallization and temperature changes. A fundamental understanding of dynamic transport processes in wall paintings is necessary to apply suitable conservation and restoration methods to preserve such objects with high cultural value. Non-invasive, mobile-NMR techniques with single-sided sensors, such as the NMR-MOUSE(®), enable to monitor the moisture content, transport and apparent diffusion constants in wall paintings. We investigated this technique by experiment and modeling to correlate salt crystallization, moisture transport and local diffusion in wall-painting samples. Moreover, the influence of different painting techniques (fresco and secco) and conservation/consolidation methods on moisture transport and diffusion is discussed. The results are compared with results from field measurements on real fresco paintings in Casa del Salone Nero and the Villa of the Papyri, Herculaneum, Italy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of domain-wall propagation in epitaxial ferroelectric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, J Y; Yang, S M; Kim, T H; Lee, H N; Yoon, J-G; Park, S; Jo, Y; Jung, M H; Noh, T W

    2009-01-30

    We investigated the ferroelectric domain-wall propagation in epitaxial Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 thin film over a wide temperature range (3-300 K). We measured the domain-wall velocity under various electric fields and found that the velocity data is strongly nonlinear with electric fields, especially at low temperature. We found that, as one of surface growth issues, our domain-wall velocity data from ferroelectric epitaxial film could be classified into the creep, depinning, and flow regimes due to competition between disorder and elasticity. The measured values of velocity and dynamical exponents indicate that the ferroelectric domain walls in the epitaxial films are fractal and pinned by a disorder-induced local field.

  15. Influence of Housing Wall Compliance on Shock Absorbers in the Context of Vehicle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvirenti, G.; Faria, C.

    2017-10-01

    Shock absorbers play a key role in vehicle dynamics. Researchers have spent significant effort in order to understand phenomena associated with this component, but there are still several issues to address, in part because new technology development and design trends continually lead to new challenges, among which weight reduction is crucial. For shock absorbers, weight reduction is related to the use of new materials (e.g. composite) or new design paradigms (e.g. more complex geometry, wall thickness, etc.). All of them are directly linked to wall compliance values higher than the actual ones. The present article proposes a first analysis of the phenomena introduced by a high wall compliance, through a modelling approach and various simulations in order to understand the vehicle behaviour changes. It is shown that high values of wall compliance lead to increased hysteresis in the force-velocity curve. However, comfort, handling and ride performances are not significantly affected by this designing parameter.

  16. On the Vibration of Single-Walled Carbon Nanocones: Molecular Mechanics Approach versus Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ansari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones is studied using molecular structural method and molecular dynamics simulations. In molecular structural approach, point mass and beam elements are employed to model the carbon atoms and the connecting covalent bonds, respectively. Single-walled carbon nanocones with different apex angles are considered. Besides, the vibrational behavior of nanocones under various types of boundary conditions is studied. Predicted natural frequencies are compared with the existing results in the literature and also with the ones obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that decreasing apex angle and the length of carbon nanocone results in an increase in the natural frequency. Comparing the vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanocones under different boundary conditions shows that the effect of end condition on the natural frequency is more prominent for nanocones with smaller apex angles.

  17. Epistemological and Treatment Implications of Nonlinear Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A. H.

    The treatment implications of understanding mind as solely epiphenomenal to nonlinearly founded neurobiology are discussed. G. Klimovsky's epistemological understanding of psychoanalysis as a science is rejected and treatment approaches integrating W. R. Bion's and D. W. Winnicott's work are supported.

  18. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann

    2003-06-01

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium in magnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequently susceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven by the free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressure gradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect the particle, momentum and heat confinement properties of the configuration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the most important modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies are carried out on plasmas in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. One phenomenon commonly observed in RFPs is mode wall locking. The localized nature of these phase- and wall locked structures results in localized power loads on the wall which are detrimental for confinement. A detailed study of the wall locked mode phenomenon is performed based on magnetic measurements from three RFP devices. The two possible mechanisms for wall locking are investigated. Locking as a result of tearing modes interacting with a static field error and locking due to the presence of a non-ideal boundary. The characteristics of the wall locked mode are qualitatively similar in a device with a conducting shell system (TPE-RX) compared to a device with a resistive shell (Extrap T2). A theoretical model is used for evaluating the threshold values for wall locking due to eddy currents in the vacuum vessel in these devices. A good correlation with experiment is observed for the conducting shell device. The possibility of successfully sustaining discharges in a resistive shell RFP is introduced in the recently rebuilt device Extrap T2R. Fast spontaneous mode rotation is observed, resulting in low magnetic fluctuations, low loop voltage and improved confinement. Wall locking is rarely observed. The low tearing mode amplitudes allow for the theoretically predicted internal non-resonant on-axis resistive wall modes to be observed. These modes have not previously been distinguished due to the formation of wall

  19. A HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF COUPLED SHEAR WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A BERRAIS

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear dynamic analysis techniques are rapidly being developed and have been recognized as indispensable tools. However, their use in the design office requires special experience. Consequently they are not generally accepted as analysis/design tools. Additionally, uncertainties are associated with the determination of the earthquake forces, the stiffness and strength of the structure; the selection of the mathematical models; and the form of the earthquake. In this paper a hybrid system for the non-linear dynamic analysis/design of coupled shear walls is briefly described. The system combines expert system technology with finite element method to carry out the dynamic analysis of coupled walls under earthquake forces. The system has been implemented using Quintec-Prolog, Quintec-Flex and FORTRAN 77, and runs on a SUN SPARC station under Unix system.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  1. In situ atom scale visualization of domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinfeng; Xu, Tao; Xu, Xiaofeng; Zeng, Yijie; Xu, Jing; Sun, Litao; Wang, Chunrui; Xing, Huaizhong; Wu, Binhe; Lu, Aijiang; Liu, Dingquan; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chu, Junhao

    2014-10-08

    A domain wall, as a device, can bring about a revolution in developing manipulation of semiconductor heterostructures devices at the atom scale. However, it is a challenge for these new devices to control domain wall motion through insulator-metal transition of correlated-electron materials. To fully understand and harness this motion, it requires visualization of domain wall dynamics in real space. Here, domain wall dynamics in VO2 insulator-metal phase transition was observed directly by in situ TEM at atom scale. Experimental results depict atom scale evolution of domain morphologies and domain wall exact positions in (202) and (040) planes referring to rutile structure at 50°C. In addition, microscopic mechanism of domain wall dynamics and accurate lattice basis vector relationship of two domains were investigated with the assistance of X-ray diffraction, ab initio calculations and image simulations. This work offers a route to atom scale tunable heterostructure device application.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  3. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit : implications for cell wall adhesion and fruit softening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, W.G.T.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Schols, H.A.; Seymour, G.B.; Knox, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic

  4. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  5. Numerical Investigation on Dynamic Crushing Behavior of Auxetic Honeycombs with Various Cell-Wall Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-chun Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxetic honeycombs have proven to be an attractive advantage in actual engineering applications owing to their unique mechanical characteristic and better energy absorption ability. The in-plane dynamic crushing behaviors of the honeycombs with various cell-wall angles are studied by means of explicit dynamic finite element simulation. The influences of the cell-wall angle, the impact velocity, and the edge thickness on the macro/microdeformation behaviors, the plateau stresses, and the specific energy absorption of auxetic honeycombs are discussed in detail. Numerical results show, that except for the impact velocity and the edge thickness, the in-plane dynamic performances of auxetic honeycombs also rely on the cell-wall angle. The “> <”-mode local deformation bands form under low- or moderate-velocity impacting, which results in lateral compression shrinkage and shows negative Poisson's ratio during the crushing. For the given impact velocity, the plateau stress at the proximal end and the energy-absorbed ability can be improved by increasing the negative cell angle, the relative density, the impact velocity, and the matrix material strength. When the microcell parameters are the constant, the plateau stresses are proportional to the square of impact velocity.

  6. Dynamic control of magnetic nanowires by light-induced domain-wall kickoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Eric; El Hallak, Fadi; Clauß, Conrad; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Totti, Federico; Dressel, Martin; Bogani, Lapo

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the speed at which systems evolve is a challenge shared by all disciplines, and otherwise unrelated areas use common theoretical frameworks towards this goal. A particularly widespread model is Glauber dynamics, which describes the time evolution of the Ising model and can be applied to any binary system. Here we show, using molecular nanowires under irradiation, that Glauber dynamics can be controlled by a novel domain-wall kickoff mechanism. In contrast to known processes, the kickoff has unambiguous fingerprints, slowing down the spin-flip attempt rate by several orders of magnitude, and following a scaling law. The required irradiance is very low, a substantial improvement over present methods of magneto-optical switching. These results provide a new way to control and study stochastic dynamic processes. Being general for Glauber dynamics, they can be extended to different kinds of magnetic nanowires and to numerous fields, ranging from social evolution to neural networks and chemical reactivity.

  7. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Force Acting Perpendicularly on a Wall Made of Concrete Blocks with Rubber Inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Maciej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper numerical analysis considering the influence of dynamical force acting on wall made of concrete blocks with rubber inserts is presented. By examining the stress values on front and back surface of the analysed wall structure model, the effectiveness of proposed solution can be measured comparing to the wall made of concrete blocks without rubber inserts. Complete numerical analysis was performed in ADINA program.

  8. Stimulated release of tissue plasminogen activator from artery wall sympathetic nerves: implications for stress-associated wall damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhifang; Jiang, Xi; Sharafeih, Roshanak; Shen, Shujing; Hand, Arthur R; Cone, Robert E; O'Rourke, James

    2005-06-01

    Recurrent stress is clinically associated with early onset hypertension and coronary artery disease. A mechanism linking emotion to pathogenic remodeling of the artery wall has not been identified. Stress stimulates acute regulated release of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) into the circulation, which is presently attributed to the vascular endothelium. Sympathetic neurons also synthesize t-PA and axonally transport it to the arterial smooth muscle. Unlike release by the endothelium, a stress-stimulated sympathetic discharge would potentially accelerate degradation of the wall matrix by plasmin. To assess whether sympathetic axons are the principal source of acute stress-induced arterial release of t-PA, we compared the output from small densely innervated and large sparsely innervated isolated artery segments before and after sympathetic stimulation, and after ablations. Following phenylephrine infusion densely-innervated microvessels in uveal eyecups were released over 60-fold greater amounts of active t-PA per milligram than the sparsely innervated aorta; and ten-fold more than carotid artery segments. Mesenteric artery release was 4.8-fold greater than release by the carotid artery. In vivo, uveal release of t-PA increased more than three-fold within one minute following superior cervical sympathetic ganglion electrical stimulation, and after phenylephrine, or nicotine infusions of the anterior chamber. Circulating levels of t-PA fell 70% following chemical sympathectomy. We propose that sympathetic nerves are the primary source of stress-induced release of t-PA into and from the densely innervated resistance arteries and arterioles, where dysregulated plasmin-induced proteolysis could damage the wall matrix.

  9. Clinical Implications of Dynamic Systems Theory for Phonological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rvachew, Susan; Bernhardt, Barbara May

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine treatment outcomes in relation to the complexity of treatment goals for children with speech sound disorders. Method: The clinical implications of dynamic systems theory in contrast with learnability theory are discussed, especially in the context of target selection decisions for children with speech sound disorders. Detailed…

  10. Numerical study of acoustically driven bubble cloud dynamics near a rigid wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingsen; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of a bubble cloud excited by a sinusoidal pressure field near a rigid wall is studied using a novel Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow model. The effects of key parameters such as the amplitude and frequency of the excitation pressure, the cloud and bubble sizes, the void fraction, and the initial standoff distance on the bubbles' collective behavior and the resulting pressure loads on the nearby wall are investigated. The study shows that nonlinear bubble cloud dynamics becomes more pronounced and results in higher pressure loading at the wall as the excitation pressure amplitude increases. The strongest collective bubble behavior occurs at a preferred resonance frequency. At this resonance frequency, pressure peaks orders of magnitudes higher than the excitation pressure result from the bubble interaction when the amplitude of the pressure excitation is high. The numerically obtained resonance frequency is significantly different from the reported natural frequency of a spherical cloud derived from linear theory, which assumes small amplitude oscillations in an unbounded medium. At high amplitudes of the excitation, the resonance frequency decreases almost linearly with the ratio of excitation pressure amplitude to ambient pressure until the ratio is larger than one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Designable and dynamic single-walled stiff nanotubes assembled from sequence-defined peptoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Haibao; Ding, Yanhuai; Wang, Mingming; Song, Yang; Liao, Zhihao; Newcomb, Christina J.; Wu, Xuepeng; Tang, Xian-Qiong; Li, Zheng; Lin, Yuehe; Yan, Feng; Jian, Teng-Yue; Mu, Peng; Chen, Chunlong

    2018-01-18

    Despite recent advances in assembly of organic nanotubes, conferral of sequence-defined engineering and dynamic response characteristics to the tubules remains a challenge. Here we report a new family of highly-designable and dynamic single-walled nanotubes assembled from sequence-defined peptoids through a unique “rolling-up and closure of nanosheet” mechanism. During the assembly process, amorphous spherical particles of amphiphilic peptoid oligomers (APOs) crystallized to form well-defined nanosheets which were then folded to form single-walled peptoid nanotubes (SW-PNTs). These SW-PNTs undergo a pH-triggered, reversible contraction-expansion motion. By varying the number of hydrophobic residues of APOs, we demonstrate the tuning of PNT wall thickness and diameter, and mechanical properties. AFM-based mechanical measurements indicate that PNTs are highly stiff (Young’s Modulus ~13-17 GPa), comparable to the stiffest known biological materials. We further demonstrate that the precise incorporation of functional groups within PNTs and the application of functional PNTs in water decontamination. We believe these SW-PNTs can provide a robust platform for development of biomimetic materials tailored to specific applications.

  12. Dynamic vessel wall properties and their reproducibility in subjects with increased cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berkmortel, F; Wollersheim, H; van Langen, H; Thien, T

    1998-06-01

    To determine reproducibility figures of dynamic arterial wall properties such as cross-sectional compliance (CC) and distensibility (DC) in subjects with increased cardiovascular risk, in comparison with healthy adults. A total of 34 persons were divided into three groups with varying cardiovascular risk factors. Diameters (D) and diameter changes (deltaD) during the heart cycle of both common carotid (CCA) and right common femoral (CFA) arteries were measured by a vessel wall movement detector system. Blood pressures (BP) were recorded non-invasively by a semi-automated oscillometric device. CC (=piD(deltaD/2deltaP) in unit mm2/kPa) and DC (=2deltaD/D)/deltaP in unit 10(-3)/kPa) were calculated from the above-mentioned parameters. Measurements were performed twice during one visit and twice again with a time interval of at least 3 days to determine intra-observer intra- and intersession variability. Reproducibility figures of CC and DC of the CCA varied between 8 and 12%, and between 13 and 22% for the CFA. Intra-observer intra- and intersession variability were similar in the three groups. In our studies the reproducibility of dynamic vascular wall properties determined by ultrasound was good. Despite differences in the absolute values for CC and DC in groups with increased cardiovascular risk, mean reproducibility figures remained at a similar level (8-12%) as in healthy volunteers.

  13. Phase relations in a forced turbulent boundary layer: implications for modelling of high Reynolds number wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvvuri, Subrahmanyam; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-03-13

    Phase relations between specific scales in a turbulent boundary layer are studied here by highlighting the associated nonlinear scale interactions in the flow. This is achieved through an experimental technique that allows for targeted forcing of the flow through the use of a dynamic wall perturbation. Two distinct large-scale modes with well-defined spatial and temporal wavenumbers were simultaneously forced in the boundary layer, and the resulting nonlinear response from their direct interactions was isolated from the turbulence signal for the study. This approach advances the traditional studies of large- and small-scale interactions in wall turbulence by focusing on the direct interactions between scales with triadic wavenumber consistency. The results are discussed in the context of modelling high Reynolds number wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Branched pectic galactan in phloem-sieve-element cell walls: implications for cell mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torode, Thomas A.; O'Neill, Rachel E.; Marcus, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    has previously been identified in garlic bulbs in which the LM26 epitope is widespread throughout most cell walls including those of phloem cells. Garlic bulb cell wall material has been used to confirm the association of the LM26 epitope with cell wall pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG...

  15. Pseudo-dynamic tests on masonry residential buildings seismically retrofitted by precast steel reinforced concrete walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Wang, Tao; Chen, Xi; Zhong, Xiang; Pan, Peng

    2017-07-01

    A retrofitting technology using precast steel reinforced concrete (PSRC) panels is developed to improve the seismic performance of old masonry buildings. The PSRC panels are built up as an external PSRC wall system surrounding the existing masonry building. The PSRC walls are well connected to the existing masonry building, which provides enough confinement to effectively improve the ductility, strength, and stiffenss of old masonry structures. The PSRC panels are prefabricated in a factory, significantly reducing the situ work and associated construction time. To demonstrate the feasibility and mechanical effectivenss of the proposed retrofitting system, a full-scale five-story specimen was constructed. The retrofitting process was completed within five weeks with very limited indoor operation. The specimen was then tested in the lateral direction, which could potentially suffer sigifnicant damage in a large earthquake. The technical feasibility, construction workability, and seismic performance were thoroughly demonstrated by a full-scale specimen construction and pseudo-dynamic tests.

  16. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, António; Duarte, Ana M.; Azevedo, Flávio; Sousa, Maria J.; Côrte-Real, Manuela; Chaves, Susana R.

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria. PMID:28357256

  17. A model of cell-wall dynamics during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Wei; Endres, Robert G.

    To survive starvation, Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores. After asymmetric cell division, the septum grows around the forespore in a process called engulfment, but the mechanism of force generation is unknown. Here, we derived a novel biophysical model for the dynamics of cell-wall remodeling during engulfment based on a balancing of dissipative, active, and mechanical forces. By plotting phase diagrams, we predict that sporulation is promoted by a line tension from the attachment of the septum to the outer cell wall, as well as by an imbalance in turgor pressures in the mother-cell and forespore compartments. We also predict that significant mother-cell growth hinders engulfment. Hence, relatively simple physical principles may guide this complex biological process.

  18. Topological susceptibility of QCD with dynamical M\\"obius domain wall fermions

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, S.; Cossu, G.; Fukaya, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.

    2017-01-01

    We compute the topological susceptibility $\\chi_t$ of lattice QCD with $2+1$ dynamical quark flavors described by the M\\"obius domain wall fermion. Violation of chiral symmetry as measured by the residual mass is kept at $\\sim$1 MeV or smaller. We measure the fluctuation of the topological charge density in a "slab" sub-volume of the simulated lattice using the method proposed by Bietenholz et al. The quark mass dependence of $\\chi_t$ agrees with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory, ...

  19. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  20. A New Boundary Model for Simulating Complex and Flexible Wall Bounded Domain in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mokhtarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive area of applications, simulation of complex wall bounded problems or any deformable boundary is still a challenge in a Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation. This limitation is rooted in the soft force nature of DPD and the fact that we need to use an antipenetration model for escaped particles. In the present paper, we propose a new model of antipenetration which preserves the conservation of linear momentum on the boundaries and enables us to simulate complex and flexible boundaries. Finally by performing numerical simulations, we demonstrate the validity of our new model.

  1. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  2. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of RC Shear Walls using Damage Mechanics Approach Considering Bond-Slip Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Davoodi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research, nonlinear dynamic analysis of concrete shear wall using a new nonlinear model based on damage mechanics approach and considering bond slip effects is presented. Nonlinear behavior of concrete is modeled by a rotational smeared crack model using damage mechanics approach. The proposed model considers major characteristics of the concrete subjected to two and three dimensional loading conditions. These characteristics are pre-softening behavior, softening initiation criteria and fracture energy conservation. The model was used in current research analysis after verification by some available numerical tests. Reinforcements are modeled by a bilinear relationship using two models: Discrete truss steel element and Smeared model. In Discrete model the effects of bond-slide between concrete and rebar is mentioned using the bond-link element model concept. Based on the presented algorithms and methodology, an FEM code is developed in FORTRAN. The validity of the proposed models and numerical algorithms has been checked using the available experimental results. Finally, numerical simulation of CAMUS I and CAMUS III reinforced concrete shear walls is carried out. Comparisons of deduced results confirm the validity of proposed models. The obtained results, both in the expected displacements and crack profiles for the walls, show a good accuracy with respect to the experimental results. Also, using discrete truss element model with respect to the smeared steel model leads to increasing the accuracy of maximum displacement response to 7% in analysis.

  3. Dynamics of the collision of a vortex ring with a vertical heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, G.; Palacios-Morales, C. A.; Zenit, R.; Solorio-Ordaz, F. J.

    2012-11-01

    We study the dynamics of the impact of a vortex ring with a vertical heated plate (at constant temperature). Laminar vortex rings were generated with a piston cylinder arrangement. The vertical wall is heated by a thermal bath which is held at constant temperature producing a laminar and stable thermal boundary layer. Measurements of the 2D velocity field were obtained with a PIV technique. The experimental results for the isothermal case are in agreement with previous investigations reported in the literature. To avoid azimuthal instabilities, we mainly conducted experiments for L /D0 = 1 (where L is the piston displacement and D0 is the cylinder inner diameter) with different wall temperatures and vortex translation velocities. For this case, secondary vortices were not observed. Using ink visualization we observed the evolution of the vortex shape. The initial circular shape evolves into a ``cat head'' shape after reaching the wall. The top and bottom regions of the vortex reduce and increase their vorticity, respectively. The sides are stretched and convected. An analysis of the different mechanisms leading to this shape evolution is presented and discussed.

  4. Analysis of Dynamic Coupling Characteristics of the Slope Reinforced by Sheet Pile Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large deformation of slope caused by earthquake can lead to the loss of stability of slope and its retaining structures. At present, there have been some research achievements about the slope reinforcement of stabilizing piles. However, due to the complexity of the structural system, the coupling relationship between soil and pile is still not well understood. Hence it is of great necessity to study its dynamic characteristics further. In view of this, a numerical model was established by FLAC3D in this paper, and the deformation and stress nephogram of sheet pile wall in peak ground motion acceleration (PGA at 0.1 g, 0.2 g, and 0.4 g were obtained. Through the analysis, some conclusions were obtained. Firstly, based on the nephogram of motion characteristics and the positions of the slip surface and the retaining wall, the reinforced slope can be divided into 6 sections approximatively, namely, the sliding body parts of A, B, C, D, and E and the bedrock part F. Secondly, the deformation and stress distributions of slope reinforced by sheet pile wall were carefully studied. Based on the results of deformation calculation from time history analysis, the interaction force between structure and soil can be estimated by the difference of peak horizontal displacements, and the structure-soil coupling law under earthquake can be studied by this approach.

  5. Influence of Transient Thermal Response of Solid Wall on Bubble Dynamics in Pool Boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of single bubble pool boiling process including transient thermal response of solid wall is performed using the ghost fluid method and the level set method for the sharp interface representation. The results show that non-physical initial condition in the numerical simulation deeply affects the process of bubble growth, and then multi-cycle simulation is necessary to eliminate its influence. It is shown by the present results that two nucleate criteria, i.e. constant waiting time and constant nucleate superheat, for determining the appearance time for the subsequent bubble lead to the same quasi-steady process of bubble growth if they are matched with each other. A periodically expanding and receding thermal “hollow” can be observed inside solid wall underneath the growing bubble. The recovery of the temperature on the nucleate site and the thermal boundary layer near the heating surface is influenced by transient heat conduction inside solid wall, which can affect evidently bubble thermal dynamics and heat transfer.

  6. Influence of Transient Thermal Response of Solid Wall on Bubble Dynamics in Pool Boiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of single bubble pool boiling process including transient thermal response of solid wall is performed using the ghost fluid method and the level set method for the sharp interface representation. The results show that non-physical initial condition in the numerical simulation deeply affects the process of bubble growth, and then multicycle simulation is necessary to eliminate its influence. It is shown by the present results that two nucleate criteria, i.e. constant waiting time and constant nucleate superheat, for determining the appearance time for the subsequent bubble lead to the same quasi-steady process of bubble growth if they are matched with each other. A periodically expanding and receding thermal “hollow” can be observed inside solid wall underneath the growing bubble. The recovery of the temperature on the nucleate site and the thermal boundary layer near the heating surface is influenced by transient heat conduction inside solid wall, which can affect evidently bubble thermal dynamics and heat transfer.

  7. Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics and Pulsed Magnetization Reversal in Four Soft Ferromagnetic Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Pulsed magnetization reversal has been studied experimentally and theoretically in four soft ferromagnetic materials. Two important industrial polycrystalline alloys HCR (50% Ni, 50% Fe) and Mumetal (77% Ni, 14% Fe, 5% Cu, 4% Mo) of thickness 6 to 25mum were investigated in toroidal format during rapid (0.1 to 7.0 Tmu s^{-1}) approximately constant voltage magnetization reversal. Drive field and magneto-optic measurements are interpreted in terms of domain wall motion. Particular attention is paid to the intermediate drive field termed step field region. Bar and surface domain models which assume a detailed balance between domain wall surface tension and magnetic field pressure are used for interpretation of the experimental data. Accord with HCR results is particularly encouraging. Comparison between HCR and Mumetal behaviour does allow some insight into the dynamic behaviour of the latter material. Metglas 2826 (rm Fe_{40 } Ni_{40} P_{14} B_6) and Metglas 2605 (rm Fe_{80} B_{20}) are amorphous alloys manufactured by Allied Chemical Company. These members of a relatively new class of soft ferromagnetic material are prepared by splat cooling from the melt at rates of over 10^{6} ^{0}Ks^ {-1}. Low coercivity and high resistivity are particularly attractive properties associated with these alloys offering considerable practical application. Long ribbons of Metglas 2826 and 2605 under tension were subjected to square magnetic field pulses. At low fields propagating head-on domain boundaries of the Sixtus Tonks type were observed of lengths 20 to 50 cms. A magneto-static model provides estimates of specific domain wall energy and exchange constant. Low field domain wall motion measurements on 2826 are consistent with eddy current damping. At high fields, however, eddy current damping is estimated to contribute about 50% of the total damping. At these fields, magnetization reversal is initiated at only one of

  8. Dynamics and scaling properties for a one-dimensional impact system with two periodically vibrating walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livorati, André L. P.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a system composed of a particle suffering impacts between two heavy periodically vibrating walls. An original, nonlinear area preserving mapping is obtained. The control parameters of amplitude of perturbation and frequency of oscillation play an important role in the phase space, shaping the portion of chaotic seas, position of invariant curves and the amount of KAM islands. The study of the behavior of the root mean square velocity was made via analytical description and numerical simulations. We proposed scaling arguments to describe its dynamics and our results show remarkably good agreement between the theory and the simulations concerning a scaling invariance with respect to the control parameters. Also, an analysis of the diffusion coefficient confirms the validity of the scaling invariance, giving robustness to our modeling.

  9. Assessing Political Dynamics in Contemporary Malaysia: Implications for Democratic Change

    OpenAIRE

    Surain Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    This article examines political dynamics in Malaysia and assesses the prospects for change in the direction of greater political liberalization. It focuses on the 12th General Election of 2008 and its implications for opportunities and challenges for liberal democratic change in Malaysia. It discusses the role of the internet-based new media in shaping an emerging public sphere, and some factors affecting the changing role of non-Malay voters in the political process. This article argues that...

  10. Nonoperative Treatment of Posterior Wall Acetabular Fractures After Dynamic Stress Examination Under Anesthesia: Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Andrew R; Boudreau, John A; Moed, Berton R

    2015-08-01

    Performing an examination under general anesthesia (EUA) using dynamic stress fluoroscopy of patients with posterior wall acetabular fractures has been used as a tool to determine hip stability and the need for surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of this technique, from a source other than its primary advocates, in patients with posterior wall acetabular fractures less than or equal to 50% who were stable on EUA and treated nonoperatively. Retrospective case series. University Level 1 Trauma Center. Seventeen patients with a posterior wall acetabular fracture stable on EUA treated nonoperatively. The patients were treated nonoperatively as guided by an EUA negative for instability. Patient follow-up averaged 30 months (range, 6-64 months). Outcome evaluation included the modified Merle d'Aubigné clinical score and the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire. Radiographic evaluation for subluxation or arthritis consisted of the 3 standard pelvic radiographs. Radiographic evaluation showed all hips to be congruent with a normal joint space. Sixteen of the 17 patients had radiographic outcomes rated as "excellent"; 1 patient was rated "good." The modified Merle d'Aubigné score (obtained in 12 patients) averaged very good, with only 1 having less than a good (graded as fair) clinical outcome. The Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment Questionnaire scores (from 11 patients) were not significantly different from normal and were within the normal reported values for all indices and categories. There was no correlation between fracture fragment size and outcome. This study further supports the contention that a stable hip joint, as determined by EUA, after posterior wall acetabular fracture treated nonoperatively is predictive of continued joint congruity, an excellent radiographic outcome, and good-to-excellent early clinical and functional outcomes. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for

  11. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  12. The Direct Effect of Flexible Walls on Fontan Connection Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree, Mike; Fagan, Kiley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-11-01

    The current standard treatment for sufferers of congenital heart defects is the palliative Fontan procedure. The Fontan procedure results in an anastomosis of major veins directly to the branched pulmonary arteries bypassing the dysfunctional ventricle. This total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) extends life past birth, but Fontan patients still suffer long-term complications like decreased exercise capacity, protein-losing enteropathy, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). These complications have direct ties to fluid dynamics within the connection. Previous experimental and computation studies of Fontan connection fluid dynamics employed rigid vessel models. More recent studies utilize flexible models, but a direct comparison of the fundamental fluid dynamics between rigid and flexible vessels only exists for a computational model, without a direct experimental validation. Thus, this study was a direct comparison of fluid dynamics within a rigid and two compliant idealized TCPCs. 2D particle image velocimetry measurements were collected at the connection center plane. Results include power loss, hepatic flow distribution, fluid shear stress, and flow structure recognition. The effect of flexible walls on these values and clinical impact will be discussed.

  13. Numerical Study of Current-Induced Domain-Wall Dynamics: Crossover from Spin Transfer to Momentum Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Daisuke; Udagawa, Masafumi; Ogata, Masao

    2009-03-01

    We study current-induced dynamics of a magnetic domain wall by solving a time-dependent Schrödinger equation combined with Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a one-dimensional electron system coupled to localized spins. Two types of domain-wall motions are observed depending on the hard-axis anisotropy, K\\bot, of the localized spin system. For small values of K\\bot, the magnetic domain wall shows a streaming motion driven by spin transfer. In contrast, for large values of K\\bot, a stick-slip motion driven by momentum transfer is obtained. We clarify the origin of these characters of domain-wall motions in terms of the dynamics of one-particle energy levels and distribution functions.

  14. Characterization of applied tensile stress using domain wall dynamic behavior of grain-oriented electrical steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fasheng; Ren, Wenwei; Tian, Gui Yun; Gao, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Stress measurement that provides early indication of stress status has become increasingly demanding in the field of Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Bridging the correlation between micro magnetic properties and the applied tensile stress is the first conceptual step to come up with a new method of non-destructive testing. This study investigates the characterization of applied tensile stress with in-situ magnetic domain imaging and their dynamic behaviors by using magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy assisted with magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF). Threshold magnetic field (TMF) feature to reflect 180 ° domain wall (DW) characteristics behaviors in different grains is proposed for stress detection. It is verified that TMF is a threshold feature with better sensitivity and brings linear correlation for stress characterization in comparison to classical coercive field, remanent magnetization, hysteresis loss and permeability parameters. The results indicate that 180 ° DWs dynamic in the inner grain is highly correlated with stress. The DW dynamics of turn over (TO) tests for different grains is studied to illustrate the repeatability of TMF. Experimental tests of high permeability grain oriented (HGO) electrical steels under stress loading have been conducted to verify this study.

  15. Large eddy simulation of flow over a wall-mounted cube: Comparison of different semi dynamic subgrid scale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nooroullahi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the ability of different semi dynamic subgrid scale models for large eddy simulation was studied in a challenging test case. The semi dynamic subgrid scale models were examined in this investigation is Selective Structure model, Coherent structure model, Wall Adaptive Large Eddy model. The test case is a simulation of flow over a wall-mounted cube in a channel. The results of these models were compared to structure function model, dynamic models and experimental data at Reynolds number 40000. Results show that these semi dynamic models could improve the ability of numerical simulation in comparison with other models which use a constant coefficient for simulation of subgrid scale viscosity. In addition, these models don't have the instability problems of dynamic models.

  16. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Horizontally Curved Thin-Walled Box-Girder Bridge due to Moving Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nallasivam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact on curved box-girder bridges due to vehicle moving across rough bridge deck have been analyzed using bridge-vehicle coupled dynamics. The bridge deck unevenness has been assumed to be a homogeneous random process in space specified by a PSD function. The analysis incorporates the effect of centrifugal forces due to vehicle moving on curved bridge. The curved box-girder bridge has been numerically modeled using computationally efficient thin-walled box-beam finite elements which take into account the torsional warping, distortion and distortional warping, that are important features of thin-walled box girders. Rigid vehicle with longitudinal and transverse input to the wheels giving rise to heave-pitch-roll degrees of freedom has been considered. The theoretical bridge model used in simulation study has been validated by a free vibration experiment using impact excitation. The impact factors for several response parameters such as bending moment, shear force, torsional moment, torsional bi-moment, distortional moment, distortional bi-moment and vertical deflections have been obtained for various bridge-vehicle parameters. Both constant velocity and forward acceleration of the vehicle have been considered to examine impact factor. The results highlighted that the impact factors of a curved box girder bridge corresponding to torsion, distortion and their corresponding bimoments have been observed to be generally very high, while those of the other responses are also relatively higher than that of corresponding straight box girder bridge.

  18. Dynamics of the spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain initialized in a domain-wall state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misguich, Grégoire; Mallick, Kirone; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2017-11-01

    We study the dynamics of an isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain starting in a domain-wall initial condition where the spins are initially up on the left half-line and down on the right half-line. We focus on the long-time behavior of the magnetization profile. We perform extensive time-dependent density-matrix renormalization-group simulations (up to t =350 ) and find that the data are compatible with a diffusive behavior. Subleading corrections decay slowly blurring the emergence of the diffusive behavior. We also compare our results with two alternative scenarios: superdiffusive behavior and enhanced diffusion with a logarithmic correction. We finally discuss the evolution of the entanglement entropy.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of momentum transport in rotating wall perfused bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N; Tığli, R Seda; Beşkardeş, Işil Gerçek; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Colak, Uner

    2010-11-01

    In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor is performed to characterize the complex hydrodynamic environment for the simulation of cartilage development in RWPV bioreactor in the presence of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs, i.e., cell-chitosan scaffolds. Shear stress exerted on chitosan scaffolds in bioreactor was calculated for different rotational velocities in the range of 33-38 rpm. According to the calculations, the lateral and lower surfaces were exposed to 0.07926-0.11069 dyne/cm(2) and 0.05974-0.08345 dyne/cm(2), respectively, while upper surfaces of constructs were exposed to 0.09196-0.12847 dyne/cm(2). Results validate adequate hydrodynamic environment for scaffolds in RWPV bioreactor for cartilage tissue development which concludes the suitability of operational conditions of RWPV bioreactor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  1. Open and closed shear-walls in high-rise structural systems: Static and dynamic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Nitti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a General Algorithm is applied to the analysis of high-rise structures. This algorithm is to be used as a calculation tool in preliminary design; it allows to define the interaction between closed and open, straight or curved shear-walls, and the forces exchanged in structures subject to mainly horizontal loads. The analysis can be performed in both static and dynamic regimes, the mode shapes and the natural frequencies being assessed. This general formulation allows analyses of high-rise structures by taking into account the torsional rigidity and the warping deformations of the elements composing the building without gross simplifications. In thisway it is possible to model the structure as a single equivalent cantilever, thus minimising the degrees of freedom of the system, and consequently the calculation time. Finally, potentials of the method proposed are demonstrated by a numerical example which emphasizes the link between global displacements and stresses in the elements composing the structure.

  2. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The Sinus Membrane-Maxillary Lateral Wall Complex: Histologic Description and Clinical Implications for Maxillary Sinus Floor Elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Angel; Monje, Alberto; Urban, Istvan; Kruger, Laura G; Garaicoa-Pazmiño, Carlos; Sugai, James V; Wang, Hom-Lay

    Maxillary sinus floor elevation has been documented as a safe and predictable procedure for gaining vertical bone height in the atrophic posterior maxillae. Conversely, there is a lack of basic research on the characteristics of the union between the sinus membrane (SM) and the bone. Clinical implications of an impaired union in healthy or pathologic membranes remain unknown. The objective of this study was to present a comprehensive histologic and morphologic description of the sinus membrane-lateral bone wall complex. In 14 fresh cadaver heads, 28 lateral wall sinus augmentation procedures were performed to obtain SM samples. Samples were assessed using hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and toluidine blue staining and immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry procedures. Specimens were coded and studied by a trained examiner using an optical microscope at ×4, ×10, ×40, and ×100 objectives. Thickness and inflammation status were assessed in these samples. Overall SM thickness of the samples was 0.40 ± 0.12 mm and was positively correlated to the inflammatory condition of the membranes. Such low values are the consequence of limited inflammation. Most of the fibers and cells in the deeper layers of the SM ran in a horizontal direction, oriented parallel to the underlying bone wall. In the immunohistochemistry study, 3 out of 7 samples showed a certain degree of nestin expression, suggesting osteogenic potential in spite of the elderly specimens. Large variations in thickness across the SM were found. These were noted to be partially correlated to the SM inflammatory status. The vast majority of the fibers were oriented parallel to the maxillary lateral wall, and only a few isolated areas showed a stronger perpendicular attachment. This might indicate the surpassing importance of the SM inflammatory status, operator skill, and other anatomical factors over the sinus membrane-maxillary lateral wall complex interface. Moreover, about half of the SM

  4. Role of proline in cell wall synthesis and plant development and its implications in plant ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POLAVARAPU BILHAN KAVI KISHOR

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Proline is a proteogenic amino acid and accumulates both under stress and non-stress conditions as a beneficial solute in plants. Recent discoveries point out that proline plays an important role in plant growth and differentiation across life cycle. It is a key determinant of many cell wall proteins that plays important roles in plant development. The role of extensins (EXTs, arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs and hydroxyproline- and proline-rich proteins (H/PRPs as important components of cell wall proteins that play pivotal roles in cell wall signal transduction cascades, plant development and stress tolerance is discussed in this review. Molecular insights are also provided here into the plausible roles of proline transporters modulating key events in plant development. In addition, the roles of proline during seed developmental transitions including storage protein synthesis are discussed.

  5. Mitochondrial dynamics in type 2 diabetes: Pathophysiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rovira-Llopis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a key role in maintaining cellular metabolic homeostasis. These organelles have a high plasticity and are involved in dynamic processes such as mitochondrial fusion and fission, mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Type 2 diabetes is characterised by mitochondrial dysfunction, high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and low levels of ATP. Mitochondrial fusion is modulated by different proteins, including mitofusin-1 (MFN1, mitofusin-2 (MFN2 and optic atrophy (OPA-1, while fission is controlled by mitochondrial fission 1 (FIS1, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1 and mitochondrial fission factor (MFF. PARKIN and (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 participate in the process of mitophagy, for which mitochondrial fission is necessary. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathways of mitochondrial dynamics, their impairment under type 2 diabetes, and pharmaceutical approaches for targeting mitochondrial dynamics, such as mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (mdivi-1, dynasore, P110 and 15-oxospiramilactone. Furthermore, we discuss the pathophysiological implications of impaired mitochondrial dynamics, especially in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Influence of confinement by smooth and rough walls on particle dynamics in dense hard-sphere suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eral, H B; van den Ende, D; Mugele, F; Duits, M H G

    2009-12-01

    We used video microscopy and particle tracking to study the dynamics of confined hard-sphere suspensions. Our fluids consisted of 1.1-microm-diameter silica spheres suspended at volume fractions of 0.33-0.42 in water-dimethyl sulfoxide. Suspensions were confined in a quasiparallel geometry between two glass surfaces: a millimeter-sized rough sphere and a smooth flat wall. First, as the separation distance (H) is decreased from 18 to 1 particle diameter, a transition takes place from a subdiffusive behavior (as in bulk) at large H, to completely caged particle dynamics at small H. These changes are accompanied by a strong decrease in the amplitude of the mean-square displacement (MSD) in the horizontal plane parallel to the confining surfaces. In contrast, the global volume fraction essentially remains constant when H is decreased. Second, measuring the MSD as a function of distance from the confining walls, we found that the MSD is not spatially uniform but smaller close to the walls. This effect is the strongest near the smooth wall where layering takes place. Although confinement also induces local variations in volume fraction, the spatial variations in MSD can be attributed only partially to this effect. The changes in MSD are predominantly a direct effect of the confining surfaces. Hence, both the wall roughness and the separation distance (H) influence the dynamics in confined geometries.

  7. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamet Elisabeth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after growth arrest were compared. A new strategy consisting of high performance cation exchange chromatography and mono-dimensional electrophoresis was established for separation of cell wall proteins. This work allowed identification of 137 predicted secreted proteins, among which 51 had not been identified previously. Apart from expected proteins known to be involved in cell wall extension such as xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolases, expansins, polygalacturonases, pectin methylesterases and peroxidases, new proteins were identified such as proteases, proteins related to lipid metabolism and proteins of unknown function. Conclusion This work highlights the CWP dynamics that takes place between the two developmental stages. The presence of proteins known to be related to cell wall extension after growth arrest showed that these proteins may play other roles in cell walls. Finally, putative regulatory mechanisms of protein biological activity are discussed from this global view of cell wall proteins.

  8. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Bautista-Ortín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution.

  9. Coupled Static and Dynamic Buckling Modelling of Thin-Walled Structures in Elastic Range Review of Selected Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołakowski Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of papers that investigate the static and dynamic coupled buckling and post-buckling behaviour of thin-walled structures is carried out. The problem of static coupled buckling is sufficiently well-recognized. The analysis of dynamic interactive buckling is limited in practice to columns, single plates and shells. The applications of finite element method (FEM or/and analytical-numerical method (ANM to solve interaction buckling problems are on-going. In Poland, the team of scientists from the Department of Strength of Materials, Lodz University of Technology and co-workers developed the analytical-numerical method. This method allows to determine static buckling stresses, natural frequencies, coefficients of the equation describing the post-buckling equilibrium path and dynamic response of the plate structure subjected to compression load and/or bending moment. Using the dynamic buckling criteria, it is possible to determine the dynamic critical load. They presented a lot of interesting results for problems of the static and dynamic coupled buckling of thin-walled plate structures with complex shapes of cross-sections, including an interaction of component plates. The most important advantage of presented analytical-numerical method is that it enables to describe all buckling modes and the post-buckling behaviours of thin-walled columns made of different materials. Thin isotropic, orthotropic or laminate structures were considered.

  10. Dissecting the regulation of pollen tube growth by modelling the interplay of hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli eLiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics are all important properties that regulate pollen tube growth. Currently, the two main pollen tube growth models, the cell wall model and the hydrodynamic model do not appear to be reconcilable. Here we develop an integrative model for pollen tube growth and show that our model reproduces key experimental observations: 1 that the hypertonic condition leads to a much longer oscillatory period and that the hypotonic condition halves the oscillatory period; 2 that oscillations in turgor are experimentally undetectable; 3 that increasing the extracellular calcium concentration or decreasing the pH decreases the growth oscillatory amplitude; 4 that knockout of Raba4d, a member of the Rab family of small GTPase proteins, decreases pollen tube length after germination for 24 hours. Using the model generated here, we reveal that 1 when cell wall extensibility is large, pollen tube may sustain growth at different volume changes and maintain relatively stable turgor; 2 turgor increases if cell wall extensibility decreases; 3 increasing turgor due to decrease in osmolarity in the media, although very small, increases volume change . However, increasing turgor due to decrease in cell wall extensibility decreases volume change. In this way regulation of pollen tube growth by turgor is context dependent. By changing the osmolarity in the media, the main regulatory points are extracellular osmolarity for water flow and turgor for the volume encompassed by the cell wall. However, if the viscosity of cell wall changes, the main regulatory points are turgor for water flow and wall extensibility for the volume encompassed by the cell wall. The novel methodology developed here reveals the underlying context-dependent regulatory principle of pollen tube growth.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  12. Static Properties and Current-Driven Dynamics of Domain Walls in Perpendicular Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy Nanostrips with Rectangular Cross-Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current-induced domain wall motion along thin ferromagnetic strips with high perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy is studied by means of full micromagnetic simulations and the extended one-dimensional model, taking into account thermal effects and edge roughness. A slow creep regime, where the motion is controlled by wall pinning and thermal activation, and a flow regime with linear variation of the DW velocity, are observed. In asymmetric stacks, where the Rashba spin-orbit field stabilizes the domain wall against turbulent transformations, the steady linear regime is extended to higher currents, leading to higher velocities than in single-layer or symmetric stacks. The pinning and depinning at and from a local constriction were also studied. The results indicate that engineering pinning sites in these strips provide an efficient pathway to achieve both high stability against thermal fluctuations and low-current depinning avoiding Joule heating. Finally, the current-driven dynamics of a pinned domain wall is examined, and both the direct and the alternating contributions to the induced voltage signal induced are characterized. It was confirmed that the direct contribution to the voltage signal can be linearly enhanced with the number of pinned walls, an observation which could be useful to develop domain-wall-based nano-oscillators.

  13. Simplified Dynamic Structural Time History Response Analysis of Flexible Approach Walls Founded on Clustered Pile Groups Using Impact_Deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Approach Walls Founded on Clustered Pile Groups Using Impact_Deck In fo rm at io n an d Te ch no lo gy L ab or at or y Barry C. White, José...Time-History Response Analysis of Flexible Approach Walls Founded on Clustered Pile Groups Using Impact_Deck Barry C. White and Robert M. Ebeling...clustered pile groups and subjected to barge train impact events. This software tool, Impact_Deck, is used to perform a dynamic, time- domain

  14. Calculation of the neutron electric dipole moment with two dynamical flavors of domain wall fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. Berruto; T. Blum; K. Orginos; A. Soni

    2005-12-08

    We present a study of the neutron electric dipole moment ({rvec d}{sub N}) within the framework of lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical light quarks. The dipole moment is sensitive to the topological structure of the gauge fields, and accuracy can only be achieved by using dynamical, or sea quark, calculations. However, the topological charge evolves slowly in these calculations, leading to a relatively large uncertainty in {rvec d}{sub N}. It is shown, using quenched configurations, that a better sampling of the charge distribution reduces this problem, but because the CP even part of the fermion determinant is absent, both the topological charge distribution and {rvec d}{sub N} are pathological in the chiral limit. We discuss the statistical and systematic uncertainties arising from the topological charge distribution and unphysical size of the quark mass in our calculations and prospects for eliminating them. Our calculations employ the RBC collaboration two flavor domain wall fermion and DBW2 gauge action lattices with inverse lattice spacing a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7 GeV, physical volume V {approx} (2 fm){sup 3}, and light quark mass roughly equal to the strange quark mass (m{sub sea} = 0.03 and 0.04). We determine a value of the electric dipole moment that is zero within (statistical) errors, |{rvec d}{sub N}| = -0.04(20) e-{theta}-fm at the smaller sea quark mass. Satisfactory results for the magnetic and electric form factors of the proton and neutron are also obtained and presented.

  15. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green’s function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  16. Phase-space dynamics of opposition control in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yongyun; Ibrahim, Joseph; Yang, Qiang; Doohan, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    The phase-space dynamics of wall-bounded shear flow in the presence of opposition control is explored by examining the behaviours of a pair of nonlinear equilibrium solutions (exact coherent structures), edge state and life time of turbulence at low Reynolds numbers. While the control modifies statistics and phase-space location of the edge state and the lower-branch equilibrium solution very little, it is also found to regularise the periodic orbit on the edge state by reverting a period-doubling bifurcation. Only the upper-branch equilibrium solution and mean turbulent state are significantly modified by the control, and, in phase space, they gradually approach the edge state on increasing the control gain. It is found that this behaviour results in a significant reduction of the life time of turbulence, indicating that the opposition control significantly increases the probability that the turbulent solution trajectory passes through the edge state. Finally, it is shown that the opposition control increases the critical Reynolds number of the onset of the equilibrium solutions, indicating its capability of transition delay. This work is sponsored by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in the UK (EP/N019342/1).

  17. The Effect of Wettability on the Dynamical Behaviors of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical behaviors of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT with the internal and external wettability are studied based on a multiple flexible shell model in the paper. The SWCNT-water system comprises five constituent parts, that is, the SWCNT, the absorbed inner and outer layers of water molecules, the water in the center of the SWCNT, and the water surrounding the absorbed outer water layer. Here we consider the absorbed water layers as infinitesimally thin shells, which interact with the nanotube via a continuum Lennard-Jones potential, and the water in the center of the SWCNT and the counterpart surrounding the absorbed outer water layer as the potential flow. It is found that the interactions of SWCNT and the water layer are responsible for an upshift in the frequency of the SWCNT and the total upshift is approximately the sum of the two corresponding upshifts. The vdW interactions also cause the increase of the frequency of internal and external water shells. We hope that the paper can offer a new modeling approach to determine whether carbon nanotubes have adsorbed fluids inside their pores and could be used for detecting changes in their filling state.

  18. A microstructurally motivated model of arterial wall mechanics with mechanobiological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, C; Ferruzzi, J; Roccabianca, S; Di Martino, E S; Humphrey, J D

    2014-03-01

    Through mechanobiological control of the extracellular matrix, and hence local stiffness, smooth muscle cells of the media and fibroblasts of the adventitia play important roles in arterial homeostasis, including adaptations to altered hemodynamics, injury, and disease. We present a new approach to model arterial wall mechanics that seeks to define better the mechanical environments of the media and adventitia while avoiding the common prescription of a traction-free reference configuration. Specifically, we employ the concept of constituent-specific deposition stretches from the growth and remodeling literature and define a homeostatic state at physiologic pressure and axial stretch that serves as a convenient biologically and clinically relevant reference configuration. Information from histology and multiphoton imaging is then used to prescribe structurally motivated constitutive relations for a bi-layered model of the wall. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by describing in vitro measured biaxial pressure-diameter and axial force-length responses of murine carotid arteries and predicting the associated intact and radially cut traction-free configurations. The latter provides a unique validation while confirming that this constrained mixture approach naturally recovers estimates of residual stresses, which are fundamental to wall mechanics, without the usual need to prescribe an opening angle that is only defined conveniently on cylindrical geometries and cannot be measured in vivo. Among other findings, the model suggests that medial and adventitial stresses can be nearly uniform at physiologic loads, albeit at separate levels, and that the adventitia bears increasingly more load at supra-physiologic pressures while protecting the media from excessive stresses.

  19. Dynamics of force impulses and bubble oscillations during gas burning on a thrust wall in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, V. S.; Drozhzhin, A. P.; Medvedev, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    Comparative experiments are formed for measuring the force impulses during combustion of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture on a thrust wall in cylindrical combustors and on an open wall shaped as a flat disk. For identical gas charges, the mean specific impulse generated by pulsed burning of the gas on an open thrust wall is found to be higher than that in the case of gas charge burning in cylindrical barrels.

  20. Outcomes of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum treated nonoperatively after diagnostic screening with dynamic stress examination under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Charles S; Moed, Berton R

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic stress fluoroscopy with the patient under general anesthesia has been advocated as a clinical measure of hip stability and congruity in patients with a posterior wall acetabular fracture. The purpose of this study was to establish the predictive value of the dynamic stress fluoroscopic examination for these fractures by evaluating clinical and radiographic outcomes after nonoperative treatment of fractures found to be stable with this examination. Twenty-one consecutive patients with an acute posterior wall fracture of the acetabulum who were shown to have a stable hip joint by dynamic stress fluoroscopy while they were under general anesthesia were treated nonoperatively. At the time of follow-up, the patients underwent clinical and/or radiographic evaluation. Clinical follow-up was performed for eighteen patients at a minimum of two years after injury, at which time the average modified Merle d'Aubigné score was very good, with no one having less than a good clinical outcome. Fifteen of these eighteen patients had radiographic evaluation at a minimum of two years, and all were found to have a congruent joint with a normal joint space and no evidence of posttraumatic arthritis. Hip joint stability determined with dynamic stress fluoroscopy with the patient under general anesthesia after a posterior wall acetabular fracture is predictive of hip joint congruity, an excellent radiographic outcome, and a good-to-excellent early clinical outcome after nonoperative treatment.

