WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall anchored proteinase

  1. Experimental testing of anchoring devices for bottom rails in partially anchored timber frame shear walls

    OpenAIRE

    Caprolu, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Källsner and Girhammar have presented a new plastic design method of wood-framed shear walls at ultimate limit state. This method allows the designer to calculate the load-carrying capacity of shear walls partially anchored, where the leading stud is not anchored against the uplift.The anchorage system of shear walls is provided from anchor bolts and hold downs. Anchor bolts provide horizontal shear continuity between the bottom rail and the foundation. Hold downs are directly connected from ...

  2. The Analysis Stability of Anchor Retaining Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamara, F. Z.; Belabed, L

    2011-01-01

    The construction of anchored retaining walls reach every day in the field of Civil Engineering especially in public works. Their dimensioning and stability are the axes of research for geotechnical. The rule is to reduce the active forces of the slide and increase the effective normal stress on the rupture surface. So that, we anchored tied-back (constituted by steel cables) in the stable ground located under the failure surface and we apply at the top a traction force. This effort can be distributed over the ground surface by means of small plates or massive reinforced concrete. The study of the stability of anchored retaining wall was also performed by using software GEO4. Many cases can be solved using analytical solutions available in the group GEO4 program, but for our standard model solution studied analytically proved unsatisfactory so we used a numerical analysis based on the method of finite element in this program. The results obtained by numerical study were interpreted to identify the precision numerical predictions. Moreover these methods were useful and economics in the realization of reinforced slopes by tied-buck. (author)

  3. Considerations on the design of through-wall anchors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricklefs, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Connections to existing buildings are often the most difficult planning challenge for the realization of construction measures in case of piping system replacements in nuclear power plants. This is due to restricted space or limited load reserves of the building structure. Usually the realization of support connections to the existing buildings is achieved by anchor bolts. But in critical cases the preferred alternative solution uses through-wall anchors. Up to now uniform assessment thresholds are not available, no technical guidelines or regulations for construction variants exist. Through-wall anchors allow significantly higher load capacities for tensile and shear loads but require enhanced planning and realization efforts.

  4. Reinforcement mechanism of multi-anchor wall with double wall facing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kouta; Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo

    2017-10-01

    The reinforced soil wall has high seismic performance as generally known. However, the seismic behavior has not been clarified accurately yet, especially on multi-anchor wall with double wall facing. Indefinite behavior of reinforced soil wall during earthquake make us complicated in case with adopting to the abutment, because of arrangement of anchor plate as reinforcement often different according to the width of roads. In this study, a series of centrifuge model tests were carried out to investigate the reinforcement mechanism of multi anchor wall with double wall facing from the perspective of the vertical earth pressure. Several types of reinforce arrangement and rigid wall were applied in order to verify the arch function in the reinforced regions. The test results show unique behavior of vertical earth pressure, which was affected by arch action. All the vertical earth pressure placed behind facing panel, are larger than that of middle part between facing panel despite of friction between backfill and facing panel. Similar results were obtained in case using rigid wall. On the other hands, the vertical earth pressure, which were measured at the 3cm high from bottom of model container, shows larger than that of bottom. This results show the existence of arch action between double walls. In addition, it implies that the wall facing of such soil structure confined the backfill as pseudo wall, which is very reason that the multi anchor wall with double wall facing has high seismic performance.

  5. Cell-Wall-Bound Proteinase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ACA-DC 178: Characterization and Specificity for β-Casein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakalidou, E.; Anastasiou, R.; Vandenberghe, I.; van Beeumen, J.; Kalantzopoulos, G.

    1999-01-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ACA-DC 178, which was isolated from Greek Kasseri cheese, produces a cell-wall-bound proteinase. The proteinase was removed from the cell envelope by washing the cells with a Ca2+-free buffer. The crude proteinase extract shows its highest activity at pH 6.0 and 40°C. It is inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, showing that the enzyme is a serine-type proteinase. Considering the substrate specificity, the enzyme is similar to the lactococcal PI-type proteinases, since it hydrolyzes β-casein mainly and α- and κ-caseins to a much lesser extent. The cell-wall-bound proteinase from L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis ACA-DC 178 liberates four main peptides from β-casein, which have been identified. PMID:10223997

  6. Evidence for the presence of proteolytically active secreted aspartic proteinase 1 of Candida parapsilosis in the cell wall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinterová, Zuzana; Šanda, Miloslav; Dostál, Jiří; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 12 (2011), s. 2004-2012 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * secreted aspartic proteinases * Sapp1p * cell wall * biotin * proteolytic activity Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.798, year: 2011

  7. Comprehensive Evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis Cell Wall-Anchored Proteins in Early Infective Endocarditis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified—a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (∼2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention. PMID:19703977

  8. Comprehensive evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis cell wall-anchored proteins in early infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified-a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (approximately 2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention.

  9. Plant glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored proteins at the plasma membrane-cell wall nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeats, Trevor H; Bacic, Antony; Johnson, Kim L

    2018-04-18

    Approximately 1% of plant proteins are predicted to be post-translationally modified with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that tethers the polypeptide to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. While the synthesis and structure of GPI anchors is largely conserved across eukaryotes, the repertoire of functional domains present in the GPI-anchored proteome has diverged substantially. In plants, this includes a large fraction of the GPI-anchored proteome being further modified with plant-specific arabinogalactan (AG) O-glycans. The importance of the GPI-anchored proteome to plant development is underscored by the fact that GPI biosynthetic null mutants exhibit embryo lethality. Mutations in genes encoding specific GPI-anchored proteins (GAPs) further supports their contribution to diverse biological processes occurring at the interface of the plasma membrane and cell wall, including signaling, cell wall metabolism, cell wall polymer cross-linking, and plasmodesmatal transport. Here, we review the literature concerning plant GPI-anchored proteins in the context of their potential to act as molecular hubs that mediate interactions between the plasma membrane and the cell wall and their potential to transduce the signal into the protoplast and thereby activate signal transduction pathways. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation into the behaviour of concrete anchored diaphragm walls under earthquake condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, H. R.; Rahaii, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    Diaphragm walls are frequently used in civil Engineering projects. Considering the variety and important volume of consumed materials (concrete, anchors and soil), one of the important factors for design and construction of these walls, are their behaviour under different executive, and loading conditions. In this paper, various models of concrete diaphragms with different number of anchors and soil parameters under static and dynamic loading have been investigated using finite element method with nonlinear models. Results including the internal forces in diaphragm walls, variation of forces in the anchors, shape of the sliding surface and variation of pressure in soil are obtained and compared. An experimental tool with suitable measurement systems for determining the pressure and internal forces was designed and realised. Also with similitude and dimensional analyses, diaphragms with different number of anchors were built and set on the shaking table test and experimented under different accelograms. Finally results of nonlinear dynamic analysis were compared with experimental results

  11. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    2006-01-01

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anchor...

  12. Test on the splitting failure capacity of the bottom rail due to uplift in partially anchored shear walls

    OpenAIRE

    Caprolu, Giuseppe; Girhammar, Ulf Arne; Källsner, Bo; Johnsson, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Källsner and Girhammar have developed a new plastic design method for wood-frame shear walls at ultimate limit state. The method is capable of calculating the load-carrying capacity of partially anchored shear walls, where the leading stud is not necessarily anchored against uplift. In fully anchored shear walls, the leading stud needs to be anchored using some kind of hold-downs to resist uplift and the bottom rail needs to be fixed by anchor bolts to resist horizontal shear forces. In parti...

  13. Mutational analysis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor pathway demonstrates that GPI-anchored proteins are required for cell wall biogenesis and normal hyphal growth in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Shaun M; Piwowar, Amy; Al Dabbous, Mash'el; Vierula, John; Free, Stephen J

    2006-03-01

    Using mutational and proteomic approaches, we have demonstrated the importance of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor pathway for cell wall synthesis and integrity and for the overall morphology of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Mutants affected in the gpig-1, gpip-1, gpip-2, gpip-3, and gpit-1 genes, which encode components of the N. crassa GPI anchor biosynthetic pathway, have been characterized. GPI anchor mutants exhibit colonial morphologies, significantly reduced rates of growth, altered hyphal growth patterns, considerable cellular lysis, and an abnormal "cell-within-a-cell" phenotype. The mutants are deficient in the production of GPI-anchored proteins, verifying the requirement of each altered gene for the process of GPI-anchoring. The mutant cell walls are abnormally weak, contain reduced amounts of protein, and have an altered carbohydrate composition. The mutant cell walls lack a number of GPI-anchored proteins, putatively involved in cell wall biogenesis and remodeling. From these studies, we conclude that the GPI anchor pathway is critical for proper cell wall structure and function in N. crassa.

  14. Proteome analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus identifies glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins associated to the cell wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, J M; Magnin, T; Tagat, E; Legrand, R; Bernard, M; Diaquin, M; Fudali, C; Latgé, J P

    2001-08-01

    Previous studies in Aspergillus fumigatus (Mouyna I., Fontaine T., Vai M., Monod M., Fonzi W. A., Diaquin M., Popolo L., Hartland R. P., Latgé J.-P, J. Biol. Chem. 2000, 275, 14882-14889) have shown that a glucanosyltransferase playing an important role in fungal cell wall biosynthesis is glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored to the membrane. To identify other GPI-anchored proteins putatively involved in cell wall biogenesis, a proteomic analysis has been undertaken in A. fumigatus and the protein data were matched with the yeast genomic data. GPI-anchored proteins of A. fumigatus were released from membrane preparation by an endogenous GPI-phospholipase C, purified by liquid chromatography and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis. They were characterized by their peptide mass fingerprint through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-(MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry and by internal amino acid sequencing. Nine GPI-anchored proteins were identified in A. fumigatus. Five of them were homologs of putatively GPI-anchored yeast proteins (Csa1p, Crh1p, Crh2p, Ecm33p, Gas1p) of unknown function but shown by gene disruption analysis to play a role in cell wall morphogenesis. In addition, a comparative study performed with chitin synthase and glucanosyl transferase mutants of A. fumigatus showed that a modification of the growth phenotype seen in these mutants was associated to an alteration of the pattern of GPI-anchored proteins. These results suggest that GPI-anchored proteins identified in this study are involved in A. fumigatus cell wall organization.

  15. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins are required for cell wall synthesis and morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmor, C Stewart; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Brininstool, Ginger; Sedbrook, John C; Hamann, Thorsten; Poindexter, Patricia; Somerville, Chris

    2005-04-01

    Mutations at five loci named PEANUT1-5 (PNT) were identified in a genetic screen for radially swollen embryo mutants. pnt1 cell walls showed decreased crystalline cellulose, increased pectins, and irregular and ectopic deposition of pectins, xyloglucans, and callose. Furthermore, pnt1 pollen is less viable than the wild type, and pnt1 embryos were delayed in morphogenesis and showed defects in shoot and root meristems. The PNT1 gene encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of mammalian PIG-M, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized mannosyltransferase that is required for synthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. All five pnt mutants showed strongly reduced accumulation of GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that they all have defects in GPI anchor synthesis. Although the mutants are seedling lethal, pnt1 cells are able to proliferate for a limited time as undifferentiated callus and do not show the massive deposition of ectopic cell wall material seen in pnt1 embryos. The different phenotype of pnt1 cells in embryos and callus suggest a differential requirement for GPI-anchored proteins in cell wall synthesis in these two tissues and points to the importance of GPI anchoring in coordinated multicellular growth.

  16. Model Solutions for Performance-Based Seismic Analysis of an Anchored Sheet Pile Quay Wall

    OpenAIRE

    C. J. W. Habets; D. J. Peters; J. G. de Gijt; A. V. Metrikine; S. N. Jonkman

    2016-01-01

    Conventional seismic designs of quay walls in ports are mostly based on pseudo-static analysis. A more advanced alternative is the Performance-Based Design (PBD) method, which evaluates permanent deformations and amounts of (repairable) damage under seismic loading. The aim of this study is to investigate the suitability of this method for anchored sheet pile quay walls that were not purposely designed for seismic loads. A research methodology is developed in which pseudo-static, permanent-di...

  17. Design Analysis and Observed Performance of a Tieback Anchored Pile Wall in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Yong Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the design process and service performance of a deep excavation supported by tieback anchored pile walls. The design procedure and design approaches for deep excavation in China are described. Based on the excavation case history for Shenyang, China, design results obtained using the elastic method and the finite element method (FEM are compared and analyzed. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of horizontal wall deformations, internal forces in the wall, earth pressures on the wall, ground surface settlements, and stabilities of the excavation. The similarities and differences between the Chinese code (JGJ 120-2012 and the European code (EN 1997-1 for the design of geotechnical structures are presented based on a design example. Through the comparison, it is indicated that the Chinese code focuses on the design result, while the European code focuses on the design process. The crucial construction methods for reducing construction risk based on the excavation case history are described. The mechanical behaviors of the excavation retained by an anchored pile wall were investigated by analyzing observed field cases. The results provide good, practical guidelines for the design and construction of a tieback anchored pile wall retained excavation in sandy soil.

  18. Dependence of optical phase modulation on anchoring strength of dielectric shield wall surfaces in small liquid crystal pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomae, Yoshitomo; Shibata, Yosei; Ishinabe, Takahiro; Fujikake, Hideo

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrated that the uniform phase modulation in a pixel can be realized by optimizing the anchoring strength on the walls and the wall width in the dielectric shield wall structure, which is the needed pixel structure for realizing a 1-µm-pitch optical phase modulator. The anchoring force degrades the uniformity of the phase modulation in ON-state pixels, but it also keeps liquid crystals from rotating against the leakage of an electric field. We clarified that the optimal wall width and anchoring strength are 250 nm and less than 10-4 J/m2, respectively.

  19. Rational use of anchor pile material of the thin retaining walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushkov Boris Semenovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the urgency of application of the reinforced concrete anchor piles in the constructions of retaining structures associated with the possibility of establishing rigid joint of element interface and more durable pile constructions in the soil. The features of the inclined anchor piles work as a part of sheet-pile retaining walls are noted. There was performed a study of the stress-strain state of the inclined reinforced concrete anchor piles of the thin sheet-pile wall with the reinforced concrete face members of T-section, combined with piles by a longitudinal beam. The authors consider a constructive scheme of retaining structure and list the applied loads. The efforts in the anchor piles were determined. The bending-moment curves show the character of the force distribution along the pile. A form of the pile ensuring the rational distribution of material along the pile is presented. The distribution of efforts along the length and effect of filling on its operation in the soil were accepted as the criteria of construction solution for a pile. The substantiation of the proposed design of pile is presented in terms of its stress-strain state and the rational use of material. The authors made conclusions on the reasonability of adopted design solutions associated with an increase in the flexural strength of pile, increment of the ultimate pullout capacity, stability improvement, effective use of backfill and exception of the «out of operation» areas of the pile.

  20. Analytical and experimental evaluation of the capacity of the bottom rail in partially anchored timber shear walls

    OpenAIRE

    Caprolu, Giuseppe; Källsner, Bo; Girhammar, Ulf Arne; Vessby, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Källsner and Girhammar have developed plastic design methods for light-frame timber shear walls that can be used for determining the load-carrying capacity when the shear walls are partially anchored. For such walls, the leading stud is not fully anchored against uplift and tying down forces are developed in the sheathing-to-framing joints. Since the forces in the anchor bolts and the sheathing-to-framing joints do not act in the same vertical plane, the bottom rail will be subjected to cross...

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis Cell Wall-Anchored Proteins in Early Infective Endocarditis▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) a...

  2. Comparative study of action of cell wall proteinases from various strains of Streptococcus cremoris on bovine α/sub s1-/, β-, and kappa-casein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, S.; Exterkate, F.A.; Slangen, C.J.; de Veer, G.J.C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments are described in which partially purified cell wall proteinases of eight strains of S. cremoris, including strain HP, were compared in their action on α/sub s1 - /, β-, and kappa-casein, as visualized by starch gel electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and TLC, and also in their action on methyl- 14 C-labeled β-casein

  3. Root hairs aid soil penetration by anchoring the root surface to pore walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengough, A Glyn; Loades, Kenneth; McKenzie, Blair M

    2016-02-01

    The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip during soil penetration was examined. Experiments using a hairless maize mutant (Zea mays: rth3-3) and its wild-type counterpart measured the anchorage force between the primary root of maize and the soil to determine whether root hairs enabled seedling roots in artificial biopores to penetrate sandy loam soil (dry bulk density 1.0-1.5g cm(-3)). Time-lapse imaging was used to analyse root and seedling displacements in soil adjacent to a transparent Perspex interface. Peak anchorage forces were up to five times greater (2.5N cf. 0.5N) for wild-type roots than for hairless mutants in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Root hair anchorage enabled better soil penetration for 1.0 or 1.2g cm(-3) soil, but there was no significant advantage of root hairs in the densest soil (1.5g cm(-3)). The anchorage force was insufficient to allow root penetration of the denser soil, probably because of less root hair penetration into pore walls and, consequently, poorer adhesion between the root hairs and the pore walls. Hairless seedlings took 33h to anchor themselves compared with 16h for wild-type roots in 1.2g cm(-3) soil. Caryopses were often pushed several millimetres out of the soil before the roots became anchored and hairless roots often never became anchored securely.The physical role of root hairs in anchoring the root tip may be important in loose seed beds above more compact soil layers and may also assist root tips to emerge from biopores and penetrate the bulk soil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Uncertainty assessment of a dike with an anchored sheet pile wall using FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rippi Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch design codes for the dikes with retaining walls rely on Finite Element Analysis (FEM in combination with partial safety factors. However, this can lead to conservative designs. For this reason, in this study, a reliability analysis is carried out with FEM calculations aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of reliability analysis for a dike with an anchored sheet pile wall modelled in the 2D FEM, Plaxis. Sensitivity and reliability analyses were carried out and enabled by coupling the uncertainty package, OpenTURNS and Plaxis. The most relevant (ultimate limit states concern the anchor, the sheet pile wall, the soil body failure (global instability and finally the system. The case was used to investigate the applicability of the First Order Reliability Method (FORM and Directional Sampling (DS to analysing these limit states. The final goal is to estimate the probability of failure and identify the most important soil properties that affect the behaviour of each component and the system as a whole. The results of this research can be used to assess and optimize the current design procedure for dikes with retaining walls.

  5. Effect of historical earthquakes on pre-stressed anchor tie back diaphragm wall and on near-by building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-stressed tie back anchored diaphragm walls are considered one of the safest lateral supports which help in overall stability when there is a significant difference in land level between back and front of these walls. Permanent lateral supports to these walls are frequently represented by supporting it laterally with foundation and floor slabs of the building. In this paper a special study of one raw anchor diaphragm wall subjected to different earthquake dynamic loads will be presented. The wall retains an excavation of 9.5 m and supports laterally a near-by 5 floor building. Five historical strong motions with different fundamental frequencies are subjected on the wall. The wall displacement, straining actions, anchor extreme force and the influence of variation of anchor stiffness are calculated using a dynamic Plaxis finite element program. The soil is considered as elasto-plastic material and represented using Mohr–Coulomb criteria, the wall and the anchor are considered to behave elastically. Prescribed displacement at the lower bottom boundary represents the earthquake motion. Far left and right absorbent boundaries are assumed to prevent dynamic wave reflection. Four static phases representing construction procedure and one dynamic loading phase are considered. It is found that the straining actions of different historical earthquakes match in shape with each other, the only change is in the amplitude which is affected by earthquake fundamental frequency and its intensity. The maximum dynamic lateral displacement of the wall is at its free top. The near-by building shows a differential settlement towards the wall which causes a change in the sign and amplitude of the straining actions. Increasing the stiffness of anchor was also studied and it was found that it reduces too much the maximum dynamic top wall lateral displacement.

  6. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Hui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI, relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3 is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. "BMI-ICAWT" curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x = P1 × x 2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056, P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164, P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412, R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of "BMI-ICAWT" curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI.

  7. AUTOMATIC THICKNESS AND VOLUME ESTIMATION OF SPRAYED CONCRETE ON ANCHORED RETAINING WALLS FROM TERRESTRIAL LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Martínez-Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain, resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  8. Automatic Thickness and Volume Estimation of Sprayed Concrete on Anchored Retaining Walls from Terrestrial LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Puente, I.; GonzálezJorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2016-06-01

    When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain), resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  9. Analysis of Flexible Anchored Hollow WPC Quay Walls of the New Berth in Tur, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ayman

    2017-10-01

    A seawall, also known as a bulkhead or retaining wall, is a structure built to reduce the effects of strong waves and to defend costal land from erosion. Traditionally, seawalls are made of steel, timber or concrete construction. Composite materials, however, have been recently introduced for their ease of installation/maintenance in dry processing, low cost, and environmentally friendly materials. A wood plastic composite (WPC) seawall system has been developed and patented for its unique hollow structure that can give greater stiffness and stability under various external stresses. This paper describes the development of design method used in the analysis of the WPC walls. The main challenge during the physical excavation works is to limit the deformations involved in order to minimize damage on adjacent structures. The deformations depend largely on the excavation and strutting procedures, but also on the properties of the structural elements like the soil, the sheet pile and strutting members. The detailed design procedure involves numerical analyses, national regulations and common practice considerations. The contribution of finite element method in this field was used herein to determine the lateral movements, the bending moments of the wall, the passive earth pressure of the soil and the tensile force exerted by the anchor rods. The overall objectives of this research can be divided into two categories, First calibration of the finite element model for the new Tur quay walls (the case study) and reviewing the results of the steel cross section that chosen and the suggested one. Second, analysis and comparing the results of WPC cross-sections with the designed Steel sheet pile wall (SPW).

  10. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  11. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  12. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  13. Effect of dewatering on seismic performance of multi-anchor wall due to high ground water level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo; Sato, Hiroki

    2017-10-01

    Previous research reported that the ground water in the backfill of reinforced soil wall made it deteriorate. According to the damage investigation of Great East Earthquake 2011, the reinforced soil structure due to high ground water level by seismic wave were deformed remarkably. Some of them classified ultimate limit state or restorability limit state. However, more than 90% of reinforced soil structure, which suffered from this earthquake, were classified into no damage condition. Therefore, it is necessary that the seismic behaviors of multi-anchor wall due to seepage flow should be clarified in order to adopt the performance-based design in such reinforced soil structure. In this study, a series of centrifugal shaking table tests were conducted to investigate the seismic behavior of multi-anchor wall due to high ground water level. The reinforced drainage pipes were installed into the backfill in order to verify the dewatering effect and additional reinforcement. Furthermore, to check only the dewatering effect, the model tests was carried out with several ground water table that was modeled the case reinforced drainage pipes installed. The test results show unique behavior of reinforced region that moved integrally. This implies that the reinforced region has been behaved as if it became one mass, and this behavior make this structure increase seismic performance. Thus, the effectiveness of dewatering was observed remarkably because of decreasing the inertial force during earthquake.

  14. Cell wall-anchored nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis contributes to escape from neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated bacteriocidal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisato Morita

    Full Text Available Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease, and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg(2+ and Ca(2+ for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression.

  15. Cell wall-anchored nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis contributes to escape from neutrophil extracellular trap-mediated bacteriocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Chisato; Sumioka, Ryuichi; Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression.

  16. Evaluation of performance of analytical and numerical methods to account for liquefaction effects on the seismic response of anchored quay walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elsäcker, W.A.; Besseling, F.; Lengkeek, H.J.; Brinkgreve, R.B.J.; de Gijt, J.G.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Liquefaction induced by earthquakes has shown to have potential devastating influence on seismic performance of anchored quay walls. Therefore, measures to mitigate liquefaction are commonly part of the design of quay walls in
    seismically active regions. Such mitigation measures are costly.

  17. Application Problems of Anchor Dowels in Reinforced Concrete Shear Wall and Frame Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Musa H. Arslan

    2016-01-01

    Strengthening of the existing seismically deficient reinforced concrete (RC) buildings is an important issue in earthquake prone regions. Addition of RC shear wall as infill or external walls into the structural system has been a commonly preferred strengthening technique since the Big Erzincan Earthquake occurred in Turkey, 1992. The newly added rigid infill walls act primarily as shear walls and relieve the non-ductile existing frames from being subjected to large shear demands providing th...

  18. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  19. Design and construction of earth retaining walls with anchors employed in excavation works at Oi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saino, Susumu; Aoshima, Ken-ichiro; Kamide, Atsushi.

    1990-01-01

    In Oi Nuclear Power Station, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., No.3 and No.4 plants of each 1180 MWe output are additionally installed, neighboring existing No.1 and No.2 plants of each 1175 MWe output in operation. The start of operation is expected in December, 1991 in No.3 plant, and in February, 1993 in No.4 plant. The total quantity of earth excavated for this additional installation works is about 3.3 million m 3 . The main works are, subsequently to the preparation of the site, the excavation for the foundations of reactor buildings and others, and the construction of the foundations for the seawater system facilities for cooling condensers and reactor auxiliary machines, and the works were begun in May, 1987. The excavation by using anchors was carried out in seven places. The vertical excavation on large scale was carried out by using the earth retaining walls of concrete-sprayed anchor structure in drain pits. In this report, the outline of the geological features, the outline of the excavation works, the design of the earth retaining walls, the execution of concrete spraying, the planning and result of measurement are described. (K.I.)

  20. Synthesis of subnanometer-diameter vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with copper-anchored cobalt catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kehang; Kumamoto, Akihito; Xiang, Rong; An, Hua; Wang, Benjamin; Inoue, Taiki; Chiashi, Shohei; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high-quality SWNTs are expected to pave the way to replace silicon for next-generation optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.We synthesize vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) with subnanometer diameters on quartz (and SiO2/Si) substrates by alcohol CVD using Cu-anchored Co catalysts. The uniform VA-SWNTs with a nanotube diameter of 1 nm are synthesized at a CVD temperature of 800 °C and have a thickness of several tens of μm. The diameter of SWNTs was reduced to 0.75 nm at 650 °C with the G/D ratio maintained above 24. Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS-STEM) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF-STEM) imaging of the Co/Cu bimetallic catalyst system showed that Co catalysts were captured and anchored by adjacent Cu nanoparticles, and thus were prevented from coalescing into a larger size, which contributed to the small diameter of SWNTs. The correlation between the catalyst size and the SWNT diameter was experimentally clarified. The subnanometer-diameter and high

  1. Wood cell-wall structure requires local 2D-microtubule disassembly by a novel plasma membrane-anchored protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Iida, Yuki; Kondo, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-07-13

    Plant cells have evolved cortical microtubules, in a two-dimensional space beneath the plasma membrane, that regulate patterning of cellulose deposition. Although recent studies have revealed that several microtubule-associated proteins facilitate self-organization of transverse cortical microtubules, it is still unknown how diverse patterns of cortical microtubules are organized in different xylem cells, which are the major components of wood. Using our newly established in vitro xylem cell differentiation system, we found that a novel microtubule end-tracking protein, microtubule depletion domain 1 (MIDD1), was anchored to distinct plasma membrane domains and promoted local microtubule disassembly, resulting in pits on xylem cell walls. The introduction of RNA interference for MIDD1 resulted in the failure of local microtubule depletion and the formation of secondary walls without pits. Conversely, the overexpression of MIDD1 reduced microtubule density. MIDD1 has two coiled-coil domains for the binding to microtubules and for the anchorage to plasma membrane domains, respectively. Combination of the two coils caused end tracking of microtubules during shrinkage and suppressed their rescue events. Our results indicate that MIDD1 integrates spatial information in the plasma membrane with cortical microtubule dynamics for determining xylem cell wall pattern. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Two novel, putatively cell wall-associated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored alpha-glucanotransferase enzymes of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kaaij, R M; Yuan, X-L; Franken, A; Ram, A F J; Punt, P J; van der Maarel, M J E C; Dijkhuizen, L

    2007-07-01

    In the genome sequence of Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88, three genes were identified with high similarity to fungal alpha-amylases. The protein sequences derived from these genes were different in two ways from all described fungal alpha-amylases: they were predicted to be glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchored, and some highly conserved amino acids of enzymes in the alpha-amylase family were absent. We expressed two of these enzymes in a suitable A. niger strain and characterized the purified proteins. Both enzymes showed transglycosylation activity on donor substrates with alpha-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds and at least five anhydroglucose units. The enzymes, designated AgtA and AgtB, produced new alpha-(1,4)-glycosidic bonds and therefore belong to the group of the 4-alpha-glucanotransferases (EC 2.4.1.25). Their reaction products reached a degree of polymerization of at least 30. Maltose and larger maltooligosaccharides were the most efficient acceptor substrates, although AgtA also used small nigerooligosaccharides containing alpha-(1,3)-glycosidic bonds as acceptor substrate. An agtA knockout of A. niger showed an increased susceptibility towards the cell wall-disrupting compound calcofluor white, indicating a cell wall integrity defect in this strain. Homologues of AgtA and AgtB are present in other fungal species with alpha-glucans in their cell walls, but not in yeast species lacking cell wall alpha-glucan. Possible roles for these enzymes in the synthesis and/or maintenance of the fungal cell wall are discussed.

  3. A glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is required for membrane localization but dispensable for cell wall association of chitin deacetylase 2 in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Baker, Lorina G; Specht, Charles A; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall proteins (CWPs) mediate important cellular processes in fungi, including adhesion, invasion, biofilm formation, and flocculation. The current model of fungal cell wall organization includes a major class of CWPs covalently bound to β-1,6-glucan via a remnant of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. This model was established by studies of ascomycetes more than a decade ago, and relatively little work has been done with other fungi, although the presumption has been that proteins identified in the cell wall which contain a predicted GPI anchor are covalently linked to cell wall glucans. The pathogenic basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans encodes >50 putatively GPI-anchored proteins, some of which have been identified in the cell wall. One of these proteins is chitin deacetylase 2 (Cda2), an enzyme responsible for converting chitin to chitosan, a cell wall polymer recently established as a virulence factor for C. neoformans infection of mammalian hosts. Using a combination of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics, we show that Cda2 is GPI anchored to membranes but noncovalently associated with the cell wall by means independent of both its GPI anchor and β-1,6-glucan. We also show that Cda2 produces chitosan when localized to the plasma membrane, but association with the cell wall is not essential for this process, thereby providing insight into the mechanism of chitosan biosynthesis. These results increase our understanding of the surface of C. neoformans and provide models of cell walls likely applicable to other undercharacterized basidiomycete pathogenic fungi. The surface of a pathogenic microbe is a major interface with its host. In fungi, the outer surface consists of a complex matrix known as the cell wall, which includes polysaccharides, proteins, and other molecules. The mammalian host recognizes many of these surface molecules and mounts appropriate responses to combat the microbial infection. Cryptococcus neoformans is a

  4. The cell envelope subtilisin-like proteinase is a virulence determinant for Streptococcus suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottschalk Marcelo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen and zoonotic agent that mainly causes septicemia, meningitis, and endocarditis. It has recently been suggested that proteinases produced by S. suis (serotype 2 are potential virulence determinants. In the present study, we screened a S. suis mutant library created by the insertion of Tn917 transposon in order to isolate a mutant deficient in a cell surface proteinase. We characterized the gene and assessed the proteinase for its potential as a virulence factor. Results Two mutants (G6G and M3G possessing a single Tn917 insertion were isolated. The affected gene coded for a protein (SSU0757 that shared a high degree of identity with Streptococccus thermophilus PrtS (95.9% and, to a lesser extent, with Streptococcus agalactiae CspA (49.5%, which are cell surface serine proteinases. The SSU0757 protein had a calculated molecular mass of 169.6 kDa and contained the catalytic triad characteristic of subtilisin family proteinases: motif I (Asp200, motif II (His239, and motif III (Ser568. SSU0757 also had the Gram-positive cell wall anchoring motif (Leu-Pro-X-Thr-Gly at the carboxy-terminus, which was followed by a hydrophobic domain. All the S. suis isolates tested, which belonged to different serotypes, possessed the gene encoding the SSU0757 protein. The two mutants devoid of subtilisin-like proteinase activity had longer generation times and were more susceptible to killing by whole blood than the wild-type parent strain P1/7. The virulence of the G6G and M3G mutants was compared to the wild-type strain in the CD1 mouse model. Significant differences in mortality rates were noted between the P1/7 group and the M3G and G6G groups (p Conclusion In summary, we identified a gene coding for a cell surface subtilisin-like serine proteinase that is widely distributed in S. suis. Evidences were brought for the involvement of this proteinase in S. suis virulence.

  5. Uncertainty assessment of a dike with an anchored sheet pile wall using FEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rippi, Aikaterini; Nuttall, Jonathan; Teixeira, Ana; Schweckendiek, T.; Lang, M.; Klijn, F.; Samuels, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch design codes for the dikes with retaining walls rely on Finite Element Analysis (FEM) in combination with partial safety factors. However, this can lead to conservative designs. For this reason, in this study, a reliability analysis is carried out with FEM calculations aiming to

  6. Model Solutions for Performance-Based Seismic Analysis of an Anchored Sheet Pile Quay Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, C.J.W.; Peters, D.J.; de Gijt, J.G.; Metrikine, A.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional seismic designs of quay walls in ports are mostly based on pseudo-static analysis. A more advanced alternative is the Performance-Based Design (PBD) method, which evaluates permanent deformations and amounts of (repairable) damage under seismic loading. The aim of this study is to

  7. Role of the Group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Caliot

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  8. Surface-Anchored Poly(4-vinylpyridine)–Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Metal Composites for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Bora

    2016-08-05

    A platform for chemiresistive gas detectors based upon single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersions stabilized by poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) covalently immobilized onto a glass substrate was developed. To fabricate these devices, a glass substrate with gold electrodes is treated with 3-bromopropyltrichlorosilane. The resulting alkyl bromide coating presents groups that can react with the P4VP to covalently bond (anchor) the polymer–SWCNT composite to the substrate. Residual pyridyl groups in P4VP not consumed in this quaternization reaction are available to coordinate metal nanoparticles or ions chosen to confer selectivity and sensitivity to target gas analytes. Generation of P4VP coordinated to silver nanoparticles produces an enhanced response to ammonia gas. The incorporation of soft Lewis acidic Pd2+ cations by binding PdCl2 to P4VP yields a selective and highly sensitive device that changes resistance upon exposure to vapors of thioethers. The latter materials have utility for odorized fuel leak detection, microbial activity, and breath diagnostics. A third demonstration makes use of permanganate incorporation to produce devices with large responses to vapors of volatile organic compounds that are susceptible to oxidation.

  9. Use of green fluorescent protein fusions to analyse the N- and C-terminal signal peptides of GPI-anchored cell wall proteins in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuxin; Zhang, Zimei; Wong, Brian

    2003-12-01

    Glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins account for 26-35% of the Candida albicans cell wall. To understand the signals that regulate these proteins' cell surface localization, green fluorescent protein (GFP) was fused to the N- and C-termini of the C. albicans cell wall proteins (CWPs) Hwp1p, Als3p and Rbt5p. C. albicans expressing all three fusion proteins were fluorescent at the cell surface. GFP was released from membrane fractions by PI-PLC and from cell walls by beta-glucanase, which implied that GFP was GPI-anchored to the plasma membrane and then covalently attached to cell wall glucans. Twenty and 25 amino acids, respectively, from the N- and C-termini of Hwp1p were sufficient to target GFP to the cell surface. C-terminal substitutions that are permitted by the omega rules (G613D, G613N, G613S, G613A, G615S) did not interfere with GFP localization, whereas some non-permitted substitutions (G613E, G613Q, G613R, G613T and G615Q) caused GFP to accumulate in intracellular ER-like structures and others (G615C, G613N/G615C and G613D/G615C) did not. These results imply that (i) GFP fusions can be used to analyse the N- and C-terminal signal peptides of GPI-anchored CWPs, (ii) the omega amino acid in Hwp1p is G613, and (iii) C can function at the omega+2 position in C. albicans GPI-anchored proteins.

  10. Improved methods for binding acma-type protein anchor fusions yo cell-wall material of micro-organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis; Ramasamy, R.; Steen, Anton; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Kuipers, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides a method for improving binding of a proteinaceous substance to cell-wall material of a Gram-positive bacterium, said substance comprising an AcmA cell wall binding domain or homolog or functional derivative thereof, said method comprising treating said cell-wall material with

  11. The GPI-anchored protein Ecm33 is vital for conidiation, cell wall integrity, and multi-stress tolerance of two filamentous entomopathogens but not for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhu, Jing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2014-06-01

    Ecm33 is one of several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. This protein is known to be involved in fungal cell wall integrity, but its contribution to multi-stress tolerance is largely unknown. Here we characterized the functions of two Ecm33 orthologues, i.e., Bbecm33 in Beauveria bassiana and Mrecm33 in Metarhizium robertsii. Bbecm33 and Mrecm33 were both confirmed as GPI-anchored cell wall proteins in immunogold localization. Single-gene disruptions of Bbecm33 and Mrecm33 caused slight growth defects, but conidial yield decreased much more in ΔBbecm33 (76 %) than in ΔMrecm33 (42 %), accompanied with significant reductions of intracellular mannitol and trehalose contents in both mutants and weakened cell walls in ΔBbecm33 only. Consequently, ΔBbecm33 was far more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbating agents Congo red and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) than ΔMrecm33, which showed null response to SDS. Both deletion mutants became significantly more sensitive to two oxidants (menadione and H2O2), two fungicides (carbendazim and ethirimol), osmotic salt NaCl, and Ca(2+) during growth despite some degrees of differences in their sensitivities to the chemical stressors. Strikingly, conidial UV-B resistance decreased by 55 % in ΔBbecm33 but was unaffected in ΔMrecm33, unlike a similar decrease (25-28 %) of conidial thermotolerance in both. All the changes were restored to wild-type levels by gene complementation through ectopic gene integration in each fungus. However, neither ΔBbecm33 nor ΔMrecm33 showed a significant change in virulence to a susceptible insect host. Our results indicate that Bbecm33 and Mrecm33 contribute differentially to the conidiation and multi-stress tolerance of B. bassiana and M. robertsii.

  12. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-09-15

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest.

  13. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  14. User's Guide: Computer Program for Simulation of Construction Sequence for Stiff Wall Systems With Multiple Levels of Anchors (CMULTIANC)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dawkins, William

    2003-01-01

    .... Top-down construction is assumed in this analysis procedure. The retaining wall system is modeled using beam on inelastic foundation methods with elastoplastic soil- pressure deformation curves (R-y curves...

  15. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  16. Two homologous genes, DCW1 (YKL046c) and DFG5, are essential for cell growth and encode glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins required for cell wall biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagaki, Hiroshi; Wu, Hong; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Ito, Kiyoshi

    2002-11-01

    The cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae consists of glucan, chitin and various kinds of mannoproteins. Major parts of mannoproteins are synthesized as glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and are then transferred to cell wall beta-1,6-glucan. A glycosyltransferase has been hypothesized to catalyse this transfer reaction. A database search revealed that the products of YKL046c and DFG5 are homologous to bacterial mannosidase. These genes are homologous to each other and have primary structures characteristic of GPI-anchored proteins. Although single disruptants of ykl046c and dfg5 were viable, ykl046cDelta was hypersensitive to a cell wall-digesting enzyme (zymolyase), suggesting that this gene is involved in cell wall biosynthesis. We therefore designated this gene as DCW1 (defective cell wall). A double disruptant of dcw1 and dfg5 was synthetically lethal, indicating that the functions of these gene products are redundant, and at least one of them is required for cell growth. Cells deficient in both Dcw1p and Dfg5p were round and large, had cell walls that contained an increased amount of chitin and secreted a major cell wall protein, Cwp1p, into the medium. Biochemical analyses showed that epitope-tagged Dcw1p is an N-glycosylated, GPI-anchored membrane protein and is localized in the membrane fraction including the cell surface. These results suggest that both Dcw1p and Dfg5p are GPI-anchored membrane proteins and are required for normal biosynthesis of the cell wall.

  17. Analysis of Anchoring Mechanism of Fully Grouted Prestressed Anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEN Zhi-jie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some researchers have been carried out on analysis of the influence of the full grouted prestressed anchor shape of borehole wall on its carrying capacity. Based on the self-affine fractal feature of anchor borehole wall structural plane, the relation equation among structural plane shear strength, liquid injection pressure, tensile load and structural plane fractal dimension D was built, the instability judgment criterion of anchoring bearing strata and rock structural plane was determined, the solving equations of disintegrated rock support density were derived. Based on the experimental results, the theoretical basis of support design under the disintegrated rock condition was offered.

  18. Anchoring alpha-manganese oxide nanocrystallites on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as electrode materials for supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Li; Qin Zongyi, E-mail: phqin@dhu.edu.cn; Wang Lingfeng; Liu Hongjin; Zhu Meifang [Donghua University, State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2010-09-15

    The partial coverage of manganese oxide (MnO{sub 2}) particles was achieved on the surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through a facile hydrothermal process. These particles were demonstrated to be alpha-manganese dioxide ({alpha}-MnO{sub 2}) nanocrystallites, and exhibited the appearance of the whisker-shaped crystals with the length of 80-100 nm. In such a configuration, the uncovered CNTs in the nanocomposite acted as a good conductive pathway and the whisker-shaped MnO{sub 2} nanocrystallites efficiently increased the contact of the electrolyte with the active materials. Thus, the highest specific capacitance of 550 F g{sup -1} was achieved using the resulting nanocomposites as the supercapacitor electrode. In addition, the enhancement of the capacity retention was observed, with the nanocomposite losing only 10% of the maximum capacity after 1,500 cycles.

  19. Anchoring alpha-manganese oxide nanocrystallites on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as electrode materials for supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Qin, Zong-Yi; Wang, Ling-Feng; Liu, Hong-Jin; Zhu, Mei-Fang

    2010-09-01

    The partial coverage of manganese oxide (MnO2) particles was achieved on the surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) through a facile hydrothermal process. These particles were demonstrated to be alpha-manganese dioxide (α-MnO2) nanocrystallites, and exhibited the appearance of the whisker-shaped crystals with the length of 80-100 nm. In such a configuration, the uncovered CNTs in the nanocomposite acted as a good conductive pathway and the whisker-shaped MnO2 nanocrystallites efficiently increased the contact of the electrolyte with the active materials. Thus, the highest specific capacitance of 550 F g-1 was achieved using the resulting nanocomposites as the supercapacitor electrode. In addition, the enhancement of the capacity retention was observed, with the nanocomposite losing only 10% of the maximum capacity after 1,500 cycles.

  20. Three-Dimensional Graphene/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Anchored with SnO2 Nanoparticles for High Performance Lithium Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Fang, Fang; Yuan, Tao; Yang, Junhe; Chen, Liang; Yao, Chi; Zheng, Shiyou; Sun, Dalin

    2017-02-01

    A unique 3D graphene-single walled carbon nanotube (G-SWNT) aerogel anchored with SnO 2 nanoparticles (SnO 2 @G-SWCNT) is fabricated by the hydrothermal self-assembly process. The influences of mass ratio of SWCNT to graphene on structure and electrochemical properties of SnO 2 @G-SWCNT are investigated systematically. The SnO 2 @G-SWCNT composites show excellent electrochemical performance in Li-ion batteries; for instance, at a current density of 100 mA g -1 , a specific capacity of 758 mAh g -1 was obtained for the SnO 2 @G-SWCNT with 50% SWCNT in G-SWCNT and the Coulombic efficiency is close to 100% after 200 cycles; even at current density of 1 A g -1 , it can still maintain a stable specific capacity of 537 mAh g -1 after 300 cycles. It is believed that the 3D G-SWNT architecture provides a flexible conductive matrix for loading the SnO 2 , facilitating the electronic and ionic transportation and mitigating the volume variation of the SnO 2 during lithiation/delithiation. This work also provides a facile and reasonable strategy to solve the pulverization and agglomeration problem of other transition metal oxides as electrode materials.