  1. Domain wall dynamics in Fe-rich glass covered amorphous microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Jesus Daniel [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo (Spain); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Kosice (Slovakia); Ruiz, Alvaro; Cobos, Raul F.; Ribot, Ivan; Vega, Victor; Alvarez, Pablo; Sanchez, Maria Luisa; Sanchez Ll., Jose Luis; Prida, Victor M. de la; Hernando, Blanca [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    The influence of glass covering on domain wall propagation in Fe{sub 65}B{sub 15}Si{sub 15}C{sub 5} amorphous microwires is studied, before and after glass removal. High values of domain wall velocity and mobility have been obtained. The domain wall velocity depends linearly on the driving magnetic field. However, the mobility of the domain wall is very different in both situations studied. The results are explained due to the modification of internal stress distribution after glass removing, that change the domain structure of the sample. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. The Origin of Nanoscopic Grooving on Vesicle Walls in Submarine Basaltic Glass: Implications for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E. French

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic networks of nanoscopic grooves measuring 50–75 nm wide by <50 nm deep occur on the walls of vesicles in the glassy margins of mid-ocean ridge pillow basalts worldwide. Until now, their exact origin and significance have remained unclear. Here we document examples of such grooved patterns on vesicle walls in rocks from beneath the North Atlantic Ocean, and give a fluid mechanical explanation for how they formed. According to this model, individual nanogrooves represent frozen viscous fingers of magmatic fluid that were injected into a thin spheroidal shell of hot glass surrounding each vesicle. The driving mechanism for this process is provided by previous numerical predictions of tangential tensile stress around some vesicles in glassy rocks upon cooling through the glass transition. The self-assembling nature of the dendritic nanogrooves, their small size, and overall complexity in form, are interesting from the standpoint of exploring new applications in the field of nanotechnology. Replicating such structures in the laboratory would compete with state-of-the-art nanolithography techniques, both in terms of pattern complexity and size, which would be useful in the fabrication of a variety of grooved nanodevices. Dendritic nanogrooving in SiO2 glass might be employed in the manufacturing of integrated circuits.

  3. Pea border cell maturation and release involve complex cell wall structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise

    2017-01-01

    of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our...

  4. Gut Fermentation of Dietary Fibres: Physico-Chemistry of Plant Cell Walls and Implications for Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Williams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of dietary fibre (DF originates from plant cell walls. Chemically, DF mostly comprise carbohydrate polymers, which resist hydrolysis by digestive enzymes in the mammalian small intestine, but can be fermented by large intestinal bacteria. One of the main benefits of DF relate to its fermentability, which affects microbial diversity and function within the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT, as well as the by-products of the fermentation process. Much work examining DF tends to focus on various purified ingredients, which have been extracted from plants. Increasingly, the validity of this is being questioned in terms of human nutrition, as there is evidence to suggest that it is the actual complexity of DF which affects the complexity of the GIT microbiota. Here, we review the literature comparing results of fermentation of purified DF substrates, with whole plant foods. There are strong indications that the more complex and varied the diet (and its ingredients, the more complex and varied the GIT microbiota is likely to be. Therefore, it is proposed that as the DF fermentability resulting from this complex microbial population has such profound effects on human health in relation to diet, it would be appropriate to include DF fermentability in its characterization—a functional approach of immediate relevance to nutrition.

  5. Clinical implications of dynamic systems theory for phonological development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rvachew, Susan; Bernhardt, Barbara May

    2010-02-01

    To examine treatment outcomes in relation to the complexity of treatment goals for children with speech sound disorders. The clinical implications of dynamic systems theory in contrast with learnability theory are discussed, especially in the context of target selection decisions for children with speech sound disorders. Detailed phonological analyses of pre-and posttreatment speech samples are provided for 6 children who received treatment in a previously published randomized controlled trial of contrasting approaches to target selection (Rvachew & Nowak, 2001). Three children received treatment for simple target phonemes that did not introduce any new feature contrasts into the children's phonological systems. Three children received treatment for complex targets that represented feature contrasts that were absent from the children's phonological systems. Children who received treatment for simple targets made more progress toward the acquisition of the target sounds and demonstrated emergence of complex untreated segments and feature contrasts. Children who received treatment for complex targets made little measurable gain in phonological development. Treatment outcomes will be enhanced if the clinician selects treatment targets at the segmental and prosodic levels of the phonological system in such a way as to stabilize the child's knowledge of subcomponents that form the foundation for the emergence of more complex phoneme contrasts.

  6. Assessing Political Dynamics in Contemporary Malaysia: Implications for Democratic Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surain Subramaniam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines political dynamics in Malaysia and assesses the prospects for change in the direction of greater political liberalization. It focuses on the 12th General Election of 2008 and its implications for opportunities and challenges for liberal democratic change in Malaysia. It discusses the role of the internet-based new media in shaping an emerging public sphere, and some factors affecting the changing role of non-Malay voters in the political process. This article argues that democratization in Malaysia is already occurring, albeit at a gradual pace; it is being pushed by the new political forces of civil society actors, newly empowered opposition parties, and the internet-based media. The boundaries of this emerging democratic space is simultaneously being shaped and contested by the political competition between status-quo and reformist forces in this society. Some institutional changes have expanded the parameters of democratic space, although the entrenched dominant institutions of the ruling regime continue to wield sufficient amounts of institutional capacity to subvert any consolidation of these democratic changes for now.

  7. Detailed Dynamic Heat Transfer in Thick Brick Walls Typical of Lille Metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antczak E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of thermal transfer in old houses massive walls offers a big interest permitting the understanding of their specificities and the choice of a suitable material for their eventual insulation. We propose to study the thermal transfer in massive brick walls that characterize the Northern Europe old houses. To do so, we will begin by defining the thermal transfer mode: we proved that the transfer mode can be reduced to a unidirectional transfer. Then, an experimental wall is built and submitted to two different solicitation types (constant temperature in steady state mode and sinusoidal temperature through a wooden insulated box containing a radiator. The interest of these solicitations is to determine the thermal properties of the wall: the steady-state regime permits to determine the thermal resistances of the system when the harmonic regime permits to determine the thermal capacities of the system.

  8. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. © 2016 The Authors.

  9. Electric-field-driven domain wall dynamics in perpendicularly magnetized multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    González, Diego López; Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Van de Wiele, Ben; Franke, Kévin J. A.; Casiraghi, Arianna; Taniyama, Tomoyasu; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    We report on reversible electric-field-driven magnetic domain wall motion in a Cu/Ni multilayer on a ferroelectric BaTiO3 substrate. In our heterostructure, strain-coupling to ferroelastic domains with in-plane and perpendicular polarization in the BaTiO3 substrate causes the formation of domains with perpendicular and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, respectively, in the Cu/Ni multilayer. Walls that separate magnetic domains are...

  10. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ki-Yeob; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Jae Woong; Ryu, Yong Hee; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2017-01-01

    Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs), has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of...

  11. Simulation of evacuation processes in a square with a partition wall using a cellular automaton model for pedestrian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoping; Li, Wei; Guan, Chao

    2010-06-01

    The level of service in public walking spaces is mainly determined by the differences in pedestrian traffic demand and infrastructure supply. A problem worth studying is the evacuation process in a closed square with partition wall. In this paper, a cellular automaton model is presented to simulate the evacuation process in the square. This model defines a floor field and considers the selection of an exit and effect of social forces. Some simulation results show the model’s correct description of the pedestrian dynamics. Both the total evacuation time and the degree of pedestrians jamming in a certain area are regarded as the indicators of the evacuation progress and the measure of evacuation efficiency. Concerning the two indicators, some viewpoints on the evacuation design of the partition wall are put forward: (1) changing the length of the partition wall could reduce the evacuation time, however, it could also bring the serious pedestrians jamming in a certain area, which may cause potential injury; (2) with the prior consideration for evacuation time, the length of the partition wall should be better chosen to make the pedestrians jamming less severe.

  12. Universal domain wall dynamics under electric field in Ta/CoFeB/MgO devices with perpendicular anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weiwei; Vernier, Nicolas; Agnus, Guillaume; Garcia, Karin; Ocker, Berthold; Zhao, Weisheng; Fullerton, Eric E; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2016-11-16

    Electric field effects in ferromagnetic metal/dielectric structures provide a new route to control domain wall dynamics with low-power dissipation. However, electric field effects on domain wall velocities have only been observed so far in the creep regime where domain wall velocities are low due to strong interactions with pinning sites. Here we show gate voltage modulation of domain wall velocities ranging from the creep to the flow regime in Ta/Co 40 Fe 40 B 20 /MgO/TiO 2 structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a universal description of the role of applied electric fields in the various pinning-dependent regimes by taking into account an effective magnetic field being linear with the electric field. In addition, the electric field effect is found to change sign in the Walker regime. Our results are consistent with voltage-induced modification of magnetic anisotropy. Our work opens new opportunities for the study and optimization of electric field effect at ferromagnetic metal/insulator interfaces.

  13. Universal domain wall dynamics under electric field in Ta/CoFeB/MgO devices with perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weiwei; Vernier, Nicolas; Agnus, Guillaume; Garcia, Karin; Ocker, Berthold; Zhao, Weisheng; Fullerton, Eric E.; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2016-01-01

    Electric field effects in ferromagnetic metal/dielectric structures provide a new route to control domain wall dynamics with low-power dissipation. However, electric field effects on domain wall velocities have only been observed so far in the creep regime where domain wall velocities are low due to strong interactions with pinning sites. Here we show gate voltage modulation of domain wall velocities ranging from the creep to the flow regime in Ta/Co40Fe40B20/MgO/TiO2 structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a universal description of the role of applied electric fields in the various pinning-dependent regimes by taking into account an effective magnetic field being linear with the electric field. In addition, the electric field effect is found to change sign in the Walker regime. Our results are consistent with voltage-induced modification of magnetic anisotropy. Our work opens new opportunities for the study and optimization of electric field effect at ferromagnetic metal/insulator interfaces. PMID:27848936

  14. Visualization of tissue velocity data from cardiac wall motion measurements with myocardial fiber tracking: principles and implications for cardiac fiber structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bernd André; Kreher, Björn W; Markl, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen

    2006-04-01

    The spatial arrangement of myocardial fiber structure affects the mechanical and electrical properties of the heart. Therefore, information on the structure and dynamics of the orientation of the muscle fibers in the human heart might provide significant insight into principles of the mechanics of normal ventricular contraction and electrical propagation and may subsequently aid pre- and postsurgical evaluation of patients. Fiber orientation is inherently linked to cardiac wall motion, which can be measured with phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), also termed tissue phase mapping (TPM). This study provides initial results of the visualization of velocity data with fiber tracking algorithms and discusses implications for the fiber orientations. In order to generate datasets with sufficient volume coverage and resolution TPM measurements with three-dimensional (3D) velocity encoding were executed during breath-hold periods and free breathing. Subsequent postprocessing evaluation with a tracking algorithm for acceleration fields derived from the velocity data was performed. Myocardial acceleration tracking illustrated the dynamics of fiber structure during four different phases of left ventricular performance, that include isovolumetric contraction (IVC), mid-systole, isovolumetric relaxation (IVR), and mid-diastole. Exact reconstruction of the myocardial fiber structure from velocity data requires mathematical modeling of spatiotemporal evolution of the velocity fields. 'Acceleration fibers' were reconstructed at these four phases during the cardiac cycle, and these findings may become (a) surrogate parameters in the normal ventricle, (b) baseline markers for subsequent clinical studies of abnormal hearts with altered architecture, and (c) may help to explain and illustrate functional features of cardiac performance in structural models like the helical ventricular myocardial band.

  15. Dynamical scaling, domain-growth kinetics, and domain-wall shapes of quenched two-dimensional anisotropic XY models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Praestgaard, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    obeys dynamical scaling and the shape of the dynamical scaling function pertaining to the structure factor is found to depend on P. Specifically, this function is described by a Porod-law behavior, q-ω, where ω increases with the wall softness. The kinetic exponent, which describes how the linear domain...... infinite to zero temperature as well as to nonzero temperatures below the ordering transition. The continuous nature of the spin variables causes the domain walls to be ‘‘soft’’ and characterized by a finite thickness. The steady-state thickness of the walls can be varied by a model parameter, P. At zero...... size varies with time, R(t)∼tn, is for both models at zero temperature determined to be n≃0.25, independent of P. At finite temperatures, the growth kinetics is found to cross over to the Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn law characterized by n≃0.50. The results support the idea of two separate zero...

  16. Coupled dynamics of vortex-induced vibration and stationary wall at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Jaiman, Rajeev K.; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2017-09-01

    The flow past an elastically mounted circular cylinder placed in proximity to a plane wall is numerically studied in both two dimensions (2D) and three dimensions (3D). This paper aims to explain the mechanism of the cylinder bottom shear layer roll-up suppression in the context of laminar vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of a cylinder placed in the vicinity of a plane stationary wall. In 2D simulations, VIV of a near-wall cylinder with structure-to-displaced fluid mass ratios of m* = 2 and 10 is investigated at the Reynolds number of Re = 100 at a representative gap ratio of e/D = 0.90, where e denotes the gap distance between the cylinder surface and the plane wall. First, the cylinder is placed at five different upstream distances, LU, to study the effects of the normalized wall boundary layer thickness, δ /D , on the hydrodynamic quantities involved in the VIV of a near-wall cylinder. It is found that the lock-in range shifts towards the direction of the higher reduced velocity Ur as δ /D increases and that the lock-in range widens as m* reduces. Second, via visualization of the vortex shedding patterns, four different modes are classified and the regime maps are provided for both m* = 2 and 10. Third, the proper orthogonal decomposition analysis is employed to assess the cylinder bottom shear layer roll-up suppression mechanism. For 3D simulations at Re = 200, the circular cylinder of a mass ratio of m* = 10 with a spanwise length of 4D is placed at a gap ratio of e/D = 0.90 and an upstream distance of LU = 10D. The 3D vortex patterns are investigated to re-affirm the vortex shedding suppression mechanism. The pressure distributions around the cylinder are identified within one oscillation cycle of VIV. The pressure and the shear stress distributions on the bottom wall are examined to demonstrate the effects of near-wall VIV on the force distributions along the plane wall. It is found that both the suction pressure and the shear stress right below the cylinder

  17. Dynamic behavior of radiant cooling system based on capillary tubes in walls made of high performance concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikeska, Tomás; Svendsen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    using cooling water for the radiant cooling system with a temperature only about 4K lower than the temperature of the room air. The relatively high speed reaction of the designed system is a result of the slim construction of the sandwich wall elements made of high performance concrete. (C) 2015...... the small amount of fresh air required by standards to provide a healthy indoor environment.This paper reports on experimental analyses evaluating the dynamic behavior of a test room equipped with a radiant cooling system composed of plastic capillary tubes integrated into the inner layer of sandwich wall...... elements made of high performance concrete. The influence of the radiant cooling system on the indoor climate of the test room in terms of the air, surface and operative temperatures and velocities was investigated.The results show that the temperature of the room air can be kept in a comfortable range...

  18. Contact forces between a particle and a wet wall at both quasi-static and dynamic state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contact regime of particle-wall is investigated by the atomic force microscope (AFM and theoretical models. First, AFM is used to measure the cohesive force between a micron-sized grain and a glass plate at quasi-static state under various humidity. It is found out that the cohesive force starts to grow slowly and suddenly increase rapidly beyond a critical Relative Humidity (RH. Second, mathematical models of contacting forces are presented to depict the dynamic process that a particle impacts on a wet wall. Then the energy loss of a falling grain is calculated in comparison with the models and the experimental data from the previous references. The simulation results show that the force models presented here are adaptive for both low and high viscosity fluid films with different thickness.

  19. Nanosecond domain wall dynamics in ferroelectric Pb(Zr, Ti)O(3) thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Alexei; Do, Dal-Hyun; Kim, Dong Min; Eom, Chang-Beom; Adams, Bernhard; Dufresne, Eric M; Evans, Paul G

    2006-05-12

    Domain wall motion during polarization switching in ferroelectric thin films is fundamentally important and poses challenges for both experiments and modeling. We have visualized the switching of a Pb(Zr, Ti)O(3) capacitor using time-resolved x-ray microdiffraction. The structural signatures of switching include a reversal in the sign of the piezoelectric coefficient and a change in the intensity of x-ray reflections. The propagation of polarization domain walls is highly reproducible from cycle to cycle of the electric field. Domain wall velocities of 40 m s(-1) are consistent with the results of other methods, but are far less than saturation values expected at high electric fields.

  20. Dynamics of chiral domain wall under the spin-orbit torques in heavy metal/ferromagnet bilayers with in-plane anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Han; He, Peng-Bin; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Li, Zai-Dong

    2017-11-01

    The dynamics of domain wall driven by the spin-orbit torques is theoretically studied in the heavy metal/ferromagnet bilayer with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and in-plane magnetic anisotropy. Based on the Walker profile, we infer that DMI has a selectivity for the chirality of head-to-head (tail-to-tail) static wall. By analyzing the dynamic equations obtained from the collective coordinates methods, we find that there exists a switching or a hysteresis of the polarity of wall in the low-current regime. In the presence of DMI, the wall can keep sustained propagation which velocity saturates for high current and is proportional to the strength of DMI. Furthermore, the DMI makes the adjacent walls possess the same chirality and move in the same direction.

  1. Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Woetzel, Mathias; Rhensius, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions in Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanowires at room temperature. We show that this purely thermal motion is well described by an Arrhenius law, allowing for a description...

  2. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Song [College of Electrical Engineering and Control Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816 (China); School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Tian, GuiYun, E-mail: tian280@hotmail.com [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness. - Highlights: • The skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise profile is proposed as a new feature for applied stress determination. • The skewness is sensitive to applied stress and independent to excitation frequency. • Domain wall energy and pinning distance influence the relaxation time of domain wall, which leads to a non-linear behavior of skewness under compressive stress.

  3. Coupling between Current and Dynamic Magnetization : from Domain Walls to Spin Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    So far, we have derived some general expressions for domain-wall motion and the spin motive force. We have seen that the β parameter plays a large role in both subjects. In all chapters of this thesis, there is an emphasis on the determination of this parameter. We also know how to incorporate

  4. A multiscale SPH particle model of the near-wall dynamics of leukocytes in flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Babak; Comerford, Andrew; Ellero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiscale Lagrangian particle solver based on SPH is developed with the intended application of leukocyte transport in large arteries. In such arteries, the transport of leukocytes and red blood cells can be divided into two distinct regions: the bulk flow and the near-wall region. In the bulk flow, the transport can be modeled on a continuum basis as the transport of passive scalar concentrations. Whereas in the near-wall region, specific particle tracking of the leukocytes is required and lubrication forces need to be separately taken into account. Because of large separation of spatio-temporal scales involved in the problem, simulations of red blood cells and leukocytes are handled separately. In order to take the exchange of leukocytes between the bulk fluid and the near-wall region into account, solutions are communicated through coupling of conserved quantities at the interface between these regions. Because the particle tracking is limited to those leukocytes lying in the near-wall region only, our approach brings considerable speedup to the simulation of leukocyte circulation in a test geometry of a backward-facing step, which encompasses many flow features observed in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Dynamics and control of a heat pump assisted extractive dividing-wall column for bioethanol dehydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patraşcu, Iulian; Bildea, Costin Sorin; Kiss, Anton A.

    Recently, a novel heat-pump-assisted extractive distillation process taking place in a dividing-wall column was proposed for bioethanol dehydration. This integrated design combines three distillation columns into a single unit that allows over 40% energy savings and low specific energy requirements

  6. The bio-physics of condensation of divalent cations into the bacterial wall has implications for growth of Gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Cyril; Cherkaoui, Mohammed; Egan, Sharon; Leigh, James

    2017-02-01

    The anionic-polyelectrolyte nature of the wall of Gram-positive bacteria has long been suspected to be involved in homeostasis of essential cations and bacterial growth. A better understanding of the coupling between the biophysics and the biology of the wall is essential to understand some key features at play in ion-homeostasis in this living system. We consider the wall as a polyelectrolyte gel and balance the long-range electrostatic repulsion within this structure against the penalty entropy required to condense cations around wall polyelectrolytes. The resulting equations define how cations interact physically with the wall and the characteristic time required for a cation to leave the wall and enter into the bacterium to enable its usage for bacterial metabolism and growth. The model was challenged against experimental data regarding growth of Gram-positive bacteria in the presence of varying concentration of divalent ions. The model explains qualitatively and quantitatively how divalent cations interact with the wall as well as how the biophysical properties of the wall impact on bacterial growth (in particular the initiation of bacterial growth). The interplay between polymer biophysics and the biology of Gram positive bacteria is defined for the first time as a new set of variables that contribute to the kinetics of bacterial growth. Providing an understanding of how bacteria capture essential metal cations in way that does not follow usual binding laws has implications when considering the control of such organisms and their ability to survive and grow in extreme environments. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. NMR investigation of domain wall dynamics and hyperfine field anisotropy in magnets by the magnetic video-pulse excitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavasheli, Ts A.; Mamniashvili, GI; Gegechkori, T. O.

    2017-04-01

    Two-pulse nuclear spin echoes were studied experimentally depending on the time of application and pulse amplitudes of the DC magnetic field-magnetic video-pulses (MVP) as well as on the value of the external magnetic field. The measurements were performed with nanopowders and polycrystals of metallic cobalt, in lithium ferrite and half metal Co2MnSi. Two types of dependences of these signals on time of application of MVP with respect to moments of application of exciting radio-frequency pulses were established, which were determined by the degree of anisotropy of local hyperfine fields. The mechanisms of influence of the pinning and mobility of domain walls on the revealed specific features of the signals under study are also discussed. It is shown that temporal spectra of the MVP effect on two-pulse echoes in multidomain magnets are determined by the parameters of domain walls and can be used for qualitative and quantitative characterization of the domain wall dynamics of magnets.

  8. Non-linear dynamic instability analysis of thin-walled stiffener beam subjected to uniform harmonic in-plane loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amit; Panda, Sarat Kumar; Dey, Tanish

    2017-11-01

    Present analysis deals with nonlinear flexural-torsional vibration and dynamic instability of thin-walled stiffener beam with open section subjected to harmonic in-plane loading. The static and dynamic components of the applied harmonic in-plane loading are assumed to vary uniformly. A set of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) describing the vibration of system is derived. Using Galerkin's method, these partial differential equations are reduced into coupled Mathieu equations. The steady state response of the system is determined by solving the condition for a non-trivial solution. The principal regions of parametric resonance are determined using the method suggested by Bolotin. The numerical results are presented to investigate the effect of aspect ratios, boundary conditions and static load factor on the frequency-amplitude responses and instability regions.

  9. Numerical investigation of flow dynamics and scalar transport in a wall-bounded turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrebtov, M.; Bazhenov, A.; Borynyak, K.

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of Large Eddy Simulation of a turbulent jet discharging into a confined slot with the wall spacing to jet inlet width ratio = 0.1 and Re = 104. The jet exhibits a meandering motion accompanied by formation of checkerboard pattern of large vortices in the mixing layer. A passive scalar transport was simulated with uniform inlet distribution of the scalar. It was found that the fluctuations of spanwise velocity component grow downstream and their maximum location is migrating from the lateral boundaries of the jet (free-shear layers) to the wall-boundary layers. Some evidence of counter-gradient turbulent scalar transport was found in the mixing layers of the jet, which may be attributed to the influence of observed large-scale checkerboard-type vortices.

  10. Dynamic Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes modified electrodes using a Langmuir-Schaefer method

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, David; Romero, Edna Cecilia; Colina, Álvaro; Heras, Aránzazu

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroelectrochemistry is a fundamental technique to characterize single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films. In this work, we have performed the study of SWCNT films transferred to a glassy carbon electrode using a Langmuir-Schaefer method. Langmuir balance has allowed us to control the characteristics of the film that can be easily transferred to the electrode support. Time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry experiments at scan rates between 20 and 400 mV s−1 were done in two di...

  11. The dynamics of a capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The motion of an initially spherical capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow is investigated via an accelerated boundary integral implementation. The neo-Hookean model is used as the constitutive law of the capsule membrane. The maximum wall-normal migration is observed when the oscillation period of the imposed shear is of the order of the relaxation time of the elastic membrane; hence, the optimal capillary number scales with the inverse of the oscillation frequency and the ratio agrees well with the theoretical prediction in the limit of high-frequency oscillation. The migration velocity decreases monotonically with the frequency of the applied shear and the capsule-wall distance. We report a significant correlation between the capsule lateral migration and the normal stress difference induced in the flow. The periodic variation of the capsule deformation is roughly in phase with that of the migration velocity and normal stress difference, with twice the frequency of the imposed shear. The maximum...

  12. Suitability of pharmacokinetic models for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of abdominal aortic aneurysm vessel wall: a comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Lai Nguyen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Increased microvascularization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA vessel wall has been related to AAA progression and rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three pharmacokinetic models to describe AAA vessel wall enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with AAA underwent DCE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The volume transfer constant (K(trans , which reflects microvascular flow, permeability and surface area, was calculated by fitting the blood and aneurysm vessel wall gadolinium concentration curves. The relative fit errors, parameter uncertainties and parameter reproducibilities for the Patlak, Tofts and Extended Tofts model were compared to find the most suitable model. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation (CV. Further, the relationship between K(trans and AAA size was investigated. RESULTS: DCE-MRI examinations from thirty-nine patients (mean age±SD: 72±6 years; M/F: 35/4 with an mean AAA maximal diameter of 49±6 mm could be included for pharmacokinetic analysis. Relative fit uncertainties for K(trans based on the Patlak model (17% were significantly lower compared to the Tofts (37% and Extended Tofts model (42% (p<0.001. K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility for the Patlak model (ICC = 0.61 and CV = 22% was comparable with the Tofts (ICC = 0.61, CV = 23% and Extended Tofts model (ICC = 0.76, CV = 22%. K(trans was positively correlated with maximal AAA diameter (Spearman's ρ = 0.38, p = 0.02 using the Patlak model. CONCLUSION: Using the presented imaging protocol, the Patlak model is most suited to describe DCE-MRI data of the AAA vessel wall with good K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility.

  13. Modeling, Characterization and Analysis of the dynamic behavior of heat transfers through polyethylene and glass walls of Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi-Triki, N.; Bendimerad, S.; Chermiti, A.; Mahdjoub, T.; Draoui, B.; Abène, A.

    The conventional agricultural tunnel greenhouse is highly widespread in Mediterranean countries, despite the shortcomings it presents, specifically the overheating during the day and the intense cooling at night. This can sometimes lead to an internal thermal inversion. The chapel-shaped glass greenhouse is relatively more efficient, but its evolution remains slow because of its investment cost and amortization. The objectives of the agricultural greenhouse are to create a microclimate that is favorable to the requirements and growth of plants from the surrounding climatic conditions and produce cheap off-season fruits, vegetables and flowers which must be highly available all along the year. The agricultural greenhouse is defined by its structural and functional architecture as well as by the optical, thermal and mechanical qualities of its wall and the accompanying technical support. The greenhouse is supposed to be a confined environment where there is an exchange of several components. The main intervening factors are: light, temperature and relative humidity. When protected, the culture heats up more than when in free air because of the wall that acts as a barrier to harmful influences of the wind and the surrounding climatic variations as well as to the reduction in internal air convection. This thermal evolution state depends on the air-tightness degree of the cover and its physical characteristics. It has to be transparent to solar rays, and must as well absorb and reflect infrared rays emitted by the soil. This leads to trapped solar rays, called the "greenhouse effect". In this article, we propose the dynamic modeling of the greenhouse system, the characterization and analysis of the thermal behavior of the wall for both experimental greenhouses, where the first one is made of polyethylene (tunnel greenhouse) and the second of glass (chapel-shaped greenhouse), throughout experimentation and simulation which finally lead to identifying the evolution in the

  14. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  15. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  16. Implications of short time scale dynamics on long time processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystel El Hage

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a comprehensive overview of the structural dynamics in topical gas- and condensed-phase systems on multiple length and time scales. Starting from vibrationally induced dissociation of small molecules in the gas phase, the question of vibrational and internal energy redistribution through conformational dynamics is further developed by considering coupled electron/proton transfer in a model peptide over many orders of magnitude. The influence of the surrounding solvent is probed for electron transfer to the solvent in hydrated I−. Next, the dynamics of a modified PDZ domain over many time scales is analyzed following activation of a photoswitch. The hydration dynamics around halogenated amino acid side chains and their structural dynamics in proteins are relevant for iodinated TyrB26 insulin. Binding of nitric oxide to myoglobin is a process for which experimental and computational analyses have converged to a common view which connects rebinding time scales and the underlying dynamics. Finally, rhodopsin is a paradigmatic system for multiple length- and time-scale processes for which experimental and computational methods provide valuable insights into the functional dynamics. The systems discussed here highlight that for a comprehensive understanding of how structure, flexibility, energetics, and dynamics contribute to functional dynamics, experimental studies in multiple wavelength regions and computational studies including quantum, classical, and more coarse grained levels are required.

  17. Which AO/OTA 31-A2 pertrochanteric fractures can be treated with a dynamic hip screw without developing a lateral wall fracture? A CT-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Singh, Ravijot; Gn, Kiran Kumar; Jain, Vaibhav; Gupta, Ankit; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay

    2016-05-01

    To determine whether radiographic measurements derived from standard computed tomography (CT) evaluation can be used to predict likelihood of a peri-operative lateral femoral wall fracture in AO/OTA 31-A2 pertrochanteric fractures treated with a dynamic hip screw (DHS). Fifty-one patients with AO/OTA 31-A2 classified pertrochanteric fractures were evaluated using a pre-operative CT scan of the pelvis with both hips. Dimensions of the lateral wall were calculated for each patient using four parameters: (1) height of the lateral wall above the vastus ridge; (2) circumference of the lateral wall 2 cm below the vastus ridge at an angle of 135°; this circumference was further divided into an anterior, lateral and posterior component; (3) cortical thickness at the centre of the lateral component of the lateral wall; and (4) cortical index. All patients were treated with a 135° DHS. Postoperative radiographs were assessed for lateral femoral wall fracture. Patients with a lateral wall fracture (17/51) had a smaller circumference (4.47 cm vs 5.44 cm p value fractures with a lateral wall height of > 1.68 cm and an anterior component of > 2.10 cm in circumference are not likely to sustain a lateral wall fracture when treated with a DHS.

  18. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Affan, I A M; Hugtenburg, R P; Bari, D S; Al-Saleh, W M; Piliero, M; Evans, S; Al-Hasan, M; Al-Zughul, B; Al-Kharouf, S; Ghaith, A

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose. © 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Affan, I. A. M., E-mail: info@medphys-environment.co.uk; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bari, D. S. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and University of Zakho, Duhok (Iraq); Al-Saleh, W. M. [Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, United Kingdom and King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Science, Hofuf (Saudi Arabia); Evans, S. [Department of Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Singleton Hospital, Swansea SA2 8QA (United Kingdom); Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B. [College of Sciences, Zarqa University, Zarqa (Jordan); Al-Kharouf, S. [The Royal Scientific Society, Amman (Jordan); Ghaith, A. [Association of Arab Universities, Amman (Jordan)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  20. Exercise Dynamics in Secondary Mitral Regurgitation: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Philippe B; Schwammenthal, Ehud; Levine, Robert A; Vandervoort, Pieter M

    2017-01-17

    Secondary mitral valve regurgitation (MR) remains a challenging problem in the diagnostic workup and treatment of patients with heart failure. Although secondary MR is characteristically dynamic in nature and sensitive to changes in ventricular geometry and loading, current therapy is mainly focused on resting conditions. An exercise-induced increase in secondary MR, however, is associated with impaired exercise capacity and increased mortality. In an era where a multitude of percutaneous solutions are emerging for the treatment of patients with heart failure, it becomes important to address the dynamic component of secondary MR during exercise as well. A critical reappraisal of the underlying disease mechanisms, in particular the dynamic component during exercise, is of timely importance. This review summarizes the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the dynamic deterioration of secondary MR during exercise, its functional and prognostic impact, and the way current treatment options affect the dynamic lesion and exercise hemodynamics in general. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Dynamic testing of thin-walled composite box beams in a vacuum chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1989-01-01

    Vibration characteristics of thin-walled composite box beams are measured in a rotating environment in a 10-ft diameter vacuum chamber. Symmetric and antisymmetric layup beams are fabricated out of graphite/epoxy prepreg material using an autoclave molding technique. These are excited using piezoelectric ceramic elements and responses are measured using strain gages and accelerometers. First three natural modes are identified using spectrum analyzer over a range of rotational speeds up to 1000 rpm. Measured frequencies and mode shapes (displacement as well as strain) are correlated satisfactorily with calculated finite element results.

  2. Immobilization of the laccases from trametes versicolor and streptomyces coelicolor on single-wall carbon nanotube electrodes: a molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trohalaki, S. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); General Dynamics Information Technology, Dayton, OH (United States); Pachter, R. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Luckarift, H.R. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Universal Technology Corporation, Dayton, OH (United States); Johnson, G.R. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    2012-08-15

    In this work, we investigate the immobilization of laccases from Trametes versicolor (TvL) and the small laccase (SLAC) from Streptomyces coelicolor on single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surfaces. SLAC may potentially offer improved adsorption on the electrode, thus improving bioelectrocatalytic activity via direct electron transfer (DET). Laccase immobilization on SWCNTs is achieved non-covalently with a molecular tether (1-pyrene butanoic acid, succinimidyl ester) that forms an amide bond with an amine group on the laccase surface while the pyrene coordinates to the SWCNT by {pi}-{pi} stacking. In our approach, density functional theory calculations were first used to model the interaction energies between SWCNTs and pyrene to validate an empirical force field, thereafter applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In the simulated models, the SWCNT was placed near the region of the (type 1) Cu(T1) atom in the laccases, and in proximity to other regions where adsorption seems likely. Calculated interaction energies between the SWCNTs and laccases and distances between the SWCNT surface and the Cu(T1) atom have shown that SWCNTs adsorb more strongly to SLAC than to TvL, and that the separation between the SWCNTs and Cu(T1) atoms is smaller for SLAC than for TvL, having implications for improved DET. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Investigation of Thermal Expansion Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Raman Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimir, Daniel

    The mechanical properties of nano-sized materials seem to differ significantly from the predicted behavior of their bulk macroscopic counterparts (Smart, 2014, 16). The former tend to be stronger, more malleable and exhibit greater flexibility. The thermal properties of materials have also been shown to be altered significantly after having been shrunken to nanometer dimensions. The nano material that exhibits this peculiar behavior that is studied in this dissertation are single walled carbon nanotubes. Single walled carbon nanotubes are hollow cylindrical tubes that are one atomic layer in thickness and made up of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms. The majority of samples have diameters on the order 1 nm, with lengths ranging from 1 micron to sometimes a centimeter (Tomanek, 2008, v). The thermo-mechanical quantity that I specifically examine in this research is the linear and volume thermal expansion coefficients of SWCNTs. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficient is the ratio of the change in unit length in response to a 1 degree Celsius rise in temperature. The "true" value of this quantity is obtained in the theoretical limit of a vanishing temperature range DeltaT in the ratio stated above. However, this simply stated thermo-mechanical quantity for Carbon Nanotubes still remains a controversial topic, with widespread discrepancies among results of certain magnitudes - such as the temperature at the occurrence of maximum contraction, and at the transition from contraction to expansion. In conclusion, there is much incentive in examining the somewhat controversial variation in the behavior and quoted values of the thermal expansion of these quasi one-dimensional objects. In this study, I examine this important property of single walled carbon nanotubes using Resonant Raman Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation based on the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order potential. The latter is a well established potential that is well-suited to

  4. Dynamics of Peregrine combs and Peregrine walls in an inhomogeneous Hirota and Maxwell-Bloch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Zi-Qi; Sun, Wen-Rong; Shi, Yu-Ying; Li, Min; Xu, Min

    2017-06-01

    Under investigation in this paper is an inhomogeneous Hirota-Maxwell-Bloch (IHMB) system which can describe the propagation of optical solitons in an erbium-doped optical fiber. The breather multiple births (BMBs) are derived with periodically varying group velocity dispersion (GVD) coefficients. Under large periodic modulations in the GVD coefficient of IHMB system, the Peregrine comb (PC) solution is produced, which can be viewed as the limiting case of the BMBs. When the amplitude of the modulation satisfies a special condition, the Peregrine wall (PW) that can be regarded as an intermediate state between rogue wave and PC is obtained. The effects of the third-order dispersion on the spatiotemporal characteristics of PCs and PWs are studied. Our results may be useful for the experimental control and manipulation of the formation of generalized Peregrine rogue waves in inhomogeneous erbium-doped optical fiber.

  5. Slug-flow dynamics with phase change heat transfer in compact heat exchangers with oblique wavy walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Matsushita, Ryo; Suzuki, Yuji

    2017-11-01

    With abundance of low-temperature geothermal energy source, small-scale binary-cycle power generation system has gained renewed attention. Although heat exchangers play a dominant role in thermal efficiency and the system size, the optimum design strategy has not been established due to complex flow phenomena and the lack of versatile heat transfer models. In the present study, the concept of oblique wavy walls, with which high j/f factor is achieved by strong secondary flows in single-phase system, is extended to two-phase exchangers. The present analyses are based on evaporation model coupled to a VOF technique, and a train of isolated bubbles is generated under the controlled inlet quality. R245fa is adopted as a low boiling-point working media, and two types of channels are considered with a hydraulic diameter of 4 mm: (i) a straight circular pipe and (ii) a duct with oblique wavy walls. The focus is on slug-flow dynamics with evaporation under small capillary but moderate Weber numbers, where the inertial effect as well as the surface tension is of significance. A possible direction of the change in thermo-physical properties is explored by assuming varied thermal conductivity. Effects of the vortical motions on evaporative heat transfer are highlighted. This work has been supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Japan.

  6. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of effects of nickel coating on torsional behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Haiyang, E-mail: gsfshy@sohu.co [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China); Zha Xinwei [School of Science, Xi' an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi' an 710121 (China)

    2011-02-15

    The effects of nickel coating on the torsional behaviors of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) subject to torsion motion are investigated using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The simulation results show that regardless of chirality, defect or radius, nickel coating can considerably enhance the critical torque of SWCNTs. However, by comparing the critical torsion angle between nickel-coated SWCNTs and corresponding pristine SWCNTs, it is found that nickel coating in small-radius nanotubes does induce a reduction in the critical torsion angle. The results also show that the structural failure of nickel coated imperfect (9,0) SWCNT occurs at an obviously higher critical torque in comparison with uncoated (9,0) SWCNT with a vacancy defect. Furthermore, we also find that the critical torque of a short nickel coated SWCNT is bigger than that of a long one, while the critical torsion angle for a short tube is smaller than that for a long one.

  8. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  9. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  10. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit: implications for cell adhesion and fruit softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, William George Tycho

    2002-01-01

    polysaccharides to the non-softening and altered cell adhesion phenotype. Cell wall material (CWM) and solubilised fractions of mature green and red ripe fruit were analysed by chemical, enzymatic and immunochemical techniques. No major differences in CWM sugar composition were detected although differences were......The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic...... that was chelator-soluble was 50% less in Cnr cell walls at both the mature green and red ripe stages. Chelator-soluble material from ripe-stage Cnr was more susceptible to endo-polygalacturonase degradation than the corresponding material from wild-type fruit. In addition, cell walls from Cnr fruit contained...

  11. Skin and chest wall dose with multi-catheter and MammoSite breast brachytherapy: Implications for late toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttino, Laurie W; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Miheala; Arthur, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) continues to increase in popularity. Up to 14% of patients treated with the MammoSite (MS) report some degree of chronic pain, which may be related to chest wall toxicity. Reports from several institutions using the multicatheter (MC) technique have not shown associated elevated chest wall toxicity. Additionally, a recent investigation has suggested that increased toxicity may occur with the MS when the dose to the chest wall exceeds 125% of the prescribed dose. This investigation compares the skin and chest wall doses of a cohort of patients treated with the MC technique to a group treated with the MS. The dosimetric data for 43 patients treated with the MC technique and 83 patients treated with the MS at Virginia Commonwealth University were reviewed. This cohort represents consecutively treated patients from our most recent experience to minimize any learning curve effect on dosimetry. Plans were generated using 3D software (Brachyvision, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Multiple dwell positions were used for all MS patients to optimize dose delivery. The minimum distances from the planning target volume to the skin and chest wall were calculated, as well as the maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall. The mean skin distances for patients treated with the MC technique and the MS were 0.5 and 0.9cm, respectively (pskin distance, the mean skin dose for the MC technique was only 2.3Gy per fraction (67% of prescription dose). The mean skin dose for the MS was 3.2Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose, pskin dose for the MS was 3.6Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose, pskin doses in excess of 125% for the MC and MS were 0% and 9.6%, respectively. The percentage of patients receiving chest wall doses in excess of 125% for the MC and MS were 0% and 38.6%, respectively. The MC technique results in more conformal dose delivery, with significantly lower mean skin and chest wall doses. Treatment

  12. Implications of Exchange Rate Dynamics and External Reserve for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we examined the impact of exchange rate dynamics and external reserve on inflation and investment in Nigeria between the period 1970 – 2009, using a combination of ordinary least squares, augmented dickey fuller unit root test and the co- integration test. The changes in external reserve had a positive ...

  13. Tourist activated networks: Implications for dynamic packaging systems in tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Gretzel, Ulrike; Fesenmaier, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses tourist activated networks as a concept to inform technological applications supporting dynamic bundling and en-route recommendations. Empirical data was collected from travellers who visited a regional destination in the US and then analyzed with respect to its network struc...... marketing....

  14. the implications of land use/cover dynamics on resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-04

    Dec 4, 2017 ... Geographic Information System (GIS) in describing land use/cover changes in Tubah Sub-division. Primary data was ... Keywords: Land use/cover, Dynamics, Remote Sensing Techniques, Geographic Information System,. Resource ..... Grazing land dropped to 82.18km2, accounting for. 22.5% of the ...

  15. Dynamics and diversity in use: implications for aesthetics and usability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bijl-Brouwer, Mieke; Eggink, Wouter; Boks, C.; McMahon, C.; Ion, W.; Parkinson, B

    2010-01-01

    The ease of use or usability of a product depends not only on product characteristics, but on the user characteristics and environment in which a product is used as well. Products that are used in varying use situations therefore have to meet varying usability demands. In our research on dynamics

  16. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann

    2003-01-01

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium inmagnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequentlysucceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven bythe free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressuregradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect theparticle, momentum and heat confinement properties of theconfiguration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the mostimportant modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies arecarried out on plas...

  17. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel E Moller

    Full Text Available The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently established technique, based on polysaccharide microarrays probed with antibodies and carbohydrate binding modules, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated with fungus-farming in ants.

  18. Pulsed laser CVD investigations of single-wall carbon nanotube growth dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Styers-Barnett, D. J.; Puretzky, A. A.; Rouleau, C. M.; Yuan, D.; Ivanov, I. N.; Xiao, K.; Liu, J.; Geohegan, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The nucleation and rapid growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were explored by pulsed-laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (PLA-CVD). A special high-power, Nd:YAG laser system with tunable pulse width (>0.5 ms) was implemented to rapidly heat (>3×104°C/s) metal catalyst-covered substrates to different growth temperatures for very brief (sub-second) and controlled time periods as measured by in situ optical pyrometry. Utilizing growth directly on transmission electron microscopy grids, exclusively SWNTs were found to grow under rapid heating conditions, with a minimum nucleation time of >0.1 s. By measuring the length of nanotubes grown by single laser pulses, extremely fast growth rates (up to 100 microns/s) were found to result from the rapid heating and cooling induced by the laser treatment. Subsequent laser pulses were found not to incrementally continue the growth of these nanotubes, but instead activate previously inactive catalyst nanoparticles to grow new nanotubes. Localized growth of nanotubes with variable density was demonstrated through this process and was applied for the reliable direct-write synthesis of SWNTs onto pre-patterned, catalyst-covered metal electrodes for the synthesis of SWNT field-effect transistors.

  19. Pulsed Laser CVD Investigations of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Liu, Zuqin [ORNL; Styers-Barnett, David J [ORNL; Puretzky, Alexander A [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher M [ORNL; Yuan, Dongning [Duke University; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL; Liu, Jie [Duke University

    2008-01-01

    The nucleation and rapid growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were explored by pulsed-laser assisted chemical vapor deposition (PLA-CVD). A special high-power, Nd:YAG laser system with tunable pulse width (> 0.5 ms) was implemented to rapidly heat (>30,000 C/s) metal catalyst-covered substrates to different growth temperatures for very brief (sub-second) and controlled time periods as measured by in situ optical pyrometry. Utilizing growth directly on transmission electron microscopy grids, exclusively SWNTs were found to grow under rapid heating conditions, with a minimum nucleation time of >0.10 s. By measuring the length of nanotubes grown by single laser pulses, extremely fast growth rates (up to 100 microns/s) were found to result from the rapid heating and cooling induced by the laser treatment. Subsequent laser pulses were found not to incrementally continue the growth of these nanotubes, but instead activate previously inactive catalyst nanoparticles to grow new nanotubes. Localized growth of nanotubes with variable density was demonstrated through this process, and was applied for the reliable direct-write synthesis of SWNTs onto pre-patterned, catalyst-covered metal electrodes for the synthesis of SWNT field-effect transistors.

  20. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Sydney, Australia. December 6, 1990. Lumley, J. L. A dynamical-systems-theory approach to the wall region. Environmental Engineering Laboratory, CSIRO...Nonlinear Science. Holmes, P. Editor in Chief, Nonlinear Scinece Today. Holmes, P. Reviewer for Physica D, J. Sound Vib., J. Phys., Q. Appl. Math, Phys...Spring, 1994; Organizing committee member. Holmes, P. Editorial Board Member: Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis; Journal of Nonlinear Scinece

  1. Impact of inner-wall reflection on UV reactor performance as evaluated by using computational fluid dynamics: The role of diffuse reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentao; Li, Mengkai; Bolton, James R; Qu, Jiuhui; Qiang, Zhimin

    2017-02-01

    Making use of the reflected ultraviolet (UV) radiation with a reflective inner wall is a promising way to improve UV reactor performance. In this study, the impact of inner-wall reflection on UV reactor performance was evaluated in annular single-lamp UV reactors by using computational fluid dynamics, with an emphasis on the role of diffuse reflection. The UV radiation inside the reactor chamber was simulated using a calibrated discrete ordinates radiation model, which has been proven to be a reliable tool for modeling fluence rate (FR) distributions in UV reactors with a reflective inner wall. The results show that UV reactors with a highly reflective inner wall (Reflectivity = 0.80) had obviously higher FRs and reduction equivalent fluences (REFs) than those with an ordinary inner wall (Reflectivity = 0.26). The inner-wall diffuse reflection further increased the reactor REF, as a result of the elevated volume-averaged FR. The FR distribution uniformity had conditioned contributions to UV reactor performance. Specifically, in UV reactors with a plug-like flow the FR distribution uniformity contributed to the REF to some extent, while in UV reactors with a mixed flow it had little influence on the REF. This study has evaluated, for the first time, the impact of inner-wall diffuse reflection on UV reactor performance and has renewed the understanding about the contribution of FR distribution uniformity to UV reactor performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multicomponent ballistic transport in narrow single wall carbon nanotubes: Analytic model and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutat, T.; Adler, J.; Sheintuch, M.

    2011-01-01

    The transport of gas mixtures through molecular-sieve membranes such as narrow nanotubes has many potential applications, but there remain open questions and a paucity of quantitative predictions. Our model, based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations, proposes that ballistic motion, hindered by counter diffusion, is the dominant mechanism. Our simulations of transport of mixtures of molecules between control volumes at both ends of nanotubes give quantitative support to the model's predictions. The combination of simulation and model enable extrapolation to longer tubes and pore networks.

  3. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m{sup -2} over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures ({approx}100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300-700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  4. Understanding the Effect of Gas Dynamics in Plasma Gun Performance for Simulating Fusion Wall Response to Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Will; Underwood, Thomas; Righetti, Fabio; Cappelli, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the suitability of a pulsed coaxial plasma accelerator to simulate the interaction of edge-localized modes with plasma first wall materials is investigated. Experimental measurements derived from a suite of diagnostics are presented that focus on both the properties of the plasma flow and the manner in which such jets couple with material interfaces. Specific emphasis is placed on quantifying the variation in these properties using tungsten tokens exposed to the plasma plume as the gun volume is progressively filled with more neutral gas. These results are mapped to the operational dynamics of the gun via a time-resolved Schlieren cinematic visualization of the density gradient within the flow. Resulting videos indicate the existence of two distinct modes with vastly different characteristic timescales, spatial evolution, and plasma properties. Time resolved quantification of the associated plasma heat flux for both modes, including a range spanning 150 MW m-2 - 10 GW m-2, is presented using both a fast thermocouple gauge and an IR camera. Both diagnostics in conjunction with a heat transfer model provide an accurate description of the energy transfer dynamics and operational characteristics of plasma guns. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program.

  5. The dynamics of drops coating the underside of a flexible wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Craster; Wray, Alex; Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    Lister et al., 2009, showed that a thin fluid coating the underside of a ceiling (a model which extends in particular the works of Hammond, 1983, and Lister et al., 2005) can give rise to pendent drops. If these are fixed in place by boundary conditions, they drain to give drops of constant pressure surrounded by annular trenches. These authors also showed that, on larger domains starting from an initial perturbation, these drops will undergo a self-induced quasi-steady translation. This is driven by the release of gravitational potential energy as the fluid in the film falls into the drop. The speed and growth of these drops is accessible to analytical computation by the self-similar study of the thin trenches surrounding them, and matching to far external conditions. The subsequent dynamics are intricate, allowing for coalescence (not seen in 1 dimension) as well as complex drop-drop interactions. We extend this model to allow for the ceiling to be a flexible substrate, and also to account for inertial effects in the drops. We then investigate the effect this has on the dynamics of the drops. EPSRC DTA.

  6. Determinants of Self-Employment Dynamics and their Implications on Entrepreneurial Policy Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Millán

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the main results of the empirical research on self-employment dynamics —particularly entry and success— and discusses their possible implications on entrepreneurial policy effectiveness. The main goal of this study is to promote a debate on this topic, encouraging conditional analyses that serve as guidance in the design of a policy agenda.

  7. Kinematics and dynamics of a solitary wave interacting with varying bathymetry and/or a vertical wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsellis, Christos; Athanassoulis, Gerassimos; Charalampopoulos, Alexis-Tzianni

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigate the transformations that solitary surface waves undergo during their interaction with uneven seabed and/or fully reflective vertical boundaries. This is accomplished by performing simulations using a non-local Hamiltonian formulation, taking into account full nonlinearity and dispersion, in the presence of variable seabed [1]. This formulation is based on an exact coupled-mode representation of the velocity potential, leading to efficient and accurate computations of the Dirichlet to Neumann operator, required in Zakharov/Craig-Sulem formulation [2], [3]. In addition, it allows for the efficient computation of wave kinematics (velocity, acceleration) and the pressure field, in the time-dependent fluid domain, up to its physical boundaries. Such computations are performed for the case of high-amplitude solitary waves interacting with varying bathymetry and/or a vertical wall, shedding light to their kinematics and dynamics. More specifically, we first consider two benchmark cases, namely the transformation of solitary waves over a plane beach [4], and the reflection of solitary waves on a vertical wall [5]. As a further step, results on the scattering/reflection of a solitary wave due to an undulating seabed, and on the disintegration of a solitary wave travelling form shallow to deep water are also presented. References:[1] G.A. Athanassoulis. & Ch.E. Papoutsellis, in Volume 7: Ocean Engineering, ASME, OMAE2015-41452, p. V007T06A029 (2015)[2] W. Craig, C. Sulem, J. Comp. Phys. 108, 73-83 (1993) [3] V. Zakharov, J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys 9, 86-94 (1968)[4] S. Grilli, R. Subramanya, T. Svendsen. & J. Veeramony, J. Waterway, Port, Coastal, Ocean Eng. 120(6), 609-628. (1994)[5] Y.Y. Chen, C. Kharif , J.H. Yang, H.C. Hsu, J. Touboul & J. Chambarel, Eur. J. Mech B-Fluid 49, 20-28 (2015)

  8. VCSEL modal dynamics and implications for 100Gbps links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Stephen E.; Lavrencik, Justin

    2017-02-01

    Modulation rates of VCSELs within multimode fiber links are now 25Gbps as standardized by both IEEE and Infiniband. Yet the need continues to advance the serial data rates to 50Gbps and higher to more readily support 100Gbps links with manageable fiber count. At these higher modulation rates the multimode VCSEL dynamics cannot be accurately modeled as single mode sources coupled into a MMF modeled as a simple filter. Specifically, our recent experimental results demonstrate the limitations of the standard mode partition noise and relative intensity noise models. By direct measurement of VCSEL mode dynamics we have shown modal statistics to be comprised of a mix of both correlated and anti-correlated components with a correlation time of a few symbol periods at 100G. Through simulations and experiments we demonstrate that MPN is significantly over estimated in the standard modeling tools and that RIN is enhanced by fiber dispersive effects, an effect not currently captured by current standard modeling methods and potentially underestimated.