  1. Ultrathin molybdenum diselenide nanosheets anchored on multi-walled carbon nanotubes as anode composites for high performance sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhian; Yang, Xing; Fu, Yun; Du, Ke

    2015-11-01

    Ultrathin molybdenum diselenide nanosheets are decorated on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) via a one-step hydrothermal method. Uniform MoSe2 nanosheets are firmly anchored on MWCNT according to the characterizations of scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM). When evaluated as anodes for sodium storage, the MoSe2@MWCNT composites deliver a reversible specific capacity of 459 mAh g-1 at a current of 200 mA g-1 over 90 cycles, and a specific capacity of 385 mAh g-1 even at a current rate of 2000 mAh g-1, which is better than the MoSe2 nanosheets. The enhanced electrochemical performance of the MoSe2@MWCNT composites can be ascribed to the synergic effects of MoSe2 nanosheets and MWCNT. The high capacity and good rate performance reveal that the MoSe2@MWCNT composites are very promising for applications in sodium-ion batteries.

  2. Non-covalently anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes with hexa-decafluorinated zinc phthalocyanine as ppb level chemiresistive chlorine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.; Kumar, Subodh; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    A cost effective solution assembly method has been explored for preparing zinc(II)1,2,3,4,8,9,10,11,15,16,17,18,22,23,24,25-hexa-decafluoro-29H,31H-phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) investigations confirm the non-covalent anchoring of F16ZnPc onto MWCNTs-COOH through п-п stacking interactions. Further, a highly sensitive and selective chemiresistive Cl2 sensor has been fabricated using F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid. The response of sensor is found to be 21.28% for 2 ppm of Cl2 with a response time of 14 s and theoretical detection limit of the sensor is found down to 0.06 ppb. The improved Cl2 sensing characteristics of hybrid are found to be originated from the synergetic interaction between F16ZnPc and MWCNTs-COOH. The underlying mechanism for improved gas sensing performance of F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH sensor towards Cl2 has been explained using Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies.

  3. An asymmetric supercapacitor with ultrahigh energy density based on nickle cobalt sulfide nanocluster anchoring multi-wall carbon nanotubes hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ping; Fan, Mingjin; Yang, Desuo; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hualei; Wang, Jinqing

    2016-07-01

    The development of novel electrode materials with high energy density and long cycling life is critical to realize electrochemical capacitive energy storage for practical applications. In this paper, the hybrids of nickle cobalt sulfide/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (NiCo2S4/MWCNTs) with different contents of MWCNTs are prepared using a facile one-pot solvothermal reaction. As novel active materials for supercapacitors, the electrochemistry tests show that the hybrid of NiCo2S4/MWCNTs-5 is able to deliver a high specific capacitance of 2080 F g-1 at the current density of 1 A g-1, even superior rate capability of 61% capacitance retention after a 20-fold increase in current densities, when the content of MWCNTs is up to 5%. More importantly, an asymmetric supercapacitor assembled by NiCo2S4/MWCNTs-5 as positive electrode and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) as negative electrode delivers a high energy density of 51.8 Wh Kg-1 at a power density of 865 W kg-1, and 85.7% of its initial capacitance is retained at the current density of 4 A g-1 after 5000 charge-discharge cycles, exhibiting potential prospect for practical applications.

  4. The vagina of women infected with Trichomonas vaginalis has numerous proteinases and antibody to trichomonad proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, J F; Newton, E; Dennis, C; Neale, K A

    1991-12-01

    Patients with trichomoniasis have serum antibody to numerous T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases, indicating that the proteinases are expressed in vivo. It was important, therefore, to examine for the presence of soluble trichomonad proteinases and/or antibody to the proteinases in the vagina of infected women. Vaginal washes (VWs) from 20 women were examined for the presence of proteinases by electrophoresis using acrylamide co-polymerised with gelatin as the indicator system. Antibody to proteinases in VWs was detected by an immunoprecipitation assay involving protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus first coated with anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody, which was then added to VWs. For VWs having soluble proteinases, the bacteria were used to determine whether immune complexes between antibody and proteinases were present. VWs without soluble proteinases were incubated with the anti-human IgG treated bacteria before adding to detergent extracts of T. vaginalis. Individual isolates from the patients examined in this study were also analysed by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis for their proteinase content. Finally, VWs were from patients without any history of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) as well as from individuals having numerous other STDs, including yeast, group B streptococcus, chlamydia, and syphilis. Approximately one-third of patients had soluble proteinases in the VWs; the remaining two-thirds (70%) of patients and normal women had no detectable proteinases in VWs. Half of the patients without soluble proteinases had IgG which, when bound to S. aureus, immunoprecipitated many proteinases from a detergent extract of T. vaginalis. All soluble proteinases and those precipitated from trichomonal extracts were inhibited by inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. Finally, patients having trichomoniasis in addition to numerous other STD agents, including yeast, group B streptococcus, chlamydia, and syphilis did not have soluble proteinases

  5. [Ulysses retrotransposon aspartate proteinase (Drosophila virilis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, D A; Savvateeva, L V; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2002-01-01

    Retrotransposones are mobile genetic elements occurring in genomes of bacteria, plants or animals. Retrotransposones were found to contain nucleotide sequences encoding proteins which are homological to retroviral aspartic proteinases. Our research has been focused on Ulysses which is mobile genetic element found in Drosophila virilis. We suggested a primary structure of Ulysses proteinase using comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of retroviral proteinases and proteinases from retrotransposones. The appropriate cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purification of recombinant protein (12 kD) has been carried out by affinity chromatography using pepstatine-agarose. The obtained protein has proteolytic activity at optimum pH 5.5 like the majority of aspartic proteinases.

  6. Brittle stalk 2 encodes a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that affects mechanical strength of maize tissues by altering the composition and structure of secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Ada; Dhugga, Kanwarpal S; Appenzeller, Laura; Meeley, Robert; Bourett, Timothy M; Howard, Richard J; Rafalski, Antoni

    2006-10-01

    A spontaneous maize mutant, brittle stalk-2 (bk2-ref), exhibits dramatically reduced tissue mechanical strength. Reduction in mechanical strength in the stalk tissue was highly correlated with a reduction in the amount of cellulose and an uneven deposition of secondary cell wall material in the subepidermal and perivascular sclerenchyma fibers. Cell wall accounted for two-thirds of the observed reduction in dry matter content per unit length of the mutant stalk in comparison to the wildtype stalk. Although the cell wall composition was significantly altered in the mutant in comparison to the wildtype stalks, no compensation by lignin and cell wall matrix for reduced cellulose amount was observed. We demonstrate that Bk2 encodes a Cobra-like protein that is homologous to the rice Bc1 protein. In the bk2-ref gene, a 1 kb transposon-like element is inserted in the beginning of the second exon, disrupting the open reading frame. The Bk2 gene was expressed in the stalk, husk, root, and leaf tissues, but not in the embryo, endosperm, pollen, silk, or other tissues with comparatively few or no secondary cell wall containing cells. The highest expression was in the isolated vascular bundles. In agreement with its role in secondary wall formation, the expression pattern of the Bk2 gene was very similar to that of the ZmCesA10, ZmCesA11, and ZmCesA12 genes, which are known to be involved in secondary wall formation. We have isolated an independent Mutator-tagged allele of bk2, referred to as bk2-Mu7, the phenotype of which is similar to that of the spontaneous mutant. Our results demonstrate that mutations in the Bk2 gene affect stalk strength in maize by interfering with the deposition of cellulose in the secondary cell wall in fiber cells.

  7. A Novel Plasma Membrane-Anchored Protein Regulates Xylem Cell-Wall Deposition through Microtubule-Dependent Lateral Inhibition of Rho GTPase Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Fukuda, Hiroo; Oda, Yoshihisa

    2017-08-21

    Spatial control of cell-wall deposition is essential for determining plant cell shape [1]. Rho-type GTPases, together with the cortical cytoskeleton, play central roles in regulating cell-wall patterning [2]. In metaxylem vessel cells, which are the major components of xylem tissues, active ROP11 Rho GTPases form oval plasma membrane domains that locally disrupt cortical microtubules, thereby directing the formation of oval pits in secondary cell walls [3-5]. However, the regulatory mechanism that determines the planar shape of active Rho of Plants (ROP) domains is still unknown. Here we show that IQD13 associates with cortical microtubules and the plasma membrane to laterally restrict the localization of ROP GTPase domains, thereby directing the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. Loss and overexpression of IQD13 led to the formation of abnormally round and narrow secondary cell-wall pits, respectively. Ectopically expressed IQD13 increased the presence of parallel cortical microtubules by promoting microtubule rescue. A reconstructive approach revealed that IQD13 confines the area of active ROP domains within the lattice of the cortical microtubules, causing narrow ROP domains to form. This activity required the interaction of IQD13 with the plasma membrane. These findings suggest that IQD13 positively regulates microtubule dynamics as well as their linkage to the plasma membrane, which synergistically confines the area of active ROP domains, leading to the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. This finding sheds light on the role of microtubule-plasma membrane linkage as a lateral fence that determines the planar shape of Rho GTPase domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Ogden Anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, W E; Cerniglia, M W; Carro, A

    1998-06-01

    Many procedures performed by podiatric surgeons today require the use of a soft-tissue anchoring device. In recent years, many new anchoring devices have become available for use in the foot and ankle. The authors introduce a new soft-tissue anchoring device that has yet to be described in the podiatric literature and present two cases in which the new anchor was used.

  9. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  10. Serine proteinases and their inhibitors in fertilization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonáková, Věra; Jelínková-Slavíčková, Petra

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 8, 3,4 (2004), s. 108-110 ISSN 1211-8869. [Central European Conference on Human Tumor Markers /5./. Praha, 01.10.2004-03.10.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/02/0433; GA ČR GP303/02/P069; GA ČR GP303/04/P070; GA MZd NJ7463 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : serine proteinase * proteinase inhibitors * fertilization Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Autoactivation of proteinase A initiates activation of yeast vacuolar zymogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1992-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PEP4 gene encodes proteinase A, an aspartyl protease. pep4 mutants are defective in the activation of many vacuolar hydrolases, including proteinase B. We have expressed a pep4 mutation which directs the accumulation of pro-proteinase A with a defective active site. Co...

  12. Characterization of the mature cell surface proteinase of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Josefina M; Brown, Lucía; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Hebert, Elvira M

    2015-05-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinase (CEP) of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 (PrtL) has an essential role in bacterial growth, contributes to the flavor and texture development of fermented products, and can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides during milk fermentation. The genome of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 possesses only one gene that encodes PrtL, which consists of 1924 amino acids and is a multidomain protein anchored to the cell via its W domain. PrtL was extracted from the cell under high ionic strength conditions using NaCl, suggesting an electrostatic interaction between the proteinase and the cell envelope. The released PrtL was purified and biochemically characterized; its activity was maximal at temperatures between 37 and 40 °C and at pH between 7 and 8. Under optimal conditions, PrtL exhibited higher affinity for succinyl-alanyl-alanyl-prolyl-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide than for succinyl-alanyl-glutamyl-prolyl-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide, while methoxy-succinyl-arginyl-prolyl-tyrosyl-p-nitroanilide was not degraded. A similar α- and β-casein degradation pattern was observed with the purified and the cell envelope-bound proteinase. Finally, on the basis of its specificity towards caseins and the unique combination of amino acids at residues thought to be involved in substrate specificity, PrtL can be classified as a representative of a new group of CEP.

  13. Proteinase-activated receptors - mediators of early and delayed normal tissue radiation responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer-Jensen, M.

    2003-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are G-protein coupled receptors that are activated by proteolytic exposure of a receptor-tethered ligand. The discovery of this receptor family represents one of the most intriguing recent developments in signal transduction. PARs are involved in the regulation of many normal and pathophysiological processes, notably inflammatory and fibroproliferative responses to injury. Preclinical studies performed in our laboratory suggest that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays a critical role in the mechanism of chronicity of radiation fibrosis, while proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may mediate important fibroproliferative responses in irradiated intestine. Specifically, activation of PAR-1 by thrombin, and PAR-2 by pancreatic trypsin and mast cell proteinases, appears to be involved in acute radiation-induced inflammation, as well as in subsequent extracellular matrix deposition, leading to the development of intestinal wall fibrosis and clinical complications. Pharmacological modulators of PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression or activation would be potentially useful as preventive or therapeutic agents in patients who receive radiation therapy, especially if blockade could be targeted to specific tissues or cellular compartments

  14. Squash inhibitor family of serine proteinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otlewski, J.; Krowarsch, D.

    1996-01-01

    Squash inhibitors of serine proteinases form an uniform family of small proteins. They are built of 27-33 amino-acid residues and cross-linked with three disulfide bridges. The reactive site peptide bond (P1-P1') is between residue 5 (Lys, Arg or Leu) and 6 (always Ile). High resolution X-ray structures are available for two squash inhibitors complexed with trypsin. NMR solution structures have also been determined for free inhibitors. The major structural motif is a distorted, triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. A similar folding motif has been recently found in a number of proteins, including: conotoxins from fish-hunting snails, carboxypeptidase inhibitor from potato, kalata B1 polypeptide, and in some growth factors (e.g. nerve growth factor, transforming growth factor β2, platelet-derived growth factor). Squash inhibitors are highly stable and rigid proteins. They inhibit a number of serine proteinases: trypsin, plasmin, kallikrein, blood clotting factors: X a and XII a , cathepsin G. The inhibition spectrum can be much broadened if specific amino-acid substitutions are introduced, especially at residues which contact proteinase. Squash inhibitors inhibit proteinases via the standard mechanism. According to the mechanism, inhibitors are substrates which exhibit at neutral pH a high k cat /K m index for hydrolysis and resynthesis of the reactive site, and a low value of the hydrolysis constant. (author)

  15. Management of subluxated capsular bag-fixated intraocular lenses using a capsular anchor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ton, Yokrat; Naftali, Modi; Lapid Gortzak, Ruth; Assia, Ehud I.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the use of the capsular anchor (AssiAnchor) to manage a subluxated intraocular lens (IOL) in the capsular bag. The anchor comprises 2 prongs that hold the anterior lens capsule and a central rod that is sutured to the scleral wall, enabling centration of the IOL-capsular bag complex. Six

  16. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  17. A cytotoxic serine proteinase isolated from mouse submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, T; Nagumo, N; Ikigai, H; Murakami, K; Okubo, S; Toda, M; Ohnishi, R; Tomita, M

    1989-08-01

    We have isolated a novel cytotoxic factor from the submandibular glands of male BALB/c mice by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. The cytotoxic factor is a serine proteinase, which belongs to the mouse glandular kallikrein (mGK) family, with an Mr of approximately 27,000. The purified serine proteinase showed cytotoxic activity against mouse thymocytes in a dose-dependent manner, and a serine proteinase inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, blocked its cytotoxic activity.

  18. Anchorage Behaviors of Frictional Tieback Anchors in Silty Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Tsung; Hsiao, Wen-Ta; Chen, Ke-Ting; Hu, Wen-Chi; Wu, Ssu-Yi

    2017-06-01

    Soil anchors are extensively used in geotechnical applications, most commonly serve as tieback walls in deep excavations. To investigate the anchorage mechanisms of this tieback anchor, a constitutive model that considers both strain hardening and softening and volume dilatancy entitled SHASOVOD model, and FLAC3D software are used to perform 3-D numerical analyses. The results from field anchor tests are compared with those calculated by numerical analyses to enhance the applicability of the numerical method. After the calibration, this research carried out the parameter studies by numerical analyses. The numerical results reveal that whether the yield of soil around an anchor develops to ground surface and/or touches the diaphragm wall depending on the overburden depth H and the embedded depth Z of an anchor, this study suggests the minimum overburden and embedded depths to avoid the yield of soils develop to ground surface and/or touch the diaphragm wall. When the embedded depth, overburden depth or fixed length of an anchor increases, the anchorage capacity also increases. Increasing fixed length should be the optimum method to increase the anchorage capacity for fixed length less than 20m. However, when the fixed length of an anchor exceeds 30 m, the increasing rate of anchorage capacity per fixed length decreases, and progressive yield occurs obviously between the fixed length and surrounding soil.

  19. Antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, P J; Olson, J E; Lee, G K; Palmer, J T; Klaus, J L; Rasnick, D

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors. A number of vinyl sulfones strongly inhibited falcipain, a Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteinase that is a critical hemoglobinase. In studies of cultured parasites, nanomolar concentrations of three vinyl sulfones inhibited parasite hemoglobin degradation, metabolic activity, and development. The antimalarial effects correlated with the inhibition of falcipain. Our results suggest that vinyl sulfones or...

  20. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen are the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/033/02/0195-0207. Keywords. Kallikrein; prostate cancer biomarker; proteinase activity; seminal plasma; tumour proliferation and metastasis; therapeutic target. Abstract. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were each isolated from human seminal fluid and ...

  1. New aspartic proteinase of Ulysses retrotransposon from Drosophila virilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, D A; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2004-06-01

    This work is focused on the investigation of a proteinase of Ulysses mobile genetic element from Drosophila virilis. The primary structure of this proteinase is suggested based on comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of aspartic proteinases from retroviruses and retrotransposons. The corresponding cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein accumulated in inclusion bodies. The recombinant protein (12 kD) was subjected to refolding and purified by affinity chromatography on pepstatin-agarose. Proteolytic activity of the protein was determined using oligopeptide substrates melittin and insulin B-chain. It was found that the maximum of the proteolytic activity is displayed at pH 5.5 as for the majority of aspartic proteinases. We observed that hydrolysis of B-chain of insulin was totally inhibited by pepstatin A in the micromolar concentration range. The molecular weight of the monomer of the Ulysses proteinase was determined by MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometry.

  2. Nonsingular walls in plane cholesteric layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, V A; Osipov, M A; Stewart, I W

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a straight interface (wall) between regions with differing values of the pitch in planar cholesteric layers with finite strength of the surface anchoring is investigated theoretically. It is found that the shape and strength of the anchoring potential influences essentially the structure of the wall and a motionless wall between thermodynamically stable regions without a singularity in the director distribution in the layer can exist for sufficiently weak anchoring only. More specifically, for the existence of such a wall the dimensionless parameter S d = K 22 /Wd (where W is the depth of the anchoring potential, K 22 is the elastic twist modulus and d is the layer thickness) should exceed its critical value, which is dependent on the shape of the anchoring potential. General equations describing the director distribution in the wall are presented. Detailed analysis of these equations is carried out for the case of infinitely strong anchoring at one surface and finite anchoring strength at the second layer surface. It is shown that the wall width L is directly dependent upon the shape and strength of the anchoring potential and that its estimate ranges from d to (dL p ) 1/2 (where L p = K 22 /W is the penetration length), corresponding to different anchoring strengths and shape potentials. The dependence of the director distribution in the wall upon all three Frank elastic moduli is analytically found for some specific limiting cases of the model anchoring potentials. Motion of the wall is briefly investigated and the corresponding calculations performed under the assumption that the shape of a moving wall is the same as a motionless one. It is noted that experimental investigation of the walls in planar cholesteric layers can be used for the determination of the actual shape of surface anchoring potentials

  3. Isolation, cloning and structural characterisation of boophilin, a multifunctional Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from the cattle tick.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Macedo-Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of coagulation factors from blood-feeding animals display a wide variety of structural motifs and inhibition mechanisms. We have isolated a novel inhibitor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus, one of the most widespread parasites of farm animals. The inhibitor, which we have termed boophilin, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Mature boophilin is composed of two canonical Kunitz-type domains, and inhibits not only the major procoagulant enzyme, thrombin, but in addition, and by contrast to all other previously characterised natural thrombin inhibitors, significantly interferes with the proteolytic activity of other serine proteinases such as trypsin and plasmin. The crystal structure of the bovine alpha-thrombin.boophilin complex, refined at 2.35 A resolution reveals a non-canonical binding mode to the proteinase. The N-terminal region of the mature inhibitor, Q16-R17-N18, binds in a parallel manner across the active site of the proteinase, with the guanidinium group of R17 anchored in the S(1 pocket, while the C-terminal Kunitz domain is negatively charged and docks into the basic exosite I of thrombin. This binding mode resembles the previously characterised thrombin inhibitor, ornithodorin which, unlike boophilin, is composed of two distorted Kunitz modules. Unexpectedly, both boophilin domains adopt markedly different orientations when compared to those of ornithodorin, in its complex with thrombin. The N-terminal boophilin domain rotates 9 degrees and is displaced by 6 A, while the C-terminal domain rotates almost 6 degrees accompanied by a 3 A displacement. The reactive-site loop of the N-terminal Kunitz domain of boophilin with its P(1 residue, K31, is fully solvent exposed and could thus bind a second trypsin-like proteinase without sterical restraints. This finding explains the formation of a ternary thrombin.boophilin.trypsin complex, and suggests a mechanism for prothrombinase inhibition in vivo.

  4. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  5. A zymography analysis of proteinase activity present in Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathiparambil, Madanan G; Cattavarayane, Sandhanakrishnan; Manickam, Gayathri D; Singh, Kavita; Perumana, Sudhakaran R; Sehgal, Subhash C

    2011-03-01

    Leptospirosis is a major public health problem caused by spirochete Leptospira which is an extracellular pathogen. During infection and invasion, the bacteria cross the physical barriers and later it encounter with the host defence mechanism. These processes may involve proteolytic degradation of the host tissue biomatrix. In an effort to understand the production and nature of Leptospiral proteinases, investigations were carried out using zymograpic methods. The results showed that the leptospires degrades different kind of protein substances such as gelatin, casein, and albumin. Gelatin zymography reveals that different serovars contain multiple gelatinases in the molecular weight range from 240 to 32 kDa. Studies using inhibitors suggested that the Leptospiral proteinases include metalloproteinases, serine or cysteine proteinases. The temperature sensitivity suggests that some of these proteinases are stable even at high temperatures. The presence of multiple gelatinases in Leptospira serovars suggests a critical role for these enzymes in Leptospiral invasion and pathogenesis.

  6. Detection and Characterization of Bacterial Proteinases Using Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanan, Madathiparambil G; Mechoor, Ambili

    2017-01-01

    Proteinases play a crucial role in invasion and pathogenesis of bacteria, especially the extracellular and membrane-bound forms. Analysis of these proteinases demands the isolation by retaining the enzymatic activity. The isolation procedures maintaining the native structure of the enzyme in its soluble form are also of extreme importance. The qualitative analyses of these proteinases are carried out by electrophoresis and zymography. Enzymatic characterization based on the effect of inhibitors and activators on gelatinase activity also can be assessed using this zymography. The membrane-bound proteinases can be isolated in their native and soluble form, still retaining the activity using 6-aminocaproic acid and sodium deoxycholate; the procedure of which is explained in this chapter.

  7. The induction of proteinases in corn and soybean by anoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanToai, T.; Hwang, Shihying

    1989-01-01

    This study characterized the anaerobic changes in proteinase activities in corn and soybean roots and to investigate the possibility that these changes might contribute to the differential anaerobiosis tolerance of the two species. After 24 h of anoxia, crude protein extracts from H60 corn and Keller soybean root tips (10cm) were assayed for proteinase activities at pH range from 4.5 to 9.5. Turnover of aberrant proteins was studied in seedlings labelled with 3 H-leucine for 12 h under: (a) puromycin (0.64 mM) in air, (b) ethanol (1%) in air, (c) nitrogen and (d) air. After the treatment, the labelled proteins remaining in roots were determined every 2 h for 6 h. In both corn and soybean, activities of alkali proteinases increased, and activities of acid proteinases declined under anoxia. Neutral proteinases increase in anoxic corn roots, but decline in anoxic soybean roots. The protein turnover rate in corn treated with puromycin, ethanol and nitrogen was much higher than in control roots. The protein turnover rate in soybean roots treated with puromycin, ethanol was similar to the rate of the control. The results indicated that: (a) anoxic corn can degrade aberrant proteins, but anoxic soybean cannot, (b) the degradation of aberrant proteins in anoxic corn is accomplished by neutral proteinases, and (c) the accumulation of aberrant proteins in soybean might contribute to the susceptibility of this species to anoxia

  8. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza V. Oliva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.Obtidas de sementes leguminosas, várias proteínas inibem proteinases de origem animal, incluindo humanas, e podem ser consideradas para o desenvolvimento de compostos com atividade biológica. Inibidores da família Bowman-Birk e da família Kunitz vegetal tem sido caracterizados em relação a especificidade para proteinase, estrutura primária e sitio reativo. O nosso grupo majoritariamente vem estudando o gênero Bauhinia, principalmente as espécies bauhinioides, rufa, ungulatae variegata. Em algumas espécies, mais de um inibidor com propriedades diferentes foi caracterizado. Embora tais proteínas apresentem alta similaridade estrutural, diferem quanto à inibição de proteinases, e foram exploradas em estudos utilizando diversos modelos biológicos.

  9. Neutrophils degrade subendothelial matrices in the presence of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor. Cooperative use of lysosomal proteinases and oxygen metabolites.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, S J; Regiani, S

    1984-01-01

    Triggered neutrophils rapidly degraded labeled matrices secreted by cultured, venous endothelial cells via a process dependent on elastase but not oxygen metabolites. In the presence of high concentrations of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor, the ability of the stimulated neutrophil to solubilize the matrix was impaired. However, at lower concentrations of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor the neutrophil could enhance the degradative potential of its released elastase by a H2O2-dependent process. Coin...

  10. Effects of endogenous cysteine proteinases on structures of collagen fibres from dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Fei; Song, Liang; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Li, Dong-Mei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Konno, Kunihiko; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-10-01

    Autolysis of sea cucumber, caused by endogenous enzymes, leads to postharvest quality deterioration of sea cucumber. However, the effects of endogenous proteinases on structures of collagen fibres, the major biologically relevant substrates in the body wall of sea cucumber, are less clear. Collagen fibres were prepared from the dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus), and the structural consequences of degradation of the collagen fibres caused by endogenous cysteine proteinases (ECP) from Stichopus japonicus were examined. Scanning electron microscopic images showed that ECP caused partial disaggregation of collagen fibres into collagen fibrils by disrupting interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed increased structural disorder of fibrillar collagen caused by ECP. SDS-PAGE and chemical analysis indicated that ECP can liberate glycosaminoglycan, hydroxyproline and collagen fragments from collagen fibres. Thus ECP can cause disintegration of collagen fibres by degrading interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepek Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock.

  12. Effects of an Anchoring Configuration on the Static Response of Geotextile and Geogrid Fabrics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simmons, Lebron

    2000-01-01

    An investigation is made of a potential retrofit system for in-fill masonry walls subjected to blast effects that consist of geotextile or geogrid materials anchored to the roof, floor slabs and beams...

  13. Proteinases of human epidermis; a possible mechanism for polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, N; Hatcher, V B; Lazarus, G S [Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y. (USA); Montefiore Hospital, New York (USA); Duke Univ., Durham, N.C. (USA))

    1976-12-08

    Three neutral proteinases (EC 3.4.-,-) and cathepsin D have been identified in human epidermis utilizing a highly sensitive radioactive method. The proteinases were extracted in 1.0 M KCl and 0.1% Triton X-100 and separated by Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The neutral proteinase peaks were all inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate and thus were serine proteinases. Incubation of the enzyme fractions with (/sup 3/H)diisopropyl fluorophosphate followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the two larger molecular weight proteinases were enzyme mixtures. The small molecular weight (/sup 3/H)diisopropyl fluorophosphate proteinase migrated as a single band. Injection of the small molecular weight neutral proteinase into rabbit skin produced a polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration and edema. The reaction was not observed with the diisopropul fluorophosphate-inhibited enzyme fraction. The release of neutral proteinases may be one of the signal events in the epidermal inflammatory response.

  14. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The efficiency of an anchor may be expressed as the ratio (holding force + weight of anchor). In dry sand .... the market at the beginning of the coming season in three sizes, namely 20, 35 and. 60 lb. These are ... Taylor frozen-flow hypothesis.

  15. Evolutionary patterns of proteinase activity in attine ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenova, Tatyana; Hughes, David Peter; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2011-01-01

    hypothesized that fungal proteinase activity may have been under selection for efficiency and that different classes of proteinases might be involved. Results: We determined proteinase activity profiles across a wide pH range for fungus gardens of 14 Panamanian species of fungus-growing ants, representing...... classes. Remarkably, the single symbiont that is shared by species of the crown group of Atta and Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants mostly showed metalloproteinase activity, suggesting that recurrent changes in enzyme production may have occurred throughout the domestication history of fungus-garden symbionts......Background: Attine ants live in symbiosis with a basidiomycetous fungus that they rear on a substrate of plant material. This indirect herbivory implies that the symbiosis is likely to be nitrogen deprived, so that specific mechanisms may have evolved to enhance protein availability. We therefore...

  16. Not all Anchors Weigh Equally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Michael; Velazquez, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    The anchoring bias is a reliable effect wherein a person's judgments are affected by initially presented information, but it is unknown specifically why this effect occurs. Research examining this bias suggests that elements of both numeric and semantic priming may be involved. To examine this, the present research used a phenomenon wherein people treat numeric information presented differently in Arabic numeral or verbal formats. We presented participants with one of many forms of an anchor that represented the same value (e.g., twelve hundred or 1,200). Thus, we could examine how a concept's meaning and its absolute numeric value affect anchoring. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that people respond to Arabic and verbal anchors differently. Experiment 3 showed that these differences occurred largely because people tend to think of numbers in digit format. This suggests that one's conceptual understanding of the anchored information matters more than its strict numeric value.

  17. Extracellular glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored mannoproteins and proteases of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenheer, Richard A; Jin Lee, Young; Blumwald, Eduardo; Phinney, Brett S; Gelli, Angie

    2007-06-01

    Extracellular proteins of Cryptococcus neoformans are involved in the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis, and some are immunoreactive antigens that may potentially serve as candidates for vaccine development. To further study the extracellular proteome of the human fungal pathogen Cry. neoformans, we conducted a proteomic analysis of secreted and cell wall-bound proteins with an acapsular strain of Cry. neoformans. Proteins were identified from both intact cells and cell walls. In both cases, extracellular proteins were removed with trypsin or beta-glucanase, and then all proteins/peptides were purified by solid-phase extraction, spin dialysis, and HPLC, and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study identified 29 extracellular proteins with a predicted N-terminal signal sequence and also a predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor motif in more than half. Among the novel proteins identified were five glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins with extensive Ser/Thr-rich regions but no apparent functional domains, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored aspartic protease, and a metalloprotease with structural similarity to an elastinolytic metalloprotease of Aspergillus fumigatus. This study suggests that Cry. neoformans has the machinery required to target glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins to the cell wall, and it confirms the extracellular proteolytic ability of Cry. neoformans.

  18. Production of a heterologous proteinase A by Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper; Tidemand, L.D.; Winther, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of Saccharomyces kluyveri for heterologous protein production, S. kluyveri Y159 was transformed with a S. cerevisiae-based multi-copy plasmid containing the S. cerevisiae PEP4 gene, which encodes proteinase A, under the control of its native promoter. As a refer......In order to evaluate the potential of Saccharomyces kluyveri for heterologous protein production, S. kluyveri Y159 was transformed with a S. cerevisiae-based multi-copy plasmid containing the S. cerevisiae PEP4 gene, which encodes proteinase A, under the control of its native promoter...

  19. Coronavirus 3CL(pro) proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Lund, Ole; Brunak, Søren

    2004-01-01

    the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection...

  20. Dynamics of postirradiation intracellular cysteine and aspartic proteinases profiles in proliferating and nonproliferating mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Osmak, M.; Suhar, A.; Turk, V.; Skrk, J.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of postirradiation intracellular cysteine and aspartic proteinases profiles were examined in proliferating and nonproliferating Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V 79). The results show that there are significant alterations in cysteine and aspartic intracellular proteinases activity already in the early postirradiation period, which are different in proliferating and nonproliferating cells. Irradiation of the cells examined to low doses and up to 15 Gy induced an increase in cysteine proteinases activity in the early postexposure period, while at higher irradiation doses applied, the activity of these proteinases was decreased. These observations suggest that intracellular proteinases are actively participating in process involving recovery from radiation injury or cell killing. (orig.) [de

  1. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide...

  2. Purification and characterization of cell-envelope proteinase from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-10-18

    Oct 18, 2012 ... phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride;. ACE, angiotensin-I-converting enzyme. Poolman, 1998). Cell-envelope proteinase (CEP) play an important role in the lactobacillus proteolytic system. CEPs are the critical enzyme in the system (Kunji et al., 1996), since it is the only enzyme that can initiate the breakdown of.

  3. The resistance of insects to plant proteinase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    The research reported in this thesis describes the induction of proteinase inhibitor synthesis in solanaceous plants (tobacco and tomato), when lepidopteran larvae (Manduca sexta and Spodoptera exigua) are feeding on leaves. It is shown that the

  4. Assessing tether anchor labeling and usability in pickup trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Malik, Laura A; Flannagan, Carol A; Jermakian, Jessica S

    2018-04-03

    The objective of this study was to investigate vehicle factors associated with child restraint tether use and misuse in pickup trucks and evaluate 4 labeling interventions designed to educate consumers on proper tether use. Volunteer testing was performed with 24 subjects and 4 different pickup trucks. Each subject performed 8 child restraint installations among the 4 pickups using 2 forward-facing restraints: a Britax Marathon G4.1 and an Evenflo Triumph. Vehicles were selected to represent 4 different implementations of tether anchors among pickups: plastic loop routers (Chevrolet Silverado), webbing routers (Ram), back wall anchors (Nissan Frontier), and webbing routers plus metal anchors (Toyota Tundra). Interventions included a diagram label, Quick Response (QR) Code linked to video instruction, coordinating text label, and contrasting text tag. Subjects used the child restraint tether in 93% of trials. However, tether use was completely correct in only 9% of trials. An installation was considered functional if the subject attached the tether to a tether anchor and had a tight installation (ignoring routing and head restraint position); 28% of subjects achieved a functional installation. The most common installation error was attaching the tether hook to the anchor/router directly behind the child restraint (near the top of the seatback) rather than placing the tether through the router and attaching it to the anchor in the adjacent seating position. The Nissan Frontier, with the anchor located on the back wall of the cab, had the highest rate of correct installations but also had the highest rate of attaching the tether to components other than the tether anchor (seat adjustor, child restraint storage hook, around head restraint). None of the labeling interventions had a significant effect on correct installation; not a single subject scanned the QR Code to access the video instruction. Subjects with the most successful installations spent extensive time

  5. Calculation of anchor forces on penetration liners for the reactor vessel Schmehausen (Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roennert, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Penetrations through the walls of the single cavity PCPV Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel for the 300 MW(e) reactor are lined with steel penetration liners welded to the liner of the cavity. For gas-tightness of the system the penetrations are closed by covers. To secure their integration with the concrete, the liners are anchored to it by means of shear studs and/or angles. Being embedded in concrete, over the full width of the walls, the liners are exposed to lateral and longitudinal concrete deformations causing forces on the anchors. The axial blow-out force due to the pressure of the coolant on the closures must also be transferred through the anchors to the concrete. In the design of anchored penetration liners stress analyses are performed to determine anchor forces under different loading conditions and at several ages of the PCPV. The present paper deals with the mathematical estimation of the anchor forces on the basis of given concrete deformations, temperature of liners, and pressure in the vessel by the method of replacing the penetration liners and their anchors by a spring model with linear stiffness characteristics for both the liner and the anchors. An example of the computations on a digital computer is shown. (author)

  6. Propeptide-mediated inhibition of cognate gingipain proteinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Laila Huq

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major pathogen associated with chronic periodontitis. The organism's cell-surface cysteine proteinases, the Arg-specific proteinases (RgpA, RgpB and the Lys-specific proteinase (Kgp, which are known as gingipains have been implicated as major virulence factors. All three gingipain precursors contain a propeptide of around 200 amino acids in length that is removed during maturation. The aim of this study was to characterize the inhibitory potential of the Kgp and RgpB propeptides against the mature cognate enzymes. Mature Kgp was obtained from P. gingivalis mutant ECR368, which produces a recombinant Kgp with an ABM1 motif deleted from the catalytic domain (rKgp that enables the otherwise membrane bound enzyme to dissociate from adhesins and be released. Mature RgpB was obtained from P. gingivalis HG66. Recombinant propeptides of Kgp and RgpB were produced in Escherichia coli and purified using nickel-affinity chromatography. The Kgp and RgpB propeptides displayed non-competitive inhibition kinetics with K(i values of 2.04 µM and 12 nM, respectively. Both propeptides exhibited selectivity towards their cognate proteinase. The specificity of both propeptides was demonstrated by their inability to inhibit caspase-3, a closely related cysteine protease, and papain that also has a relatively long propeptide. Both propeptides at 100 mg/L caused a 50% reduction of P. gingivalis growth in a protein-based medium. In summary, this study demonstrates that gingipain propeptides are capable of inhibiting their mature cognate proteinases.

  7. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  8. Self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feerick, Emer M; Wilson, Joanne; Jarman-Smith, Marcus; Ó'Brádaigh, Conchur M; McGarry, J Patrick

    2014-10-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the self-tapping ability of carbon fibre reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) has been conducted. Six CFR-PEEK suture anchor designs were investigated using PEEK-OPTIMA® Reinforced, a medical grade of CFR-PEEK. Experimental tests were conducted to investigate the maximum axial force and torque required for self-taping insertion of each anchor design. Additional experimental tests were conducted for some anchor designs using pilot holes. Computational simulations were conducted to determine the maximum stress in each anchor design at various stages of insertion. Simulations also were performed to investigate the effect of wall thickness in the anchor head. The maximum axial force required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 150 N for any anchor design. The maximum torque required to insert a self-tapping CFR-PEEK suture anchor did not exceed 0.8 Nm. Computational simulations reveal significant stress concentrations in the region of the anchor tip, demonstrating that a re-design of the tip geometry should be performed to avoid fracture during self-tapping, as observed in the experimental component of this study. This study demonstrates the ability of PEEK-OPTIMA Reinforced suture anchors to self-tap polyurethane foam bone analogue. This provides motivation to further investigate the self-tapping ability of CFR-PEEK suture anchors in animal/cadaveric bone. An optimised design for CFR-PEEK suture anchors offers the advantages of radiolucency, and mechanical properties similar to bone with the ability to self-tap. This may have positive implications for reducing surgery times and the associated costs with the procedure. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Vertical Equilibrium of Sheet Pile Walls with Emphasis on Toe Capacity and Plugging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Augustesen, Anders Hust; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    Constructions including retaining walls are normally established in areas where it is impossible to conduct an excavation with inclined sides. Due to large excavation depths and due to restrictions on the deformations of the wall, it is often necessary to anchor the wall. The limited space makes...... at the pile toe to fulfil vertical equilibrium. The paper describes a case study of sheet pile walls in Aalborg Clay, and the amount of loads transferred as point loads at the pile toe for free and anchored walls is estimated. A parametric study is made for the free wall with regards to the height...... and the roughness of the wall. Due to limitations of the calculation method, the study of the anchored wall only includes variation of the roughness. For the case study, it is found that the vertical equilibrium is fulfilled for the considered free wall. An anchored wall needs a plug forming at the pile toe...

  10. Detection of Aspartic Proteinase Activities Using Gel Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Handunge Kumudu Irani

    2017-01-01

    Gel zymography is a two-stage process where the proteins from the test sample are first separated by electrophoresis followed by the detection of the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. Many zymography procedures use sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with an appropriate substrate. The procedure described here uses native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in the absence of both SDS and substrate. In order to visualize aspartic proteinase activity, the gel is impregnated in bovine hemoglobin at pH 3.0 for 15 min after the electrophoresis procedure. Subsequently, the gel is incubated in a humid container in the absence of hemoglobin for 1 h at 37 °C. At the end, the gel is stained with amido black and destained. Clear areas against a dark background corresponding to aspartic proteinase activities can be detected.

  11. Erythrocyte endogenous proteinase activity during blood bank storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Angelis, V; de Matteis, M C; Orazi, B M; Santarossa, L; Della Toffola, L; Raineri, A; Vettore, L

    1990-01-01

    We studied proteolytic alterations of membrane proteins in ghosts derived from human red blood cells, preserved up to 35 days in the liquid state either as whole blood or with additive solution. The study was carried out by performing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of stromal proteins from erythrocytes, either previously treated with proteinase inhibitors or previously incubated in conditions promoting proteolysis. To differentiate the effect of erythrocyte from granulocyte proteinases, the investigation was also carried out in leukocyte-free red cell preparations. The results show: (1) the effects of endogenous proteinases on membrane proteins derived from red cells stored under blood bank conditions; (2) a decrease of proteolytic effects in ghosts derived from red cells which have been submitted to a longer storage; (3) a relevant influence of the red cell resuspending medium before lysis on the time-dependent onset and exhaustion of proteolysis in ghosts. The presence of increased proteolysis in ghosts could be regarded as a marker of molecular lesions induced in red cells by storage under blood bank conditions.

  12. Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, John D.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent discoveries and delves in detail about what is known about each of the proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) and proteinases (matrix metalloproteinase-20 and kallikrein-related peptidase-4) that are secreted into the enamel matrix. After an overview of enamel development, this review focuses on these enamel proteins by describing their nomenclature, tissue expression, functions, proteinase activation, and proteinase substrate specificity. These proteins and their respective null mice and human mutations are also evaluated to shed light on the mechanisms that cause nonsyndromic enamel malformations termed amelogenesis imperfecta. Pertinent controversies are addressed. For example, do any of these proteins have a critical function in addition to their role in enamel development? Does amelogenin initiate crystallite growth, does it inhibit crystallite growth in width and thickness, or does it do neither? Detailed examination of the null mouse literature provides unmistakable clues and/or answers to these questions, and this data is thoroughly analyzed. Striking conclusions from this analysis reveal that widely held paradigms of enamel formation are inadequate. The final section of this review weaves the recent data into a plausible new mechanism by which these enamel matrix proteins support and promote enamel development. PMID:24159389

  13. Modality analysis of anchored ion exchange tower using Ansys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liang; Lei Zeyong

    2008-01-01

    Ion exchange towers are exposed to serious damage in the event of earthquakes. It is very necessary to study the seismic resistance of ion exchange tower. A finite element model of anchored ion exchange tower was made by Ansys. The first 10 ranks of inherent frequencies were made out, and three-dimensional main vibratory model figures were drawn out. The maximal stress along x-axis and y-axis and the main displacement were found at the bottom part of the wall of tower junction with the pillars. It is concluded that the breakage of tower wall easily occurs at the bottom part of the wall of tower junction with the pillars. Therefore, it is very important to reinforce the junction of the tower body, and the strengthening plate should lie near the bottom of wall. (authors)

  14. An accessory protein required for anchoring and assembly of amyloid fibres in B. subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibres, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibres. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previously YqxM) that serves both to anchor the fibres to the cell wall and to assemble TasA into fibres. TapA is found in discrete foci in the cell envelope and these foci disappear when cells are treated with a mixture of D-amino acids. Purified cell wall sacculi retain a functional form of this anchoring protein such that purified fibres can be anchored to the sacculi in vitro. In addition, we show that TapA is essential for the proper assembly of the fibres. Its absence results in a dramatic reduction in TasA levels and what little TasA is left produces only thin fibres that are not anchored to the cell. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. An Accessory Protein Required for Anchoring and Assembly of Amyloid Fibers in B. subtilis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibers, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibers. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previously YqxM) that serves both to anchor the fibers to the cell wall and to assemble TasA into fibers. TapA is found in discrete foci in the cell envelope and these foci disappear when cells are treated with a mixture of D-amino acids. Purified cell wall sacculi retain a functional form of this anchoring protein such that purified fibers can be anchored to the sacculi in vitro. In addition, we show that TapA is essential for the proper assembly of the fibers. Its absence results in a dramatic reduction in TasA levels and what little TasA is left produces only thin fibers that are not anchored to the cell. PMID:21477127

  16. Management of subluxated capsular bag-fixated intraocular lenses using a capsular anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Yokrat; Naftali, Modi; Gortzak, Ruth Lapid; Assia, Ehud I

    2016-05-01

    We describe the use of the capsular anchor (AssiAnchor) to manage a subluxated intraocular lens (IOL) in the capsular bag. The anchor comprises 2 prongs that hold the anterior lens capsule and a central rod that is sutured to the scleral wall, enabling centration of the IOL-capsular bag complex. Six pseudophakic patients presenting with subluxated posterior chamber IOLs in the capsular bag were operated on using the device. The anchor was used successfully in all cases, although in 2 cases only 1 prong was placed under the capsulorhexis edge. In 1 eye, 2 anchors were used 1 month apart following repeated traumatic zonular injury. The capsular bag holding the IOL remained centered and stable throughout the follow-up period. The anchoring device, which was originally designed to preserve the lens capsule and stabilize subluxated crystalline lenses, can also be used to treat subluxation of a capsular bag-fixated IOL. Dr. Assia is the inventor of the AssiAnchor, has a licensed patent of the anchor, and is consultant to Hanita Lenses. Dr. Lapid-Gortzak is a consultant to and speaker for Alcon Surgical, Inc., Hanita Lenses, Orca Surgical, and Sanoculis Ltd.; a speaker for Santen; and a consultant to Icon. Drs. Ton and Naftali have no financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2016 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trichoderma harzianum transformant has high extracellular alkaline proteinase expression during specific mycoparasitic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Maria Helena S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycoparasite Trichoderma harzianum produces an alkaline proteinase that may be specifically involved in mycoparasitism. We have constructed transformant strains of this fungus that overexpress this alkaline proteinase. Some of the transformants were assessed for alkaline proteinase activity, and those with higher activity than the wild type were selected for further studies. One of these transformant strains produced an elevated and constitutive pbr1 mRNA level during mycoparasitic interactions with Rhizoctonia solani.