  9. Magnolia lanuginosa (Wall. Figlar & Noot. in West Khasi Hills of Meghalaya, northeastern India: re-collection and implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aabid Hussain Mir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnolia lanuginosa (Wall. Figlar & Noot. [= Michelia lanuginosa Wall.], a rare tree species of Meghalaya, is restricted to the West Khasi Hills District, Meghalaya.  The species was considered to have become extinct from the state.  The present paper reports a recent re-collection of the species from four locations in the West Khasi Hills after a lapse of almost 100 years.  In addition, the population structure, regeneration status and the threat to the species are also discussed so as to develop effective strategies for its conservation.  

  10. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eWEI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360 and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3. Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16, AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31, AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32 and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35, were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed.

  11. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ding, Shi-You; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed. PMID:26029221

  12. The Deuterium Fraction in Massive Starless Cores and Dynamical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C.; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Pillai, Thushara; Butler, Michael J.; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sakai, Takeshi

    2016-04-01

    We study deuterium fractionation in two massive starless/early-stage cores, C1-N and C1-S, in Infrared Dark Cloud G028.37+00.07, which was first identified by Tan et al. with ALMA. Line emission from multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ were observed with the ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m, and IRAM 30 m telescopes. By simultaneously fitting the spectra, we estimate the excitation conditions and deuterium fraction, {D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+} \\equiv \\quad [{{{N}}}2{{{D}}}+]/[{{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+], with values of {D}{frac}{{{N}}2{{{H}}}+} ≃ 0.2-0.7, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Additional observations of o-H2D+ are also presented that help constrain the ortho-to-para ratio of H2, which is a key quantity affecting the degree of deuteration. We then present chemodynamical modeling of the two cores, especially exploring the implications for the collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff. In order to reach the high level of observed deuteration of {{{N}}}2{{{H}}}+, we find that the most likely evolutionary history of the cores involves collapse at a relatively slow rate, ≲ one-tenth of free-fall.

  13. Treefall inputs to boreal soils and implications for C dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manies, K.; Harden, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Stand replacing fires are the dominant disturbance of black spruce-dominated boreal forests. A previous study (Manies et al. 2005) determined that fire-killed wood is the source of between 10% and 60% of the carbon (C) found in the deeper, more recalcitrant soil layers of these ecosystems, although these inputs vary spatially and temporally. In that study, we assumed that the turnover time for standing dead to be converted to woody debris was approximately nine years. Over the last decade, however, woody debris inventories within two Alaskan study sites, both of which burned in 1999, indicate a longer turnover time than previously estimated. We have used these new constraints on course woody debris inputs to update the original model and calculated the impact slower fall rates could have on C storage within the deep soil C pool. These new values increase the amount of wood-derived C by up to 20%, which in turn increases deep C storage. Understanding the source of soil C is important for modeling efforts, especially those that need to partition different sources of C to determine rates of C cycling. These results also have implications for land managers who are beginning to consider C storage as a part of their management strategies.

  14. The impact of an underground cut-off wall on nutrient dynamics in groundwater in the lower Wang River watershed, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Pingping; Xu, Shiguo

    2017-03-01

    Underground cut-off walls in coastal regions are mainly used to prevent saltwater intrusion, but their impact on nutrient dynamics in groundwater is not clear. In this study, a combined analysis of multiple isotopes ([Formula: see text]) and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations is used in order to assess the impact of the underground cut-off walls on the nutrient dynamics in groundwater in the lower Wang River watershed, China. Compared with the nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in groundwater downstream of the underground cut-off walls, high [Formula: see text] and total dissolved nitrogen concentrations and similar concentration levels of [Formula: see text] and total dissolved phosphorus are found in groundwater upstream of the underground cut-off walls. The isotopic data indicated the probable occurrence of denitrification and nitrification processes in groundwater upstream, whereas the fingerprint of these processes was not shown in groundwater downstream. The management of fertilizer application is critical to control nitrogen concentrations in groundwater restricted by the underground cut-off walls.

  15. Dosimetric Implications of an Injection of Hyaluronic Acid for Preserving the Rectal Wall in Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the contribution of ahyaluronic acid (HA) injection between the rectum and the prostate to reducing the dose to the rectal wall in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: As part of a phase 2 study of hypofractionated radiation therapy (62 Gy in 20 fractions), the patients received a transperineal injection of 10 cc HA between the rectum and the prostate. A dosimetric computed tomographic (CT) scan was systematically performed before (CT1) and after (CT2) the injection. Two 9-beam intensity modulated radiation therapy-SBRT plans were optimized for the first 10 patients on both CTs according to 2 dosage levels: 5 × 6.5 Gy (PlanA) and 5 × 8.5 Gy (PlanB). Rectal wall parameters were compared with a dose–volume histogram, and the prostate–rectum separation was measured at 7 levels of the prostate on the center line of the organ. Results: For both plans, the average volume of the rectal wall receiving the 90% isodose line (V90%) was reduced up to 90% after injection. There was no significant difference (P=.32) between doses received by the rectal wall on CT1 and CT2 at the base of the prostate. This variation became significant from the median plane to the apex of the prostate (P=.002). No significant differences were found between PlanA without HA and PlanB with HA for each level of the prostate (P=.77, at the isocenter of the prostate). Conclusions: HA injection significantly reduced the dose to the rectal wall and allowed a dose escalation from 6.5 Gy to 8.5 Gy without increasing the dose to the rectum. A phase 2 study is under way in our department to assess the rate of acute and late rectal toxicities when SBRT (5 × 8.5 Gy) is combined with an injection of HA.

  16. Temporal and spatial dynamics of optical emission from laser ablation of the first wall materials of fusion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongye, ZHAO; Cong, LI; Yong, WANG; Zhiwei, WANG; Liang, GAO; Zhenhua, HU; Jing, WU; Guang-Nan, LUO; Hongbin, DING

    2018-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been developed to in situ diagnose the chemical compositions of the first wall in the EAST tokamak. However, the dynamics of optical emission of the key plasma-facing materials, such as tungsten, molybdenum and graphite have not been investigated in a laser produced plasma (LPP) under vacuum. In this work, the temporal and spatial dynamics of optical emission were investigated using the spectrometer with ICCD. Plasma was produced by an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) with pulse duration of 6 ns. The results showed that the typical lifetime of LPP is less than 1.4 μs, and the lifetime of ions is shorter than atoms at ∼10‑6 mbar. Temporal features of optical emission showed that the optimized delay times for collecting spectra are from 100 to 400 ns which depended on the corresponding species. For spatial distribution, the maximum LIBS spectral intensity in plasma plume is obtained in the region from 1.5 to 3.0 mm above the sample surface. Moreover, the plasma expansion velocity involving the different species in a multicomponent system was measured for obtaining the proper timing (gate delay time and gate width) of the maximum emission intensity and for understanding the plasma expansion mechanism. The order of expansion velocities for various species is {V}{{{C}}+}> {V}{{H}}> {V}{{{Si}}+}> {V}{{Li}}> {V}{{Mo}}> {V}{{W}}. These results could be attributed to the plasma sheath acceleration and mass effect. In addition, an optimum signal-to-background ratio was investigated by varying both delay time and detecting position.

  17. Dynamic interactions among badgers: implications for sociality and disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Monika; Palphramand, Kate L; Newton-Cross, Geraldine; Hutchings, Michael R; White, Piran C L

    2008-07-01

    1. Direct interactions between individuals play an important part in the sociality of group-living animals, their mating system and disease transmission. Here, we devise a methodology to quantify relative rates of proximity interaction from radio-tracking data and highlight potential asymmetries within the contact network of a moderate-density badger population in the north-east of England. 2. We analysed radio-tracking data from four contiguous social groups, collected over a 3-year period. Dynamic interaction analysis of badger dyads was used to assess the movement of individuals in relation to the movement of others, both within and between social groups. Dyads were assessed with regard to season, sex, age and sett use pattern of the badgers involved. 3. Intragroup separation distances were significantly shorter than intergroup separation distances, and interactions between groups were rare. Within groups, individuals interacted with each other more often than expected, and interaction patterns varied significantly with season and sett use pattern. Non-mover dyads (using the main sett for day-resting on > 50% of occasions) interacted more frequently than mover dyads (using an outlier sett for day-resting on > 50% of occasions) or mover-non-mover dyads. Interactions between group members occurred most frequently in winter. 4. Of close intragroup interactions (sociality and support the suggestion that badger social groups are comprised of different subgroups, in our case based on differential sett use patterns. 5. Asymmetries in contact structure within a population will affect the way in which diseases are transmitted through a social network. Assessment of these networks is essential for understanding the persistence and spread of disease within populations which do not mix freely or which exhibit heterogeneities in their spatial or social behaviour.

  18. Dynamics of living phytoplankton: Implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, A B [Centre for Marine and Environmental Research (CIMA), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)], E-mail: abarbosa@ualg.pt

    2009-01-01

    Phytoplankton is the dominant primary producer in aquatic ecosystems and is considered a gauge of ecological condition and change. Some phytoplankton groups, namely diatoms, dinoflagellates, and coccolithophores, produce morphological or chemical fossils that can be used for paleoenvironmental reconstruction. This study aims to review the processes that regulate dynamics in living phytoplankton and to highlight how this knowledge is used in paleoecological studies. The distribution patterns of phytoplankton in present-day aquatic ecosystems are shaped by the interplay between processes that regulate cell growth and cell death. Cell growth and cell death are regulated by the internal environment of phytoplankton (e.g., specific environmental tolerances, resource uptake properties, cell size, density and morphology, alternative nutritional strategies such as mixotrophy or N{sub 2} uptake, motility, intracellular storage capacities, grazing resistance properties), and by its external environment. The external environment includes variables dependent on the availability of resources (e.g., light intensity, concentration of CO{sub 2} and dissolved inorganic macronutrients and micronutrients, availability of living prey in case of mixotrophs) and variables independent of resources (e.g., temperature, salinity, turbulence, ultraviolet radiation, bioactive compounds, activity of grazers, viruses, and eukaryotic parasites). The importance of recently described loss processes, such as grazing by phagotrophic protists, viral lyses, and programmed cell death, is discussed in the context of its potential impact upon phytoplankton vertical fluxes. Examples of the use of different phytoplankton metrics (e.g. abundance, species composition, species morphology, and elemental composition) to infer contemporaneous as well as past environmental and ecological conditions are critically evaluated.

  19. Dynamics of living phytoplankton: Implications for paleoenvironmental reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A. B.

    2009-01-01

    Phytoplankton is the dominant primary producer in aquatic ecosystems and is considered a gauge of ecological condition and change. Some phytoplankton groups, namely diatoms, dinoflagellates, and coccolithophores, produce morphological or chemical fossils that can be used for paleoenvironmental reconstruction. This study aims to review the processes that regulate dynamics in living phytoplankton and to highlight how this knowledge is used in paleoecological studies. The distribution patterns of phytoplankton in present-day aquatic ecosystems are shaped by the interplay between processes that regulate cell growth and cell death. Cell growth and cell death are regulated by the internal environment of phytoplankton (e.g., specific environmental tolerances, resource uptake properties, cell size, density and morphology, alternative nutritional strategies such as mixotrophy or N2 uptake, motility, intracellular storage capacities, grazing resistance properties), and by its external environment. The external environment includes variables dependent on the availability of resources (e.g., light intensity, concentration of CO2 and dissolved inorganic macronutrients and micronutrients, availability of living prey in case of mixotrophs) and variables independent of resources (e.g., temperature, salinity, turbulence, ultraviolet radiation, bioactive compounds, activity of grazers, viruses, and eukaryotic parasites). The importance of recently described loss processes, such as grazing by phagotrophic protists, viral lyses, and programmed cell death, is discussed in the context of its potential impact upon phytoplankton vertical fluxes. Examples of the use of different phytoplankton metrics (e.g. abundance, species composition, species morphology, and elemental composition) to infer contemporaneous as well as past environmental and ecological conditions are critically evaluated.

  20. Modelling Martian landslides: dynamics, velocity, and paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Blasio, Fabio Vittorio; Crosta, Giovanni Battista

    2017-11-01

    Landslides on Mars exhibit features such as steep collapse, extreme deposit thinning, and long runout. We study the flow dynamics of Martian landslides particularly in Valles Marineris, where landslides are among the largest and longest. Firstly, we observe that landslides in Valles Marineris share a series of features with terrestrial landslides fallen onto glaciers. The presence of suspected glacial and periglacial morphologies from the same areas of Valles Marineris, and the results of remote sensing measurements suggest the presence of ice under the soil and into the rock slopes. Thus, we explore with numerical simulation the possibility that such landslides have been lubricated by ice. To establish a plausible rheological model for these landslides, we introduce two possible scenarios. One scenario assumes ice only at the base of the landslide, the other inside the rock-soil. A numerical model is extended here to include ice in these two settings, and the effect of lateral widening of the landslide. Only if the presence of ice is included in the calculations, do results reproduce reasonably well both the vertical collapse of landslide material in the scarp area, and the extreme thinning and runout in the distal area, which are evident characteristics of large landslides in Valles Marineris. The calculated velocity of landslides (often well in excess of 100 m/s and up to 200 m/s at peak) compares well with velocity estimates based on the run-up of the landslides on mounds. We conclude that ice may have been an important medium of lubrication of landslides on Mars, even in equatorial areas like Valles Marineris.

  1. Highly sensitive monitoring of chest wall dynamics and acoustics provides diverse valuable information for evaluating ventilation and diagnosing pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, Jimy; Faingersh, Anna; Waisman, Dan; Landesberg, Amir

    2014-06-15

    Current practice of monitoring lung ventilation in neonatal intensive care units, utilizing endotracheal tube pressure and flow, end-tidal CO2, arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry, and hemodynamic indexes, fails to account for asymmetric pathologies and to allow for early detection of deteriorating ventilation. This study investigated the utility of bilateral measurements of chest wall dynamics and sounds, in providing early detection of changes in the mechanics and distribution of lung ventilation. Nine healthy New Zealand rabbits were ventilated at a constant pressure, while miniature accelerometers were attached to each side of the chest. Slowly progressing pneumothorax was induced by injecting 1 ml/min air into the pleural space on either side of the chest. The end of the experiment (tPTX) was defined when arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry dropped acoustics provide novel information that is sensitive to asymmetric changes in ventilation, enabling early detection and localization of pneumothorax. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huan [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Tang, Xiaobin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China); Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Various incident sites of CNTs are classified into three types for the first time. • Different ion energies and fluences are considered to study the radiation damage. • CNTs have ability to heal the radiation-induced damage at higher temperature. • Stability of a large-diameter tube excels in a slim one under the same conditions. - Abstract: The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  3. Glottis effects on the cough clearance process simulated with a CFD dynamic mesh and Eulerian wall film model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Concepción; Suárez, Eduardo; Parga, Oscar; Vence, Jesús

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we have reproduced the cough clearance process with an Eulerian wall film model. The simulated domain is based on realistic geometry from the literature, which has been improved by adding the glottis and epiglottis. The vocal fold movement has been included due to the dynamic mesh method, considering different abduction and adduction angles and velocities. The proposed methodology captures the deformation of the flexible tissue, considers non-Newtonian properties for the mucus, and enables us to reproduce a single cough or a cough epoch. The cough efficiency (CE) has been used to quantify the overall performance of the cough, considering many different boundary conditions, for the analysis of the glottis effect. It was observed that a viscous shear force is the main mechanism in the cough clearance process, while the glottis closure time and the epiglottis position do not have a significant effect on the CE. The cough assistance devices improve the CE, and the enhancement rate grows logarithmically with the operating pressure. The cough can achieve an effective mucus clearance process, even with a fixed glottis. Nevertheless, the glottis closure substantially improves the CE results.

  4. The influence of covering a germanium nanowire with a single wall carbon nanotube on mechanical properties: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, M.; Davoodi, J.

    2017-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are potential candidates for applications in quantum information processing, Josephson junctions, and field-effect transistors. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of covering a germanium nanowire (GeNW) with a single wall carbon nanotube (CNT) on the stress-strain diagram, failure points, and Young's modulus using molecular dynamics simulations. To describe the interactions between atoms in the system, we used Tersoff potential. Also, a Nose-Hoover thermostat was employed to control temperature of the system. The stress-strain curves of GeNW and GeNW inside CNT (CNT-GeNW) were obtained at various temperatures, radii, and strain velocities. It was found that coverage of GeNW with CNT led to 2-6 fold improved Young's modulus. It was also determined that a significant part of the Young's modulus in CNT-GeNW is due to the presence of CNT. Moreover, we defined the behavior of Young's modulus of GeNW as well as CNT-GeNW in the [100], [110], and [111] crystallography direction and found that Young's modulus decreased with increasing temperature. In addition, by increasing strain velocity, Young's modulus decreased for GeNW but increased for CNT-GeNW. Finally, we observed that when a GeNW is covered by a CNT, its failure point increased as compared with GeNW.

  5. [Association between trunk muscle activation and wall inclination during various static climbing positions: implications for therapeutic climbing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, C; Donath, L; Wagner, H

    2014-06-01

    Sport climbing has been increasingly applied as therapy for patients with orthopaedic problems. Results from previous intervention studies have already revealed positive effects, especially for people with back problems, although there is a lack of baseline knowledge regarding the general effects of climbing. The aim of this present study is to investigate the muscle activation of the trunk while performing various static climbing positions at different inclination angles. SUBJECTS/MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirteen healthy adults without climbing experience were asked to hold three static climbing positions (base position, lifting a hand, lifting a foot) at three different handhold set-ups and six wall inclination angles (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 15°, 18°) for 5 seconds each. Bilateral muscle activity of Erector spinae, Multifidus, Latissimus dorsi, Obliquus externus abdominis, Obliquus internus abdominis and Rectus abdominis was measured using surface electromyography. Data were analysed for each muscle and climbing condition separately. Compared to the vertical wall, the muscle activity starts to differ significantly (p ≤ 0.05) from 12° onwards. This inclination angle particularly affects the activity of all muscles when lifting a hand (0.000 ≤ p ≤ 0.048). The oblique abdominal muscles did not show any or little effects when lifting a foot or being in the base position, while all other muscles demonstrate a continuous increase. The EMG data were normalised to the corresponding base position and analysed for each muscle and climbing condition separately. Inclinable climbing walls are an appropriate method to increase muscle activity. Compared to the base position, activation of the oblique abdominal muscles, which are relevant for a stable trunk, is increased only when a hand is lifted. Climbing walls used for therapy should offer variable inclination angles. Further research should concentrate on the development and evaluation of climbing exercises for

  6. The population dynamical implications of male-biased parasitism in different mating systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Miller

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Although there is growing evidence that males tend to suffer higher levels of parasitism than females, the implications of this for the population dynamics of the host population are not yet understood. Here we build on an established 'two-sex' model and investigate how increased susceptibility to infection in males affects the dynamics, under different mating systems. We investigate the effect of pathogenic disease at different case mortalities, under both monogamous and polygynous mating systems. If the case mortality is low, then male-biased parasitism appears similar to unbiased parasitism in terms of its effect on the population dynamics. At higher case mortalities, we identified significant differences between male-biased and unbiased parasitism. A host population may therefore be differentially affected by male-biased and unbiased parasitism. The dynamical outcome is likely to depend on a complex interaction between the host's mating system and demography, and the parasite virulence.

  7. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    Pectic homogalacturonan (HG) is one of the main constituents of plant cell walls. When processed to low degrees of esterification, HG can form complexes with divalent calcium ions. These macromolecular structures (also called egg boxes) play an important role in determining the biomechanics of cell...... walls and in mediating cell-to-cell adhesion. Current immunological methods enable only steady-state detection of egg box formation in situ. Here we present a tool for efficient real-time visualisation of available sites for HG crosslinking within cell wall microdomains. Our approach is based on calcium...... thermodynamic model. Using defined carbohydrate microarrays, we show that the long OG probe binds exclusively to HG that has a very low degree of esterification and in the presence of divalent ions. We used this probe to study real-time dynamics of HG during elongation of Arabidopsis pollen tubes and root hairs...

  8. On the vibrational behavior of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes under the physical adsorption of biomolecules in the aqueous environment: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajori, S; Ansari, R; Darvizeh, M

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of biomolecules on the walls of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an aqueous environment is of great importance in the field of nanobiotechnology. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the mechanical vibrational behavior of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and DWCNTs) under the physical adsorption of four important biomolecules (L-alanine, guanine, thymine, and uracil) in vacuum and an aqueous environment. It was observed that the natural frequencies of these CNTs in vacuum reduce under the physical adsorption of biomolecules. In the aqueous environment, the natural frequency of each pure CNT decreased as compared to its natural frequency in vacuum. It was also found that the frequency shift for functionalized CNTs as compared to pure CNTs in the aqueous environment was dependent on the radius and the number of walls of the CNT, and could be positive or negative.

  9. Relaxation processes and glass transition of confined polymer melts: A molecular dynamics simulation of 1,4-polybutadiene between graphite walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, M.; Binder, K.; Paul, W.

    2017-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a chemically realistic model for 1,4-polybutadiene in a thin film geometry confined by two graphite walls are presented. Previous work on melts in the bulk has shown that the model faithfully reproduces static and dynamic properties of the real material over a wide temperature range. The present work studies how these properties change due to nano-confinement. The focus is on orientational correlations observable in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and on the local intermediate incoherent neutron scattering function, Fs(qz, z, t), for distances z from the graphite walls in the range of a few nanometers. Temperatures from about 2Tg down to about 1.15Tg, where Tg is the glass transition temperature in the bulk, are studied. It is shown that weakly attractive forces between the wall atoms and the monomers suffice to effectively bind a polymer coil that is near the wall. For a wide regime of temperatures, the Arrhenius-like adsorption/desorption kinetics of the monomers is the slowest process, while very close to Tg the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-like α-relaxation takes over. The α-process is modified only for z ≤1.2 nm due to the density changes near the walls, less than expected from studies of coarse-grained (bead-spring-type) models. The weakness of the surface effects on the glass transition in this case is attributed to the interplay of density changes near the wall with the torsional potential. A brief discussion of pertinent experiments is given.

  10. Environmental Implications of Dynamic Policies on Food Consumption and Waste Handling in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Martin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study will review the environmental implications of dynamic policy objectives and instruments outlined in the European Union 7th Framework Programme (EU-FP7 Project DYNAmic policy MIXes for absolute decoupling of EU resource use from economic growth (DYNAMIX to address reductions in food consumption, food waste and a change in waste handling systems. The environmental implications of reductions in protein intake, food waste reductions, food waste management and donations are addressed using a life cycle approach to find the greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, land use and water consumption. Data are provided from the Statistics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAOSTAT food balance sheets for the European Union (EU with a base year of 2010 and life cycle inventory (LCI data from a meta-study of available GHG, land use and water consumption data for major food products. The implications are reviewed using a number of scenarios for the years 2030 and 2050 assuming policy instruments are fully effective. Results indicate that reductions in animal-based protein consumption significantly reduce environmental impacts, followed thereafter by reductions in food waste (assuming this also reduces food consumption. Despite the positive implications the policy mixes may have for targets for decoupling, they are not enough to meet GHG emissions targets for the EU outlined in the DYNAMIX project, although land and water use have no significant change compared to 2010 levels.

  11. Short persistence of bendiocarb sprayed on pervious walls and its implication for the indoor residual spray program in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeebiyo, Yemane; Dengela, Dereje; Tesfaye, Alemayehu Getachew; Anshebo, Gedeon Yohannes; Kolyada, Lena; Wirtz, Robert; Chibsa, Sheleme; Fornadel, Christen; George, Kristen; Belemvire, Allison; Taffese, Hiwot Solomon; Lucas, Bradford

    2016-05-05

    With the emergence and spread of vector resistance to pyrethroids and DDT in Africa, several countries have recently switched or are considering switching to carbamates and/or organophosphates for indoor residual spraying (IRS). However, data collected on the residual life of bendiocarb used for IRS in some areas indicate shorter than expected bio-efficacy. This study evaluated the effect of pH and wall type on the residual life of the carbamates bendiocarb and propoxur as measured by the standard World Health Organization (WHO) cone bioassay test. In phase I of this study, bendiocarb and propoxur were mixed with buffered low pH (pH 4.3) local water and non-buffered high pH (pH 8.0) local water and sprayed on two types of wall surface, mud and dung, in experimental huts. In the six month phase II study, the two insecticides were mixed with high pH local water and sprayed on four different surfaces: painted, dung, mud and mud pre-wetted with water. The residual bio-efficacy of the insecticides was assessed monthly using standard WHO cone bioassay tests. In phase I, bendiocarb mixed with high pH water killed more than 80% of susceptible Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes for two months on both dung and mud surfaces. On dung surfaces, the 80% mortality threshold was achieved for three months when the bendiocarb was mixed with low pH water and four months when it was mixed with high pH water. Propoxur lasted longer than bendiocarb on dung surfaces, staying above the 80% mortality threshold for four and five months when mixed with high and low pH water, respectively. Phase II results also showed that the type of surface sprayed has a significant impact on the bio-efficacy of bendiocarb. Keeping the spray water constant at the same high pH of 8.0, bendiocarb killed 100% of exposed mosquitoes on impervious painted surfaces for the six months of the study period compared with less than one month on mud surfaces. Mixing the insecticides in alkaline water did not reduce the

  12. Microparticle shape effects on margination, near-wall dynamics and adhesion in a three-dimensional simulation of red blood cell suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2015-03-21

    We present a 3D computational modeling study of the transport of micro-scale drug carriers modeled as microparticles of different shapes (spherical, oblate, and prolate) in whole blood represented as a suspension of deformable red blood cells. The objective is to quantify the effect of microparticle shapes on their margination, near-wall dynamics and adhesion. We observe that the near-wall accumulation is highest for oblate particles of moderate aspect ratio, followed by spherical particles, and lowest for very elongated prolate particles. The result is explained using micro-scale dynamics of individual particles, and their interaction with red blood cells. We observe that the orientation of microparticles in 3D space and the frequency of their collisions with red blood cells are the key factors affecting their margination. We show that due to repeated collisions with red blood cells in the presence of a bounding wall, the axes of revolution of oblate particles align near the plane of the shear flow, but those of prolate particles shift towards the vorticity axis with a wider distribution. Such specific orientations lead to more frequent collisions and a greater lateral drift for oblate particles than microspheres, but less frequent collisions and a reduced lateral drift for elongated prolate particles, resulting in the observed differences in their near-wall accumulation. Once marginated, the particle shape has an entirely different effect on the likelihood of making particle-wall contacts. We find that marginated prolate particles, due to their alignment along the vorticity axis and large angular fluctuations, are more likely to make contacts with the wall than spherical and oblate particles. We further simulate the adhesion between flowing microparticles and the wall in the presence of red blood cells, and observe that once wall contacts are established, the likelihood of firm adhesion is greater for disk-like particles, followed by elongated prolates, and

  13. A benchmark study for the crown-type splashing dynamics of one- and two-component droplet wall-film interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, A.; Terzis, A.; Lamanna, G.; Marengo, M.; Weigand, B.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper investigates experimentally the impact dynamics of crown-type splashing for miscible two- and one-component droplet wall-film interactions over a range of Weber numbers and dimensionless film thicknesses. The splashing outcome is parametrised in terms of a set of quantifiable parameters, such as crown height, top and base diameter, wall inclination, number of fingers, and secondary droplet properties. The results show that the outcome of a splashing event is not affected by the choice of similar or dissimilar fluids, provided the dimensionless film thickness is larger than 0.1. Below this threshold, distinctive features of two-component interactions appear, such as hole formation and crown bottom breakdown. The observation of different crown shapes (e.g. V-shaped, cylindrical, and truncated-cone) confirms that vorticity production induces changes in the crown wall inclination, thus affecting the evolution of the crown height and top diameter. The evolution of the crown base diameter, instead, is mainly dependent on the relative importance of liquid inertia and viscous losses in the wall-film. The maximum number of liquid fingers decreases with increasing wall, film thickness, due to the enhanced attenuation of the effect of surface properties on the fingering process. The formation of secondary droplets is also affected by changes in the crown wall inclination. In particular, for truncated-cone shapes the occurrence of crown rim contraction induces a large scatter in the secondary droplet properties. Consequently, empirical models for the maximum number and mean diameter of the secondary droplets are derived for V-shaped crowns, as observed for the hexadecane-Hyspin interactions.

  14. Bacterial wall products induce downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors on endothelial cells via a CD14-dependent mechanism: implications for surgical wound healing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, C

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogenic cytokine which has been identified as the principal polypeptide growth factor influencing endothelial cell (EC) migration and proliferation. Ordered progression of these two processes is an absolute prerequisite for initiating and maintaining the proliferative phase of wound healing. The response of ECs to circulating VEGF is determined by, and directly proportional to, the functional expression of VEGF receptors (KDR\\/Flt-1) on the EC surface membrane. Systemic sepsis and wound contamination due to bacterial infection are associated with significant retardation of the proliferative phase of wound repair. The effects of the Gram-negative bacterial wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial lipoprotein (BLP) on VEGF receptor function and expression are unknown and may represent an important biological mechanism predisposing to delayed wound healing in the presence of localized or systemic sepsis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We designed a series of in vitro experiments investigating this phenomenon and its potential implications for infective wound repair. VEGF receptor density on ECs in the presence of LPS and BLP was assessed using flow cytometry. These parameters were assessed in hypoxic conditions as well as in normoxia. The contribution of CD14 was evaluated using recombinant human (rh) CD14. EC proliferation in response to VEGF was quantified in the presence and absence of LPS and BLP. RESULTS: Flow cytometric analysis revealed that LPS and BLP have profoundly repressive effects on VEGF receptor density in normoxic and, more pertinently, hypoxic conditions. The observed downregulation of constitutive and inducible VEGF receptor expression on ECs was not due to any directly cytotoxic effect of LPS and BLP on ECs, as measured by cell viability and apoptosis assays. We identified a pivotal role for soluble\\/serum CD14, a highly specific bacterial wall product receptor, in

  15. Vortex dynamics and elliptical structure wake interaction in the proximity of wall using 2-D RANS simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar H. S.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2-D numerical study is performed to analyses the flow characteristic behind the elliptical structure placed near the wall for three different gap ratios as 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0. Computational domain and model is initially validated with the unbounded flow over a cylinder without considering wall effect for Reynolds number of 3900. For flow over the cylinder with near wall, computational domain is modelled as Blasius profile is the input to the area of interest. At different gap ratios the effect of boundary layer on vortex shedding is studied with Reynolds number of 1440. By applying different turbulent model for analysis, study the variation in the results and suggest the suitable model for the present type of study. It has been observed that the wall effect is predominant in case of the gap ratio of 0.25 as compared to other gap ratios.

  16. Heterogeneity of left ventricular wall thickening mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Allen; Nguyen, Tom C; Malinowski, Marcin; Daughters, George T; Miller, D Craig; Ingels, Neil B

    2008-08-12

    Myocardial fibers are grouped into lamina (or sheets) 3 to 4 cells thick. Fiber shortening produces systolic left ventricular (LV) wall thickening primarily by laminar extension, thickening, and shear, but the regional variability and transmural distribution of these 3 mechanisms are incompletely understood. Nine sheep had transmural radiopaque markers inserted into the anterior basal and lateral equatorial LV. Four-dimensional marker dynamics were studied with biplane videofluoroscopy to measure circumferential, longitudinal, and radial systolic strains in the epicardium, midwall, and endocardium. Fiber and sheet angles from quantitative histology allowed transformation of these strains into transmural contributions of sheet extension, thickening, and shear to systolic wall thickening. At all depths, systolic wall thickening in the anterior basal region was 1.6 to 1.9 times that in the lateral equatorial region. Interestingly, however, systolic fiber shortening was identical at each transmural depth in these regions. Endocardial anterior basal sheet thickening was >2 times greater than in the lateral equatorial region (epicardium, 0.16+/-0.15 versus 0.03+/-0.06; endocardium, 0.45+/-0.40 versus 0.17+/-0.09). Midwall sheet extension was >2 times that in the lateral wall (0.22+/-0.12 versus 0.09+/-0.06). Epicardial and midwall sheet shears in the anterior wall were approximately 2 times higher than in the lateral wall (epicardium, 0.14+/-0.07 versus 0.05+/-0.03; midwall, 0.21+/-0.12 versus 0.12+/-0.06). These data demonstrate fundamentally different regional contributions of laminar mechanisms for amplifying fiber shortening to systolic wall thickening. Systolic fiber shortening was identical at each transmural depth in both the anterior and lateral LV sites. However, systolic wall thickening of the anterior site was much greater than that of the lateral site. Fiber shortening drives systolic wall thickening, but sheet dynamics and orientations are of great

  17. Implications of synaptic biophysics for recurrent network dynamics and active memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durstewitz, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    In cortical networks, synaptic excitation is mediated by AMPA- and NMDA-type receptors. NMDA differ from AMPA synaptic potentials with regard to peak current, time course, and a strong voltage-dependent nonlinearity. Here we illustrate based on empirical and computational findings that these specific biophysical properties may have profound implications for the dynamics of cortical networks, and via dynamics on cognitive functions like active memory. The discussion will be led along a minimal set of neural equations introduced to capture the essential dynamics of the various phenomena described. NMDA currents could establish cortical bistability and may provide the relatively constant synaptic drive needed to robustly maintain enhanced levels of activity during working memory epochs, freeing fast AMPA currents for other computational purposes. Perhaps more importantly, variations in NMDA synaptic input-due to their biophysical particularities-control the dynamical regime within which single neurons and networks reside. By provoking bursting, chaotic irregularity, and coherent oscillations their major effect may be on the temporal pattern of spiking activity, rather than on average firing rate. During active memory, neurons may thus be pushed into a spiking regime that harbors complex temporal structure, potentially optimal for the encoding and processing of temporal sequence information. These observations provide a qualitatively different view on the role of synaptic excitation in neocortical dynamics than entailed by many more abstract models. In this sense, this article is a plead for taking the specific biophysics of real neurons and synapses seriously when trying to account for the neurobiology of cognition.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  19. Dataset of the molecular dynamics simulations of bilayers consisting of short amyloidogenic peptide VDSWNVLVAG from Bgl2p–glucantransferase of S. cerevisiae cell wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Glyakina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The amyloidogenic peptide VDSWNVLVAG from Bgl2p–glucantransferase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall and its modifying analog VESWNVLVAG were taken for the construction of four types of bilayers which differ by orientation of the peptides in the layers and of the layers relative to each other. These bilayers were used as starting models for the molecular dynamics (MD at three charge states (neutral, pH3, and pH5. The changes of the fraction of secondary structure during 1 ns simulations were received for 96 MD trajectories. The data article contains the necessary information for the construction of models of β-strands organization in the oligomer structure. These results were used in the associated research article “Structural model of amyloid fibrils for amyloidogenic peptide from Bgl2p–glucantransferase of S. cerevisiae cell wall and its modifying analog. New morphology of amyloid fibrils” (Selivanova et al., 2016 [1].

  20. CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY OF TIMBER-FRAME HOUSES RESISTANT TO DYNAMIC LOADS – STUDY ON MODELS OF EXTERIOR WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Szczepanski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to show the numeric representation of experimental studies concerning the behaviour of exterior wall models of a timber-frame house under harmonic loading. A single wall model according to traditional technology of timber-frame house walls (filling with mineral wool was tested. The analysis was conducted for the following frequencies: 0.5 Hz, 1.0 Hz, 2.0 Hz and 5.0 Hz for various values of the specified displacement. A number of hysteresis loops were obtained for each of the tests. Based on them, the damping ratio as well as stiffness were calculated. The skeleton model filled with mineral wool (traditional technology experienced serious damage under larger displacements. The results of the study have been used to propose a numerical model of wall filled with mineral wool. The proposed numerical model is consistent with the results for the values ​​obtained during the experimental study, which proves the correctness of the adopted solution.

  1. High-Speed Observations of Dynamic Fracture Propagation in Solids and Their Implications in Earthquake Rupture Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2016-04-01

    This contribution outlines our experimental observations of seismicity-related fast fracture (rupture) propagation in solids utilising high-speed analog and digital photography (maximum frame rate 1,000,000 frames per second) over the last two decades. Dynamic fracture may be triggered or initiated in the monolithic or layered seismic models by detonation of micro explosives, a projectile launched by a gun, laser pulses and electric discharge impulses, etc. First, we have investigated strike-slip rupture along planes of weakness in transparent photoelastic (birefringent) materials at a laboratory scale and shown (at that time) extraordinarily fast rupture propagation in a bi-material system and its possible effect on the generation of large strong motion in the limited narrow areas in the Kobe region on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake (Uenishi Ph.D. thesis 1997, Uenishi et al. BSSA 1999). In this series of experiments, we have also modelled shallow dip-slip earthquakes and indicated a possible origin of the asymmetric ground motion in the hanging and foot-walls. In the photoelastic photographs, we have found the unique dynamic wave interaction and generation of specific shear and interface waves numerically predicted by Uenishi and Madariaga (Eos 2005), and considered as a case study the seismic motion associated with the 2014 Nagano-ken Hokubu (Kamishiro Fault), Japan, dip-slip earthquake (Uenishi EFA 2015). Second, we have experimentally shown that even in a monolithic material, rupture speed may exceed the local shear wave speed if we employ hyperelasically behaving materials like natural rubber (balloons) (Uenishi Eos 2006, Uenishi ICF 2009, Uenishi Trans. JSME A 2012) but fracture in typical monolithic thin fluid films (e.g. soap bubbles, which may be treated as a solid material) propagates at an ordinary subsonic (sub-Rayleigh) speed (Uenishi et al. SSJ 2006). More recent investigation handling three-dimensional rupture propagation

  2. Implications of altered phenology on the carbon dynamics of deciduous oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Matthew; Eaton, Edward; Pinnington, Ewan; Morison, James

    2016-04-01

    The widely observed advance in spring budburst across a range of temperate forest species due to climatic warming has received considerable attention. Such changes in phenology have important implications not only for the choice of species and provenances currently being planted, which need to be suited to both current and future climatic conditions, but also for the carbon dynamics of forest ecosystems. Using a combination of phenology observations and carbon balance modelling, this study examines the influence of tree phenology and growing season length on carbon sequestration. Tree phenology and seasonal carbon dynamics were measured using phenocam images and Eddy Covariance (EC) at a deciduous oak plantation in the south-east of England (Alice Holt, Hampshire, UK). Manual phenology observations of spring budburst were also recorded in a range of European oak provenances over seven years (2004 - 2009 and again in 2013) at a trial site nearby. The EC and manual observation sites were exposed to very similar meteorological conditions. At the manual observation site there was a strong correlation between mean spring air temperature and the date of budburst in all provenances. The order in which budburst occurred was largely conserved between years and was strongly linked to source latitude, provenances that originated from southerly locations consistently reached budburst prior to those from more northerly locations. The timing of budburst in the local provenance at the manual observation site was synchronous with budburst at the EC site. The Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon (DALEC) model was optimised for the Alice Holt site. By altering the timing of budburst within the model to reflect the observed variation in the European provenances, we assessed the implications of altered phenology on the carbon dynamics of deciduous oak in southern England.

  3. A ReaxFF-based molecular dynamics study of the mechanisms of interactions between reactive oxygen plasma species and the Candida albicans cell wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T.; Shi, L.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zou, L.; Zhang, L.

    2017-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas have attracted significant attention and have been widely used to inactivate pathogens, yet the mechanisms underlying the interactions between plasma-generated species and bio-organisms have not been elucidated clearly. In this paper, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the mechanisms of interactions between reactive oxygen plasma species (O, OH, and O2) and β-1,6-glucan (a model for the C. albicans cell wall) from a microscopic point of view. Our simulations show that O and OH species can break structurally important C-C and C-O bonds, while O2 molecules exhibit only weak, non-bonded interactions with β-1,6-glucan. Hydrogen abstraction from hydroxyl or CH groups occurs first in all bond cleavage mechanisms. This is followed by a cascade of bond cleavage and double bond formation events. These lead to the destruction of the fungal cell wall. O and OH have similar effects related to their bond cleavage mechanisms. Our simulation results provide fundamental insights into the mechanisms underlying the interactions between reactive oxygen plasma species and the fungal cell wall of C. albicans at the atomic level.

  4. Addition of Phenylboronic Acid to Malus domestica Pollen Tubes Alters Calcium Dynamics, Disrupts Actin Filaments and Affects Cell Wall Architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefeng Fang

    Full Text Available A key role of boron in plants is to cross-link the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II through borate diester linkages. Phenylboronic acid (PBA can form the same reversible ester bonds but cannot cross-link two molecules, so can be used as an antagonist to study the function of boron. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PBA on apple (Malus domestica pollen tube growth and the underlying regulatory mechanism. We observed that PBA caused an inhibition of pollen germination, tube growth and led to pollen tube morphological abnormalities. Fluorescent labeling, coupled with a scanning ion-selective electrode technique, revealed that PBA induced an increase in extracellular Ca2+ influx, thereby elevating the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]c and disrupting the [Ca2+]c gradient, which is critical for pollen tube growth. Moreover the organization of actin filaments was severely perturbed by the PBA treatment. Immunolocalization studies and fluorescent labeling, together with Fourier-transform infrared analysis (FTIR suggested that PBA caused an increase in the abundance of callose, de-esterified pectins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs at the tip. However, it had no effect on the deposition of the wall polymers cellulose. These effects are similar to those of boron deficiency in roots and other organs, indicating that PBA can induce boron deficiency symptoms. The results provide new insights into the roles of boron in pollen tube development, which likely include regulating [Ca2+]c and the formation of the actin cytoskeleton, in addition to the synthesis and assembly of cell wall components.

  5. Oscillatory dynamics in a model of vascular tumour growth - implications for chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maini PK

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigations of solid tumours suggest that vessel occlusion may occur when increased pressure from the tumour mass is exerted on the vessel walls. Since immature vessels are frequently found in tumours and may be particularly sensitive, such occlusion may impair tumour blood flow and have a negative impact on therapeutic outcome. In order to study the effects that occlusion may have on tumour growth patterns and therapeutic response, in this paper we develop and investigate a continuum model of vascular tumour growth. Results By analysing a spatially uniform submodel, we identify regions of parameter space in which the combination of tumour cell proliferation and vessel occlusion give rise to sustained temporal oscillations in the tumour cell population and in the vessel density. Alternatively, if the vessels are assumed to be less prone to collapse, stable steady state solutions are observed. When spatial effects are considered, the pattern of tumour invasion depends on the dynamics of the spatially uniform submodel. If the submodel predicts a stable steady state, then steady travelling waves are observed in the full model, and the system evolves to the same stable steady state behind the invading front. When the submodel yields oscillatory behaviour, the full model produces periodic travelling waves. The stability of the waves (which can be predicted by approximating the system as one of λ-ω type dictates whether the waves develop into regular or irregular spatio-temporal oscillations. Simulations of chemotherapy reveal that treatment outcome depends crucially on the underlying tumour growth dynamics. In particular, if the dynamics are oscillatory, then therapeutic efficacy is difficult to assess since the fluctuations in the size of the tumour cell population are enhanced, compared to untreated controls. Conclusions We have developed a mathematical model of vascular tumour growth formulated as a system of partial

  6. Dynamical response of multi-walled carbon nanotube resonators based on continuum mechanics modeling for mass sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myungseok; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Wan [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Kilho [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Kwanwoong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dai, Mai Duc [Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology and Education, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam)

    2017-05-15

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has recently received much attention due to its excellent electromechanical properties, indicating that CNT can be employed for development of Nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) such as nanomechanical resonators. For effective design of CNT-based resonators, it is required to accurately predict the vibration behavior of CNT resonators as well as their frequency response to mass adsorption. In this work, we have studied the vibrational behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators by using a continuum mechanics modeling that was implemented in Finite element method (FEM). In particular, we consider a transversely isotropic hollow cylinder solid model with Finite element (FE) implementation for modeling the vibration behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators. It is shown that our continuum mechanics model provides the resonant frequencies of various MWCNTs being comparable to those obtained from experiments. Moreover, we have investigated the frequency response of MWCNT resonators to mass adsorption by using our continuum model with FE implementation. Our study sheds light on our continuum mechanics model that is useful in predicting not only the vibration behavior of MWCNT resonators but also their sensing performance for further effective design of MWCNT- based NEMS devices.

  7. A SUMOylation Motif in Aurora-A: Implications in Spindle Dynamics and Oncogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio ePérez de Castro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aurora-A is a serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in centrosome maturation, spindle dynamics and chromosome orientation and is frequently found overexpressed in human cancers. In this work, we show that Aurora-A interacts with the SUMO conjugating enzyme UBC9 and co-localizes with SUMO-1 in mitotic cells. Aurora-A can be SUMOylated in vitro and mutation in the highly conserved SUMOylation residue lysine 249 results in the induction of mitotic defects characterized by defective and multipolar spindles. The Aurora-AK249R mutant has normal kinase activity but it displays altered dynamics at the mitotic spindle. In addition, ectopic expression of the Aurora-AK249R mutant results in a significant increase in the susceptibility to malignant transformation induced by the Ras oncogene and an increased protection against apoptosis in tumor cells treated with mitotic poisons. These data suggest that modification by SUMO residues may control Aurora-A function at the spindle and suggest that deficient SUMOylation of this kinase may have relevant implications in tumor development or cancer therapy.

  8. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of D α signals for type I edge localized modes characterization on JET with a carbon wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Barbara; Fanni, Alessandra; Murari, Andrea; Pisano, Fabio; Contributors, JET

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the dynamic characteristics of type-I ELM time-series from the JET tokamak, the world’s largest magnetic confinement plasma physics experiment, have been investigated. The dynamic analysis has been focused on the detection of nonlinear structure in D α radiation time series. Firstly, the method of surrogate data has been applied to evaluate the statistical significance of the null hypothesis of static nonlinear distortion of an underlying Gaussian linear process. Several nonlinear statistics have been evaluated, such us the time delayed mutual information, the correlation dimension and the maximal Lyapunov exponent. The obtained results allow us to reject the null hypothesis, giving evidence of underlying nonlinear dynamics. Moreover, no evidence of low-dimensional chaos has been found; indeed, the analysed time series are better characterized by the power law sensitivity to initial conditions which can suggest a motion at the ‘edge of chaos’, at the border between chaotic and regular non-chaotic dynamics. This uncertainty makes it necessary to further investigate about the nature of the nonlinear dynamics. For this purpose, a second surrogate test to distinguish chaotic orbits from pseudo-periodic orbits has been applied. In this case, we cannot reject the null hypothesis which means that the ELM time series is possibly pseudo-periodic. In order to reproduce pseudo-periodic dynamical properties, a periodic state-of-the-art model, proposed to reproduce the ELM cycle, has been corrupted by a dynamical noise, obtaining time series qualitatively in agreement with experimental time series.

  9. Short-term dynamics of evaporative enrichment of xylem water in woody stems: implications for ecohydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gómez, Paula; Serrano, Luis; Ferrio, Juan Pedro

    2017-04-01

    In ecohydrology, it is generally assumed that xylem water reflects the water source used by plants. Several studies have reported isotopic enrichment within woody tissues, particularly during dormancy periods or after long periods of inactivity. However, little is known about the short-term dynamics of this process. Here we assessed the magnitude and dynamics of xylem isotopic enrichment in suberized twigs of pines and oaks. We performed a series of laboratory experiments, in which we monitored hourly changes in water content and isotopic composition under two contrasting scenarios of sap flow restriction. First, we simulated the effect of extreme hydraulic failure by excising twigs to restrict sap flow, while sealing the wounds to ensure that water loss took place only through the leaves or bark, as would be the case for evaporation in attached stems. Second, we studied the effect of reduced leaf transpiration by darkening with aluminium foil all the leaves of healthy, well-watered saplings growing in pot conditions. We found evidence of fast evaporative enrichment in metabolically active stems, as a consequence of a temporal decline in sap flow rates, and not necessarily linked to a traceable decline in stem water content. The excision experiments showed significant isotopic changes (~+1‰ in oxygen) appearing in enrichment of xylem water in stems is a highly dynamic process that may have significant effects even during short periods of restricted water flow. This has important implications for the study of plant water uptake, as well as for ecosystem- and global-scale hydrological models. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Terahertz-Field-Induced Large Macroscopic Polarization and Domain-Wall Dynamics in an Organic Molecular Dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, T; Miyamoto, T; Yamakawa, H; Terashige, T; Ono, T; Kida, N; Okamoto, H

    2017-03-10

    A rapid polarization control in paraelectric materials is important for an ultrafast optical switching useful in the future optical communication. In this study, we applied terahertz-pump second-harmonic-generation-probe and optical-reflectivity-probe spectroscopies to the paraelectric neutral phase of an organic molecular dielectric, tetrathiafulvalene-p-chloranil and revealed that a terahertz pulse with the electric-field amplitude of ∼400  kV/cm produces in the subpicosecond time scale a large macroscopic polarization whose magnitude reaches ∼20% of that in the ferroelectric ionic phase. Such a large polarization generation is attributed to the intermolecular charge transfers and breathing motions of domain walls between microscopic neutral and ionic domains induced by the terahertz electric field.

  11. A novel four-dimensional angiographic approach to assess dynamic superficial wall stress of coronary arteries in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xinlei; von Birgelen, Clemens; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    it for the first time in two clinical cases to investigate the potential relationship between dynamic stress concentration at baseline and plaque rupture during acute coronary syndrome (ACS) several months later. METHODS AND RESULTS: Three-dimensional angiographic reconstructions of the interrogated arteries were...... performed at several phases of the cardiac cycle, followed by finite element analysis to obtain the dynamic SWS data. The peak stress at baseline was found at the distal and proximal lesion longitudinal shoulders, being 121.8kPa and 98.0kPa, respectively. Intriguingly, in both cases, the sites...

  12. Intensity-dependent exciton dynamics of (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes: momentum selection rules, diffusion, and nonlinear interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, D Mark; Schneck, Jude R; Green, Alexander A; Hersam, Mark C; Ziegler, Lawrence D; Swan, Anna K

    2011-12-27

    The exciton dynamics for an ensemble of individual, suspended (6,5), single-walled carbon nanotubes revealed by single color E(22) resonant pump-probe spectroscopy for a wide range of pump fluences are reported. The optically excited initial exciton population ranges from approximately 5 to 120 excitons per ∼725 nm nanotube. At the higher fluences of this range, the pump-probe signals are no longer linearly dependent on the pump intensity. A single, predictive model is described that fits all data for two decades of pump fluences and three decades of delay times. The model introduces population loss from the optically active zero momentum E(22) state to the rest of the E(22) subband, which is dark due to momentum selection rules. In the single exciton limit, the E(11) dynamics are well described by a stretched exponential, which is a direct consequence of diffusion quenching from an ensemble of nanotubes of different lengths. The observed change in population relaxation dynamics as a function of increasing pump intensity is attributed to exciton-exciton Auger de-excitation in the E(11) subband and, to a lesser extent, in the E(22) subband. From the fit to the model, an average defect density 1/ρ = 150 nm and diffusion constants D(11) = 4 cm(2)/s and D(22) = 0.2 cm(2)/s are determined.

  13. Comparison of particle-wall interaction boundary conditions in the prediction of cyclone collection efficiency in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde Ramirez, M.; Coury, J.R.; Goncalves, J.A.S., E-mail: jasgon@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, many computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have appeared attempting to predict cyclone pressure drop and collection efficiency. While these studies have been able to predict pressure drop well, they have been only moderately successful in predicting collection efficiency. Part of the reason for this failure has been attributed to the relatively simple wall boundary conditions implemented in the commercially available CFD software, which are not capable of accurately describing the complex particle-wall interaction present in a cyclone. According, researches have proposed a number of different boundary conditions in order to improve the model performance. This work implemented the critical velocity boundary condition through a user defined function (UDF) in the Fluent software and compared its predictions both with experimental data and with the predictions obtained when using Fluent's built-in boundary conditions. Experimental data was obtained from eight laboratory scale cyclones with varying geometric ratios. The CFD simulations were made using the software Fluent 6.3.26. (author)

  14. Cosmological implications of Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with a dynamical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintanar, G. Leonardo; de La Macorra, Axel

    We study the cosmological implications of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model when the coupling constant is field dependent. The NJL model has a four-fermion interaction describing two different phases due to quantum interaction effects and determined by the strength of the coupling constant g. It describes massless fermions for weak coupling and a massive fermions and strong coupling, where a fermion condensate is formed. In the original NJL model, the coupling constant g is indeed constant, and in this work we consider a modified version of the NJL model by introducing a dynamical field dependent coupling motivated by string theory. The effective potential as a function of the varying coupling (aimed to implement a natural phase transition) is seen to develop a negative divergence, i.e. becomes a “bottomless well” in certain limit region. Although we explain how an lower unbounded potential is not necessarily unacceptable in a cosmological context, the divergence can be removed if we consider a mass term for the coupling like field. We found that for a proper set of parameters, the total potential obtained has two minima, one located at the origin (the trivial solution, in which the fluid associated with the fields behave like matter); and the other related to the nontrivial solution. This last solution has three possibilities: (1) if the minimum is positive Vmin > 0, the system behaves as a cosmological constant, thus leading eventually to an accelerated universe; (2) if the minimized potential vanishes Vmin = 0, then we have matter with no acceleration; (3) finally a negative minimum Vmin universe with a flat geometry. Therefore, a possible interpretation as dark matter (DM) or dark energy (DE) is allowed among the behaviors implicated in the model.