  18. [Lactic acid bacteria proteinase and quality of fermented dairy products--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Lanwei; Han, Xue

    2015-12-04

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could synthesize cell envelope proteinase with weak activity, which primarily degrades casein. In addition to its crucial role in the rapid growth of LAB in milk, LAB proteinases are also of industrial importance due to their contribution to the formation of texture and flavor of many fermented dairy products. The proteolytic system, properties of proteinase, the degradation product of casein and its effect on the quality of fermented dairy products were reviewed in this manuscript.

  19. Redox regulation of peroxiredoxin and proteinases by ascorbate and thiols during pea root nodule senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Karin; Dutilleul, Christelle; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Vanacker, Hélène; Bernard, Stéphanie; Finkemeier, Iris; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-02-20

    Redox factors contributing to nodule senescence were studied in pea. The abundance of the nodule cytosolic peroxiredoxin but not the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin protein was modulated by ascorbate. In contrast to redox-active antioxidants such as ascorbate and cytosolic peroxiredoxin that decreased during nodule development, maximal extractable nodule proteinase activity increased progressively as the nodules aged. Cathepsin-like activities were constant throughout development but serine and cysteine proteinase activities increased during senescence. Senescence-induced cysteine proteinase activity was inhibited by cysteine, dithiotreitol, or E-64. Senescence-dependent decreases in redox-active factors, particularly ascorbate and peroxiredoxin favour decreased redox-mediated inactivation of cysteine proteinases.

  20. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as the chain begins to drag along the ground; and it also serves, by lying flat on the ground, to keep the palm set at the correct angle as it buries itself. In stockless anchors there are two digging blades set on opposite sides of the shank, and hinged to it by a horizontal hinge which allows them to set themselves at the correct.

  1. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward [ 3 H]-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics

  2. Experimental testing of hold down devices for timber frame shear walls

    OpenAIRE

    Caprolu, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Källsner and Girhammar [1] have presented a new plastic design method for wood-framed shear walls at ultimate limit state. This method allows the designer to calculate the load-carrying capacity of partially anchored shear walls, where the leading stud is not anchored against uplift. The anchorage system of shear walls is provided by anchor bolts in the bottom rail and hold downs at the leading stud. Anchor bolts provide horizontal shear continuity between the bottom rail and the foundation. ...

  3. Identification of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in immune defense in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, Pparahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain.

  4. Identification of a Serine Proteinase Homolog (Sp-SPH) Involved in Immune Defense in the Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, Pparahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain. PMID:23724001

  5. Proteinase K processing of rabbit muscle creatine kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leydier, C; Andersen, Jens S.; Couthon, F

    1997-01-01

    Proteinase K cleaves selectively both cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of creatine kinase leading to the appearance of two fragments, a large N-terminal one (K1) and a small C-terminal peptide (K2) which remain associated together. The loss of enzymatic activity correlates with the extent...... of monomer cleavage. N-terminal sequencing of the K2 fragments from rabbit cytosolic and pig mitochondrial creatine kinase shows that these peptides begin with A328 and A324, respectively. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry demonstrates that K2 peptide is composed of 53 residues (A328-K380). However...

  6. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to deliver heterologous antigens to the bird immune system. Additionally, the analysis of the structure and immunogenicity of the generated rCjaAD hybrid protein showed that the CjaA antigen can be considered as a starting point to construct multiepitope anti-Campylobacter vaccines.

  7. Nominal Anchors in the CIS

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M Keller; Thomas J Richardson

    2003-01-01

    Monetary policy has become increasingly important in the countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) as fiscal adjustment and structural reforms have taken root. Inflation has been brought down to relatively low levels in almost all of these countries, raising the question of what should be the appropriate nominal anchor at this stage. Formally, almost all CIS countries have floating exchange rate regimes, yet in practice they manage their exchange rates very heavily, perhaps be...

  8. Engineering of the Lactococcus lactis serine proteinase by construction of hybrid enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerrigter, Ingrid J.; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Nijhuis, Monique; Reuver, Marjon B. de; Siezen, Roland J.; Venema, Gerhardus; Vos, Willem M. de; Kok, Jan

    Plasmids containing wild-type and hybrid proteinase genes were constructed from DNA fragments of the prtP genes of Lactococcus lactis strains Wg2 and SK11. These plasmids were introduced into the plasmid-free strain L. lactis MG1363. The serine proteinases produced by these L. lactis strains were

  9. Bioinspired metal-cell wall-metal sandwich structure on an individual bacterial cell scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Mei; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei

    2012-08-25

    Pd nanoparticles were introduced to individual Bacillus cells and dispersedly anchored on both the inside and outside of the cell walls. The anchored nanoparticles served as "seeds" to drive the formation of double metallic layers forming a metal-cell wall-metal sandwich structure at the single-cell level.

  10. Serine proteinase inhibitors from nematodes and the arms race between host and pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, X; Maizels, R M

    2001-03-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors are encoded by a large gene family of long evolutionary standing. Recent discoveries of parasite proteins that inhibit human serine proteinases, together with the complete genomic sequence from Caenorhabditis elegans, have provided a set of new serine proteinase inhibitors from more primitive metazoan animals such as nematodes. The structural features (e.g. reactive centre residues), gene organization (including intron arrangements) and inhibitory function and targets (e.g. inflammatory and coagulation pathway proteinase) all contribute important new insights into proteinase inhibitor evolution. Some parasite products have evolved that block enzymes in the mammalian host, but the human host responds with a significant immune response to the parasite inhibitors. Thus, infection produces a finely balanced conflict between host and pathogen at the molecular level, and this might have accelerated the evolution of these proteins in parasitic species as well as their hosts.

  11. A study on plate anchor detailing systems of shear re-bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurumaki, S.; Ujiie, K.; Nishikawa, T.; Kitayama, K.

    1995-01-01

    For shell walls and base slabs in reactor buildings, besides a large amount of main bars, numerous shear re-bars have been employed to resist to out-of-plane force. As a result , detailing work involving shear re-bar is extremely involved. For example, the employed re-bar anchor method differs from the ordinary methods in which, a end of shear re-bar with 135-degrees hook or with anchor plate type and another re-bar end with 90-degrees hook are used. However the structural characteristics in members using shear re-bar of the bolt-mounted anchor plate have not yet been examined. A test was performed to confirm the effects of anchor methods for shear re-bars on shearing behavior of members. This paper describes the test plan, method and results. (author). 12 figs., 7 tabs

  12. Functional specialization and evolution of leader proteinases in the family Closteroviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C W; Peremyslov, V V; Mushegian, A R; Dawson, W O; Dolja, V V

    2001-12-01

    Members of the Closteroviridae and Potyviridae families of the plant positive-strand RNA viruses encode one or two papain-like leader proteinases. In addition to a C-terminal proteolytic domain, each of these proteinases possesses a nonproteolytic N-terminal domain. We compared functions of the several leader proteinases using a gene swapping approach. The leader proteinase (L-Pro) of Beet yellows virus (BYV; a closterovirus) was replaced with L1 or L2 proteinases of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV; another closterovirus), P-Pro proteinase of Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV; a crinivirus), and HC-Pro proteinase of Tobacco etch virus (a potyvirus). Each foreign proteinase efficiently processed the chimeric BYV polyprotein in vitro. However, only L1 and P-Pro, not L2 and HC-Pro, were able to rescue the amplification of the chimeric BYV variants. The combined expression of L1 and L2 resulted in an increased RNA accumulation compared to that of the parental BYV. Remarkably, this L1-L2 chimera exhibited reduced invasiveness and inability to move from cell to cell. Similar analyses of the BYV hybrids, in which only the papain-like domain of L-Pro was replaced with those derived from L1, L2, P-Pro, and HC-Pro, also revealed functional specialization of these domains. In subcellular-localization experiments, distinct patterns were observed for the leader proteinases of BYV, CTV, and LIYV. Taken together, these results demonstrated that, in addition to a common proteolytic activity, the leader proteinases of closteroviruses possess specialized functions in virus RNA amplification, virus invasion, and cell-to-cell movement. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that functionally distinct L1 and L2 of CTV originated by a gene duplication event.

  13. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm

  14. Zymography in Multiwells for Quality Assessment of Proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechoor, Ambili; Madanan, Madathiparambil G

    2017-01-01

    Zymography is a well-standardized protocol for the qualitative assessment and analysis of proteinases under specified conditions. However, analysis of a large number of samples simultaneously becomes a challenge when the zymography is carried out by the usual protocol of electrophoresis. This can be overcome by assaying the matrix-degrading proteinases in substrate-impregnated gels in multiwells. Enzymes are copolymerized with 300 mL of 10% acrylamide impregnated with gelatin substrate and incubated for 16 h. The gels are then stained with Coomassie blue, destained with water, and visualized with the naked eye. The intensity; if needed can be measured with a densitometer or gel documentation system. This method has been tested for bacterial collagenases as well as some matrix-degrading metalloproteinases that were purified from rat mammary gland. It can also be used to characterize the enzymes with respect to the type and concentration of the cations required for activity and the role of other regulatory molecules that may affect the enzyme activity. The added advantage of this method is that the electrophoresis set up and electricity is not needed for the procedure.

  15. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  16. Regulation of cell wall biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2007-12-01

    Plant cell walls differ in their amount and composition among various cell types and even in different microdomains of the wall of a given cell. Plants must have evolved regulatory mechanisms controlling biosynthesis, targeted secretion, and assembly of wall components to achieve the heterogeneity in cell walls. A number of factors, including hormones, the cytoskeleton, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, phosphoinositides, and sugar nucleotide supply, have been implicated in the regulation of cell wall biosynthesis or deposition. In the past two years, there have been important discoveries in transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis. Several transcription factors in the NAC and MYB families have been shown to be the key switches for activation of secondary wall biosynthesis. These studies suggest a transcriptional network comprised of a hierarchy of transcription factors is involved in regulating secondary wall biosynthesis. Further investigation and integration of the regulatory players participating in the making of cell walls will certainly lead to our understanding of how wall amounts and composition are controlled in a given cell type. This may eventually allow custom design of plant cell walls on the basis of our needs.

  17. Novel applications for glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in pharmaceutical and industrial biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Günter

    2011-04-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins have been regarded as typical cell surface proteins found in most eukaryotic cells from yeast to man. They are embedded in the outer plasma membrane leaflet via a carboxy-terminally linked complex glycolipid GPI structure. The amphiphilic nature of the GPI anchor, its compatibility with the function of the attached protein moiety and the capability of GPI-anchored proteins for spontaneous insertion into and transfer between artificial and cellular membranes initially suggested their potential for biotechnological applications. However, these expectations have been hardly fulfilled so far. Recent developments fuel novel hopes with regard to: (i) Automated online expression, extraction and purification of therapeutic proteins as GPI-anchored proteins based on their preferred accumulation in plasma membrane lipid rafts, (ii) multiplex custom-made protein chips based on GPI-anchored cell wall proteins in yeast, (iii) biomaterials and biosensors with films consisting of sets of distinct GPI-anchored binding-proteins or enzymes for sequential or combinatorial catalysis, and (iv) transport of therapeutic proteins across or into relevant tissue cells, e.g., enterocytes or adipocytes. Latter expectations are based on the demonstrated translocation of GPI-anchored proteins from plasma membrane lipid rafts to cytoplasmic lipid droplets and eventually further into microvesicles which upon release from donor cells transfer their GPI-anchored proteins to acceptor cells. The value of these technologies, which are all based on the interaction of GPI-anchored proteins with membranes and surfaces, for the engineering, production and targeted delivery of biomolecules for a huge variety of therapeutic and biotechnological purposes should become apparent in the near future.

  18. The potency and specificity of the interaction between the IA3 inhibitor and its target aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phylip, L H; Lees, W E; Brownsey, B G

    2001-01-01

    The yeast IA3 polypeptide consists of only 68 residues, and the free inhibitor has little intrinsic secondary structure. IA3 showed subnanomolar potency toward its target, proteinase A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and did not inhibit any of a large number of aspartic proteinases with similar...... by the nontarget aspartic proteinases, it was not cleaved by proteinase A. The random coil IA3 polypeptide escapes cleavage by being stabilized in a helical conformation upon interaction with the active site of proteinase A. This results, paradoxically, in potent selective inhibition of the target enzyme....

  19. A legged anchoring mechanism for capsule endoscopes using micropatterned adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Paul; Cheung, Eugene; Sitti, Metin

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a new concept for an anchoring mechanism to enhance existing capsule endoscopes. The mechanism consists of three actuated legs with compliant feet lined with micropillar adhesives to be pressed into the intestine wall to anchor the device at a fixed location. These adhesive systems are inspired by gecko and beetle foot hairs. Single-leg and full capsule mathematical models of the forces generated by the legs are analyzed to understand capsule performance. Empirical friction models for the interaction of the adhesives with an intestinal substrate were experimentally determined in vitro using dry and oil-coated elastomer micropillar arrays with 140 microm pillar diameter, 105 microm spacing between pillars, and an aspect ratio of 1:1 on fresh porcine small intestine specimens. Capsule prototypes were also tested in a simulated intestine environment and compared with predicted peristaltic loads to assess the viability of the proposed design. The experimental results showed that a deployed 10 gr capsule robot can withstand axial peristaltic loads and anchor reliably when actuation forces are greater than 0.27 N using dry micropillars. Required actuation forces may be reduced significantly by using micropillars coated with a thin silicone oil layer.

  20. Proteinase activity in cell nuclei of rats exposed to γ-radiation and methyl nitrosourea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakhova, L.V.; Surkenova, G.N.; Gaziev, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    Activity of nuclear proteinases in blood and liver cells of rats exposed to whole-body γ-irradiation (10 Gy) has been comparatively studied by the capacity of splitting the caseic substrate. Proteinase activity in nuclei of irradiated rat leukocytes was shown to increase by 2.5 times and to gradually decrease after 48 h reaching 150-160% as compared to the control. Two hours following a single injection of methyl nitrosourea the alteration in the activity of proteinases in nuclei of rat hepatocytes and leukocytes was different from the alteration of this index after γ-irradiation

  1. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium-Linens ATCC-9174

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8,5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis...... and 126 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that the native enzyme exists as a dimer. Mg2+ and Ca2+ activated the proteinase, as did NaCl; however, Hg2+ Fe2+, and Zn2+ caused strong inhibition. The sequence of the first 20 N-terminal amino acids was NH2-Ala-Lys- Asn...

  2. The Plant-Derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI Attenuates Elastase-Induced Emphysema in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Tadeu Martins-Olivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elastase mediates important oxidative actions during the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, few resources for the inhibition of elastase have been investigated. Our study evaluated the ability of the recombinant plant derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI to modulate elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation. Methods. C57Bl/6 mice were given intratracheal elastase (ELA group or saline (SAL group and were treated intraperitoneally with rBbKI (ELA-rBbKI and SAL-rBbKI groups. At day 28, the following analyses were performed: (I lung mechanics, (II exhaled nitric oxide (ENO, (III bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and (IV lung immunohistochemical staining. Results. In addition to decreasing mechanical alterations and alveolar septum disruption, rBbKI reduced the number of cells in the BALF and decreased the cellular expression of TNF-α, MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1, eNOS, and iNOS in airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. rBbKI decreased the volume proportion of 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. A reduction in the number of MUC-5-positive cells in the airway walls was also observed. Conclusion. rBbKI reduced elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. rBbKI may be a potential pharmacological tool for COPD treatment.

  3. Murasaki: a fast, parallelizable algorithm to find anchors from multiple genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Popendorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the number of available genome sequences increasing rapidly, the magnitude of sequence data required for multiple-genome analyses is a challenging problem. When large-scale rearrangements break the collinearity of gene orders among genomes, genome comparison algorithms must first identify sets of short well-conserved sequences present in each genome, termed anchors. Previously, anchor identification among multiple genomes has been achieved using pairwise alignment tools like BLASTZ through progressive alignment tools like TBA, but the computational requirements for sequence comparisons of multiple genomes quickly becomes a limiting factor as the number and scale of genomes grows. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our algorithm, named Murasaki, makes it possible to identify anchors within multiple large sequences on the scale of several hundred megabases in few minutes using a single CPU. Two advanced features of Murasaki are (1 adaptive hash function generation, which enables efficient use of arbitrary mismatch patterns (spaced seeds and therefore the comparison of multiple mammalian genomes in a practical amount of computation time, and (2 parallelizable execution that decreases the required wall-clock and CPU times. Murasaki can perform a sensitive anchoring of eight mammalian genomes (human, chimp, rhesus, orangutan, mouse, rat, dog, and cow in 21 hours CPU time (42 minutes wall time. This is the first single-pass in-core anchoring of multiple mammalian genomes. We evaluated Murasaki by comparing it with the genome alignment programs BLASTZ and TBA. We show that Murasaki can anchor multiple genomes in near linear time, compared to the quadratic time requirements of BLASTZ and TBA, while improving overall accuracy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Murasaki provides an open source platform to take advantage of long patterns, cluster computing, and novel hash algorithms to produce accurate anchors across multiple genomes with

  4. Anchor Bolt Position in Base Plate In Terms Of T and J Anchor Bolt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    b Osman Mohamad Hairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, L anchor bolt system has been used for a long period of time in construction industry as one of the distributing load structures. However, there are some weaknesses in L anchor bolt which may straighten and pullup when charged with tensile load. Current practices prefer to use other types of anchor bolt systems, such as headed studs anchor bolt system to replace the L anchor bolt design. There has been lack of studies to prove that it is more effective in terms of performance. A new T anchor bolt which was basically modified from headed studs anchor bolt was proposed in this study to compare its performance of tensile loading in concrete failure to typical L design. This study aims to determine whether the T anchor bolt system gives better performance as compared to an L anchor bolt system. The performance was rated based on tensile loading on concrete failure pattern. A pullout test was conducted on two different anchor bolt systems, namely L and T. The anchor bolt embedded depth, h in concrete were varied according to their hook or bend radius. Each sample was repeated twice. There were totally eight samples. The hook or bend radius used were 50 mm and 57.5 mm for sample L1 and L2, respectively. 90-degree bend were used on sample T1 and T2. Based on test results, it can be seen that the performance of concrete failure pattern under tensile load on both L and T anchor bolt design samples with 200 mm embedment depth was better than deeper embedment depth of 230 mm. But the L anchor bolt design gives the best results as compared to T design. Although T anchor bolt design shows higher resistance before first bond failure to the concrete sample. T anchor bolt was analysed and needed deeper embedment depth to allow formation of cone pull-out shape to acquire better performance.

  5. Link Anchors in Images: Is there Truth?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aly, Robin; McGuinness, Kevin; Kleppe, Martijn; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; O'Connor, Noel; de Jong, Franciska M.G.

    2012-01-01

    While automatic linking in text collections is well understood, little is known about links in images. In this work, we investigate two aspects of anchors, the origin of a link, in images: 1) the requirements of users for such anchors, e.g. the things users would like more information on, and 2)

  6. 76 FR 30301 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Part 1812 RIN 2700-AD64 Commercial... consistent with NASA's authority under Section 401 of the Commercial Space Competitiveness Act (CSCA) of 1992. NASA may enter into multi-year anchor tenancy contracts for commercial space goods or services. Anchor...

  7. PepJ is a new extracellular proteinase of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emri, T; Szilágyi, M; László, K; M-Hamvas, M; Pócsi, I

    2009-01-01

    Under carbon starvation, Aspergillus nidulans released a metallo-proteinase with activities comparable to those of PrtA, the major extracellular serine proteinase of the fungus. The relative molar mass of the enzyme was 19 kDa as determined with both denaturing and renaturing SDS PAGE, while its isoelectric point and pH and temperature optima were 8.6, 5.5 and 65 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 3.5-10.5 and was still active at 95 degrees C in the presence of azocasein substrate. MALDI-TOF MS analysis demonstrated that the proteinase was encoded by the pepJ gene (locus ID AN7962.3), and showed high similarity to deuterolysin from Aspergillus oryzae. The size of the mature enzyme, its EDTA sensitivity and heat stability also supported the view that A. nidulans PepJ is a deuterolysin-type metallo-proteinase.

  8. Ringstone anchors from Gujarat, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    of Dwarka and Somanath have yielded several ringstone anchors along with other stone anchors such as triangular and grapnel types. The raw material used for these ring stones comprises basalt, sandstone and limestone. Earlier, these anchors were identified...

  9. Identification of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH involved in immune defense in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-xia Zhang

    Full Text Available Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH, originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus, bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN, and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, P<0.05, and increase phenoloxidase activity if triggered by PGN in vitro (paired t-test, P<0.05. Importantly, the Sp-SPH protein was demonstrated to promote the survival rate of the animals after challenge with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain.

  10. Side-by-side comparison of Raman spectra of anchored and suspended carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, Anton N; Pabba, Santosh; Cohn, Robert W; Sumanasekera, G U; Hewaparakrama, Kapila P

    2008-01-01

    Raman spectra of ordered carbon nanomaterials are quite sensitive to surface perturbations, including trace residues, structural defects and residual stress. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments with carbon nanotubes and graphene. Their spectra change due to subtle changes in preparation and attachment to the substrate and to each other. Differences are most clearly seen by forming a material into an air bridge and probing it in the air gap and at the anchor points. A monolayer graphene sheet, shows a larger disorder band at the anchor points than in the air gap. However, a bundle or rope of parallel-aligned single-wall nanotubes shows a larger disorder band in the gap than at the anchor points. For the graphene sheet the substrate surface deforms the graphene, leading to increases in the disorder band. For the rope, the close proximity of the nanotubes to each other appears to produce a larger stress than the rope resting on the substrate

  11. Identification of Novel Placentally Expressed Aspartic Proteinase in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Majewska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents pioneering data concerning the human pregnancy-associated glycoprotein-Like family, identified in the genome, of the term placental transcriptome and proteome. RNA-seq allowed the identification of 1364 bp hPAG-L/pep cDNA with at least 56.5% homology with other aspartic proteinases (APs. In silico analyses revealed 388 amino acids (aa of full-length hPAG-L polypeptide precursor, with 15 aa-signal peptide, 47 aa-blocking peptide and 326 aa-mature protein, and two Asp residues (D, specific for a catalytic cleft of the APs (VVFDTGSSNLWV91-102 and AIVDTGTSLLTG274-285. Capillary sequencing identified 9330 bp of the hPAG-L gene (Gen Bank Acc. No. KX533473, composed of nine exons and eight introns. Heterologous Western blotting revealed the presence of one dominant 60 kDa isoform of the hPAG-L amongst cellular placental proteins. Detection with anti-pPAG-P and anti-Rec pPAG2 polyclonals allowed identification of the hPAG-L proteins located within regions of chorionic villi, especially within the syncytiotrophoblast of term singleton placentas. Our novel data extend the present knowledge about the human genome, as well as placental transcriptome and proteome during term pregnancy. Presumably, this may contribute to establishing a new diagnostic tool for examination of some disturbances during human pregnancy, as well as growing interest from both scientific and clinical perspectives.

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteinase A excretion and wine making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lulu; Chen, Yefu; Du, Yongjing; Wang, Xibin; Guo, Xuewu; Dong, Jian; Xiao, Dongguang

    2017-11-09

    Proteinase A (PrA), the major protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, plays an essential role in zymogen activation, sporulation, and other physiological processes in vivo. The extracellular secretion of PrA often occurs during alcoholic fermentation, especially in the later stages when the yeast cells are under stress conditions, and affects the quality and safety of fermented products. Thus, the mechanism underlying PrA excretion must be explored to improve the quality and safety of fermented products. This paper briefly introduces the structure and physiological function of PrA. Two transport routes of PrA, namely, the Golgi-to-vacuole pathway and the constitutive Golgi-to-plasma membrane pathway, are also discussed. Moreover, the research history and developments on the mechanism of extracellular PrA secretion are described. In addition, it is briefly discussed that calcium homeostasis plays an important role in the secretory pathway of proteins, implying that the regulation of PrA delivery to the plasma membrane requires the involvement of calcium ion. Finally, this review focuses on the effects of PrA excretion on wine making (including Chinese rice wine, grape wine, and beer brewage) and presents strategies to control PrA excretion.

  13. Phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida spp. isolates from vulvovaginitis in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirkhani, S; Sepahvand, A; Mirzaee, M; Anbari, K

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize phospholipase and proteinase activities of Candida isolates from 82 vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and to study the relationship of these activities with vulvovaginitis. Totally 82 Candida isolates from vagina samples of VVC patients were randomly collected over the period between September and December 2014 from hospitalized patients at the general hospitals of Lorestan province, Iran. Isolates were previously identified by conventional mycological methods. The phospholipase and proteinase activities were evaluated by Egg yolk agar, Tween 80 opacity medium and agar plate methods. The most common Candida species was identified Candida albicans (n=34, 41.5%), followed by Candida famata (n=13, 15.8%), Candida tropicalis (n=11, 13.4%), and Candida parapsilosis (n=9, 11%). The most phospholipase activity was observed in Candida colliculosa (40%), followed by C. famata (38.5%), and Candida krusei (33.3%). The findings revealed that the correlation between phospholipase production by Candida spp. and the presence of VVC was not found to be statistically significant (P=0.91). All Candida spp. exhibited considerable proteinase activity; so that 100% of C. colliculosa, C. parapsilosis, Candida kefyr, and Candida intermedia isolates produced high proteinase activity with Pz 4+ scores. There was a significant correlation between proteinase production by Candida spp. and the presence of VVC (P=0.009). The obtained findings revealed that Candida spp. isolates may produce both virulence factors, phospholipase and proteinase. Although the phospholipase production was only observed in <40% of the isolates; however there was a significant association between proteinase production by Candida spp. and VVC. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-10-01

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  15. Improving performance by anchoring movement and "nerves".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E; Dotson, Charles O; Jagodinsky, Adam E; Clark, Lily C; Smallwood, Lorraine L; Wilburn, Christopher; Weimar, Wendi H; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Golf's governing bodies' recent decision to ban all putting styles "anchoring one end of the club against the body" bridges an important practical problem with psychological theory. We report the first experiment testing whether anchoring provides technical and/or psychological advantage in competitive performance. Many "greats" of professional golf from Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus to Tiger Woods have argued against anchoring, believing that it takes "nerves" out of competitive performance and therefore artificially levels the playing field. To shed more light on the issue, we tested participants' performance with anchored and unanchored putters under low and high pressure when controlling for the putter length. We found no statistically significant evidence for a technical advantage due to anchoring but a clear psychological advantage: participants who anchored their putters significantly outperformed unanchored counterparts under high, but not low, pressure. Results provide tentative evidence for the ban's justification from a competitive standpoint. However, before any definite conclusions can be made, more research is needed when using high-level golfers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultraweak azimuthal anchoring of a nematic liquid crystal on a planar orienting photopolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nespoulous, Mathieu; Blanc, Christophe; Nobili, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    The search of weak anchoring is an important issue for a whole class of liquid crystal displays. In this paper we present an orienting layer showing unreached weak planar azimuthal anchoring for 4-n-pentyl-4 ' -cyanobiphenyl nematic liquid crystal (5CB). Azimuthal extrapolation lengths as large as 80 μm are easily obtained. Our layers are made with the commercial photocurable polymer Norland optical adhesive 60. The anisotropy of the film is induced by the adsorption of oriented liquid crystal molecules under a 2 T magnetic field applied parallel to the surfaces. We use the width of surface π-walls and a high-field electro-optical method to measure, respectively, the azimuthal and the zenithal anchorings. The azimuthal anchoring is extremely sensitive to the ultraviolet (UV) dose and it also depends on the magnetic field application duration. On the opposite, the zenithal anchoring is only slightly sensitive to the preparation parameters. All these results are discussed in terms of the adsorption/desorption mechanisms of the liquid crystal molecules on the polymer layer and of the flexibility of the polymer network

  17. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  18. An earth anchor system: installation and design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.L. Copstead; D.D. Studier

    1990-01-01

    A system for anchoring the guylines and skylines of cable yarding equipment is presented. A description of three types of tipping plate anchors is given. Descriptions of the installation equipment and methods specific to each type are given. Procedures for determining the correct number of anchors to install are included, as are guidelines for installing the anchors so...

  19. Effect of pH on the production of alkaline proteinase by alkalophilic Bacillus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Makio; Horikoshi, Koki

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the pH of the medium on the microbial growth and alkaline proteinase production, and on the uptake of various substances by alkalophilic Bacillus sp. No.8-1 were studied to investigate the physiological properties of alkalophilic bacteria. Both the microbial growth and alkaline proteinase production by replacement culture were maximum between pH 9 and 10. The alkaline proteinase production sources were also effective for the production. The uptake of various substances such as glucose, acetate, amino acids, and uracil, necessary for proteinase production by this strain, was maximum between pH 9 and 10. The uptake of α-aminoisobutyric acid, a nonmetabolizable amino acid analogue, was also maximum at pH 10. The pH-dependence of these substance was not due to their ionic forms being affected by extracellular pH. It was concluded from above results that good production of alkaline proteinase in alkaline media was due to the active uptake of various nutrients in this culture condition. (auth.)

  20. Determination of germ tube, phospholipase, and proteinase production by bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Souza Mattei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida albicans is a commensal and opportunistic agent that causes infection in immunocompromised individuals. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of this yeast, including the production of germ tubes (GTs and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate GT production and phospholipase and proteinase activities in bloodstream isolates of C. albicans. Methods One hundred fifty-three C. albicans isolates were obtained from blood samples and analyzed for GT, phospholipase, and proteinase production. The assays were performed in duplicate in egg yolk medium containing bovine serum albumin and human serum. Results Detectable amounts of proteinase were produced by 97% of the isolates, and 78% of the isolates produced phospholipase. GTs were produced by 95% of the isolates. A majority of the isolates exhibited low levels of phospholipase production and high levels of proteinase production. Conclusions Bloodstream isolates of C. albicans produce virulence factors such as GT and hydrolytic enzymes that enable them to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  1. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Theresa Sigle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2. Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania.

  2. Plant Proteinase Inhibitors in Therapeutics – Focus on Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Srikanth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are known to have many secondary metabolites and phytochemical compounds which are highly explored at biochemical and molecular genetics level and exploited enormously in the human health care sector. However, there are other less explored small molecular weight proteins, which inhibit proteases/proteinases. Plants are good sources of protease inhibitors (PIs which protect them against diseases, insects, pests, and herbivores. In the past, proteinaceous PIs were considered primarily as protein-degrading enzymes. Nevertheless, this view has significantly changed and PIs are now treated as very important signaling molecules in many biological activities such as inflammation, apoptosis, blood clotting and hormone processing. In recent years, PIs have been examined extensively as therapeutic agents, primarily to deal with various human cancers. Interestingly, many plant-based PIs are also found to be effective against cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory diseases and neurological disorders. Several plant PIs are under further evaluation in in vitro clinical trials. Among all types of PIs, Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI has been studied extensively in the treatment of many diseases, especially in the field of cancer prevention. So far, crops such as beans, potatoes, barley, squash, millet, wheat, buckwheat, groundnut, chickpea, pigeonpea, corn and pineapple have been identified as good sources of PIs. The PI content of such foods has a significant influence on human health disorders, particularly in the regions where people mostly depend on these kind of foods. These natural PIs vary in concentration, protease specificity, heat stability, and sometimes several PIs may be present in the same species or tissue. However, it is important to carry out individual studies to identify the potential effects of each PI on human health. PIs in plants make them incredible sources to determine novel PIs with specific pharmacological and

  3. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Ma

    Full Text Available Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants' WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain.

  4. Parametric Evaluation of Racking Performance of Platform Timber Framed Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Dhonju, R..; D’Amico, B..; Kermani, A..; Porteous, J..; Zhang, B..

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a quantitative assessment of the racking performance of partially anchored timber framed walls, based on experimental tests. A total of 17 timber framed wall specimens, constructed from a combination of materials under different load configurations, were tested. The experimental study was designed toexamine the influence of a range of geometrical parameters, such as fastener size and spacings, wall length, arrangement of studs and horizontal members, as well as the effect ...

  5. Percutaneous Transcholecystic Biliary Interventions Using Gallbladder Anchors: Feasibility Study in the Swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopera, Jorge E.; Kirsch, David; Qian Zhong; Ruiz, Bernardo; Brazzini, Augusto; Gonzales, Arturo; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wilfrido

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our initial experience with a swine model for biliary interventions by using a percutaneous transcholecystic access after suture anchor of the gallbladder. Telepaque tablets were given to five pigs to opacify the gallbladder. Under fluoroscopy, the opacified gallbladder was punctured percutaneously and three suture anchors were used to fix the anterior wall of the gallbladder to the abdominal wall. Two weeks later, the gallbladder was punctured and access into the distal common bile was obtained through the cystic duct. Balloon expandable stents were deployed into the distal common bile duct. Follow-up cholangiograms were obtained at 1 and 2 weeks. Necropsy was performed after 2 weeks to evaluate the relationship between the gallbladder and abdominal wall. Suture anchor placement was successful in all five pigs. One pig with a deep and highly positioned gallbladder developed fever, anorexia, and vomiting secondary to excessive stretch of the gallbladder. Placement of the guidewire through the extremely tortuous and small cystic ducts proved to be the most challenging step of the procedure. Metallic stents were successfully deployed in all four pigs in which it was attempted. Four animals tolerated the procedures without changes in their clinical conditions and no symptoms. Successful follow-up cholangiograms were performed at 1 and 2 weeks post-stent deployment without complications. All stents remained patent during the follow-up period. Necropsy demonstrated close attachment and adherence of the gallbladders to the antero-lateral abdominal wall in all four animals. Suture anchoring of the gallbladder is feasible in most pigs with superficially located gallbladders. This technique allows a safe and repeat access into the biliary system using a transcholecystic approach

  6. Surface effects on magnetic Freedericksz transition in ferronematics with soft particle anchoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bena, R.-E.; Petrescu, Emil

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic field-induced Freedericksz transition in a homeotropically aligned ferronematic (FN) in the case of weak anchoring molecules to the walls is studied. A correction to the Burylov-Raikher expression for the second-order transition threshold field is found. The possibility of a first-order transition is discussed in connection with the similar results for nematic liquid crystals. The saturation magnetic field is also obtained in terms of FN, surface and device parameters

  7. Biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Hilda M.; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human trichomonosis, infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The host-parasite interaction and pathophysiological processes of trichomonosis remain incompletely understood. This review focuses on the advancements reached in the area of the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis, especially in the role of the cysteine proteinases. It highlights various approaches made in this field and lists a group of trichomonad cysteine proteinases involved in diverse processes such as invasion of the mucous layer, cytoadherence, cytotoxicity, cytoskeleton disruption of red blood cells, hemolysis, and evasion of the host immune response. A better understanding of the biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of this parasite could be used in the identification of new chemotherapeutic targets. An additional advantage could be the development of a vaccine in order to reduce transmission of T. vaginalis. PMID:25348828

  8. Energy dissipation and high-strain rate dynamic response of E-glass fiber composites with anchored carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the mechanical properties of an E-glass fabric composite reinforced with anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on the E-glass fabric using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition procedure. The E-glass fabric with attached CNTs was then incorpor...

  9. Participation of intracellular cysteine proteinases, in particular cathepsin B, in degradation of collagen in periosteal tissue explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Hoeben, K. A.; Jansen, D. C.; Buttle, D. J.; Beertsen, W.; Everts, V.

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of cysteine proteinases in the degradation of soft connective tissue collagen was studied in cultured periosteal explants. Using cysteine proteinase inhibitors that were active intracellularly or extracellularly (Ep453 and Ep475, respectively), it was shown that over-all collagen

  10. pH-dependent processing of yeast procarboxypeptidase Y by proteinase A in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, S O; van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase Y is a vacuolar enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It enters the vacuole as a zymogen, procarboxypeptidase Y, which is immediately processed in a reaction involving two endoproteases, proteinase A and proteinase B. We have investigated the in vitro activation of purified proca...

  11. Coronavirus 3CLpro proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blom Nikolaj

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the passing of more than a year since the first outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, efficient counter-measures are still few and many believe that reappearance of SARS, or a similar disease caused by a coronavirus, is not unlikely. For other virus families like the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection. Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network was trained to recognise the cleavage sites in the genomes obtaining a sensitivity of 87.0% and a specificity of 99.0%. Several proteins known to be cleaved by other viruses were submitted to prediction as well as proteins suspected relevant in coronavirus pathology. Cleavage sites were predicted in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-1, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage candidates were identified which might be important to elucidate coronavirus pathology. Furthermore, the method might assist in design of proteinase inhibitors for treatment of SARS and possible future diseases caused by coronaviruses. It is made available for public use at our website: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCorona/.

  12. Ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with asthma: role of neutrophil-derived serine proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltermann, T J; Peters, E A; Alberts, B; Kwikkers, K; Borggreven, P A; Hiemstra, P S; Dijkman, J H; van Bree, L A; Stolk, J

    1998-04-01

    Proteinase inhibitors may be of potential therapeutic value in the treatment of respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. Our aim was to study the role of neutrophils, and neutrophil-derived serine proteinases in an acute model in patients with asthma. Exposure to ozone induces an acute neutrophilic inflammatory reaction accompanied by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. It is thought that these two effects of ozone are linked, and that neutrophil-derived serine proteinases (i.e. elastase) may play a role in the ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. Therefore, we examined the effect of recombinant antileukoprotease (rALP), one of the major serine proteinase inhibitors in the lung, on ozone-induced changes in airway hyperresponsiveness in this model. We observed that 16 h after exposure to ozone, airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine was increased both following placebo and rALP treatment. There was no significant difference between placebo and rALP treatment (change in area under the dose-response curve to methacholine: 117.3+/-59.0 vs 193.6+/-59.6 % fall x DD; p=.12). Moreover, the immediate decrease in FEV1 after ozone exposure was not significantly different between the two groups (placebo: -29.6+/-6.7%; rALP: -20.9+/-3.8%; p=.11). In addition, no significant differences were observed in plasma levels of fibrinogen degradation products generated by neutrophil serine proteinases before and after exposure to ozone. We conclude that neutrophil-derived serine proteinases are not important mediators for ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness.

  13. Career anchors and learning plan (part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is divided into three parts. The first part concentrates on how important career is for an individual, organization and society. The author establishes that understanding of career has changed dramatically and does not only refer to climbing up the career ladder, but also moving off or even down the career ladder. The notion of career, as a lifelong and professional path, encompasses all aspects of human personality and their roles acquired through one's life. On basis of vast and longitudinal research, where the author has studied career anchors of individuals, it is the objective of the author to find out on basis of what grounds do the individuals decide to take certain directions in their careers and how learning contributes to such decisions. As a source the author has used Shein's theory of career anchors. Part one describes in greater detail 8 different career anchors and introduces their main features with the findings of the research, which refer to the analysis of professions (work positions and established career anchors. The author thus verifies the hypothesis that career anchors do exist in our area.

  14. The aspartic proteinase family of three Phytophthora species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytophthora species are oomycete plant pathogens with such major social and economic impact that genome sequences have been determined for Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum. Pepsin-like aspartic proteinases (APs) are produced in a wide variety of species (from bacteria to humans) and contain conserved motifs and landmark residues. APs fulfil critical roles in infectious organisms and their host cells. Annotation of Phytophthora APs would provide invaluable information for studies into their roles in the physiology of Phytophthora species and interactions with their hosts. Results Genomes of Phytophthora infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum contain 11-12 genes encoding APs. Nine of the original gene models in the P. infestans database and several in P. sojae and P. ramorum (three and four, respectively) were erroneous. Gene models were corrected on the basis of EST data, consistent positioning of introns between orthologues and conservation of hallmark motifs. Phylogenetic analysis resolved the Phytophthora APs into 5 clades. Of the 12 sub-families, several contained an unconventional architecture, as they either lacked a signal peptide or a propart region. Remarkably, almost all APs are predicted to be membrane-bound. Conclusions One of the twelve Phytophthora APs is an unprecedented fusion protein with a putative G-protein coupled receptor as the C-terminal partner. The others appear to be related to well-documented enzymes from other species, including a vacuolar enzyme that is encoded in every fungal genome sequenced to date. Unexpectedly, however, the oomycetes were found to have both active and probably-inactive forms of an AP similar to vertebrate BACE, the enzyme responsible for initiating the processing cascade that generates the Aβ peptide central to Alzheimer's Disease. The oomycetes also encode enzymes similar to plasmepsin V, a membrane-bound AP that cleaves effector proteins of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum during

  15. Ultimate load capacities of expansion anchor bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnecki, R.M.; Manrique, M.A.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of available experimental expansion anchor bolt test data is presented. These data were collected as part of programs by the nuclear industry to address generic issues related to verification of seismic adequacy of equipment in nuclear power plants. Some of the data presented are suitable for use in seismic probabilistic risk assessments. For example, mean values of ultimate strength, along with their standard deviation and coefficients of variation, for a range of most typical expansion anchor bolt sizes are presented. Effects of interaction between shear and tension, edge distance, spacing, and cracking of the concrete are presented in a manner that is more suitable for use in deterministic evaluations. Related industry programs to derive anchor bolt capacities are briefly discussed. Recommendations for areas of further investigation are also presented

  16. Anchoring Proteins as Regulators of Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, Alessia; Ghigo, Alessandra; Scott, John D.; Hirsch, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and temporal organization of signal transduction is coordinated through the segregation of signaling enzymes in selected cellular compartments. This highly evolved regulatory mechanism ensures the activation of selected enzymes only in the vicinity of their target proteins. In this context, cAMP-responsive triggering of protein kinase A is modulated by a family of scaffold proteins referred to as A-kinase anchoring proteins. A-kinase anchoring proteins form the core of multiprotein complexes and enable simultaneous but segregated cAMP signaling events to occur in defined cellular compartments. In this review we will focus on the description of A-kinase anchoring protein function in the regulation of cardiac physiopathology. PMID:22859670

  17. Comparison of Suture-Based Anchors and Traditional Bioabsorbable Anchors in Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, W Chad; Tsai, Michael A; Parks, Brent G; Miller, Stuart D

    We compared the pullout strength of a suture-based anchor versus a bioabsorbable anchor in the distal fibula and calcaneus and evaluated the relationship between bone mineral density and peak load to failure. Eight paired cadaveric specimens underwent a modified Broström procedure and Achilles tendon reattachment. The fibula and calcaneus in the paired specimens received either a suture-based anchor or a bioabsorbable suture anchor. The fibular and calcaneal specimens were loaded to failure, defined as a substantial decrease in the applied load or pullout from the bone. In the fibula, the peak load to failure was significantly greater with the suture-based versus the bioabsorbable anchors (133.3 ± 41.8 N versus 76.8 ± 35.3 N; p = .002). No significant difference in load with 5 mm of displacement was found between the 2 groups. In the calcaneus, no difference in the peak load to failure was found between the 2 groups, and the peak load to failure with 5 mm of displacement was significantly lower with the suture-based than with the bioabsorbable anchors (52.2 ± 9.8 N versus 75.9 ± 12.4 N; p = .003). Bone mineral density and peak load to failure were significantly correlated in the fibula with the suture-based anchor. An innovative suture-based anchor had a greater peak load to failure compared with a bioabsorbable anchor in the fibula. In the calcaneus, the load at 5 mm of displacement was significantly lower in the suture-based than in the bioabsorbable group. The correlation findings might indicate the need for a cortical bone shelf with the suture-based anchor. Suture-based anchors could be a viable alternative to bioabsorbable anchors for certain foot and ankle procedures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  20. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L proteinase-based synthetic peptide for immunodiagnosis and prevention of sheep fasciolosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; El Ridi, R.; Salah, M.; Wagih, A.; Aziz, H. W.; Tallima, H.; El Shafie, M. H.; Khalek, T. A.; Ammou, F. F. A.; Strongylis, C.; Moussis, V.; Tsikaris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 3 (2008), s. 349-357 ISSN 0006-3525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cathepsin L proteinase * peptides * sequential oligopeptide carriers * synthetic peptide vaccine * Fasciiola gigantica Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.823, year: 2008

  1. Secreted aspartate proteinases, a virulence factor of Candida spp.: Occurrence among clinical isolates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hamal, P.; Dostál, Jiří; Raclavský, V.; Krylová, M.; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2004), s. 491-496 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MZd NI6485 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : Candida spp. * aspartate proteinases * RAPD typing Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  2. Recombinant protein to analyze autoantibodies to proteinase 3 in systemic vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rarok, AA; Huitema, MG; van der Leij, MJ; van der Geld, YM; Berthold, H; Schmitt, J; Stegeman, CA; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    2003-01-01

    The presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies with specificity for proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) usually is detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with purified PR3 as a substrate. We studied the technical performance of direct and capture ELISA using a recombinant

  3. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  4. Expression of recombinant proteinase 3, the autoantigen in Wegener's granulomatosis, in insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Geld, YM; Smook, MLF; Huitema, MG; Harmsen, MC; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    2002-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is the major autoantigen for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. Little is known about the major antigenic sites on PR3. To facilitate epitope mapping, PR3 was cloned in insect cells using a baculovirus expression system. Four

  5. Inhibitory activity and conformational transition of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, A.J.; Huber, R.; Degryse, E.; Speck, D.; Bischoff, Rainer

    1991-01-01

    Several variants of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) were investigated by spectroscopic methods and characterized according to their inhibitory activity. Replacement of Thr345 (P14) with Arg in alpha 1-PI containing an Arg residue in position 358 (yielding [Thr345----Arg,

  6. The digestion of phagocytosed collagen is inhibited by the proteinase inhibitors leupeptin and E-64

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, V.; Beertsen, W.; Tigchelaar-Gutter, W.