  15. Lattice dynamics and domain wall oscillations of morphotropic Pb(Zr,Ti)O.sub.3./sub. ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buixaderas, Elena; Bovtun, Viktor; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Savinov, Maxim; Vaněk, Přemysl; Gregora, Ivan; Malic, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2016), 1-10, č. článku 054315. ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25639S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15014 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : PZT * phonon * lattice dynamics * dielectric response * Raman * infrared spectroscopy * broad-band spectroscopy * piezoelectrics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  16. Molecular dynamics study on resonance frequency change due to axial-strain-induced torsions of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won, E-mail: jwkang@cjnu.ac.k [Department of Computer Engineering, Chungju National University, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Sub, E-mail: kks1114@cjnu.ac.k [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chungju National University, Chungju 380-702 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Ki Ryang [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Jung, E-mail: hjhwang@cau.ac.k [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-21

    We investigated, via the classical MD simulation method based on Tersoff-Brenner potential, the fundamental resonance frequency changes of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) resonators originated from the purely mechanical coupling of the axial-strain-induced torsion (ASIT) response. The fundamental frequency changes were also negligible where the ASIT responses were negligible in achiral SWCNTs whereas those were explicitly found under both compression and tension for the chiral SWCNTs with the obvious ASIT responses. Specially, for SWCNT with the chiral angle of {pi}/12, where the highest ASIT response can be found, the fundamental resonance frequency changes were highest. The fundamental resonance frequencies under the tensioning increased almost linearly with increasing the axial strain whereas they rapidly decreased under compression with increasing the compressive strain. - Research highlights: Frequency changes of nanotube resonators due to the axial-strain-induced torsion. Resonant frequency changes were highest for nanotube with the chiral angle of {pi}/12. Resonant frequencies under tensioning increase linearly with increasing the strain. Resonant frequencies rapidly decrease with increasing the compression.

  17. Three-dimensional, time-resolved profiling of ferroelectric domain wall dynamics by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haussmann, Alexander; Schmidt, Sebastian; Wehmeier, Lukas; Eng, Lukas M. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute of Applied Physics and Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed), Dresden (Germany); Kirsten, Lars; Cimalla, Peter; Koch, Edmund [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Clinical Sensoring and Monitoring, Dresden (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We apply here spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) for the precise detection and temporal tracking of ferroelectric domain walls (DWs) in magnesium-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (Mg:PPLN). We reproducibly map static DWs at an axial (depth) resolution down to ∝ 0.6 μm, being located up to 0.5 mm well inside the single crystalline Mg:PPLN sample. We show that a full 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the DW geometry is possible from the collected data, when applying a special algorithm that accounts for the nonlinear optical dispersion of the material. Our OCT investigation provides valuable reference information on the DWs' polarization charge distribution, which is known to be the key to the electrical conductivity of ferroelectric DWs in such systems. Hence, we carefully analyze the SD-OCT signal dependence both when varying the direction of incident polarization, and when applying electrical fields along the polar axis. Surprisingly, the large backreflection intensities recorded under extraordinary polarization are not affected by any electrical field, at least for field strengths below the switching threshold, while no significant signals above noise floor are detected under ordinary polarization. Finally, we employed the high-speed SD-OCT setup for the real-time DW tracking upon ferroelectric domain switching under high external fields. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Water Balance to Recharge Calculation: Implications for Watershed Management Using Systems Dynamics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Dhungel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater depletion in the face of growth is a well-known problem, particularly in those areas that have grown to become dependent on a declining resource. This research comprises a broad synthesis of existing water resources data, to understand the long-term implications of continued growth in water demand on groundwater dominant water resources, and to develop a tool for sustainable water management. The Palouse region of Washington and Idaho, USA. (approximately 60,000 people in a rural setting is entirely dependent on groundwater from two basalt aquifers for potable water. Using the systems dynamics approach and a water balance that considered the entire hydrologic cycle, a hydrologic model of these aquifers was developed, tested and applied to simulate their behavior over a 150 year time period assuming the current infrastructure does not change. With 1% population growth and current water extraction rates, the results indicated the upper aquifer use may be sustainable, while the lower aquifer use is likely unsustainable in the long term. This study also shows that uncertainties in key aspects of the system create limitations to groundwater management.

  19. Distribution of chloride, pH, resistivity, and sulfate levels in backfill for mechanically-stabilized earth walls and implications for corrosion testing : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Road construction projects often require mechanically stabilized earth (MSE), earthwork : construction in which soil is retained by walls and reinforced with wire mesh, metal strips, : and structural geosynthetics (geotextile or geogrid). The fill so...

  20. Distribution of chloride, pH, resistivity, and sulfate levels in backfill for mechanically-stabilized earth walls and implications for corrosion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The ultimate goals of this research were to improve quality, speed completion, and reduce risk in mechanically-stabilized : earth (MSE) wall projects. Research objectives were to assure (1) that variability in the corrosion properties of soil (pH, : ...

  1. Thermally induced magnonic spin current, thermomagnonic torques, and domain-wall dynamics in the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-G.; Chotorlishvili, L.; Guo, G.-H.; Sukhov, A.; Dugaev, V.; Barnaś, J.; Berakdar, J.

    2016-09-01

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion in magnetic insulators has been considered theoretically, with a particular focus on the role of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) and thermomagnonic torques. The thermally assisted DW motion is a consequence of the magnonic spin current due to the applied thermal bias. In addition to the exchange magnonic spin current and the exchange adiabatic and the entropic spin transfer torques, we also consider the DMI-induced magnonic spin current, thermomagnonic DMI fieldlike torque, and the DMI entropic torque. Analytical estimations are supported by numerical calculations. We found that the DMI has a substantial influence on the size and the geometry of DWs, and that the DWs become oriented parallel to the long axis of the nanostrip. Increasing the temperature smoothes the DWs. Moreover, the thermally induced magnonic current generates a torque on the DWs, which is responsible for their motion. From our analysis it follows that for a large enough DMI the influence of DMI-induced fieldlike torque is much stronger than that of the DMI and the exchange entropic torques. By manipulating the strength of the DMI constant, one can control the speed of the DW motion, and the direction of the DW motion can be switched, as well. We also found that DMI not only contributes to the total magnonic current, but also it modifies the exchange magnonic spin current, and this modification depends on the orientation of the steady-state magnetization. The observed phenomenon can be utilized in spin caloritronics devices, for example in the DMI based thermal diodes. By switching the magnetization direction, one can rectify the total magnonic spin current.

  2. Holocene landscape dynamics of the Ghaggar-Hakra floodplain, India: implications for the Indus Civilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Julie; Thomas, David; Pawar, Vikas; Gupta, Sanjeev; Petrie, Cameron; Singh, Ravindra

    2016-04-01

    The area around the ephemeral Ghaggar-Hakra River system in India and Pakistan is associated with a dense concentration of Indus Civilisation archaeological sites. Giosan et al. (2012) have suggested that a decline, and ultimately cessation, of flow in this river system in response to the weakening of the Asian Monsoon was influential in the collapse of the Indus Civilisation around 4,000 years ago and palaeoclimatic studies in the region (e.g. Berkelhammer et al., 2012; Dixit et al., 2014; Leipe et al., 2014) have shown abrupt drying events during the mid-Holocene, which are superimposed onto a longer-term insolation driven decline in Asian Monsoon intensity. Further work is required to understand the dynamics of this river system during the Holocene and to assess the importance of changing landscape dynamics, as well as climatic variability, in the decline of the Indus Civilisation. This paper presents optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates from palaeochannel sediments and associated dune deposits in the Ghaggar-Hakra river system in Northwest India, with the aim of understanding late Quaternary geomorphological and palaeoenvironmental change. Reconstructing palaeoenvironmental variability will allow a comparison between the documented archaeological record of the Indus Civilisation and an absolute chronology of regional landscape dynamism. This comparison will also allow an insight into whether the mid-Holocene collapse and/or transformation of the Indus Civilisation can be correlated with geomorphological and/or climatic variability. Berkelhammer, M., Sinha, A., Stott, L., Cheng, H., Pausata, F.S.R., and Yoshimura, K., 2012, An abrupt shift in the Indian monsoon 4000 years ago, in Giosan, L., Fuller, D.Q., Nicoll, K., Flad, R.K. and Clift P.D. (eds.), Climates, landscapes, and civilizations. American Geophysical Union Geophysical Monograph, 198, 75-87. Dixit, Y., Hodell, D.A. and Petrie, C.A., 2012. Abrupt weakening of the summer monsoon in northwest

  3. Research on both the encapsulation process and the dynamical behaviors of the H8Si8O12 molecule inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Liu, Chun-Jian; Jing, Xiao-Dan; Qiu, Zhong-Yuan; Xu, Mei-Jin; Zheng, Shi-Peng; Yao, Zhen; Liu, Bing-Bing

    2017-10-01

    Both the encapsulation process and the dynamical behaviors of the H8Si8O12 molecule inside single-walled carbon nanotubes have been studied by using the molecular dynamical simulation method. Our results show that the smallest diameter for the encapsulation of the H8Si8O12 molecule is about 11.59 Å whereas the most suitable diameter of nanotubes for the molecular encapsulation is about 12.21 Å. The encapsulated H8Si8O12 molecule exhibits an irregularly oscillating motion along the tube’s long axis. On the cross section of a tube, a frequently collisional motion between the host-guest molecules is exhibited. The mean free path and the frequency of the collisional motion have been investigated by considering the different diameters and temperatures. The study also shows that the increasing temperature mainly increases the rotational angular kinetic energy of the encapsulated molecule with the diameter being smaller than 19 Å. As the diameter further increases (larger than 19 Å), the increasing temperature increases the total kinetic energy (including both the translational kinetic energy and rotational kinetic energy).

  4. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  5. Charge-Transfer Dynamics in the Lowest Excited State of a Pentacene–Fullerene Complex: Implications for Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joseph, Saju

    2017-10-02

    We characterize the dynamic nature of the lowest excited state in a pentacene/C60 complex on the femtosecond time scale, via a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory. We analyze the correlations between the molecular vibrations of the complex and the oscillations in the electron-transfer character of its lowest excited state, which point to vibration-induced coherences between the (pentacene-based) local-excitation (LE) state and the complex charge-transfer (CT) state. We discuss the implications of our results on this model system for the exciton-dissociation process in organic solar cells.

  6. Simulation of bending stress variation in long buried thick-walled pipes under the earth’s movement using combined linear dynamics and beam theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salau Tajudeen A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reported a simulation approach to the understanding of the interactions between a buried pipe and the soil system by computing the bending stress variation of harmonically-excited buried pipes. The established principles of linear dynamics theory and simple beam theory were utilised in the analysis of the problem of buried pipe bending stress accumulation and its dynamics. With regards to the parameters that influence the bending stress variations, the most important are the isolation factor, uniform external load, and the corresponding limiting conditions. The simulated mathematical expressions, containing static and dynamic parameters of the buried pipe and earth, were coded in Fortran programming language and applied in the simulation experiment. The results obtained showed that harmonically-excited buried thick-walled pipe became stable and effective when the ratio of the natural frequency of vibration to the forced frequency is greater than 2.0, whenever the damped factor is used as the control parameter for the maximum bending stress. The mirror image of the stress variation produces variation in the location of the maximum bending stress in quantitative terms. The acceptable pipe materials for the simulated cases must have yield strength in bending greater than or equal to 13.95 MPa. The results obtained in this work fill a gap in the literature and will be useful to pipeline engineers and designers, as well as to environmental scientists in initialising and controlling environmental issues and policy formulation concerning the influence of buried pipe on the soil and water in the environment.

  7. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  8. Dynamics of Gestalt psychology (invited review of Perceptual Dynamics: Theoretical foundations and philosophical implications of Gestalt psychology by F. Sundqvist)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, P.A. van der

    2006-01-01

    In Perceptual Dynamics, Sundqvist argues that the early 20th-century Gestaltist ideas gain fresh relevance by recent developments in cognitive science, particularly by approaches that start from either dynamic systems theory or connectionism. In this review, it is argued that Sundqvist's book is a

  9. Population Dynamics of Owned, Free-Roaming Dogs: Implications for Rabies Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conan, Anne; Akerele, Oluyemisi; Simpson, Greg; Reininghaus, Bjorn; van Rooyen, Jacques; Knobel, Darryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Rabies is a serious yet neglected public health threat in resource-limited communities in Africa, where the virus is maintained in populations of owned, free-roaming domestic dogs. Rabies elimination can be achieved through the mass vaccination of dogs, but maintaining the critical threshold of vaccination coverage for herd immunity in these populations is hampered by their rapid turnover. Knowledge of the population dynamics of free-roaming dog populations can inform effective planning and implementation of mass dog vaccination campaigns to control rabies. Methodology/Principal Findings We implemented a health and demographic surveillance system in dogs that monitored the entire owned dog population within a defined geographic area in a community in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. We quantified demographic rates over a 24-month period, from 1st January 2012 through 1st January 2014, and assessed their implications for rabies control by simulating the decline in vaccination coverage over time. During this period, the population declined by 10%. Annual population growth rates were +18.6% in 2012 and -24.5% in 2013. Crude annual birth rates (per 1,000 dog-years of observation) were 451 in 2012 and 313 in 2013. Crude annual death rates were 406 in 2012 and 568 in 2013. Females suffered a significantly higher mortality rate in 2013 than males (mortality rate ratio [MRR] = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.28–1.85). In the age class 0–3 months, the mortality rate of dogs vaccinated against rabies was significantly lower than that of unvaccinated dogs (2012: MRR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.05–0.21; 2013: MRR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.11–0.69). The results of the simulation showed that achieving a 70% vaccination coverage during annual campaigns would maintain coverage above the critical threshold for at least 12 months. Conclusions and Significance Our findings provide an evidence base for the World Health Organization’s empirically-derived target of 70% vaccination coverage

  10. Molecular dynamics of solutions of poly-3-octyl-thiophene and functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes studied by neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Díaz-Paniagua, Carlos [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Urbina, Antonio, E-mail: a.urbina@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Plaza del Hospital 1, 30202 Cartagena (Spain); García-Sakai, Victoria [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Seydel, Tilo [Institut Laue-Langevin, 39042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Abad, José; Padilla, Javier; García-Valverde, Rafael; Espinosa, Nieves [Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Plaza del Hospital 1, 30202 Cartagena (Spain); Gómez-Escalonilla, Marí a-José; Langa, Fernando [Instituto de Nanociencia, Nanotecnología y Materiales Moleculares (INAMOL), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 45071 Toledo (Spain); Batallán, Francisco [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • P3OT diffusion characteristic times in toluene solution at different temperatures have been obtained. • Gelation process for P3OT in solution has been demonstrated. • A methodology for elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering data analysis for liquids has been developed. - Abstract: Using both quasielastic and elastic window neutron spectroscopy, we study the molecular dynamics of poly-3-octyl-thiophene and of mixtures of carbon nanotube derivatives and poly-3-octyl-thiophene, both in deuterated toluene solutions. From the analysis of the experimental results of solutions for a broad range of concentrations, from very diluted to concentrated, different regimes of molecular motions are established, and a critical concentration between 2 and 3 wt% for the overlapping of macromolecules is obtained, including evidence of gelation processes for the higher concentrations driven by the entanglement of the macromolecules. Additionally, the temperature and momentum dependence of the characteristic times of the motions are obtained from the fit of the experimental data to stretched exponential models, delivering temperature dependent subnanosecond timescales for the diffusion of the macromolecule (0.02–0.5 ns)

  11. Hydra effects in stable communities and their implications for system dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Michael H; Abrams, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    A hydra effect occurs when the mean density of a species increases in response to greater mortality. We show that, in a stable multispecies system, a species exhibits a hydra effect only if maintaining that species at its equilibrium density destabilizes the system. The stability of the original system is due to the responses of the hydra-effect species to changes in the other species' densities. If that dynamical feedback is removed by fixing the density of the hydra-effect species, large changes in the community make-up (including the possibility of species extinction) can occur. This general result has several implications: (1) Hydra effects occur in a much wider variety of species and interaction webs than has previously been described, and may occur for multiple species, even in small webs; (2) conditions for hydra effects caused by predators (or diseases) often differ from those caused by other mortality factors; (3) introducing a specialist or a switching predator of a hydra-effect species often causes large changes in the community, which frequently involve extinction of other species; (4) harvest policies that attempt to maintain a constant density of a hydra-effect species may be difficult to implement, and, if successful, are likely to cause large changes in the densities of other species; and (5) trophic cascades and other indirect effects caused by predators of hydra-effect species can exhibit amplification of effects or unexpected directions of change. Although we concentrate on systems that are originally stable and models with no stage-structure or trait variation, the generality of our result suggests that similar responses to mortality will occur in many systems without these simplifying assumptions. In addition, while hydra effects are defined as responses to altered mortality, they also imply counterintuitive responses to changes in immigration and other parameters affecting population growth.

  12. Dynamic Assessment for Better Placement: Implications of Vygotsky’s ZAD and ZPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hessam Agheshteh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As argued by Poehner (2008, Dynamic Assessment (DA can substantially improve our understanding of students’ abilities and promote their development at the same time by providing information on both the individuals’ Zone of Actual Development (ZAD and their Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD, and this way helps us avoid overestimates and underestimates of these individuals’ abilities. The present study, as a result, was an attempt to investigate the role DA can play in students’ placement into appropriate levels and courses of education. For this end, the researchers observed and recorded the placement interviews of four placement teachers in the Iran Language Institute (ILI and Nashr-e-Zaban. The researchers analyzed the gathered data and found out that the placement teachers dealt more with the students’ ZAD than their ZPD. Adopting the Interactionist Model of DA, and believing that “understanding individuals’ abilities necessitates intervention” (Poehner, 2008, p. 113, the researchers discussed DA and its key concepts including ZPD, mediation, scaffolding, intervention, the assessment-instruction integration and the role these could play in a better prediction of the students’ future performance and emergent abilities. Having discussed DA and its key concepts using some examples from previous placement interviews in a six-hour course, the researchers observed and recorded the placement interviews of the four teachers in the following term. The gathered data were transcribed and interpreted to see if the intervention had an effect on placement teachers’ performance of placement interviews. The results showed that placement teachers then relied more on DA and its key concepts as better indicators of students’ future performance. The implications are for those teachers who hold placement interviews to adopt a more development-oriented approach and assess the students’ both ZAD and ZPD so that they can avoid misplacements

  13. Remote Dynamic Earthquake Triggering in Shale Gas Basins in Canada and Implications for Triggering Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Rebecca M.; Liu, Yajing; Wang, Bei; Kao, Honn; Yu, Hongyu

    2017-04-01

    Here we investigate the occurrence of remote dynamic triggering in three sedimentary basins in Canada where recent fluid injection activity is correlated with increasing numbers of earthquakes. In efforts to count as many small, local earthquakes as possible for the statistical test of triggering, we apply a multi-station matched-filter detection method to continuous waveforms to detect uncataloged local earthquakes in 10-day time windows surrounding triggering mainshocks occurring between 2013-2015 with an estimated local peak ground velocity exceeding 0.01 cm/s. We count the number of earthquakes in 24-hour bins and use a statistical p-value test to determine if the changes in seismicity levels after the mainshock waves have passed are statistically significant. The p-value tests show occurrences of triggering following transient stress perturbations of sites that suggest local faults may remain critically stressed over periods similar to the time frame of our study ( 2 years) or longer, potentially due to maintained high pore pressures in tight shale formations following injection. The time window over which seismicity rates change varies at each site, with more delayed triggering occurring at sites where production history is longer. The observations combined with new modeling results suggest that the poroelastic response of the medium may be the dominant factor influencing instantaneous triggering, particularly in low-permeability tight shales. At sites where production history is longer and permeabilities have been increased, both pore pressure diffusion and the poroelastic response of the medium may work together to promote both instantaneous and delayed triggering. Not only does the interplay of the poroelastic response of the medium and pore pressure diffusion have implications for triggering induced earthquakes near injection sites, but it may be a plausible explanation for observations of instantaneous and delayed earthquake triggering in general.

  14. Albedo Dynamics after Fire in Southern Africa; Contributing Factors and Implications for Regional Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M.; D'Odorico, P.; Scanlon, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have documented instantaneous reductions in albedo (darkening) of the land surface after fires in sub-Saharan Africa. However, at longer time scales the interplay of vegetation removal and revelation of dry underlaying soils could result in higher albedo (brightening) and a negative radiative forcing, a phenomenon that requires further investigation. In this study we consider the effect of fire on albedo weeks to months after early fires occurring southern Africa at the onset of the 2015 dry season. We make opportunistic use of the SMAP radar-based soil moisture product to account and correct for fine-scale spatiotemporal variability in soil moisture. Furthermore, this allows us to bypass issues associated with reference pixel approach. We use advanced statistical modeling and multiple satellite data sources to quantify the relative contributions of underlying soil type, fire-induced char deposition and vegetation removal, and seasonal fluctuations in soil moisture to overall albedo dynamics. In line with previous studies, we find a general decrease in albedo immediately following fire. However, within a month of burning, about half of the study pixels exhibit fire-induced brightening. Long-lived albedo increases of up to 0.04 are common in semiarid regions. These values continue to increase over the course of the dry season. There are distinct geographic trends in the occurrence of brightening which are attributable to regional gradients in soil type and vegetation cover. Given the prevalence of brightening in drier regions and the potential for persistent surface modification, we discuss the implications for regional climate. Specifically, we consider how bright burn scars following widespread fires offer a mechanism that could help explain recent evidence of fire-induced rainfall suppression in African drylands.

  15. Developmental changes in guard cell wall structure and pectin composition in the moss Funaria: implications for function and evolution of stomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merced, Amelia; Renzaglia, Karen

    2014-10-01

    In seed plants, the ability of guard cell walls to move is imparted by pectins. Arabinan rhamnogalacturonan I (RG1) pectins confer flexibility while unesterified homogalacturonan (HG) pectins impart rigidity. Recognized as the first extant plants with stomata, mosses are key to understanding guard cell function and evolution. Moss stomata open and close for only a short period during capsule expansion. This study examines the ultrastructure and pectin composition of guard cell walls during development in Funaria hygrometrica and relates these features to the limited movement of stomata. Developing stomata were examined and immunogold-labelled in transmission electron microscopy using monoclonal antibodies to five pectin epitopes: LM19 (unesterified HG), LM20 (esterified HG), LM5 (galactan RG1), LM6 (arabinan RG1) and LM13 (linear arabinan RG1). Labels for pectin type were quantitated and compared across walls and stages on replicated, independent samples. Walls were four times thinner before pore formation than in mature stomata. When stomata opened and closed, guard cell walls were thin and pectinaceous before the striated internal and thickest layer was deposited. Unesterified HG localized strongly in early layers but weakly in the thick internal layer. Labelling was weak for esterified HG, absent for galactan RG1 and strong for arabinan RG1. Linear arabinan RG1 is the only pectin that exclusively labelled guard cell walls. Pectin content decreased but the proportion of HG to arabinans changed only slightly. This is the first study to demonstrate changes in pectin composition during stomatal development in any plant. Movement of Funaria stomata coincides with capsule expansion before layering of guard cell walls is complete. Changes in wall architecture coupled with a decrease in total pectin may be responsible for the inability of mature stomata to move. Specialization of guard cells in mosses involves the addition of linear arabinans. © The Author 2014

  16. Many-particle theory of optical properties in low-dimensional nanostructures. Dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes and semiconductor quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malic, Ermin

    2008-09-02

    This work focuses on the theoretical investigation of optical properties of low-dimensional nanostructures, specifically single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The density-matrix formalism is applied to explain recent experimental results and to give insight into the underlying physics. A microscopic calculation of the absorption coefficient and the Rayleigh scattering cross section is performed by a novel approach combining the density-matrix formalism with the tight-binding wave functions. The calculated spectra of metallic nanotubes show a double-peaked structure resulting from the trigonal warping effect. The intensity ratios of the four lowest-lying transitions in both absorption and Rayleigh spectra can be explained by the different behavior of the optical matrix elements along the high-symmetry lines K-{gamma} and K-M. The Rayleigh line shape is predicted to be asymmetric, with an enhanced cross section for lower photon energies arising from non-resonant contributions of the optical susceptibility. Furthermore, the Coulomb interaction is shown to be maximal when the momentum transfer is low. For intersubband processes with a perpendicular momentum transfer, the coupling strength is reduced to less than 5%. The chirality and diameter dependence of the excitonic binding energy and the transition frequency are presented in Kataura plots. Furthermore, the influence of the surrounding environment on the optical properties of CNTs is investigated. Extending the confinement to all three spatial dimensions, semiconductor Bloch equation are derived to describe the dynamics in QD semiconductor lasers and amplifiers. A detailed microscopic analysis of the nonlinear turn-on dynamics of electrically pumped InAs/GaAs QD lasers is performed, showing the generation of relaxation oscillations on a nanosecond time scale in both the photon and charge carrier density. The theory predicts a strong damping of relaxation oscillations

  17. Hierarchical Calibration and Validation Framework of Bench-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations for Solvent-based Carbon Capture: Part 2. Chemical Absorption across a Wetted Wall Column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Zhijie; Lai, Canhai; Whyatt, Greg A.; Marcy, Peter; Sun, Xin

    2018-02-01

    The first part of this paper (Part 1) presents a numerical model for non-reactive physical mass transfer across a wetted wall column (WWC). In Part 2, we improved the existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate chemical absorption occurring in a WWC as a bench-scale study of solvent-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. To generate data for WWC model validation, CO2 mass transfer across a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent was first measured on a WWC experimental apparatus. The numerical model developed in this work has the ability to account for both chemical absorption and desorption of CO2 in MEA. In addition, the overall mass transfer coefficient predicted using traditional/empirical correlations is conducted and compared with CFD prediction results for both steady and wavy falling films. A Bayesian statistical calibration algorithm is adopted to calibrate the reaction rate constants in chemical absorption/desorption of CO2 across a falling film of MEA. The posterior distributions of the two transport properties, i.e., Henry’s constant and gas diffusivity in the non-reacting nitrous oxide (N2O)/MEA system obtained from Part 1 of this study, serves as priors for the calibration of CO2 reaction rate constants after using the N2O/CO2 analogy method. The calibrated model can be used to predict the CO2 mass transfer in a WWC for a wider range of operating conditions.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Effect of Temperature on the Tensile Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Ni-Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature on the tensile behavior of the armchair (6, 6 single-walled carbon nanotubes with a Ni-coating (SWCNT-Ni was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD methods. The mechanical properties of SWCNT-Ni and SWCNT were calculated and analyzed at different temperatures in the range from 220 K to 1200 K. From the MD results, temperature was determined to be the crucial factor affecting the mechanical properties of SWCNT-Ni and SWCNT. After coating nickel atoms onto the surface of a SWCNT, the Young’s modulus, tensile strength, and tensile failure strain of SWCNT were greatly reduced with temperature rising, indicating that the nickel atoms on the surface of SWCNT degrade its mechanical properties. However, at high temperature, the Young’s modulus of both the SWCNT and the SWCNT-Ni exhibited significantly greater temperature sensitivity than at low temperatures, as the mechanical properties of SWCNT-Ni were primarily dominated by temperature and C-Ni interactions. During these stretching processes at different temperatures, the nickel atoms on the surface of SWCNT-Ni could obtain the amount of energy sufficient to break the C-C bonds as the temperature increases.

  19. Cell Wall Growth and Modulation Dynamics in a Model Unicellular Green Alga—Penium margaritaceum: Live Cell Labeling with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Domozych

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga that possesses cell wall polymers similar to those of land plants. Several wall macromolecules of this alga are recognized by monoclonal antibodies specific for wall polymer epitopes of land plants. Immunofluorescence protocols using these antibodies may be employed to label specific cell wall constituents of live cells. Fluorescent labeling persists for several days, and this attribute allows for tracing of wall epitopes in both long- and short-term studies of cell development. Quantitative analysis of surface area covered by cell wall polymers is also easily performed. We show that significant cell expansion caused by incubation of cells in low levels of osmotically active agents like mannitol, glucose, or sucrose results from the inability of cells to undergo cytokinesis but does not result in significant changes to the amount of new cell wall. We also demonstrate that cells can be maintained for long periods of time in culture medium supplemented with specific cell wall-degrading enzymes where notable changes to wall infrastructure occur. These results demonstrate the great potential value of Penium in elucidating fundamental events during cell wall synthesis and modulation in plant cells.

  20. The role of the carotid sinus in the reduction of arterial wall stresses due to head movements--potential implications for cervical artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, F M; Soellinger, M; Baumgartner, R W; Poulikakos, D; Boesiger, P; Kurtcuoglu, V

    2009-04-16

    Spontaneous dissection of the cervical internal carotid artery (sICAD) is a major cause of stroke in young adults. A tear in the inner part of the vessel wall triggers sICAD as it allows the blood to enter the wall and develop a transmural hematoma. The etiology of the tear is unknown but many patients with sICAD report an initiating trivial trauma. We thus hypothesised that the site of the tear might correspond with the location of maximal stress in the carotid wall. Carotid artery geometries segmented from magnetic resonance images of a healthy subject at different static head positions were used to define a path of motion and deformation of the right cervical internal carotid artery (ICA). Maximum head rotation to the left and rotation to the left combined with hyperextension of the neck were investigated using a structural finite element model. A role of the carotid sinus as a geometrically compliant feature accommodating extension of the artery is shown. At the extreme range of the movements, the geometrical compliance of the carotid sinus is limited and significant stress concentrations appear just distal to the sinus with peak stresses at the internal wall on the posterior side of the vessel following maximum head rotation and on the anteromedial portion of the vessel wall following rotation and hyperextension. Clinically, the location of sICAD initiation is 10-30 mm distal to the origin of the cervical ICA, which corresponds with the peak stress locations observed in the model, thus supporting trivial trauma from natural head movements as a possible initiating factor in sICAD.

  1. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  2. A dynamic ultrasound simulation of a pulsating three-layered CCA for validation of two-dimensional wall motion and blood velocity estimation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Yufeng; Cai, Guanghui; Zhang, Kexin; Deng, Li; Gao, Lian; Han, Suya; Chen, Jianhua

    2017-11-17

    A dynamic ultrasound simulation model for the common carotid artery (CCA) with three arterial layers for validation of two-dimensional wall motion and blood velocity estimation algorithms is proposed in the present study. This model describes layers with not only characteristics of echo distributions conforming to clinical ones but also varying thicknesses, axial, and radial displacements with pulsatile blood pressure during a cardiac cycle. The modeling process is as follows: first, a geometrical model according with the clinical structure size of a CCA is built based on the preset layer thicknesses and the diameter of lumen. Second, a three-dimensional scatterer model is constructed by a mapping with a Hilbert space-filling curve from the one-dimensional scatterer distribution with the position and amplitude following Gamma and Gaussian distributions, respectively. The characteristics of three layers and blood are depicted by smoothly adjusting the scatterer density, the scale, and shape parameters of the Gamma distribution as well as the mean and standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution. To obtain the values of parameters of scatterer distributions, including the shape parameter, density, and intensity, for arterial layers and blood, the envelope signals simulated from different configurations of scatterer distribution are compared with those from different kinds of tissue of CCAs in vivo through a statistic analysis. Finally, the dynamic scatterer model is realized based on the blood pressure, elasticity modulus of intima-media (IM) and adventitia, varying IM thickness, axial displacement of IM as well as blood flow velocity at central axis during a cardiac cycle. Then, the corresponding radiofrequency (RF) signals, envelope signals, and B-mode images of the pulsatile CCA are generated in a dynamic scanning mode using Field II platform. The three arterial layers, blood, and surrounding tissue in simulated B-mode ultrasound images are clearly legible. The

  3. Implications of dynamic changes in miR-192 expression in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Yuan; Xue, Song; Wang, Xudong; Dai, Huili; Qian, Jiaqi; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng

    2017-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) with poor outcomes. While many important functions of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in various diseases, few studies reported miRNAs in acute kidney IRI, especially the dynamic changes in their expression and their implications during disease progression. The expression of miR-192, a specific kidney-enriched miRNA, was assessed in both the plasma and kidney of IRI rats at different time points after kidney injury and compared to renal function and kidney histological changes. The results were validated in the plasma of the selected patients with AKI after cardiac surgery compared with those matched patients without AKI. The performance characteristics of miR-192 were summarized using area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC-ROC). MiRNA profiling in plasma led to the identification of 42 differentially expressed miRNAs in the IRI group compared to the sham group. MiR-192 was kidney-enriched and chosen for further validation. Real-time PCR showed that miR-192 levels increased by fourfold in the plasma and decreased by about 40% in the kidney of IRI rats. Plasma miR-192 expression started increasing at 3 h and peaked at 12 h, while kidney miR-192 expression started decreasing at 6 h and remained at a low level for 7 days after reperfusion. Plasma miR-192 level in patients with AKI increased at the time of ICU admission, was stable for 2 h and decreased after 24 h. AUC-ROC was 0.673 (95% CI: 0.540-0.806, p = 0.014). Plasma miR-192 expression was induced in a time-dependent manner after IRI in rats and patients with AKI after cardiac surgery, comparably to the kidney injury development and recovery process, and may be useful for the detection of AKI.

  4. A submesoscale coherent vortex in the Ligurian Sea: From dynamical barriers to biological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; Mayot, Nicolas; Prieur, Louis; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Mortier, Laurent; Le Goff, Hervé; Gourcuff, Claire; Coppola, Laurent; Lavigne, Héloïse; Raimbault, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    In June 2013, a glider equipped with oxygen and fluorescence sensors has been used to extensively sample an anticyclonic Submesoscale Coherent Vortex (SCV) in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea). Those measurements are complemented by full-depth CTD casts (T, S, and oxygen) and water samples documenting nutrients and phytoplankton pigments within the SCV and outside. The SCV has a very homogeneous core of oxygenated waters between 300 and 1200 m formed 4.5 months earlier during the winter deep convection event. It has a strong dynamical signature with peak velocities at 700 m depth of 13.9 cm s-1 in cyclogeostrophic balance. The eddy has a small radius of 6.2 km corresponding to high Rossby number of -0.45. The vorticity at the eddy center reaches -0.8f. Cross-stream isopycnic diffusion of tracers between the eddy core and the surroundings is found to be very limited due to dynamical barriers set by the SCV associated with a diffusivity coefficient of about 0.2 m2 s-1. The deep core is nutrients-depleted with concentrations of nitrate, phosphate, and silicate, 13-18% lower than the rich surrounding waters. However, the nutriclines are shifted of about 20-50 m toward the surface thus increasing the nutrients availability for phytoplankton. Chlorophyll-a concentrations at the deep chlorophyll maximum are subsequently about twice bigger as compared to outside. Pigments further reveal the predominance of nanophytoplankton inside the eddy and an enhancement of the primary productivity. This study demonstrates the important impact of postconvective SCVs on nutrients distribution and phytoplankton community, as well as on the subsequent primary production and carbon sequestration.Plain Language SummaryDue to harsh meteorological conditions in winter, a few places of the world's ocean experience an intense cooling of their surface waters that start to sink in a process called oceanic deep convection. It is crucial for the functioning of the ocean, but also the marine

  5. Dynamical compensation and structural identifiability of biological models: Analysis, implications, and reconciliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Banga, Julio R

    2017-11-01

    The concept of dynamical compensation has been recently introduced to describe the ability of a biological system to keep its output dynamics unchanged in the face of varying parameters. However, the original definition of dynamical compensation amounts to lack of structural identifiability. This is relevant if model parameters need to be estimated, as is often the case in biological modelling. Care should we taken when using an unidentifiable model to extract biological insight: the estimated values of structurally unidentifiable parameters are meaningless, and model predictions about unmeasured state variables can be wrong. Taking this into account, we explore alternative definitions of dynamical compensation that do not necessarily imply structural unidentifiability. Accordingly, we show different ways in which a model can be made identifiable while exhibiting dynamical compensation. Our analyses enable the use of the new concept of dynamical compensation in the context of parameter identification, and reconcile it with the desirable property of structural identifiability.

  6. Mitochondrial dynamics, quality control and miRNA regulation in skeletal muscle: implications for obesity and related metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmans, Dennis; Houzelle, Alexandre; Schrauwen, Patrick; Hoeks, Joris

    2016-06-01

    The western dietary habits and sedentary lifestyle largely contributes to the growing epidemic of obesity. Mitochondria are at the front line of cellular energy homoeostasis and are implicated in the pathophysiology of obesity and obesity-related metabolic disease. In recent years, novel aspects in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, such as mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial protein quality control and post-transcriptional regulation of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins, have emerged. In this review, we discuss the recent findings concerning the dysregulation of these processes in skeletal muscle in obesogenic conditions. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  7. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  8. Temporal carbon dynamics of forests in Washington, US: implications for ecological theory and carbon management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal L. Raymond; Donald. McKenzie

    2014-01-01

    We quantified carbon (C) dynamics of forests in Washington, US using theoretical models of C dynamics as a function of forest age. We fit empirical models to chronosequences of forest inventory data at two scales: a coarse-scale ecosystem classification (ecosections) and forest types (potential vegetation) within ecosections. We hypothesized that analysis at the finer...

  9. Mean-field behavior as a result of noisy local dynamics in self-organized criticality: Neuroscience implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, S. Amin; Montakhab, Afshin

    2014-05-01

    Motivated by recent experiments in neuroscience which indicate that neuronal avalanches exhibit scale invariant behavior similar to self-organized critical systems, we study the role of noisy (nonconservative) local dynamics on the critical behavior of a sandpile model which can be taken to mimic the dynamics of neuronal avalanches. We find that despite the fact that noise breaks the strict local conservation required to attain criticality, our system exhibits true criticality for a wide range of noise in various dimensions, given that conservation is respected on the average. Although the system remains critical, exhibiting finite-size scaling, the value of critical exponents change depending on the intensity of local noise. Interestingly, for a sufficiently strong noise level, the critical exponents approach and saturate at their mean-field values, consistent with empirical measurements of neuronal avalanches. This is confirmed for both two and three dimensional models. However, the addition of noise does not affect the exponents at the upper critical dimension (D =4). In addition to an extensive finite-size scaling analysis of our systems, we also employ a useful time-series analysis method to establish true criticality of noisy systems. Finally, we discuss the implications of our work in neuroscience as well as some implications for the general phenomena of criticality in nonequilibrium systems.

  10. Bush encroachment dynamics and rangeland management implications in the Horn of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangelands in the Horn of Africa have been undergoing a rapid shift from herbaceous to woody plant dominance in the past decades, threatening subsistence livestock herding and pastoral food security. Despite of significant rangeland management implications, quantification of the spatial extent of en...

  11. Molecular dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis KasA: implications for inhibitor and substrate binding and consequences for drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Benjamin; Kisker, Caroline; Sotriffer, Christoph A.

    2011-11-01

    Inhibition of the production of fatty acids as essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall has been an established way of fighting tuberculosis for decades. However, increasing resistances and an outdated medical treatment call for the validation of new targets involved in this crucial pathway. In this regard, the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase KasA is a promising enzyme. In this study, three molecular dynamics simulations based on the wildtype crystal structures of inhibitor bound and unbound KasA were performed in order to investigate the flexibility and conformational space of this target. We present an exhaustive analysis of the binding-site flexibility and representative pocket conformations that may serve as new starting points for structure-based drug design. We also revealed a mechanism which may account for the comparatively low binding affinity of thiolactomycin. Furthermore, we examined the behavior of water molecules within the binding pocket and provide recommendations how to handle them in the drug design process. Finally, we analyzed the dynamics of a channel that accommodates the long-chain fatty acid substrates and, thereby, propose a mechanism of substrate access to this channel and how products are most likely released.

  12. Dynamical system of scalar field from 2-dimension to 3-D and its cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Tu, Hong; Huang, Jiasheng; Shu, Chenggang

    2016-09-01

    We give the three-dimensional dynamical autonomous systems for most of the popular scalar field dark energy models including (phantom) quintessence, (phantom) tachyon, K-essence, and general non-canonical scalar field models, change the dynamical variables from variables (x, y, λ ) to observable related variables (w_{φ }, Ω _{φ }, λ ), and show the intimate relationships between those scalar fields that the three-dimensional system of K-essence can reduce to (phantom) tachyon, general non-canonical scalar field can reduce to (phantom) quintessence and K-essence can also reduce to (phantom) quintessence for some special cases. For the applications of the three-dimensional dynamical systems, we investigate several special cases and give the exactly dynamical solutions in detail. In the end of this paper, we argue that it is more convenient and also has more physical meaning to express the differential equations of dynamical systems in (w_{φ }, Ω _{φ }, λ ) instead of variables (x, y, λ ) and to investigate the dynamical system in three dimensions instead of two dimensions. We also raise a question about the possibility of the chaotic behavior in the spatially flat single scalar field FRW cosmological models in the presence of ordinary matter.

  13. Comparison of the Young-Laplace law and finite element based calculation of ventricular wall stress: implications for postinfarct and surgical ventricular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Tendulkar, Amod; Sun, Kay; Saloner, David A; Wallace, Arthur W; Ge, Liang; Guccione, Julius M; Ratcliffe, Mark B

    2011-01-01

    Both the Young-Laplace law and finite element (FE) based methods have been used to calculate left ventricular wall stress. We tested the hypothesis that the Young-Laplace law is able to reproduce results obtained with the FE method. Magnetic resonance imaging scans with noninvasive tags were used to calculate three-dimensional myocardial strain in 5 sheep 16 weeks after anteroapical myocardial infarction, and in 1 of those sheep 6 weeks after a Dor procedure. Animal-specific FE models were created from the remaining 5 animals using magnetic resonance images obtained at early diastolic filling. The FE-based stress in the fiber, cross-fiber, and circumferential directions was calculated and compared to stress calculated with the assumption that wall thickness is very much less than the radius of curvature (Young-Laplace law), and without that assumption (modified Laplace). First, circumferential stress calculated with the modified Laplace law is closer to results obtained with the FE method than stress calculated with the Young-Laplace law. However, there are pronounced regional differences, with the largest difference between modified Laplace and FE occurring in the inner and outer layers of the infarct borderzone. Also, stress calculated with the modified Laplace is very different than stress in the fiber and cross-fiber direction calculated with FE. As a consequence, the modified Laplace law is inaccurate when used to calculate the effect of the Dor procedure on regional ventricular stress. The FE method is necessary to determine stress in the left ventricle with postinfarct and surgical ventricular remodeling. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of Young Laplace law and finite element based calculation of ventricular wall stress: Implications for post infarct and surgical ventricular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Tendulkar, Amod; Sun, Kay; Stander, Nielen; Saloner, David A.; Wallace, Arthur W.; Ge, Liang; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Both the Young Laplace law and finite element (FE) based methods have been used to calculate left ventricular (LV) wall stress. We tested the hypothesis that the Young Laplace law is able to reproduce results obtained with FE method. Methods Magnetic resonance (MRI) images with non-invasive tags were used to calculate 3D myocardial strain in five sheep 16 weeks after anteroapical myocardial infarction and in one of those sheep 6 weeks after a Dor procedure. Animal specific FE models were created from the remaining five animals using MRI images obtained at early diastolic filling. FE based stress in the fiber, cross fiber and circumferential directions was calculated and compared to stress calculated with (Young Laplace law) and without (Modified Laplace) the assumption that wall thickness is very much less than the radius of curvature. Results First,circumferential stress calculated with the Modified Laplace law is closer to results obtained with the FE method than stress calculated with the Young Laplace law. However, there are pronounced regional differences with the largest difference between Modified Laplace and FE occurring especially in the inner and outer layers of the infarct borderzone. Also, stress calculated with Modified Laplace is very different than stress in the fiber and cross fiber direction calculated with FE. As a consequence, the Modified Laplace law is inaccurate when used to calculate the effect of the Dor procedure on regional ventricular stress. Conclusion The FE method is necessary to determine stress in the LV with post infarct and surgical ventricular remodeling. PMID:21172505

  15. Complexity, fractal dynamics and determinism in treadmill ambulation: Implications for clinical biomechanists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollman, John H; Watkins, Molly K; Imhoff, Angela C; Braun, Carly E; Akervik, Kristen A; Ness, Debra K

    2016-08-01

    Reduced inter-stride complexity during ambulation may represent a pathologic state. Evidence is emerging that treadmill training for rehabilitative purposes may constrain the locomotor system and alter gait dynamics in a way that mimics pathological states. The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamical system components of gait complexity, fractal dynamics and determinism during treadmill ambulation. Twenty healthy participants aged 23.8 (1.2) years walked at preferred walking speeds for 6min on a motorized treadmill and overground while wearing APDM 6 Opal inertial monitors. Stride times, stride lengths and peak sagittal plane trunk velocities were measured. Mean values and estimates of complexity, fractal dynamics and determinism were calculated for each parameter. Data were compared between overground and treadmill walking conditions. Mean values for each gait parameter were statistically equivalent between overground and treadmill ambulation (P>0.05). Through nonlinear analyses, however, we found that complexity in stride time signals (P<0.001), and long-range correlations in stride time and stride length signals (P=0.005 and P=0.024, respectively), were reduced on the treadmill. Treadmill ambulation induces more predictable inter-stride time dynamics and constrains fluctuations in stride times and stride lengths, which may alter feedback from destabilizing perturbations normally experienced by the locomotor control system during overground ambulation. Treadmill ambulation, therefore, may provide less opportunity for experiencing the adaptability necessary to successfully ambulate overground. Investigators and clinicians should be aware that treadmill ambulation will alter dynamic gait characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamics of Atmospheric Waves In a Hazy Atmosphere: Implications for Titan and Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcheva, Katia

    2017-10-01

    We present a dynamical model of atmospheric gravity waves propagating in a stable atmosphere in the presence of small-size particulates. We consider a two-way interaction: (i) the effect of atmospheric mass-loading on the propagation of the waves and (ii) the dynamical forcing of the haze particle motion in the presence of variable atmospheric winds. The model illustrates the effect on the vertical distribution of haze particles due to wave-induces vertical winds and wind gradients. The results are presented in the context of Titan’s atmosphere and Cassini observations.

  17. Seismic displacement of gravity retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic displacement of gravity walls had been studied using conventional static methods for controlled displacement design. In this study plain strain numerical analysis is performed using Plaxis dynamic program where prescribed displacement is applied at the bottom boundary of the soil to simulate the applied seismic load. Constrained absorbent side boundaries are introduced to prevent any wave reflection. The studied soil is chosen dense granular sand and modeled as elasto-plastic material according to Mohr–Column criteria while the gravity wall is assumed elastic. By comparing the resulted seismic wall displacements calculated by numerical analysis for six historical ground motions with that calculated by the pseudo-static method, it is found that numerical seismic displacements are either equal to or greater than corresponding pseudo-static values. Permissible seismic wall displacement calculated by AASHTO can be used for empirical estimation of seismic displacement. It is also found that seismic wall displacement is directly proportional with the positive angle of inclination of the back surface of the wall, soil flexibility and with the earthquake maximum ground acceleration. Seismic wall sliding is dominant and rotation is negligible for rigid walls when the ratio between the wall height and the foundation width is less than 1.4, while for greater ratios the wall becomes more flexible and rotation (rocking increases till the ratio reaches 1.8 where overturning is susceptible to take place. Cumulative seismic wall rotation increases with dynamic time and tends to be constant at the end of earthquake.

  18. UNDERSTANDING TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION THROUGH SYSTEM DYNAMICS MODELING: IMPLICATIONS FOR AGRIBUSINESS MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Donna K.; Norvell, Jonathan; Sonka, Steven T.; Nelson, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of sophisticated simulation tools in aiding agribusiness managers' decision making. The system dynamics model developed here provides insight into the use of such models to evaluate potential adoption rates and diffusion patterns of yield mapping and monitoring technologies. The model allows for comparative analyses of the possible effects of different profit assumptions on adoption and diffusion.

  19. A dynamical systems view of motor preparation: Implications for neural prosthetic system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Krishna V.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Sahani, Maneesh; Churchland, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Neural prosthetic systems aim to help disabled patients suffering from a range of neurological injuries and disease by using neural activity from the brain to directly control assistive devices. This approach in effect bypasses the dysfunctional neural circuitry, such as an injured spinal cord. To do so, neural prostheses depend critically on a scientific understanding of the neural activity that drives them. We review here several recent studies aimed at understanding the neural processes in premotor cortex that precede arm movements and lead to the initiation of movement. These studies were motivated by hypotheses and predictions conceived of within a dynamical systems perspective. This perspective concentrates on describing the neural state using as few degrees of freedom as possible and on inferring the rules that govern the motion of that neural state. Although quite general, this perspective has led to a number of specific predictions that have been addressed experimentally. It is hoped that the resulting picture of the dynamical role of preparatory and movement-related neural activity will be particularly helpful to the development of neural prostheses, which can themselves be viewed as dynamical systems under the control of the larger dynamical system to which they are attached. PMID:21763517

  20. Tourist activated networks: Implications for dynamic bundling and en-route recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Gretzel, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses tourist-activated networks as a concept to inform technological applications supporting dynamic bundling and en route recommendations. Empirical data were collected from travelers who visited a regional destination in the US and then analyzed with respect to its network str...... marketing....

  1. Dynamic morphology of fish larvae, structural implications of friction forces in swimming, feeding and ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osse, J.W.M.; Boogaart, van den J.G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic morphology is the study of the ontogenetic transformations of functional systems in growing organisms. This paper describes these processes in fish larvae as they grow into the juvenile stage. Details of form changes and growth at the level of the organism and its organs are given. Some

  2. Isotope effects in photodissociation: Chemical reaction dynamics and implications for atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Solvejg; Grage, Mette Marie-Louise; Nyman, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    and implicitly involve the short time approximation. in the time-dependent methods the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved exactly and the method considers the effect of dynamics away from the Franck-Condon region. We illustrate the presented methods using small molecules (HCl, N2O, OCS and HCHO...

  3. Customary land tenure dynamics at peri-urban Ghana : Implications for land administration system modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arko-Adjei, A.; de Jong, J.; Zevenbergen, J.A.; Tuladhar, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Customary land tenure is criticized as dynamic with the institutional framework unable to provide enough tenure security at all times. It is also criticized as ineffective to cope with the trends in land tenure delivery at peri-urban areas where individualization of land and demand for land is high.

  4. Dynamics of weed populations : spatial pattern formation and implications for control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling studies were carried out to analyse spatio-temporal dynamics of annual weed populations and to identify the key factors that determine the long-term herbicide use of weed control programmes. Three different weed control programmes were studied.

    In the first weed

  5. Growth of Chitinophaga pinensis on Plant Cell Wall Glycans and Characterisation of a Glycoside Hydrolase Family 27 β-l-Arabinopyranosidase Implicated in Arabinogalactan Utilisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren S McKee

    Full Text Available The genome of the soil bacterium Chitinophaga pinensis encodes a diverse array of carbohydrate active enzymes, including nearly 200 representatives from over 50 glycoside hydrolase (GH families, the enzymology of which is essentially unexplored. In light of this genetic potential, we reveal that C. pinensis has a broader saprophytic capacity to thrive on plant cell wall polysaccharides than previously reported, and specifically that secretion of β-l-arabinopyranosidase activity is induced during growth on arabinogalactan. We subsequently correlated this activity with the product of the Cpin_5740 gene, which encodes the sole member of glycoside hydrolase family 27 (GH27 in C. pinensis, CpArap27. Historically, GH27 is most commonly associated with α-d-galactopyranosidase and α-d-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity. A new phylogenetic analysis of GH27 highlighted the likely importance of several conserved secondary structural features in determining substrate specificity and provides a predictive framework for identifying enzymes with the less common β-l-arabinopyranosidase activity.

  6. Biomechanics of Posterior Dynamic Fusion Systems in the Lumbar Spine: Implications for Stabilization With Improved Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Alexander K; Siegfried, Catherine M; Chew, Brandon; Hobbs, Joseph; Sabersky, Abraham; Jho, Diana J; Cook, Daniel J; Bellotte, Jonathan Brad; Whiting, Donald M; Cheng, Boyle C

    2016-08-01

    A comparative biomechanical human cadaveric spine study of a dynamic fusion rod and a traditional titanium rod. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the biomechanical metrics associated with a dynamic fusion device, Isobar TTL Evolution, and a rigid rod. Dynamic fusion rods may enhance arthrodesis compared with a rigid rod. Wolff's law implies that bone remodeling and growth may be enhanced through anterior column loading (AL). This is important for dynamic fusion rods because their purpose is to increase AL. Six fresh-frozen lumbar cadaveric specimens were used. Each untreated specimen (Intact) underwent biomechanical testing. Next, each specimen had a unilateral transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion performed at L3-L4 using a cage with an integrated load cell. Pedicle screws were also placed at this time. Subsequently, the Isobar was implanted and tested, and finally, a rigid rod replaced the Isobar in the same pedicle screw arrangement. In terms of range of motion, the Isobar performed comparably to the rigid rod and there was no statistical difference found between Isobar and rigid rod. There was a significant difference between the intact and rigid rod and also between intact and Isobar conditions in flexion extension. For interpedicular displacement, there was a significant increase in flexion extension (P=0.017) for the Isobar compared with the rigid rod. Isobar showed increased AL under axial compression compared with the rigid rod (P=0.024). Isobar provided comparable stabilization to a rigid rod when using range of motion as the metric, however, AL was increased because of the greater interpedicular displacement of dynamic rod compared with a rigid rod. By increasing interpedicular displacement and AL, it potentially brings clinical benefit to procedures relying on arthrodesis.

  7. Environmental effects on cephalopod population dynamics: implications for management of fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhouse, Paul G K; Pierce, Graham J; Nichols, Owen C; Sauer, Warwick H H; Arkhipkin, Alexander I; Laptikhovsky, Vladimir V; Lipiński, Marek R; Ramos, Jorge E; Gras, Michaël; Kidokoro, Hideaki; Sadayasu, Kazuhiro; Pereira, João; Lefkaditou, Evgenia; Pita, Cristina; Gasalla, Maria; Haimovici, Manuel; Sakai, Mitsuo; Downey, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Cephalopods are a relatively small class of molluscs (~800 species), but they support some large industrial scale fisheries and numerous small-scale, local, artisanal fisheries. For several decades, landings of cephalopods globally have grown against a background of total finfish landings levelling off and then declining. There is now evidence that in recent years, growth in cephalopod landings has declined. The commercially exploited cephalopod species are fast-growing, short-lived ecological opportunists. Annual variability in abundance is strongly influenced by environmental variability, but the underlying causes of the links between environment and population dynamics are poorly understood. Stock assessment models have recently been developed that incorporate environmental processes that drive variability in recruitment, distribution and migration patterns. These models can be expected to improve as more, and better, data are obtained on environmental effects and as techniques for stock identification improve. A key element of future progress will be improved understanding of trophic dynamics at all phases in the cephalopod life cycle. In the meantime, there is no routine stock assessment in many targeted fisheries or in the numerous by-catch fisheries for cephalopods. There is a particular need for a precautionary approach in these cases. Assessment in many fisheries is complicated because cephalopods are ecological opportunists and stocks appear to have benefited from the reduction of key predator by overexploitation. Because of the complexities involved, ecosystem-based fisheries management integrating social, economic and ecological considerations is desirable for cephalopod fisheries. An ecological approach to management is routine in many fisheries, but to be effective, good scientific understanding of the relationships between the environment, trophic dynamics and population dynamics is essential. Fisheries and the ecosystems they depend on can only be

  8. Non-monotonic dynamics and crosstalk in signaling pathways and their implications for pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wijk, Roeland; Tans, Sander J.; Wolde, Pieter Rein Ten; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2015-06-01

    Currently, drug discovery approaches commonly assume a monotonic dose-response relationship. However, the assumption of monotonicity is increasingly being challenged. Here we show that for two simple interacting linear signaling pathways that carry two different signals with different physiological responses, a non-monotonic input-output relation can arise with simple network topologies including coherent and incoherent feed-forward loops. We show that non-monotonicity of the response functions has severe implications for pharmacological treatment. Fundamental constraints are imposed on the effectiveness and toxicity of any drug independent of its chemical nature and selectivity due to the specific network structure.

  9. Project Summary (2012-2015) – Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkle, Ross [University of Central Florida; Benscoter, Brian [Florida Atlantic University; Comas, Xavier [Florida Atlantic University; Sumner, David [USGS; DeAngelis, Donald [USGS

    2015-04-07

    Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change The objectives of this project are to: 1) quantify above- and below-ground carbon stocks of terrestrial ecosystems along a seasonal hydrologic gradient in the headwaters region of the Greater Everglades watershed; 2) develop budgets of ecosystem gaseous carbon exchange (carbon dioxide and methane) across the seasonal hydrologic gradient; 3) assess the impact of climate drivers on ecosystem carbon exchange in the Greater Everglades headwater region; and 4) integrate research findings with climate-driven terrestrial ecosystem carbon models to examine the potential influence of projected future climate change on regional carbon cycling. Note: this project receives a one-year extension past the original performance period - David Sumner (USGS) is not included in this extension.

  10. Ecohydrology of a Tropical Landscape: Hydrological Regimes and Implications for Water Resources and Ecological Dynamics in the Talgua Watershed, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, W. M.; Jass, T. L.; Emanuel, R. E.

    2016-12-01

    The tropics play a central role in regulating Earth's environmental systems, not only cycling more water than any other region in the world but also influencing global biogeochemical and energy balances. Increasing and widespread deforestation, climate change, and other disturbances are rapidly altering Earth system processes in the tropics, yet our understanding of these processes and their implications is limited for certain locations. Honduras, located within the Mesoamerican region, is one such location. A combination of rapid land use change (including deforestation at 3% y-1), hurricanes, droughts, poor access to drinking water, and poverty place Honduras among the most environmentally vulnerable countries in the world. However, these factors also create an ideal scenario for understanding complex human-environment interactions and their effects on tropical eco-hydrological systems. To this end, we collected and analyzed hydrological and meteorological data from the upper Talgua River, a forested, montane catchment in the headwaters of Honduras' Patuca River, during 2015 and 2016. We characterized the water balance and basic water quality relationships for the Talgua River, an important accomplishment for such a data-sparse region. We place our results in the context of coupled human-water dynamics in this region of Mesoamerica and discuss implications for water resources and other environmental services. Our analyses, embedded research infrastructure, and long-term partnerships with local institutions help provide valuable insights that narrow the existing knowledge gap in tropical ecohydrology and related socio-environmental dynamics. Our work also helps local communities and governments plan and make well-informed decisions about water and related resources.

  11. Biotensegrity of the extracellular matrix: physiology, dynamic mechanical balance and implications in oncology and mechanotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eTadeo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells have the capacity to convert mechanical stimuli into chemical changes. This process is based on the tensegrity principle, a mechanism of tensional integrity. To date, this principle has been demonstrated to act in physiological processes such as mechanotransduction and mechanosensing at different scales (from cell sensing through integrins to molecular mechanical interventions or even localized massage. The process involves intra- and extracellular components, including the participation of extracellular matrix and microtubules that act as compression structures, and actin filaments, which act as tension structures. The nucleus itself has its own tensegrity system which is implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Despite present advances, only the tip of the iceberg has so far been uncovered regarding the role of extracellular matrix compounds in influencing biotensegrity in pathological processes. Groups of cells, together with the surrounding ground substance, are subject to different and specific forces which certainly influence biological processes. In this paper we review the current knowledge on the role of extracellular matrix elements in determining biotensegrity in malignant processes, and describe their implication in therapeutic response, resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy, and subsequent tumor progression. Original data based on the study of neuroblastic tumors will be provided.

  12. Expression patterns of Brassica napus genes implicate IPT, CKX, sucrose transporter, cell wall invertase, and amino acid permease gene family members in leaf, flower, silique, and seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiancheng; Jiang, Lijun; Jameson, Paula Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Forage brassica (Brassica napus cv. Greenland) is bred for vegetative growth and biomass production, while its seed yield remains to be improved for seed producers without affecting forage yield and quality. Cytokinins affect seed yield by influencing flower, silique and seed number, and seed size. To identify specific cytokinin gene family members as targets for breeding, as well as genes associated with yield and/or quality, a B. napus transcriptome was obtained from a mixed sample including leaves, flower buds and siliques of various stages. Gene families for cytokinin biosynthesis (BnIPT1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8 and 9), cytokinin degradation (BnCKX1 to BnCKX7), cell wall invertase (BnCWINV1 to BnCWINV6), sugar transporter (BnSUT1 to BnSUT6) and amino acid permease (BnAAP1 to BnAAP8) were identified. As B. napus is tetraploid, homoeologues of each gene family member were sought. Using multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis, the parental genomes of the two B. napus homoeologues could be differentiated. RT-qPCR was then used to determine the expression of gene family members and their homoeologues in leaves, flowers, siliques and seeds of different developmental stages. The expression analysis showed both temporal and organ-specific expression profiles among members of these multi-gene families. Several pairs of homoeologues showed differential expression, both in terms of level of expression and differences in temporal or organ-specificity. BnCKX2 and 4 were identified as targets for TILLING, EcoTILLING and MAS. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  13. Surface polyethylene glycol conformation influences the protein corona of polyethylene glycol-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes: potential implications on biological performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchetti, Cristiano; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Magrini, Andrea; Palmieri, Graziana; Mattei, Maurizio; Bernardini, Sergio; Rosato, Nicola; Bottini, Nunzio; Bottini, Massimo

    2013-03-26

    Investigation of the nanoparticle protein corona, the shell of plasma proteins formed around nanoparticles immediately after they enter the bloodstream, is a benchmark in the study of the applications of nanoparticles in all fields of medicine, from pharmacology to toxicology. We report the first investigation of the protein corona adsorbed onto single-walled carbon nanotubes modified with 2 kDa molecular weight polyethylene glycol chains [PEG(2k)-modified SWCNTs or PEG2-SWCNTs] by using a large-scale gel-based proteomics method on biological replicates. More than 240 plasma proteins were selected, and their differences were analyzed among PEG2-SWCNTs differing in surface charge and PEG conformation. The protein corona of PEG2-SWCNTs showed that coagulation proteins, immunoglobulins, apolipoproteins, and proteins of the complement system were among the proteins bound by PEG2-SWCNTs and that their recruitment was independent from the isoelectric point, molecular weight, total hydrophobicity, and number of polyaromatic residues of the proteins. Statistical analysis on protein relative abundance revealed that PEG conformation had a higher influence on the PEG2-SWCNTs' protein corona repertoire than nanotube surface charge. PEG conformation also affected the biological performance of PEG2-SWCNTs. A change in PEG conformation from mushroom to mushroom-brush transition affected the competitive adsorption of the major constituents of the protein corona of PEG2-SWCNTs and promoted shorter blood circulation time, faster renal excretion, and higher relative spleen versus liver uptake of PEG2-SWCNTs. Our data suggest that the protein corona, along with steric stabilization, may mediate the action of PEG conformation on the pharmacokinetic profile of PEG-modified SWCNTs.

  14. Variability in early height growth rate of forest trees: implications for retrospective studies of stand dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain J. Palik; Kurt S. Pregitzer

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective studies of forest stand dynamics may rely on estimates of tree ages. In some of these studies, trees are aged near the stem base, while in other studies trees may be aged at breast height. An age correction may be added to breast-height ages in an attempt to account for average time to reach breast height and thus provide better estimates of total ages....

  15. Modeling Biomarker Dynamics with Implications for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin B. Hedican

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors review existing models of biomarker dynamics and develop and investigate several new models which may better accommodate the underlying biology. While the general foundations of the models studied could be applied to a number of biomarker systems, the parameter values and specific applications to treatment regimens are focused on the role of prostate-specific antigen (PSA as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Included are suggestions for possible clinical validation studies.

  16. Examining Affective-Motivational Dynamics and Behavioral Implications Within The Interpersonal Context of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervoort, Tine; Trost, Zina

    2017-10-01

    Emotional, motivational, and interpersonal dimensions are considered integral to pain experience but have largely been examined separately. In this focus article, we argue that an integrative theoretical account that acknowledges each of these elements is a critical next step to capture the complexity and nuance of interpersonal pain dynamics and to shape future research. The aim of this focus article is to provide a foundation for such an account by drawing upon established insights from appraisal theory of emotion, influential behavioral models, empathy/interpersonal pain research, and social psychology literature to highlight conceptual relationships, potential mechanisms of action, and avenues of inquiry that have not previously been examined in the context of pain. Specifically, we highlight the interpersonal nature of pain and the conceptual relationship between emotion and motivation in pain experience. We discuss an affective-motivational tension between self- and other-oriented goals that can arise within the interpersonal pain context, and how such dynamics may affect the nature and effectiveness of caregiving behavior. We then describe the role of emotion regulation and strategies that may facilitate optimal interpersonal pain dynamics and caregiving within a multiple goal context. Finally, we outline a foundation for an integrative theoretical model and directions for future research. Drawing upon insights from appraisal theory of emotion, empathy/interpersonal pain research, influential behavioral models, and social psychology literature, this focus article provides a foundation for an integrative affective-motivational account of interpersonal pain dynamics as a basis for theoretical and clinical advancement. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Isotopic Approach to Soil Carbonate Dynamics and Implications for Paleoclimatic Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendall, E.G.; Harden, J.W.; Trumbore, S.E.; Chadwick, O.A.

    1994-01-01

    The radiocarbon content and stable isotope composition of soil carbonate are best described by a dynamic system in which isotopic reequilibration occurs as a result of recurrent dissolution and reprecipitation. Depth of water penetration into the soil profile, as well as soil age, determines the degree of carbonate isotope reequilibration. We measured ??13C, ??18O and radiocarbon content of gravel rinds and fine (alluvial fans were deposited.

  18. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  19. Using experimental human influenza infections to validate a viral dynamic model and the implications for prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S C; You, S H; Liu, C Y; Chio, C P; Liao, C M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this work was to use experimental infection data of human influenza to assess a simple viral dynamics model in epithelial cells and better understand the underlying complex factors governing the infection process. The developed study model expands on previous reports of a target cell-limited model with delayed virus production. Data from 10 published experimental infection studies of human influenza was used to validate the model. Our results elucidate, mechanistically, the associations between epithelial cells, human immune responses, and viral titres and were supported by the experimental infection data. We report that the maximum total number of free virions following infection is 10(3)-fold higher than the initial introduced titre. Our results indicated that the infection rates of unprotected epithelial cells probably play an important role in affecting viral dynamics. By simulating an advanced model of viral dynamics and applying it to experimental infection data of human influenza, we obtained important estimates of the infection rate. This work provides epidemiologically meaningful results, meriting further efforts to understand the causes and consequences of influenza A infection.

  20. The Internal Dynamics of Fibrinogen and Its Implications for Coagulation and Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Köhler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibrinogen is a serum multi-chain protein which, when activated, aggregates to form fibrin, one of the main components of a blood clot. Fibrinolysis controls blood clot dissolution through the action of the enzyme plasmin, which cleaves fibrin at specific locations. Although the main biochemical factors involved in fibrin formation and lysis have been identified, a clear mechanistic picture of how these processes take place is not available yet. This picture would be instrumental, for example, for the design of improved thrombolytic or anti-haemorrhagic strategies, as well as, materials with improved biocompatibility. Here, we present extensive molecular dynamics simulations of fibrinogen which reveal large bending motions centered at a hinge point in the coiled-coil regions of the molecule. This feature, likely conserved across vertebrates according to our analysis, suggests an explanation for the mechanism of exposure to lysis of the plasmin cleavage sites on fibrinogen coiled-coil region. It also explains the conformational variability of fibrinogen observed during its adsorption on inorganic surfaces and it is supposed to play a major role in the determination of the hydrodynamic properties of fibrinogen. In addition the simulations suggest how the dynamics of the D region of fibrinogen may contribute to the allosteric regulation of the blood coagulation cascade through a dynamic coupling between the a- and b-holes, important for fibrin polymerization, and the integrin binding site P1.

  1. Fluid Dynamics Panel Working Group 12 on Adaptive Wind Tunnel Walls: Technology and Applications (Les Souffleries a Paroi Adaptable Technologies et Applications)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    Facilit Designatlon Adaptive Walls Wind Tunnel (AWWI) OrgniztionL Istituto di Aerodinamica "Umberto Nobile Counr’ Ita* The Istituto di Aeradinamica...hence correctable, Appendix, namely the low-speed University of along a specified line In the inner, experimental Naples Istituto di Aerodinamica

  2. Peripheral dose from uniform dynamic multileaf collimation fields: implications for sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, D S; Animesh; Deshpande, S S; Phurailatpam, R D; Deshpande, D D; Shrivastava, S K; Dinshaw, K A

    2006-04-01

    The increase in the number of monitor units in sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy, compared with conventional techniques for the same target dose, may lead to an increase in peripheral dose (PD). PD from a linear accelerator was measured for 6 MV X-ray using 0.6 cm3 ionization chamber inserted at 5 cm depth into a 35 cm x 35 cm x 105 cm plastic water phantom. Measurements were made for field sizes of 6 cm x 6 cm, 10 cm x 10 cm and 14 cm x 14 cm, shaped in both static and dynamic multileaf collimation (DMLC) mode, employing strip fields of fixed width 0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.0 cm, respectively. The effect of collimator rotation and depth of measurement on peripheral dose was investigated for 10 cm x 10 cm field. Dynamic fields require 2 to 14 times the number of monitor units than does a static open field for the same dose at the isocentre, depending on strip field width and field size. Peripheral dose resulting from dynamic fields manifests two distinct regions showing a crest and trough within 30 cm from the field edge and a steady exponential fall beyond 30 cm. All dynamic fields were found to deliver a higher PD compared with the corresponding static open fields, being highest for smallest strip field width and largest field size; also, the percentage increase observed was highest at the largest out-of-field distance. For 6 cm x 6 cm field, dynamic fields with 0.5 cm and 2 cm strip field width deliver PDs 8 and 2 times higher than that of the static open field. The corresponding factors for 14 cm x 14 cm field were 15 and 6, respectively. The factors by which PD for DMLC fields increase, relative to jaws-shaped static fields for out-of-field distance beyond 30 cm, are almost the same as the corresponding increases in the number of monitor units. Reductions of 20% and 40% in PD were observed when the measurements were done at a depth of 10 cm and 15 cm, respectively. When the multileaf collimator executes in-plane (collimator 90 degrees) motion

  3. The Writing on the Wall: National and Global Implications of the Ruling Chinese Communist Party’s Domestic and Foreign Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Kok-Kheng Yeoh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The December 201 5 crackdown on labour activists was the culmination of a year of the Chinese Communist Party regime’s war on China’s civil society kicked off by of the arrests of the “Feminist Five” in March followed by the infamous crackdown on civil rights lawyers that began on 5th July and lasted till August. At around the same time, from mid-October to end of December 2015, five owners and staff members of Hong Kong’s Mighty Current publishing company and Causeway Bay bookshop which respectively publishes and selling politically dissident books banned by China disappeared under mysterious circumstances (including one while vacationing in Pattaya, Thailand, and another while inspecting warehouse in Hong Kong and reemerged in mainland China under the custody of the Chinese authorities. While these volatile incidents were unfolding domestically, the year also witnessed the continued rise of China’s economic might in the global system. With specific focus on the latest events unfolding from year 2015 to the present, this paper attempts to interpret such developments especially in terms of government policies with respect to the State’s relations with the civil society since the leadership transition from Hu-Wen to Xi-Li administration, the implications of the global reach of China’s economic might and soft power in this regard, as well as the current nature of the governing regime of the Chinese Communist Party.

  4. The Writing on the Wall: National and Global Implications of the Ruling Chinese Communist Party’s Domestic and Foreign Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Kok-Kheng Yeoh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The December 2015 crackdown on labour activists was the culmination of a year of the Chinese Communist Party regime’s war on China’s civil society kicked off with the arrests of the “Feminist Five” in March, followed by the infamous crackdown on civil rights lawyers that began on 5th July and lasted till August. At around the same time, from mid-October to end of December 2015, five owners and staff members of Hong Kong’s Mighty Current publishing company and Causeway Bay bookshop which respectively publishes and sells politically dissident books banned by China disappeared under mysterious circumstances (including one while vacationing in Pattaya, Thailand, and another while inspecting warehouse in Hong Kong and reemerged in mainland China under the custody of the Chinese authorities. While these volatile incidents were unfolding domestically, the year also witnessed the continued rise of China’s economic might in the global system. With specific focus on the latest events unfolding from year 2015 to the present, this paper attempts to interpret such developments especially in terms of government policies with respect to the State’s relations with the civil society since the leadership transition from Hu-Wen to Xi-Li administration, the implications of the global reach of China’s economic might and soft power in this regard, as well as the current nature of the governing regime of the Chinese Communist Party.

  5. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations ...

  6. Implications of Dynamic Pressure Transducer Mounting Variations on Measurements in Pyrotechnic Test Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibbern, Andreas; Crisafulli, Jeffrey; Hagopia, Michael; McDougle, Stephen H.; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate dynamic pressure measurements are often difficult to make within small pyrotechnic devices, and transducer mounting difficulties can cause data anomalies that lead to erroneous conclusions. Delayed initial pressure response followed by data ringing has been observed when using miniaturized pressure transducer mounting adapters required to interface transducers to small test chambers. This delayed pressure response and ringing, combined with a high data acquisition rate, has complicated data analysis. This paper compares the output signal characteristics from different pressure transducer mounting options, where the passage distance from the transducer face to the pyrotechnic chamber is varied in length and diameter. By analyzing the data and understating the associated system dynamics, a more realistic understanding of the actual dynamic pressure variations is achieved. Three pressure transducer mounting configurations (elongated, standard, and face/flush mount) were simultaneously tested using NASA standard initiators in closed volume pressure bombs. This paper also presents results of these pressure transducer mounting configurations as a result of a larger NASA Engineering and Safety Center pyrovalve test project. Results from these tests indicate the improved performance of using face/flush mounted pressure transducers in this application. This type of mounting improved initial pressure measurement response time by approximately 19 s over standard adapter mounting, eliminating most of the lag time; provided a near step-function type initial pressure increase; and greatly reduced data ringing in high data acquisition rate systems. The paper goes on to discuss other issues associated with the firing and instrumentation that are important for the tester to understand.

  7. Early dynamic ultrasound for neonatal hip instability: implications for rural Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Susan L; Schoo, Adrian; Walters, Lucie

    2017-03-21

    Neonatal instability of the hip (NIH), where the femoral head can move away from the acetabulum, in the first weeks of life, is an important risk factor for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). In rural areas in Australia, there is a recent trend to increased late diagnosis of DDH. Clinical screening of infant hips, a common practice in Australia, is experience dependent. Best practice early screening techniques are still debated with different techniques and timing used internationally. This systematic review examines early dynamic ultrasound (eDUS) screening for hip instability in the first 6 weeks after birth, and the early interventions informed by these findings and considers the findings for the context of rural Australia. The Cochrane Library, Medline, CINAHL and PEDro were searched for original research or systematic reviews, and clinical studies 1998 to 2015 involving dynamic ultrasound. Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tools were used to appraise the studies. Nineteen studies were included. Early Dynamic Ultrasound (DUS) is consistently described as a reliable assessment of NIH. Early DUS is recommended for risk factors including geographical areas of high prevalence. Approaches to early intervention of hips with excessive movement are somewhat discipline-related and include: primary prevention (advice), secondary prevention (abduction supports), and conservative management (removable splints). In the context of increased prevalence of DDH in rural Australia, contemporary evidence suggests that introduction of early DUS could provide rural infants with more effective screening than clinical examination alone. Targeted early advice about posturing and simple removable supports to abduct infant hips could prevent some cases of DDH in rural Australia.

  8. Implications of tree species for gross soil nitrate dynamics in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björsne, Anna-Karin; Gundersen, Per; Rütting, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Tree species have an impact on soil properties and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems (Legout et al., 2016; Staelens et al., 2012). Several studies have investigated the nitrate (NO_3) dynamics in soil and compared tree species (Lovett et al., 2004; Andrianarisoa et al., 2010). However, most studies investigate only potential net nitrification (PNN), which does not show the real dynamics in the soil. In this study we have investigated gross N dynamics in a common garden experiment in Denmark. The aim of the study was to understand how gross dynamics of NO3 processes differ in soil with different tree species. Soil from plots with Norway spruce (Picea abies) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) was sampled. 15N isotopes were used to trace the activities in the soil and numerical modelling to calculate gross rates. Nitrous oxide (N_2O) losses from the incubated soils were also measured. The preliminary results show low NO3 concentration in Picea soil, while a steady nitrification and consumption of NO_3, which indicates a small NO3 pool with fast turnover. In Fagus soil the NO3 concentration is much higher, which could be explained by the low NO3 consumption rates, leading to a build-up of NO3 in the soil. The N_2O fluxes from Fagus soil are also higher, indicating larger N losses. These results show the significance of tree species and suggest what long-term effects it could have on the soil N retention. Andrianarisoa, K. S., Zeller, B., Poly, F., Siegenfuhr, H., Bienaimé, S., Ranger, J., and Dambrine, E.: Control of Nitrification by Tree Species in a Common-Garden Experiment, Ecosystems, 13, 1171-1187, 10.1007/s10021-010-9390-x, 2010. Legout, A., van der Heijden, G., Jaffrain, J., Boudot, J.-P., and Ranger, J.: Tree species effects on solution chemistry and major element fluxes: A case study in the Morvan (Breuil, France), For. Ecol. Manage., 378, 244-258, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.003, 2016. Lovett, G. M., Weathers, K. C., Arthur, M. A., and Schultz, J

  9. Seasonal Dynamics and Distribution of Ticks in Rwanda: Implications for Tick Control Strategy in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Edward Mutandwa; Nshimiyimana Juvenal

    2010-01-01

    The broad objective of this study was to examine the dynamics and seasonal distribution of tick species in Rwanda in three agro-ecological zones namely high altitude (Gishwati), the mid altitude (Huye) and the lower altitude zones (Nyagatare). Ten cows per zone were identified and used for collecting ticks m onthly on a period covering the short dry season and long rainy season from December 2002 to June 2003. These animals were not treated and remained on pasture land. The results revealed t...

  10. Patterns, drivers and implications of dissolved oxygen dynamics in tropical mangrove forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattone, Carlo; Sheaves, Marcus

    2017-10-01

    Estuarine mangrove forests regulate and facilitate many ecological processes, and provide nursery ground for many commercially important species. However, mangroves grow in sediments with high carbon loading and high respiration rates which can potentially influencing the dissolved oxygen (DO) dynamics of tidal water flowing into mangrove forests, as bacteria strip DO from the incoming water to carry out metabolic functions. In turn this is likely to influence the way nekton and other aquatic organisms utilize mangrove forests. Despite these possibilities, previous work has focused on looking at DO dynamics within mangrove creeks, with little research focusing on understanding DO dynamics within the mangrove forests themselves during tidal inundation or of DO levels of pools within the forest remaining once the tide has ebbed. The present study investigates the pattern in DO at various distances within an estuarine Rhizophora stylosa forest in tropical north Queensland. DO levels were recorded at 5 min interval over 2 days and multiple tidal cycles, data were collected between 2013 and 2014 for a total of 32 tidal cycles encompassing multiples seasons and tidal amplitudes. There were substantial fluctuations in DO, often varying from normoxic to hypoxic within the same tidal cycle. A range of factors influenced DO dynamics, in particular: tidal height, amount of sunlight, tidal phase, and distance from the outer edge of the mangrove forest. In fact, spring tides tend to have high DO saturation, particularly during the flooding phase, however as the tide starts ebbing, DO depletes rapidly especially in areas further inside the forest. Moreover during tidal disconnection the remnant pools within the forest quickly became anoxic. These variations in DO suggest that the use of mangrove forests by animals is likely to be constrained by their ability to withstand low DO levels, and provides a plausible explanation for the apparent paucity of benthic organism observed

  11. Examining dynamic visual scene displays: implications for arranging and teaching symbol selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, Andrea Rachelle; Reichle, Joe; Johnson, LeAnne; Monn, Emily

    2010-11-01

    Evidence supports using visual scene displays (VSDs) with young children using speech-generating devices. This study examined initial and subsequent performance during VSD use by children age 24-27 and 33-36 months to explore child characteristics that may relate to navigational skill differences. Children located 9 vocabulary items using a dynamic VSD. Tests of mean difference and analyses of variance were both completed to examine within- and between-age-group performance for accuracy and latency across 3 time points: at initial exposure, at criterion, and at a 2-week maintenance session for each of 2 linked navigational pages. Results indicated that, at initial exposure, older participants' symbol selections were significantly more accurate and significantly faster when navigating through each page of a 2-page dynamic VSD. Results also indicated that though younger participants required significantly more sessions to achieve mastery, when the effects of practice and language comprehension were controlled, performance differences between age groups were not found when maintenance was evaluated. Older children perform better than younger children on initial opportunities. However, younger children learn to use VSDs in relatively few instructional opportunities, suggesting that VSDs can be used with children as young as 2 years of age.

  12. Flower morphology and pollinator dynamics in Solanum carolinense (Solanaceae): implications for the evolution of andromonoecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Aguilar, Andrea; Kalisz, Susan; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2008-08-01

    Flower morphology and pollinator dynamics play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of many breeding systems, including andromonoecy. We used a series of field experiments to test the functional relationship between flower morphology and pollination dynamics (e.g., pollen receipt and export) in Solanum carolinense. We find that long-styled flowers serve primarily as pollen recipients and short-styled flowers as pollen donors, making this the first study to support the male-female interference hypothesis for the evolution of andromonoecy. However, this difference in the primary male or female function of the flowers depends on the pollinator identity. In flowers visited by Bombus impatiens, style length has a positive relationship with pollen deposition and a negative relationship with pollen removal. In contrast, neither morphological nor behavioral traits determine pollen deposition or removal by small halictid bees. We demonstrate that different pollinators could select for different floral morphologies, and thus, our research suggests that pollinator-specific interactions with flower morphology play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of anrdromonoecy.

  13. Large Saharan dust storms: Implications for chlorophyll dynamics in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallisai, Rachele; Volpe, Gianluca; Peters, Francesc

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the large (LDE) and very large (VLDE) Saharan dust deposition events that occurred between 2000 and 2007 and their short-term impact on the dynamics of marine phytoplankton in the Mediterranean Sea. A total of 153 LDE were identified unevenly distributed over the years. Events were more frequent during winter, in the eastern Mediterranean, and autumn, when they affected both the western and the central Mediterranean. Most of the 31 VLDE occurred during winter and autumn in the central Mediterranean. The dynamics of chlorophyll after VLDE were studied as a proxy for phytoplankton response to atmospheric dust. A significant response of chlorophyll to dust addition was evident; this appeared to be especially true for the western Mediterranean where a chlorophyll increase of up to 345% was recorded, whereas in the central Mediterranean it was up to 146% and in the eastern Mediterranean up to 121%. Chlorophyll response behavior was quite heterogeneous probably as a result of the uniqueness of each VLDE, the differences between Mediterranean areas, the community structure of phytoplankton, and the interaction between bacteria and phytoplankton for new resources. An eastward decreasing trend in chlorophyll response was observed, which is in accordance with the relative importance of bacterial activity with respect to phytoplankton. The increase in mineral aerosols with increased aridity in the region together with the decrease in the depth of the mixed layer of the oceans should boost the importance of aerosols fueling marine production.

  14. Morphometry Governs the Dynamics of a Drainage Basin: Analysis and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atrayee Biswas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mountainous rivers are the most significant source of water supply in the Himalayan provinces of India. The drainage basin dynamics of these rivers are controlled by the tectonomorphic parameters, which include both surface and subsurface characteristics of a basin. To understand the drainage basin dynamics and their usefulness in watershed prioritisation and management in terms of soil erosion studies and groundwater potential assessment and flood hazard risk reduction in mountainous rivers, morphometric analysis of a Himalayan River (Supin River basin has been taken as a case study. The entire Supin River basin has been subdivided into 27 subwatersheds and 36 morphometric parameters have been calculated under four broad categories: drainage network, basin geometry, drainage texture, and relief characteristics, each of which is further grouped into five different clusters having similar morphometric properties. The various morphometric parameters have been correlated with each other to understand their underlying relationship and control over the basin hydrogeomorphology. The result thus generated provides adequate knowledge base required for decision making during strategic planning and delineation of prioritised hazard management zones in mountainous terrains.

  15. Introduction to Ubiquitous Cartography and Dynamic Geovisualization with Implications for Disaster and Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrebícek, Jirí; Konecný, Milan

    Several large-scale data and information infrastructures (SDI) are being created (INSPIRE, GMES) to support management and decision-making processes, and they are also used for solving a wide range of problems, including crisis management. These solutions require updated, precise, interoperable and integrated spatial data and information equipped with metadata. Up-to-date information, their suitable structuring and easy access to them are necessary for supporting timely and correct decision making in emergency/crisis situations. Most such information is geo-referenced. Cartographic visualization plays an important role for a user's orientation. Visualization is not an isolated element of the information transfer process; it depends on the status of source databases, decision support models, and the behavior of users. Current solutions of crisis management employ static cartographic visualizations based on prepared models of crisis situations. The chapter concentrates on ubiquitous cartography and dynamic geovisualization of real-time models and on the project “Dynamic Geovisualization in Crisis Management” undertaken at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic.

  16. A Model of Longitudinal Tension Dynamics in Paper Webs and Implications for Web Breaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios; Uesaka, Tetsu

    2002-03-01

    Web breaks are rare but costly events with significant impact on printing presses and papermaking machines. Macroscopic paper defects have been traditionally blamed for causing web breaks, but improvements in paper quality have created interest in the microscopic causes of strength reliability of paper and the role of web tension variations. We present a continuum model of longitudinal tension dynamics in paper webs. The model predicts high straining rates at nip contacts, which may have significant impact on strength reliability. From the general model we obtain the low-frequency web response in terms of an ordinary differential equation. We show that the web is a low-pass filter that reduces the impact of dynamic speed perturbations on strain variations. We prove that the empirical relation between mechanical draw and strain increments is valid only in the steady state. We also estimate the strain variations caused by shape deformations of paper rolls, and we derive an explicit expression for the resulting frequency of web breaks based on a weak-link model of fracture. Finally, we briefly discuss the high-frequency response.

  17. Switching among graphic patterns is governed by oscillatory coordination dynamics: Implications for understanding handwriting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier-Giorgio eZanone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Revisiting an original idea by Hollerbach (1981, previous work has established that the production of graphic shapes, assumed to be the blueprint for handwriting, is governed by the dynamics of orthogonal non-linear coupled oscillators. Such dynamics determines few stable coordination patterns, giving rise to a limited set of preferred graphic shapes, namely, four lines and four ellipsoids independent of orientation. The present study investigates the rules of switching among such graphic coordination patterns. Seven participants were required to voluntarily switch within twelve pairs of shapes presented on a graphic tablet. In line with previous theoretical and experimental work on bimanual coordination, results corroborated our hypothesis that the relative stability of the produced coordination patterns determines the time needed for switching: the transition to a more stable pattern was shorter, and inversely. Moreover, switching between patterns with the same orientation but different eccentricities was faster than with a change in orientation. Nonetheless, the switching time covaried strictly with the change in relative phase effected by the transition between two shapes, whether this implied a change in eccentricity or in orientation. These findings suggest a new operational definition of what the (motor units or strokes of handwriting are and shed a novel light on how co-articulation and recruitment of degrees of freedom may occur in graphic skills. They also yield some leads for understanding the acquisition and the neural underpinnings of handwriting.

  18. Switching among graphic patterns is governed by oscillatory coordination dynamics: implications for understanding handwriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanone, Pier-Giorgio; Athènes, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Revisiting an original idea by Hollerbach (1981), previous work has established that the production of graphic shapes, assumed to be the blueprint for handwriting, is governed by the dynamics of orthogonal non-linear coupled oscillators. Such dynamics determines few stable coordination patterns, giving rise to a limited set of preferred graphic shapes, namely, four lines and four ellipsoids independent of orientation. The present study investigates the rules of switching among such graphic coordination patterns. Seven participants were required to voluntarily switch within twelve pairs of shapes presented on a graphic tablet. In line with previous theoretical and experimental work on bimanual coordination, results corroborated our hypothesis that the relative stability of the produced coordination patterns determines the time needed for switching: the transition to a more stable pattern was shorter, and inversely. Moreover, switching between patterns with the same orientation but different eccentricities was faster than with a change in orientation. Nonetheless, the switching time covaried strictly with the change in relative phase effected by the transition between two shapes, whether this implied a change in eccentricity or in orientation. These findings suggest a new operational definition of what the (motor) units or strokes of handwriting are and shed a novel light on how coarticulation and recruitment of degrees of freedom may occur in graphic skills. They also yield some leads for understanding the acquisition and the neural underpinnings of handwriting.

  19. Implications of normal and disordered remodeling dynamics of corneodesmosomes in stratum corneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Kitajima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Desmosomes and corneodesmosomes are the most important adhering junctions, providing strength for the epidermal sheet structure made of living keratinocytes and enucleated stratum corneum corneocytes, respectively. These junctions are connected directly with transmembrane desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins (Dsgs, and desmocollins (Dscs; mainly Dsg1/Dsc1 and Dsg3/Dsc3 in desmosomes, and Dsg1/Dsc1 with corneodesmosin in corneodesmosomes. Dsgs and Dscs are associated with several proteins at their inner cytoplasmic domains to anchor keratin intermediate filaments. Desmosomes are not static, but dynamic units that undergo regular remodeling to allow for keratinocyte outward-migration in the epidermis. In corneodesmosomes, this dynamic nature of desmosomes is lost by fixing desmosomal cadherins with corneodesmosin at the intercellular domain of desmosomes and possibly with the formation of peptide bonds by activation of transglutaminase-1 at the intracellular face of desmosomes. Immediately after formation, corneodesmosomes normally commit to degradation, which is complicatedly regulated by proteolytic cleavage of their respective extracellular portions, via kallikrein-regulated peptidases and cathepsins. This proteolytic activity is in turn controlled by a variety of inhibitory agents, including protease inhibitors, cholesterol sulfate, and an acidic gradient. The impairment of protease control causes keratinization disorders. This review focuses on the regulation of corneodesmosome remodeling in relation to disorders of the stratum corneum.

  20. Internal Gravity Wave Activity Hotspot and Implications for the Middle Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Petr; Pisoft, Petr; Lilienthal, Friederike; Jacobi, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Internal gravity waves are widely recognized to contribute significantly to the energy and angular momentum transport. They play a significant role in affecting many of the middle atmospheric phenomena (like the QBO or Brewer-Dobson circulation). Using GPS RO density profiles, we have discovered a localized area of enhanced IGW activity and breaking in the lower stratosphere of Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region.With a 3D primitive equation model of the middle atmosphere we studied the effects of such a localized breaking region on large-scale dynamics and transport. Possible forcing and propagation directions of planetary waves caused by such a localized IGW forcing were investigated and consequences for the polar vortex stability and stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropical region were discussed.Finally, applying 3D EP flux and 3D residual circulation diagnostics, we investigated the possible role of this area in the longitudinal variability of the Brewer- Dobson circulation with a hypothesis of its enhanced downwelling branch in this region. In the proces, model results were compared with the ozone and tracer distribution data from GOME, GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY further confirming the importance of the Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region for middle atmospheric dynamics.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations on interaction between bacterial proteins: Implication on pathogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2017-12-18

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation studies on interaction between bacterial proteins: an outer-membrane protein STY3179 and a yfdX protein STY3178 of Salmonella Typhi. STY3179 has been found to be involved in bacterial adhesion and invasion. STY3178 is recently biophysically characterized. It is a soluble protein having antibiotic binding and chaperon activity capabilities. These two proteins co-occur and are from neighboring gene in Salmonella Typhi-occurrence of homologs of both STY3178 and STY3179 are identified in many Gram-negative bacteria. We show using homology modeling, docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation that they can form a stable complex. STY3178 belongs to aqueous phase, while the beta barrel portion of STY3179 remains buried in DPPC bilayer with extra-cellular loops exposed to water. To understand the molecular basis of interaction between STY3178 and STY3179, we compute the conformational thermodynamics which indicate that these two proteins interact through polar and acidic residues belonging to their interfacial region. Conformational thermodynamics results further reveal instability of certain residues in extra-cellular loops of STY3179 upon complexation with STY3178 which is an indication for binding with host cell protein laminin. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The prevalence and morphology of the corona mortis (Crown of death): A meta-analysis with implications in abdominal wall and pelvic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Beatrice; Henry, Brandon Michael; Vikse, Jens; Skinningsrud, Bendik; Pękala, Jakub R; Walocha, Jerzy A; Cirocchi, Roberto; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2017-12-09

    Corona mortis is a highly variable vascular connection between the obturator and external iliac or inferior epigastric arteries or veins located behind the superior pubic ramus in the retropubic space (space of Retzius). Due to the significant variation in this collateral circulation, detailed anatomical knowledge of the corona mortis is vital to enhance the prevention of possible iatrogenic errors in hernia repair and other pubic surgical procedures. The aim of our meta-analysis was to provide comprehensive data on the prevalence, anatomical characteristics, and ethnic variations of the corona mortis vessel. An extensive search was conducted through the major electronic databases to identify eligible articles. Data extracted included investigative method, prevalence of the corona mortis vessels among hemi-pelvises (overall, arterial only, venous only, and combined), distance from the corona mortis to pubic symphysis, and assessment of gender, side, laterality, and ethnicity subgroups. A total of 21 studies (n=2184 hemi-pelvises) were included in the meta-analysis. The overall prevalence of the corona mortis in hemi-pelvises is high (49.3%). A venous corona mortis is more prevalent than an arterial corona mortis (41.7% vs. 17.0%). The corona mortis is more common in Asia (59.3%) than in Europe (42.8%) and North America (44.3%). As a corona mortis is present in an about half of all hemi-pelvises, it is important to consider the possibilities of its presence when undertaking surgical procedures and plan accordingly to avoid injuries. All surgeons operating in the retropubic region should have a thorough understanding of the anatomical characteristics and surgical implications of a corona mortis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Long-term dynamics of dissolved organic carbon: implications for drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, José L J; Köhler, Stephan J; Futter, Martyn N

    2012-08-15

    Surface waters are the main source of drinking water in many regions. Increasing organic carbon concentrations are a cause for concern in Nordic countries since both dissolved and particulate organic carbon can transport contaminants and adversely affect drinking water treatment processes. We present a long-term study of dynamics of total (particulate and dissolved) organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in the River Fyris. This river supplies drinking water to approximately 200000 people in Uppsala, Sweden. The River Fyris is a main tributary to Lake Mälaren, which supplies drinking water to approximately 2 million people in the greater Stockholm area. Utilities responsible for drinking water supply in both Uppsala and Stockholm have expressed concerns about possible increases in TOC. We evaluate organic carbon dynamics within the Fyris catchment by calculating areal mass exports using observed TOC concentrations and modeled flows and by modeling dissolved organic carbon (as a proxy for TOC) using the dynamic, process based INCA-C model. Exports of TOC from the catchment ranged from 0.8 to 5.8 g m(-2) year(-1) in the period 1995-2010. The variation in annual exports was related to climatic variability which influenced seasonality and amount of runoff. Exports and discharge uncoupled at the end of 2008. A dramatic increase in TOC concentrations was observed in 2009, which gradually declined in 2010-2011. INCA-C successfully reproduced the intra- and inter-annual variation in concentrations during 1996-2008 and 2010-2011 but failed to capture the anomalous increase in 2009. We evaluated a number of hypotheses to explain the anomaly in 2009 TOC values, ultimately none proved satisfactory. We draw two main conclusions: there is at least one unknown or unmeasured process controlling or influencing surface water TOC and INCA-C can be used as part of the decision-making process for current and future use of rivers for drinking water supply. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B

  4. Pulse dynamics of dual-wavelength dissipative soliton resonances and domain wall solitons in a Tm fiber laser with fiber-based Lyot filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Zhao, Kangjun; Xiao, Xiaosheng; Yang, Changxi

    2017-11-27

    We report on the first demonstration of dual-wavelength square-wave pulses in a thulium-doped fiber laser. Under appropriate cavity parameters, dual-wavelength dissipative soliton resonances (DSRs) and domain wall solitons (DWSs) are successively obtained. Meanwhile, dark pulses generation is achieved at the dual-wavelength DWSs region due to the overlap of the two domain wall pulses. The fiber-based Lyot filter, conducted by inserting PMF between an in-line PBS and a PD-ISO, facilitates the generation of dual-wavelength operation. The polarization-resolved investigation suggests that the cross coupling between two orthogonal polarization components in the high nonlinear fiber plays an important role in the square-wave pulses formation. The investigation may be helpful for further understanding the square-wave pulse formation and has potential in application filed of multi-wavelength pulsed fiber lasers.

  5. Review of Long Wave Dynamics over Reefs and into Ports with Implication for Port Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ap van Dongeren

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the dynamics of infragravity (long-period waves over reef systems and the consequences of these waves for operations in ports located behind reefs with particular attention to Western Australia. Swells which originate in the Southern Ocean generate long (infragravity waves, which propagate to the coast. On the reef edge, the swell waves are largely dissipated, transferring energy to turbulence and heat but also in that process generating long wave energy. The remaining swell waves are dominated by the infragravity waves and propagate towards the mainland and into port basins where they cause moored ship motions with consequences for the operational downtime of the port’s operations. When contemplating solutions to mitigate the impact of the long wave problems, these may be addressed from two sides: from the load side (waves and the strength side (mooring. The former will be discussed in this paper.

  6. BLOOD-STAGE DYNAMICS AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF MIXED PLASMODIUM VIVAX–PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM INFECTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASON, DANIEL P.; McKENZIE, F. ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    We present a mathematical model of the blood-stage dynamics of mixed Plasmodium vivax–Plasmodium falciparum malaria infections in humans. The model reproduces features of such infections found in nature and suggests several phenomena that may merit clinical attention, including the potential recrudescence of a long-standing, low-level P. falciparum infection following a P. vivax infection or relapse and the capacity of an existing P. vivax infection to reduce the peak parasitemia of a P. falciparum superinfection. We simulate the administration of anti-malarial drugs, and illustrate some potential complications in treating mixed-species malaria infections. Notably, our model indicates that when a mixed-species infection is misdiagnosed as a single-species P. vivax infection, treatment for P. vivax can lead to a surge in P. falciparum parasitemia. PMID:10497972

  7. Implications of interacting microscale habitat heterogeneity and disturbance events on Folsomia candida (Collembola) population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meli, Mattia; Palmqvist, Annemette; Forbes, Valery E

    2014-01-01

    The authors implemented a fractal algorithm in a spatially explicit individual-based model, in order to generate landscapes with different microscale patterns of habitat fragmentation and disturbance events, and studied their effects on population dynamics of the collembolan Folsomia candida. Among......, they are exposed to natural stressors, which might influence the effects of chemicals on populations. We designed simulation experiments that incorporate these 3 factors, and investigated their effects on populations of F. candida, in presence or absence of behavioural avoidance of contaminated habitat. Simulation...... results show that spatial autocorrelation of contamination has different effects on population growth and equilibrium size according to the percentage of clean habitat. This pattern changes when avoidance behaviour is excluded from the model, as does population recovery after a series of disturbance...

  8. Mammal diversity and metacommunity dynamics in urban green spaces: implications for urban wildlife conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Travis; Fidino, Mason; Lehrer, Elizabeth W; Magle, Seth B

    2017-12-01

    As urban growth expands and natural environments fragment, it is essential to understand the ecological roles fulfilled by urban green spaces. To evaluate how urban green spaces function as wildlife habitat, we estimated mammal diversity and metacommunity dynamics in city parks, cemeteries, golf courses, and natural areas throughout the greater Chicago, Illinois, USA region. We found similar α-diversity (with the exception of city parks), but remarkably dissimilar communities in different urban green spaces. Additionally, the type of urban green space greatly influenced species colonization and persistence rates. For example, coyotes (Canis latrans) had the highest, but white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) the lowest probability of persistence in golf courses compared to other green space types. Further, most species had a difficult time colonizing city parks even when sites were seemingly available. Our results indicate that urban green spaces contribute different, but collectively important, habitats for maintaining and conserving biodiversity in cities. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Long-term composition dynamics of PAH-containing NAPLs and implications for risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, C.A.; Knightes, C.D.; Brown, D.G.

    1999-12-15

    Subsurface contaminants such as coal tar, creosote, diesel fuel, and other petroleum-derived materials typically exist as very complex chemical mixtures. Risk assessment is useful for site management if a single metric can represent the composition-dependent risk profile of the mixture. This paper examines the factors governing human health risk assessment for multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A model is presented describing the interdependence of the dissolution rates of individual compounds and the shifts in the NAPL composition that occur due to the large differences in aqueous solubilities. The model also accounts for solidification of the less soluble NAPL constituents. Thirty-year numerical simulations describe composition dynamics for natural environmental processes as well as three remediation processes: pump-and-treat, bioremediation, and solvent extraction. Carcinogenic risk due to ingestion of contaminated groundwater at the source is estimated, and its dependence on contaminant removal and NAPL composition shifts is described. When composition dynamics are slow, a compound like naphthalene has great potential to contribute to risk because it may persist in groundwater. When there is significant depletion of the lower molecular weight compounds, the risk is dominated by contributions from compounds such as benzo[a]pyrene. Remediation technologies have the greatest potential for risk reduction if they are effective in removing the more carcinogenic, high molecular weight compounds. Because PAHs can contribute to risk for different reasons and because of the interdependence of their behaviors, compositional approaches lead to better risk predictions for PAHs than simple lumped metrics such as total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH).

  10. COMPUTER DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF DRUG DEPENDENCE THROUGH ARTIFICIAL NEURONAL NETWORK: PEDAGOGICAL AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. SANTOS

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available To develop and to evaluate the efficiency of a software able to simulate a virtual patient at different stages of addition was the main goal and challenge of this work. We developed the software in Borland™ Delphi  5®  programming language. Techniques of artificial intelligence, neuronal networks and expert systems, were responsible for modeling the neurobiological structures and mechanisms of the interaction with the drugs used. Dynamical simulation and  hypermedia were designed to increase the software’s interactivity which was able to show graphical information from virtual instrumentation and from realistic functional magnetic resonance imaging display. Early, the program was designed to be used by undergraduate students to improve their neurophysiologic learn, based not only in an interaction of membrane receptors with drugs, but in such a large behavioral simulation. The experimental manipulation of the software was accomplished by: i creating a virtual patient from a normal mood to a behavioral addiction, increasing gradatively: alcohol, opiate or cocaine doses. ii designing an approach to treat the patient, to get total or partial remission of behavioral disorder by combining psychopharmacology and psychotherapy. Integration of dynamic simulation with hypermedia and artificial intelligence has been able to point out behavioral details as tolerance, sensitization and level of addiction to drugs of abuse and so on, turned into a potentially useful tool in the development of teaching activities on several ways, such as education as well clinical skills, in which it could assist patients, families and health care to improve and test their knowledge and skills about different faces supported by drugs dependency. Those features are currently under investigation.

  11. Constant proportion harvest policies: dynamic implications in the Pacific halibut and Atlantic cod fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubu, Abdul-Aziz; Li, Nianpeng; Conrad, Jon M; Zeeman, Mary-Lou

    2011-07-01

    Overfishing, pollution and other environmental factors have greatly reduced commercially valuable stocks of fish. In a 2006 Science article, a group of ecologists and economists warned that the world may run out of seafood from natural stocks if overfishing continues at current rates. In this paper, we explore the interaction between a constant proportion harvest policy and recruitment dynamics. We examine the discrete-time constant proportion harvest policy discussed in Ang et al. (2009) and then expand the framework to include stock-recruitment functions that are compensatory and overcompensatory, both with and without the Allee effect. We focus on constant proportion policies (CPPs). CPPs have the potential to stabilize complex overcompensatory stock dynamics, with or without the Allee effect, provided the rates of harvest stay below a threshold. If that threshold is exceeded, CPPs are known to result in the sudden collapse of a fish stock when stock recruitment exhibits the Allee effect. In case studies, we analyze CPPs as they might be applied to Gulf of Alaska Pacific halibut fishery and the Georges Bank Atlantic cod fishery based on harvest rates from 1975 to 2007. The best fit models suggest that, under high fishing mortalities, the halibut fishery is vulnerable to sudden population collapse while the cod fishery is vulnerable to steady decline to zero. The models also suggest that CPP with mean harvesting levels from the last 30 years can be effective at preventing collapse in the halibut fishery, but these same policies would lead to steady decline to zero in the Atlantic cod fishery. We observe that the likelihood of collapse in both fisheries increases with increased stochasticity (for example, weather variability) as predicted by models of global climate change. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of a haptophyte bloom in Lake George, ND: Implications for alkenone-based temperature reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, S.; Toney, J. L.; Andersen, R.; Bohn, R.; Nyren, P.; Huang, Y.; Amaral-Zettler, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Lacustrine alkenone records hold potential to be valuable sedimentary archives of continental paleotemperature. However, uncertainties in alkenone biosynthesis and bloom timing by novel species of lake-dwelling haptophytes hamper the widespread use of this proxy. Our previous research employing molecular ecology techniques on sediments and enrichment cultures revealed the presence of two distinct species of haptophyte in Lake George (LG), North Dakota (46.74°N, 99.49°W). LG sediments contain abundant tetra-unsaturated alkenones, typical of lake records, but it is unclear whether only one of the haptophyte species produces this alkenone signature. During the period from April-July 2011, we returned to Lake George to characterize the LG in situ water column bloom community. We performed bi-weekly sampling of the lake's photic zone to gauge the abundance of haptophyte species and their individual alkenone lipid profiles. Samples were collected at 0m, 5m and 10m depths and analyzed for bulk lipid signatures and DNA concentrations of the two haptophyte species. Group and species-specific Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) probes targeting 18S rRNA determined the abundance of all haptophytes, as well as the novel Lake George haptophyte species (Species OTU8). We also used FISH probes to sort preserved cells from the environmental samples using flow-cytometry. This unique approach allows for the analysis of alkenone lipids from individual haptophyte communities. Using haptophytes isolated from environmental samples, our culture studies have yielded an unexpected diversity in LG haptophyte species and their alkenone production. Here we discuss alkenone concentration variability over the spring bloom period, the competition between multiple haptophyte species, and the implications of our findings on paleoclimate reconstructions using lacustrine alkenones.