    1985-01-01

    Using morphometric methods the effects of the thiol-proteinase inhibitors leupeptin and E-64 on the digestion of intracytoplasmic collagen fibrils were studied in cultured mouse bone explants. Both drugs caused a dose-dependent increase of lysosomal structures containing cross-banded collagen

  7. Serum proteinase inhibitors and other serum proteins in protein-energy malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelp, F.P.; Migasena, P.; Pongpaew, P.; SCHREURS W.H.P

    1977-01-01

    1. The concentrations of serum protein albumin, prealbumin and transferrin were determined in twenty-eight cases of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) with infection, together with the levels of serum proteinase inhibitors (PI), alpha1-antitrypsin (AT), alpha1-antichymotrypsin (Ach),

  8. The helper component-proteinase of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic potyvirus causes severe yield losses in cowpea, an important legume crop in semi-arid regions of Africa. We have elucidated the genomic sequence of the virus and subsequently focused our attention on the so-called helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro), a

  9. Applicability of Yeast Extracellular Proteinases in Brewing: Physiological and Biochemical Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilinski, Carl A.; Russell, Inge; Stewart, Graham G.

    1987-01-01

    A general screening survey for expression of extracellular acid proteinase production was performed on over 100 cultures belonging to the genus Saccharomyces. Although two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed positive extracellular proteinase phenotypes in plate tests, it was not possible to demonstrate proteolytic activities in cell-free culture supernatants in assays performed at beer pH values. Of several yeasts from other genera examined, Saccharomycopsis fibuligera and Torulopsis magnoliae produced extracellular proteinases with desirable properties. Proteolytic activities were detected in assays performed at beer pH values and at lower temperature. Brewer's wort served as a highly inducing medium for extracellular proteinase production, with T. magnoliae yielding enzyme of highest specific activity. In fact, commencement of enzyme production was detected shortly after the onset of exponential growth in brewer's wort. Inclusion of crude enzyme preparations in brewer's wort inoculated simultaneously with brewer's yeast reduced final ethanol yields slightly and was found to be effective in reducing chill haze formation in bottled beer. PMID:16347298

  10. The aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds its own inhibitor into a helix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M; Phylip, L H; Lees, W E

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinase A from yeast is specifically and potently inhibited by a small protein called IA3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although this inhibitor consists of 68 residues, we show that the inhibitory activity resides within the N-terminal half of the molecule. Structures solved at 2...

  11. Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins that facilitate ER-to-Golgi transport of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, W P; Walter, P

    1999-04-01

    Many eukaryotic cell surface proteins are anchored in the lipid bilayer through glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). GPI anchors are covalently attached in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The modified proteins are then transported through the secretory pathway to the cell surface. We have identified two genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LAG1 and a novel gene termed DGT1 (for "delayed GPI-anchored protein transport"), encoding structurally related proteins with multiple membrane-spanning domains. Both proteins are localized to the ER, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Deletion of either gene caused no detectable phenotype, whereas lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells displayed growth defects and a significant delay in ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that LAG1 and DGT1 encode functionally redundant or overlapping proteins. The rate of GPI anchor attachment was not affected, nor was the transport rate of several non-GPI-anchored proteins. Consistent with a role of Lag1p and Dgt1p in GPI-anchored protein transport, lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells deposit abnormal, multilayered cell walls. Both proteins have significant sequence similarity to TRAM, a mammalian membrane protein thought to be involved in protein translocation across the ER membrane. In vivo translocation studies, however, did not detect any defects in protein translocation in lag1Delta dgt1Delta cells, suggesting that neither yeast gene plays a role in this process. Instead, we propose that Lag1p and Dgt1p facilitate efficient ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins.

  12. Chemical biology of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    CSIR-IIIM. Chemical biology of. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. Ram Vishwakarma. CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu. N ti l I tit t f I l. N. D lhi. National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi. Piramal Life Sciences Ltd, Mumbai ...

  13. Method and apparatus for dismantling mechanical anchors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovskiy, Yu P; Chendev, F S; Gritsayuk, B I; Gubin, N I; Osipov, S P

    1982-01-01

    This apparatus is designed to reduce the amount of labor required to dismantle mechanical anchors while at the same time lowering expenditures for lumber. Longwall beams and timber skips are used to support the cap and any fractured rock faces. The apparatus itself has grooves, vertical guides, and a drive system to position the longwall beams.

  14. Molecular cloning of a cysteine proteinase cDNA from the cotton boll weevil Anthonomus grandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira Neto, Osmundo Brilhante; Batista, João Aguiar Nogueira; Rigden, Daniel John; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Fragoso, Rodrigo Rocha; Monteiro, Ana Carolina Santos; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grossi-De-Sa, Maria Fátima

    2004-06-01

    The cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) causes severe cotton crop losses in North and South America. This report describes the presence of cysteine proteinase activity in the cotton boll weevil. Cysteine proteinase inhibitors from different sources were assayed against total A. grandis proteinases but, unexpectedly, no inhibitor tested was particularly effective. In order to screen for active inhibitors against the boll weevil, a cysteine proteinase cDNA (Agcys1) was isolated from A. grandis larvae using degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. Sequence analysis showed significant homologies with other insect cysteine proteinases. Northern blot analysis indicated that the mRNA encoding the proteinase was transcribed mainly in the gut of larvae. No mRNA was detected in neonatal larvae, pupae, or in the gut of the adult insect, suggesting that Agcys1 is an important cysteine proteinase for larvae digestion. The isolated gene will facilitate the search for highly active inhibitors towards boll weevil larvae that may provide a new opportunity to control this important insect pest.

  15. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhuang

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  16. Stone anchors from the Okhamandal region, Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Gudigar, P.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    During marine archaeological explorations since 1983, off Dwarka, a large number of stone anchors were discovered and dated to 1400 BC, comparing with anchors found in Mediterranean waters. In recent archaeological explorations off Dwarka, Bet...

  17. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  18. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-09-01

    Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  19. Technical note: drifting versus anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai-Haase, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-12-01

    Stream networks have recently been discovered to be major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross-comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams with different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (2) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil collar to seal the chambers to the water surface, rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  20. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann C Smigocki

    Full Text Available Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  1. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  2. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  3. AnchorDock: Blind and Flexible Anchor-Driven Peptide Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y

    2015-05-05

    The huge conformational space stemming from the inherent flexibility of peptides is among the main obstacles to successful and efficient computational modeling of protein-peptide interactions. Current peptide docking methods typically overcome this challenge using prior knowledge from the structure of the complex. Here we introduce AnchorDock, a peptide docking approach, which automatically targets the docking search to the most relevant parts of the conformational space. This is done by precomputing the free peptide's structure and by computationally identifying anchoring spots on the protein surface. Next, a free peptide conformation undergoes anchor-driven simulated annealing molecular dynamics simulations around the predicted anchoring spots. In the challenging task of a completely blind docking test, AnchorDock produced exceptionally good results (backbone root-mean-square deviation ≤ 2.2Å, rank ≤15) for 10 of 13 unbound cases tested. The impressive performance of AnchorDock supports a molecular recognition pathway that is driven via pre-existing local structural elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  5. Experimental Research on Destruction Mode and Anchoring Performance of Carbon Fiber Phyllostachys pubescens Anchor Rod with Different Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yulan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The anchoring technology is extensively applied in reinforcing protection of the earth relics. Now that no specification is available for different new anchor rods in earth relics protection due to diversified destruction modes of earth relics and complexity of engineering technology conditions, it is urgent to guide reinforcing design and construction with a complete detailed anchor rod research document. With the new carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod as the research object, six lots of in situ tests are designed to, respectively, study the destruction mode and anchoring performance of the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod under different anchor length L, anchor rod diameter D, bore diameter H, grouting material S, rib spacing R, and inclination angle A in this paper. By studying load shift curve experiment in drawing of the anchor rod, the destruction mode and ultimate bearing capacity of the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod in different experiment lots are obtained, and the concept of permitted application value N in anchor rod design is proposed. By studying strain distribution characteristics of anchor rods in experimental lots along the length direction under action of the permitted application value N and combining the existing destruction mode and ultimate bearing capacity, this paper analyzes influences of L, D, H, S, R, and A on anchoring effect of the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod; gives the reasonable value range of L, D, H, and R when the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod is used for reinforcing design of the earth relics; and provides favorable experiment basis for reinforcing design of the earth relics based on the carbon fiber Phyllostachys pubescens anchor rod.

  6. Comparative Study on Different Slot Forms of Prestressed Anchor Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Si, Jianhui; Jian, Zheng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, two models of prestressed pier, rectangular cavity anchor block and arch hollow anchor block are established. The ABAQUS software was used to calculate the stress of the surface of the neck of the pier and the cavity of the anchor block, through comparative analysis. The results show that compared with the rectangular cavity anchor block, the stress of the pier and the cavity can be effectively reduced when the arch hole is used, and the amount of prestressed anchor can be reduced, so as to obtain obvious economic benefits.

  7. Investigation of edge plasmas in the anchor cell region of GAMMA 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Khairul; Nakashima, Yousuke; Yatsu, Kiyoshi

    2000-01-01

    The first results of Langmuir probe measurements at the outer transition region of the anchor cell of GAMMA 10 are given. A probe current asymmetry in vertical direction is found in this region. It is also found that the asymmetry of probe current increases in outward direction and the direction of the asymmetry is independent on movable limiter position. A relation of the plasma asymmetry with the main magnetic field configuration is investigated. Plasma flow through the non-asymmetric magnetic field configuration region is thought to be the source of plasma asymmetry in this region, i.e., ∇B and curvature drifts are responsible for the asymmetry. Possibility of cold plasma formation in the anchor cell region is obtained during plug electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and can be explained with the desorption of particles due to the collision of the drifted out particles with the wall. (author)

  8. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  9. A scale distortion theory of anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Shane W; Mochon, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    We propose that anchoring is often best interpreted as a scaling effect--that the anchor changes how the response scale is used, not how the focal stimulus is perceived. Of importance, we maintain that this holds true even for so-called objective scales (e.g., pounds, calories, meters, etc.). In support of this theory of scale distortion, we show that prior exposure to a numeric standard changes respondents' use of that specific response scale but does not generalize to conceptually affiliated judgments rendered on similar scales. Our findings highlight the necessity of distinguishing response language effects from representational effects in places where the need for that distinction has often been assumed away.

  10. Electrochromic mirror using viologen-anchored nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Na [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Nature-mimic I/O interface Research Section, 218 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, Advanced Device Technology, 217 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seong M.; Ah, Chil Seong; Song, Juhee; Ryu, Hojun; Kim, Yong Hae [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Nature-mimic I/O interface Research Section, 218 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Youb, E-mail: youby@etri.re.kr [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Nature-mimic I/O interface Research Section, 218 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, Advanced Device Technology, 217 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Three types of ECM device were fabricated using viologen-anchored ECDs. • The devices were investigated according to their optical structures. • The anti-reflection material affects the reflectance and the coloration efficiency. • The device design of ECMs is a crucial factor for clear reflected images. - Abstract: Electrochromic mirrors (ECMs) that are used in automobile mirrors need to have high reflectance, a high contrast ratio, and a clear image. In particular, it is critical that distortions of clear images are minimized for safety. Therefore, an ECM is fabricated using viologen-anchored nanoparticles and a magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) layer with an anti-reflection function. The ECM has approximately 30.42% in the reflectance dynamic range and 125 cm{sup 2}/C high coloration efficiency.

  11. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  12. Anchoring in a novel bimanual coordination pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslovat, Dana; Lam, Melanie Y; Brunke, Kirstin M; Chua, Romeo; Franks, Ian M

    2009-02-01

    Anchoring in cyclical movements has been defined as regions of reduced spatial or temporal variability [Beek, P. J. (1989). Juggling dynamics. PhD thesis. Amsterdam: Free University Press] that are typically found at movement reversal points. For in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronizing reversal points with a metronome pulse has resulted in decreased anchor point variability and increased pattern stability [Byblow, W. D., Carson, R. G., & Goodman, D. (1994). Expressions of asymmetries and anchoring in bimanual coordination. Human Movement Science, 13, 3-28; Fink, P. W., Foo, P., Jirsa, V. K., & Kelso, J. A. S. (2000). Local and global stabilization of coordination by sensory information. Experimental Brain Research, 134, 9-20]. The present experiment examined anchoring during acquisition, retention, and transfer of a 90 degrees phase-offset continuous bimanual coordination pattern (whereby the right limb lags the left limb by one quarter cycle), involving horizontal flexion about the elbow. Three metronome synchronization strategies were imposed: participants either synchronized maximal flexion of the right arm (i.e., single metronome), both flexion and extension of the right arm (i.e., double metronome within-limb), or flexion of each arm (i.e., double metronome between-limb) to an auditory metronome. In contrast to simpler in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronization of additional reversal points to the metronome did not reduce reversal point variability or increase pattern stability. Furthermore, practicing under different metronome synchronization strategies did not appear to have a significant effect on the rate of acquisition of the pattern.

  13. Consistency Anchor Formalization and Correctness Proofs

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel, Correia; Bessani, Alysson

    2014-01-01

    This is report contains the formal proofs for the techniques for increasing the consistency of cloud storage as presented in "Bessani et al. SCFS: A Cloud-backed File System. Proc. of the 2014 USENIX Annual Technical Conference. June 2014." The consistency anchor technique allows one to increase the consistency provided by eventually consistent cloud storage services like Amazon S3. This technique has been used in the SCFS (Shared Cloud File System) cloud-backed file system for solving rea...

  14. Career anchors and career resilience: Supplementary constructs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Van Vuuren

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously the authors reported on a study in which an attempt was made at defining and measuring the construct career resilience (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998. The present article continues this investigation by reporting on the relationship between career resilience and career anchors, as defined in Scheins (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992 career anchor model. The aim of the study was to determine whether career anchor patterning could potentially inhibit or facilitate individuals' levels of career resilience. The "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 together with Scheins (1990 "Career Orientations Inventory" (COI were administered to 352 skilled employees. The findings regarding the statistical relationship between the two constructs are discussed. Opsomming Loopbaanankers en loopbaangehardheid: supplementere konstrukte? In n vorige publikasie van Fourie en Van Vuuren (1998 is die bevindinge aangaande die afbakening en meting van die konstruk, loopbaangehardheid, gerapporteer. In die huidige artikel word die ondersoek voortgesit met 'n beskrywing van die verwantskap tussen loopbaangehardheid en loopbaanankers, soos gedefinieer in die loopbaanankermodel van Schein (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992. Die doel met die studie was om te bepaal of die mate van loopbaanankerontplooiing individuele vlakke van loopbaangehardheid potensieel fasiliteer ofinhibeer. Die "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 is tesame met die "Career Orientation Inventory" (COI (Schein, 1990 op 352 geskoolde werknemers geadministreer. Die bevindinge betreffende die statistiese verwantskap tussen die twee konstrukte word bespreek.

  15. Results of the ANCHOR prospective, multicenter registry of EndoAnchors for type Ia endoleaks and endograft migration in patients with challenging anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, William D; Mehta, Manish; Varnagy, David; Moore, William M; Arko, Frank R; Joye, James; Ouriel, Kenneth; de Vries, Jean-Paul

    2014-10-01

    Proximal attachment site complications continue to occur after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR), specifically type Ia endoleak and endograft migration. EndoAnchors (Aptus Endosystems, Sunnyvale, Calif) were designed to enhance endograft proximal fixation and sealing, and the current study was undertaken to evaluate the potential benefit of this treatment. During the 23-month period ending in December 2013, 319 subjects were enrolled at 43 sites in the United States and Europe. EndoAnchors were implanted in 242 patients (75.9%) at the time of an initial EVAR procedure (primary arm) and in 77 patients with an existing endograft and proximal aortic neck complications (revision arm). Technical success was defined as deployment of the desired number of EndoAnchors, adequate penetration of the vessel wall, and absence of EndoAnchor fracture. Procedural success was defined as technical success without a type Ia endoleak at completion angiography. Values are expressed as mean ± standard deviation and interquartile range. The 238 male (74.6%) and 81 female (25.4%) subjects had a mean age of 74.1 ± 8.2 years. Aneurysms averaged 58 ± 13 (51-63) mm in diameter at the time of EndoAnchor implantation (core laboratory measurements). The proximal aortic neck averaged 16 ± 13 (7-23) mm in length (42.7% <10 mm and 42.7% conical) and 27 ± 4 mm (25-30 mm) in diameter; infrarenal neck angulation was 24 ± 15 (13-34) degrees. The number of EndoAnchors deployed was 5.8 ± 2.1 (4-7). Technical success was achieved in 303 patients (95.0%) and procedural success in 279 patients (87.5%), 217 of 240 (89.7%) and 62 of 77 (80.5%) in the primary and revision arms, respectively. There were 29 residual type Ia endoleaks (9.1%) at the end of the procedure. During mean follow-up of 9.3 ± 4.7 months, 301 patients (94.4%) were free from secondary procedures. Among the 18 secondary procedures, eight were performed for residual type Ia endoleaks and the others

  16. Transgenic rice plants harboring an introduced potato proteinase inhibitor II gene are insect resistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, X; Li, X; Xue, Q; Abo-el-Saad, M; Xu, D; Wu, R

    1996-04-01

    We introduced the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PINII) gene (pin2) into several Japonica rice varieties, and regenerated a large number of transgenic rice plants. Wound-inducible expression of the pin2 gene driven by its own promoter, together with the first intron of the rice actin 1 gene (act1), resulted in high-level accumulation of the PINII protein in the transgenic plants. The introduced pin2 gene was stably inherited in the second, third, and fourth generations, as shown by molecular analyses. Based on data from the molecular analyses, several homozygous transgenic lines were obtained. Bioassay for insect resistance with the fifth-generation transgenic rice plants showed that transgenic rice plants had increased resistance to a major rice insect pest, pink stem borer (Sesamia inferens). Thus, introduction of an insecticidal proteinase inhibitor gene into cereal plants can be used as a general strategy for control of insect pests.

  17. Circadian rhythms of cysteine proteinases and cystatins, potential tumour markers, in normal sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimerman, N.; Krasovec, M.; Mesko-Brguljan, P.; Suskovic, S.; Kos, J.

    2002-01-01

    Circadian day/night variations have been evidenced in all major groups of organisms and at all levels of organisation of the organism. Circadian intra-individual variations are known for a number of analyses in serum including tumour-associated markers. It was suggested that the serum levels of cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors may be of clinical importance for prognosis and diagnosis in cancer. Since known circadian rhythms are important for choosing the best sampling time, interpretation of the results of a diagnostic test, patient monitoring, and timing of a therapy, our objective was to establish 24-h variations of cysteine proteinases, cathepsins B, H, L, and their low molecular weight inhibitors, stefin A, stefin B, and cystatin C, in sera from healthy subjects. (author)

  18. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of proteinase K at pD 6.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardberg, Anna S [ORNL; Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Myles, Dean A A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    AbstractA preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the proteolytic enzyme proteinase K is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the vapour-diffusion method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2.3 on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in 2.5 days. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, particularly at the active site. This information will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying proteinase K's catalytic activity and to an enriched understanding of the subtilisin clan of serine proteases.

  19. Molecular cloning of Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor of the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hee Jeong; Cho, Hyun Kook; Park, Eun-Mi; Hong, Gyeong-Eun; Kim, Young-Ok; Nam, Bo-Hye; Kim, Woo-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jun; Han, Hyon Sob; Jang, In-Kwon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Cheong, Jaehun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors play important roles in host defence systems involving blood coagulation and pathogen digestion. We isolated and characterized a cDNA clone for a Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor (KPI) from a hemocyte cDNA library of the oriental white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The KPI gene consists of three exons and two introns. KPI cDNA contains an open reading frame of 396 bp, a polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA, and a poly (A) tail. KPI cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 131 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 21 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of KPI contains two homologous Kazal domains, each with six conserved cysteine residues. The mRNA of KPI is expressed in the hemocytes of healthy shrimp, and the higher expression of KPI transcript is observed in shrimp infected with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), suggesting a potential role for KPI in host defence mechanisms.

  20. Novel Aggregation Properties of Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Sap6 Mediate Virulence in Oral Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohitashw; Saraswat, Darpan; Tati, Swetha; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans, a commensal fungus of the oral microbiome, causes oral candidiasis in humans with localized or systemic immune deficiencies. Secreted aspartic proteinases (Saps) are a family of 10 related proteases and are virulence factors due to their proteolytic activity, as well as their roles in adherence and colonization of host tissues. We found that mice infected sublingually with C. albicans cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and a Δsap8 strain) had thicker fungal plaques and more severe oral infection, while infection with the Δsap6 strain was attenuated. These hypervirulent strains had highly aggregative colony structure in vitro and higher secreted proteinase activity; however, the levels of proteinase activity of C. albicans Saps did not uniformly match their abilities to damage cultured oral epithelial cells (SCC-15 cells). Hyphal induction in cells overexpressing Sap6 (SAP6 OE and Δsap8 cells) resulted in formation of large cell-cell aggregates. These aggregates could be produced in germinated wild-type cells by addition of native or heat-inactivated Sap6. Sap6 bound only to germinated cells and increased C. albicans adhesion to oral epithelial cells. The adhesion properties of Sap6 were lost upon deletion of its integrin-binding motif (RGD) and could be inhibited by addition of RGD peptide or anti-integrin antibodies. Thus, Sap6 (but not Sap5) has an alternative novel function in cell-cell aggregation, independent of its proteinase activity, to promote infection and virulence in oral candidiasis.

  1. Cloning and characterization of Sapp2p, the second aspartic proteinase isoenzyme from Candida parapsilosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Merkerová, M.; Dostál, Jiří; Hradilek, Martin; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7 (2006), s. 1018-1026 ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0038; GA ČR(CZ) GA303/04/0432; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : aspartic proteinase * Candida parapsilosis * zymogen conversion Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.274, year: 2006

  2. In vitro differential activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases of clinical isolates of Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurean D'Eça Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Candida yeasts are commensals; however, if the balance of normal flora is disrupted or the immune defenses are compromised, Candida species can cause disease manifestations. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida, including the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases in clinical isolates of Candida spp. METHODS: Eighty-two isolates from hospitalized patients collected from various sites of origin were analyzed. Phospholipase production was performed in egg yolk medium and the production of proteinase was verified in a medium containing bovine serum albumin. The study was performed in triplicate. RESULTS: Fifty-six (68.3% of isolates tested were phospholipase positive and 16 (44.4% were positive for proteinase activity. C. tropicalis was the species with the highest number of positive isolates for phospholipase (91.7%. Statistically significant differences were observed in relation to production of phospholipases among species (p<0,0001 and among the strains from different sites of origin (p=0.014. Regarding the production of acid protease, the isolates of C. parapsilosis tested presented a larger number of producers (69.2%. Among the species analyzed, the percentage of protease producing isolates did not differ statistically (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901 (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of C. non-albicans and all C. albicans isolates were great producers of hydrolytic enzymes and, consequently, might be able to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  3. Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busot, Grethel Yanet; McClure, Bruce; Ibarra-Sánchez, Claudia Patricia; Jiménez-Durán, Karina; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    After landing on a wet stigma, pollen grains hydrate and germination generally occurs. However, there is no certainty of the pollen tube growth through the style to reach the ovary. The pistil is a gatekeeper that evolved in many species to recognize and reject the self-pollen, avoiding endogamy and encouraging cross-pollination. However, recognition is a complex process, and specific factors are needed. Here the isolation and characterization of a stigma-specific protein from N. alata, NaStEP (N. alata Stigma Expressed Protein), that is homologous to Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, are reported. Activity gel assays showed that NaStEP is not a functional serine proteinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical and protein blot analyses revealed that NaStEP is detectable in stigmas of self-incompatible (SI) species N. alata, N. forgetiana, and N. bonariensis, but not in self-compatible (SC) species N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. benthamiana, N. longiflora, and N. glauca. NaStEP contains the vacuolar targeting sequence NPIVL, and immunocytochemistry experiments showed vacuolar localization in unpollinated stigmas. After self-pollination or pollination with pollen from the SC species N. tabacum or N. plumbaginifolia, NaStEP was also found in the stigmatic exudate. The synthesis and presence in the stigmatic exudate of this protein was strongly induced in N. alata following incompatible pollination with N. tabacum pollen. The transfer of NaStEP to the stigmatic exudate was accompanied by perforation of the stigmatic cell wall, which appeared to release the vacuolar contents to the apoplastic space. The increase in NaStEP synthesis after pollination and its presence in the stigmatic exudates suggest that this protein may play a role in the early pollen-stigma interactions that regulate pollen tube growth in Nicotiana.

  4. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a serine proteinase inhibitor gene from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riahi, Yael; Siman-Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2004-02-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) are irreversible suicide inhibitors of proteinases that regulate a wide range of biological processes, including pathogen evasion of the host defence system. We report the cloning and characterization of a gene encoding a serpin from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (Ehserp) that may function in this manner. The protein encoded by Ehserp contains 371 amino acids with a predicted mass of 42.6 kDa. Antibodies to a 42 kDa recombinant Ehserp react specifically with two bands of 42 and 49 kDa in trophozoite extracts. Ehserp has a cytoplasmic localization and is secreted by trophozoites incubated in the presence of mammalian cells, but not by resting trophozoites. A panel of mammalian serine proteinases was screened, but none of them was inhibited by the recombinant Ehserp. In contrast, the 49 kDa Ehserp present in the secretion product (SP) of activated macrophages interacted with human neutrophil cathepsin G to form a complex resistant to sodium dodecyl sulphate. We discuss the nature of the 42 and 49 kDa Ehserp and the possible roles that Ehserp may play in the survival of the parasite inside the host.

  5. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized.

  6. Dynamic performance of concrete undercut anchors for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrenholtz, Christoph, E-mail: christoph@mahrenholtz.net; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Behavior of undercut anchors under dynamic actions simulating earthquakes. • First high frequency load and crack cycling tests on installed concrete anchors ever. • Comprehensive review of anchor qualification for Nuclear Power Plants. - Abstract: Post-installed anchors are widely used for structural and nonstructural connections to concrete. In many countries, concrete anchors used for Nuclear Power Plants have to be qualified to ensure reliable behavior even under extreme conditions. The tests required for qualification of concrete anchors are carried out at quasi-static loading rates well below the rates to be expected for dynamic actions deriving from earthquakes, airplane impacts or explosions. To investigate potentially beneficial effects of high loading rates and cycling frequencies, performance tests on installed undercut anchors were conducted. After introductory notes on anchor technology and a comprehensive literature review, this paper discusses the qualification of anchors for Nuclear Power Plants and the testing carried out to quantify experimentally the effects of dynamic actions on the load–displacement behavior of undercut anchors.

  7. Cloning and sequence analysis of serine proteinase of Gloydius ussuriensis venom gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Dejun; Liu Shanshan; Yang Chunwei; Zhao Yizhuo; Chang Shufang; Yan Weiqun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To construct a cDNA library by using mRNA from Gloydius ussuriensis (G. Ussuriensis) venom gland, to clone and analyze serine proteinase gene from the cDNA library. Methods: Total RNA was isolated from venom gland of G. ussuriensis, mRNA was purified by using mRNA isolation Kit. The whole length cDNA was synthesized by means of smart cDNA synthesis strategy, and amplified by long distance PCR procedure, lately cDAN was cloned into vector pBluescrip-sk. The recombinant cDNA was transformed into E. coli DH5α. The cDNA of serine proteinase gene in the venom gland of G. ussuriensis was detected and amplified using the in situ hybridization. The cDNA fragment was inserted into pGEMT vector, cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Results: The capacity of cDNA library of venom gland was above 2.3 x 10 6 . Its open reading frame was composed of 702 nucleotides and coded a protein pre-zymogen of 234 amino acids. It contained 12 cysteine residues. The sequence analysis indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA fragment shared high identity with the thrombin-like enzyme genes of other snakes in the GenBank. the query sequence exhibited strong amino acid sequence homology of 85% to the serine proteas of T. gramineus, thrombin-like serine proteinase I of D. acutus and serine protease catroxase II of C. atrox respectively. Based on the amino acid sequences of other thrombin-like enzymes, the catalytic residues and disulfide bridges of this thrombin-like enzyme were deduced as follows: catalytic residues, His 41 , Asp 86 , Ser 180 ; and six disulfide bridges Cys 7 -Cys 139 , Cys 26 -Cys 42 , Cys 74 -Cys 232 , Cys 118 -Cys 186 , Cys 150 -Cys 165 , Cys 176 -Cys 201 . Conclusion: The capacity of cDNA library of venom gland is above 2.3 x 10 6 , overtop the level of 10 5 capicity. The constructed cDNA library of G. ussuriensis venom gland would be helpful platform to detect new target genes and further gene manipulate. The cloned serine

  8. Snake venom serine proteinases specificity mapping by proteomic identification of cleavage sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelanis, André; Huesgen, Pitter F; Oliveira, Ana Karina; Tashima, Alexandre K; Serrano, Solange M T; Overall, Christopher M

    2015-01-15

    Many snake venom toxins are serine proteases but their specific in vivo targets are mostly unknown. Various act on components of the coagulation cascade, and fibrinolytic and kallikrein-kinin systems to trigger various pathological effects observed in the envenomation. Despite showing high similarity in terms of primary structure snake venom serine proteinases (SVSPs) show exquisite specificity towards macromolecular substrates. Therefore, the characterization of their peptide bond specificity is important for understanding the active site preference associated with effective proteolysis as well as for the design of peptide substrates and inhibitors. Bothrops jararaca contains various SVSPs among which Bothrops protease A is a specific fibrinogenolytic agent and PA-BJ is a platelet-activating enzyme. In this study we used proteome derived peptide libraries in the Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS) approach to explore the peptide bond specificity of Bothrops protease A and PA-BJ in order to determine their individual peptide cleavage sequences. A total of 371 cleavage sites (208 for Bothrops protease A and 163 for PA-BJ) were detected and both proteinases displayed a clear preference for arginine at the P1 position. Moreover, the analysis of the specificity profiles of Bothrops protease A and PA-BJ revealed subtle differences in the preferences along P6-P6', despite a common yet unusual preference for Pro at P2. Taken together, these results map the subsite specificity of both SVSPs and shed light in the functional differences between these proteinases. Proteolysis is key to various pathological effects observed upon envenomation by viperid snakes. The use of the Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS) approach for the easy mapping of proteinase subsite preferences at both the prime- and non-prime sides concurrently gives rise to a fresh understanding of the interaction of the snake venom serine proteinases with peptide and

  9. Construction and performance of a permanent earth anchor (tieback) system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obergfell, M.N.

    1987-02-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider is the newest addition to the high-energy physics research complex at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. One of the many unique features of this project is the large, underground pit, where massive particle detectors will study the collision of subatomic particles. The large, open pit utilizes nearly 600 permanent earth anchors (tiebacks) for the support of the 56 ft (17 m) high walls, and is one of the largest applications of tiebacks for permanent support of a structure. This paper examines the use of tiebacks on this project with emphasis on their installation and performance

  10. Starting point anchoring effects in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    of preferences in Choice Experiments resembles the Dichotomous Choice format, there is reason to suspect that Choice Experiments are equally vulnerable to anchoring bias. Employing different sets of price levels in a so-called Instruction Choice Set presented prior to the actual choice sets, the present study...... subjectivity in the present study is gender dependent, pointing towards, that female respondents are prone to be affected by the price levels employed. Male respondents, on the other hand, are not sensitive towards these prices levels. Overall, this implicates that female respondents, when employing a low......-priced Instruction Choice Set, tend to express lower willingness-to-pay than when higher prices are employed....

  11. The bone-anchored hearing aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sou...... vibrations are led directly to the inner ear via the mastoid bone, bypassing the middle ear. This is achieved via an osseointegrated implant and a skin-penetrating abutment. Studies report high success rates and a majority of complications as typically minor in nature....

  12. Stone anchors from Minicoy Island, Lakshadweep, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    and Ali Rajas of Kerala. It appears that the mainland had contact with these islands during the early centuries of the Christian era, if not earlier (Sila Tripati, 1999). Though Islam came to Lakshadweep after the 11th and 12th centuries AD..., stitches, ropes and even sails (Hourani, 1995). With the passage of time the maritime contacts between the people of Lakshadweep and Arabs became closer, as demonstrated by the discovery of an Indo- 3 Arabian stone anchor in the Jama Mosque on Minicoy...

  13. ANCHORING IN THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana L. Shklyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of marketing, both ineconomy and in politics is to attract themaximum number of customers or voters, maximizing customer satisfaction and ,ideally, improve the quality of life.The author, in various aspects, thetechnology of anchoring used in NLP, to attract customers and voters, both in the economy and in politics.In different examples demonstrate theoverall impact on the psychology of the consumer. Separating policy and the economy, marketers are missing something. The author proposes to look at how psychologicalanchors affect these two, at fi rst glance, different vector.

  14. Adsorption phenomena and anchoring energy in nematic liquid crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Barbero, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Despite the large quantity of phenomenological information concerning the bulk properties of nematic phase liquid crystals, little is understood about the origin of the surface energy, particularly the surface, interfacial, and anchoring properties of liquid crystals that affect the performance of liquid crystal devices. Self-contained and unique, Adsorption Phenomena and Anchoring Energy in Nematic Liquid Crystals provides an account of new and established results spanning three decades of research into the problems of anchoring energy and adsorption phenomena in liquid crystals.The book contains a detailed discussion of the origin and possible sources of anchoring energy in nematic liquid crystals, emphasizing the dielectric contribution to the anchoring energy in particular. Beginning with fundamental surface and anchoring properties of liquid crystals and the definition of the nematic phase, the authors explain how selective ion adsorption, dielectric energy density, thickness dependence, and bias voltage...

  15. The H1 histone-specific proteinase is associated with nuclear matrix and stimulated by DNA containing breaks of denatured sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaziev, A.I.; Kutsyj, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    Discovery of proteinase in nuclear matrix specific of H1 histone and dependent presence of breaks or denatured sites in DNA permits to assume that the given enzyme, obviously, participates in replication and DNA repair, in regulation of genes expression. Removal of H1 histone by proteinase is, probably, necessary for procedure of these processes, and, obviously, this proteinase suffers conformational changes in the composition of the DNA-histone complex. H1 histone disintegration in nucleohistone containing damaged sites of DNA by specific proteinase, probably, represents one of the mechanisms for providing DNA repair in cells of higher organisms

  16. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of suction anchor pullout capacity under undrained conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jarand, Pollestad

    2015-01-01

    Master's thesis in Offshore technology Floating units are dependent on reliable mooring systems to ensure safety during marine operations. Suction anchors have proved to be a technologically viable and cost-effective concept. They are capable of precision installation, re-use, and provide large resistive capacity. This thesis investigates load capacity and failure modes of suction anchors subjected to vertical, horizontal (lateral), and incline loading. Suction anchor design co...

  18. Mean-field density functional theory of a nanoconfined classical, three-dimensional Heisenberg fluid. I. The role of molecular anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattes, Stefanie M.; Gubbins, Keith E.; Schoen, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we employ classical density functional theory (DFT) to investigate for the first time equilibrium properties of a Heisenberg fluid confined to nanoscopic slit pores of variable width. Within DFT pair correlations are treated at modified mean-field level. We consider three types of walls: hard ones, where the fluid-wall potential becomes infinite upon molecular contact but vanishes otherwise, and hard walls with superimposed short-range attraction with and without explicit orientation dependence. To model the distance dependence of the attractions, we employ a Yukawa potential. The orientation dependence is realized through anchoring of molecules at the substrates, i.e., an energetic discrimination of specific molecular orientations. If the walls are hard or attractive without specific anchoring, the results are "quasi-bulk"-like in that they can be linked to a confinement-induced reduction of the bulk mean field. In these cases, the precise nature of the walls is completely irrelevant at coexistence. Only for specific anchoring nontrivial features arise, because then the fluid-wall interaction potential affects the orientation distribution function in a nontrivial way and thus appears explicitly in the Euler-Lagrange equations to be solved for minima of the grand potential of coexisting phases.

  19. Testing methods of steel wi re ropes at the anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Kropuch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces an application of the acoustic andthermographic method in the defectoscopic testing of immobilesteel wire ropes at the most critical point, the anchor. Firstmeasurements and their results by these new defectoscopic methodsare shown. In defectoscopic tests at the anchor, the widelyused magnetic method gives unreliable results, and therefore presentsa problem for steel wire defectoscopy. Application of the two new methods in the steel wire defectoscopy at the anchor point will enableincreased safety measures at the anchor of steel wire ropes in bridge, roof, tower and aerial cable lift constructions.

  20. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  1. Efficiency analysis and assessment of interlocking PVC sheet piling walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emam, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    The use of PVC sheet piling in marine environments offers a number of unique advantages that include weight saving, corrosion resistance and environmentally safe material. In this study, one of the widely used classical methods as well as a finite element analysis are used to analyze such sheet piling walls. The analysis focuses on the effect of some important parameters on the wall global behavior, bending moments, stresses and deflections. The parameters include wall cross-section, wall height, embedment depth, number and spacing of anchor rods, and type of soil and loading conditions. Furthermore, the effect of the shape of the wall cross-section and the location of the interlocking joints has been studied by using plane frame and arch-like models. Results indicate that the finite element modeling is an effective tool for numerical approximation of soil-structure interaction problems. The required theoretical embedment depth is nearly 30 % of the clear wall height. Also, the modulus of subgrade reaction has a minor effect on both cantilever wall and one anchor sheet-pile wall. Finally, lateral (horizontal) action shows that deep sections tend to behave like an arch under radial loading which might increase normal stresses at some critical sections

  2. End-anchored polymers in good solvents from the single chain limit to high anchoring densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mark D; Grest, Gary S; Douglas, Jack F; Kent, Michael S; Suo, Tongchuan

    2016-11-07

    An increasing number of applications utilize grafted polymer layers to alter the interfacial properties of solid substrates, motivating refinement in our theoretical understanding of such layers. To assess existing theoretical models of them, we have investigated end-anchored polymer layers over a wide range of grafting densities, σ, ranging from a single chain to high anchoring density limits, chain lengths ranging over two orders of magnitude, for very good and marginally good solvent conditions. We compare Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, numerical self-consistent field calculations, and experimental measurements of the average layer thickness, h, with renormalization group theory, the Alexander-de Gennes mushroom theory, and the classical brush theory. Our simulations clearly indicate that appreciable inter-chain interactions exist at all simulated areal anchoring densities so that there is no mushroom regime in which the layer thickness is independent of σ. Moreover, we find that there is no high coverage regime in which h follows the predicted scaling, h ∼ Nσ 1/3 , for classical polymer brushes either. Given that no completely adequate analytic theory seems to exist that spans wide ranges of N and σ, we applied scaling arguments for h as a function of a suitably defined reduced anchoring density, defined in terms of the solution radius of gyration of the polymer chains and N. We find that such a scaling approach enables a smooth, unified description of h in very good solvents over the full range of anchoring density and chain lengths, although this type of data reduction does not apply to marginal solvent quality conditions.

  3. Optimal Design of Sheet Pile Wall Embedded in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manas Ranjan; Das, Sarat Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Sheet pile wall is a type of flexible earth retaining structure used in waterfront offshore structures, river protection work and temporary supports in foundations and excavations. Economy is an essential part of a good engineering design and needs to be considered explicitly in obtaining an optimum section. By considering appropriate embedment depth and sheet pile section it may be possible to achieve better economy. This paper describes optimum design of both cantilever and anchored sheet pile wall penetrating clay using a simple optimization tool Microsoft Excel ® Solver. The detail methodology and its application with examples are presented for cantilever and anchored sheet piles. The effects of soil properties, depth of penetration and variation of ground water table on the optimum design are also discussed. Such a study will help professional while designing the sheet pile wall penetrating clay.

  4. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, Jutta [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Kontaxis, Georg [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Campus Vienna Biocenter 5, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Rancan, Chiara [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Department of Gene Vectors, Haematologikum, Marchioninistrasse 25, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Skern, Tim, E-mail: timothy.skern@meduniwien.ac.at [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb{sup pro}) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb{sup pro} L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. {sup 15}N-HSQC measurements of Lb{sup pro} L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb{sup pro}, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb{sup pro}, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb{sup pro} and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb{sup pro}. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes.