  13. Factors promoting larch dominance in Eastern Siberia: fire versus growth performance and implications for carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Wirth, C.; Mollicone, D.; von Lüpke, N.; Ziegler, W.; Achard, F.; Mund, M.; Prokushkin, A.; Scherbina, S.

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of fire and climate in determining canopy species composition and aboveground carbon stocks were investigated. Measurements were made along a transect extending from the dark taiga zone of Central Siberia, where Picea and Abies dominate the canopy, into the Larix zone of Eastern Siberia. We test the hypotheses that the change in canopy species composition is based (1) on climate-driven performance only, (2) on fire only, or (3) on fire-performance interactions. We show that the evergreen conifers Picea obovata and Abies sibirica are the natural late-successional species both in Central and Eastern Siberia, provided there has been no fire for an extended period of time. There are no changes in the climate-driven performance of the observed species. Fire appears to be the main factor explaining the dominance of Larix. Of lesser influence were longitude, hydrology and active-layer thickness. Stand-replacing fires decreased from 300 to 50 yr between the Yenisei Ridge and the upper Tunguska. Repeated non-stand-replacing surface fires eliminated the regeneration of Abies and Picea. With every 100 yr since the last fire, the percentage of Larix decreased by 20 %. Biomass of stems of single trees did not show signs of age-related decline. Relative diameter increment was 0.41 ± 0.20 % at breast height and stem volume increased linearly over time with a rate of about 0.36 t C ha-1 yr-1 independent of age class and species. Stand volumes reached about 130 t C ha-1 (equivalent to about 520 m3 ha-1). Individual trees of Larix were older than 600 yr. The maximum age and biomass seemed to be limited by fungal rot of heart wood. 60 % of old Larix and Picea and 30 % of Pinus sibirica trees were affected by stem rot. Implications for the future role of fire and of plant diseases are discussed.

  14. Estimating Rheological Parameters of Anhydrite from Folded Evaporite sequences: Implications for Internal Dynamics of Salt Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuszek, Marta; Dabrowski, Marcin; Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Urai, Janos L.; Raith, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Salt structures have been identified as a potential target for hydrocarbon, CO2, or radioactive waste storage. The most suitable locations for magazines are considered in the thick and relatively homogeneous rock salt layers. However, salt structures often consist of the evaporite sequence including rock salt intercalated with other rock types e.g.: anhydrite, gypsum, potassium and magnesium salt, calcite, dolomite, or shale. The presence of such heterogeneities causes a serious disturbance in the structure management. Detailed analysis of the internal architecture and internal dynamics of the salt structure are crucial for evaluating them as suitable repositories and also their long-term stability. The goal of this study is to analyse the influence of the presence of anhydrite layers on the internal dynamics of salt structures. Anhydrite is a common rock in evaporite sequences. Its physical and mechanical properties strongly differ from the properties of rock salt. The density of anhydrite is much higher than the density of salt, thus anhydrite is likely to sink in salt causing the disturbance of the surrounding structures. This suggestion was the starting point to the discussion about the long-term stability of the magazines in salt structures [1]. However, the other important parameter that has to be taken into account is the viscosity of anhydrite. The high viscosity ratio between salt and anhydrite can restrain the layer from sinking. The rheological behaviour of anhydrite has been studied in laboratory experiments [2], but the results only provide information about the short-term behaviour. The long-term behaviour can be best predicted using indirect methods e.g. based on the analysis of natural structures that developed over geological time scale. One of the most promising are fold structures, the shape of which is very sensitive to the rheological parameters of the deforming materials. Folds can develop in mechanically stratified materials during layer

  15. Ventricle wall movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow in hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Richard D; Basati, Sukhraaj; Sweetman, Brian; Guo, Xiaodong; Linninger, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of fluid flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) are poorly understood. Normally, CSF flows out of the brain through the ventricles. However, ventricular enlargement during NPH may be caused by CSF backflow into the brain through the ventricles. A previous study showed this reversal of flow; in the present study, the authors provide additional clinical data obtained in patients with NPH and supplement these data with computer simulations to better understand the CSF flow and ventricular wall displacement and emphasize its clinical implications. Three NPH patients and 1 patient with aqueductal stenosis underwent cine phase-contrast MR imaging (cine MR imaging) for measurement of CSF flow and ventricle wall movement during the cardiac cycle. These data were compared to data previously obtained in 8 healthy volunteers. The CSF flow measurements were obtained at the outlet of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Calculation of the ventricular wall movement was determined from the complete set of cine MR images obtained axially at the middle of the lateral ventricle. The data were obtained before and after CSF removal with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with an adjustable valve. To supplement the clinical data, a computational model was used to predict the transmural pressure and flow. In healthy volunteers, net CSF aqueductal flow was 1.2 ml/minute in the craniocaudal direction. In patients with NPH, the net CSF flow was in the opposite direction--the caudocranial direction--before shunt placement. After shunting, the magnitude of the abnormal fluid flow decreased or reversed, with the flow resembling the normal flow patterns observed in healthy volunteers. The authors' MR imaging-based measurements of the CSF flow direction and lateral ventricle volume size change and the results of computer modeling of fluid dynamics lead them to conclude that the directional pattern and magnitude of CSF flow in patients with NPH may be an indication of the disease state. This has

  16. Tumor Bed Dynamics After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases: Implications for Postoperative Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: lesley.a.jarvis@hitchcock.org [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Simmons, Nathan E. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Bellerive, Marc [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Erkmen, Kadir [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Eskey, Clifford J. [Department of Radiology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hug, Eugen B. [Procure, New York, New York (United States); Roberts, David W. [Section of Neurosurgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze 2 factors that influence timing of radiosurgery after surgical resection of brain metastases: target volume dynamics and intracranial tumor progression in the interval between surgery and cavity stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Three diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were retrospectively analyzed for 41 patients with a total of 43 resected brain metastases: preoperative MRI scan (MRI-1), MRI scan within 24 hours after surgery (MRI-2), and MRI scan for radiosurgery planning, which is generally performed {<=}1 week before SRS (MRI-3). Tumors were contoured on MRI-1 scans, and resection cavities were contoured on MRI-2 and MRI-3 scans. Results: The mean tumor volume before surgery was 14.23 cm{sup 3}, and the mean cavity volume was 8.53 cm{sup 3} immediately after surgery and 8.77 cm{sup 3} before SRS. In the interval between surgery and SRS, 20 cavities (46.5%) were stable in size, defined as a change of {<=}2 cm{sup 3}; 10 cavities (23.3%) collapsed by >2 cm{sup 3}; and 13 cavities (30.2%) increased by >2 cm{sup 3}. The unexpected increase in cavity size was a result of local progression (2 cavities), accumulation of cyst-like fluid or blood (9 cavities), and nonspecific postsurgical changes (2 cavities). Finally, in the interval between surgery and SRS, 5 cavities showed definite local tumor progression, 4 patients had progression elsewhere in the brain, 1 patient had both local progression and progression elsewhere, and 33 patients had stable intracranial disease. Conclusions: In the interval between surgical resection and delivery of SRS, surgical cavities are dynamic in size; however, most cavities do not collapse, and nearly one-third are larger at the time of SRS. These observations support obtaining imaging for radiosurgery planning as close to SRS delivery as possible and suggest that delaying SRS after surgery does not offer the benefit of cavity collapse in most patients. A prospective, multi

  17. The dynamic implications of debt relief for low-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Lucía Romero-Barrutieta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Debt relief provides low-income countries with an incentive to accumulate debt, boost consumption, and reduce investment over time. We quantify this incentive effect employing a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model, calibrated to 1982–2006 Ugandan data, and find that long-run debt and consumption-to-GDP ratios are about twice as high with debt relief than without it, while the investment-to-GDP ratio is sixty percent lower. Our simulations show that debt-relief episodes are likely to have only a temporary impact on debt levels but may have a lasting effect over the size of the economy, lowering GDP growth up to twenty percent over time. These results fill a gap in the debt relief literature since, to the best of our knowledge, the quantification of incentive effects is rather scarce. The paper further contributes to the literature by constructing a tractable structural model that is able to replicate the data well and captures key features of low-income countries facing the possibility of debt relief.

  18. Stem cell dynamics and heterogeneity: implications for epidermal regeneration and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, M; Niemann, C

    2012-01-01

    The skin epithelium undergoes constant renewal, a process that is driven by stem cells (SCs) localising to the interfollicular epidermis and different regions of the hair follicle. Over the last years, tremendous progress has been made to unravel the physiological function of distinct stem and progenitor cell populations by using genetic lineage tracing in vivo, transplantation, clonogenicity approaches and live cell imaging. It turned out that these cell compartments constitute heterogeneous SC pools and that individual SCs respond differently to various signals sent by the microenvironment. Recent genetic manipulation experiments and elegant mouse models have shed light on the signalling pathways being crucial for self-renewal and lineage fate decisions during tissue homeostasis. Here, we summarise current concepts of SC function in mammalian skin and focus on the dynamic behaviour of SCs during morphogenesis and tissue regeneration of the skin epithelium. Clearly, understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of SC regulation and function during tissue homeostasis has enormous impact on our view of the pathogenesis of various skin diseases and will be beneficial for regenerative medicine. Recent experiments suggest an important role of tissue SCs in the process of skin tumour initiation and progression. For the future, the genuine challenge is to further dissect SC function in pathophysiological settings and to translate our knowledge to design novel efficient therapeutic strategies for treatment of cutaneous cancer.

  19. Modern drug design: the implication of using artificial neuronal networks and multiple molecular dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Oleksandr; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We report the implementation of molecular modeling approaches developed as a part of the 2016 Grand Challenge 2, the blinded competition of computer aided drug design technologies held by the D3R Drug Design Data Resource (https://drugdesigndata.org/). The challenge was focused on the ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a highly flexible nuclear receptor of the cholesterol derivative chenodeoxycholic acid. FXR is considered an important therapeutic target for metabolic, inflammatory, bowel and obesity related diseases (Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 4:523-532, 2015), but in the context of this competition it is also interesting due to the significant ligand-induced conformational changes displayed by the protein. To deal with these conformational changes we employed multiple simulations of molecular dynamics (MD). Our MD-based protocols were top-ranked in estimating the free energy of binding of the ligands and FXR protein. Our approach was ranked second in the prediction of the binding poses where we also combined MD with molecular docking and artificial neural networks. Our approach showed mediocre results for high-throughput scoring of interactions.

  20. Dynamics of plumes in a compressible mantle with phase changes: Implications for phase boundary topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, Andrea B.; van Keken, Peter E.

    2013-11-01

    While plumes rising from the deep mantle may be responsible for hotspot volcanism, their existence has not yet been unambiguously confirmed by seismological studies. Several seismic studies reported that the topography of the 670-km discontinuity is flat below hotspots, which disagrees with the elevation expected due to its negative Clapeyron slope and plume excess temperature. An improved numerical method that includes compressibility and consistently implemented phase transitions is used to study plume evolution in the Earth’s mantle. The influence of latent heat on plume behavior for varying convective vigor and Clapeyron slope of the endothermic phase change at 670 km depth is studied in axisymmetric spherical shell geometry. Minor differences in plume dynamics are found for models considering and neglecting latent heat. Three regimes of plume behavior at the endothermic phase boundary are observed: besides complete plume inhibition and penetration along the symmetry axis an intermediate regime in which the plume forms a ring around the symmetry axis is found. These models also predict that the 670-km discontinuity is flat below hotspots due to a large plume head in the lower mantle of about 1000 km diameter that significantly thins as it rises into the upper mantle. This is explained by the lower viscosity in the upper mantle and the spreading of the temporarily inhibited plume below the endothermic phase boundary, which reconciles the flat 670-km discontinuity with a deep mantle plume origin.

  1. BEAM DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SARAF ACCELERATOR INCLUDING ERROR PROPAGATION AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EURISOL DRIVER

    CERN Document Server

    J. Rodnizki, D. Berkovits, K. Lavie, I. Mardor, A. Shor and Y. Yanay (Soreq NRC, Yavne), K. Dunkel, C. Piel (ACCEL, Bergisch Gladbach), A. Facco (INFN/LNL, Legnaro, Padova), V. Zviagintsev (TRIUMF, Vancouver)

    AbstractBeam dynamics simulations of SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting RF linear accelerator have been performed in order to establish the accelerator design. The multi-particle simulation includes 3D realistic electromagnetic field distributions, space charge forces and fabrication, misalignment and operation errors. A 4 mA proton or deuteron beam is accelerated up to 40 MeV with a moderated rms emittance growth and a high real-estate gradient of 2 MeV/m. An envelope of 40,000 macro-particles is kept under a radius of 1.1 cm, well below the beam pipe bore radius. The accelerator design of SARAF is proposed as an injector for the EURISOL driver accelerator. The Accel 176 MHZ β0=0.09 and β0=0.15 HWR lattice was extended to 90 MeV based on the LNL 352 MHZ β0=0.31 HWR. The matching between both lattices ensures smooth transition and the possibility to extend the accelerator to the required EURISOL ion energy.

  2. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: Implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eKreis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, the mitochondria or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  3. Subcellular targeting and dynamic regulation of PTEN: implications for neuronal cells and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Patricia; Leondaritis, George; Lieberam, Ivo; Eickholt, Britta J

    2014-01-01

    PTEN is a lipid and protein phosphatase that regulates a diverse range of cellular mechanisms. PTEN is mainly present in the cytosol and transiently associates with the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate PI(3,4,5)P3, thereby antagonizing the PI3-Kinase signaling pathway. Recently, PTEN has been shown to associate also with organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the mitochondria, or the nucleus, and to be secreted outside of the cell. In addition, PTEN dynamically localizes to specialized sub-cellular compartments such as the neuronal growth cone or dendritic spines. The diverse localizations of PTEN imply a tight temporal and spatial regulation, orchestrated by mechanisms such as posttranslational modifications, formation of distinct protein-protein interactions, or the activation/recruitment of PTEN downstream of external cues. The regulation of PTEN function is thus not only important at the enzymatic activity level, but is also associated to its spatial distribution. In this review we will summarize (i) recent findings that highlight mechanisms controlling PTEN movement and sub-cellular localization, and (ii) current understanding of how PTEN localization is achieved by mechanisms controlling posttranslational modification, by association with binding partners and by PTEN structural or activity requirements. Finally, we will discuss the possible roles of compartmentalized PTEN in developing and mature neurons in health and disease.

  4. Dynamic changes in parietal activation during encoding: implications for human learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Jeremy A; Rosner, Zachary A; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; Cerreta, Adelle G; Shimamura, Arthur P

    2013-11-15

    The ventral posterior parietal cortex (vPPC) monitors successful memory retrieval, yet its role during learning remains unclear. Indeed, increased vPPC activation during stimulus encoding is often negatively correlated with subsequent memory performance, suggesting that this region is suppressed during learning. Alternatively, the vPPC may engage in learning-related processes immediately after stimulus encoding thus facilitating retrieval at a later time. To investigate this possibility, we assessed vPPC activity during item presentation and immediately following its offset when a cue to remember was presented. We observed a dynamic change in vPPC response such that activity was negatively correlated with subsequent memory during stimulus presentation but positively correlated immediately following the stimulus during the cue phase. Furthermore, regional differences in this effect suggest a degree of functional heterogeneity within the vPPC. These findings demonstrate that the vPPC is engaged during learning and acts to facilitate post-encoding memory processes that establish long-term cortical representations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of social networks derived from ecological data: implications for inferring infectious disease dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Sarah E; Cagnacci, Francesca; Stradiotto, Anna; Arnoldi, Daniele; Hudson, Peter J

    2009-09-01

    1. Social network analyses tend to focus on human interactions. However, there is a burgeoning interest in applying graph theory to ecological data from animal populations. Here we show how radio-tracking and capture-mark-recapture data collated from wild rodent populations can be used to generate contact networks. 2. Both radio-tracking and capture-mark-recapture were undertaken simultaneously. Contact networks were derived and the following statistics estimated: mean-contact rate, edge distribution, connectance and centrality. 3. Capture-mark-recapture networks produced more informative and complete networks when the rodent density was high and radio-tracking produced more informative networks when the density was low. Different data collection methods provide more data when certain ecological characteristics of the population prevail. 4. Both sets of data produced networks with comparable edge (contact) distributions that were best described by a negative binomial distribution. Connectance and closeness were statistically different between the two data sets. Only betweenness was comparable. The differences between the networks have important consequences for the transmission of infectious diseases. Care should be taken when extrapolating social networks to transmission networks for inferring disease dynamics.

  6. Circuit topology of self-interacting chains: implications for folding and unfolding dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugler, Andrew; Tans, Sander J; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2014-11-07

    Understanding the relationship between molecular structure and folding is a central problem in disciplines ranging from biology to polymer physics and DNA origami. Topology can be a powerful tool to address this question. For a folded linear chain, the arrangement of intra-chain contacts is a topological property because rearranging the contacts requires discontinuous deformations. Conversely, the topology is preserved when continuously stretching the chain while maintaining the contact arrangement. Here we investigate how the folding and unfolding of linear chains with binary contacts is guided by the topology of contact arrangements. We formalize the topology by describing the relations between any two contacts in the structure, which for a linear chain can either be in parallel, in series, or crossing each other. We show that even when other determinants of folding rate such as contact order and size are kept constant, this 'circuit' topology determines folding kinetics. In particular, we find that the folding rate increases with the fractions of parallel and crossed relations. Moreover, we show how circuit topology constrains the conformational phase space explored during folding and unfolding: the number of forbidden unfolding transitions is found to increase with the fraction of parallel relations and to decrease with the fraction of series relations. Finally, we find that circuit topology influences whether distinct intermediate states are present, with crossed contacts being the key factor. The approach presented here can be more generally applied to questions on molecular dynamics, evolutionary biology, molecular engineering, and single-molecule biophysics.

  7. Mangrove Carbon Stocks and Ecosystem Cover Dynamics in Southwest Madagascar and the Implications for Local Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Benson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Of the numerous ecosystem services mangroves provide, carbon storage is gaining particular attention for its potential role in climate change mitigation strategies. Madagascar contains 2% of the world’s mangroves, over 20% of which is estimated to have been deforested through charcoal production, timber extraction and agricultural development. This study presents a carbon stock assessment of the mangroves in Helodrano Fagnemotse in southwest Madagascar alongside an analysis of mangrove land-cover change from 2002 to 2014. Similar to other mangrove ecosystems in East Africa, higher stature, closed-canopy mangroves in southwest Madagascar were estimated to contain 454.92 (±26.58 Mg·C·ha−1. Although the mangrove extent in this area is relatively small (1500 ha, these mangroves are of critical importance to local communities and anthropogenic pressures on coastal resources in the area are increasing. This was evident in both field observations and remote sensing analysis, which indicated an overall net loss of 3.18% between 2002 and 2014. Further dynamics analysis highlighted widespread transitions of dense, higher stature mangroves to more sparse mangrove areas indicating extensive degradation. Harnessing the value that the carbon stored within these mangroves holds on the voluntary carbon market could generate revenue to support and incentivise locally-led sustainable mangrove management, improve livelihoods and alleviate anthropogenic pressures.

  8. Jerks Abound: Observations of Geomagnetic Jerks and Implications for Core Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W. J.; Mound, J. E.; Livermore, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    The geomagnetic field is generated by the constant evolution of the fluid outer core. Geomagnetic jerks are rapid changes in the secular variation of Earth's magnetic field, the variation of the field at time scales on the order of months to decades, attributed primarily to changing flows near the surface of the outer core. Various generation mechanisms have been suggested for these rapid changes but none have conclusively explained the phenomena. Our recent study of geomagnetic jerks in observatory data over the period of 1957 to 2008 indicates that jerks are far more frequent an occurrence than previously suggested and perhaps part of the more rapid end of a spectrum of core dynamics. Whilst jerks are seen to be common, relative peaks in the global number of jerk occurrences are seen in 1968-71, 1973-74, 1977-79, 1983-85, 1989-93, 1995-98 and 2002-03 with the suggestion of further poorly sampled events in the early 1960s and late 2000s. We do not find consistent patterns in the spatial distributions of occurrences suggesting complex origins or the superposition of several discrete individual events. We observe that jerk amplitudes vary through time and their variations are potentially periodic in Europe and North America. These signals may be related to the 6-year periods detected independently in the secular variation and length-of-day, and thus may constrain the source of jerks in the core.

  9. Dynamic temperature fields under Mars landing sites and implications for supporting microbial life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Richard; Kral, Tim; Chevrier, Vincent; Pilgrim, Robert; Roe, Larry

    2010-01-01

    While average temperatures on Mars may be too low to support terrestrial life-forms or aqueous liquids, diurnal peak temperatures over most of the planet can be high enough to provide for both, down to a few centimeters beneath the surface for some fraction of the time. A thermal model was applied to the Viking 1, Viking 2, Pathfinder, Spirit, and Opportunity landing sites to demonstrate the dynamic temperature fields under the surface at these well-characterized locations. A benchmark temperature of 253 K was used as a lower limit for possible metabolic activity, which corresponds to the minimum found for specific terrestrial microorganisms. Aqueous solutions of salts known to exist on Mars can provide liquid solutions well below this temperature. Thermal modeling has shown that 253 K is reached beneath the surface at diurnal peak heating for at least some parts of the year at each of these landing sites. Within 40 degrees of the equator, 253 K beneath the surface should occur for at least some fraction of the year; and, within 20 degrees , it will be seen for most of the year. However, any life-form that requires this temperature to thrive must also endure daily excursions to far colder temperatures as well as periods of the year where 253 K is never reached at all.

  10. Implications of heterogeneity in the shock wave propagation of dynamically shocked materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Jeff

    The field of shock physics as a whole has only recently begun to pay particular attention to modeling heterogeneous materials under shock loading. These materials are important because of their practicality in terms of creating stronger, more shock resistant materials. To understand why they absorb shock impact energy better than homogeneous materials means that the small-scale processes that occur during the shock loading of these heterogeneous materials needs to be understood. Recent computational experiments, called mesoscale simulations, have shown that explicitly incorporating small-scale heterogeneous features into hydrocode simulations allows the bulk shock response of the heterogeneous material to be observed while not requiring the use of empirically determined constitutive equations. Including these features in simulations can offer insights into the irreversible mechanisms that dominate the propagation of shock waves in heterogeneous materials. Three cases where the mesoscale approach for modeling the dynamic shock loading of heterogeneous materials are presented. These materials fall into three categories: granular - dry sand, granular with binder - concrete, and granular contained in a metal foam with a binder - granular explosive contained in an aluminum foam. The processes in which shock waves propagate through each material are addressed and relationships between the three materials are discussed. Particle velocity profiles for dry sand and concrete was obtained from Harvard University and Eglin Air Force Base, respectively. Mesoscale simulations using CTH are conducted for each type of heterogeneous material and the results are compared to the experimental data.

  11. A Framework for Defining Sustainable Energy Transitions: Principles, Dynamics, and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgouris Sgouridis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available While partial energy transitions have been observed in the past, the complete transition of a fossil-based energy system to a sustainable energy one is historically unprecedented on a large scale. Switching from an economy based on energy stocks to one based on energy flows requires a social paradigm shift. This paper defines Sustainable Energy Transition (SET and introduces a set of five propositions that prescribe its sustainability. The propositions are comprehensive, spanning environmental constraints, resource availability, equity, and the transition dynamics from an energy and economic accounting perspective aimed at addressing all three pillars of sustainability. In order to rigorously define the constraints of SET a theoretical energy economy framework is introduced along with the concept of the renewable energy investment ratio. The paper concludes with a practical application of the SET propositions on the global energy system and identifies an order of magnitude underinvestment in the renewable energy investment ratio in comparison to the estimated level needed for a controlled transition that satisfies all propositions. The option of drastically increasing this ratio in the future may not be available as it would reduce societally available energy, imposing unacceptably high energy prices that would induce either fossil resource extraction beyond the safely recoverable resources or energy poverty.

  12. Spatial and temporal Brook Trout density dynamics: Implications for conservation, management, and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; Jefferson T. Deweber,; Jason Detar,; Kristine, David; John A. Sweka,

    2014-01-01

    Many potential stressors to aquatic environments operate over large spatial scales, prompting the need to assess and monitor both site-specific and regional dynamics of fish populations. We used hierarchical Bayesian models to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability in density and capture probability of age-1 and older Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis from three-pass removal data collected at 291 sites over a 37-year time period (1975–2011) in Pennsylvania streams. There was high between-year variability in density, with annual posterior means ranging from 2.1 to 10.2 fish/100 m2; however, there was no significant long-term linear trend. Brook Trout density was positively correlated with elevation and negatively correlated with percent developed land use in the network catchment. Probability of capture did not vary substantially across sites or years but was negatively correlated with mean stream width. Because of the low spatiotemporal variation in capture probability and a strong correlation between first-pass CPUE (catch/min) and three-pass removal density estimates, the use of an abundance index based on first-pass CPUE could represent a cost-effective alternative to conducting multiple-pass removal sampling for some Brook Trout monitoring and assessment objectives. Single-pass indices may be particularly relevant for monitoring objectives that do not require precise site-specific estimates, such as regional monitoring programs that are designed to detect long-term linear trends in density.

  13. Rib Geometry Explains Variation in Dynamic Structural Response: Potential Implications for Frontal Impact Fracture Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Michelle M; Kang, Yun-Seok; Goldman, Samuel D; Schafman, Michelle A; Schlecht, Stephen H; Moorhouse, Kevin; Bolte, John H; Agnew, Amanda M

    2017-09-01

    The human thorax is commonly injured in motor vehicle crashes, and despite advancements in occupant safety rib fractures are highly prevalent. The objective of this study was to quantify the ability of gross and cross-sectional geometry, separately and in combination, to explain variation of human rib structural properties. One hundred and twenty-two whole mid-level ribs from 76 fresh post-mortem human subjects were tested in a dynamic frontal impact scenario. Structural properties (peak force and stiffness) were successfully predicted (p < 0.001) by rib cross-sectional geometry obtained via direct histological imaging (total area, cortical area, and section modulus) and were improved further when utilizing a combination of cross-sectional and gross geometry (robusticity, whole bone strength index). Additionally, preliminary application of a novel, adaptive thresholding technique, allowed for total area and robusticity to be measured on a subsample of standard clinical CT scans with varied success. These results can be used to understand variation in individual rib response to frontal loading as well as identify important geometric parameters, which could ultimately improve injury criteria as well as the biofidelity of anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) and finite element (FE) models of the human thorax.

  14. Implications of semi-geostrophic dynamics for Rossby wave packet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Volkmar; Wolf, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Upper troposheric Rossby wave packets have received increased attention recently, partly because of their potential role in triggering heavy weather downstream. In most studies wave packets are detected by computing the envelope of the meridional wind field using either complex demodulation or a Hilbert transform technique. The latter requires less choices to be made and appears, therefore, preferable. However, the Hilbert transform technique is fraught with a significant problem, namely a tendency which makes a single wave packet to fragment into several parts. The problem arises because Rossby wave packets feature substantial deviations from the almost plane wave paradigm - owing to the semi-geostrophic nature of the underlying dynamics. As a consequence higher harmonics are included into the reconstructed envelope. A possible way out lies in additional smoothing, e.g. by means of a filter, or resorting to complex demodulation (which implies some smoothing anyways). Another possibility lies in applying the Hilbert transform technique in semi-geostrophic coordinate space. In this presentation we first illustrate the problem using sythetic wave packets. Thereafter we investigate observed Rossby wave packets using ERA-interim data. It is shown that the technique involving the semi-geostrophic coordinate transformation often works well. However, it sometimes fails in cases when the wave packet travels on a low wave-number background flow. The reasons are discussed and examples are given.

  15. Assessing vaccination sentiments with online social media: implications for infectious disease dynamics and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Salathé

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the dynamics of health behaviors in social networks and how they affect collective public health outcomes, but measuring population health behaviors over time and space requires substantial resources. Here, we use publicly available data from 101,853 users of online social media collected over a time period of almost six months to measure the spatio-temporal sentiment towards a new vaccine. We validated our approach by identifying a strong correlation between sentiments expressed online and CDC-estimated vaccination rates by region. Analysis of the network of opinionated users showed that information flows more often between users who share the same sentiments - and less often between users who do not share the same sentiments - than expected by chance alone. We also found that most communities are dominated by either positive or negative sentiments towards the novel vaccine. Simulations of infectious disease transmission show that if clusters of negative vaccine sentiments lead to clusters of unprotected individuals, the likelihood of disease outbreaks is greatly increased. Online social media provide unprecedented access to data allowing for inexpensive and efficient tools to identify target areas for intervention efforts and to evaluate their effectiveness.

  16. Modern drug design: the implication of using artificial neuronal networks and multiple molecular dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Oleksandr; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2017-11-01

    We report the implementation of molecular modeling approaches developed as a part of the 2016 Grand Challenge 2, the blinded competition of computer aided drug design technologies held by the D3R Drug Design Data Resource (https://drugdesigndata.org). The challenge was focused on the ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a highly flexible nuclear receptor of the cholesterol derivative chenodeoxycholic acid. FXR is considered an important therapeutic target for metabolic, inflammatory, bowel and obesity related diseases (Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 4:523-532, 2015), but in the context of this competition it is also interesting due to the significant ligand-induced conformational changes displayed by the protein. To deal with these conformational changes we employed multiple simulations of molecular dynamics (MD). Our MD-based protocols were top-ranked in estimating the free energy of binding of the ligands and FXR protein. Our approach was ranked second in the prediction of the binding poses where we also combined MD with molecular docking and artificial neural networks. Our approach showed mediocre results for high-throughput scoring of interactions.

  17. Phosphorus dynamics in and below the redoxcline in the Black Sea and implications for phosphorus burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, N.; Kraal, P.; Séguret, M. J. M.; Flores, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; Slomp, C. P.

    2018-02-01

    Marine basins with oxygen-depleted deep waters provide a natural laboratory to investigate the consequences of anoxic and sulfidic (i.e. euxinic) conditions for biogeochemical processes in seawater and sediments. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of the key nutrient phosphorus (P) and associated elements such as manganese (Mn), iron (Fe) and calcium (Ca) in the euxinic deep basin of the Black Sea. By examining water column particles with scanning electron microscope - energy dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we show that Mn(III/IV)-P is the key form of particulate P in the redoxcline. Other forms of particulate P include organic P, Fe(III)-P, and inorganic polyphosphates. Most inorganic P particles that are formed in the redoxcline subsequently dissolve in the underlying sulfidic waters, with the exception of some particulate Fe(III)-P that accounts for efficiency in the sediments is ∼27%, which is relatively high when compared to estimates for sediments in other euxinic basins such as the Baltic Sea (efficient sequestration of P in Black Sea sediments.

  18. Chemical dynamics of triacetylene formation and implications to the synthesis of polyynes in Titan's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Kim, Y S; Kaiser, R I; Mebel, A M; Liang, M C; Yung, Y L

    2009-09-22

    For the last four decades, the role of polyynes such as diacetylene (HCCCCH) and triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan has been a subject of vigorous research. These polyacetylenes are thought to serve as an UV radiation shield in planetary environments; thus, acting as prebiotic ozone, and are considered as important constituents of the visible haze layers on Titan. However, the underlying chemical processes that initiate the formation and control the growth of polyynes have been the least understood to date. Here, we present a combined experimental, theoretical, and modeling study on the synthesis of the polyyne triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) via the bimolecular gas phase reaction of the ethynyl radical (CCH) with diacetylene (HCCCCH). This elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barrier, and yields the triacetylene molecule via indirect scattering dynamics through complex formation in a single collision event. Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere imply that triacetylene may serve as a building block to synthesize even more complex polyynes such as tetraacetylene (HCCCCCCCCH).

  19. Implications of agricultural encroachment on the carbon and greenhouse gas dynamics in tropical African wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew; Kansiime, Frank; Jones, Michael

    2015-04-01

    the production and emission of methane (CH4), and plant-facilitated emissions of up to 32 mg CH4 m-2 h-1 were measured from mature papyrus plants grown in a constructed wetland, suggesting that these wetlands may make a significant contribution to regional methane emissions. The conversion of the papyrus wetlands to agricultural land use has significant implications for the carbon budgets of these systems, as the decomposition of detrital material in addition to the carbon exported in the crop biomass resulted in a net loss of carbon of ~10 t C ha-1 yr-1. The development of sustainable wetland management strategies are therefore required to maintain and enhance the services provided by these ecosystems especially under increasing population pressures and future climatic scenarios.

  20. Dynamics of riverine CO2 in the Yangtze River fluvial network and their implications for carbon evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi; Liu, Shaoda

    2017-04-01

    Understanding riverine carbon dynamics is critical for not only better estimates of various carbon fluxes but also evaluating their significance in the global carbon budget. As an important pathway of global land-ocean carbon exchange, the Yangtze River has received less attention regarding its vertical carbon evasion compared with lateral transport. Using long-term water chemistry data, we calculated CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) from pH and alkalinity and examined its spatial and temporal dynamics and the impacts of environmental settings. With alkalinity ranging from 415 to > 3400 µeq L-1, the river waters were supersaturated with dissolved CO2, generally 2-20-fold the atmospheric equilibrium (i.e., 390 µatm). Changes in pCO2 were collectively controlled by carbon inputs from terrestrial ecosystems, hydrological regime, and rock weathering. High pCO2 values were observed spatially in catchments with abundant carbonate presence and seasonally in the wet season when recently fixed organic matter was exported into the river network. In-stream processing of organic matter facilitated CO2 production and sustained the high pCO2, although the alkalinity presented an apparent dilution effect with water discharge. The decreasing pCO2 from the smallest headwater streams through tributaries to the mainstem channel illustrates the significance of direct terrestrial carbon inputs in controlling riverine CO2. With a basin-wide mean pCO2 of 2662 ± 1240 µatm, substantial CO2 evasion from the Yangtze River fluvial network is expected. Future research efforts are needed to quantify the amount of CO2 evasion and assess its biogeochemical implications for watershed-scale carbon cycle. In view of the Yangtze River's relative importance in global carbon export, its CO2 evasion would be significant for global carbon budget.

  1. Sexual segregation in juvenile New Zealand sea lion foraging ranges: implications for intraspecific competition, population dynamics and conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine S Leung

    Full Text Available Sexual segregation (sex differences in spatial organisation and resource use is observed in a large range of taxa. Investigating causes for sexual segregation is vital for understanding population dynamics and has important conservation implications, as sex differences in foraging ecology may affect vulnerability to area-specific human activities. Although behavioural ecologists have proposed numerous hypotheses for this phenomenon, the underlying causes of sexual segregation are poorly understood. We examined the size-dimorphism and niche divergence hypotheses as potential explanations for sexual segregation in the New Zealand (NZ sea lion (Phocarctos hookeri, a nationally critical, declining species impacted by trawl fisheries. We used satellite telemetry and linear mixed effects models to investigate sex differences in the foraging ranges of juvenile NZ sea lions. Male trip distances and durations were almost twice as long as female trips, with males foraging over the Auckland Island shelf and in further locations than females. Sex was the most important variable in trip distance, maximum distance travelled from study site, foraging cycle duration and percent time at sea whereas mass and age had small effects on these characteristics. Our findings support the predictions of the niche divergence hypothesis, which suggests that sexual segregation acts to decrease intraspecific resource competition. As a consequence of sexual segregation in foraging ranges, female foraging grounds had proportionally double the overlap with fisheries operations than males. This distribution exposes female juvenile NZ sea lions to a greater risk of resource competition and bycatch from fisheries than males, which can result in higher female mortality. Such sex-biased mortality could impact population dynamics, because female population decline can lead to decreased population fecundity. Thus, effective conservation and management strategies must take into account

  2. Dynamic implications of discontinuous recrystallization in cold basal ice: Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samyn, D.; Svensson, A.; Fitzsimons, S. J.

    2008-09-01

    Crystallographic investigations have been conducted of cold (-17°C) debris-bearing ice from the base of an Antarctic outlet glacier (Taylor Glacier). The 4-m-thick sequence studied has been retrieved from a 20-m-long tunnel dug from the glacier snout and has been analyzed with an automatic ice fabric analyzer (AIFA). The top and bottom of the sequence consists of clean meteoric ice (englacial facies), whereas alternating debris-rich and clean bubbly ice layers are found in the middle part (stratified facies). Ice from the englacial facies displays a polygonal texture and a strong c-axis clustering toward the vertical, denoting recrystallization through "subgrain rotation" (SGR). In contrast, clean ice from the stratified facies shows SGR fabrics which are delimited at the contact with debris-rich layers by large, interlocking grains organized in ribbons. These two distinct textures within the stratified facies are associated with looser c-axis patterns at the scale of single thin sections, which is interpreted as resulting from "migration recrystallization" (MR). The change from SGR to MR trends marks a clear increase in grain boundary and nucleation kinetics (hence the term "discontinuous recrystallization") and may be associated with strain localization at rheological interfaces during basal ice genesis. Analogies with bottom ice from deep polar ice sheets, where temperature is commonly higher than at the studied site, are highlighted. Two recrystallization scenarios are proposed, accounting for the development of both types of fabrics. It is shown that by controlling the repartition of stress and strain energy within basal ice, the rheology of debris-bearing ice layers plays a decisive role in recrystallization dynamics at structural interfaces. We also demonstrate how the same recrystallization regimes may occur in cold glaciers and temperate ice sheets, provided that strain accumulation has been high enough in the former. This challenges the common belief

  3. The seismic cycle at subduction thrusts: 2. Dynamic implications of geodynamic simulations validated with laboratory models

    KAUST Repository

    van Dinther, Y.

    2013-04-01

    The physics governing the seismic cycle at seismically active subduction zones remains poorly understood due to restricted direct observations in time and space. To investigate subduction zone dynamics and associated interplate seismicity, we validate a continuum, visco-elasto-plastic numerical model with a new laboratory approach (Paper 1). The analogous laboratory setup includes a visco-elastic gelatin wedge underthrusted by a rigid plate with defined velocity-weakening and -strengthening regions. Our geodynamic simulation approach includes velocity-weakening friction to spontaneously generate a series of fast frictional instabilities that correspond to analog earthquakes. A match between numerical and laboratory source parameters is obtained when velocity-strengthening is applied in the aseismic regions to stabilize the rupture. Spontaneous evolution of absolute stresses leads to nucleation by coalescence of neighboring patches, mainly occurring at evolving asperities near the seismogenic zone limits. Consequently, a crack-, or occasionally even pulse-like, rupture propagates toward the opposite side of the seismogenic zone by increasing stresses ahead of its rupture front, until it arrests on a barrier. The resulting surface displacements qualitatively agree with geodetic observations and show landward and, from near the downdip limit, upward interseismic motions. These are rebound and reversed coseismically. This slip increases adjacent stresses, which are relaxed postseismically by afterslip and thereby produce persistent seaward motions. The wide range of observed physical phenomena, including back-propagation and repeated slip, and the agreement with laboratory results demonstrate that visco-elasto-plastic geodynamic models with rate-dependent friction form a new tool that can greatly contribute to our understanding of the seismic cycle at subduction zones.

  4. Dynamics of Hierarchical Urban Green Space Patches and Implications for Management Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhoulu; Wang, Yaohui; Deng, Jinsong; Shen, Zhangquan; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Jinxia; Gan, Muye

    2017-06-06

    Accurately quantifying the variation of urban green space is the prerequisite for fully understanding its ecosystem services. However, knowledge about the spatiotemporal dynamics of urban green space is still insufficient due to multiple challenges that remain in mapping green spaces within heterogeneous urban environments. This paper uses the city of Hangzhou to demonstrate an analysis methodology that integrates sub-pixel mapping technology and landscape analysis to fully investigate the spatiotemporal pattern and variation of hierarchical urban green space patches. Firstly, multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was applied to time series Landsat data to derive green space coverage at the sub-pixel level. Landscape metric analysis was then employed to characterize the variation pattern of urban green space patches. Results indicate that Hangzhou has experienced a significant loss of urban greenness, producing a more fragmented and isolated vegetation landscape. Additionally, a remarkable amelioration of urban greenness occurred in the city core from 2002 to 2013, characterized by the significant increase of small-sized green space patches. The green space network has been formed as a consequence of new urban greening strategies in Hangzhou. These strategies have greatly fragmented the built-up areas and enriched the diversity of the urban landscape. Gradient analysis further revealed a distinct pattern of urban green space landscape variation in the process of urbanization. By integrating both sub-pixel mapping technology and landscape analysis, our approach revealed the subtle variation of urban green space patches which are otherwise easy to overlook. Findings from this study will help us to refine our understanding of the evolution of heterogeneous urban environments.

  5. Dynamics of Hierarchical Urban Green Space Patches and Implications for Management Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhoulu Yu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurately quantifying the variation of urban green space is the prerequisite for fully understanding its ecosystem services. However, knowledge about the spatiotemporal dynamics of urban green space is still insufficient due to multiple challenges that remain in mapping green spaces within heterogeneous urban environments. This paper uses the city of Hangzhou to demonstrate an analysis methodology that integrates sub-pixel mapping technology and landscape analysis to fully investigate the spatiotemporal pattern and variation of hierarchical urban green space patches. Firstly, multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was applied to time series Landsat data to derive green space coverage at the sub-pixel level. Landscape metric analysis was then employed to characterize the variation pattern of urban green space patches. Results indicate that Hangzhou has experienced a significant loss of urban greenness, producing a more fragmented and isolated vegetation landscape. Additionally, a remarkable amelioration of urban greenness occurred in the city core from 2002 to 2013, characterized by the significant increase of small-sized green space patches. The green space network has been formed as a consequence of new urban greening strategies in Hangzhou. These strategies have greatly fragmented the built-up areas and enriched the diversity of the urban landscape. Gradient analysis further revealed a distinct pattern of urban green space landscape variation in the process of urbanization. By integrating both sub-pixel mapping technology and landscape analysis, our approach revealed the subtle variation of urban green space patches which are otherwise easy to overlook. Findings from this study will help us to refine our understanding of the evolution of heterogeneous urban environments.

  6. Dynamics of Hierarchical Urban Green Space Patches and Implications for Management Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhoulu; Wang, Yaohui; Deng, Jinsong; Shen, Zhangquan; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Jinxia; Gan, Muye

    2017-01-01

    Accurately quantifying the variation of urban green space is the prerequisite for fully understanding its ecosystem services. However, knowledge about the spatiotemporal dynamics of urban green space is still insufficient due to multiple challenges that remain in mapping green spaces within heterogeneous urban environments. This paper uses the city of Hangzhou to demonstrate an analysis methodology that integrates sub-pixel mapping technology and landscape analysis to fully investigate the spatiotemporal pattern and variation of hierarchical urban green space patches. Firstly, multiple endmember spectral mixture analysis was applied to time series Landsat data to derive green space coverage at the sub-pixel level. Landscape metric analysis was then employed to characterize the variation pattern of urban green space patches. Results indicate that Hangzhou has experienced a significant loss of urban greenness, producing a more fragmented and isolated vegetation landscape. Additionally, a remarkable amelioration of urban greenness occurred in the city core from 2002 to 2013, characterized by the significant increase of small-sized green space patches. The green space network has been formed as a consequence of new urban greening strategies in Hangzhou. These strategies have greatly fragmented the built-up areas and enriched the diversity of the urban landscape. Gradient analysis further revealed a distinct pattern of urban green space landscape variation in the process of urbanization. By integrating both sub-pixel mapping technology and landscape analysis, our approach revealed the subtle variation of urban green space patches which are otherwise easy to overlook. Findings from this study will help us to refine our understanding of the evolution of heterogeneous urban environments. PMID:28587309

  7. The Impact of Detoxification Costs and Predation Risk on Foraging: Implications for Mimicry Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelhorn, John; Rowe, Candy; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Higginson, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    Prey often evolve defences to deter predators, such as noxious chemicals including toxins. Toxic species often advertise their defence to potential predators by distinctive sensory signals. Predators learn to associate toxicity with the signals of these so-called aposematic prey, and may avoid them in future. In turn, this selects for mildly toxic prey to mimic the appearance of more toxic prey. Empirical evidence shows that mimicry could be either beneficial (‘Mullerian’) or detrimental (‘quasi-Batesian’) to the highly toxic prey, but the factors determining which are unknown. Here, we use state-dependent models to explore how tri-trophic interactions could influence the evolution of prey defences. We consider how predation risk affects predators’ optimal foraging strategies on aposematic prey, and explore the resultant impact this has on mimicry dynamics between unequally defended species. In addition, we also investigate how the potential energetic cost of metabolising a toxin can alter the benefits to eating toxic prey and thus impact on predators’ foraging decisions. Our model predicts that both how predators perceive their own predation risk, and the cost of detoxification, can have significant, sometimes counterintuitive, effects on the foraging decisions of predators. For example, in some conditions predators should: (i) avoid prey they know to be undefended, (ii) eat more mildly toxic prey as detoxification costs increase, (iii) increase their intake of highly toxic prey as the abundance of undefended prey increases. These effects mean that the relationship between a mimic and its model can qualitatively depend on the density of alternative prey and the cost of metabolising toxins. In addition, these effects are mediated by the predators’ own predation risk, which demonstrates that, higher trophic levels than previously considered can have fundamental impacts on interactions among aposematic prey species. PMID:28045959

  8. Dynamic implications of ridges on a debris avalanche deposit at Tutupaca volcano (southern Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Patricio; Roche, Olivier; Samaniego, Pablo; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Bernard, Karine; Mariño, Jersy

    2016-02-01

    Catastrophic volcanic landslides can involve different parts of a volcano that can be incorporated into any resulting debris avalanche. The different material properties may influence the mechanical behaviour and, hence, the emplacement mechanisms of the different avalanche units. We present data from a coupled hydrothermal- and magmatic-related volcanic landslide at Tutupaca volcano (Peru). Around ad 1802, the hydrothermal system under Tutupaca's growing dacite dome failed, creating a debris avalanche that triggered a large explosive eruption. A typical debris avalanche hummocky unit is found, formed out of rock from the dome foot and the underlying hydrothermally altered lavas. It is covered by a more widespread and remarkable deposit that contains remnants of the hot dome core and the inner hydrothermal material. This deposit has ridges 20-500-m long, 10-30-m wide and 1-5-m high, regularly spaced and that fan slightly outward. Cross sections exposed within the ridges reveal coarser cores and finer troughs, suggesting grain size segregation during emplacement. Ridge morphology and granulometry are consistent with fingering known to occur in granular flows. The ridges are also associated with large blocks that have evidence of differential movement compared with the rest of the flowing mass. The presence of both ridged and hummocky deposits in the same event shows that, as different lithologies combine and collapse sequentially, materials with different mechanical properties can coexist in one landslide, leading to contrasting emplacement dynamics. The different structures thus highlight the complexity of such hazardous volcanic events and show the difficulty we face with modelling them.

  9. The elastic precursor behavior of tantalum under dynamic loading, its implications and modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Jow-Lian (Washington State University)

    2010-03-01

    When elastic-plastic materials, such as metals, are subjected to moderately high strain rates or dynamic loadings, the plastic stress wave trails behind the elastic wave because of its slower wave speed. Due to the inherent time-dependent nature of the plastic deformation, the elastic precursor generally loads the material to a metastable elastic state at a stres level that is higher than the static strength of the material. This metastable state gradually relaxes to the equilibrium state and the relaxation results in the so-called precursor decay. In a recent work by Asay et al. (J. Appl. Phys., 2009), the inelastic response of annealed and cold-rolled pure polycrystalline tantalum at intermediate strain rates ({approx} 106/sec) was experimentally characterized with ramp wave loading. It was found that the precursor of the annealed tantalum showed little decay over a propagation distance of 6 mm even though the peak precursor stress was well above the static strength of the mateiral. The precursor for the cold-rolled sample was more dispersive and did not exhibit the characteristics depicted by the annealed samples. In this study, a constitutive model based on the concept of dislocation motion and generation was developed to gain insights into this somewhat unusual precursor behavior, particularly for the annealed samples, and the possible underlying deformation mechanisms for tantalum. Despite its simplicity, the model worked quite well for both the annealed and cold-rolled materials. The tantalum studied here essentially exhibits strong rate sensitivity and this behavior is modeled through the low dislocation density and the strong stress dependence of the dislocation velocity. Both of these contributions may be related to the low mobility of the screw dislocations in bcc metals. This low mobility may result from its extended, three-dimensional core structure.

  10. Transmission dynamics of rabies virus in Thailand: Implications for disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puanghat Apirom

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Thailand, rabies remains a neglected disease with authorities continuing to rely on human death statistics while ignoring the financial burden resulting from an enormous increase in post-exposure prophylaxis. Past attempts to conduct a mass dog vaccination and sterilization program have been limited to Bangkok city and have not been successful. We have used molecular epidemiology to define geographic localization of rabies virus phylogroups and their pattern of spread in Thailand. Methods We analyzed 239 nucleoprotein gene sequences from animal and human brain samples collected from all over Thailand between 1998 and 2002. We then reconstructed a phylogenetic tree correlating these data with geographical information. Results All sequences formed a monophyletic tree of 2 distinct phylogroups, TH1 and TH2. Three subgroups were identified in the TH1 subgroup and were distributed in the middle region of the country. Eight subgroups of TH2 viruses were identified widely distributed throughout the country overlapping the TH1 territory. There was a correlation between human-dependent transportation routes and the distribution of virus. Conclusion Inter-regional migration paths of the viruses might be correlated with translocation of dogs associated with humans. Interconnecting factors between human socioeconomic and population density might determine the transmission dynamics of virus in a rural-to-urban polarity. The presence of 2 or more rabies virus groups in a location might be indicative of a gene flow, reflecting a translocation of dogs within such region and adjacent areas. Different approaches may be required for rabies control based on the homo- or heterogeneity of the virus. Areas containing homogeneous virus populations should be targeted first. Control of dog movement associated with humans is essential.

  11. Pastoralist-predator interaction at the roof of the world: Conflict dynamics and implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffar Ud. Din

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pastoralism and predation are two major concomitantly known facts and matters of concern for conservation biologists worldwide. Pastoralist-predator conflict constitutes a major social-ecological concern in the Pamir mountain range encompassing Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Tajikistan, and affects community attitudes and tolerance toward carnivores. Very few studies have been conducted to understand the dynamics of livestock predation by large carnivores like snow leopards (Panthera uncia and wolves (Canis lupus, owing to the region's remoteness and inaccessibility. This study attempts to assess the intensity of livestock predation (and resulting perceptions by snow leopards and wolves across the Afghani, Pakistani, and Tajik Pamir range during the period January 2008-June 2012. The study found that livestock mortality due to disease is the most serious threat to livestock (an average 3.5 animal heads per household per year and ultimately to the rural economy (an average of US$352 per household per year as compared to predation (1.78 animal heads per household per year, US$191 in the three study sites. Overall, 1419 (315 per year heads of livestock were reportedly killed by snow leopards (47% and wolves (53% in the study sites. People with comparatively smaller landholdings and limited earning options, other than livestock rearing, expressed negative attitudes toward both wolves and snow leopards and vice versa. Education was found to be an effective solution to dilute people's hatred for predators. Low public tolerance of the wolf and snow leopard in general explained the magnitude of the threat facing predators in the Pamirs. This will likely continue unless tangible and informed conservation measures like disease control and predation compensation programs are taken among others.

  12. Human impacts on 20th century fire dynamics and implications for global carbon and water trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2018-03-01

    Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct human effect on fire). Here, we utilize the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) to quantify the impacts of changes in human ignition and suppression on fire dynamics and associated carbon and water cycles. We find that the impact is to significantly reduce the 20th century global burned area by a century average of 38 Mha/yr and by 103 Mha/yr at the end of the century. Land carbon gain is weakened by 17% over the 20th century, mainly due to increased human deforestation fires and associated escape fires (i.e., degradation fires) in the tropical humid forests, even though the decrease in burned area in many other regions due to human fire suppression acts to increase land carbon gain. The direct human effect on fire weakens the upward trend in global runoff throughout the century by 6% and enhances the upward trend in global evapotranspiration since ~ 1945 by 7%. In addition, the above impacts in densely populated, highly developed (if population density > 0.1 person/km2), or moderately populated and developed regions are of opposite sign to those in other regions. Our study suggests that particular attention should be paid to human deforestation and degradation fires in the tropical humid forests when reconstructing and projecting fire carbon emissions and net atmosphere-land carbon exchange and estimating resultant impacts of direct human effect on fire.