  5. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberger, Jutta; Kontaxis, Georg; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb pro ) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb pro L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. 15 N-HSQC measurements of Lb pro L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb pro , lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb pro , stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb pro and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb pro . - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes

  6. Testing and modeling of cyclically loaded rock anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joar Tistel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Public Roads Administration (NPRA is planning for an upgrade of the E39 highway route at the westcoast of Norway. Fixed links shall replace ferries at seven fjord crossings. Wide spans and large depths at the crossings combined with challenging subsea topography and environmental loads call for an extension of existing practice. A variety of bridge concepts are evaluated in the feasibility study. The structures will experience significant loads from deadweight, traffic and environment. Anchoring of these forces is thus one of the challenges met in the project. Large-size subsea rock anchors are considered a viable alternative. These can be used for anchoring of floating structures but also with the purpose of increasing capacity of fixed structures. This paper presents first a thorough study of factors affecting rock anchor bond capacity. Laboratory testing of rock anchors subjected to cyclic loading is thereafter presented. Finally, the paper presents a model predicting the capacity of a rock anchor segment, in terms of a ribbed bar, subjected to a cyclic load history. The research assumes a failure mode occurring in the interface between the rock anchor and the surrounding grout. The constitutive behavior of the bonding interface is investigated for anchors subjected to cyclic one-way tensile loads. The model utilizes the static bond capacity curve as a basis, defining the ultimate bond τbu and the slip s1 at τbu. A limited number of input parameters are required to apply the model. The model defines the bond-slip behavior with the belonging rock anchor capacity depending on the cyclic load level (τmax cy/τbu, the cyclic load ratio (R = τmin cy/τmax cy, and the number of load cycles (N. The constitutive model is intended to model short anchor lengths representing an incremental length of a complete rock anchor.

  7. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery in a survival animal model using a transabdominal magnetic anchoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Beom; Park, Chan Ho; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2011-12-01

    Though single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) can reduce operative scarring and facilitates postoperative recovery, it does have some limitations, such as reduction in instrument working, difficulty in triangulation, and collision of instruments. To overcome these limitations, development of new instruments is needed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a magnetic anchoring system in performing SILS ileocecectomy. Experiments were performed in a living dog model. Five dogs (26.3-29.2 kg) underwent ileocecectomy using a multichannel single port (OCTO port; Darim, Seoul, Korea). The port was inserted at the umbilicus and maintained a CO(2) pneumoperitoneum. Two magnet-fixated vascular clips were attached to the colon using an endoclip applicator, and it was held together across the abdominal wall by using an external handheld magnet. The cecum was then retracted in an upward direction by moving the external handheld magnet, and the mesocolon was dissected with Ultracision(®). Extracorporeal functional end-to-end anastomosis was done using a linear stapler. All animals survived during the observational period of 2 weeks, and then re-exploration was performed under general anesthesia for evaluation of intra-abdominal healing and complications. Mean operation time was 70 min (range 55-100 min), with each subsequent case taking less time. The magnetic anchoring system was effective in achieving adequate exposure in all cases. All animals survived and convalesced normally without evidence of clinical complication during the observation period. At re-exploration, all anastomoses were completely healed and there were no complications such as abscess, bleeding or organ injury. SILS ileocecectomy using a magnetic anchoring system was safe and effective in a dog model. The development of magnetic anchoring systems may be beneficial for overcoming the limitations of SILS.

  8. Seismic response of unanchored and partially anchored liquid-storage tanks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, P.K.; Veletsos, A.S.

    1995-12-01

    Ground-mounted vertical storage tanks are important components of nuclear plant safety systems. A systematic study is made of the principal effects of base uplifting on the seismic response of laterally excited, unanchored and partially anchored cylindrical liquid-storage tanks. The study consists of two parts: the first deals with the static uplifting resistance of the flexible base plate, and the second deals with the dynamic response of the uplifting system. An insight into the behavior of the uplifting base plate is first gained with the help of a prismatic beam solution. In Section 2, the solution is implemented exactly, whereas in Section 3 it is implemented approximately by use of the Ritz energy procedure. Solutions are next presented for axisymmetrically and asymmetrically uplifted base plate of tanks, in Section 4. For the axisymmetric case the solution is implemented exactly, as well as approximately by modeling the plate by a series of semiinfinite prismatic beams. The accuracy of the latter approach is confirmed by comparing its predictions with those of the former. In Section 5, a highly efficient and rational method is presented for the dynamic response analysis of uplifting tanks. Both unanchored tanks and partially anchored tanks, for which the number of anchor bolts at the base is insufficient to ensure full fixity, are considered. It is shown that base uplifting may reduce significantly the hydrodynamic pressures, but these reductions may be associated with increased axial compressive stresses in the tank wall and large plastic rotations at the plate-shell junction. For partially anchored tanks, energy loss due to bolt yielding is found to be small

  9. Protective role of purified cysteine proteinases against Fasciola gigantica infection in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Rabia, Ibrahim; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; Diab, Tarek; Zada, Suher

    2012-03-01

    Fascioliasis is one of the public health problems in the world. Cysteine proteinases (CP) released by Fasciola gigantica play a key role in parasite feeding, migration through host tissues, and in immune evasion. There has been some evidence from several parasite systems that proteinases might have potential as protective antigens against parasitic infections. Cysteine proteinases were purified and tested in vaccine trials of sheep infected with the liver fluke. Multiple doses (2 mg of CP in Freund's adjuvant followed by 3 booster doses 1 mg each at 4 week intervals) were injected intramuscularly into sheep 1 week prior to infect orally with 300 F. gigantica metacercariae. All the sheep were humanely slaughtered 12 weeks after the first immunization. Changes in the worm burden, ova count, and humoral and cellular responses were evaluated. Significant reduction was observed in the worm burden (56.9%), bile egg count (70.7%), and fecel egg count (75.2%). Immunization with CP was also found to be associated with increases of total IgG, IgG(1), and IgG(2) (P<0.05). Data showed that the serum cytokine levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, revealed significant decreases (P<0.05). However, the anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6, showed significant increases (P<0.05). In conclusion, it has been found that CP released by F. gigantica are highly important candidates for a vaccine antigen because of their role in the fluke biology and host-parasite relationships.

  10. Purification, characterization and cloning of an aspartic proteinase inhibitor from squash phloem exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeller, J T; Farley, P C; Ramsay, R J; Sullivan, P A; Laing, W A

    1998-05-15

    Phloem exudate from squash fruit contains heat-inactivated material which inhibits pepsin activity. This inhibitory activity was purified by mild acid treatment, chromatography on trypsin-agarose, Sephadex G-75 and reverse-phase HPLC, resulting in the elution of three peaks with pepsin-inhibitory activity. N-terminal sequencing indicated a common sequence of MGPGPAIGEVIG and the presence of minor species with seven- or two-amino-acid N-terminal extensions beyond this point. Microheterogeneity in this end sequence was exhibited within and between two preparations. Internal sequencing of a major peak after a trypsin digestion gave the sequence FYNVVVLEK. The common N-terminal sequence was used to design a degenerate primer for 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and cDNA clones encoding two isoforms of the inhibitor were obtained. The open reading frames of both cDNAs encoded proteins (96% identical) which contained the experimentally determined internal sequence. The amino acid content calculated from the predicted amino acid sequence was very similar to that measured by amino acid analysis of the purified inhibitor. The two predicted amino acid sequences (96 residues) had neither similarity to any other aspartic proteinase inhibitor nor similarity to any other protein. The inhibitors have a molecular mass of 10,552 Da, measured by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry and approximately 10,000 Da by SDS/PAGE, and behave as dimers of approximately 21,000 Da during chromatography on Superdex G-75 gel-filtration medium. The calculated molecular masses from the predicted amino acid sequences were 10,551 Da and 10,527 Da. The inhibitor was capable of inhibiting pepsin (Ki = 2 nM) and a secreted aspartic proteinase from the fungus Glomerella cingulata (Ki = 20 nM). The inhibitor, which is stable over acid and neutral pH, has been named squash aspartic proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI).

  11. Effect of oral antiseptic agents on phospholipase and proteinase enzymes of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun-Can, Banu; Kadir, Tanju; Gumru, Birsay

    2016-02-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most prevalent form of oral candida infections among the denture wearers. Generally, antiseptic oral rinses used in the treatment of these infections are considered as an adjunct or alternative antifungal treatment. Studies have suggested that the intraoral concentrations of antiseptics decrease substantially to the sub-therapeutic levels on account of the dynamics of the oral cavity. This condition yields the question about the minimum antiseptic concentration that effect the character or pathogenesis of Candida during treatment. The extracellular phospholipase and proteinase enzymes of Candida albicans are regarded to have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human fungal infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different sub-therapeutic concentrations of chlorhexidine gluconate, hexetidine and triclosan on the production of these enzymes by C. albicans strains isolated from 20 patients with denture stomatitis. Phospholipase test was done by using Sabouraud dextrose agar with egg yolk, proteinase test was done by using bovine serum albumin agar. Phospholipase test was done by using Sabouraud dextrose agar with egg yolk, proteinase test was done by using bovine serum albumin agar. Exoenzyme production of 20 strains which were brief exposured to sub-therapeutic concentrations of three antiseptic agents decreased significantly compared with the strains that were not exposured with antiseptic values (pantiseptics (pantiseptic was compared, there were no significant differences between enzymatic activities (p>0.05). The results of this study show that sub-therapeutic levels of each antiseptic may modulate candidal exoenzyme production, consequently suppressing pathogenicity of C. albicans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo

  13. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  14. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  15. Stone anchors of India: Findings, classification and significance.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    Various types of stone anchors have been observed during inshore and offshore explorations along the east and west coasts of India. The earliest stone anchors of India have been recorded from the Harappan sites (3rd millennium BC), but their shape...

  16. Anchor stabilization of trapped particle modes in mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Roslyakov, G.V.

    1986-07-01

    It is shown that for trapped particle modes in tandem mirrors, the pressure of the passing particles in the anchor region introduces a stabilizing term proportional to the sum of the anchor's field line curvature and total diamagnetic pressure. The theory is applied to the proposed gas dynamic trap experiment

  17. Career Anchors: Results of an Organisational Study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnall, Jane

    1998-01-01

    Career anchors of 374 British employees were identified using Schein's questionnaire. Age, gender, and length of service had no significant effect on distribution of anchors. Job level had some relationship. The information could be used to determine appropriate career-development strategies. (SK)

  18. Anchor stabilization of trapped particle modes in mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Roslyakov, G.V.

    1986-04-01

    It is shown that for trapped particle modes in tandem mirrors, the pressure of the passing particles in the anchor region introduces a stabilizing term proportional to the sum of the anchor's field line curvature and total diamagnetic pressure. The theory is applied to the proposed gas dynamic trap experiment

  19. Understanding Rasch Measurement: Partial Credit Model and Pivot Anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Rita K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Rasch measurement partial credit model, what it is, how it differs from other Rasch models, and when and how to use it. Also describes the calibration of instruments with increasingly complex items. Explains pivot anchoring and illustrates its use and describes the effect of pivot anchoring on step calibrations, item hierarchy, and…

  20. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  1. Random substitution of large parts of the propeptide of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast aspartic protease, proteinase A, has a 54 amino-acid propeptide, which is removed during activation of the zymogen in the vacuole. Apart from being involved inhibition/activation, the propeptide has been shown to be essential for formation of a stable active enzyme (van den Hazel, H. B...... of the mutants were subjected to a colony screen for ones exhibiting activity. A high frequency (around 1%) of active constructs was found, which indicates a very high tolerance for mutations in the propeptide. Thirty-nine functional mutant forms containing random sequence at either the N- or C-terminal half...

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of bovine colostrum low-Mr cysteine proteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirado, M; Tsunasawa, S; Sakiyama, F; Niinobe, M; Fujii, S

    1985-07-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of bovine colostrum cysteine proteinase inhibitor was determined by sequencing native inhibitor and peptides obtained by cyanogen bromide degradation, Achromobacter lysylendopeptidase digestion and partial acid hydrolysis of reduced and S-carboxymethylated protein. Achromobacter peptidase digestion was successfully used to isolate two disulfide-containing peptides. The inhibitor consists of 112 amino acids with an Mr of 12787. Two disulfide bonds were established between Cys 66 and Cys 77 and between Cys 90 and Cys 110. A high degree of homology in the sequence was found between the colostrum inhibitor and human gamma-trace, human salivary acidic protein and chicken egg-white cystatin.

  3. Test Score Equating Using Discrete Anchor Items versus Passage-Based Anchor Items: A Case Study Using "SAT"® Data. Research Report. ETS RR-14-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Zu, Jiyun; Curley, Edward; Carey, Jill

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of discrete anchor items versus passage-based anchor items on observed score equating using empirical data.This study compares an "SAT"® critical reading anchor that contains more discrete items proportionally, compared to the total tests to be equated, to another anchor that…

  4. Pipe supports and anchors - LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    Pipe design and support design can not be treated as separate disciplines. A coordinated design approach is required if LMFBR pipe system adequacy is to be achieved at a reasonable cost. It is particularly important that system designers understand and consider those factors which influence support train flexibility and thus the pipe system dynamic stress levels. The system approach must not stop with the design phase but should continue thru the erection and acceptance test procedures. The factors that should be considered in the design of LMFBR pipe supports and anchors are described. The various pipe support train elements are described together with guidance on analysis, design and application aspects. Post erection acceptance and verification test procedures are then discussed

  5. Differential gene expression for suicide-substrate serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) in vegetative and grain tissues of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, T.H.; Marttila, S.; Rasmussen, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    centres in vitro, were ubiquitous at low levels, but the protein could not be detected. EST analysis showed that expression of genes for serpins with BSZx-type reactive centres in vegetative tissues is widespread in the plant kingdom, suggesting a common regulatory function. For BSZ4 and BSZ7, expression...... their irreversible inhibitory mechanism in the inhibition of exogenous proteinases capable of breaking down seed storage proteins, and in the defence of specific cell types in vegetative tissues.......Proteins of the serpin superfamily (similar to43 kDa) from mature cereal grains are in vitro suicide-substrate inhibitors of specific mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family. However, unlike the 'standard-mechanism' serine proteinase inhibitors (

  6. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  7. Biased calculations: Numeric anchors influence answers to math equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available People must often perform calculations in order to produce a numeric estimate (e.g., a grocery-store shopper estimating the total price of his or her shopping cart contents. The current studies were designed to test whether estimates based on calculations are influenced by comparisons with irrelevant anchors. Previous research has demonstrated that estimates across a wide range of contexts assimilate toward anchors, but none has examined estimates based on calculations. In two studies, we had participants compare the answers to math problems with anchors. In both studies, participants' estimates assimilated toward the anchor values. This effect was moderated by time limit such that the anchoring effects were larger when the participants' ability to engage in calculations was limited by a restrictive time limit.

  8. Grapnel stone anchors from Saurashtra: Remnants of Indo-Arab trade on the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.

    Stone anchors have been used as a primary source of information on ancient navigation by marine archaeologists since long. These anchors used by ancient mariners are often noticed underwater at various places across the world. Stone anchors are also...

  9. Effects of accuracy motivation and anchoring on metacomprehension judgment and accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The current research investigates how accuracy motivation impacts anchoring and adjustment in metacomprehension judgment and how accuracy motivation and anchoring affect metacomprehension accuracy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions produced by the between-subjects factorial design involving accuracy motivation (incentive or no) and peer performance anchor (95%, 55%, or no). Two studies showed that accuracy motivation did not impact anchoring bias, but the adjustment-from-anchor process occurred. Accuracy incentive increased anchor-judgment gap for the 95% anchor but not for the 55% anchor, which induced less certainty about the direction of adjustment. The findings offer support to the integrative theory of anchoring. Additionally, the two studies revealed a "power struggle" between accuracy motivation and anchoring in influencing metacomprehension accuracy. Accuracy motivation could improve metacomprehension accuracy in spite of anchoring effect, but if anchoring effect is too strong, it could overpower the motivation effect. The implications of the findings were discussed.

  10. Containment liner plate anchors and steel embedments test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Lo, P.L.; Johnson, T.E.; Pfeifer, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes test data on shear load and deformation capabilities for liner plate line anchors and structural steel embedments in reinforced and prestressed concrete nuclear containments. Reinforced and prestressed nuclear containments designed and constructed in the United States are lined with a minimum of 0.64 cm steel plate. The liner plates are anchored by the use of either studs or structural members (line anchors) which usually run in the vertical direction. This paper will only address line anchors. Static load versus displacement test data is necessary to assure that the design is adequate for the maximum loads. The test program for the liner anchors had the following major objectives: determine load versus displacement data for a variety of anchors considering structural tees and small beams with different weld configurations, from the preceding tests, determine which anchors would lead to an economical and extremely safe design and test these anchors for cyclic loads resulting from thermal fluctuations. Various concrete embeds in the containment and other structures are subjected to loads such as pipe rupture which results in shear. Since many of the loads are transient by nature, it is necessary to know the load-displacement relationship so that the energy absorption can be determined. The test program for the embeds had the following objectives: determine load-displacement relationship for various size anchors from 6.5 cm 2 to 26 cm 2 with maximum capacities of approximately 650 kN; determine the effect of various anchor width-to-thickness ratios for the same shear area

  11. Plant Proteinase Inhibitor BbCI Modulates Lung Inflammatory Responses and Mechanic and Remodeling Alterations Induced by Elastase in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Theodoro-Junior, Osmar A.; Oliveira, Bruno T. M.; Oliva, Leandro V.; Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra C.; Bonturi, Camila R.; Brito, Marlon V.; Lopes, Fernanda D. T. Q. S.; Prado, Carla M.; Florencio, Ariana C.; Martins, Mílton A.; Owen, Caroline A.; Leick, Edna A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Proteinases play a key role in emphysema. Bauhinia bauhinioides cruzipain inhibitor (BbCI) is a serine-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. We evaluated BbCI treatment in elastase-induced pulmonary alterations. Methods.??C57BL/6 mice received intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group). One group of mice was treated with BbCI (days 1, 15, and 21 after elastase instillation, ELABC group). Controls received saline and BbCI (SALBC group). After 28 days, we evaluated respirator...

  12. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...

  13. High-affinity binding of two molecules of cysteine proteinases to low-molecular-weight kininogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, B.; Stoka, V.; Björk, I.; Boudier, C.; Johansson, G.; Dolenc, I.; Colic, A.; Bieth, J. G.; Turk, V.

    1995-01-01

    Human low-molecular-weight kininogen (LK) was shown by fluorescence titration to bind two molecules of cathepsins L and S and papain with high affinity. By contrast, binding of a second molecule of cathepsin H was much weaker. The 2:1 binding stoichiometry was confirmed by titration monitored by loss of enzyme activity and by sedimentation velocity experiments. The kinetics of binding of cathepsins L and S and papain showed the two proteinase binding sites to have association rate constants kass,1 = 10.7-24.5 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 and kass,2 = 0.83-1.4 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. Comparison of these kinetic constants with previous data for intact LK and its separated domains indicate that the faster-binding site is also the tighter-binding site and is present on domain 3, whereas the slower-binding, lower-affinity site is on domain 2. These results also indicate that there is no appreciable steric hindrance for the binding of proteinases between the two binding sites or from the kininogen light chain. PMID:8528085

  14. Intracellular localization of Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Marttila

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Treponema denticola is an important periodontal pathogen capable of tissue invasion. Its chymotrypsin-like proteinase (CTLP can degrade a number of basement membrane components in vitro, thus suggesting a contribution to tissue invasion by the spirochete. The aim of this study was to analyze the localization of CTLP in chronic periodontitis tissues ex vivo. A polyclonal antibody specific to T. denticola cell-bound CTLP was used to detect the spirochetes in the gingival tissues of patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis (n=25 by immunohistochemistry and periodic acid-Schiff staining (PAS. The presence of T. denticola in the periodontal tissue samples was analyzed by PCR. Periodontal tissue samples of 12 of the 25 patients were found to be positive for T. denticola by PCR. Moreover, CTLP could be detected in the periodontal tissues of all these patients by immunohistochemistry. In the epithelium, the CTLP was mostly intracellular. Typically, the positive staining could be seen throughout the whole depth of the epithelium. When detected extracellularly, CTLP was localized mainly as granular deposits. The connective tissue stained diffusely positive in four cases. The positive staining co-localized with the PAS stain in nine cases. T. denticola and its CTLP could be detected in diseased human periodontium both intra- and extracellularly. The granular staining pattern was suggestive of the presence of T. denticola bacteria, whereas the more diffused staining pattern was indicative of the recent presence of the bacterium and shedding of the cell-bound proteinase.

  15. Characterization of a New Cell Envelope Proteinase PrtP from Lactobacillus rhamnosus CGMCC11055.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Ouyang, Xudong; Xin, Yongping; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Susu; Kong, Jian

    2016-09-21

    Cell envelope proteinases (CEPs) play essential roles in lactic acid bacteria growth in milk and health-promoting properties of fermented dairy products. The genome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CGMCC11055 possesses two putative CEP genes prtP and prtR2, and the PrtP displays the distinctive domain organization from PrtR2 reported. The PrtP was purified and biochemically characterized. The results showed that the optimal activity occurred at 44 °C, pH 6.5. p-Amidinophenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride obviously inhibited enzymatic activity, suggesting PrtP was a member of serine proteinases. Under the optimal conditions, β-casein was a favorite substrate over αS1- and κ-casein, and 35 oligopeptides were identified in the β-casein hydrolysate, including the phosphoserine peptide and bioactive isoleucine-proline-proline. By analysis of the amino acid sequences of those oligopeptides, proline was the preferred residue at the breakdown site. Therefore, we speculated that PrtP was a new type of CEPs from Lb. rhamnosus.

  16. Identification of Placental Aspartic Proteinase in the Eurasian Beaver (Castor fiber L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Aleksandra; Panasiewicz, Grzegorz; Majewska, Marta; Paukszto, Lukasz; Bieniek-Kobuszewska, Martyna; Szafranska, Bozena

    2018-04-18

    Aspartic proteinases (AP) form a multigenic group widely distributed in various organisms and includes pepsins (pep), cathepsins D and E, pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAGs) as well as plant, fungal, and retroviral proteinases. This study describes the transcript identification and expression localization of the AP within the discoid placenta of the Castor fiber . We identified 1257 bp of the AP cDNA sequence, encoding 391 amino acids (aa) of the polypeptide precursor composed of 16 aa signal peptide, 46 aa pro-piece, and 329 aa of the mature protein. Within the AP precursor, one site of potential N -glycosylation (NPS 119–121 ) and two Asp residues (D) specific for the catalytic cleft of AP were identified (VLFDTGSSNLWV 91–102 and GIVDTGTSLLTV 277–288 ). The highest homology of the identified placental AP nucleotide and aa sequence was to mouse pepsinogen C (75.8% and 70.1%, respectively). Identified AP also shared high homology with other superfamily members: PAGs, cathepsins, and napsins. The AP identified in this study was named as pepsinogen/PAG-Like (pep/PAG-L). Diversified pep/PAG-L protein profiles with a dominant 58 kDa isoform were identified. Immune reactive signals of the pep/PAG-L were localized within the trophectodermal cells of the beaver placenta. This is the first report describing the placental AP (pep/PAG-L) in the C. fiber .

  17. Effect of the Solvent Temperatures on Dynamics of Serine Protease Proteinase K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Sang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To obtain detailed information about the effect of the solvent temperatures on protein dynamics, multiple long molecular dynamics (MD simulations of serine protease proteinase K with the solute and solvent coupled to different temperatures (either 300 or 180 K have been performed. Comparative analyses demonstrate that the internal flexibility and mobility of proteinase K are strongly dependent on the solvent temperatures but weakly on the protein temperatures. The constructed free energy landscapes (FELs at the high solvent temperatures exhibit a more rugged surface, broader spanning range, and higher minimum free energy level than do those at the low solvent temperatures. Comparison between the dynamic hydrogen bond (HB numbers reveals that the high solvent temperatures intensify the competitive HB interactions between water molecules and protein surface atoms, and this in turn exacerbates the competitive HB interactions between protein internal atoms, thus enhancing the conformational flexibility and facilitating the collective motions of the protein. A refined FEL model was proposed to explain the role of the solvent mobility in facilitating the cascade amplification of microscopic motions of atoms and atomic groups into the global collective motions of the protein.

  18. Biomechanical comparison of traditional anchors to all-suture anchors in a double-row rotator cuff repair cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschka, Andrew M; Hafer, Jason S; Reynolds, Kirk A; Aberle, Nicholas S; Baldini, Todd H; Hawkins, Monica J; McCarty, Eric C

    2015-10-01

    To further reduce the invasiveness of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair surgery the all-suture anchor has been developed. The all-suture anchor requires less bone removal and reduces the potential of loose body complications. The all-suture anchor must also have adequate biomechanical strength for the repair to heal. The hypothesis is there is no significant difference in the biomechanical performance of supraspinatus repairs using an all-suture anchor when compared to traditional solid-body suture anchors. Using nine shoulders per group, the supraspinatus tendon was dissected from the greater tuberosity. The four different double row repairs tested were (medial row/lateral row): A: ICONIX2/ICONIX2; B: ICONIX2/Stryker ReelX 3.9mm; C: ICONIX2/Stryker ReelX 4.5mm; D: Arthrex BioComposite CorkScrew FT 4.5mm/Arthrex BioComposite SwiveLock 4.75mm. The ICONIX2 was the only all-suture anchor tested. Tendons underwent cyclic loading from 10 to 100N for 500 cycles, followed by load-to-failure. Data was collected at cycles 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500. One-way ANOVA analysis was used to assess significance (P≤0.05). The anchor combinations tested did not differ significantly in anterior (P>0.4) or posterior (P>0.3) gap formation, construct stiffness (P>0.7), ultimate load (P=0.06), or load to 5mm gap formation (P=0.84). The all-suture anchor demonstrated comparable biomechanical performance in multiple double-row anchor combinations to a combination of traditional solid-body anchors. Thus it may be an attractive option to further reduce the invasiveness of rotator cuff repairs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spin selection at organic spinterface by anchoring group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhao; Qiu, Shuai; Miao, Yuan-yuan; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Hu, Gui-chao, E-mail: hgc@sdnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The sign of interfacial spin polarization can be selected by using different anchoring groups. • A sp{sup 3}-d or sp-d hybridization may occur and induce spin polarization when the anchoring group changes. • Interfacial spin polarization depends on both the type of the outer orbital of the anchoring atom as well as its energy. - Abstract: Control of organic interfacial spin polarization is crucial in organic spintronics. Based on ab initio theory, here we proposed a spin selection at organic interface via anchoring group by adsorbing an organic molecule onto Ni(111) surface. The results demonstrate that either a positive or negative interfacial spin polarization may be obtained by choosing different anchoring groups. The orbital analysis via the projected density of states shows that the interfacial spin polarization is sensitive to the hybridization of the outer orbital of the anchoring atom as well as its energy relative to the d orbital of the ferromagnetic atom. The work indicates a feasible way to realize spin selection at the organic spinterface by anchoring group.

  20. Modified Kidner procedure utilizing a Mitek bone anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, D M; Julsrud, M E; Erdmann, B B; Jacobs, P M; Ringstrom, J B

    1998-01-01

    The recent development of small bone suture anchors has created several potential applications in reconstructive surgery of the foot. Mitek bone anchors are simple to insert, require less aggressive dissection and surgical time than reefing of the redundant posterior tibial tendon, and are a reliable method of tendon-to-bone fixation. Mitek bone anchors are an excellent technique for the treatment of redundant tibialis posterior tendon following a modified Kidner procedure. In modified Kidner procedures involving an excessively large os tibiale externum, Mitek anchoring of the redundant tibialis posterior tendon to the navicular bone is an excellent means for secure plication of the posterior tibial tendon in cases involving intraoperative tendon laxity. A description of the Mitek Anchor System and technique of application in a modified Kinder procedure is presented. The purpose of this study was to describe patient satisfaction and long-term clinical outcomes of the modified Kinder procedure with and without the Mitek bone anchoring system. A retrospective study of the modified Kinder procedure was performed with 13 patients being evaluated, seven with Mitek anchoring and six without. The University of Maryland 100-point Painful Foot Center Scoring System was modified to be more specific to the modified Kinder procedure for assessment of subjective long-term results. Patient overall satisfaction was rated good to excellent by 85.6% of patients in the Mitek group and by 100% of patients in the non-Mitek group. Use of the Mitek anchor allowed for quicker postoperative recovery to resumption of ambulation without assistive devices (average of 3 weeks vs. 4.42 weeks) and a quicker return to pain-free ambulation in normal shoegear (average of 4 weeks vs. 6 weeks). Mitek anchoring of the tibialis posterior tendon, theoretically, increases medial arch support as evidenced by 14% of the Mitek group and 67% of the non-Mitek group requiring postoperative orthotics.

  1. Quantifying Heuristic Bias: Anchoring, Availability, and Representativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan; Josephson, S Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Construct: Authors examined whether a new vignette-based instrument could isolate and quantify heuristic bias. Heuristics are cognitive shortcuts that may introduce bias and contribute to error. There is no standardized instrument available to quantify heuristic bias in clinical decision making, limiting future study of educational interventions designed to improve calibration of medical decisions. This study presents validity data to support a vignette-based instrument quantifying bias due to the anchoring, availability, and representativeness heuristics. Participants completed questionnaires requiring assignment of probabilities to potential outcomes of medical and nonmedical scenarios. The instrument randomly presented scenarios in one of two versions: Version A, encouraging heuristic bias, and Version B, worded neutrally. The primary outcome was the difference in probability judgments for Version A versus Version B scenario options. Of 167 participants recruited, 139 enrolled. Participants assigned significantly higher mean probability values to Version A scenario options (M = 9.56, SD = 3.75) than Version B (M = 8.98, SD = 3.76), t(1801) = 3.27, p = .001. This result remained significant analyzing medical scenarios alone (Version A, M = 9.41, SD = 3.92; Version B, M = 8.86, SD = 4.09), t(1204) = 2.36, p = .02. Analyzing medical scenarios by heuristic revealed a significant difference between Version A and B for availability (Version A, M = 6.52, SD = 3.32; Version B, M = 5.52, SD = 3.05), t(404) = 3.04, p = .003, and representativeness (Version A, M = 11.45, SD = 3.12; Version B, M = 10.67, SD = 3.71), t(396) = 2.28, p = .02, but not anchoring. Stratifying by training level, students maintained a significant difference between Version A and B medical scenarios (Version A, M = 9.83, SD = 3.75; Version B, M = 9.00, SD = 3.98), t(465) = 2.29, p = .02, but not residents or attendings. Stratifying by heuristic and training level, availability maintained

  2. Configuration of an inelastic flexible anchored cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Dreyer

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available Consider an inelastic, perfectly flexible cable with given external forces acting on the total length of the cable. The one end-point is fixed in the origin and the other end-point is anchored at a given point (a;b;c in space. The resulting configuration of the cable in space can be modelled by a system of non-linear differential equations. In this article it is shown that this continuous model of the cable can always be solved in terms of an integral. In the special case of a constant (i.e. independent of the position on the cable external force per unit length the solution is given explicitly in terms of three constants that describe the tension at the origin. These three constants are determined by the boundary values a, b and c at the other end-point, and must be calculated in general by a numerical procedure from the three resulting simultaneous non-linear equations. A few applications of this method are shown.

  3. The Contribution of Proteinase-Activated Receptors to Intracellular Signaling, Transcellular Transport and Autophagy in Alzheimer´s Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, R.; Rohan, Z.; Holada, K.; Olejár, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 2-12 ISSN 1567-2050 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s Disease * autophagy * proteinase-activated receptors Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.145, year: 2015

  4. Rats and mice immunised with chimeric human/mouse proteinase 3 produce autoantibodies to mouse Pr3 and rat granulocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geld, Ymke M.; Hellmark, Thomas; Selga, Daina; Heeringa, Peter; Huitema, Minke G.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we employed chimeric human/ mouse Proteinase 3 ( PR3) proteins as tools to induce an autoantibody response to PR3 in rats and mice. Method: Rats and mice were immunised with recombinant human PR3 ( HPR3), recombinant murine PR3 ( mPR3), single chimeric human/ mouse PR3 ( HHm,

  5. Proteinases in excretory-secretory products of Toxocara canis second-stage larvae: zymography and modeling insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Páez, Gonzalo Ernesto; Alba-Hurtado, Fernando; García-Tovar, Carlos Gerardo; Argüello-García, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Components released in excretory-secretory products of Toxocara canis larvae (TES) include phosphatidylethanolamine-binding proteins (TES26), mucins (TES120, MUC2-5), and C-type lectins (TES32, TES70) and their biochemical, immunological, and diagnostic properties have been extensively studied albeit proteinase activities towards physiological substrates are almost unknown. Proteolytic activities in TES samples were first analyzed by gel electrophoresis with gelatin as substrate. Major activities of ~400, 120, and 32 kDa in TES were relatively similar over a broad pH range (5.5-9.0) and all these were of the serine-type as leupeptin abolished gelatinolysis. Further, the ~400 kDa component degraded all physiological substrates tested (laminin, fibronectin, albumin, and goat IgG) and the 120 kDa component degraded albumin and goat IgG while proteinases of lower MW (45, 32, and 26 kDa) only degraded laminin and fibronectin, preferentially at alkaline pH (9.0). By protein modeling approaches using the known sequences of TES components, only TES26 and MUC4 displayed folding patterns significantly related to reference serine proteinases. These data suggest that most of serine proteinase activities secreted in vitro by infective larvae of T. canis have intriguing nature but otherwise help the parasite to affect multiple components of somatic organs and bodily fluids within the infected host.

  6. Osteoclastic bone degradation and the role of different cysteine proteinases and matrix metalloproteinases: differences between calvaria and long bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Vincent; Korper, Wolf; Hoeben, Kees A.; Jansen, Ineke D. C.; Bromme, Dieter; Cleutjens, Kitty B. J. M.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Saftig, Paul; Beertsen, Wouter

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone degradation involves the activity of cathepsin K. We found that in addition to this enzyme other, yet unknown, cysteine proteinases participate in digestion. The results support the notion that osteoclasts from different bone sites use different enzymes to degrade the collagenous

  7. INCREASING THE THERMOSTABILITY OF THE NEUTRAL PROTEINASE OF BACILLUS-STEAROTHERMOPHILUS BY IMPROVEMENT OF INTERNAL HYDROGEN-BONDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EIJSINK, VGH; VRIEND, G; VANDERZEE, [No Value; VANDENBURG, B; VENEMA, G

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to increase the thermostability of the neutral proteinase of Bacillus stearothermophilus the buried Ala-170 was replaced by serine. Molecular-dynamics simulations showed that Ser-170 stabilizes the enzyme by formation of an internal hydrogen bond. In addition, the hydroxy group of

  8. Lipases and proteinases in milk : occurrence, heat inactivation, and their importance for the keeping quality of milk products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence and heat inactivation of native and bacterial lipases and proteinases in milk were studied.

    Production of these enzymes by Gram-negative psychrotrophic bacteria in milk was found to take place towards the end of exponential growth and in the stationary growth

  9. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Extensive expansion of A1 family aspartic proteinases in fungi revealed by evolutionary analyses of 107 complete eukaryotic proteomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revuelta, M.V.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Kay, J.; Have, ten A.

    2014-01-01

    The A1 family of eukaryotic aspartic proteinases (APs) forms one of the 16 AP families. Although one of the best characterized families, the recent increase in genome sequence data has revealed many fungal AP homologs with novel sequence characteristics. This study was performed to explore the

  11. Overlapping binding sites for trypsin and papain on a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from Prosopis juliflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Octávio L; Grossi de Sá, Maria F; Sales, Maurício P; Mello, Luciane V; Oliveira, Adeliana S; Rigden, Daniel J

    2002-11-15

    Proteinase inhibitors are among the most promising candidates for expression by transgenic plants and consequent protection against insect predation. However, some insects can respond to the threat of the proteinase inhibitor by the production of enzymes insensitive to inhibition. Inhibitors combining more than one favorable activity are therefore strongly favored. Recently, a known small Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from Prosopis juliflora (PTPKI) has been shown to possess unexpected potent cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity. Here we show, by enzyme assay and gel filtration, that, unlike other Kunitz inhibitors with dual activities, this inhibitor is incapable of simultaneous inhibition of trypsin and papain. These data are most readily interpreted by proposing overlapping binding sites for the two enzymes. Molecular modeling and docking experiments favor an interaction mode in which the same inhibitor loop that interacts in a canonical fashion with trypsin can also bind into the papain catalytic site cleft. Unusual residue substitutions at the proposed interface can explain the relative rarity of twin trypsin/papain inhibition. Other changes seem responsible for the relative low affinity of PTPKI for trypsin. The predicted coincidence of trypsin and papain binding sites, once confirmed, would facilitate the search, by phage display for example, for mutants highly active against both proteinases. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Design of SC walls and slabs for impulsive loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Amit H. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-11

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures have historically been the preferred choice for blast resistant structures because of their mass and the ductility provided by steel reinforcement. Steel-plate composite (SC) walls are a viable alternative to RC for protecting the infrastructure against explosive threats. SC structures consist of two steel faceplates with a plain concrete core between them. The steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete using stud anchors and connected to each other using tie bars. SC structures provide mass from the concrete infill and ductility from the continuous external steel faceplates. This dissertation presents findings and recommendations from experimental and analytical investigations of the performance of SC walls subjected to far-field blast loads.

  13. Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitors Limit Water Stress Responses in White Clover (Trifolium repens L.) Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Afsana; Leung, Susanna; Nikmatullah, Aluh; Dijkwel, Paul P; McManus, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    The response of plants to water deficiency or drought is a complex process, the perception of which is triggered at the molecular level before any visible morphological responses are detected. It was found that different groups of plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are induced and play an active role during abiotic stress conditions such as drought. Our previous work with the white clover ( Trifolium repens L.) Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitor ( Tr-KPI ) gene family showed that Tr-KPIs are differentially regulated to ontogenetic and biotic stress associated cues and that, at least some members of this gene family may be required to maintain cellular homeostasis. Altered cellular homeostasis may also affect abiotic stress responses and therefore, we aimed to understand if distinct Tr-PKI members function during drought stress. First, the expression level of three Tr-KPI genes, Tr-KPI1 , Tr-KPI2 , and Tr-KPI5 , was measured in two cultivars and one white clover ecotype with differing capacity to tolerate drought. The expression of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 increased in response to water deficiency and this was exaggerated when the plants were treated with a previous period of water deficiency. In contrast, proline accumulation and increased expression of Tr-NCED1 , a gene encoding a protein involved in ABA biosynthesis, was delayed in plants that experienced a previous drought period. RNAi knock-down of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 resulted in increased proline accumulation in leaf tissue of plants grown under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions. In addition, increased expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis was found. The data suggests that Tr-KPIs , particularly Tr-KPI5 , have an explicit function during water limitation. The results also imply that the Tr-KPI family has different in planta proteinase targets and that the functions of this protein family are not solely restricted to one of storage proteins or in response to biotic stress.

  14. Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitors Limit Water Stress Responses in White Clover (Trifolium repens L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsana Islam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The response of plants to water deficiency or drought is a complex process, the perception of which is triggered at the molecular level before any visible morphological responses are detected. It was found that different groups of plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs are induced and play an active role during abiotic stress conditions such as drought. Our previous work with the white clover (Trifolium repens L. Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitor (Tr-KPI gene family showed that Tr-KPIs are differentially regulated to ontogenetic and biotic stress associated cues and that, at least some members of this gene family may be required to maintain cellular homeostasis. Altered cellular homeostasis may also affect abiotic stress responses and therefore, we aimed to understand if distinct Tr-PKI members function during drought stress. First, the expression level of three Tr-KPI genes, Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, and Tr-KPI5, was measured in two cultivars and one white clover ecotype with differing capacity to tolerate drought. The expression of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 increased in response to water deficiency and this was exaggerated when the plants were treated with a previous period of water deficiency. In contrast, proline accumulation and increased expression of Tr-NCED1, a gene encoding a protein involved in ABA biosynthesis, was delayed in plants that experienced a previous drought period. RNAi knock-down of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 resulted in increased proline accumulation in leaf tissue of plants grown under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions. In addition, increased expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis was found. The data suggests that Tr-KPIs, particularly Tr-KPI5, have an explicit function during water limitation. The results also imply that the Tr-KPI family has different in planta proteinase targets and that the functions of this protein family are not solely restricted to one of storage proteins or in response to biotic stress.

  15. The anchoring bias reflects rational use of cognitive resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Falk; Griffiths, Thomas L; M Huys, Quentin J; Goodman, Noah D

    2018-02-01

    Cognitive biases, such as the anchoring bias, pose a serious challenge to rational accounts of human cognition. We investigate whether rational theories can meet this challenge by taking into account the mind's bounded cognitive resources. We asked what reasoning under uncertainty would look like if people made rational use of their finite time and limited cognitive resources. To answer this question, we applied a mathematical theory of bounded rationality to the problem of numerical estimation. Our analysis led to a rational process model that can be interpreted in terms of anchoring-and-adjustment. This model provided a unifying explanation for ten anchoring phenomena including the differential effect of accuracy motivation on the bias towards provided versus self-generated anchors. Our results illustrate the potential of resource-rational analysis to provide formal theories that can unify a wide range of empirical results and reconcile the impressive capacities of the human mind with its apparently irrational cognitive biases.

  16. Correlation of Persistence, Initiative and Career Anchors Categories of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I A Novikova

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of the results of comparative empirical study of persistence, initiative and Career Anchors categories of the students on the basis of the systemic-functional approach.

  17. Anchored but not internalized: shape dependent endocytosis of nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bokai; Feng, Xi; Yin, Hang; Ge, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yanhuan; Chu, Zhiqin; Raabova, Helena; Vavra, Jan; Cigler, Petr; Liu, Renbao; Wang, Yi; Li, Quan

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticle-cell interactions begin with the cellular uptake of the nanoparticles, a process that eventually determines their cellular fate. In the present work, we show that the morphological features of nanodiamonds (NDs) affect both the anchoring and internalization stages of their endocytosis. While a prickly ND (with sharp edges/corners) has no trouble of anchoring onto the plasma membrane, it suffers from difficult internalization afterwards. In comparison, the internalization of a round ND (obtained by selective etching of the prickly ND) is not limited by its lower anchoring amount and presents a much higher endocytosis amount. Molecular dynamics simulation and continuum modelling results suggest that the observed difference in the anchoring of round and prickly NDs likely results from the reduced contact surface area with the cell membrane of the former, while the energy penalty associated with membrane curvature generation, which is lower for a round ND, may explain its higher probability of the subsequent internalization.

  18. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  19. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  20. Identification of B cell recognized linear epitopes in a snake venom serine proteinase from the central American bushmaster Lachesis stenophrys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal, M; Alape-Girón, A; Barboza-Arguedas, E; Aguilar-Ulloa, W; Flores-Díaz, M

    2017-12-15

    Snake venom serine proteinases are toxins that perturb hemostasis acting on proteins from the blood coagulation cascade, the fibrinolytic or the kallikrein-kinin system. Despite the relevance of these enzymes in envenomations by viper bites, the characterization of the antibody response to these toxins at the molecular level has not been previously addressed. In this work surface-located B cell recognized linear epitopes from a Lachesis stenophrys venom serine proteinase (UniProt accession number Q072L7) were predicted using an artificial neuronal network at the ABCpred server, the corresponding peptides were synthesized and their immunoreactivity was analyzed against a panel of experimental and therapeutic antivenoms. A molecular model of the L. stenophrys enzyme was built using as a template the structure of the D. acutus Dav-PA serine proteinase (Q9I8X1), which displays the highest degree of sequence similarity to the L. stenophrys enzyme among proteins of known 3D structure, and the surface-located epitopes were identified in the protein model using iCn3D. A total of 13 peptides corresponding to the surface exposed predicted epitopes from L. stenophrys serine proteinase were synthesized and, their reactivity with a rabbit antiserum against the recombinant enzyme and a panel of antivenoms was evaluated by a capture ELISA. Some of the epitopes recognized by monospecific and polyspecific antivenoms comprise sequences overlapping motifs conserved in viper venom serine proteinases. The identification and characterization of relevant epitopes recognized by B cells in snake venom toxins may provide valuable information for the preparation of immunogens that help in the production of improved therapeutic antivenoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Processing of predicted substrates of fungal Kex2 proteinases from Candida albicans, C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Oliver

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kexin-like proteinases are a subfamily of the subtilisin-like serine proteinases with multiple regulatory functions in eukaryotes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the Kex2 protein is biochemically well investigated, however, with the exception of a few well known proteins such as the α-pheromone precursors, killer toxin precursors and aspartic proteinase propeptides, very few substrates are known. Fungal kex2 deletion mutants display pleiotropic phenotypes that are thought to result from the failure to proteolytically activate such substrates. Results In this study we have aimed at providing an improved assembly of Kex2 target proteins to explain the phenotypes observed in fungal kex2 deletion mutants by in vitro digestion of recombinant substrates from Candida albicans and C. glabrata. We identified CaEce1, CA0365, one member of the Pry protein family and CaOps4-homolog proteins as novel Kex2 substrates. Conclusion Statistical analysis of the cleavage sites revealed extended subsite recognition of negatively charged residues in the P1', P2' and P4' positions, which is also reflected in construction of the respective binding pockets in the ScKex2 enzyme. Additionally, we provide evidence for the existence of structural constrains in potential substrates prohibiting proteolysis. Furthermore, by using purified Kex2 proteinases from S. cerevisiae, P. pastoris, C. albicans and C. glabrata, we show that while the substrate specificity is generally conserved between organisms, the proteinases are still distinct from each other and are likely to have additional unique substrate recognition.

  2. Development of a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale for Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Research Product 2018-06 Development of a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale for Leadership Tatiana H. Toumbeva Krista L...anchored Rating Scale for Leadership 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W5J9CQ-11-D-0004 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62278 6...observer- based behavioral measure to help instructors more reliably and accurately evaluate the development of leadership attributes and competencies

  3. Talar anchor placement for modified Brostrom lateral ankle stabilization procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angirasa, Arush K; Barrett, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The modified Brostrom procedure has been a proven procedure with excellent utility in the treatment of lateral ankle instability within limitation. Multiple variations of the original technique have been described in the literature to date. Included in these variations are differences in anchor placement, suture technique, or both. In this research study, we propose placing a bone screw anchor into the lateral shoulder of the talus rather than the typical placement at the lateral malleolus for anatomic reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments.

  4. Reduction of lateral loads in abutments using ground anchors

    OpenAIRE

    Laefer, Debra F.; Truong-Hong, Linh; Le, Khanh Ba

    2013-01-01

    In bridge design, economically addressing large, lateral earth pressures on bridge abutments is a major challenge. Traditional approaches employ enlargement of the abutment components to resist these pressures. This approach results in higher construction costs. As an alternative, a formal approach using ground anchors to resist lateral soil pressure on bridge abutments is proposed herein. The ground anchors are designed to minimise lateral forces at the pile cap base. Design examples for hig...

  5. A comparison of lateral ankle ligament suture anchor strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Crates, John M

    2013-06-01

    Lateral ankle ligament repairs increasingly use suture anchors instead of bone tunnels. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of a knotted and knotless suture anchor appropriate for a lateral ankle ligament reconstruction. In porcine distal fibulae, 10 samples of 2 different PEEK anchors were inserted. The attached sutures were cyclically loaded between 10N and 60N for 200 cycles. A destructive pull was performed and failure loads, cyclic displacement, stiffness, and failure mode recorded. PushLock 2.5 anchors failed before 200 cycles. PushLock 100 cycle displacement was less than Morphix 2.5 displacement (panchors completing 200 cycles was 86.5N (PushLock) and 252.1N (Morphix) (panchor breaking and suture breakage. The knotted Morphix demonstrated more displacement and greater failure strength than the knotless PushLock. The PushLock failed consistently with suture breaking. The Morphix anchor failed both by anchor breaking and by suture breaking. Copyright © 2012 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Peptide-Mediated Liposome Fusion: The Effect of Anchor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek S. A. Crone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A minimal model system for membrane fusion, comprising two complementary peptides dubbed “E” and “K” joined to a cholesterol anchor via a polyethyleneglycol spacer, has previously been developed in our group. This system promotes the fusion of large unilamellar vesicles and facilitates liposome-cell fusion both in vitro and in vivo. Whilst several aspects of the system have previously been investigated to provide an insight as to how fusion is facilitated, anchor positioning has not yet been considered. In this study, the effects of placing the anchor at either the N-terminus or in the center of the peptide are investigated using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence assays. It was discovered that anchoring the “K” peptide in the center of the sequence had no effect on its structure, its ability to interact with membranes, or its ability to promote fusion, whereas anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence dramatically decreases fusion efficiency. We postulate that anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence disrupts its ability to form homodimers with peptides on the same membrane, leading to aggregation and content leakage.

  7. Itraconazole-resistant Candida auris with phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity from a case of vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-15

    Since the emergence of pathogenic non-albicans Candida species, a number of new isolates have been added to the list. One such unusual species is Candida auris (C. auris), recently isolated and studied in few reports. In this study, a case of vulvovaginitis caused by Candida auris incidentally identified by molecular methods using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS PCR) is described. Antifungal susceptibility testing revealed the isolate to be resistant to itraconazole (MIC ≥ 2 µg/ml) and expressed important virulence factors including phospholipase, proteinase and hemolysin activity. The patient was successfully treated with oral fluconazole and did not have any invasive fungemia. Very few cases of this emerging pathogen have been reported. However, its isolation from clinical specimens reveals the significance of non-albicans candida species over C. albicans and the diversity of Candida spp causing infections.

  8. The effect of proteinases (keratinases) in the pathogenesis of Dermatophyte infection using scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samdani, A.J.; Al-Bitar, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the inter-relationship between the stratum corneum of host and the fungal micro-organisms using scanning electron microscopy for a complete understanding of the host parasite relationship. Material and Methods: Skin surface biopsies were obtained two patients suffering from tinea cruris infection. One patient was infected with trichophyton rubrum and the other with epidermophytom floccosum strains. Results: The scanning electron microphotographs obtained from two patients showed a large number of villi in the infected area. The fungal hyphae were seen to placed intercellularly as well seem to be traversing through the corneocytes in many places. Conclusion: From the results observed in this study it could be suggested that the secretion of proteinases from the fungal hyphae together with the mechanical force of the invading organisms in vivo might be playing part in the invasion of the organisms. (author)

  9. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  10. Partial purification and characterization of cysteine proteinase inhibitor from chicken plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawdkuen, Saroat; Benjakul, Soottawat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Lanier, Tyre C

    2006-08-01

    A high-molecular-weight cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) was purified from chicken (Gallus gallus) plasma using polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation and affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose-4B. The CPI was purified 96.8-fold with a yield of 28.9%. Based on inhibitory activity staining for papain, CPI was shown to have an apparent molecular mass of 122 kDa. No inhibitory activity was obtained under reducing condition, indicating that CPI from chicken plasma was stabilized by disulfide bonds. CPI was stable in temperature ranges from 40 to 70 degrees C for 10 min; however, more than 50% of the inhibitory activity towards papain was lost within 30 min of heating at 90 degrees C. CPI was stable in the presence of salt up to 3%. The purified CPI exhibited the inhibitory activity toward autolysis of arrowtooth flounder (Atheresthes stomias) and Pacific whiting (Merluccius productus) natural actomyosin (NAM) in a concentration-dependent manner.

  11. On the Robustness of Anchoring Effects in WTP and WTA Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Drew Fudenberg; David K Levine; Zacharias Maniadis

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine the effects of the anchoring manipulation of Ariely, Loewenstein, and Prelec (2003) on the evaluation of common market goods and find very weak anchoring effects. We perform the same manipulation on the evaluation of binary lotteries, and find no anchoring effects at all. This suggests limits on the robustness of anchoring effects. (JEL C91, D12, D44)

  12. The Effect of Mini and Midi Anchor Tests on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Çigdem Akin

    2018-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the test forms to the midi anchor test and the mini anchor test performance based on item response theory. The research was conducted with using simulated data which were generated based on Rasch model. In order to equate two test forms the anchor item nonequivalent groups (internal anchor test) was…

  13. Pyramidal anchor stone from Baga waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    . Pyramidal anchor stones have an apex hole which goes up to the round hole, however Goa anchor stone has no such perforation, but, instead has a rectangular cutting on the apex. The anchor stone is compared with Greek pyramidal anchor stones, and probably...

  14. Metabolic mapping of proteinase activity with emphasis on in situ zymography of gelatinases: review and protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiks, Wilma M; Mook, Olaf R F

    2004-06-01

    Proteases are essential for protein catabolism, regulation of a wide range of biological processes, and in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Several techniques are available to localize activity of proteases in tissue sections or cell preparations. For localization of the activity of matrix metalloproteinases, in situ zymography was introduced some decades ago. The procedure is based on zymography using SDS polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin, casein, or fibrin as substrate. For in situ zymography, either a photographic emulsion containing gelatin or a fluorescence-labeled proteinaceous macromolecular substrate is brought into contact with a tissue section or cell preparation. After incubation, enzymatic activity is revealed as white spots in a dark background or as black spots in a fluorescent background. However, this approach does not allow precise localization of proteinase activity because of limited sensitivity. A major improvement in sensitivity was achieved with the introduction of dye-quenched (DQ-)gelatin, which is gelatin that is heavily labeled with FITC molecules so that its fluorescence is quenched. After cleavage of DQ-gelatin by gelatinolytic activity, fluorescent peptides are produced that are visible against a weakly fluorescent background. The incubation with DQ-gelatin can be combined with simultaneous immunohistochemical detection of a protein on the same section. To draw valid conclusions from the findings with in situ zymography, specific inhibitors need to be used and the technique has to be combined with immunohistochemistry and zymography. In that case, in situ zymography provides data that extend our understanding of the role of specific proteinases in various physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  16. Unmasking of complements using proteinase-K in formalin fixed paraffin embedded renal biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal biopsy interpretation requires histopathology, direct immunofluorescence (DIF and electron microscopy. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE sent for light microscopy can be used for DIF after antigen retrieval. However, complement staining has not been satisfactory. We standardized DIF using proteinase-K for antigen retrieval in FFPE renal biopsies. A pilot study was conducted on known cases of membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN, membranoproliferative type-1 (MPGN-1, immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN, and anti-glomerular basement disease (anti-GBM. Immunofluorescence panel included fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC conjugated IgG, IgA, IgM, complements (C3 and C1q, light chains (kappa, lambda and fibrinogen antibodies. After standardization of the technique, 75 renal biopsies and 43 autopsies cases were stained. Out of 43 autopsy cases, immune-complex mediated glomerulonephritis (GN was confirmed in 18 cases (Lupus nephritis-11, IgAN-6, MGN-1, complement-mediated dense deposit disease (DDD-1 and monoclonal diseases in 4 cases (amyloidosis-3, cast nephropathy-1. Immune-mediated injury was excluded in 17 cases (focal segmental glomerulosclerosis -3, crescentic GN-6 [pauci-immune-3, anti-GBM-3], thrombotic microangiopathy-5, atherosclerosis-3. Renal biopsies (n-75 where inadequate or no frozen sample was available; this technique classified 52 mesangiocapillary pattern as MPGN type-1-46, DDD-2 and (C3GN-4. Others were diagnosed as IgAN-3, lupus nephritis-2, MGN-4, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN-1, Non-IC crescentic GN-1, monoclonal diseases-3. In nine cases, DIF on FFPE tissue could not help in making diagnosis. Proteinase-K enzymatic digestion of FFPE renal biopsies can unmask complements (both C3 and C1q in immune-complexes mediated and complement-mediated diseases. This method showed good results on autopsy tissues archived for as long as 15 years.

  17. Failure Capacity Evaluation for Anchor System of NPP Facilities by using a Shaking Table Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyung O; Jung, Min Ki; Park, Jin Wan; Lim, Ji Hoon

    2010-02-01

    This study investigate the destructive influence of crack locations on the anchor performance to evaluate the seismic performance of NPP equipment anchored on damaged concrete. For this purpose, small-scale specimens were fabricated according to the following three cases: 1) with a non-damaged anchor; 2) with cracks running through the anchor; and 3) with cracks along the expected corn-shape fracture away from the anchor. The result verified with the finite element method is as follows: In the first and second cases that is, with a non-damaged anchor and with cracks running through the anchor destruction occurred at the anchor steel. In the third case that is, with cracks around the anchor, a 30% decline in the seismic performance was identified. This result indicates that evaluation of seismic performance and relevant reinforcement are required when cracks occur away from the anchor along the expected destructive surface

  18. Use of the ROC anchor in foot and ankle surgery. A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwada, G T

    1999-05-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on the use of the ROC (Radial Osteo Compression) soft-tissue anchor in foot and ankle surgery. This article describes how the anchor is deployed, problematic aspects of using the anchor, and complications and success rates associated with the anchor in ankle stabilizations, posterior tibial tendon reconstruction, peroneus brevis tendon reconstruction after fracture of the base of the fifth metatarsal, and detachment and reattachment of the Achilles tendon. The ROC anchor consists of the anchor with nonabsorbable suture attached to the shaft, the deployment handle, and drill bits. The anchor and shaft are snapped into the deployment handle and inserted into the drill hole. Compression of the trigger deploys the anchor into the hole. The ROC anchor was found to be reliable, useful, and relatively easy to deploy, with outcomes similar to those of other soft-tissue anchors.

  19. Ultimate limit state design of sheet pile walls by finite elements and nonlinear programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Sven

    2005-01-01

    The design of sheet pile walls by lower bound limit analysis is considered. The design problem involves the determination of the necessary yield moment of the wall, the wall depth and the anchor force such that the structure is able to sustain the given loads. This problem is formulated...... as a nonlinear programming problem where the yield moment of the wall is minimized subject to equilibrium and yield conditions. The finite element discretization used enables exact fulfillment of these conditions and thus, according to the lower bound theorem, the solutions are safe....

  20. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-04

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  1. Novel role for proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) in membrane trafficking of proteinase-activated receptor 4 (PAR4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; McIntosh, Kathryn A; Pediani, John D; Robben, Joris; Cooke, Alexandra E; Nilsson, Mary; Gould, Gwyn W; Mundell, Stuart; Milligan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2012-05-11

    Proteinase-activated receptors 4 (PAR(4)) is a class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) recognized through the ability of serine proteases such as thrombin and trypsin to mediate receptor activation. Due to the irreversible nature of activation, a fresh supply of receptor is required to be mobilized to the cell surface for responsiveness to agonist to be sustained. Unlike other PAR subtypes, the mechanisms regulating receptor trafficking of PAR(4) remain unknown. Here, we report novel features of the intracellular trafficking of PAR(4) to the plasma membrane. PAR(4) was poorly expressed at the plasma membrane and largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a complex with the COPI protein subunit β-COP1. Analysis of the PAR(4) protein sequence identified an arginine-based (RXR) ER retention sequence located within intracellular loop-2 (R(183)AR → A(183)AA), mutation of which allowed efficient membrane delivery of PAR(4). Interestingly, co-expression with PAR(2) facilitated plasma membrane delivery of PAR(4), an effect produced through disruption of β-COP1 binding and facilitation of interaction with the chaperone protein 14-3-3ζ. Intermolecular FRET studies confirmed heterodimerization between PAR(2) and PAR(4). PAR(2) also enhanced glycosylation of PAR(4) and activation of PAR(4) signaling. Our results identify a novel regulatory role for PAR(2) in the anterograde traffic of PAR(4). PAR(2) was shown to both facilitate and abrogate protein interactions with PAR(4), impacting upon receptor localization and cell signal transduction. This work is likely to impact markedly upon the understanding of the receptor pharmacology of PAR(4) in normal physiology and disease.

  2. Retroperitoneal aortic hemorrhage caused by penetration of an endovascular stent-graft anchoring barb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, Christopher P; Winterbottom, Andrew; Shaida, Nadeem; Boyle, Jonathan R

    2013-08-01

    To report a rare case of acute intraoperative retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to aortic penetration by the suprarenal anchoring barb on a stent-graft. A 75-year-old patient on dual antiplatelet therapy for coronary stents and low-molecular-weight heparin for atrial thrombus underwent elective endovascular repair of a 6.7-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A device with suprarenal fixation and metal anchoring barbs was implanted, and a molding balloon was used that at no time covered the proximal bare metal stents or barbs. In recovery, the patient became tachycardic and hypotensive. After resuscitation, imaging identified an anterior barb penetrating the aortic wall, causing the acute retroperitoneal hemorrhage. A decision to treat conservatively rather than resort to open surgery was difficult but ultimately influenced by the patients' high risk for open surgery. The patient was treated by aggressive reversal of heparin and platelet transfusion, and the bleed settled spontaneously. Major surgery and subsequent morbidity may be avoided by medical management of what would appear to be a surgical problem.

  3. A prominent anchoring effect on the kinetic control of drug release from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vy Anh; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2018-01-15

    This work demonstrated kinetically controlled release of model drugs (ibuprofen, FITC) from well-tailored mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) depending on the surface charges and molecular sizes of the drugs. The molecular interactions between entrapped drugs and the pore walls of MSNs controlled the release of the drugs through the pore channels of MSNs. Also, polydopamine (PDA) layer-coated MSNs (MSNs@PDA) was quite effective to retard the release of large FITC, in contrast to a slight retardation effect on relatively small Ibuprofen. Of all things, FITC (Fluorescein isothiocyanate)-labeled APTMS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) (APTMS-FITC conjugates) grafted onto the MSNs generate a pinch-effect on the pore channel (so-called a prominent anchoring effect), which was highly effective in trapping (or blocking) drug molecules at the pore mouth of the MSNs. The anchored APTMS-FITC conjugates provided not only tortuous pathways to the diffusing molecules, but also sustained release of the ibuprofen over a long period of time (∼7days). The fast release kinetics was predicted by an exponential equation based on Fick's law, while the slow release kinetics was predicted by Higuchi model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  5. Molecular basis of surface anchored protein A deficiency in the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasi Balachandran

    Full Text Available Protein A in Staphylococcus aureus is encoded by the spa (staphylococcal protein A gene and binds to immunoglobulin (Ig. The S. aureus strain Wood 46 has been variously reported as protein A-deficient and/or spa negative and used as a control in animal models of staphylococcal infections. The results of this study indicate that Wood 46 has normal spa expression but transcribes very low levels of the srtA gene which encodes the sortase A (SrtA enzyme. This is consistent with unique mutations in the srtA promoter. In this study, a low level of sortase A explains deficient anchoring of proteins with an LPXTG motif, such as protein A, fibrinogen-binding protein and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B on to the peptidoglycan cell wall. The activity of secreted protein A is an important consideration for use of Wood 46 in functional experiments and animal models.

  6. Molecular basis of surface anchored protein A deficiency in the Staphylococcus aureus strain Wood 46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Manasi; Giannone, Richard J; Bemis, David A; Kania, Stephen A

    2017-01-01

    Protein A in Staphylococcus aureus is encoded by the spa (staphylococcal protein A) gene and binds to immunoglobulin (Ig). The S. aureus strain Wood 46 has been variously reported as protein A-deficient and/or spa negative and used as a control in animal models of staphylococcal infections. The results of this study indicate that Wood 46 has normal spa expression but transcribes very low levels of the srtA gene which encodes the sortase A (SrtA) enzyme. This is consistent with unique mutations in the srtA promoter. In this study, a low level of sortase A explains deficient anchoring of proteins with an LPXTG motif, such as protein A, fibrinogen-binding protein and fibronectin-binding proteins A and B on to the peptidoglycan cell wall. The activity of secreted protein A is an important consideration for use of Wood 46 in functional experiments and animal models.

  7. Simplified design of flexible expansion anchored plates for nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, N.K.; Hingorani, N.V.; Longlais, T.G.; Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL)

    1984-01-01

    In nuclear power plant construction, expansion anchored plates are used to support pipe, cable tray and HVAC duct hangers, and various structural elements. The expansion anchored plates provide flexibility in the installation of field-routed lines where cast-in-place embedments are not available. General design requirements for expansion anchored plate assemblies are given in ACI 349, Appendix B (1). The manufacturers recommend installation procedures for their products. Recent field testing in response to NRC Bulletin 79-02 (2) indicates that anchors, installed in accordance with manufacturer's recommended procedures, perform satisfactorily under static and dynamic loading conditions. Finite element analysis is a useful tool to correctly analyze the expansion anchored plates subject to axial tension and biaxial moments, but it becomes expensive and time-consuming to apply this tool for a large number of plates. It is, therefore, advantageous to use a simplified method, even though it may be more conservative as compared to the exact method of analysis. This paper presents a design method referred to as the modified rigid plate analysis approach to simplify both the initial design and the review of as-built conditions

  8. Analysis of green kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Hayward) proteinases by two-dimensional zymography and direct identification of zymographic spots by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Riccio, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Proteinases present in kiwi fruits are potentially allergenic enzymes belonging to the papain family of cysteine proteinases. Actinidin is a prominent kiwi enzyme. The study of kiwi proteinases is important for the follow-up of fruit maturation, a deeper insight in the allergenic properties of individual proteins, and the application of kiwi proteinases for meat tenderisation and other industrial purposes. Kiwi crude extracts were analysed by two-dimensional zymography on gelatin-containing gels. The digestion by the reactivated proteolytic enzymes after electrophoresis resulted in insights into kiwi proteinases. A mixture of several enzyme isotypes with the same pI but different molecular mass was observed. Clear spots, corresponding to the proteolytic activities, were excised, digested with trypsin, and submitted to MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry for protein identification. The most representative enzyme was actinidin. The innovative achievements of the present study are the: (1) two-dimensional zymographic map of kiwi gelatinases without the need for extensive purification; and (2) direct identification of proteinase isotypes by means of direct MALDI-ToF MS analysis of the zymographic spots. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry

  9. Cationic ferritin uptake by cultured anterior pituitary cells treated with the proteinase inhibitor, BOC-DPhe-Phe-Lys-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, G; Bácsy, E; Rappay, G

    1988-01-01

    Cultured cells from the anterior pituitary glands of adult rats were treated with the tripeptide aldehyde proteinase inhibitor, BOC-DPhe-Phe-Lys-H. The addition of this tripeptide aldehyde decreased the in vitro release of prolactin to 25% of the control value, while the release of growth hormone in the same cultures decreased to 33% of the control value. Prolactin immunostaining was stronger in semithin sections of proteinase-inhibitor-treated cultures than in control sections. After 2 h treatment with the inhibitor, prolactin- and growth hormone-containing secretory granules were numerous, and the number of crinophagic vacuoles had increased. In the presence of the inhibitor, the overall cytoarchitecture of parenchymal cells was well preserved, and the pathway of the uptake of cationic ferritin appeared to be unaffected.

  10. [Experimental approach to the prophylaxis and treatment of acute lung injury syndrome with proteinase inhibitors and corvitin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moĭbenko, O O; Kubyshkin, A V; Kharchenko, V Z; Horokhova, N Iu; Semenets', P F

    2003-01-01

    The results of a combined study of the proteolysis on a model of post-ischemic toxemia in rats showed a decrease in antiproteinase potential and an activation of proteolysis. The activation of proteolysis and inhibition of antiproteinases was observed not only in the blood, but also in the bronchoalveolar secretion. Those changes were accompanied with the changes in the morphological structure of the lungs. The data obtained have shown a high effectiveness of proteinase inhibitor (contrical) and an antioxidant of flavonoid group (corvetine). Those drugs decreased the morphological changes in the lungs and prevented the development of imbalance in proteinase-inhibitor system. The prophylactic effect was more considerable when both drugs were used in a combined way.

  11. Flexibility of cold- and heat-adapted subtilisin-like serine proteinases evaluated with fluorescence quenching and molecular dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigtryggsdóttir, Asta Rós; Papaleo, Elena; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigríður H.

    2014-01-01

    activity of cold adapted enzymes when compared to homologues from thermophiles, reflects their higher molecular flexibility. To assess a potential difference in molecular flexibility between the two homologous proteinases, we have measured their Trp fluorescence quenching by acrylamide at different......The subtilisin-like serine proteinases, VPR, from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species and aqualysin I (AQUI) from the thermophile Thermus aquaticus, are structural homologues, but differ significantly with respect to stability and catalytic properties. It has been postulated that the higher catalytic...... to Trp (Y191W). A lower quenching effect of acrylamide on the intrinsic fluorescence of the thermophilic AQUI_Y191W was observed at all temperatures measured (10-55°C), suggesting that it possesses a more rigid structure than VPR. The MD analysis (Cα rmsf profiles) showed that even though VPR and AQUI...

  12. Production of proteinase A by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a cell-recycling fermentation system: Experiments and computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, S.; Biedermann, K.; Emborg, Claus

    1996-01-01

    experimentally and by computer simulations. Experiments and simulations showed that cell mass and product concentration were enhanced by high ratios of recycling. Additional simulations showed that the proteinase A concentration decreased drastically at high dilution rates and the optimal volumetric...... productivities were at high dilution rates just below washout and at high ratios of recycling. Cell-recycling fermentation gave much higher volumetric productivities and stable product concentrations in contrast to simple continuous fermentation....

  13. A secreted aspartic proteinase from Glomerella cingulata: purification of the enzyme and molecular cloning of the cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S J; Templeton, M D; Sullivan, P A

    1997-04-01

    A secreted aspartic proteinase from Glomerella cingulata (GcSAP) was purified to homogeneity by ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme has an M, of 36000 as estimated by SDS-PAGE, optimal activity from pH 3.5 to pH 4.0 and is inhibited by pepstatin. The N-terminal sequence, 23 residues long, was used to design a gene-specific primer. This was used in 3' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR to amplify a 1.2 kb fragment of the gcsap cDNA. A second gene-specific primer was designed and used in 5' RACE PCR to clone the 5' region. This yielded a 600 bp DNA fragment and completed the open reading frame. The gcsap open reading frame encodes a protein with a 78 residue prepro-sequence typical of other fungal secreted aspartic proteinases. Based on the deduced sequence, the mature enzyme contains 329 amino acids and shows approximately 40% identity to other fungal aspartic proteinases. Subsequent cloning and sequencing of gcsap fragments obtained from PCR with genomic DNA revealed a 73 bp intron beginning at nt 728. Southern analyses at medium and high stringency indicated that G. cingulata possesses one gene for the secreted aspartic proteinase, and Northern blots indicated that gene expression was induced by exogenous protein and repressed by ammonium salts. GcSAP is a putative pathogenicity factor of G. cingulata, and it will now be possible to create SAP-mutants and assess the role GcSAP plays in pathogenicity.

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae can secrete Sapp1p proteinase of Candida parapsilosis but cannot use it for efficient nitrogen acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vinterová, Zuzana; Bauerová, Václava; Dostál, Jiří; Sychrová, Hana; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2013), s. 336-344 ISSN 1225-8873 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1945; GA ČR GAP302/12/1151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Candida parapsilosis * Saccharomyces cerevisiae * secreted aspartic proteinase * SAPP1 * nitrogen metabolism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EE - Microbiology, Virology (FGU-C) Impact factor: 1.529, year: 2013

  15. Putrescine-Dependent Re-Localization of TvCP39, a Cysteine Proteinase Involved in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal-Gamez, Bertha Isabel; Quintas-Granados, Laura Itzel; Arroyo, Rossana; Vázquez-Carrillo, Laura Isabel; Ramón-Luing, Lucero De los Angeles; Carrillo-Tapia, Eduardo; Alvarez-Sánchez, María Elizbeth

    2014-01-01

    Polyamines are involved in the regulation of some Trichomonas vaginalis virulence factors such as the transcript, proteolytic activity, and cytotoxicity of TvCP65, a cysteine proteinase (CP) involved in the trichomonal cytotoxicity. In this work, we reported the putrescine effect on TvCP39, other CP that also participate in the trichomonal cytotoxicity. Parasites treated with 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DAB) (an inhibitor of putrescine biosynthesis), diminished the amount and proteolytic activity...

  16. [Concentration of cysteine proteinase inhibitors in urine, amniotic fluid and serum from women in pregnancy complicated by EPH-gestosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmowski, A; Sobiech, K A; Kertyńska, I; Terpiłowski, L; Słowińska-Lisowska, M; Pałczyński, B; Malik, B

    2000-10-01

    Cysteine proteinase inhibitors (IPC) concentration was measured by the modified Barrett method using papaine in urine, amniotic fluid and serum obtained from the healthy labored women and from labored women in pregnancy complicated by EPH-gestosis. It was noticed the statistically significant increase in the IPC concentration in the material from the pregnant women with EPH-gestosis comparing to the women, which pregnancy had the physiologically normal course.

  17. Anchoring effect on first passage process in Taiwan financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsing; Liao, Chi-Yo; Ko, Jing-Yuan; Lih, Jiann-Shing

    2017-07-01

    Empirical analysis of the price fluctuations of financial markets has received extensive attention because a substantial amount of financial market data has been collected and because of advances in data-mining techniques. Price fluctuation trends can help investors to make informed trading decisions, but such decisions may also be affected by a psychological factors-the anchoring effect. This study explores the intraday price time series of Taiwan futures, and applies diffusion model and quantitative methods to analyze the relationship between the anchoring effect and price fluctuations during first passage process. Our results indicate that power-law scaling and anomalous diffusion for stock price fluctuations are related to the anchoring effect. Moreover, microscopic price fluctuations before switching point in first passage process correspond with long-term price fluctuations of Taiwan's stock market. We find that microscopic trends could provide useful information for understanding macroscopic trends in stock markets.

  18. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S.; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-01

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and

  19. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  20. The M358R variant of α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, William P., E-mail: sheffiel@mcmaster.ca [Canadian Blood Services, Centre for Innovation, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Bhakta, Varsha [Canadian Blood Services, Centre for Innovation, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-12

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 2} M{sup −1}sec{sup −1}. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.

  1. The M358R variant of α_1-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, William P.; Bhakta, Varsha

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α_1-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10"2 M"−"1sec"−"1. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.

  2. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis by the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella: comparison of midgut proteinases from susceptible and resistant larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D E; Brookhart, G L; Kramer, K J; Barnett, B D; McGaughey, W H

    1990-03-01

    Midgut homogenates from susceptible and resistant strains of the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, were compared for their ability to activate the entomocidal parasporal crystal protein from Bacillus thuringiensis. The properties of midgut proteinases from both types of larvae were also examined. Electrophoretic patterns of crystal protein from B. thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki (HD-1) and aizawai (HD-133 and HD-144) were virtually unchanged following digestion by either type of midgut homogenate. Changes in pH (9.5 to 11.5) or midgut homogenate concentration during digestion failed to substantially alter protein electrophoretic patterns of B. thuringiensis HD-1 crystal toxin. In vitro toxicity of crystal protein activated by either type of midgut preparation was equal toward cultured insect cells from either Manduca sexta or Choristoneura fumiferana. Electrophoresis of midgut extracts in polyacrylamide gels containing gelatin as substrate also yielded matching mobility patterns of proteinases from both types of midguts. Quantitation of midgut proteolytic activity using tritiated casein as a substrate revealed variation between midgut preparations, but no statistically significant differences between proteolytic activities from susceptible and resistant Indian meal moth larvae. Inhibition studies indicated that a trypsin-like proteinase with maximal activity at pH 10 is a major constituent of Indian meal moth midguts. The results demonstrated that midguts from susceptible and resistant strains of P. interpunctella are similar both in their ability to activate B. thuringiensis protoxin and in their proteolytic activity.

  3. Functional Properties of a Cysteine Proteinase from Pineapple Fruit with Improved Resistance to Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plant cells, many cysteine proteinases (CPs are synthesized as precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and then are subject to post-translational modifications to form the active mature proteinases. They participate in various cellular and physiological functions. Here, AcCP2, a CP from pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus L. belonging to the C1A subfamily is analyzed based on the molecular modeling and homology alignment. Transcripts of AcCP2 can be detected in the different parts of fruits (particularly outer sarcocarps, and gradually increased during fruit development until maturity. To analyze the substrate specificity of AcCP2, the recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from Pichia pastoris. The precursor of purified AcCP2 can be processed to a 25 kDa active form after acid treatment (pH 4.3. Its optimum proteolytic activity to Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-NH-Mec is at neutral pH. In addition, the overexpression of AcCP2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana can improve the resistance to fungal pathogen of Botrytis cinerea. These data indicate that AcCP2 is a multifunctional proteinase, and its expression could cause fruit developmental characteristics of pineapple and resistance responses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  4. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craik Charles S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins. A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora.

  5. Identification and activity of a lower eukaryotic serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) from Cyanea capillata: analysis of a jellyfish serpin, jellypin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elisabeth B; Miller, David; Rometo, David; Greenberg, Robert M; Brömme, Dieter; Cataltepe, Sule; Pak, Stephen C; Mills, David R; Silverman, Gary A; Luke, Cliff J

    2004-09-21

    Delineating the phylogenetic relationships among members of a protein family can provide a high degree of insight into the evolution of domain structure and function relationships. To identify an early metazoan member of the high molecular weight serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily, we initiated a cDNA library screen of the cnidarian, Cyanea capillata. We identified one serpin cDNA encoding for a full-length serpin, jellypin. Phylogenetic analysis using the deduced amino acid sequence showed that jellypin was most similar to the platyhelminthe Echinococcus multiocularis serpin and the clade P serpins, suggesting that this serpin evolved approximately 1000 million years ago (MYA). Modeling of jellypin showed that it contained all the functional elements of an inhibitory serpin. In vitro biochemical analysis confirmed that jellypin was an inhibitor of the S1 clan SA family of serine proteinases. Analysis of the interactions between the human serine proteinases, chymotrypsin, cathepsin G, and elastase, showed that jellypin inhibited these enzymes in the classical serpin manner, forming a SDS stable enzyme/inhibitor complex. These data suggest that the coevolution of serpin structure and inhibitory function date back to at least early metazoan evolution, approximately 1000 MYA.

  6. A thermolabile aspartic proteinase from Mucor mucedo DSM 809: gene identification, cloning, and functional expression in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegin, Sirma; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the cDNA encoding the aspartic proteinase of Mucor mucedo DSM 809 has been identified by RNA ligased-mediated and oligo-capping rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The gene contained an open reading frame of 1,200 bp and encoded for a signal peptide of 21 amino acid residues. Two N-glycosylation sites were observed within the identified sequence. The proteinase gene was cloned into the vector pGAPZαA and expressed in Pichia pastoris X-33 for the first time. The protein has been secreted in functionally active form into the culture medium. The expression system does not require any acid activation process. The factors affecting the expression level were optimized in shaking flask cultures. Maximum enzyme production was observed with an initial medium pH of 3.5 at 20 °C and 220 rpm shaking speed utilizing 4 % glucose as a carbon and energy source. The enzyme was purified with cation exchange chromatography and further studies revealed that the enzyme was secreted in glycosylated form. The purified enzyme exhibited remarkable sensitivity to thermal treatment and became completely inactivated after incubation at 55 °C for 10 min. These results indicated that the recombinant proteinase could be considered as a potential rennet candidate for the cheese-making industry.

  7. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...... to humans. GPI-APs confer important cellular functions as receptors, enzymes and scaffolding molecules. Specific enzymes and detergent extraction methods combined with separation technologies and mass spectrometry permit proteomic analysis of GPI-APs from plasma membrane preparations to reveal cell...

  8. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  9. COBRA encodes a putative GPI-anchored protein, which is polarly localized and necessary for oriented cell expansion in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelman, G; Morikami, A; Jung, J; Baskin, T I; Carpita, N C; Derbyshire, P; McCann, M C; Benfey, P N

    2001-05-01

    To control organ shape, plant cells expand differentially. The organization of the cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall is a key determinant of differential expansion. Mutations in the COBRA (COB) gene of Arabidopsis, known to affect the orientation of cell expansion in the root, are reported here to reduce the amount of crystalline cellulose in cell walls in the root growth zone. The COB gene, identified by map-based cloning, contains a sequence motif found in proteins that are anchored to the extracellular surface of the plasma membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. In animal cells, this lipid linkage is known to confer polar localization to proteins. The COB protein was detected predominately on the longitudinal sides of root cells in the zone of rapid elongation. Moreover, COB RNA levels are dramatically upregulated in cells entering the zone of rapid elongation. Based on these results, models are proposed for the role of COB as a regulator of oriented cell expansion.

  10. Near-field interaction of colloid near wavy walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yimin; Serra, Francesca; Wong, Denise; Steager, Edward; Stebe, Kathleen

    Anisotropic media can be used to manipulate colloids, in tandem with carefully designed boundary conditions. For example, in bulk nematic liquid crystal, a wall with homeotropic anchoring repels a colloid with the same anchoring; yet by changing the surface topography from planar to concave, one can turn repulsion into attraction. We explore the behaviors of micro-particles with associated topological defects (hedgehogs or Saturn rings) near wavy walls. The walls locally excite disturbance, which decays into bulk. The range of influence is related to the curvature. The distortion can be used to position particles, either directly on the structure or at a distance away, based on the ``splay-matching'' rules. When distortion becomes stronger through the deepening of the well, the splay field created by the wall can prompt transformation from a Saturn ring to a hedgehog. We combine wells of different wavelength and depth to direct colloid movement. We apply a magnetic field to reset the initial position of ferromagnetic colloids and subsequently release them to probe the elastic energy landscape. Our platform enables manipulation, particle selection, and a detailed study of defect structure under the influence of curvature. Army Research Office.

  11. Computational study of some benzamidine-based inhibitors of thrombin-like snake venom proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Elsa S.; Nascimento, Marco A. C.; Ramos, Maria João

    Pit viper venoms contain a number of serine proteinases that, despite their observed coagulant thrombin-like action in vitro, exhibit a paradoxical benign defibrinogenating (anticoagulant) action in vivo, with clinical applications in preventing thrombi and improved blood circulation. Considering that several benzamidine-based inhibitors, some highly selective to thrombin, also inhibit the enzymatic activity of such venombins, the modeling of their enzyme-inhibitor interactions could provide valuable information on the topological factors that determine the divergences in activity. The first step, and the object of the present study, was to derive the necessary set of parameters, consistent with the CHARMM force field, and to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a few selected representatives of the inhibitors in question under physiological conditions. Bonding and van der Waals parameters were derived by analogy to similar ones in the existing force field. Net atomic charges were obtained with a restrained fitting to the molecular electrostatic potential generated at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The parameters were refined to reproduce the available experimental geometries and crystal data, and the MD simulations of the free inhibitors in aqueous solution at 298 K provided an insightful description of their available conformational space.

  12. Inhibition of growth hormone and prolactin secretion by a serine proteinase inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappay, G.; Nagy, I.; Makara, G.B.; Horvath, G.; Karteszi, M.; Bacsy, E.; Stark, E.

    1984-01-01

    The action of the tripeptide aldehyde t-butyloxycarbonyl-DPhe-Pro-Arg-H (boc-fPR-H), belonging to a family of serine proteinase inhibitors, on the release of immunoreactive prolactin (iPRL) and growth hormone (iGH) has been studied. In rat anterior pituitary cell cultures and pituitary quarters 1 mM boc-fPR-H inhibited basal iPRL and iGH release. Thyroliberin-induced iPRL release by cultured cells was also markedly inhibited with a concomitant accumulation of intracellular iPRL. During the short- and long-term exposure of cells to boc-fPR-H there were no changes in total cell protein contents and in activities of some lysosomal marker enzymes. The marked inhibition of basal as well as stimulated hormone release in the presence of the enzyme inhibitor might suggest that at least a portion of the hormones is released via a proteolytic enzyme-dependent process

  13. Elastase-induced emphysema: retention of instilled proteinase in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhaus, R.A.; Janoff, A.

    1982-01-01

    Airway instillation of proteinases with the ability to degrade elastin has been used to produce disease in the rat analogous to human pulmonary emphysema. This study examined the retention, localization, and fate of endotracheally instilled elastase using 125 I labeled enzyme and immunoperoxidase histochemistry. Porcine pancreatic elastase labeled with 125 I was detected in rat lungs through 96 h after instillation; over half of the label was still present after 7 h. Similar results were obtained when elastase was reacted with a specific, catalytic site inactivator prior to instillation. Trypsin and denatured elastase, however, were cleared much more rapidly from the lung (less than half of the label present after 30 min). When lungs were homogenized after instillation of active elastase, the soluble fraction contained elastase bound to rat alpha1-antitrypsin. In addition, a small amount of label (less than 10%) appeared bound to insoluble components for extended periods of time. Using immunoperoxidase histochemistry, it was found that exogenous elastase was rapidly contained with pulmonary alveolar macrophages, as well as associated with alveolar septums and other parenchymal structures. Similar results were obtained with elastase from both porcine pancreas and human neutrophils. These results suggest that exogenous elastase in the rat, and perhaps endogenous elastolytic enzymes in humans, may have several fates in the lungs: complex formation with endogenous inhibitors, containment within the macrophage, and/or association with connective tissue targets

  14. Truncation of a P1 leader proteinase facilitates potyvirus replication in a non-permissive host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongying; Pasin, Fabio; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; García, Juan Antonio; Rodamilans, Bernardo

    2017-11-08

    The Potyviridae family is a major group of plant viruses that includes c. 200 species, most of which have narrow host ranges. The potyvirid P1 leader proteinase self-cleaves from the remainder of the viral polyprotein and shows large sequence variability linked to host adaptation. P1 proteins can be classified as Type A or Type B on the basis, amongst other things, of their dependence or not on a host factor to develop their protease activity. In this work, we studied Type A proteases from the Potyviridae family, characterizing their host factor requirements. Our in vitro cleavage analyses of potyvirid P1 proteases showed that the N-terminal domain is relevant for host factor interaction and suggested that the C-terminal domain is also involved. In the absence of plant factors, the N-terminal end of Plum pox virus P1 antagonizes protease self-processing. We performed extended deletion mutagenesis analysis to define the N-terminal antagonistic domain of P1. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic domain led to a gain-of-function phenotype, strongly increasing local infection in a non-permissive host. Altogether, our results shed new insights into the adaptation and evolution of potyvirids. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  15. Potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors: modulating plant physiology and host resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, David; Lorito, Matteo

    2011-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) are a large and complex group of plant proteins. Members of the potato type I (Pin1) and II (Pin2) proteinase inhibitor families are among the first and most extensively characterized plant PIs. Many insects and phytopathogenic microorganisms use intracellular and extracellular serine proteases playing important roles in pathogenesis. Plants, however, are able to fight these pathogens through the activation of an intricate defence system that leads to the accumulation of various PIs, including Pin1 and Pin2. Several transgenic plants over-expressing members of the Pin1 and Pin2 families have been obtained in the last twenty years and their enhanced defensive capabilities demonstrated against insects, fungi and bacteria. Furthermore, Pin1 and Pin2 genetically engineered plants showed altered regulation of different plant physiological processes (e.g., dehydratation response, programmed cell death, plant growth, trichome density and branching), supporting an endogenous role in various plant species in addition to the well established defensive one. This review summarizes the current knowledge about Pin1 and Pin2 structure, the role of these proteins in plant defence and physiology, and their potential exploitation in biotechnology.