  13. Human impacts on 20th century fire dynamics and implications for global carbon and water trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2018-03-01

    Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct human effect on fire). Here, we utilize the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) to quantify the impacts of changes in human ignition and suppression on fire dynamics and associated carbon and water cycles. We find that the impact is to significantly reduce the 20th century global burned area by a century average of 38 Mha/yr and by 103 Mha/yr at the end of the century. Land carbon gain is weakened by 17% over the 20th century, mainly due to increased human deforestation fires and associated escape fires (i.e., degradation fires) in the tropical humid forests, even though the decrease in burned area in many other regions due to human fire suppression acts to increase land carbon gain. The direct human effect on fire weakens the upward trend in global runoff throughout the century by 6% and enhances the upward trend in global evapotranspiration since 1945 by 7%. In addition, the above impacts in densely populated, highly developed (if population density > 0.1 person/km2), or moderately populated and developed regions are of opposite sign to those in other regions. Our study suggests that particular attention should be paid to human deforestation and degradation fires in the tropical humid forests when reconstructing and projecting fire carbon emissions and net atmosphere-land carbon exchange and estimating resultant impacts of direct human effect on fire.

  14. Viral persistence, latent reservoir, and blips: a review on HIV-1 dynamics and modeling during HAART and related treatment implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 eradication from infected individuals has not been achieved with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for a prolonged period of time. The cellular reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4{sup +} T cells remains a major obstacle to viral elimination. The reservoir does not decay significantly over long periods of time as is able to release replication competent HIV-1 upon cell activation. Residual ongoing viral replication may likely occur in many patients because low levels of virus can be detected in plasma by sensitive assays and transient episodes of viremia, or HIV-1 blips, are often observed in patients even with successful viral suppression for many years. Here we review our current knowledge of the factors contributing to viral persistence, the latent reservoir, and blips, and mathematical models developed to explore them and their relationships. We show how mathematical modeling can help improve our understanding of HIV-1 dynamics in patients on HAART and the quantitative events underlying HIV-1 latency, reservoir stability, low-level viremic persistence, and emergence of intermittent viral blips. We also discuss treatment implications related to these studies.

  15. Regeneration Dynamics of Coast Redwood, a Sprouting Conifer Species: A Review with Implications for Management and Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L. O’Hara

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens (Lamb. ex. D. Don Endl. is unique among conifer species because of its longevity, the great sizes of individual trees, and its propensity to reproduce through sprouts. Timber harvesting in the native redwood range along the coast of the western United States has necessitated restoration aimed to promote old forest structures to increase the total amount of old forest, the connectivity between old forests, and to enhance the resiliency of these ecosystems. After disturbance or harvest, healthy redwood stumps sprout vigorously, often producing dozens of sprouts within two years of disturbance. These sprouts form highly aggregated spatial patterns because they are clustered around stumps that may number less than 50 ha−1. Thinning of sprouts can accelerate individual tree growth, providing an effective restoration strategy to accelerate formation of large trees and old forest structures or increase stand growth for timber production. However, management, including restoration activities, is a contentious issue throughout the native range of redwood because of the history of overexploitation of this resource and perceptions that overexploitation is continuing. This paper reviews the science of early stand dynamics in coast redwood and their implications for restoration and other silvicultural strategies.

  16. Dog and cat management through sterilization: Implications for population dynamics and veterinary public policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ricardo Augusto; Baquero, Oswaldo Santos; Guilloux, Aline Gil Alves; Moretti, Caio Figueiredo; de Lucca, Tosca; Rodrigues, Ricardo Conde Alves; Castagna, Cláudio Luiz; Presotto, Douglas; Kronitzky, Yury Cezar; Grisi-Filho, José Henrique Hildebrand; Ferreira, Fernando; Amaku, Marcos

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to compare different sterilization scenarios allowing the adoption of the most adequate strategy to control owned dog and cat population sizes as the official veterinary public policy for animal control in an urban area of Campinas municipality, Brazil. To achieve this goal, the vital parameters of the owned pet population were measured in a neighborhood of Campinas called Jardim Vila Olimpia through questionnaires used in two census studies performed in February 2012 and June 2013. Different hypothetical sterilization scenarios were compared with the scenario of a single sterilization campaign performed in the study area between the census studies. Using a deterministic mathematical model, population dynamics were simulated for these different scenarios. We have observed that for both owned dogs and cats, the impact on the population size achieved by a single sterilization campaign would be diluted over the years, equating to the impact achieved by the usual sterilization rate practiced before the sterilization campaign yearly. Moreover, using local and global sensitivity analyses, we assessed the relative influence on animal population evolution of each vital parameter used in the mathematical models. The more influential parameters for both species were the carrying capacity of the environment and sterilization rates of males and females (for both species). We observed that even with sterilizing 100% of the intact animals annually, it would not be possible to obtain proportions greater than 86% and 88% of sterilized dogs and cats, respectively, after 20 years due to the high introduction of new intact animals. There is no public dog and cat sterilization service in place in the city, and sporadic and local sterilization campaigns are performed with a prior communication to the owners to bring their animals to be sterilized in a selected veterinary facility. If a sterilization campaign was performed annually in the study area, it would

  17. The Dynamics of Vulnerability and Implications for Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Urban Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, L.; Daly, M.; Travis, W.; Wilhelmi, O.; Klein, R.; Kenney, D.; Ray, A. J.; Miller, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent reports and scholarship have suggested that adapting to current climate variability may represent a "no regrets" strategy for adapting to climate change. Filling "adaptation deficits" and other approaches that rely on addressing current vulnerabilities are of course helpful for responding to current climate variability, but we find here that they are not sufficient for adapting to climate change. First, following a comprehensive review and unique synthesis of the natural hazards and climate adaptation literatures, we advance six reasons why adapting to climate variability is not sufficient for adapting to climate change: 1) Vulnerability is different at different levels of exposure; 2) Coping with climate variability is not equivalent to adaptation to longer term change; 3) The socioeconomic context for vulnerability is constantly changing; 4) The perception of risk associated with climate variability does not necessarily promote adaptive behavior in the face of climate change; 5) Adaptations made to short term climate variability may reduce the flexibility of the system in the long term; and 6) Adaptive actions may shift vulnerabilities to other parts of the system or to other people. Instead we suggest that decision makers faced with choices to adapt to climate change must consider the dynamics of vulnerability in a connected system-- how choices made in one part of the system might impact other valued outcomes or even create new vulnerabilities. Furthermore we suggest that rather than expressing climate change adaptation as an extension of adaptation to climate variability, the research and practice communities would do well to articulate adaptation as an imperfect policy, with tradeoffs and consequences and that decisions be prioritized to preserve flexibility be revisited often as climate change unfolds. We then present the results of a number of empirical studies of decision making for drought in urban water systems in the United States to understand

  18. Seasonal Oxygen Dynamics in a Thermokarst Bog in Interior Alaska: Implications for Rates of Methane Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, R. B.; Moorberg, C.; Wong, A.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and wetlands represent the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere. However, much of the methane generated in anoxic wetlands never gets emitted to the atmosphere; up to >90% of generated methane can get oxidized to carbon dioxide. Thus, oxidation is an important methane sink and changes in the rate of methane oxidation can affect wetland methane emissions. Most methane is aerobically oxidized at oxic-anoxic interfaces where rates of oxidation strongly depend on methane and oxygen concentrations. In wetlands, oxygen is often the limiting substrate. To improve understanding of belowground oxygen dynamics and its impact on methane oxidation, we deployed two planar optical oxygen sensors in a thermokarst bog in interior Alaska. Previous work at this site indicated that, similar to other sites, rates of methane oxidation decrease over the growing season. We used the sensors to track spatial and temporal patterns of oxygen concentrations over the growing season. We coupled these in-situ oxygen measurements with periodic oxygen injection experiments performed against the sensor to quantify belowground rates of oxygen consumption. We found that over the season, the thickness of the oxygenated water layer at the peatland surface decreased. Previous research has indicated that in sphagnum-dominated peatlands, like the one studied here, rates of methane oxidation are highest at or slightly below the water table. It is in these saturated but oxygenated locations that both methane and oxygen are available. Thus, a seasonal reduction in the thickness of the oxygenated water layer could restrict methane oxidation. The decrease in thickness of the oxygenated layer coincided with an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption during our oxygen injection experiments. The increase in oxygen consumption was not explained by temperature; we infer it was due to an increase in substrate availability for oxygen consuming reactions and

  19. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Biocement Formation during Stimulation and Augmentation: Implications for Soil Consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navdeep K. Dhami

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbially-induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP is a naturally occurring process wherein durable carbonates are formed as a result of microbial metabolic activities. In recent years, MICP technology has been widely harnessed for applications in civil engineering wherein synthesis of calcium carbonate crystals occurs at ambient temperature paving way for low energy biocement. MICP using pure urease (UA and carbonic anhydrase (CA producing bacteria has been promising in laboratory conditions. In the current study we enriched ureolytic and carbonic anhydrase communities in calcareous soil under biostimulation and bioaugmentation conditions and investigated the effect of microbial dynamics on carbonate precipitation, calcium carbonate polymorph selection and consolidation of biological sand column under nutrient limited and rich conditions. All treatments for stimulation and augmentation led to significant changes in the composition of indigenous bacterial population. Biostimulation as well as augmentation through the UA route was found to be faster and more effective compared to the CA route in terms of extracellular enzyme production and carbonate precipitation. Synergistic role of augmented cultures along with indigenous communities was recorded via both the routes of UA and CA as more effective calcification was seen in case of augmentation compared to stimulation. The survival of supplemented isolates in presence of indigenous bacterial communities was confirmed through sequencing of total diversity and it was seen that both UA and CA isolate had the potential to survive along with native communities under high nutrient conditions. Nutrient conditions played significant role in determining calcium carbonate polymorph fate as calcitic crystals dominated under high carbon supplementation. Finally, the consolidation of sand columns via stimulation and augmentation was successfully achieved through both UA and CA route under high nutrient conditions

  20. Cell wall integrity, genotoxic injury and PCD dynamics in alfalfa saponin-treated white poplar cells highlight a complex link between molecule structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, Stefania; Tava, Aldo; Avato, Pinarosa; Biazzi, Elisa; Macovei, Anca; Biggiogera, Marco; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2015-03-01

    In the present work, eleven saponins and three sapogenins purified from Medicago sativa were tested for their cytotoxicity against highly proliferating white poplar (Populus alba L.) cell suspension cultures. After preliminary screening, four saponins with different structural features in terms of aglycone moieties and sugar chains (saponin 3, a bidesmoside of hederagenin; saponins 4 and 5, monodesmoside and bidesmoside of medicagenic acid respectively, and saponin 10, a bidesmoside of zanhic acid) and different cytotoxicity were selected and used for further investigation on their structure-activity relationship. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses provided for the first time evidence of the effects exerted by saponins on plant cell wall integrity. Exposure to saponin 3 and saponin 10 resulted into disorganization of the outer wall layer and the effect was even more pronounced in white poplar cells treated with the two medicagenic acid derivatives, saponins 4 and 5. Oxidative burst and nitric oxide accumulation were common hallmarks of the response of white poplar cells to saponins. When DNA damage accumulation and DNA repair profiles were evaluated by Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis, induction of single and double strand breaks followed by effective repair was observed within 24h. The reported data are discussed in view of the current issues dealing with saponin structure-activity relationship. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural elucidation of Eucalyptus lignin and its dynamic changes in the cell walls during an integrated process of ionic liquids and successive alkali treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han-Yin; Wang, Chen-Zhou; Chen, Xue; Cao, Xue-Fei; Sun, Shao-Ni; Sun, Run-Cang

    2016-12-01

    An integrated process based on ionic liquids ([Bmim]Cl and [Bmim]OAc) pretreatment and successive alkali post-treatments (0.5, 2.0, and 4.0% NaOH at 90°C for 2h) was performed to isolate lignins from Eucalyptus. The structural features and spatial distribution of lignin in the Eucalyptus cell wall were investigated thoroughly. Results revealed that the ionic liquids pretreatment promoted the isolation of alkaline lignin from the pretreated samples without obvious structural changes. Additionally, the integrated process resulted in syringyl-rich lignin macromolecules with more β-O-4' linkages and less phenolic hydroxyl groups. Confocal Raman microscopy analysis showed that the dissolution behavior of lignin was varied in the morphologically distinct regions during the successive alkali treatments, and lignin dissolved was mainly stemmed from the secondary wall regions. These results provided some useful information for understanding the mechanisms of delignification during the integrated process and enhancing the potential utilizations of lignin in future biorefineries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DMPD: Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15069387 Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic science...te immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch. PubmedID 15069387 Title... Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic sciencer

  3. The State of the GeoWall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P. J.; Leigh, J.; van Keken, P.; Johnson, A.

    2003-12-01

    The GeoWall stereo projection technology has been widely adopted within Earth Science. Over 20,000 undergraduate students per year use a GeoWall in classroom and lab settings at over 80 institutions around the world using over 200 GeoWalls. We believe that critical mass for this technology has been reached in the Earth Science. Many collaborations have been initiated. With Iris, GeoWall is exploring new ways to monitor seismic networks in real-time and to visualize extremely large, whole Earth seismic simulations. We are also working with a number of drilling organizations including JOI, DOSECC and LacCore to bring modern visualization technology to core interpretation and drill site selection. Also, over 15 museums now have or are building GeoWalls for informal education. Much of the science that is being performed on the GeoWall is finding its way directly into the classroom and science museum. One of the success stories has been the GeoWall Consortium's interaction with industry. The basic hardware for the GeoWall has been spun off to companies that now sell variations of the hardware. In addition, many software companies including ESRI and Dynamic Graphics have added support for the GeoWall in their products. The future of GeoWall is four fold. Curriculum development will bring more material to all GeoWall users. Assessment of the curriculum and educational psychology will give us GeoWall best practices. In technology development, the GeoWall 2 is a 20+ million pixel, tiled display which brings more resolution to the Earth Sciences than ever. To support research the consortium is developing a volume rendering application to visualize extremely large datasets.

  4. Divergence of sperm and leukocyte age-dependent telomere dynamics: implications for male-driven evolution of telomere length in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Kenneth I; Hunt, Steven C.; Susser, Ezra; Kimura, Masayuki; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Carrell, Douglas; Aviv, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) dynamics in vivo are defined by TL and its age-dependent change, brought about by cell replication. Leukocyte TL (LTL), which reflects TL in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), becomes shorter with age. In contrast, sperm TL, which reflects TL in the male germ cells, becomes longer with age. Moreover, offspring of older fathers display longer LTL. Thus far, no study has examined LTL and sperm TL relations with age in the same individuals, nor considered their implications fo...

  5. Domain Wall Mobility in Co-Based Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kladivova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the domain wall between opposite circularly magnetized domains in amorphous cylindrical sample with circular easy direction is theoretically studied. The wall is driven by DC current. Various mechanisms which influence the wall velocity were taken into account: current magnitude, deformation of the mowing wall, Hall effect, axially magnetized domain in the middle of the wire. Theoretical results obtained are in a good agreement with experiments on Cobased amorphous ferromagnetic wires.

  6. Dynamic Edematous Response of the Human Heart to Myocardial Infarction: Implications for Assessing Myocardial Area at Risk and Salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Barreiro-Pérez, Manuel; Martin-García, Ana; Sánchez-González, Javier; Agüero, Jaume; Galán-Arriola, Carlos; García-Prieto, Jaime; Díaz-Pelaez, Elena; Vara, Pedro; Martinez, Irene; Zamarro, Ivan; Garde, Beatriz; Sanz, Javier; Fuster, Valentin; Sánchez, Pedro L; Ibanez, Borja

    2017-10-03

    Clinical protocols aimed to characterize the post-myocardial infarction (MI) heart by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) need to be standardized to take account of dynamic biological phenomena evolving early after the index ischemic event. Here, we evaluated the time course of edema reaction in patients with ST-segment-elevation MI by CMR and assessed its implications for myocardium-at-risk (MaR) quantification both in patients and in a large-animal model. A total of 16 patients with anterior ST-segment-elevation MI successfully treated by primary angioplasty and 16 matched controls were prospectively recruited. In total, 94 clinical CMR examinations were performed: patients with ST-segment-elevation MI were serially scanned (within the first 3 hours after reperfusion and at 1, 4, 7, and 40 days), and controls were scanned only once. T2 relaxation time in the myocardium (T2 mapping) and the extent of edema on T2-weighted short-tau triple inversion-recovery (ie, CMR-MaR) were evaluated at all time points. In the experimental study, 20 pigs underwent 40-minute ischemia/reperfusion followed by serial CMR examinations at 120 minutes and 1, 4, and 7 days after reperfusion. Reference MaR was assessed by contrast-multidetector computed tomography during the index coronary occlusion. Generalized linear mixed models were used to take account of repeated measurements. In humans, T2 relaxation time in the ischemic myocardium declines significantly from early after reperfusion to 24 hours, and then increases up to day 4, reaching a plateau from which it decreases from day 7. Consequently, edema extent measured by T2-weighted short-tau triple inversion-recovery (CMR-MaR) varied with the timing of the CMR examination. These findings were confirmed in the experimental model by showing that only CMR-MaR values for day 4 and day 7 postreperfusion, coinciding with the deferred edema wave, were similar to values measured by reference contrast-multidetector computed tomography. Post

  7. Review on Seismic Rehabilitation of a 56-Story RC Tall Building having Shear Wall System Based on A Nonlinear Dynamic Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epackachi, S.; Esmaili, O.; Mirghaderi, S. R.; Taheri, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    Tehran tower is a 56 story reinforced concrete tall building consisting of three wings with identical plan dimensions each approximately 48 meters by 22 meters. The three wings are at 120 degree from each other and have no expansions/seismic Joints. This paper contains the consideration of the retrofitting of the Tehran tower based on the findings of an exhaustive investigation of the nonlinear performance evaluation efforts. It has tried to show the procedure followed, methodologies utilized, and the results obtained for life-safety and collapse-prevention evaluation of the building. More over the weak zones of the structure due to analysis results are introduced and appropriate retrofit technique for satisfaction related life-safety and collapse-prevention criteria is presented. Actually in this project to improve the local behavior of coupling panels which are located regularly in main walls and definitely have been recognized as the most vulnerable structural elements, making use of steel plates which are connected to concrete members by chemical anchors has been used as the best retrofitting method for this case. Therefore in the final section of this paper it has been tried to explain the professional practical method utilized to perform the mentioned retrofitting project.

  8. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  9. Great Wall of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface

  10. Charged Domain Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Fogli, G. L.; Tedesco, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate Charged Domain Walls (CDW's), topological defects that acquire surface charge density $Q$ induced by fermion states localized on the walls. The presence of an electric and magnetic field on the walls is also discussed. We find a relation in which the value of the surface charge density $Q$ is connected with the existence of such topological defects.

  11. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  12. Effects of Material Rheology and Die Walls Translational Motions on the Dynamics of Viscous Flow during Equal Channel Angular Extrusion through a Segal 2θ-Die: CFD 2D Solution of a Curl Transfer Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Perig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article is focused on a phenomenological description of a polymer workpiece Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE through 2θ-dies of Segal and Iwahashi geometries with a channel intersection angle 2θ = 105° with fixed and movable external inlet and outlet die walls. The local flow dynamics, including the formation of macroscopic rotation and a dead zone appearance during the flow of plasticine, paraffin, and wax workpiece models through the subject die configuration was studied using physical simulation techniques. The present article utilizes a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD numerical approach to a theoretical description of 2D viscous flow of incompressible Newtonian continuum through the stated die geometries. The boundary value problem for the Navier-Stokes equations in the curl transfer form for the local viscous flow was formulated and numerically solved with a finite-difference method. Theoretical CFD-derived plots with computational flow lines, dimensionless flow and curl functions, flow velocities, and tangential stresses for viscous material flow through the stated die geometries have been generated and described. As a first rheological approximation the derived computational results provide the theoretical description of physical simulation experiments and visualize the formation of ECAE-induced rotational modes of large deformations like macroscopic rotation and rotational inhomogeneity.

  13. Turbulent channel flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Marco Edoardo; Brandt, Luca

    2017-11-01

    We perform numerical simulations of turbulent channel flows over porous walls and deformable hyper-elastic walls. The flow over porous walls is simulated using volume-averaged Navier ``Stokes equations within the porous layers, while the multiphase flow over deformable walls is solved with a one-continuum formulation which allows the use of a fully Eulerian formulation. New insights on the effect of these complex walls on the turbulent flows in terms of friction, statistics and flow structures are discussed using a number of post-processing techniques. The turbulent flow in the channel is affected by the porous and moving walls in a similar manner even at low values of porosity and elasticity due to the non-zero fluctuations of vertical velocity at the interface that influence the flow dynamics. The near-wall streaks and the associated quasi-streamwise vortices are strongly reduced near porous and deformable isotropic wall while the flow becomes more correlated in the spanwise direction. On the contrary, an opposite behavior is noticed in the case of anisotropic porous layers, with an increase of streamwise correlation due to a strengthening of the low- and high-speed streaks.

  14. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    a network of cell wall polysaccharides, which are remodeled in response to growth conditions and environmental stress. However, little is known about how cell wall elasticity is regulated and how it affects adaptation to stresses such as sudden changes in osmolarity. We show that elasticity is critical for survival under conditions of osmotic shock, before stress signaling pathways have time to induce gene expression and drive glycerol accumulation. Critical cell wall remodeling enzymes control cell wall flexibility, and its regulation is strongly dependent on host nutritional inputs. We also demonstrate an entirely new level of cell wall dynamism, where significant architectural changes and structural realignment occur within seconds of an osmotic shock. Copyright © 2015 Ene et al.

  15. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  16. Effect of pristine and functionalized single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes on CO2separation of mixed matrix membranes based on polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1): a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzar, Karim; Modarress, Hamid; Amjad-Iranagh, Sepideh

    2017-08-19

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were conducted to investigate the transport properties of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and oxygen through pure and mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) based on polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-1). For this purpose, first, 0.5 to 3 wt% of pristine single-walled carbon nanotube (p-SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (p-MWCNT) were embedded into the pure PIM-1, and then for better dispersion of CNT particles into the polymer matrix and to improve the performance of the resulting MMMs, polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized SWCNT and MWCNT (f-SWCNT and f-MWCNT, respectively) were loaded. The characterization of the obtained MMMs was carried out by using density, glass transition temperature, X-ray pattern, and fractional free volume calculations. Comparing the obtained results with the available reported experimental data, indicate the authenticity of the applied simulation approach. The simulation results exhibit that the pristine and PEG-functionalized CNT particles improve the transport properties such as diffusivity, solubility, and permeability of the PIM-1 membranes, without sacrificing their selectivity. Also, the MMMs incorporated with 2 wt% of the functionalized CNT particles indicate better performance for the CO 2 separation from other gases. According to the calculated results, the highest permeability and diffusivity for CO 2 are observed in the [PIM-1/f-SWCNT] MMM among the other membranes which represent that the loading of the f-SWCNTs can enhance the CO 2 separation performance of PIM-1 more than other CNTs studied in this work.

  17. Creating universes with thick walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a "thick wall", which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the "Farhi-Guth-Guven" (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The ADM mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  18. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  19. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  20. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the plant cell wall)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varner, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the chemistry and architecture of plant cells walls, the extracellular matrices that taken together shape the plant and provide mechanical support for the plant. Cell walls are dynamic structures that regulate, or are the site of, many physiological processes, in addition to being the cells' first line of defense against invading pathogens. In the past year we have examined the role of the cell wall enzyme ascorbic acid oxidase as related to the structure of the wall and its possible interactions with hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the wall.

  1. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  2. Characterizing Seismic Anisotropy across the Peruvian Flat-Slab Subduction Zone: Implications for the Dynamics of Flat-Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Caroline; Long, Maureen; Beck, Susan; Wagner, Lara; Tavera, Hernando

    2014-05-01

    -slab anisotropy beneath all stations. Splitting is however is weakest and nulls most prevalent above the incoming Nazca Ridge where the slab is at its most shallow. This suggests the main source for the local S anisotropy may be from a thin mantle wedge layer sandwiched between the slab and upper plate. The deepest local S events sample a large volume of dipping slab material and provide increasing evidence for distinct anisotropy within the subducting slab itself that has fast polarizations parallel to the slab strike. Our detailed shear wave splitting study therefore reveals the presence of complex and multi-layered anisotropy across the Peruvian flat-slab region. We are able to characterize different sources of anisotropy in the sub-slab mantle, slab, asthenospheric wedge and the over-riding plate, each with their own implications for the regional subduction dynamics.

  3. Identifying the dynamic characteristics of a dual core-wall and frame building in Chile using aftershocks of the 27 February 2010 (Mw=8.8) Maule, Chile, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Mehmet; Sereci, Mark; Boroschek, Ruben; Carreño, Rodrigo; Bonelli, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    Following the 27 February 2010 (Mw = 8.8) Offshore Maule, Chile earthquake, a temporary, 16-channel, real-time data streaming array was installed in a recently constructed building in Viña del Mar to capture its responses to aftershocks. The cast-in-place, reinforced concrete building is 16 stories high, with 3 additional basement levels, and has dual system comprising multiple structural walls and perimeter frames. This building was not damaged during the main-shock, but other buildings of similar design in Viña del Mar and other parts of Chile were damaged, although none collapsed. Dynamic characteristics of the building identified from the low-amplitude (PGA of about 2 Gal) response recordings of aftershocks are found to compare well with those determined from modal analyses using a design level FEM model. Distinct “major-axes” translational and torsional fundamental frequencies, as well as frequencies of secondary modes, are identified. Evidence of beating is consistently observed in the response data for each earthquake. Results do not match well with U.S. code formulas.

  4. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  5. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  6. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  7. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  8. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  9. Effects of the Transient Blood Flow-Wall Interaction on the Wall Stress Distribution in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rubing; Geindreau, Christian; Lasheras, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Our static finite element analysis (FEA) of both idealized and real clinical models has shown that the maximum diameter and asymmetry have substantial influence on the AAA wall stress distribution. The thrombus inside the AAA was also found to reduce the magnitude of the wall stresses. To achieve a better understanding of the wall stress distribution in real AAAs, a dynamic FEA was also performed. We considered models, both symmetric and non-symmetric, in which the aorta is assumed isotropic with nonlinear material properties. For the limiting case of rigid walls, the evolution of the flow pattern and the wall shear stresses due to fluid flow at different stages of cardiac cycle predicted by our simulations are compared with experimental results obtained in in-vitro models. A good agreement is found between both results. Finally, we have extended the analysis to the physiologically correct case of deformable walls and characterized the transient effects on the wall stresses.

  10. On Real Intrinsic Wall Crossings

    CERN Document Server

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We study moduli space stabilization of a class of BPS configurations from the perspective of the real intrinsic Riemannian geometry. Our analysis exhibits a set of implications towards the stability of the D-term potentials, defined for a set of abelian scalar fields. In particular, we show that the nature of marginal and threshold walls of stabilities may be investigated by real geometric methods. Interestingly, we find that the leading order contributions may easily be accomplished by translations of the Fayet parameter. Specifically, we notice that the various possible linear, planar, hyper-planar and the entire moduli space stabilities may easily be reduced to certain polynomials in the Fayet parameter. For a set of finitely many real scalar fields, it may be further inferred that the intrinsic scalar curvature defines the global nature and range of vacuum correlations. Whereas, the underlying moduli space configuration corresponds to a non-interacting basis at the zeros of the scalar curvature, where the...

  11. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...

  12. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  13. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  14. The role of social capital on trust development and dynamics: Implications for cooperation, monitoring and team performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, A.C.; Bijlsma-Frankema, K.M.; de Jong, B.A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the development and dynamics of trust in project teams and explored the relation with cooperation, monitoring and team performance. Two types of teams were distinguished at the start of the projects: low prior social-capital teams (teams composed of members that have no previous

  15. Implications for anomalous mantle pressure and dynamic topography from lithospheric stress patterns in the North Atlantic Realm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, Søren Bom

    2016-01-01

    -aerial during the time of break-up, two components of dynamic topography seem to have affected the area: a short-lived, which affected a wider area along the rift system and quickly dissipated after break-up, and a more durable in the close vicinity of Iceland. This is consistent with the appearance...

  16. Population dynamics of an invasive forest insect and associated natural enemies in the aftermath of invasion: implications for biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the population dynamics of exotic pests and associated natural enemies is important in developing sound management strategies in invaded forest ecosystems. The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is an invasive phloem-feeding beetle that h...

  17. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...

  18. History-dependent ion transport through conical nanopipettes and the implications in energy conversion dynamics at nanoscale interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Dengchao; Kvetny, Maksim M; Brown, Warren; Liu, Juan; Wang, Gangli

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of ion transport at nanostructured substrate-solution interfaces play vital roles in high-density energy conversion, stochastic chemical sensing and biosensing, membrane separation, nanofluidics and fundamental nanoelectrochemistry. Further advancements in these applications require a fundamental understanding of ion transport at nanoscale interfaces. The understanding of the dynamic or transient transport, and the key physical process involved, is limited, which contrasts sharply with widely studied steady-state ion transport features at atomic and nanometer scale interfaces. Here we report striking time-dependent ion transport characteristics at nanoscale interfaces in current-potential ( I - V ) measurements and theoretical analyses. First, a unique non-zero I - V cross-point and pinched I - V curves are established as signatures to characterize the dynamics of ion transport through individual conical nanopipettes. Second, ion transport against a concentration gradient is regulated by applied and surface electrical fields. The concept of ion pumping or separation is demonstrated via the selective ion transport against concentration gradients through individual nanopipettes. Third, this dynamic ion transport process under a predefined salinity gradient is discussed in the context of nanoscale energy conversion in supercapacitor type charging-discharging, as well as chemical and electrical energy conversion. The analysis of the emerging current-potential features establishes the urgently needed physical foundation for energy conversion employing ordered nanostructures. The elucidated mechanism and established methodology can be generalized into broadly-defined nanoporous materials and devices for improved energy, separation and sensing applications.

  19. Nonparametric modeling of US interest rate term structure dynamics and implications on the prices of derivative securities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, GJ

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a nonparametric model of interest rate term structure dynamics based an a spot rate process that permits only positive interest rates and a market price of interest rate risk that precludes arbitrage opportunities. Both the spot rate process and the market price of interest rate

  20. Population dynamics of calanoid copepods and the implications of their predation by clupeid fish in the Central Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllmann, C.; Köster, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    Population dynamics of major Baltic calanoid copepod species in the Gotland Basin during the last two decades were characterized by a decline of Pseudocalanus elongatus associated with declining salinities, and an increase of Temora longicornis and Acartia spp. potentially due to warmer condition...... temperature-driven increase in the T. longicornis stock, as was observed for Acartia spp., which was not significantly consumed...

  1. Hurricane impacts on a pair of coastal forested watersheds: implications of selective hurricane damage to forest structure and streamflow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.D. Jayakaran; T.M. Williams; H. Ssegane; D.M. Amatya; B. Song; C.C. Trettin

    2014-01-01

    Hurricanes are infrequent but influential disruptors of ecosystem processes in the southeastern Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Every southeastern forested wetland has the potential to be struck by a tropical cyclone. We examined the impact of Hurricane Hugo on two paired coastal South Carolina watersheds in terms of streamflow and vegetation dynamics, both before and after...

  2. Sensitivity of emergent sociohydrologic dynamics to internal system properties and external sociopolitical factors: Implications for water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafei, Y.; Tonts, M.; Sivapalan, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that effective management of water resources requires a holistic understanding of the coevolving dynamics inherent in the coupled human-hydrology system. One of the fundamental information gaps concerns the sensitivity of coupled system feedbacks to various endogenous system properties and exogenous societal contexts. This paper takes a previously calibrated sociohydrology model and applies an idealized implementation, in order to: (i) explore the sensitivity of emergent dynamics resulting from bidirectional feedbacks to assumptions regarding (a) internal system properties that control the internal dynamics of the coupled system and (b) the external sociopolitical context; and (ii) interpret the results within the context of water resource management decision making. The analysis investigates feedback behavior in three ways, (a) via a global sensitivity analysis on key parameters and assessment of relevant model outputs, (b) through a comparative analysis based on hypothetical placement of the catchment along various points on the international sociopolitical gradient, and (c) by assessing the effects of various direct management intervention scenarios. Results indicate the presence of optimum windows that might offer the greatest positive impact per unit of management effort. Results further advocate management tools that encourage an adaptive learning, community-based approach with respect to water management, which are found to enhance centralized policy measures. This paper demonstrates that it is possible to use a place-based sociohydrology model to make abstractions as to the dynamics of bidirectional feedback behavior, and provide insights as to the efficacy of water management tools under different circumstances.

  3. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile eALBENNE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cells walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last ten years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions.

  4. Cell wall heterogeneity in root development of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Somssich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signalling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modelling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes.

  5. The Dynamics of Intra-Family Relationships During Incarceration and the Implications for Children of Incarcerated Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyojong; Woo, Youngki; Lee, Heeuk D; Cochran, John K

    2018-02-01

    The current study examines effects of changes in intra-family relationships after parental incarceration on internalizing behaviors of the children of incarcerated parents. Using data from a sample of 249 incarcerated parents with minor children in South Korea, the present study found that perceived degradation of family relationships among inmate parents, their non-incarcerated spouses, and children was a significant risk factor of internalizing behaviors of children of incarcerated parents. The current study also found that inmate parents who had more frequent family contact were more likely to perceive improvements of all forms of intra-family relationships during incarceration. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. Implications for the agriculture sector of a green economy transition in the Western Cape province of South Africa : a system dynamics modelling approach to food crop production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Niekerk, J. B. S.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Western Cape Provincial government in South Africa has introduced a green economy framework, ‘Green is Smart’, to create a more sustainable economy. This framework stipulates plans for the Western Cape Province to implement more sustainable farming practices for food crop production. While sustainable farming practices will have benefits for the environment, they will also impact food crop production and will require financial investments from stakeholders. To comprehend fully the problem at hand, and to understand better the implications of a green economy transition for the food crop production system, system dynamics modelling was undertaken. The model’s findings highlight that sustainable farming practices will only be financially and environmentally viable if they match the yields of conventional farming practices.

  7. Spatio-temporal dynamics of soil water in a semi-arid Mediterranean ecosystem: implications for plant dynamics and spatial pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Yolanda; Moret-Fernández, David; Arroyo, Antonio I.; de Frutos, Ángel; Saiz, Hugo; Alados, Concepción L.

    2014-05-01

    Soil water presents high temporal and spatial variability in drylands. The temporal variability is determined by the heterogeneous and unpredictable rainfall pattern in these ecosystems. The spatial variability is associated to the well-known "source-sink" eco-hydrological dynamics occurring in drylands, related to the patchy vegetation and bare soil structure with water run-off generated on the bare soil patches and water infiltration preferentially into vegetated areas. These run-off - run-on systems has been extensively studied and the processes involved are well known, including the role of different plant types capturing the water run-on, increasing infiltration and reducing evaporation under plant canopies. However, integrative studies of hydrological and ecological processes in a whole ecosystem during a prolonged time period are scarce, despite the relevance of this approach to understand the role of hydrological processes (and what hydrological process are most important) determining plant dynamics and spatial pattern. We present an eco-hydrological study conducted in a semiarid Mediterranean ecosystem in the Middle Ebro Valley (NE Spain), where soil water content and patterns of plant establishment were followed during 30 months in 4 microsites: open bare areas, under two shrub species (Salsola vermiculata and Artemisia herba-alba) and one perennial grass species (Lygeum spartum). These 4 microsites represent the vast majority of the land in the ecosystem under study. Water infiltration, photosynthetic photon flux and soil temperature were also recorded in the 4 microsites. Simultaneously, seedling establishment and survival were recorded twice per year in the same microsites. Lygeum spartum was the microsite with the largest increment in water infiltration, and with the largest reduction in both solar radiation and soil temperature when compared with the measurement in the open bare areas. However, soil water content after rainfall under the canopy of

  8. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  9. Heterogeneity of O2 dynamics in soil amended with animal manure and implications for greenhouse gas emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Kun; Bruun, Sander; Larsen, Morten Kobæk

    2015-01-01

    in soils in which the same amount of solid fraction of pig manure had been distributed in three different ways (mixed, layered, single patch) and which were maintained at awater potential of 5 kPa (corresponding to 91% of water-filled pore space). In parallel, the greenhouse gas emissions (N2O, CO2 and CH4...... the cumulative N2O emissions and reduced the cumulative CO2 fluxes. The faster the anoxia developed, the less the nitrification process appeared to contribute to N2O emissions. No treatment effects on CH4 emissions were observed. Combined high resolution imaging of O2 dynamics and measurements of N2O emission...... rates are essential to get a detailed understanding of how O2 availability regulates the distribution and coupling of denitrification and nitrification activity in soil. Such unique information on soil O2 dynamics could be used for further modelling and quantification of processes producing greenhouse...

  10. Understanding prostate-specific antigen dynamics in monitoring metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizokami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of novel hormonal therapies as well as docetaxel and cabazitaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC has changed the outlook for this group of patients with improvements in progression-free survival and overall survival. Physicians often diagnose the progression of prostate cancer using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA. However, serum PSA is not always correlated with the clinical status in CRPC. To evaluate the PSA dynamics with greater precision, understanding of the control of PSA and of the mechanisms of development of CRPC is needed. Moreover, it is necessary to use new hormonal therapies with an appropriate timing to optimally improve the prognosis and the QOL of the patients. In the present review, we ascertain the PSA dynamics and the mechanisms of the development of CRPC to assist in optimal utilization of the new treatments for mCRPC.

  11. Dengue Vector Dynamics (Aedes aegypti) Influenced by Climate and Social Factors in Ecuador: Implications for Targeted Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. Methods/Principal findings We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. Conclusions These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish. PMID:24324542

  12. Simulation of Ca2+-activated Cl- current of cardiomyocytes in rabbit pulmonary vein: implications of subsarcolemmal Ca2+ dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Chae Hun; Kim, Won Tae; Ha, Jeong Mi; Lee, Yoon Jin; Seong, Hyeon Chan; Choe, Han; Jang, Yeon Jin; Youm, Jae Boum; Earm, Yung E

    2006-05-15

    In recent studies, we recorded transiently activated outward currents by the application of three-step voltage pulses to induce a reverse mode of Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX). We found that these currents were mediated by a Ca2+-activated Cl- current. Based on the recent reports describing the atrial Ca2+ transients, the Ca2+ transient at the subsarcolemmal space was initiated and then diffused into the cytosolic space. Because the myocardium in the pulmonary vein is an extension of the atrium, the Ca2+-activated Cl- current may reflect the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ dynamics. We tried to predict the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ dynamics by simulating these current traces. According to recent reports on the geometry of atrial myocytes, we assumed that there were three compartments of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR): a network SR, a junctional SR and a central SR. Based on these structures, we also divided the cytosolic space into three compartments: the junctional, subsarcolemmal and cytosolic spaces. Geometry information and cellular capacitance suggested that there were essentially no T-tubules in these cells. The basic physical data, such as the compartmental volumes, the diffusion coefficients and the stability coefficients of the Ca2+ buffers, were obtained from the literature. In the simulation, we incorporated the NCX, the L-type Ca2+ channel, the rapid activating outward rectifier K+ channel, the Na+-K+ pump, the SR Ca2+-pump, the ryanodine receptor, the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel and the dynamics of Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-. In these conditions, we could successfully reconstruct the Ca2+-activated Cl- currents. The simulation allowed estimation of the Ca2+ dynamics of each compartment and the distribution of the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel and the NCX in the sarcolemma on the junctional or subsarcolemmal space.

  13. The Application of Dynamic Capabilities in E-commerce Innovation Context : The Implications for Chinese E-commerce companies

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, YongJia; Liang, WeiMin

    2007-01-01

    This study mainly investigated how Chinese E-commerce companies should cope with E-commerce innovation with specific dynamic capabilities. E-commerce (Electronic Commerce) innovation includes three phases of innovation based on technology and time. They are web-based commerce, mobile commerce (M-commerce) and ubiquitous commerce (U-commerce). They caused not only technological changes but also organizational changes. To cope with E-commerce innovation, a prerequisite is to understand the impa...

  14. Block-and-fault dynamics modelling of the Himalayan frontal arc: Implications for seismic cycle, slip deficit, and great earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobieva, Inessa; Mandal, Prantik; Gorshkov, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    A numerical block-and-fault dynamics model (BAFD) of the Himalayan frontal arc, India is developed to understand the long-term patterns of strain accumulation and occurrences of great earthquakes in the Himalaya. The morphostructural scheme outlines twelve major crustal blocks, and external driving motions are prescribed using GPS data. The BAFD model reproduces essential features of the geodynamics and seismicity of the Himalayan frontal arc. The locations of the large synthetic earthquakes and their maximum magnitudes are consistent with the information available from the instrumental and historical earthquake catalogues. We model the evolution of the slip deficit and seismic cycles for different sections across the Himalaya frontal arc. The modelled seismic cycles are found to be varying from 700 to 2100 years and are in good agreement with the return periods estimates from the recent paleoseismological studies. We notice that the accumulation of the slip deficit depends not only on the rate of shortening, rheology and structure but also on the dynamics of the confining crustal blocks. Further, we observe that tectonic motions of the Shillong plateau and Assam basin microplates play a significant role in controlling the seismicity patterns of the Bhutan block, which resulted in the decreased seismic activity, and increased rate of aseismic displacement. Thus, we infer that the regional seismicity patterns are a consequence of dynamics of the entire regional fault-and-block system rather than dynamics of individual fault. Our BAFD modelling predicts the maximum earthquake hazard associated with future large/great earthquakes for the central Himalayan gap region, which lies between the 1905 Kangra and the 2015 Gorkha earthquake ruptures, but relatively less hazard in Kashmir and Assam.

  15. Dengue vector dynamics (Aedes aegypti influenced by climate and social factors in Ecuador: implications for targeted control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Stewart Ibarra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011, conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in

  16. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  17. Comment on ``Dynamical Implications of Block Averaging'' by G. Treviño and E.L Andreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Richard M.

    2008-05-01

    A 2006 article in Boundary-Layer Meteorology by G. Treviño and E.L Andreas presents a derivation that questions the use of time averaging for computing turbulence statistics. Their derivation shows that time averaging over a finite interval always leads to a zero integral time scale. As a result, Treviño and Andreas argue that any turbulence quantities derived from time averaging are tainted and incompatible with the Navier Stokes equations. While Treviño and Andreas are correct that time averaging does produce integral scales that are quite different from what researchers commonly expect, this comment demonstrates that the theoretical implications are not as dire as they claim.

  18. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...... wall shear stress of 3 Pa for the standardised EHEDG cleaning test method. The cleaning tests were performed on a test disc placed in a radial flowcell assay. Turbulent flow conditions were generated and the corresponding wall shear stresses were predicted from CFD simulations. Combining wall shear...... stress predictions from a simulation using the low Re k-epsilon and one using the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds were found to produce reliable predictions compared to empirical solutions for the ideal flow case. The comparison of wall shear stress curves predicted for the real RFC...

  19. Crawling at High Speeds: Steady Level Locomotion in the Spider Cupiennius salei-Global Kinematics and Implications for Centre of Mass Dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Weihmann

    Full Text Available Spiders are an old yet very successful predatory group of arthropods. Their locomotor system differs from those of most other arthropods by the lack of extensor muscles in two major leg joints. Though specific functional characteristics can be expected regarding the locomotion dynamics of spiders, this aspect of movement physiology has been only scarcely examined so far. This study presents extensive analyses of a large dataset concerning global kinematics and the implications for dynamics of adult female specimens of the large Central American spider Cupiennius salei (Keyserling. The experiments covered the entire speed-range of straight runs at constant speeds. The analyses revealed specific characteristics of velocity dependent changes in the movements of the individual legs, as well as in the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of both the centre of mass and the body. In contrast to many other fast moving arthropods, C. salei avoid vertical fluctuations of their centre of mass during fast locomotion. Accordingly, aerial phases were not observed here. This behaviour is most likely a consequence of optimising energy expenditure with regard to the specific requirements of spiders' leg anatomy. A strong synchronisation of two alternating sets of legs appears to play only a minor role in the locomotion of large spiders. Reduced frequency and low centre of mass amplitudes as well as low angular changes of the body axes, in turn, seems to be the result of relatively low leg coordination.

  20. High Affinity vs. Native Fibronectin in the Modulation of αvβ3 Integrin Conformational Dynamics: Insights from Computational Analyses and Implications for Molecular Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Paladino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how binding events modulate functional motions of multidomain proteins is a major issue in chemical biology. We address several aspects of this problem by analyzing the differential dynamics of αvβ3 integrin bound to wild type (wtFN10, agonist or high affinity (hFN10, antagonist mutants of fibronectin. We compare the dynamics of complexes from large-scale domain motions to inter-residue coordinated fluctuations to characterize the distinctive traits of conformational evolution and shed light on the determinants of differential αvβ3 activation induced by different FN sequences. We propose an allosteric model for ligand-based integrin modulation: the conserved integrin binding pocket anchors the ligand, while different residues on the two FN10's act as the drivers that reorganize relevant interaction networks, guiding the shift towards inactive (hFN10-bound or active states (wtFN10-bound. We discuss the implications of results for the design of integrin inhibitors.

  1. Kinetic suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by griseofulvin: Implications for its possible use in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dulal; Rathinasamy, K.; Santra, Manas K.; Wilson, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    The antifungal drug griseofulvin inhibits mitosis strongly in fungal cells and weakly in mammalian cells by affecting mitotic spindle microtubule (MT) function. Griseofulvin also blocks cell-cycle progression at G2/M and induces apoptosis in human tumor cell lines. Despite extensive study, the mechanism by which the drug inhibits mitosis in human cells remains unclear. Here, we analyzed the ability of griseofulvin to inhibit cell proliferation and mitosis and to affect MT polymerization and organization in HeLa cells together with its ability to affect MT polymerization and dynamic instability in vitro. Griseofulvin inhibited cell-cycle progression at prometaphase/anaphase of mitosis in parallel with its ability to inhibit cell proliferation. At its mitotic IC50 of 20 μM, spindles in blocked cells displayed nearly normal quantities of MTs and MT organization similar to spindles blocked by more powerful MT-targeted drugs. Similar to previously published data, we found that very high concentrations of griseofulvin (>100 μM) were required to inhibit MT polymerization in vitro. However, much lower drug concentrations (1–20 μM) strongly suppressed the dynamic instability behavior of the MTs. We suggest that the primary mechanism by which griseofulvin inhibits mitosis in human cells is by suppressing spindle MT dynamics in a manner qualitatively similar to that of much more powerful antimitotic drugs, including the vinca alkaloids and the taxanes. In view of griseofulvin's lack of significant toxicity in humans, we further suggest that it could be useful as an adjuvant in combination with more powerful drugs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:15985553

  2. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  3. Bias correction in Global Mean Temperature comparisons between Global Climate Models and implications for the deterministic and stochastic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sandra; Stainforth, David; Watkins, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Global mean temperature (GMT) provides a simple means of benchmarking a broad ensemble of global climate models (GCMs) against past observed GMT which in turn provide headline assessments of the consequences of possible future forcing scenarios. The slow variations of past changes in GMT seen in different GCMs track each other [1] and the observed GMT reasonably closely. However, the different GCMs tend to generate GMT time-series which have absolute values that are offset with respect to each other [2]. Subtracting these offsets is an integral part of comparisons between ensembles of GCMs and observed past GMT. We will discuss how this constrains how the GCMs are related to each other. The GMT of a given GCM is a macroscopic reduced variable that tracks a subset of the full information contained in the time evolving solution of that GCM. If the GMT slow timescale dynamics of different GCMs is to a good approximation the same, subject to a linear translation, then the phenomenology captured by this dynamics is essentially linear; any feedback is to leading order linear in GMT. It then follows that a linear energy balance evolution equation for GMT is sufficient to reproduce the slow timescale GMT dynamics, provided that the appropriate effective heat capacity and feedback parameters are known. As a consequence, the GCM's GMT timeseries may underestimate the impact of, and uncertainty in, the outcomes of future forcing scenarios. The offset subtraction procedure identifies a slow time-scale dynamics in model generated GMT. Fluctuations on much faster timescales do not typically track each other from one GCM to another, with the exception of major forcing events such as volcanic eruptions. This suggests that the GMT time-series can be decomposed into a slow and fast timescale which naturally leads to stochastic reduced energy balance models for GMT. [1] IPCC Chapter 9 P743 and fig 9.8,IPCC TS.1 [2] see e.g. [Mauritsen et al., Tuning the Climate of a Global Model

  4. Internal Migration, Regional Labour Market Dynamics and Implications for German East-West Disparities – Results from a Panel VAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alecke, Björn; Mitze, Timo; Untiedt, Gerhard

    This paper analyses the causal linkages between regional labour market variables and internal migration flows among German states between 1991–2006. We adopt a Panel VAR approach to identify the feedback effects among the variables and analyse the dynamic properties of the system through...... impulseresponse functions.We also use the model to track the evolution of the particular East-West migration since re-unification aiming to shed more light on the East German “empirical puzzle”, characterized by lower migration responses than expected from the regional labour market position relative to the West......, this supports the view of “repressed” migration flows for that period....

  5. Creating universes with thick walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, Andrew; Albrecht, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a “thick wall”, which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the “Farhi-Guth-Guven” (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  6. Relation between wall shear stress and carotid artery wall thickening MRI versus CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cibis, Merih; Potters, Wouter V.; Selwaness, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS), a parameter associated with endothelial function, is calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or phase-contrast (PC) MRI measurements. Although CFD is common in WSS (WSSCFD) calculations, PC-MRI-based WSS (WSSMRI) is more favorable in population studies; since it ...

  7. Investigation of Stability Alarming for Retaining Wall Structures with Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To warn of the stability of retaining wall structures with damage, a simplified mechanical model and a finite element model of this retaining wall-soil coupling system are established. Via finite element model updating, a baseline finite element model of the wall-soil system is acquired. A damage alarming index ERSD (Energy Ratio Standard Deviation is proposed via the wavelet packet analysis of a virtual impulse response function of dynamic responses to this baseline finite element model. The internal relationships among the alarming index, earth pressure, and damage stability of the wall are analyzed. Then, a damage stability alarming method for the retaining walls is advanced. To verify the feasibility and validity of this alarming method, vibration tests on the baseline finite element model of a pile plate retaining wall are performed. The ERSD is used as an alarm for the damage stability of the wall. Analysis results show that, with an increase in the ERSD, the stability of the wall changes from a stable state to an unstable one. The wall reaches a critical stable state when the alarming index reaches its threshold value. Thus, the damage stability of this pile plate retaining wall can be alarmed via ERSD.

  8. Dynamics of Metal Partitioning at the Cell-Solution Interface: Implications for Toxicity Assessment under Growth-Inhibiting Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Paquet, Nathalie; Lavoie, Michel; Fortin, Claude

    2015-06-02

    Metal toxicity toward microorganisms is usually evaluated by determining growth inhibition. To achieve a mechanistic interpretation of such toxic effects, the intricate coupling between cell growth kinetics and metal partitioning dynamics at the cell-solution interface over time must be considered on a quantitative level. A formalism is elaborated to evaluate cell-surface-bound, internalized, and extracellular metal fractions in the limit where metal uptake kinetics is controlled by internalization under noncomplexing medium conditions. Cell growth kinetics is tackled using the continuous logistic equation modified to include growth inhibition by metal accumulation to intracellular or cell surface sites. The theory further includes metal-proton competition for adsorption at cell-surface binding sites, as well as possible variation of cell size during exposure to metal ions. The formalism elucidates the dramatic impacts of initial cell concentration on metal bioavailability and toxicity over time, in agreement with reported algae bioassays. It further highlights that appropriate definition of toxicity endpoints requires careful inspection of the ratio between exposure time scale and time scale of metal depletion from bulk solution. The latter depends on metal internalization-excretion rate constants, microorganism growth, and the extent of metal adsorption on nonspecific, transporter, and growth inhibitory sites. As an application of the theory, Cd toxicity in the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata is interpreted from constrained modeling of cell growth kinetics and of interfacial Cd-partitioning dynamics measured under various exposure conditions.

  9. Nutrient sources and dynamics in a mediterranean fluvial regime (Ebro river, NE Spain) and their implications for water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla, Néstor J.; Galve, Jorge P.; Zaera, Lidia G.; Retamar, Javier F.; Álvarez, Alejandro N. A.