  16. Blocking proteinase-activated receptor 2 alleviated neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H; Wei, Y; Tian, F; Niu, T; Yi, G

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Especially, neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effectively therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a family member of G-protein-coupled receptors and are activated by a proteolytic mechanism. One of its subtypes PAR2 has been reported to be engaged in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms responsible for SCI evoked-neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increases PAR2 and its downstream pathways TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal PAR2 by intrathecal injection of FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibits neuropathic pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation whereas FSLLRY-NH2 decreases the protein expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 as well as the levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Results of this study have important implications, i.e. targeting one or more of these signaling molecules involved in activation of PAR2 and TRPV1/TRPA1 evoked by SCI may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  17. Interaction between tumor cell surface receptor RAGE and proteinase 3 mediates prostate cancer metastasis to bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Sergeeva, Anna; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Smith, Tracey L.; Tarleton, Christy A.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Marchiò, Serena; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2017-01-01

    Human prostate cancer often metastasizes to bone, but the biological basis for such site-specific tropism remains largely unresolved. Recent work led us to hypothesize that this tropism may reflect pathogenic interactions between RAGE, a cell surface receptor expressed on malignant cells in advanced prostate cancer, and proteinase 3 (PR3), a serine protease present in inflammatory neutrophils and hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we establish that RAGE-PR3 interaction mediates homing of prostate cancer cells to the bone marrow. PR3 bound to RAGE on the surface of prostate cancer cells in vitro, inducing tumor cell motility through a non-proteolytic signal transduction cascade involving activation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1. In preclinical models of experimental metastasis, ectopic expression of RAGE on human prostate cancer cells was sufficient to promote bone marrow homing within a short time frame. Our findings demonstrate how RAGE-PR3 interactions between human prostate cancer cells and the bone marrow microenvironment mediate bone metastasis during prostate cancer progression, with potential implications for prognosis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:28428279

  18. Single-Step Purification and Characterization of A Recombinant Serine Proteinase Inhibitor from Transgenic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shweta; Agarwal, Saurabh; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2016-05-01

    Expression of recombinant therapeutic proteins in transgenic plants has a tremendous impact on safe and economical production of biomolecules for biopharmaceutical industry. The major limitation in their production is downstream processing of recombinant protein to obtain higher yield and purity of the final product. In this study, a simple and rapid process has been developed for purification of therapeutic recombinant α1-proteinase inhibitor (rα1-PI) from transgenic tomato plants, which is an abundant serine protease inhibitor in human serum and chiefly inhibits the activity of neutrophil elastase in lungs. We have expressed rα1-PI with modified synthetic gene in transgenic tomato plants at a very high level (≃3.2 % of total soluble protein). The heterologous protein was extracted with (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, followed by chromatographic separation on different matrices. However, only immunoaffinity chromatography resulted into homogenous preparation of rα1-PI with 54 % recovery. The plant-purified rα1-PI showed molecular mass and structural conformation comparable to native serum α1-PI, as shown by mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy. The results of elastase inhibition assay revealed biological activity of the purified rα1-PI protein. This work demonstrates a simple and efficient one-step purification of rα1-PI from transgenic plants, which is an essential prerequisite for further therapeutic development.

  19. AbetaPP/APLP2 family of Kunitz serine proteinase inhibitors regulate cerebral thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Previti, Mary Lou; Nieman, Marvin T; Davis, Judianne; Schmaier, Alvin H; Van Nostrand, William E

    2009-04-29

    The amyloid beta-protein precursor (AbetaPP) is best recognized as the precursor to the Abeta peptide that accumulates in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, but less is known about its physiological functions. Isoforms of AbetaPP that contain a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor (KPI) domain are expressed in brain and, outside the CNS, in circulating blood platelets. Recently, we showed that KPI-containing forms of AbetaPP regulates cerebral thrombosis in vivo (Xu et al., 2005, 2007). Amyloid precursor like protein-2 (APLP2), a closely related homolog to AbetaPP, also possesses a highly conserved KPI domain. Virtually nothing is known of its function. Here, we show that APLP2 also regulates cerebral thrombosis risk. Recombinant purified KPI domains of AbetaPP and APLP2 both inhibit the plasma clotting in vitro. In a carotid artery thrombosis model, both AbetaPP(-/-) and APLP2(-/-) mice exhibit similar significantly shorter times to vessel occlusion compared with wild-type mice indicating a prothrombotic phenotype. Similarly, in an experimental model of intracerebral hemorrhage, both AbetaPP(-/-) and APLP2(-/-) mice produce significantly smaller hematomas with reduced brain hemoglobin content compared with wild-type mice. Together, these results indicate that AbetaPP and APLP2 share overlapping anticoagulant functions with regard to regulating thrombosis after cerebral vascular injury.

  20. A Proteomics Investigation of Anchored PKA-RI Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovanich, D.

    2013-01-01

    Compartmentalization of kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the specificity of second messenger mediated signaling events. Localization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase is mediated by interaction of its regulatory subunit (PKA-R) with the versatile family of A-kinase anchoring

  1. 76 FR 10627 - Assumption Buster Workshop: Trust Anchors Are Invulnerable

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-25

    ... day-long workshop on the pros and cons of the use and implementation of trust anchors. The workshop... National Coordination Office (NCO) for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development... Coordination Office for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program on...

  2. Empirical evidence for resource-rational anchoring and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Falk; Griffiths, Thomas L; M Huys, Quentin J; Goodman, Noah D

    2018-04-01

    People's estimates of numerical quantities are systematically biased towards their initial guess. This anchoring bias is usually interpreted as sign of human irrationality, but it has recently been suggested that the anchoring bias instead results from people's rational use of their finite time and limited cognitive resources. If this were true, then adjustment should decrease with the relative cost of time. To test this hypothesis, we designed a new numerical estimation paradigm that controls people's knowledge and varies the cost of time and error independently while allowing people to invest as much or as little time and effort into refining their estimate as they wish. Two experiments confirmed the prediction that adjustment decreases with time cost but increases with error cost regardless of whether the anchor was self-generated or provided. These results support the hypothesis that people rationally adapt their number of adjustments to achieve a near-optimal speed-accuracy tradeoff. This suggests that the anchoring bias might be a signature of the rational use of finite time and limited cognitive resources rather than a sign of human irrationality.

  3. Fullerene-based Anchoring Groups for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christian A.; Ding, Dapeng; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger

    2008-01-01

    We present results on a new fullerene-based anchoring group for molecular electronics. Using lithographic mechanically controllable break junctions in vacuum we have determined the conductance and stability of single-molecule junctions of 1,4-bis(fullero[c]pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzene. The compound can...

  4. Ten Anchor Points for Teaching Principles of Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkovick, Chuck

    2004-01-01

    Effective marketing instructors commonly share a love for their students, an affinity for the subject matter, and a devotion to continuous quality improvement. The purpose of this article is to highlight 10 anchor points for teaching Principles of Marketing, which are designed to better engage students in the learning process. These anchor…

  5. Stable Pt clusters anchored to monovacancies on graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medasani, Bharat K.; Liu, Jun; Sushko, Maria L.

    2017-10-09

    Abstract

    anchor'>

  6. Robust conductance of dumbbell molecular junctions with fullerene anchoring groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Settnes, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2011-01-01

    The conductance of a molecular wire connected to metallic electrodes is known to be sensitive to the atomic structure of the molecule-metal contact. This contact is to a large extent determined by the anchoring group linking the molecular wire to the metal. It has been found experimentally that a...

  7. Liquifying PLDLLA Anchor Fixation in Achilles Reconstruction for Insertional Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Stephanie A; Boden, Allison L; Mignemi, Danielle; Bariteau, Jason T

    2018-04-01

    Insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) is a frequent cause of posterior heel pain and is often associated with Haglund's deformity. Surgical correction for refractory cases of IAT has been well studied; however, the method of tendon fixation to bone in these procedures remains controversial, and to date, no standard technique has been identified for tendon fixation in these surgeries. Often, after Haglund's resection, there is large exposed cancellous surface for Achilles reattachment, which may require unique fixation to optimize outcomes. Previous studies have consistently demonstrated improved patient outcomes after Achilles tendon reconstruction with early rehabilitation with protected weight bearing, evidencing the need for a strong and stable anchoring of the Achilles tendon that allows early weight bearing without tendon morbidity. In this report, we highlight the design, biomechanics, and surgical technique of Achilles tendon reconstruction with Haglund's deformity using a novel technique that utilizes ultrasonic energy to liquefy the suture anchor, allowing it to incorporate into surrounding bone. Biomechanical studies have demonstrated superior strength of the suture anchor utilizing this novel technique as compared with prior techniques. However, future research is needed to ensure that outcomes of this technique are favorable when compared with outcomes using traditional suture anchoring methods. Level V: Operative technique.

  8. Local ecological knowledge (LEK) on fish behavior around anchored FADs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macusi, Edison D.; Abreo, Neil A.S.; Babaran, Ricardo P.

    2017-01-01

    The Fishing Industry in the Philippines plays an important role in the food and employment need of Filipino fishers. By using anchored Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs or payao), the Philippine tuna fisheries was transformed into a million-dollar industry. Minimal studies on exploitation rates and

  9. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  10. Memory for Dialogue: Recalling an Anchor through Talk and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Pam

    This paper reports on a project involving student recall of the dialogue in a movie and retention of the "anchor," which in this case refers to a videotape recording of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The project looked at how students retained knowledge over a few days and what kind of activities resulted from expertise with an…

  11. Experience-based, body-anchored qualitative research interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    -anchored interviewing, and second, by an interview guide that explores a research participant's personal experience with mindfulness meditation. An excerpt from an interview is discussed to illustrate the advantages of this interview form, namely its value as a methodological instrument for qualitative research...

  12. Poor Anchoring Limits Dyslexics' Perceptual, Memory, and Reading Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-01-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin,…

  13. Competition of elastic and adhesive properties of carbon nanotubes anchored to atomic force microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, Charlotte; Marsaudon, Sophie; Boisgard, Rodolphe; Aime, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we address the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes anchored to atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips in a detailed analysis of experimental results and exhaustive description of a simple model. We show that volume elastic and surface adhesive forces both contribute to the dynamical AFM experimental signals. Their respective weights depend on the nanotube properties and on an experimental parameter: the oscillation amplitude. To quantify the elastic and adhesive contributions, a simple analytical model is used. It enables analytical expressions of the resonance frequency shift and dissipation that can be measured in the atomic force microscopy dynamical frequency modulation mode. It includes the nanotube adhesive contribution to the frequency shift. Experimental data for single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes compare well to the model predictions for different oscillation amplitudes. Three parameters can be extracted: the distance necessary to unstick the nanotube from the surface and two spring constants corresponding to tube compression and to the elastic force required to overcome the adhesion force

  14. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins in Fusarium graminearum: Inventory, Variability, and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenour, William R.; Harris, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of cell surface proteins to plant pathogenicity of fungi is not well understood. As such, the objective of this study was to investigate the functions and importance of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in the wheat pathogen F. graminearum. GPI-APs are surface proteins that are attached to either the membrane or cell wall. In order to simultaneously disrupt several GPI-APs, a phosphoethanolamine transferase-encoding gene gpi7 was deleted and the resultant mutant characterized in terms of growth, development, and virulence. The Δgpi7 mutants exhibited slower radial growth rates and aberrantly shaped macroconidia. Furthermore, virulence tests and microscopic analyses indicated that Gpi7 is required for ramification of the fungus throughout the rachis of wheat heads. In parallel, bioinformatics tools were utilized to predict and inventory GPI-APs within the proteome of F. graminearum. Two of the genes identified in this screen (FGSG_01588 and FGSG_08844) displayed isolate-specific length variability as observed for other fungal cell wall adhesion genes. Nevertheless, deletion of these genes failed to reveal obvious defects in growth, development, or virulence. This research demonstrates the global importance of GPI-APs to in planta proliferation in F. graminearum, and also highlights the potential of individual GPI-APs as diagnostic markers. PMID:24312325

  15. Maximizing coupling strength of magnetically anchored surgical instruments: how thick can we go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Sara L; Bergs, Richard; Gedeon, Makram; Paramo, Juan; Fernandez, Raul; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Scott, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetic Anchoring and Guidance System (MAGS) includes an external magnet that controls intra-abdominal surgical instruments via magnetic attraction forces. We have performed NOTES (Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery) and LESS (Laparoendoscopic Single Site) procedures using MAGS instruments in porcine models with up to 2.5-cm-thick abdominal walls, but this distance may not be sufficient in some humans. The purpose of this study was to determine the maximal abdominal wall thickness for which the current MAGS platform is suitable. Successive iterations of prototype instruments were developed; those evaluated in this study include external (134-583 g, 38-61 mm diameter) and internal (8-39 g, 10-22 mm diameter) components using various grades, diameters, thicknesses, and stacking/shielding/focusing configurations of permanent Neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnets. Nine configurations were tested for coupling strength across distances of 0.1-10 cm. The force-distance tests across an air medium were conducted at 0.5-mm increments using a robotic arm fitted with a force sensor. A minimum theoretical instrument drop-off (decoupling) threshold was defined as the separation distance at which force decreased below the weight of the heaviest internal component (39 g). Magnetic attraction forces decreased exponentially over distance. For the nine configurations tested, the average forces were 3,334 ± 1,239 gf at 0.1 cm, 158 ± 98 gf at 2.5 cm, and 8.7 ± 12 gf at 5 cm; the drop-off threshold was 3.64 ± 0.8 cm. The larger stacking configurations and magnets yielded up to a 592% increase in attraction force at 2.5 cm and extended the drop-off threshold distance by up to 107% over single-stack anchors. For the strongest configuration, coupling force ranged from 5,337 gf at 0.1 cm to 0 gf at 6.95 cm and yielded a drop-off threshold distance of 4.78 cm. This study suggests that the strongest configuration of currently available MAGS instruments is suitable for

  16. Outcomes of the modified Brostrom procedure using suture anchors for chronic lateral ankle instability--a prospective, randomized comparison between single and double suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byung-Ki; Kim, Yong-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Choi, Eui-Sung; Shon, Hyun-Chul; Park, Kyoung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The present prospective, randomized study was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of the modified Brostrom procedure using single and double suture anchors for chronic lateral ankle instability. A total of 50 patients were followed up for more than 2 years after undergoing the modified Brostrom procedure. Of the 50 procedures, 25 each were performed using single and double suture anchors by 1 surgeon. The Karlsson scale had improved significantly to 89.8 points and 90.6 points in the single and double anchor groups, respectively. Using the Sefton grading system, 23 cases (92%) in the single anchor group and 22 (88%) in the double anchor group achieved satisfactory results. The talar tilt angle and anterior talar translation on stress radiographs using the Telos device had improved significantly to an average of 5.7° and 4.6 mm in the single anchor group and 4.5° and 4.3 mm in the double anchor group, respectively. The double anchor technique was superior with respect to the postoperative talar tilt. The single and double suture anchor techniques produced similar clinical and functional outcomes, with the exception of talar tilt as a reference of mechanical stability. The modified Brostrom procedure using both single and double suture anchors appears to be an effective treatment method for chronic lateral ankle instability. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. On Moderator Detection in Anchoring Research: Implications of Ignoring Estimate Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan N. Cheek

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Anchoring, whereby judgments assimilate to previously considered standards, is one of the most reliable effects in psychology. In the last decade, researchers have become increasingly interested in identifying moderators of anchoring effects. We argue that a drawback of traditional moderator analyses in the standard anchoring paradigm is that they ignore estimate direction—whether participants’ estimates are higher or lower than the anchor value. We suggest that failing to consider estimate direction can sometimes obscure moderation in anchoring tasks, and discuss three potential analytic solutions that take estimate direction into account. Understanding moderators of anchoring effects is essential for a basic understanding of anchoring and for applied research on reducing the influence of anchoring in real-world judgments. Considering estimate direction reduces the risk of failing to detect moderation.

  18. Career Anchors of United States Air Force Information Systems Workers: A Turnover Predictor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynne, Lee

    2002-01-01

    ...) and the work of Schein (1987) to measure the career anchors, job satisfaction, and turnover intention of AF IS workers to determine if those whose job type and career anchor match report higher satisfaction and lower turnover...

  19. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl; Wiberg, Joanna; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Må rtensson, Jerker; Brown, Tom; Nordén, Bengt; Albinsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    , such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore

  20. A Single-hole stone anchor from Kottapatnam: Early historic port site of Andhra Pradesh, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Rao, K.P.; Kumari, S.; Imsong, O.; Vanlalhruaitluangi, V.

    of Kottapatnam and this is the first stone anchor reported from Andhra coast. In this paper the single hole stone anchor has been detailed along with its probable period and the trade contacts of Kottapatnam as a port...

  1. Retractable Robotic Anchor for Hard Rock and Granular Soils, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC, is developing an innovative retractable robotic anchor that works in hard rock and granular soils permitting anchoring and subsequent...

  2. Steel shear strength of anchors with stand-off base plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Sign and signal structures are often connected to concrete foundations through a stand-off annular base plate with a double-nut anchor bolt connection, which leaves exposed anchor bolt lengths below leveling nuts used in these connections. Cantilever...

  3. Stress analysis of liners for prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels with regard to non-linear behaviour of liner material and of anchor-characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberpichler, R.; Schnellenbach, G.

    1975-01-01

    The thin liner attached by anchors like a membrane to the interior wall of a prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessel (PCRV) has to provide the leak-tightness of the vessel. Furthermore the liner may serve as internal shuttering for placing of concrete as well as a support for the cooling system. The two-dimensional behaviour of the liner is investigated with regard to non-linear anchor-characteristics and non-linear material behaviour of the liner. The analysis is based on a plane stress model under the assumption of a membrane state of the liner. Calculations are performed by the dynamic relaxation method. With the aid of available non-linear stress-strain diagrams, describing the post-buckling behaviour, individual panels are considered as buckled ones. The adjacent unbuckled panels are calculated on other non-linear diagrams. Strains and stresses in the liner and additional shear loads in the anchors can be calculated with arbitrary sizing and spacing of the anchors. With respect to the parameters they are easily controlled. Since actual loads on the liner are defined by the PCRV-behaviour, an economical and safe design is possible. Finally an extreme case is calculated to assess the maximum value of the shear-forces assuming zero post-buckling capacity for the buckled panel. (Auth.)

  4. Characterizing the flow of stirred vessels with anchor type impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.C. Peixoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in chemical industries, there are few works which studies anchor type impellers and only a fraction of the works investigate these systems under a computational approach. The great majority refers to turbine impellers, specially Rushton turbines, under turbulent flow. Anchor impellers are used specially for highly viscous flow, typical of polymer reactions. The viscosity is normally in the range 1000-10000 cp. Since this range of viscosity describe highly viscous flows, the reactions for anchor agitated systems are normally carried out under laminar flow. This work presents a detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach to study the behaviour of stirred vessels using anchor impellers. The axial plane of the tank, which is being modelled, is divided into small control volumes, which collectively is referred to as the mesh, or grid. In each of these cells the momentum balance, energy and mass conservation, which describes the model, are rewritten algebraically using the finite volumes method to relate such variables as velocity, pressure and temperature to values in neighbouring cells. The equations are then solved numerically, and the results yield the flow corresponding to the model. Since the geometry of a vessel with anchor impellers strictly calls for a three dimensional method, an approximation is made to account for the effect of the blades (Kuncewics, 1992. The main objective of this work is to give a detailed description of the flow generated by this axial impeller with a view to indicate ways in which the design and operation of these systems can be improved.

  5. Arthroscopic repair of lateral ankle ligament complex by suture anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingwei; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shiyi; Li, Hongyun; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yunxia

    2014-06-01

    Arthroscopic repair of the lateral ligament complex with suture anchors is increasingly used to treat chronic ankle instability (CAI). Our aims are (1) to analyze and evaluate the literature on arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the anterior talofibular ligament and (2) to conduct a systematic review of the clinical evidence on the reported outcomes and complications of treating CAI with this technique. We performed a systematic review of the literature using PubMed, Ovid, Elsevier ScienceDirect, Web of Science-Conference Proceedings Citation Index, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from 1987 to September 2013. Clinical studies using the arthroscopic suture anchor technique to treat CAI were included. Outcome measures consisted of clinical assessment of postoperative ligament stability and complications. In addition, the methodologic quality of the included studies was assessed by use of the modified Coleman Methodology Score. After reviewing 371 studies, we identified 6 studies (5 retrospective case series and 1 prospective case series, all Level IV) that met the inclusion criteria, with a mean Coleman Methodology Score of 71.8 ± 7.52 (range, 63 to 82). In these studies 178 patients (179 ankles) underwent arthroscopic suture anchor repair of the anterior talofibular ligament with a mean follow-up period of 38.9 months (range, 6 to 117.6 months). All patients were reported to have subjective improvement of their ankle instability, with complications in 31 cases. Studies of arthroscopic suture anchor technique to treat CAI are sparse, with moderate mean methodologic quality. The included studies suggest that the arthroscopic technique is a feasible procedure to restore ankle stability; however, on the basis of our review, this technique seems to be associated with a relatively high complication rate. Extensive cadaveric studies, clinical trials, and comparative studies comparing arthroscopic and open repair should be performed in the future. Level

  6. Genome-wide analysis of cell wall-related genes in Tuber melanosporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Sillo, Fabiano; Kohler, Annegret; Schneider, Georg; Faccio, Antonella; Tisserant, Emilie; Martin, Francis; Bonfante, Paola

    2012-06-01

    A genome-wide inventory of proteins involved in cell wall synthesis and remodeling has been obtained by taking advantage of the recently released genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal Tuber melanosporum black truffle. Genes that encode cell wall biosynthetic enzymes, enzymes involved in cell wall polysaccharide synthesis or modification, GPI-anchored proteins and other cell wall proteins were identified in the black truffle genome. As a second step, array data were validated and the symbiotic stage was chosen as the main focus. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments were performed on 29 selected genes to verify their expression during ectomycorrhizal formation. The results confirmed the array data, and this suggests that cell wall-related genes are required for morphogenetic transition from mycelium growth to the ectomycorrhizal branched hyphae. Labeling experiments were also performed on T. melanosporum mycelium and ectomycorrhizae to localize cell wall components.

  7. Do budget balance rules anchor budget balance expectations? -- Some international evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Rülke, Jan-Christoph; Frenkel, Michael; Lis, Eliza

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study that analyzes whether budget balance expectations are anchored and whether budget balance rules effectively anchor expectations. To this end, we use a unique data set which covers budget balance expectations in 17 countries that implemented a budget balance rules. While our results are mixed concerning the general impact of budget balance rules on anchoring expectations, we do find that specific features of budget balance rules are important to successfully anchor budg...

  8. HKUST-1 Membranes Anchored on Porous Substrate by Hetero MIL-110 Nanorod Array Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yiyin; Cao, Wei; Li, Junwei; Sun, Luwei; Peng, Xinsheng

    2013-09-02

    Great anchors and seeds: Hetero-seeding growth processes and anchored nanorod arrays were successfully utilized in the synthesis of HKUST-1 membranes. These arrays were firmly anchored on porous substrates by using a MIL-110 nanorod array as both the anchor and seed. The resulting HKUST-1 membranes demonstrated good separation factors for binary gases exceeding the Knudson selectivity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A group of 20 stone anchors from the waters of Dwarka, on the Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Gudigar, P.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    A large number of stone anchors were discovered in a water depth of 10-14 m off Dwarka during the 1998-99 season. The seabed near the anchors consists of a ledge with an average height of 1 m. Several anchors were found trapped between the rocks...

  10. Conceptualization and Exploration of Composite Career Anchors: An Analysis of Information Systems Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Hindupur V.; Potosky, Denise

    2003-01-01

    Information systems professionals (n=163) completed measures of career anchors and outcomes (career/job satisfaction, job performance, perceived advancement prospects); 46% had multiple dominant anchors and these individuals did not have significantly different career outcomes than those with single dominant anchors. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  11. Wound-induced proteinase inhibitor in Salix viminalis and its association with defence against insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarikoski, P. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics

    1997-09-01

    For successful traditional breeding, the plant material has to be screened for genetic variation for the desired traits. By screening Salix clones for wound-induced proteinase inhibitor (PI) activity and ethylene evolution, it was possible to identify variation for both characters among the Salix clones tested. However, no correlation was observed with insect and pathogen resistance. Since there was no simple relationship between wound-induced ethylene production, accumulation of PI and pest resistance, a more systematic investigation of Salix PIs was begun. A gene (swin1.1) encoding a 21 kDa trypsin inhibitor with characteristics of Kunitz-type of PI was sequenced. The trypsin inhibitor encoded by the isolated swin1.1 gene was shown to be functional in vitro and exhibit specificity for trypsin. It is therefore likely that this PI is involved in the plant defence in Salix, since many insects have trypsin as their major digestive protease. In further support of this view, in bio-tests with poplar the mortality of the first instar larvae (Lymantria dispar) was significantly increased, both after application of the trypsin inhibitor encoded by swin1.1 directly on poplar leaves and after feeding the larvae with transgenic poplar over-expressing the swin1.1 gene. In Salix, the swin1.1 gene was shown to be induced by mechanical wounding, insect feeding and by treatment with the signalling substances salicylic and jasmonic acid. The locally wound-induced response (mechanical and insect) was greater than the systemic response. Other swin1 gene family members were also differentially expressed after the inductive treatment. 187 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Production, purification, and characterization of human alpha1 proteinase inhibitor from Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Liat; Trinh, Loc; Azadi, Parastoo; Ishihara, Mayumi; Sonon, Roberto; Karnaukhova, Elena; Ophir, Yakir; Golding, Basil; Shiloach, Joseph

    2009-02-15

    Human alpha one proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) was cloned and expressed in Aspergillus niger, filamentious fungus that can grow in defined media and can perform glycosylation. Submerged culture conditions were established using starch as carbon source, 30% dissolved oxygen concentration, pH 7.0 and 28 degrees C. Eight milligrams per liter of active alpha1-PI were secreted to the growth media in about 40 h. Controlling the protein proteolysis was found to be an important factor in the production. The effects of various carbon sources, pH and temperature on the production and stability of the protein were tested and the product was purified and characterized. Two molecular weights variants of the recombinant alpha1-PI were produced by the fungus; the difference is attributed to the glycosylated part of the molecule. The two glycoproteins were treated with PNGAse F and the released glycans were analyzed by HPAEC, MALDI/TOF-MS, NSI-MS(n), and GC-MS. The MALDI and NSI- full MS spectra of permethylated N-glycans revealed that the N-glycans of both variants contain a series of high-mannose type glycans with 5-20 hexose units. Monosaccharide analysis showed that these were composed of N-acetylglucos-amine, mannose, and galactose. Linkage analysis revealed that the galactosyl component was in the furanoic conformation, which was attaching in a terminal non-reducing position. The Galactofuranose-containing high-mannnose type N-glycans are typical structures, which recently have been found as part of several glycoproteins produced by Aspergillus niger.

  13. Expression of proteinase inhibitor II proteins during floral development in Solanum americanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Suk-Fong; Chye, Mee-Len

    2004-10-01

    The heterologous expression of serine proteinase inhibitor II (PIN2) proteins confers insect resistance in transgenic plants, but little is known of their endogenous roles. We have cloned two cDNAs encoding Solanum americanum PIN2 proteins, SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b. SaPIN2a is highly expressed in stem, particularly in the phloem, suggesting it could possibly regulate proteolysis in the sieve elements. When SaPIN2a was expressed in transgenic lettuce, we observed an inhibition of endogenous trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities. Here, we demonstrate that both SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b are expressed in floral tissues that are destined to undergo developmental programmed cell death (PCD), suggesting possible endogenous roles in inhibiting trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities during flower development. Northern and western blot analyses revealed that SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b mRNAs and proteins show highest expression early in floral development. In situ hybridization analysis and immunolocalization on floral sections, localized SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b mRNAs and their proteins to tissues that would apparently undergo PCD: the ovules, the stylar transmitting tissue, the stigma and the vascular bundles. Detection of PCD in floral sections was achieved using terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis. Examination of the mid-style before, and 1 day after, pollination revealed that high expression of SaPIN2a and SaPIN2b in the style was inversely correlated with PCD.

  14. Proteinase 3 on apoptotic cells disrupts immune silencing in autoimmune vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Arnaud; Martin, Katherine R.; Bonnefoy, Francis; Saas, Philippe; Mocek, Julie; Alkan, Manal; Terrier, Benjamin; Kerstein, Anja; Tamassia, Nicola; Satyanarayanan, Senthil Kumaran; Ariel, Amiram; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Guillevin, Loïc; Cassatella, Marco A.; Mueller, Antje; Thieblemont, Nathalie; Lamprecht, Peter; Mouthon, Luc; Perruche, Sylvain; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis that is associated with granulomatous inflammation and the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). We previously determined that PR3 on the surface of apoptotic neutrophils interferes with induction of antiinflammatory mechanisms following phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that enzymatically active membrane-associated PR3 on apoptotic cells triggered secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including granulocyte CSF (G-CSF) and chemokines. This response required the IL-1R1/MyD88 signaling pathway and was dependent on the synthesis of NO, as macrophages from animals lacking these pathways did not exhibit a PR3-associated proinflammatory response. The PR3-induced microenvironment facilitated recruitment of inflammatory cells, such as macrophages, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), and neutrophils, which were observed in close proximity within granulomatous lesions in the lungs of GPA patients. In different murine models of apoptotic cell injection, the PR3-induced microenvironment instructed pDC-driven Th9/Th2 cell generation. Concomitant injection of anti-PR3 ANCAs with PR3-expressing apoptotic cells induced a Th17 response, revealing a GPA-specific mechanism of immune polarization. Accordingly, circulating CD4+ T cells from GPA patients had a skewed distribution of Th9/Th2/Th17. These results reveal that PR3 disrupts immune silencing associated with clearance of apoptotic neutrophils and provide insight into how PR3 and PR3-targeting ANCAs promote GPA pathophysiology. PMID:26436651

  15. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 modulates OA-related pain, cartilage and bone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesa, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana C; Dunning, Lynette; McGavin, Laura; Bennett, Louise; McIntosh, Kathryn; Crilly, Anne; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Plevin, Robin; van 't Hof, Rob J; Rowan, Andrew D; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S; Lockhart, John C; Ferrell, William R

    2016-11-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) deficiency protects against cartilage degradation in experimental osteoarthritis (OA). The wider impact of this pathway upon OA-associated pathologies such as osteophyte formation and pain is unknown. Herein, we investigated early temporal bone and cartilage changes in experimental OA in order to further elucidate the role of PAR2 in OA pathogenesis. OA was induced in wild-type (WT) and PAR2-deficient (PAR2 -/- ) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). Inflammation, cartilage degradation and bone changes were monitored using histology and microCT. In gene rescue experiments, PAR2 -/- mice were intra-articularly injected with human PAR2 (hPAR2)-expressing adenovirus. Dynamic weight bearing was used as a surrogate of OA-related pain. Osteophytes formed within 7 days post-DMM in WT mice but osteosclerosis was only evident from 14 days post induction. Importantly, PAR2 was expressed in the proliferative/hypertrophic chondrocytes present within osteophytes. In PAR2 -/- mice, osteophytes developed significantly less frequently but, when present, were smaller and of greater density; no osteosclerosis was observed in these mice up to day 28. The pattern of weight bearing was altered in PAR2 -/- mice, suggesting reduced pain perception. The expression of hPAR2 in PAR2 -/- mice recapitulated osteophyte formation and cartilage damage similar to that observed in WT mice. However, osteosclerosis was absent, consistent with lack of hPAR2 expression in subchondral bone. This study clearly demonstrates PAR2 plays a critical role, via chondrocytes, in osteophyte development and subchondral bone changes, which occur prior to PAR2-mediated cartilage damage. The latter likely occurs independently of OA-related bone changes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor 2 modulates OA-related pain, cartilage and bone pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesa, Carmen; Ortiz, Ana C; Dunning, Lynette; McGavin, Laura; Bennett, Louise; McIntosh, Kathryn; Crilly, Anne; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Plevin, Robin; van ‘t Hof, Rob J; Rowan, Andrew D; McInnes, Iain B; Goodyear, Carl S; Lockhart, John C; Ferrell, William R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) deficiency protects against cartilage degradation in experimental osteoarthritis (OA). The wider impact of this pathway upon OA-associated pathologies such as osteophyte formation and pain is unknown. Herein, we investigated early temporal bone and cartilage changes in experimental OA in order to further elucidate the role of PAR2 in OA pathogenesis. Methods OA was induced in wild-type (WT) and PAR2-deficient (PAR2−/−) mice by destabilisation of the medial meniscus (DMM). Inflammation, cartilage degradation and bone changes were monitored using histology and microCT. In gene rescue experiments, PAR2−/− mice were intra-articularly injected with human PAR2 (hPAR2)-expressing adenovirus. Dynamic weight bearing was used as a surrogate of OA-related pain. Results Osteophytes formed within 7 days post-DMM in WT mice but osteosclerosis was only evident from 14 days post induction. Importantly, PAR2 was expressed in the proliferative/hypertrophic chondrocytes present within osteophytes. In PAR2−/− mice, osteophytes developed significantly less frequently but, when present, were smaller and of greater density; no osteosclerosis was observed in these mice up to day 28. The pattern of weight bearing was altered in PAR2−/− mice, suggesting reduced pain perception. The expression of hPAR2 in PAR2−/− mice recapitulated osteophyte formation and cartilage damage similar to that observed in WT mice. However, osteosclerosis was absent, consistent with lack of hPAR2 expression in subchondral bone. Conclusions This study clearly demonstrates PAR2 plays a critical role, via chondrocytes, in osteophyte development and subchondral bone changes, which occur prior to PAR2-mediated cartilage damage. The latter likely occurs independently of OA-related bone changes. PMID:26698846

  17. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  18. Crystal structure of the alkaline proteinase Savinase from Bacillus lentus at 1.4 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzel, C; Klupsch, S; Papendorf, G; Hastrup, S; Branner, S; Wilson, K S

    1992-01-20

    Savinase (EC3.4.21.14) is secreted by the alkalophilic bacterium Bacillus lentus and is a representative of that subgroup of subtilisin enzymes with maximum stability in the pH range 7 to 10 and high activity in the range 8 to 12. It is therefore of major industrial importance for use in detergents. The crystal structure of the native form of Savinase has been refined using X-ray diffraction data to 1.4 A resolution. The starting model was that of subtilisin Carlsberg. A comparison to the structures of the closely related subtilisins Carlsberg and BPN' and to the more distant thermitase and proteinase K is presented. The structure of Savinase is very similar to those of homologous Bacillus subtilisins. There are two calcium ions in the structure, equivalent to the strong and the weak calcium-binding sites in subtilisin Carlsberg and subtilisin BPN', well known for their stabilizing effect on the subtilisins. The structure of Savinase shows novel features that can be related to its stability and activity. The relatively high number of salt bridges in Savinase is likely to contribute to its high thermal stability. The non-conservative substitutions and deletions in the hydrophobic binding pocket S1 result in the most significant structural differences from the other subtilisins. The different composition of the S1 binding loop as well as the more hydrophobic character of the substrate-binding region probably contribute to the alkaline activity profile of the enzyme. The model of Savinase contains 1880 protein atoms, 159 water molecules and two calcium ions. The crystallographic R-factor [formula; see text].

  19. AβPP/APLP2 Family of Kunitz Serine Proteinase Inhibitors Regulate Cerebral Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Previti, Mary Lou; Nieman, Marvin T.; Davis, Judianne; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Van Nostrand, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid β-protein precursor (AβPP) is best recognized as the precursor to the Aβ peptide that accumulates in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease, but less is known about its physiological functions. Isoforms of AβPP that contain a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor (KPI) domain are expressed in brain and, outside the CNS, in circulating blood platelets. Recently, we showed that KPI-containing forms of AβPP regulates cerebral thrombosis in vivo (Xu et al., 2005 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:18135–18140; Xu et al. 2007 Stroke 38:2598–2601). Amyloid precursor like protein-2 (APLP2), a closely related homolog to AβPP, also possesses a highly conserved KPI domain. Virtually nothing is known of its function. Here we show that APLP2 also regulates cerebral thrombosis risk. Recombinant purified KPI domains of AβPP and APLP2 both inhibit the plasma clotting in vitro. In a carotid artery thrombosis model both AβPP−/− and APLP2−/− mice exhibit similar significantly shorter times to vessel occlusion compared with wild-type mice indicating a pro-thrombotic phenotype. Similarly, in an experimental model of intracerebral hemorrhage both AβPP−/− and APLP2−/− mice produce significantly smaller hematomas with reduced brain hemoglobin content compared with wild-type mice. Together, these results indicate that AβPP and APLP2 share overlapping anticoagulant functions with regard to regulating thrombosis after cerebral vascular injury. PMID:19403832

  20. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  1. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  2. Constrained Active Learning for Anchor Link Prediction Across Multiple Heterogeneous Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxing; Zhang, Jiawei; Wu, Quanyuan; Jia, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Wei, Xiaokai; Yu, Philip S

    2017-08-03

    Nowadays, people are usually involved in multiple heterogeneous social networks simultaneously. Discovering the anchor links between the accounts owned by the same users across different social networks is crucial for many important inter-network applications, e.g., cross-network link transfer and cross-network recommendation. Many different supervised models have been proposed to predict anchor links so far, but they are effective only when the labeled anchor links are abundant. However, in real scenarios, such a requirement can hardly be met and most anchor links are unlabeled, since manually labeling the inter-network anchor links is quite costly and tedious. To overcome such a problem and utilize the numerous unlabeled anchor links in model building, in this paper, we introduce the active learning based anchor link prediction problem. Different from the traditional active learning problems, due to the one-to-one constraint on anchor links, if an unlabeled anchor link a = ( u , v ) is identified as positive (i.e., existing), all the other unlabeled anchor links incident to account u or account v will be negative (i.e., non-existing) automatically. Viewed in such a perspective, asking for the labels of potential positive anchor links in the unlabeled set will be rewarding in the active anchor link prediction problem. Various novel anchor link information gain measures are defined in this paper, based on which several constraint active anchor link prediction methods are introduced. Extensive experiments have been done on real-world social network datasets to compare the performance of these methods with state-of-art anchor link prediction methods. The experimental results show that the proposed Mean-entropy-based Constrained Active Learning (MC) method can outperform other methods with significant advantages.

  3. Cyclic biomechanical testing of biocomposite lateral row knotless anchors in a human cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Bava, Eric D; Spenciner, David B; Piccirillo, Justin

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the mechanical performance of biocomposite knotless lateral row anchors based on both anchor design and the direction of pull. Two lateral row greater tuberosity insertion sites (anterior and posterior) were identified in matched pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaveric shoulders DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) scanned to verify comparability. The humeri were stripped of all soft tissue and 3 different biocomposite knotless lateral row anchors: HEALIX Knotless BR (DePuy Mitek, Raynham MA), BioComposite PushLock (Arthrex, Naples, FL), and Bio-SwiveLock (Arthrex). Fifty-two anchors were distributed among the insertion locations and tested them with either an anatomic or axial pull. A fixed-gauge loop (15 mm) of 2 high-strength sutures from each anchor was created. After a 10-Nm preload, anchors were cycled from 10 to 45 Nm at 0.5 Hz for 200 cycles and tested to failure at 4.23 mm/second. The load to reach 3 mm and 5 mm displacement, ultimate failure load, displacement at ultimate failure, and failure mode were recorded. Threaded anchors (Bio-SwiveLock, P = .03; HEALIX Knotless, P = .014) showed less displacement with anatomic testing than did the nonthreaded anchor (BioComposite PushLock), and the HEALIX Knotless showed less overall displacement than did the other 2 anchors. The Bio-SwiveLock exhibited greater failure loads than did the other 2 anchors (P < .05). Comparison of axial and anatomic loading showed no maximum load differences for all anchors as a whole (P = .1084). Yet, anatomic pulling produced higher failure loads than did axial pulling for the Bio-SwiveLock but not for the BioComposite PushLock or the HEALIX Knotless. The nonthreaded anchor (BioComposite PushLock) displayed lower failure loads than did both threaded anchors with axial pulling. Threaded biocomposite anchors (HEALIX Knotless BR and Bio-SwiveLock) show less anatomic loading displacement and higher axial failure loads than do the nonthreaded

  4. Novel Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors from the skin secretion of the Splendid leaf frog, Cruziohyla calcarifer

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Proaño-Bolaños; Renjie Li; Mei Zhou; Lei Wang; Xinping Xi; Elicio E. Tapia; Luis A. Coloma; Tianbao Chen; Chris Shaw

    2017-01-01

    Peptidase inhibitors have an important role controlling a variety of biological processes. Here, we employed a peptidomic approach including molecular cloning, tandem mass spectrometry and enzymatic assays to reveal 7 Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (CCKPs) (18 variants) in the skin secretion of the unexplored frog, Cruziohyla calcarifer. All 18 proteins shared the Kazal pattern C-X(7)-C-X(6,7)-C-X(6,7)-Y-X(3)-C-X(2)-C-X(15-21)-C and 3 disulphide bridges. Based on structural comparative anal...

  5. In silico design, synthesis, and assays of specific substrates for proteinase 3: influence of fluorogenic and charged groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narawane, Shailesh; Budnjo, Adnan; Grauffel, Cédric; Haug, Bengt Erik; Reuter, Nathalie

    2014-02-13

    Neutrophil serine proteases are specific regulators of the immune response, and proteinase 3 is a major target antigen in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. FRET peptides containing 2-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) and N-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)ethylenediamine (EDDnp) as fluorophore and quencher groups, respectively, have been widely used to probe proteases specificity. Using in silico design followed by enzymatic assays, we show that Abz and EDDnp significantly contribute to substrate hydrolysis by PR3. We also propose a new substrate specific for PR3.

  6. Quantitative evaluation of Candia antarctica lipase B displayed on the cell surface of a Pichia pastoris based on an FS anchor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xing-xiang; Wang, Bei-bei; Sun, Yu-fei; Lin, Ying; Han, Shuang-yan; Zheng, Sui-ping; Cui, Tang-bing

    2013-03-01

    A new approach is described to quantify the number of enzyme molecules, such as Candia antarctica lipase B, that are displayed on the cell surface of Pichia pastoris. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) were fused and displayed on the surface of P. pastoris by linking to the anchor flocculation functional domain of FLO1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, flow cytometry, and fluorescence spectrophotometry were used to monitor the fluorescence intensity of fused EGFP. Combined with the corresponding protein concentration detected in the medium, a standard curve describing the relationship between the fusion protein concentration and fluorescence intensity were obtained and could be used to number CALB displayed on the cell surface. The results showed that approx. 10(4) molecules of CALB molecules were immobilized on the single P. pastoris cell wall based on FS anchor system.

  7. Organization, 'Anchoring' of Knowledge, and Innovative Activity in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Vinding, Anker Lund

    2006-01-01

    The construction industry is characterised by the widespread use of project organisation. It has been suggested that the relatively low level of innovative activity in the industry can be explained by the temporary nature of firm boundary-crossing projects. Survey data from the Danish construction...... industry is used to investigate the importance of learning and 'anchoring' of project-specific knowledge at the firm level for participation in innovative activities. The data cover both the overall Danish construction industry and a specific region, North Jutland, which has a relatively high...... specialisation of construction workers. Latent class and regression analyses reveal that firms that make extensive use of partnering, together with internal product and process evaluation and knowledge diffusion (labelled 'knowledge-anchoring mechanisms'), are more likely to participate in innovative activities...

  8. Proteomic analysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elortza, Felix; Nühse, Thomas S; Foster, Leonard J

    2003-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are a functionally and structurally diverse family of post-translationally modified membrane proteins found mostly in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane in a variety of eukaryotic cells. Although the general role of GPI-APs remains...... unclear, they have attracted attention because they act as enzymes and receptors in cell adhesion, differentiation, and host-pathogen interactions. GPI-APs may represent potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets in humans and are interesting in plant biotechnology because of their key role in root...... and 44 GPI-APs in an Arabidopsis thaliana membrane preparation, representing the largest experimental dataset of GPI-anchored proteins to date....

  9. Optimization Analysis Model of Self-Anchored Suspension Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hangers of self-anchored suspension bridge need to be tensioned suitably during construction. In view of this point, a simplified optimization calculation method of cable force for self-anchored suspension bridge has been developed based on optimization theories, such as minimum bending energy method, and internal force balanced method, influence matrix method. Meanwhile, combined with the weak coherence of main cable and the adjacently interaction of hanger forces, a simplified analysis method is developed using MATLAB, which is then compared with the optimization method that consider the main cable's geometric nonlinearity with software ANSYS in an actual example bridge calculation. This contrast proves the weak coherence of main cable displacement and the limitation of the adjacent cable force influence. Furthermore, a tension program that is of great reference value has been developed; some important conclusions, advices, and attention points have been summarized.

  10. Lower limit of strength wedge-type anchor bolts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnedo Pena, A.; Frances Urmeneta, M.