    2005-03-01

    Nonpoint source and point source nutrient loads (N, PO 4-P, COD) to the Ebro River in its central sector were estimated using hydrogeological and socioeconomical data. Their impacts on eutrophication and nutrient dynamics in the river were analyzed through a review of the public administration's historical data and the interpretation of two sampling profiles in September 02 (low flows season) and April 03 (high flows season). A marked seasonality was found in nutrient concentrations, nutrient loads and eutrophication indicators (O 2, Turbidity), appearing symptoms of eutrophication during the summer related to both NPS and PS Nutrient loads within the study area. Agricultural NPS account for 64% of NO 3 loads generated within the study area while urban and industrial PS are responsible of 88% PO 4-P and 71% COD loads. Biological reactions within the river ecosystem (including denitrification in the most eutrophic branches) were found to be a key factor in nutrient content and dynamics. Improvements in urban and industrial wastewater treatment facilities, land use planning and restoration of river-side wetlands, seem to be adequate policies for the improvement of the nutrient water quality in the studied sector of the Ebro River. Flow and temperature seasonality related to Mediterranean fluvial regime imposes significant limitations to nutrient PS in order to accomplish the combined approach proposed in European Water Framework Directive (WFD), based upon Emission Limit Values (ELV) and Environmental Quality Standards (EQS).

  10. IMPLICATIONS OF SPATIAL AND RELATIONAL RECONFIGURATION ON THE DYNAMICS OF THE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE IN THE AUTO SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian-Ovidiu CINADE

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As an impact factor of the competitive advantage dynamics, relocation is, basically, an outcome of concentration or dispersion on the location, in the business chain, of such as car-building companies, components suppliers and distributors. Proximity and low labor costs in developing countries are the basic factors considered by both the car assemblers and the components suppliers. The approach of spatial focusing needs a two relational plans analysis: on the one hand of the reports between component builders and suppliers and on the other hand of the reports amongst various automobile builders which benefit from the same productive location. This article focuses on the determination of the role of relational and spatial configuration amongst several automobile assemblers in generating the competitive advantage of the auto sector. For such purpose, we needed to observe a coenterprise which manufactures the models of different brands. The competition report amongst several builders as in case of co-enterprise TPCA from Kolín, Czech Republic has the following effect: flexibility of production, increase of feedback capacity to the dynamics of the market and the benefitting from the same workforce basin.

  11. Dynamical Properties of Eccentric Nuclear Disks: Stability, Longevity, and Implications for Tidal Disruption Rates in Post-merger Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Ann-Marie; Halle, Andrew; Moody, Mackenzie; McCourt, Michael; Nixon, Chris; Wernke, Heather

    2018-02-01

    In some galaxies, the stars orbiting the supermassive black hole take the form of an eccentric nuclear disk, in which every star is on a coherent, apsidally aligned orbit. The most famous example of an eccentric nuclear disk is the double nucleus of Andromeda, and there is strong evidence for many more in the local universe. Despite their apparent ubiquity, however, a dynamical explanation for their longevity has remained a mystery: differential precession should wipe out large-scale apsidal-alignment on a short timescale. Here we identify a new dynamical mechanism which stabilizes eccentric nuclear disks, and explain for the first time the negative eccentricity gradient seen in the Andromeda nucleus. The stabilizing mechanism drives oscillations of the eccentricity vectors of individual orbits, both in direction (about the mean body of the disk) and in magnitude. Combined with the negative eccentricity gradient, the eccentricity oscillations push some stars near the inner edge of the disk extremely close to the black hole, potentially leading to tidal disruption events (TDEs). Order of magnitude calculations predict extremely high rates in recently formed eccentric nuclear disks (∼0.1–1 {{yr}}-1 {{gal}}-1). Unless the stellar disks are replenished, these rates should decrease with time as the disk depletes in mass. If eccentric nuclear disks form during gas-rich major mergers, this may explain the preferential occurrence of TDEs in recently merged and post-merger (E+A/K+A) galaxies.

  12. Effects of the 2006 El Nino on Tropospheric Ozone and Carbon Monoxide: Implications for Dynamics and Biomass Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, S.; Ziemke, J. R.; Duncan, B. N.; Diehl, t. L.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the 2006 El Nino on tropospheric O3 and CO at tropical and sub-tropical latitudes measured from the OMI and MLS instruments on the Aura satellite. The 2006 El Nino-induced drought allowed forest fires set to clear land to burn out of control during October and November in the Indonesian region. The effects of these fires are clearly seen in the enhancement of GO concentration measured from the MLS instrument. We have used a global model of atmospheric chemistry and transport (GMI CTM) to quantify the relative irrrportance of biomass burning and large scale transport: in producing observed changes in tropospheric O3 and CO . The model results show that during October and November both biomass burning and meteorological changes contributed almost equally to the observed increase in tropospheric O3 in the Indonesian region. The biomass component was 4-6 DU but it was limited to the Indonesian region where the fires were most intense, The dynamical component was 4-8 DU but it covered a much larger area in the Indian Ocean extending from South East Asia in the north to western Australia in the south. By December 2006, the effect of biomass taming was reduced to zero and the obsemed changes in tropospheric O3 were mostly due to dynamical effects. The model results show an increase of 2-3% in the global burden of tropospheric ozone. In comparison, the global burdean of CO increased by 8-12%.

  13. Dynamical Orientation of Large Molecules on Oxide Surfaces and its Implications for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-11-12

    A dual experimental-computational approach utilizing near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) is presented for determining the orientation of a large adsorbate on an oxide substrate. A system of interest in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells is studied: an organic cyanoacrylic acid-based donor-π-acceptor dye (WN1) bound to anatase TiO2. Assessment of nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS spectra is supported by calculations of the electronic structure that indicate energetically discrete transitions associated with the two π systems of the C-N triple bond in the cyanoacrylic acid portion of the dye. Angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra are fitted to determine the orientation of these two orbital systems, and the results indicate an upright orientation of the adsorbed dye, 63 from the TiO2 surface plane. These experimental results are then compared to computational studies of the WN1 dye on an anatase (101) TiO2 slab. The ground state structure obtained from standard DFT optimization is less upright (45 from the surface) than the NEXAFS results. However, DFT-MD simulations, which provide a more realistic depiction of the dye at room temperature, exhibit excellent agreement - within 2 on average - with the angles determined via NEXAFS, demonstrating the importance of accounting for the dynamic nature of adsorbate-substrate interactions and DFT-MD\\'s powerful predictive abilities. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  14. A hydrophobic patch surrounding Trp154 in human neuroserpin controls the helix F dynamics with implications in inhibition and aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad Farhan; Kaushik, Abhinav; Kapil, Charu; Gupta, Dinesh; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2017-02-01

    Neuroserpin (NS) mediated inhibition of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is important for brain development, synapse formation and memory. Aberrations in helix F and β-sheet A movement during inhibition can directly lead to epilepsy or dementia. Conserved W154 residue in a hydrophobic patch between helix F and β-sheet A is ideally placed to control their movement during inhibition. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation on wild type (WT) NS and its two variants (W154A and W154P) demonstrated partial deformation in helix F and conformational differences in strands 1A and 2A only in W154P. A fluorescence and Circular Dichroism (CD) analysis with purified W154 variants revealed a significant red-shift and an increase in α-helical content in W154P as compared to W154A and WT NS. Kinetics of tPA inhibition showed a decline in association rates (ka) for W154A as compared to WT NS with indication of complex formation. Appearance of cleaved without complex formation in W154P indicates that the variant acts as substrate due to conformational misfolding around helix F. Both the variants however showed increased rate of aggregation as compared to WT NS. The hydrophobic patch identified in this study may have importance in helix F dynamics of NS.

  15. Silver nanoparticles uptake by salt marsh plants - Implications for phytoremediation processes and effects in microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Joana P; Mucha, Ana P; Francisco, Telmo; Gomes, Carlos Rocha; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2017-06-15

    This study investigated the uptake of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by a salt marsh plant, Phragmites australis, as well as AgNPs effects on rhizospheric microbial community, evaluating the implications for phytoremediation processes. Experiments were carried out with elutriate solution doped with Ag, either in ionic form or in NP form. Metal uptake was evaluated in plant tissues, elutriate solutions and sediments (by AAS) and microbial community was characterized in terms of bacterial community structure (evaluated by ARISA). Results showed Ag accumulation but only in plant belowground tissues and only in the absence of rhizosediment, the presence of sediment reducing Ag availability. But in plant roots Ag accumulation was higher when Ag was in NP form. Multivariate analysis of ARISA profiles showed significant effect of the absence/presence of Ag either in ionic or NP form on microbial community structure, although without significant differences among bacterial richness and diversity. Overall, P. australis can be useful for phytoremediation of medium contaminated with Ag, including with AgNPs. However, the presence of Ag in either forms affected the microbial community structure, which may cause disturbances in ecosystems function and compromise phytoremediation processes. Such considerations need to be address regarding environmental management strategies applied to the very important estuarine areas. The form in which the metal was added affected metal uptake by Phragmites australis and rhizosediment microbial community structure, which can affect phytoremediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Perivascular adipose tissue and the dynamic regulation of Kv 7 and Kir channels: Implications to resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Maik; Welsh, Donald G; Schubert, Rudolf

    2017-12-06

    Resistant hypertension is defined as high blood pressure that remains uncontrolled despite treatment with at least three antihypertensive drugs at adequate doses. Resistant hypertension is an increasingly common clinical problem in older age, obesity, diabetes, sleep apnea, and chronic kidney disease. Although the direct vasodilator minoxidil was introduced in the early 1970s, only recently has this drug been shown to be particularly effective in a subgroup of patients with treatment-resistant or uncontrolled hypertension. This pharmacological approach is interesting from a mechanistic perspective since minoxidil is the only clinically used K+ channel opener today, which targets a subclass of K+ channels, namely KATP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Beside KATP channels, two other classes of VSMC K+ channels could represent novel effective targets for treatment of resistant hypertension, namely Kv 7 (KCNQ) and inward rectifier potassium (Kir 2.1) channels. Interestingly, these channels are unique among VSMC potassium channels. First, both have been implicated in the control of microvascular tone by perivascular adipose tissue. Second, they exhibit biophysical properties strongly controlled and regulated by membrane voltage, but not intracellular calcium. This review focuses on Kv 7 (Kv 7.1-5) and Kir (Kir 2.1) channels in VSMCs as potential novel drug targets for treatment of resistant hypertension, particularly in comorbid conditions such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhythm and Time in Music Epitomize the Temporal Dynamics of Human Communicative Behavior: The Broad Implications of London's Trinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Keller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Three key issues about rhythm and timing in music are drawn to the attention of linguists in a paper by London (2012. In this commentary, I argue that these issues are relevant not only to linguists, but also to those in any field dealing with the temporal dynamics of human communicative behavior. Thus, the distinction between endogenously and exogenously driven mechanisms of perceptual organization, the active nature of perception, and the presence of multiple time scales are topics that also concern experimental psychologists and cognitive neuroscientists. London’s argument that these three issues play a crucial role in the perception of rhythm and timing implies that they should be considered collectively when attempting to understand diverse communicative acts.

  18. Quantifying geomorphic controls on riparian forest dynamics using a linked physical-biological model: implications for river corridor conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, J. C.; Harper, E. B.; Fremier, A. K.; Hayden, M. K.; Battles, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    In high-order alluvial river systems, physical factors of flooding and channel migration are particularly important drivers of riparian forest dynamics because they regulate habitat creation, resource fluxes of water, nutrients and light that are critical for growth, and mortality from fluvial disturbance. Predicting vegetation composition and dynamics at individual sites in this setting is challenging, both because of the stochastic nature of the flood regime and the spatial variability of flood events. Ecological models that correlate environmental factors with species’ occurrence and abundance (e.g., ’niche models’) often work well in infrequently-disturbed upland habitats, but are less useful in river corridors and other dynamic zones where environmental conditions fluctuate greatly and selection pressures on disturbance-adapted organisms are complex. In an effort to help conserve critical riparian forest habitat along the middle Sacramento River, CA, we are taking a mechanistic approach to quantify linkages between fluvial and biotic processes for Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii), a keystone pioneer tree in dryland rivers ecosystems of the U.S. Southwest. To predict the corridor-wide population effects of projected changes to the disturbance regime from flow regulation, climate change, and landscape modifications, we have coupled a physical model of channel meandering with a patch-based population model that incorporates the climatic, hydrologic, and topographic factors critical for tree recruitment and survival. We employed these linked simulations to study the relative influence of the two most critical habitat types--point bars and abandoned channels--in sustaining the corridor-wide cottonwood population over a 175-year period. The physical model uses discharge data and channel planform to predict the spatial distribution of new habitat patches; the population model runs on top of this physical template to track tree colonization and survival on

  19. Dynamics of defensive reactivity in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia: implications for the etiology of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jan; Hamm, Alfons O; Pané-Farré, Christiane A; Gerlach, Alexander L; Gloster, Andrew T; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lang, Thomas; Alpers, Georg W; Helbig-Lang, Sylvia; Deckert, Jürgen; Fydrich, Thomas; Fehm, Lydia; Ströhle, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Arolt, Volker

    2012-09-15

    The learning perspective of panic disorder distinguishes between acute panic and anxious apprehension as distinct emotional states. Following animal models, these clinical entities reflect different stages of defensive reactivity depending upon the imminence of interoceptive or exteroceptive threat cues. The current study tested this model by investigating the dynamics of defensive reactivity in a large group of patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia (PD/AG). Three hundred forty-five PD/AG patients participated in a standardized behavioral avoidance test (being entrapped in a small, dark chamber for 10 minutes). Defense reactivity was assessed measuring avoidance and escape behavior, self-reports of anxiety and panic symptoms, autonomic arousal (heart rate and skin conductance), and potentiation of the startle reflex before and during exposure of the behavioral avoidance test. Panic disorder and agoraphobia patients differed substantially in their defensive reactivity. While 31.6% of the patients showed strong anxious apprehension during this task (as indexed by increased reports of anxiety, elevated physiological arousal, and startle potentiation), 20.9% of the patients escaped from the test chamber. Active escape was initiated at the peak of the autonomic surge accompanied by an inhibition of the startle response as predicted by the animal model. These physiological responses resembled the pattern observed during the 34 reported panic attacks. We found evidence that defensive reactivity in PD/AG patients is dynamically organized ranging from anxious apprehension to panic with increasing proximity of interoceptive threat. These data support the learning perspective of panic disorder. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Seasonal Population Dynamics of Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) in Kudzu and Soybean, and Implication for Insecticidal Management in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, J L; Roberts, P M; Toews, M D; Gardner, W A; Buntin, G D; Davis, J W; All, J N

    2017-02-01

    Megacopta cribraria (F.), an invasive species introduced from Asia in 2009, is now prolific in the southeastern United States. Megacopta cribraria develops primarily on kudzu and soybean completing two generations. It is not well understood how this economic pest is affected by changes in geographic distribution in the United States or how population levels have changed since its establishment. The effect of insecticide application timing on field populations of M. cribraria is not well documented. These studies seek to understand how population dynamics of M. cribraria vary with geographic regions in Georgia. Effect of application timing on populations throughout the growing season was also examined. Weekly from 2012 to 2013, all life stages were enumerated from kudzu and soybean environments at several locations throughout Georgia from sweeps samples and flight intercept captures. Coordinates were recorded for locations, and classified as belonging to the Piedmont or Coastal Plain region of the state. Single spray trials were conducted from 2011-2014, and applications were made to soybean at intervals throughout the season. From 2012 to 2015, two kudzu patches near Griffin, GA, were monitored to detect population changes. Differences in population dynamics from locations around the state were found, but no clear effect of latitude, longitude, or region was observed. Insecticide applications applied in July suppressed nymph populations significantly better than treatments made earlier or later. Megacopta cribraria populations declined in 2014 and 2015 compared with 2012 and 2013. These studies provide the critical information for M. cribraria management in soybean in the southeastern United States. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Insight into the structure, dynamics and the unfolding property of amylosucrases: implications of rational engineering on thermostability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    Full Text Available Amylosucrase (AS is a kind of glucosyltransferases (E.C. 2.4.1.4 belonging to the Glycoside Hydrolase (GH Family 13. In the presence of an activator polymer, in vitro, AS is able to catalyze the synthesis of an amylose-like polysaccharide composed of only α-1,4-linkages using sucrose as the only energy source. Unlike AS, other enzymes responsible for the synthesis of such amylose-like polymers require the addition of expensive nucleotide-activated sugars. These properties make AS an interesting enzyme for industrial applications. In this work, the structures and topology of the two AS were thoroughly investigated for the sake of explaining the reason why Deinococcus geothermalis amylosucrase (DgAS is more stable than Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase (NpAS. Based on our results, there are two main factors that contribute to the superior thermostability of DgAS. On the one hand, DgAS holds some good structural features that may make positive contributions to the thermostability. On the other hand, the contacts among residues of DgAS are thought to be topologically more compact than those of NpAS. Furthermore, the dynamics and unfolding properties of the two AS were also explored by the gauss network model (GNM and the anisotropic network model (ANM. According to the results of GNM and ANM, we have found that the two AS could exhibit a shear-like motion, which is probably associated with their functions. What is more, with the discovery of the unfolding pathway of the two AS, we can focus on the weak regions, and hence designing more appropriate mutations for the sake of thermostability engineering. Taking the results on structure, dynamics and unfolding properties of the two AS into consideration, we have predicted some novel mutants whose thermostability is possibly elevated, and hopefully these discoveries can be used as guides for our future work on rational design.

  2. An assessment of the fine sediment dynamics in an upland river system: INCA-Sed modifications and implications for fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Attila N; Butterfield, Dan; Futter, Martyn N; Rankinen, Katri; Thouvenot-Korppoo, Marie; Jarritt, Nick; Lawrence, Deborah S L; Wade, Andrew J; Whitehead, Paul G

    2010-05-15

    There is a need for better links between hydrology and ecology, specifically between landscapes and riverscapes to understand how processes and factors controlling the transport and storage of environmental pollution have affected or will affect the freshwater biota. Here we show how the INCA modelling framework, specifically INCA-Sed (the Integrated Catchments model for Sediments) can be used to link sediment delivery from the landscape to sediment changes in-stream. INCA-Sed is a dynamic, process-based, daily time step model. The first complete description of the equations used in the INCA-Sed software (version 1.9.11) is presented. This is followed by an application of INCA-Sed made to the River Lugg (1077 km(2)) in Wales. Excess suspended sediment can negatively affect salmonid health. The Lugg has a large and potentially threatened population of both Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Brown Trout (Salmo trutta). With the exception of the extreme sediment transport processes, the model satisfactorily simulated both the hydrology and the sediment dynamics in the catchment. Model results indicate that diffuse soil loss is the most important sediment generation process in the catchment. In the River Lugg, the mean annual Guideline Standard for suspended sediment concentration, proposed by UKTAG, of 25 mg l(-1) is only slightly exceeded during the simulation period (1995-2000), indicating only minimal effect on the Atlantic salmon population. However, the daily time step simulation of INCA-Sed also allows the investigation of the critical spawning period. It shows that the sediment may have a significant negative effect on the fish population in years with high sediment runoff. It is proposed that the fine settled particles probably do not affect the salmonid egg incubation process, though suspended particles may damage the gills of fish and make the area unfavourable for spawning if the conditions do not improve. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Projections of 21st Century African Climate: Implications for African Savanna Fire Dynamics, Human Health and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    Fire is a key agent of change in the African savannas, which are shaped through the complex interactions between trees, C4 grasses, rainfall, temperature, CO2 and fire. These fires and their emitted smoke can have numerous direct and indirect effects on the environment, water resources, air quality, and climate. For instance, veld fires in southern Africa cause large financial losses to agriculture, livestock production and forestry on an annual basis. This study contributes to our understanding of the implications of projected surface temperature evolution in Africa for fire risk, human health and agriculture over the coming decades. We use an ensemble of high-resolution regional climate model simulations of African climate for the 21st century. Regional dowscalings and recent global circulation model projections obtained for Africa indicate that African temperatures are likely to rise at 1.5 times the global rate of temperature increase in the tropics, and at almost twice the global rate of increase in the subtropics. Warming is projected to occur during the 21st century, with increases of 4-6 °C over the subtropics and 3-5 °C over the tropics plausible by the end of the century relative to present-day climate under the A2 (low mitigation) scenario. We explore the significance of the projected warming by documenting increases in projected high fire danger days and heat-wave days. General drying is projected across the continent, even for areas (e.g. tropical Africa) where an increase in rainfall is plausible. This is due to the drastic increases in temperature that are projected, which leads to drier soils (through enhanced evaporation) despite the rainfall increases. This will likely impact negatively on crop yield, particularly on the maize crop that is of crucial importance in terms of African food security.

  4. The c.2030 yr BP Plinian eruption of El Misti volcano, Peru: Eruption dynamics and hazard implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobeñas, Gisela; Thouret, Jean-Claude; Bonadonna, Costanza; Boivin, Pierre

    2012-10-01

    'El Misti' volcano near the city of Arequipa in south Peru produced a Plinian eruption c.2030 yr BP that resulted in a tephra deposit consisting of three fallout layers, several pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposits, a late stage, small debris-avalanche deposit, and lahar deposits. This VEI 4 Plinian eruption of El Misti has been selected as one of the reference eruptions for the hazard assessment and risk mitigation plan for the city of Arequipa. The Plinian column of this eruption rose up to 21-24 km and produced a tephra deposit over an area of at least 2580 km2 within the 5 cm-isopach line. The dispersal axis is oriented SW, i.e. towards the area of the basin and city of Arequipa. Later pumice- and lithic-rich PDC deposits were emplaced into radial valleys extending from the volcano up to a distance of at least 13 km. The eruption produced a minimum total bulk volume of 1.2 km3 (0.71 km3 DRE volume) of tephra and PDC deposits. Components of the tephra deposit consist of beige, gray and banded pumices, lithic fragments, a minor amount of cogenetic dacite clasts, and free crystals. The minimum volume of the tephra deposit varies between 0.2 and 0.6 km3 (exponential, power-law integration and inversion of TEPHRA2 analytical model). The tephra deposit is characterized by a bulk density of 1500 kg/m3 which results in a mass of 2.5-9.0 × 1011 kg. The maximum mass discharge rate (MDR) is 1.1 × 108 kg/s based on a plume height of 24 km. The estimated duration of the Plinian eruption ranges between 0.6 and 2.3 h. Grain size distribution, componentry, and SEM analyses of both the tephra and PDC deposits, combined with the reconstructed stratigraphic sequence of the deposit, suggest that the eruption took place in five stages: (1) generation of a 21-24 km-high eruptive column that deposited the lower tephra layer; (2) collapse of the crater walls and partial obstruction of the vent during a period of decreased intensity, which led to the formation of a thin sand

  5. Hydrogen retention in lithium on metallic walls from “in vacuo” analysis in LTX and implications for high-Z plasma-facing components in NSTX-U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaita, R., E-mail: kaita@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Lucia, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Allain, J.P.; Bedoya, F. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, & Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Bell, R.; Boyle, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Capece, A. [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ (United States); Jaworski, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Koel, B.E. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Roszell, J. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Schmitt, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Skinner, C.H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Soukhanovskii, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    The application of lithium to plasma-facing components (PFCs) has long been used as a technique for wall conditioning in magnetic confinement devices to improve plasma performance. Determining the characteristics of PFCs at the time of exposure to the plasma, however, is difficult because they can only be analyzed after venting the vacuum vessel and removing them at the end of an operational period. The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) addresses this problem by enabling PFC samples to be exposed to plasmas, and then withdrawn into an analysis chamber without breaking vacuum. The MAPP system was used to introduce samples that matched the metallic PFCs of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX). Lithium that was subsequently evaporated onto the walls also covered the MAPP samples, which were then subject to LTX discharges. In vacuo extraction and analysis of the samples indicated that lithium oxide formed on the PFCs, but improved plasma performance persisted in LTX. The reduced recycling this suggests is consistent with separate surface science experiments that demonstrated deuterium retention in the presence of lithium oxide films. Since oxygen decreases the thermal stability of the deuterium in the film, the release of deuterium was observed below the lithium deuteride dissociation temperature. This may explain what occurred when lithium was applied to the surface of the NSTX Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD). The LLD had segments with individual heaters, and the deuterium-alpha emission was clearly lower in the cooler regions. The plan for NSTX-U is to replace the graphite tiles with high-Z PFCs, and apply lithium to their surfaces with lithium evaporation. Experiments with lithium coatings on such PFCs suggest that deuterium could still be retained if lithium compounds form, but limiting their surface temperatures may be necessary.

  6. Observation of an unusual mid-stratospheric aerosol layer in the Arctic: possible sources and implications for polar vortex dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    2003-04-01

    vortex.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; middle atmosphere composition and chemistry – meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  7. Observation of an unusual mid-stratospheric aerosol layer in the Arctic: possible sources and implications for polar vortex dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    vortex.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; middle atmosphere composition and chemistry – meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  8. Biomechanical effects of trees in a mountain temperate forest: implications for biogeomorphology, soil science, and forest dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šamonil, Pavel; Daněk, Pavel; Senecká, Anna; Adam, Dušan; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2017-04-01

    Biomechanical effects of trees in forest soils represent a potentially significant factor in hillslope processes, pedocomplexity, and forest dynamics. However, these processes have been only rarely studied so far. Within this study we aim (i) to elaborate a detailed and widely applicable methodology of quantification of the main biomechanical effects of trees in soil, (ii) to reveal actual (minimal) frequencies, areas and volumes related to these effects in a mountain temperate old-growth forest. The research took place in the Boubín Primeval Forest in the Czech Republic. The fir-spruce-beech forest reserve belongs among the oldest protected areas in Europe. The reserve occupies NE slopes of an average inclination of about 14˚ on gneiss at an altitude of 930-1110 m a.s.l. We evaluated effects of all standing or lying trees of diameter at breast height (DBH) ≥ 10 cm in an area of 10.2 ha. In total, 4000 trees were studied from viewpoint of following features: treethrow, root mound, bioprotective function of standing as well as lying tree, baumstein, root baumstein, infilling stump, hole after trunk fall, stemwash, trunkwash. Any biomechanical phenomena were recorded in 59% of standing and 51% of lying dead trees (excluding the pervasive soil displacement by thickening trunk and roots and the converse infilling of the space freed during their decay with surrounding soil). Approximately one tenth of the trees expressed simultaneously opposing phenomena such as blocking of slope processes and their intensification. Different tree species and DBH categories exhibited significantly different structure of biomechanical effects in soil. Bioprotective function represented the most frequent process. However, concerning area and volume of affected soil, treethrows were an even more important phenomenon. Total area influenced by the studied biomechanical effects of current generation of trees was 343 m2ha-1. Additional 774 m2ha-1 were occupied by older treethrow pit

  9. Calcareous assemblages of the southeastern Mediterranean low-tide estuaries - Seasonal dynamics and paleo-environmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avnaim-Katav, Simona; Agnon, Amotz; Sivan, Dorit; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva

    2016-02-01

    The study of estuarine ecosystems is essential for protecting and reestablishing their threatened biota. In this research the spatio-temporal variations in the distribution patterns of foraminifera, ostracods and molluscs are analyzed in surficial sediments sampled in 2012/13 at six low-tide estuaries of the southeastern Mediterranean coast. Live assemblages are studied using multivariate statistical analyses to determine their ecological preferences and seasonal dynamics whereas the dead assemblages are used to establish a reference baseline for future paleoenvironmental reconstruction. The statistical analysis indicates that salinity, TOC and % carbonate are the main environmental factors explaining 60% of the cumulative variance and controlling the distribution pattern of the different brackish taxa encountered in these estuaries. The foraminifera Ammonia tepida and some miliolids (Quinqueloculina and Varidentella) inhabit most estuaries during summer when salinities of 13-18 psu and temperatures of 26-34 °C occur. At the Naaman stream the agglutinated species Birsteiniolla macrostoma and Trichohyalus aguayoi dominate the assemblage during autumn and winter, respectively when salinities of 3-7 psu and temperature of 18-24 °C prevail. High abundance of the monospecific assemblage of the ostracod Cyprideis torosa was encountered at the Tanninim year round in oligohaline water. The gastropod Heleobia phaeniciaca prefers living at the Naaman and Tanninim streams while Pyrgophorus sp., an invasive and low salinity species, continue colonizing more stream reaches along the Israeli coast. The dead assemblages are composed of high numbers of local and transported species. It includes post storm-surge sediments containing high numbers of inland fresh and brackish water species transported by the floods. Those are mixed with inner to mid-shelf benthic and planktonic foraminifera, ostracods and molluscs. Transportation of the marine organisms a few hundred of meters

  10. Decomposition of sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus carcasses: temperature effects, nutrient dynamics, and implications for stream food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Daniel M.; Coghlan, Stephen M.; Zydlewski, Joseph D.; Hogg, Robert S.; Canton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Anadromous fishes serve as vectors of marine-derived nutrients into freshwaters that are incorporated into aquatic and terrestrial food webs. Pacific salmonines Oncorhynchus spp. exemplify the importance of migratory fish as links between marine and freshwater systems; however, little attention has been given to sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus, 1758) in Atlantic coastal systems. A first step to understanding the role of sea lamprey in freshwater food webs is to characterize the composition and rate of nutrient inputs. We conducted laboratory and field studies characterizing the elemental composition and the decay rates and subsequent water enriching effects of sea lamprey carcasses. Proximate tissue analysis demonstrated lamprey carcass nitrogen:phosphorus ratios of 20.2:1 (±1.18 SE). In the laboratory, carcass decay resulted in liberation of phosphorus within 1 week and nitrogen within 3 weeks. Nutrient liberation was accelerated at higher temperatures. In a natural stream, carcass decomposition resulted in an exponential decline in biomass, and after 24 days, the proportion of initial biomass remaining was 27% (±3.0% SE). We provide quantitative results as to the temporal dynamics of sea lamprey carcass decomposition and subsequent nutrient liberation. These nutrient subsidies may arrive at a critical time to maximize enrichment of stream food webs.

  11. Secular dynamics of multiplanet systems: implications for the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via high-eccentricity migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.; Antonini, Fabio; Lithwick, Yoram; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets that reside very closely to their host star, within ˜0.1 au. Their formation is not well understood. It is generally believed that they cannot have formed in situ, implying that some form of migration must have occurred after their initial formation. We study the production of HJs through secular evolution in multiplanet systems with three to five planets. In this variant of high-e migration, the eccentricity of the orbit of the innermost planet is excited on secular time-scales, triggering orbital migration due to tidal dissipation. We use a secular dynamics code and carry out a population synthesis study. We find that HJs are only produced if the viscous time-scale is short (≈0.014 yr). In contrast, in up to ≈0.3 of systems, the innermost planet is tidally disrupted. The orbital period distribution is peaked around 5 d, consistent with observations. The median HJ mass is 1 MJ with a maximum of ≈2 MJ, similar to observed HJs. Approximately 0.1 of the HJs have retrograde orbits with respect to the stellar spin. We do not find a significant population of warm Jupiters in our simulations, I.e. planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 au.

  12. Assessing Vegetation Cover Dynamics Induced by Policy-Driven Ecological Restoration and Implication to Soil Erosion in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jien; Wang, Tianming; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    In the aftermath of the severe droughts and floods at the end of the 20th century, the Chinese government launched several ecological restoration projects, including the Natural Forest Protection Program in 1998 and the Grain-for-Green Program in 1999, to promote afforestation and reforestation to reduce surface runoff and consequent soil erosion nationwide. However, it is still unclear how vegetation has changed in southern China since the launch of these programs. In this study, we used the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) to analyze the vegetation cover dynamics in southern China from 2000 to 2009 and evaluate the resulting effects of controlling soil erosion. Our observations indicate that 5.3% of the study area significantly increased and 0.98% significantly decreased in EVI value (p soil erosion based upon monitoring sediment yields at hydrologic stations in the Yangtze River. This study displays the spatial patterns of trend in vegetation growth since the beginning of the 21st century in southern China and highlights the important role of China's afforestation program.

  13. The dynamics of avian influenza in western Arctic snow geese: implications for annual and migratory infection patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael D.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Brown, Justin D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Ip, Hon S.; Baranyuk, Vasily V.

    2015-01-01

    Wild water birds are the natural reservoir for low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIV). However, our ability to investigate the epizootiology of AIV in these migratory populations is challenging, and despite intensive worldwide surveillance, remains poorly understood. We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective analysis in Pacific Flyway lesser snow geese Chen caerulescens to investigate AIV serology and infection patterns. We collected nearly 3,000 sera samples from snow geese at 2 breeding colonies in Russia and Canada during 1993-1996 and swab samples from > 4,000 birds at wintering and migration areas in the United States during 2006-2011. We found seroprevalence and annual seroconversion varied considerably among years. Seroconversion and infection rates also differed between snow goose breeding colonies and wintering areas, suggesting that AIV exposure in this gregarious waterfowl species is likely occurring during several phases (migration, wintering and potentially breeding areas) of the annual cycle. We estimated AIV antibody persistence was longer (14 months) in female geese compared to males (6 months). This relatively long period of AIV antibody persistence suggests that subtype-specific serology may be an effective tool for detection of exposure to subtypes associated with highly-pathogenic AIV. Our study provides further evidence of high seroprevalence in Arctic goose populations, and estimates of annual AIV seroconversion and antibody persistence for North American waterfowl. We suggest future AIV studies include serology to help elucidate the epizootiological dynamics of AIV in wild bird populations.

  14. Biphasic toxicodynamic features of some antimicrobial agents on microbial growth: a dynamic mathematical model and its implications on hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murado, Miguel A; Vázquez, José A

    2010-08-19

    In the present work, we describe a group of anomalous dose-response (DR) profiles and develop a dynamic model that is able to explain them. Responses were obtained from conventional assays of three antimicrobial agents (nisin, pediocin and phenol) against two microorganisms (Carnobacterium piscicola and Leuconostoc mesenteroides). Some of these anomalous profiles show biphasic trends which are usually attributed to hormetic responses. But they can also be explained as the result of the time-course of the response from a microbial population with a bimodal distribution of sensitivity to an effector, and there is evidence suggesting this last origin. In light of interest in the hormetic phenomenology and the possibility of confusing it with other phenomena, especially in the bioassay of complex materials we try to define some criteria which allow us to distinguish between sensu stricto hormesis and biphasic responses due to other causes. Finally, we discuss some problems concerning the metric of the dose in connection with the exposure time, and we make a cautionary suggestion about the use of bacteriocins as antimicrobial agents. The mathematical model proposed, which combines the basis of DR theory with microbial growth kinetics, can generate and explain all types of anomalous experimental profiles. These profiles could also be described in a simpler way by means of bisigmoidal equations. Such equations could be successfully used in a microbiology and toxicology context to discriminate between hormesis and other biphasic phenomena.

  15. Biphasic toxicodynamic features of some antimicrobial agents on microbial growth: a dynamic mathematical model and its implications on hormesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murado Miguel A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present work, we describe a group of anomalous dose-response (DR profiles and develop a dynamic model that is able to explain them. Responses were obtained from conventional assays of three antimicrobial agents (nisin, pediocin and phenol against two microorganisms (Carnobacterium piscicola and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Results Some of these anomalous profiles show biphasic trends which are usually attributed to hormetic responses. But they can also be explained as the result of the time-course of the response from a microbial population with a bimodal distribution of sensitivity to an effector, and there is evidence suggesting this last origin. In light of interest in the hormetic phenomenology and the possibility of confusing it with other phenomena, especially in the bioassay of complex materials we try to define some criteria which allow us to distinguish between sensu stricto hormesis and biphasic responses due to other causes. Finally, we discuss some problems concerning the metric of the dose in connection with the exposure time, and we make a cautionary suggestion about the use of bacteriocins as antimicrobial agents. Conclusions The mathematical model proposed, which combines the basis of DR theory with microbial growth kinetics, can generate and explain all types of anomalous experimental profiles. These profiles could also be described in a simpler way by means of bisigmoidal equations. Such equations could be successfully used in a microbiology and toxicology context to discriminate between hormesis and other biphasic phenomena.

  16. Dynamic expression of 3' UTRs revealed by Poisson hidden Markov modeling of RNA-Seq: implications in gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Bushel, Pierre R

    2013-09-25

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) allows for the identification of novel exon-exon junctions and quantification of gene expression levels. We show that from RNA-Seq data one may also detect utilization of alternative polyadenylation (APA) in 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) known to play a critical role in the regulation of mRNA stability, cellular localization and translation efficiency. Given the dynamic nature of APA, it is desirable to examine the APA on a sample by sample basis. We used a Poisson hidden Markov model (PHMM) of RNA-Seq data to identify potential APA in human liver and brain cortex tissues leading to shortened 3' UTRs. Over three hundred transcripts with shortened 3' UTRs were detected with sensitivity >75% and specificity >60%. Tissue-specific 3' UTR shortening was observed for 32 genes with a q-value ≤ 0.1. When compared to alternative isoforms detected by Cufflinks or MISO, our PHMM method agreed on over 100 transcripts with shortened 3' UTRs. Given the increasing usage of RNA-Seq for gene expression profiling, using PHMM to investigate sample-specific 3' UTR shortening could be an added benefit from this emerging technology. © 2013.

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of interstitial diffusion in Ni–Cr alloys and implications for radiation induced segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, L., E-mail: lmbarnard@wisc.edu; Morgan, D., E-mail: ddmorgan@wisc.edu

    2014-06-01

    In this study, ab initio molecular dynamics, implemented via density functional theory, is used to simulate self-interstitial diffusion in pure Ni and in the Ni-18 at.% Cr model alloy. Interstitial tracer diffusivities are measured from simulation results for pure Ni and for both Ni and Cr in the Ni–18Cr alloy. An Arrhenius function fit to these tracer diffusivities is then used in a rate theory model for radiation induced segregation, along with the experimentally measured vacancy diffusivities. It is predicted that interstitial diffusion has a tendency to cause Cr enrichment near grain boundaries, partially counterbalancing the tendency for vacancy diffusion to cause Cr depletion. This results in more mild Cr depletion than would result if only the vacancy diffusion were accounted for, in better agreement with experiment. This physical description of RIS in Ni–Cr alloys, which invokes the effects of both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, is distinct from the conventional description which accounts only for the effect of vacancy diffusion.

  18. Implications of Airflow Dynamics and Soft-Tissue Reconstructions for the Heat Exchange Potential of Dinosaur Nasal Passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Jason Michael

    This study seeks to restore the internal anatomy within the nasal passages of dinosaurs via the use of comparative anatomical methods along with computational fluid dynamic simulations. Nasal airway descriptions and airflow simulations are described for extant birds, crocodylians, and lizards. These descriptions served as a baseline for airflow within the nasal passages of diapsids. The presence of shared airflow and soft-tissue properties found in the nasal passages of extant diapsids, were used to restore soft tissues within the airways of dinosaurs under the assumption that biologically unfeasible airflow patterns (e.g., lack of air movement in olfactory recess) can serve as signals for missing soft tissues. This methodology was tested on several dinosaur taxa. Restored airways in some taxa revealed the potential presence and likely shape of nasal turbinates. Heat transfer efficiency was tested in two dinosaur species with elaborated nasal passages. Results of that analysis revealed that dinosaur noses were efficient heat exchangers that likely played an integral role in maintaining cephalic thermoregulation. Brain cooling via nasal expansion appears to have been necessary for dinosaurs to have achieved their immense body sizes without overheating their brains.

  19. Dynamic response of an Arctic epishelf lake to seasonal and long-term forcing: implications for ice shelf thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Andrew K.; Laval, Bernard E.; Mueller, Derek R.; Vincent, Warwick F.; Copland, Luke

    2017-09-01

    Changes in the depth of the freshwater-seawater interface in epishelf lakes have been used to infer long-term changes in the minimum thickness of ice shelves; however, little is known about the dynamics of epishelf lakes and what other factors may influence their depth. Continuous observations collected between 2011 and 2014 in the Milne Fiord epishelf lake, in the Canadian Arctic, showed that the depth of the halocline varied seasonally by up to 3.3 m, which was comparable to interannual variability. The seasonal depth variation was controlled by the magnitude of surface meltwater inflow and the hydraulics of the inferred outflow pathway, a narrow basal channel in the Milne Ice Shelf. When seasonal variation and an episodic mixing of the halocline were accounted for, long-term records of depth indicated there was no significant change in thickness of ice along the basal channel from 1983 to 2004, followed by a period of steady thinning at 0.50 m a-1 between 2004 and 2011. Rapid thinning at 1.15 m a-1 then occurred from 2011 to 2014, corresponding to a period of warming regional air temperatures. Continued warming is expected to lead to the breakup of the ice shelf and the imminent loss of the last known epishelf lake in the Arctic.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of ethanol binding to the transmembrane domain of the glycine receptor: implications for the channel potentiation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Coalson, Rob D; Cascio, Michael

    2008-05-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is potentiated by ethanol and other anesthetics. The potentiation mechanism at the molecular level is unknown and remains elusive, but mutagenic studies have shown that ethanol and other volatile anesthetics bind to a pocket between TM1, TM2, and TM3. The present study extends previous studies (Cheng et al., Proteins 2007;68:581-593) wherein we conducted homology modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to construct models of the homopentameric alpha1 subunits of the GlyR transmembrane domain in open and closed states. To understand the potentiation of GlyR by ethanol we compare the binding of ethanol molecules to the channel in these different states. We observe that ethanol stably resides inside solvent-accessible cavities found in the open state of GlyR that are formed by I229 (of TM1) in one subunit and S267 and A288 (of TM2 and TM3, respectively) in the adjacent subunit. The volume of these putative binding pockets is state-dependent. Selective binding to the open states of receptors has been proposed to explain the potentiating actions of this class of anesthetics. In accordance with this model, our MD simulations suggest that the potentiation of ethanol on GlyR may be effected through preferential binding of ethanol molecules to an inter-subunit binding pocket in the open state.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of components of the ginger (Zingiber officinale) extract inside human acetylcholinesterase: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuya, Teobaldo; Baptista, Leonardo; Celmar Costa França, Tanos

    2017-11-23

    Components of ginger (Zingiber officinale) extracts have been described as potential new drug candidates against Alzheimer disease (AD), able to interact with several molecular targets related to the AD treatment. However, there are very few theoretical studies in the literature on the possible mechanisms of action by which these compounds can work as potential anti-AD drugs. For this reason, we performed here docking, molecular dynamic simulations and mmpbsa calculations on four components of ginger extracts former reported as active inhibitors of human acetylcholinesterase (HssAChE), and compared our results to the known HssAChE inhibitor and commercial drug in use against AD, donepezil (DNP). Our findings points to two among the compounds studied: (E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)hept-4-en-3-on and 1-(3,4-dihydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)-7-(4-hydroxy-3- ethoxyphenyl) heptane-3,5-diyl diacetate, as promising new HssAChE inhibitors that could be as effective as DNP. We also mapped the binding of the studied compounds in the different binding pockets inside HssAChE and established the preferred interactions to be favored in the design of new and more efficient inhibitors.

  2. Assessing Vegetation Cover Dynamics Induced by Policy-Driven Ecological Restoration and Implication to Soil Erosion in Southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jien Zhang

    Full Text Available In the aftermath of the severe droughts and floods at the end of the 20th century, the Chinese government launched several ecological restoration projects, including the Natural Forest Protection Program in 1998 and the Grain-for-Green Program in 1999, to promote afforestation and reforestation to reduce surface runoff and consequent soil erosion nationwide. However, it is still unclear how vegetation has changed in southern China since the launch of these programs. In this study, we used the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI to analyze the vegetation cover dynamics in southern China from 2000 to 2009 and evaluate the resulting effects of controlling soil erosion. Our observations indicate that 5.3% of the study area significantly increased and 0.98% significantly decreased in EVI value (p < 0.05. The spring EVI had largest increase in space. The conversions of croplands on steep slopes to forests resulting from national policies led to significant increases in EVI. The increase in EVI was not driven by annual average temperature and annual precipitation. By referencing ecological restoration statistical data and field observations, we showed that ecological restoration programs significantly improved vegetation cover in southern China. Increase in the area of farmland-converted forestlands has reduced soil erosion based upon monitoring sediment yields at hydrologic stations in the Yangtze River. This study displays the spatial patterns of trend in vegetation growth since the beginning of the 21st century in southern China and highlights the important role of China's afforestation program.

  3. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  4. Detection experiments with humans implicate visual predation as a driver of colour polymorphism dynamics in pygmy grasshoppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpestam, Einat; Merilaita, Sami; Forsman, Anders

    2013-05-02

    Animal colour patterns offer good model systems for studies of biodiversity and evolution of local adaptations. An increasingly popular approach to study the role of selection for camouflage for evolutionary trajectories of animal colour patterns is to present images of prey on paper or computer screens to human 'predators'. Yet, few attempts have been made to confirm that rates of detection by humans can predict patterns of selection and evolutionary modifications of prey colour patterns in nature. In this study, we first analyzed encounters between human 'predators' and images of natural black, grey and striped colour morphs of the polymorphic Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers presented on background images of unburnt, intermediate or completely burnt natural habitats. Next, we compared detection rates with estimates of capture probabilities and survival of free-ranging grasshoppers, and with estimates of relative morph frequencies in natural populations. The proportion of grasshoppers that were detected and time to detection depended on both the colour pattern of the prey and on the type of visual background. Grasshoppers were detected more often and faster on unburnt backgrounds than on 50% and 100% burnt backgrounds. Striped prey were detected less often than grey or black prey on unburnt backgrounds; grey prey were detected more often than black or striped prey on 50% burnt backgrounds; and black prey were detected less often than grey prey on 100% burnt backgrounds. Rates of detection mirrored previously reported rates of capture by humans of free-ranging grasshoppers, as well as morph specific survival in the wild. Rates of detection were also correlated with frequencies of striped, black and grey morphs in samples of T. subulata from natural populations that occupied the three habitat types used for the detection experiment. Our findings demonstrate that crypsis is background-dependent, and implicate visual predation as an important driver of evolutionary

  5. Detection experiments with humans implicate visual predation as a driver of colour polymorphism dynamics in pygmy grasshoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal colour patterns offer good model systems for studies of biodiversity and evolution of local adaptations. An increasingly popular approach to study the role of selection for camouflage for evolutionary trajectories of animal colour patterns is to present images of prey on paper or computer screens to human ‘predators’. Yet, few attempts have been made to confirm that rates of detection by humans can predict patterns of selection and evolutionary modifications of prey colour patterns in nature. In this study, we first analyzed encounters between human ‘predators’ and images of natural black, grey and striped colour morphs of the polymorphic Tetrix subulata pygmy grasshoppers presented on background images of unburnt, intermediate or completely burnt natural habitats. Next, we compared detection rates with estimates of capture probabilities and survival of free-ranging grasshoppers, and with estimates of relative morph frequencies in natural populations. Results The proportion of grasshoppers that were detected and time to detection depended on both the colour pattern of the prey and on the type of visual background. Grasshoppers were detected more often and faster on unburnt backgrounds than on 50% and 100% burnt backgrounds. Striped prey were detected less often than grey or black prey on unburnt backgrounds; grey prey were detected more often than black or striped prey on 50% burnt backgrounds; and black prey were detected less often than grey prey on 100% burnt backgrounds. Rates of detection mirrored previously reported rates of capture by humans of free-ranging grasshoppers, as well as morph specific survival in the wild. Rates of detection were also correlated with frequencies of striped, black and grey morphs in samples of T. subulata from natural populations that occupied the three habitat types used for the detection experiment. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that crypsis is background-dependent, and implicate visual predation

  6. Dynamics of a small re-introduced population of wild dogs over 25 years: Allee effects and the implications of sociality for endangered species' recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Michael J; Graf, Jan A; Szykman, Micaela; Slotow, Rob; Gusset, Markus

    2008-11-01

    We analysed 25 years (1980-2004) of demographic data on a small re-introduced population of endangered African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP), South Africa, to describe population and pack dynamics. As small populations of cooperative breeders may be particularly prone to Allee effects, this extensive data set was used to test the prediction that, if Allee effects occur, aspects of reproductive success, individual survival and population growth should increase with pack and population size. The results suggest that behavioural aspects of wild dogs rather than ecological factors (i.e. competitors, prey and rainfall) primarily have been limiting the HiP wild dog population, particularly a low probability of finding suitable mates upon dispersal at low pack number (i.e. a mate-finding Allee effect). Wild dogs in HiP were not subject to component Allee effects at the pack level, most likely due to low interspecific competition and high prey availability. This suggests that aspects of the environment can mediate the strength of Allee effects. There was also no demographic Allee effect in the HiP wild dog population, as the population growth rate was significantly negatively related to population size, despite no apparent ecological resource limitation. Such negative density dependence at low numbers indicates that behavioural studies of the causal mechanisms potentially generating Allee effects in small populations can provide a key to understanding their dynamics. This study demonstrates how aspects of a species' social behaviour can influence the vulnerability of small populations to extinction and illustrates the profound implications of sociality for endangered species' recovery.

  7. Multivariate analysis of the impacts of the turbine fuel JP-4 in a microcosm toxicity test with implications for the evaluation of ecosystem dynamics and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W G; Matthews, R A; Markiewicz, A J; Matthews, G B

    1993-12-01

    Turbine fuels are often the only aviation fuel available in most of the world. Turbine fuels consist of numerous constituents with varying water solubilities, volatilities and toxicities. This study investigates the toxicity of the water soluble fraction (WSF) of JP-4 using the Standard Aquatic Microcosm (SAM). Multivariate analysis of the complex data, including the relatively new method of nonmetric clustering, was used and compared to more traditional analyses. Particular emphasis is placed on ecosystem dynamics in multivariate space.The WSF is prepared by vigorously mixing the fuel and the SAM microcosm media in a separatory funnel. The water phase, which contains the water-soluble fraction of JP-4 is then collected. The SAM experiment was conducted using concentrations of 0.0, 1.5 and 15% WSF. The WSF is added on day 7 of the experiments by removing 450 ml from each microcosm including the controls, then adding the appropriate amount of toxicant solution and finally bringing the final volume to 3 L with microcosm media. Analysis of the WSF was performed by purge and trap gas chromatography. The organic constituents of the WSF were not recoverable from the water column within several days of the addition of the toxicant. However, the impact of the WSF on the microcosm was apparent. In the highest initial concentration treatment group an algal bloom ensued, generated by the apparent toxicity of the WSF of JP-4 to the daphnids. As the daphnid populations recovered the algal populations decreased to control values. Multivariate methods clearly demonstrated this initial impact along with an additional oscillation seperating the four treatment groups in the latter segment of the experiment. Apparent recovery may be an artifact of the projections used to describe the multivariate data. The variables that were most important in distinguishing the four groups shifted during the course of the 63 day experiment. Even this simple microcosm exhibited a variety of dynamics

  8. Current-driven and field-driven domain walls at nonzero temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314406913; van Driel, H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315885114; de Morais Smith, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836346; Duine, R.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for the dynamics of current-driven and field-driven domain-wall lines at nonzero temperature. We compute thermally averaged drift velocities from the Fokker-Planck equation that describes the nonzero-temperature dynamics of the domain wall. As special limits of this general

  9. Inorganic carbon dynamics in the upwelling system off the Oregon coast and implications for commercial shellfish hatcheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, J. M.; Hales, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing absorption of anthropogenic CO2 by the global ocean and concomitant decrease in pH will alter seawater carbonate chemistry in ways that may negatively impact calcifying organisms. In particular, the change in saturation state (Ω) of calcium carbonate minerals calcite and aragonite may be energetically unfavorable for shell formation while favoring shell dissolution. Eastern boundary upwelling systems may provide insights into how ecosystems respond to future conditions of ocean acidification when deep water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low pH and low Ω is forced toward the surface. Mortality in commercial seed stock and reduced wild set of the oyster Crassostrea gigas in the northeast Pacific during 2005-2009 reinforced the need for understanding biological responses to acidified ocean water. In response, a long-term strategy to understand local carbonate chemistry dynamics, seasonal perturbations and the effects on development of calcifying bivalves was developed. At present, a time-series of pCO2 measurements was implemented in April 2010 in Netarts Bay, Oregon at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery (WCH). The intake sits at a depth of 0.5-8ft and water is pumped in at 100gpm. A line taken off the intake is run continuously through a thermosalinograph at approximately 1.5gpm into a showerhead style equilibrator in which the headspace is recirculated by aerating the water for enhanced gas exchange. CO2 in equilibrated air is analyzed by NDIR. Additionally two discrete samples of intake seawater were taken across tidal cycles weekly and analyzed for total CO2 (TCO2) according to the methods of Hales et al. (2004) and pCO2 for quality control. The pCO2 in the bay exhibits a diurnal cycle representative of daytime photosynthesis and nighttime respiration. However, the phasing and profiles of these cycles are dominated by tidal mixing and are affected by the introduction of high pCO2 water during upwelling events. Diurnal pCO2 during

  10. Three decades of Landsat-derived spring surface water dynamics in an agricultural wetland mosaic; Implications for migratory shorebirds.

    Science.gov (United States)