    1998-01-01

    Simple expansion bolts, with a split expansion ring and a threaded bolt with an integral cone expander, called wedge type, are very used in securing and anchoring structures. The anchorage is obtained by a mechanism of torque-controlled expansion. Although less resistant than other types, its easy installation and low cost make them very competitive in light structures. In this paper, the minimum capacity values are analysed, when they are used to anchor safety-related equipment in NPP. The EPRI criteria developed in response to USI A-46 are applied and complemented by the new CEB Anchorage Design Guide. The results are compared with the information from european manufactures, adopting different safety factors for cracked and non-cracked concrete. With adequate control and inspection measures, including areas of noticeable cracking of concrete. minimum values for equipment can be obtained satisfying the strictest seismic validation requirements. (Author) 5 refs

  11. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... is the most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  12. Molecular imprinting at walls of silica nanotubes for TNT recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chenggen; Liu, Bianhua; Wang, Zhenyang; Gao, Daming; Guan, Guijian; Zhang, Zhongping

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports the molecular imprinting at the walls of highly uniform silica nanotubes for the recognition of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). It has been demonstrated that TNT templates were efficiently imprinted into the matrix of silica through the strong acid-base pairing interaction between TNT and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS). TNT-imprinted silica nanotubes were synthesized by the gelation reaction between APTS and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), selectively occurring at the porous walls of APTS-modified alumina membranes. The removal of the original TNT templates leaves the imprinted cavities with covalently anchored amine groups at the cavity walls. A high density of recognition sites with molecular selectivity to the TNT analyte was created at the wall of silica nanotubes. Furthermore, most of these recognition sites are situated at the inside and outside surfaces of tubular walls and in the proximity of the two surfaces due to the ultrathin wall thickness of only 15 nm, providing a better site accessibility and lower mass-transfer resistance. Therefore, greater capacity and faster kinetics of uptaking target species were achieved. The silica nanotube reported herein is an ideal form of material for imprinting various organic or biological molecules toward applications in chemical/biological sensors and bioassay.

  13. Crystal structures of two thiacalix[4]arene derivatives anchoring four ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The crystal structures of two thiacalixarene derivatives anchoring thiadiazole functional groups at lower rim, C60H72O4S12N8 (1), C64H80O4S12N8 (2), have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The thiacalix[4]arene framework in both 1 and 2 adopts the 1,3-alternate conformation. Com- pound 1 ...

  14. Anchored LH2 complexes in 2D polarization imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubasum, Sumera; Sakai, Shunsuke; Dewa, Takehisa; Sundström, Villy; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Nango, Mamoru; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2013-09-26

    Protein is a soft material with inherently large structural disorder. Consequently, the bulk spectroscopies of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes provide averaged information where many details are lost. Here we report spectroscopy of single light-harvesting complexes where fluorescence excitation and detection polarizations are both independently rotated. Two samples of peripheral antenna (LH2) complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila were studied. In one, the complexes were embedded in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film; in the other, they were anchored on the glass surface and covered by the PVA film. LH2 contains two rings of pigment molecules-B800 and B850. The B800 excitation polarization properties of the two samples were found to be very similar, indicating that orientation statistics of LH2s are the same in these two very different preparations. At the same time, we found a significant difference in B850 emission polarization statistics. We conclude that the B850 band of the anchored sample is substantially more disordered. We argue that both B800 excitation and B850 emission polarization properties can be explained by the tilt of the anchored LH2s due to the spin-casting of the PVA film on top of the complexes and related shear forces. Due to the tilt, the orientation statistics of two samples become similar. Anchoring is expected to orient the LH2s so that B850 is closer to the substrate. Consequently, the tilt-related strain leads to larger deformation and disorder in B850 than in B800.

  15. [Treatment of calcaneal avulsion fractures with twinfix suture anchors fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin-xiu; Wang, Kun-zheng; Wang, Chun-sheng; Xie, Yue; Dai, Zhi-tang; Liu, Gang; Liu, Wei-dong

    2011-06-01

    For the calcaneal avulsion fracture, the current method is more commonly used screws or Kirschner wire to fix fracture fragment. This article intended to explore the feasibility and clinical efficacy for the treatment of avulsion fractures with TwinFix suture anchors. From July 2007 to November 2010, 21 patients were reviewed, including 15 males and 6 females, ranging in age from 49 to 65 years,with a mean of 58.7 years. Twelve patients had nodules in the right heel and 9 patients had nodules in the left heel. All the patients had closed fractures. The typical preoperative symptoms of the patients included pain in the upper heel and weak in heel lift. Body examination results: palpable sense of bone rubbing in the back of the heel, and swelling in the heel. Surgery treatment with TwinFix suture anchors performed as follows : to fix TwinFix suture anchors into the calcaneal body, then to drill the fracture block, to make the double strand suture through the fracture holes, to knot the suture eachother to fix the block, and to use stitch to fix the remaining suture in the Achilles tendon in order to improve the block fixation. The criteria of the AOFAS Foot and Ankle Surgery by the United States Association of ankle-rear foot functional recovery was used to evaluate the Achilles tendon. Total average score was (95.5 +/- 3.12) points, including pain items of(38.5 +/- 2.18) points,the average score of functional items of (49.5 +/- 3.09) points,and power lines of 10 points in all patients. Twenty-one patients got an excellent result, 16 good and 5 poor. The methods of treatment for the calcaneal avulsion fractures with TwinFix suture anchors is a simple operation, and have excellent clinical effect, which is worthy of promotion.

  16. The anchoring bias reflects rational use of cognitive resources

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Noah; Huys, Quentin; Griffiths, Tom; Lieder, Falk

    2017-01-01

    © 2017, Psychonomic Society, Inc. Cognitive biases, such as the anchoring bias, pose a serious challenge to rational accounts of human cognition. We investigate whether rational theories can meet this challenge by taking into account the mind’s bounded cognitive resources. We asked what reasoning under uncertainty would look like if people made rational use of their finite time and limited cognitive resources. To answer this question, we applied a mathematical theory of bounded rationality to...

  17. Understanding low uptake of bone anchored hearing ads: A review.

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Rachael; Wearden, Alison; Pardesi, Sophie M; Green, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bone anchored hearing aids (Baha) improve hearing for patients for whom conventional behind-the-ear aids are problematic. However, uptake of Baha is low and it is important to understand why this is the case. Method: A narrative review was conducted. Studies examining why people accept or decline Baha and satisfaction in people with Baha were reviewed. Results: Reasons for declining Baha included limited perceived benefits, concerns about surgery, aesthetic concerns and treatment ...

  18. Improved anchoring of SSS with vacuum barrier to avoid displacement

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Foreste, A; Parma, V; Renaglia, T; Quesnel, J

    2009-01-01

    As presented in the previous speech, the incident in sector 3-4 of the LHC caused a high pressure build-up inside the cryostat insulation vacuum resulting in high longitudinal forces acting on the insulation vacuum barriers. This resulted in braking floor and floor fixations of the SSS with vacuum barrier. The strategy of improving anchoring of SSS with vacuum barrier to avoid displacement is presented and discussed.

  19. Editorial Commentary: All-Suture Anchors, Foam Blocks, and Biomechanical Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2017-06-01

    Barber's biomechanical work is well known to Arthroscopy's readers as thorough, comprehensive, and inclusive of new designs as they become available. In "All-Suture Anchors: Biomechanical Analysis of Pullout Strength, Displacement, and Failure Mode," the latest iteration, Barber and Herbert test all-suture anchors in both porcine femurs and biphasic foam. While we await in vivo clinical trials that compare all-suture anchors to currently used anchors, Barber and Herbert have provided data to inform anchor choice, and using their biomechanical data at time zero from all-suture anchor trials in an animal model, we can determine the anchors' feasibility for human clinical investigations. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Do anchor investors create value for initial public offerings? An empirical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seshadev Sahoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of anchor investors was introduced by the market regulator, Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI, to bring transparency in the book building mechanism. We examine anchor investors' investment in initial public offerings (IPOs to determine how they create value for issuing firms and participating investors. Using a database of 135 IPOs issued in the Indian market through book building mechanism during 2009–2014, we find that anchor investors' investment in IPOs reduces underpricing. Larger subscription from retail investors for anchor-supported IPOs indicates that anchor investors' participation is viewed as a credible attestation of quality of the issue. We document that anchor-supported IPOs are more liquid and less volatile in the short run. We also find that by controlling for other factors such as offer size, subscription rate and age of the firm, a part of the underpricing is reduced by anchor investors.

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. The Cell Wall of the Human Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus: Biosynthesis, Organization, Immune Response, and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latgé, Jean-Paul; Beauvais, Anne; Chamilos, Georgios

    2017-09-08

    More than 90% of the cell wall of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus comprises polysaccharides. Biosynthesis of the cell wall polysaccharides is under the control of three types of enzymes: transmembrane synthases, which are anchored to the plasma membrane and use nucleotide sugars as substrates, and cell wall-associated transglycosidases and glycosyl hydrolases, which are responsible for remodeling the de novo synthesized polysaccharides and establishing the three-dimensional structure of the cell wall. For years, the cell wall was considered an inert exoskeleton of the fungal cell. The cell wall is now recognized as a living organelle, since the composition and cellular localization of the different constitutive cell wall components (especially of the outer layers) vary when the fungus senses changes in the external environment. The cell wall plays a major role during infection. The recognition of the fungal cell wall by the host is essential in the initiation of the immune response. The interactions between the different pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and cell wall pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) orientate the host response toward either fungal death or growth, which would then lead to disease development. Understanding the molecular determinants of the interplay between the cell wall and host immunity is fundamental to combatting Aspergillus diseases.

  3. Brewer’s spent grain and corn steep liquor as alternative culture medium substrates for proteinase production by Streptomyces malaysiensis AMT-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Rodrigo Pires; Junior, Nelson Alves; Coelho, Rosalie Reed Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Brewer’s spent grain and corn steep liquor or yeast extract were used as the sole organic forms for proteinase production by Streptomyces malaysiensis in submerged fermentation. The influence of the C and N concentrations, as well as the incubation periods, were assessed. Eight proteolytic bands were detected through gelatin-gel-electrophoresis in the various extracts obtained from the different media and after different incubation periods, with apparent molecular masses of 20, 35, 43, 50, 70, 100, 116 and 212 kDa. The results obtained suggest an opportunity for exploring this alternative strategy for proteinases production by actinomycetes, using BSG and CSL as economically feasible substrates. PMID:24031767

  4. Ixodes scapularis tick serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin gene family; annotation and transcriptional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalaire Katelyn C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteinase inhibitors (Serpins are a large superfamily of structurally related, but functionally diverse proteins that control essential proteolytic pathways in most branches of life. Given their importance in the biology of many organisms, the concept that ticks might utilize serpins to evade host defenses and immunizing against or disrupting their functions as targets for tick control is an appealing option. Results A sequence homology search strategy has allowed us to identify at least 45 tick serpin genes in the Ixodes scapularis genome that are structurally segregated into 32 intronless and 13 intron-containing genes. Nine of the intron-containing serpins occur in a cluster of 11 genes that span 170 kb of DNA sequence. Based on consensus amino acid residues in the reactive center loop (RCL and signal peptide scanning, 93% are putatively inhibitory while 82% are putatively extracellular. Among the 11 different amino acid residues that are predicted at the P1 sites, 16 sequences possess basic amino acid (R/K residues. Temporal and spatial expression analyses revealed that 40 of the 45 serpins are differentially expressed in salivary glands (SG and/or midguts (MG of unfed and partially fed ticks. Ten of the 38 serpin genes were expressed from six to 24 hrs of feeding while six and fives genes each are predominantly or exclusively expressed in either MG and SG respectively. Conclusion Given the diversity among tick species, sizes of tick serpin families are likely to be variable. However this study provides insight on the potential sizes of serpin protein families in ticks. Ticks must overcome inflammation, complement activation and blood coagulation to complete feeding. Since these pathways are regulated by serpins that have basic residues at their P1 sites, we speculate that I. scapularis may utilize some of the serpins reported in this study to manipulate host defense. We have discussed our data in the context of

  5. Building bridges: formin1 of Arabidopsis forms a connection between the cell wall and the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinière, Alexandre; Gayral, Philippe; Hawes, Chris; Runions, John

    2011-04-01

    Actin microfilament (MF) organization and remodelling is critical to cell function. The formin family of actin binding proteins are involved in nucleating MFs in Arabidopsis thaliana. They all contain formin homology domains in the intracellular, C-terminal half of the protein that interacts with MFs. Formins in class I are usually targeted to the plasma membrane and this is true of Formin1 (AtFH1) of A. thaliana. In this study, we have investigated the extracellular domain of AtFH1 and we demonstrate that AtFH1 forms a bridge from the actin cytoskeleton, across the plasma membrane and is anchored within the cell wall. AtFH1 has a large, extracellular domain that is maintained by purifying selection and that contains four conserved regions, one of which is responsible for immobilising the protein. Protein anchoring within the cell wall is reduced in constructs that express truncations of the extracellular domain and in experiments in protoplasts without primary cell walls. The 18 amino acid proline-rich extracellular domain that is responsible for AtFH1 anchoring has homology with cell-wall extensins. We also have shown that anchoring of AtFH1 in the cell wall promotes actin bundling within the cell and that overexpression of AtFH1 has an inhibitory effect on organelle actin-dependant dynamics. Thus, the AtFH1 bridge provides stable anchor points for the actin cytoskeleton and is probably a crucial component of the signalling response and actin-remodelling mechanisms. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Anchors from Goa waters, central west coast of India: Remains of Goa's overseas trade contacts with Arabian countries and Portugal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh

    iron anchors, five anchors are similar in shape and belong to the 16th-17th century, whereas the other two anchors are similar in shape and datable to the 18th century. None of the stone or iron anchors have been found with any datable context except...

  7. Rapid Characterization of Insulin Modifications and Sequence Variations by Proteinase K Digestion and UHPLC-ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Sheng; Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Meng, Fanyu

    2018-01-01

    Discovery of novel insulin analogs as therapeutics has remained an active area of research. Compared with native human insulin, insulin analog molecules normally incorporate either covalent modifications or amino acid sequence variations. From the drug discovery and development perspective, methods for efficient and detailed characterization of these primary structural changes are very important. In this report, we demonstrate that proteinase K digestion coupled with UPLC-ESI-MS analysis provides a simple and rapid approach to characterize the modifications and sequence variations of insulin molecules. A commercially available proteinase K digestion kit was used to process recombinant human insulin (RHI), insulin glargine, and fluorescein isothiocynate-labeled recombinant human insulin (FITC-RHI) samples. The LC-MS data clearly showed that RHI and insulin glargine samples can be differentiated, and the FITC modifications in all three amine sites of the RHI molecule are well characterized. The end-to-end experiment and data interpretation was achieved within 60 min. This approach is fast and simple, and can be easily implemented in early drug discovery laboratories to facilitate research on more advanced insulin therapeutics. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Rapid Characterization of Insulin Modifications and Sequence Variations by Proteinase K Digestion and UHPLC-ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Sheng; Tang, Weijuan; Sheng, Huaming; Meng, Fanyu

    2018-05-01

    Discovery of novel insulin analogs as therapeutics has remained an active area of research. Compared with native human insulin, insulin analog molecules normally incorporate either covalent modifications or amino acid sequence variations. From the drug discovery and development perspective, methods for efficient and detailed characterization of these primary structural changes are very important. In this report, we demonstrate that proteinase K digestion coupled with UPLC-ESI-MS analysis provides a simple and rapid approach to characterize the modifications and sequence variations of insulin molecules. A commercially available proteinase K digestion kit was used to process recombinant human insulin (RHI), insulin glargine, and fluorescein isothiocynate-labeled recombinant human insulin (FITC-RHI) samples. The LC-MS data clearly showed that RHI and insulin glargine samples can be differentiated, and the FITC modifications in all three amine sites of the RHI molecule are well characterized. The end-to-end experiment and data interpretation was achieved within 60 min. This approach is fast and simple, and can be easily implemented in early drug discovery laboratories to facilitate research on more advanced insulin therapeutics. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a serine proteinase with thrombin-like activity from the venom of the snake Bothrops asper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V Pérez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine proteinase with thrombin-like activity was isolated from the venom of the Central American pit viper Bothrops asper. Isolation was performed by a combination of affinity chromatography on aminobenzamidine-Sepharose and ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose. The enzyme accounts for approximately 0.13% of the venom dry weight and has a molecular mass of 32 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE, and of 27 kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Its partial amino acid sequence shows high identity with snake venom serine proteinases and a complete identity with a cDNA clone previously sequenced from this species. The N-terminal sequence of the enzyme is VIGGDECNINEHRSLVVLFXSSGFL CAGTLVQDEWVLTAANCDSKNFQ. The enzyme induces clotting of plasma (minimum coagulant dose = 4.1 µg and fibrinogen (minimum coagulant dose = 4.2 µg in vitro, and promotes defibrin(ogenation in vivo (minimum defibrin(ogenating dose = 1.0 µg. In addition, when injected intravenously in mice at doses of 5 and 10 µg, it induces a series of behavioral changes, i.e., loss of the righting reflex, opisthotonus, and intermittent rotations over the long axis of the body, which closely resemble the `gyroxin-like' effect induced by other thrombin-like enzymes from snake venoms.

  11. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato.

  12. Accessibility and contribution to glucan masking of natural and genetically tagged versions of yeast wall protein 1 of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Bruce L

    2018-01-01

    Yeast wall protein 1 (Ywp1) is an abundant glycoprotein of the cell wall of the yeast form of Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. Antibodies that bind to the polypeptide backbone of isolated Ywp1 show little binding to intact yeast cells, presumably because the Ywp1 epitopes are masked by the polysaccharides of the mannoproteins that form the outer layer of the cell wall. Rare cells do exhibit much greater anti-Ywp1 binding, however, and one of these was isolated and characterized. No differences were seen in its Ywp1, but it exhibited greater adhesiveness, sensitivity to wall perturbing agents, and exposure of its underlying β-1,3-glucan layer to external antibodies. The molecular basis for this greater epitope accessibility has not been determined, but has facilitated exploration of how these properties change as a function of cell growth and morphology. In addition, previously engineered strains with reduced quantities of Ywp1 in their cell walls were also found to have greater β-1,3-glucan exposure, indicating that Ywp1 itself contributes to the masking of wall epitopes, which may be important for understanding the anti-adhesive effect of Ywp1. Ectopic production of Ywp1 by hyphae, which reduces the adhesivity of these filamentous forms of C. albicans, was similarly found to reduce exposure of the β-1,3-glucan in their walls. To monitor Ywp1 in the cell wall irrespective of its accessibility, green fluorescent protein (Gfp) was genetically inserted into wall-anchored Ywp1 using a bifunctional cassette that also allowed production from a single transfection of a soluble, anchor-free version. The wall-anchored Ywp1-Gfp-Ywp1 accumulated in the wall of the yeast forms but not hyphae, and appeared to have properties similar to native Ywp1, including its adhesion-inhibiting effect. Some pseudohyphal walls also detectably accumulated this probe. Strains of C. albicans with tandem hemagglutinin (HA) epitopes inserted into wall-anchored

  13. Accessibility and contribution to glucan masking of natural and genetically tagged versions of yeast wall protein 1 of Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce L Granger

    Full Text Available Yeast wall protein 1 (Ywp1 is an abundant glycoprotein of the cell wall of the yeast form of Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. Antibodies that bind to the polypeptide backbone of isolated Ywp1 show little binding to intact yeast cells, presumably because the Ywp1 epitopes are masked by the polysaccharides of the mannoproteins that form the outer layer of the cell wall. Rare cells do exhibit much greater anti-Ywp1 binding, however, and one of these was isolated and characterized. No differences were seen in its Ywp1, but it exhibited greater adhesiveness, sensitivity to wall perturbing agents, and exposure of its underlying β-1,3-glucan layer to external antibodies. The molecular basis for this greater epitope accessibility has not been determined, but has facilitated exploration of how these properties change as a function of cell growth and morphology. In addition, previously engineered strains with reduced quantities of Ywp1 in their cell walls were also found to have greater β-1,3-glucan exposure, indicating that Ywp1 itself contributes to the masking of wall epitopes, which may be important for understanding the anti-adhesive effect of Ywp1. Ectopic production of Ywp1 by hyphae, which reduces the adhesivity of these filamentous forms of C. albicans, was similarly found to reduce exposure of the β-1,3-glucan in their walls. To monitor Ywp1 in the cell wall irrespective of its accessibility, green fluorescent protein (Gfp was genetically inserted into wall-anchored Ywp1 using a bifunctional cassette that also allowed production from a single transfection of a soluble, anchor-free version. The wall-anchored Ywp1-Gfp-Ywp1 accumulated in the wall of the yeast forms but not hyphae, and appeared to have properties similar to native Ywp1, including its adhesion-inhibiting effect. Some pseudohyphal walls also detectably accumulated this probe. Strains of C. albicans with tandem hemagglutinin (HA epitopes inserted into

  14. The anchor of the frameless intrauterine device does not migrate over time: an analysis in over 300 women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildemeersch D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Wildemeersch,1 Ansgar Pett,2 Sohela Jandi,2 Kilian Nolte,3 Wolfgang Albrecht4 1Gynecological Outpatient Clinic and IUD Training Centre, Ghent, Belgium; 2Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Berlin, Germany; 3Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Uetze, Germany; 4Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Feldkirchen, Austria Objective: To evaluate the correct position of the anchor at insertion and follow-up and assess if migration of the anchor occurs over time. Materials and methods: This was an insertion-related, prospective, postmarketing study in 309 women. Following insertion, women were followed up at 4–6 weeks, 6 months, and yearly thereafter. The position of the visualized anchor in the fundus of the uterus was evaluated using ultrasound by measuring its distance from the serosal surface of the uterus (SA-distance. Results: A total of 309 parous (n=115 and nulliparous (n=194 women were fitted with the frameless GyneFix 200 or the GyneFix 330 intrauterine device for contraception. The mean SA-distance in 306 parous and nulliparous women was 6.0 mm (range 2.0–24.0 mm at insertion in the parous group and 5.4 mm (range 1.3–11.0 mm in the nulliparous group. At the first follow-up in 281 women, the SA-distance was 6.0 mm (range 2.0–12.0 mm in the parous group and 5.5 mm (range 1.1–11.0 mm in the nulliparous group. The SA-distance was not significantly different. One patient had an exceptionally large SA-distance of 24 mm, probably due to insertion in the posterior wall. No follow-up could be done in this patient. In 77 women, the SA-distance was measured up to 42 months. The mean SA-distance at insertion in the parous group was 5.2 mm (range 3.0–8.5 mm and 4.8 mm (range 1.3–7.0 mm in the nulliparous group. At the last follow-up up to 36 months or longer, the SA-distance was 5.1 mm (range 3.0–8.5 mm in the parous group and 4.9 mm (range 1.3–7.0 mm in the nulliparous group. The SA-distance was not significantly different. The visualized

  15. Understanding the low uptake of bone-anchored hearing aids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R; Wearden, A; Pardesi, S M; Green, K

    2017-03-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids improve hearing for patients for whom conventional behind-the-ear aids are problematic. However, uptake of bone-anchored hearing aids is low and it is important to understand why this is the case. A narrative review was conducted. Studies examining why people accept or decline bone-anchored hearing aids and satisfaction levels of people with bone-anchored hearing aids were reviewed. Reasons for declining bone-anchored hearing aids included limited perceived benefits, concerns about surgery, aesthetic concerns and treatment cost. No studies providing in-depth analysis of the reasons for declining or accepting bone-anchored hearing aids were identified. Studies of patient satisfaction showed that most participants reported benefits with bone-anchored hearing aids. However, most studies used cross-sectional and/or retrospective designs and only included people with bone-anchored hearing aids. Important avenues for further research are in-depth qualitative research designed to fully understand the decision-making process for bone-anchored hearing aids and rigorous quantitative research comparing satisfaction of people who receive bone-anchored hearing aids with those who receive alternative (or no) treatments.

  16. Not all nutrition claims are perceived equal: anchoring effects and moderating mechanisms in food advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Hye Jin; Hove, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Despite the increased use of health claims in food advertising, few studies have investigated how specific nutrition claims have differential effects depending on how they are presented. In this context, the current study tests the anchoring hypothesis. Anchoring refers to a common human tendency to evaluate information differently depending on the presence or absence of a numerical "anchor" or reference point. Two (pilot and main) experimental studies explore anchoring effects on audience response to food advertising both directly and moderated by cognitive, motivational, and message factors. The pilot study finds that food product ads employing nutrition claims with an anchor rather than without an anchor generate two results: First, participants perceive the product to have lower fat/lower calorie contents (anchoring hypothesis); second, they prefer the messages with an anchor over those without an anchor. The main study reports that when anchoring is successfully evoked, it produces favorable attitudes toward the ad, favorable attitudes toward the brand, and purchase intention-but only when moderated by health orientation, claim believability, and nutrition knowledge. Practical implications are provided with respect to regulatory guidelines and effective communication strategies for promoting low-fat and low-calorie products in food advertising.

  17. Novel strategy for diameter-selective separation and functionalization of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, R M; Afzali, A; Freitag, M; Mitzi, D B; Chen, Zh

    2008-02-01

    The problem of separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by diameter and/or chirality is one of the greatest impediments toward the widespread application of these promising materials in nanoelectronics. In this paper, we describe a novel physical-chemical method for diameter-selective CNT separation that is both simple and effective and that allows up-scaling to large volumes at modest cost. Separation is based on size-selective noncovalent matching of an appropriate anchor molecule to the wall of the CNT, enabling suspension of the CNTs in solvents in which they would otherwise not be soluble. We demonstrate size-selective separation in the 1-2 nm diameter range using easily synthesized oligo-acene adducts as a diameter-selective molecular anchor. CNT field effect transistors fabricated from diameter-selected CNTs show markedly improved electrical properties as compared to nonselected CNTs.

  18. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  19. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  20. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, Lineke

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  1. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  2. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMONLEZUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved Outer Membrane Factor (OMF protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications, such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional post-translational modification could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In E. coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X ray structure at 3.8Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitylated cysteine.

  3. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Influence of anchoring on miscarriage risk perception associated with amniocentesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuccio, Regina; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; Mastrobattista, Joan; Noblin, Sarah Jane; Refuerzo, Jerrie; Smith, Janice L; Singletary, Claire N

    2015-04-01

    One factor women consider when deciding whether to pursue amniocentesis is the risk of miscarriage. People use mechanisms like anchoring, or the prior belief regarding the magnitude of risk, as a frame of reference for new information. This study aimed to determine a woman's perception of miscarriage risk associated with amniocentesis before and after genetic counseling and to determine what factors anchor a woman's perception of miscarriage risk. One hundred thirteen women being seen for prenatal genetic counseling and possible amniocentesis at six Houston clinics participated in the two-part anonymous survey. While most women (56.7 %) perceived the risk as low or average pre-counseling and indicated the numeric risk of amniocentesis as risk as risk perception did not change after the genetic counseling session (60 %). Those who changed their feeling about the risk after counseling showed a decreased perception of the risk (p perception of the risk (p = 0.017) whereas those who declined amniocentesis were more likely to view the risk as high (p = 0.004). The only two anchoring factors that had an effect were having a friend or relative with a personal or family history of a genetic disorder (p = 0.001) and having a child already (p = 0.038); both were associated with a lower risk perception. The lack of significant factors may reflect the uniqueness of each patient's risk assessment framework and reinforces the importance of genetic counseling to elucidate individual concerns, particularly as non-invasive prenatal testing becomes more widely available and further complicates the prenatal testing landscape.

  5. Treatment of chronic deltoid ligament injury using suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Xin; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Chen; Huang, Jia-zhang

    2014-08-01

    To explore the efficacy of overlapping suture-anchor fixation for treatment of chronic deltoid ligament injury. Seventeen patients (11 men, 6 women of mean age 32.1 years [range, 18-58 years]) who had undergone surgery for chronic deltoid ligament injury from January 2007 to December 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperatively, they had undergone bilateral weight-bearing posterior-anterior radiographs, (MRI) and ultrasound examinations of the ankle. Ankle arthroscopy was performed to confirm the diagnosis, followed by surgery to clear intra-articular proliferating synovial tissues and remove cartilage debris and scar tissue. The deep layer of the deltoid ligament was sutured onto the tip of the medial malleolus and its superficial layer sutured onto its periosteum and fixed with suture anchors. American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring system for the ankle-hindfoot was used to evaluate the ankles pre- and post-operatively. The 17 patients were followed up for 12-34 months (mean 20.1 months). The angle between the long axes of the talus and first metatarsal and the hindfoot angle measured in a hindfoot alignment view (as described by Saltzman) were reduced from 5.4° ± 1.8° and 8.2° ± 2.6° preoperatively to 4.0° ± 0.9° and 5.3° ± 1.3° postoperatively, respectively. The mean AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 76.8 ± 7.0 preoperatively and 94.1 ± 3.3 at the last follow-up visit. Ten patients were scored as excellent, six as good, and one as fair. Pain was relieved in all patients and no patients had recurrent deltoid ligament injury. Using suture anchors to treat chronic deltoid ligament injury has relatively satisfactory outcomes. © 2014 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. A diverse family of serine proteinase genes expressed in cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis): implications for the design of pest-resistant transgenic cotton plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Batista, João A N; Rigden, Daniel J; Fragoso, Rodrigo R; Silva, Rodrigo O; Gomes, Eliane A; Franco, Octávio L; Dias, Simoni C; Cordeiro, Célia M T; Monnerat, Rose G; Grossi-De-Sá, Maria F

    2004-09-01

    Fourteen different cDNA fragments encoding serine proteinases were isolated by reverse transcription-PCR from cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) larvae. A large diversity between the sequences was observed, with a mean pairwise identity of 22% in the amino acid sequence. The cDNAs encompassed 11 trypsin-like sequences classifiable into three families and three chymotrypsin-like sequences belonging to a single family. Using a combination of 5' and 3' RACE, the full-length sequence was obtained for five of the cDNAs, named Agser2, Agser5, Agser6, Agser10 and Agser21. The encoded proteins included amino acid sequence motifs of serine proteinase active sites, conserved cysteine residues, and both zymogen activation and signal peptides. Southern blotting analysis suggested that one or two copies of these serine proteinase genes exist in the A. grandis genome. Northern blotting analysis of Agser2 and Agser5 showed that for both genes, expression is induced upon feeding and is concentrated in the gut of larvae and adult insects. Reverse northern analysis of the 14 cDNA fragments showed that only two trypsin-like and two chymotrypsin-like were expressed at detectable levels. Under the effect of the serine proteinase inhibitors soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and black-eyed pea trypsin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, expression of one of the trypsin-like sequences was upregulated while expression of the two chymotrypsin-like sequences was downregulated. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Characterisation of cysteine proteinases responsible for digestive proteolysis in guts of larval Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) by expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bown, D.P.; Wilkinson, H.S.; Jongsma, M.A.; Gatehouse, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are the major class of enzymes responsible for digestive proteolysis in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), a serious pest of maize. A larval gut extract hydrolysed typical cathepsin substrates, such as Z-phe-arg-AMC and Z-arg-arg-AMC, and hydrolysis was inhibited by

  8. Indication chamber of liquid metal fired steam generators with double wall for heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Martoch, J.

    1982-01-01

    The double wall of the steam generator consists of inner and outer tubes anchored in a tube plate. Between the tubes are indication spaces which end in recesses formed at least in one of the tube plates and coaxial with the outer tubes. The recesses interconnected with channels form the indication chamber to which is connected at least one sensor of the alarm signal equipment. (B.S.)

  9. Screening for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Modified Cell Wall Proteins in Pichia pastoris and Their Recombinant Expression on the Cell Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Shuli; Zhou, Xinying; Jin, Zi; Jiang, Fengchun; Han, Shuangyan; Zheng, Suiping

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins have various intrinsic functions in yeasts and different uses in vitro. In the present study, the genome of Pichia pastoris GS115 was screened for potential GPI-modified cell wall proteins. Fifty putative GPI-anchored proteins were selected on the basis of (i) the presence of a C-terminal GPI attachment signal sequence, (ii) the presence of an N-terminal signal sequence for secretion, and (iii) the absence of transmembrane domains in mature protein. The predicted GPI-anchored proteins were fused to an alpha-factor secretion signal as a substitute for their own N-terminal signal peptides and tagged with the chimeric reporters FLAG tag and mature Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB). The expression of fusion proteins on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 was determined by whole-cell flow cytometry and immunoblotting analysis of the cell wall extracts obtained by β-1,3-glucanase digestion. CALB displayed on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 with the predicted GPI-anchored proteins was examined on the basis of potential hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Finally, 13 proteins were confirmed to be GPI-modified cell wall proteins in P. pastoris GS115, which can be used to display heterologous proteins on the yeast cell surface. PMID:23835174

  10. Conventional Anchor Test Results at San Diego and Indian Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    2-inch chain, and a peg -top buoy. The YC barge was not heavily loaded during mooring or anchor testing; load was transferred from the restraint...T1 33.3 307. 2’. 1. 𔃺 13. 4~6 4 S.0’𔃽. 0 1 t~C(I.’ 3350 󈨟 (S , cO ( n’ C 4 .0 5 992 3’. 𔃻. 3 𔃽 2. .. . 7, 7 C 30.9 -- 94 bc 𔃽 I ~ (. 03 4C

  11. Codend selectivity in a commercial Danish anchor seine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noack, Thomas; Frandsen, Rikke; Krag, Ludvig Ahm

    2017-01-01

    Danish seining (or anchor seining) is a fishing technique that is gaining increasing attention because itis considered to be a fuel-efficient fishing method with low environmental impact. However, scientificdocumentation of the selectivity characteristics of Danish seines is lacking, and the gear....... The estimatedselectivity curve of dab indicated, contrary to cod and plaice, low retention of individuals below MLS.Confidence limits for larger length classes of cod and red gurnard were relatively wide. For plaice, theestimated selection factor, which is the length with 50% retention divided by mesh size...

  12. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-Out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Adamsen, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assumed that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...... allowing elastic deformations only in a layer between the pull-out cone and the concrete base. The derived model is in good agreement with experimental results, it predicts size effects and the model parameters found by calibration of the model on experimental data are in good agreement with what should...

  13. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, J. P.; Adamsen, P.

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assumed that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...... allowing elastic deformations only in a layer between the pull-out cone and the concrete base. The derived model is in good agreement with experimental results, it predicts size effects and the model parameters found by calibration of the model on experimental data are in good agreement with what should...

  14. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  15. An anchoring system for fish habitat structures: field technique, evaluation, and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara L. Fontaine; Thomas D. Merritt

    1988-01-01

    Steel cable can be used to bind rocks and logs together to construct fish habitat structures in streams. Cables must be securely anchored if structures are to withstand floods. This paper describes a way to anchor cables into bedrock or ballast boulders. Anchor tensile strength ranged from 7,500 to 36,500 pounds and was related to type of resin and embedment depth....

  16. Effects of anchoring and adjustment in the evaluation of product pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elaad, Eitan; Sayag, Neta; Ezer, Aliya

    2010-08-01

    Anchoring and adjustment comprise a heuristic that creates expectations. Two types of anchors were applied on participants' evaluation of products: the price reference of the product (maximum, minimum, or no price reference) and the context in which the products were evaluated (the prestige of the shopping center). Results showed that both factors anchored evaluations of products' value. Context effects were explained by the different expectations of visitors in prestigious (looking for quality) and less prestigious (seeking a bargain) centers.

  17. Knotless single-row rotator cuff repair: a comparative biomechanical study of 2 knotless suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Chad; Traub, Shaun; Baldini, Todd; Rioux-Forker, Dana; Spalazzi, Jeffrey P; Davisson, Twana; Hawkins, Monica; McCarty, Eric

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the gap formation during cyclic loading, maximum repair strength, and failure mode of single-row full-thickness supraspinatus repairs performed using 2 knotless suture anchors with differing internal suture-retention mechanisms in a human cadaver model. Nine matched pairs of cadaver shoulders were used. Full-thickness tears were induced by detaching the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity. Single-row repairs were performed with either type I (Opus Magnum PI; ArthroCare, Austin, Texas) or type II (ReelX STT; Stryker, Mahwah, New Jersey) knotless suture anchors. The repaired tendon was cycled from 10 to 90 N for 500 cycles, followed by load to failure. Gap formation was measured at 5, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 cycles with a video digitizing system. Anchor type or location (anterior or posterior) had no effect on gap formation during cyclic loading regardless of position (anterior, P=.385; posterior, P=.389). Maximum load to failure was significantly greater (P=.018) for repairs performed with type II anchors (288±62 N) compared with type I anchors (179±39 N). Primary failure modes were anchor pullout and tendon tearing for type II anchors and suture slippage through the anchor for type I anchors. The internal ratcheting suture-retention mechanism of type II anchors may have helped this anchor outperform the suture-cinching mechanism of type I anchors by supporting significantly higher loads before failure and minimizing suture slippage, potentially leading to stronger repairs clinically. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Intermittent use of an "anchor system" improves postural control in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Milena de Bem Zavanella; Mauerberg-deCastro, Eliane; Moraes, Renato

    2013-07-01

    Haptic information, provided by a non-rigid tool (i.e., an "anchor system"), can reduce body sway in individuals who perform a standing postural task. However, it was not known whether or not continuous use of the anchor system would improve postural control after its removal. Additionally, it was unclear as to whether or not frequency of use of the anchor system is related to improved control in older adults. The present study evaluated the effect of the prolonged use of the anchor system on postural control in healthy older individuals, at different frequencies of use, while they performed a postural control task (semi-tandem position). Participants were divided into three groups according to the frequency of the anchor system's use (0%, 50%, and 100%). Pre-practice phase (without anchor) was followed by a practice phase (they used the anchor system at the predefined frequency), and a post-practice phase (immediate and late-without anchor). All three groups showed a persistent effect 15min after the end of the practice phase (immediate post-practice phase). However, only the 50% group showed a persistent effect in the late post-practice phase (24h after finishing the practice phase). Older adults can improve their postural control by practicing the standing postural task, and use of the anchor system limited to half of their practice time can provide additional improvement in their postural control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reinforcing mechanism of anchors in slopes: a numerical comparison of results of LEM and FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Fei; Ugai, Keizo

    2003-06-01

    This paper reports the limitation of the conventional Bishop's simplified method to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors, and proposes a new approach to considering the reinforcing effect of anchors on the safety factor. The reinforcing effect of anchors can be explained using an additional shearing resistance on the slip surface. A three-dimensional shear strength reduction finite element method (SSRFEM), where soil-anchor interactions were simulated by three-dimensional zero-thickness elasto-plastic interface elements, was used to calculate the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors to verify the reinforcing mechanism of anchors. The results of SSRFEM were compared with those of the conventional and proposed approaches for Bishop's simplified method for various orientations, positions, and spacings of anchors, and shear strengths of soil-grouted body interfaces. For the safety factor, the proposed approach compared better with SSRFEM than the conventional approach. The additional shearing resistance can explain the influence of the orientation, position, and spacing of anchors, and the shear strength of soil-grouted body interfaces on the safety factor of slopes stabilized with anchors.

  20. Biomechanical advantages of triple-loaded suture anchors compared with double-row rotator cuff repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Schroeder, F Alexander; Aziz-Jacobo, Jorge; Mays, Matthew M; Rapley, Jay H

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the strength and suture-tendon interface security of various suture anchors triply and doubly loaded with ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene-containing sutures and to evaluate the relative effectiveness of placing these anchors in a single-row or double-row arrangement by cyclic loading and then destructive testing. The infraspinatus muscle was reattached to the original humeral footprint by use of 1 of 5 different repair patterns in 40 bovine shoulders. Two single-row repairs and three double-row repairs were tested. High-strength sutures were used for all repairs. Five groups were studied: group 1, 2 triple-loaded screw suture anchors in a single row with simple stitches; group 2, 2 triple-loaded screw anchors in a single row with simple stitches over a fourth suture passed perpendicularly ("rip-stop" stitch); group 3, 2 medial and 2 lateral screw anchors with a single vertical mattress stitch passed from the medial anchors and 2 simple stitches passed from the lateral anchors; group 4, 2 medial double-loaded screw anchors tied in 2 mattress stitches and 2 push-in lateral anchors capturing the medial sutures in a "crisscross" spanning stitch; and group 5, 2 medial double-loaded screw anchors tied in 2 mattress stitches and 2 push-in lateral anchors creating a "suture-bridge" stitch. The specimens were cycled between 10 and 180 N at 1.0 Hz for 3,500 cycles or until failure. Endpoints were cyclic loading displacement (5 and 10 mm), total displacement, and ultimate failure load. A single row of triply loaded anchors was more resistant to stretching to a 5- and 10-mm gap than the double-row repairs with or without the addition of a rip-stop suture (P row repair (P row created by 2 medial double-loaded suture anchors and 2 lateral push-in anchors stretched more than any other group (P row repairs with either crossing sutures or 4 separate anchor points were more likely to fail (5- or 10-mm gap) than a single-row repair loaded with 3 simple sutures

  1. Post-installed concrete anchors in nuclear power plants: Performance and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrenholtz, Philipp; Eligehausen, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Review of qualification and design regulations for anchors in nuclear power plants. • First complete set of nuclear anchor load–displacement data and its evaluation ever. • Demonstration of robust test behavior of a qualified post-installed anchor product. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants (NPPs), post-installed anchors are widely used for structural and non-structural connections to concrete. In many countries, anchor products employed for safety relevant applications have to be approved by the authorities. For the high safety standards in force for NPPs, special requirements have to be met to allow for extreme design situations. This paper presents an experimental test program conducted to evaluate the performance of anchors according to the German Guideline for Anchorages in Nuclear Power Plants and Nuclear Technology Installations (DIBt KKW Leitfaden, 2010). After a brief introduction to anchor behavior and the regulative context, the results of tension and shear tests carried out on undercut anchors are discussed. Robust load capacities and relatively small displacements determined for demanding load and crack cycling tests demonstrated the suitability of anchors qualified according to a state-of-the-art qualification guideline

  2. The anchors of steel wire ropes, testing methods and their results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Krešák

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper introduces an application of the acoustic and thermographic method in the defectoscopic testing of immobile steel wire ropes at the most critical point, the anchor. First measurements and their results by these new defectoscopic methods are shown. In defectoscopic tests at the anchor, the widely used magnetic method gives unreliable results, and therefore presents a problem for steel wire defectoscopy. Application of the two new methods in the steel wire defectoscopy at the anchor point will enable increased safety measures at the anchor of steel wire ropes in bridge, roof, tower and aerial cable lift constructions.

  3. SNP discovery and chromosome anchoring provide the first physically-anchored hexaploid oat map and reveal synteny with model species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah E Oliver

    Full Text Available A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42 has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources.

  4. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  5. Impact of fuel composition on the recirculation zone structure and its role in lean premixed flame anchoring

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. We investigate the dependence of the recirculation zone (RZ) size and structure on the fuel composition using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) and chemiluminescence measurements for C3H8/H2/air lean premixed flames stabilized in a backward-facing step combustor. Results show an intricate coupling between the flame anchoring and the RZ structure and length. For a fixed fuel composition, at relatively low equivalence ratios, the time-averaged RZ is comprised of two counter rotating eddies: a primary eddy (PE) between the shear layer and the bottom wall; and a secondary eddy (SE) between the vertical step wall and the PE. The flame stabilizes downstream of the saddle point of the dividing streamline between the two eddies. As equivalence ratio is raised, the flame moves upstream, pushing the saddle point with it and reducing the size of the SE. Higher temperature of the products reduces the velocity gradient in the shear layer and thus the reattachment length. As equivalence ratio approaches a critical value, the saddle point reaches the step and the SE collapses while the flame starts to exhibit periodic flapping motions, suggesting a correlation between the RZ structure and flame anchoring. The overall trend in the flow field is the same as we add hydrogen to the fuel at a fixed equivalence ratio, demonstrating the impact of fuel composition on the flow field. We show that the reattachment lengths (LR), which are shown to encapsulate the mean RZ structure, measured over a range of fuel composition and equivalence ratio collapse if plotted against the strained consumption speed (Sc). Results indicate that for the flame to remain anchored, the RZ structure should satisfy lR,isothermal/L R,reacting · S c/U ∞ ∼ 0.1. If this criterion cannot be met, the flame blows off, flashes back or becomes thermoacoustically unstable, suggesting a Damköhler-like criterion for

  6. Anchored PKA as a gatekeeper for gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Anchored protein kinase A (PKA) bound to A Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) mediates effects of localized increases in cAMP in defined subcellular microdomains and retains the specificity in cAMP-PKA signaling to distinct extracellular stimuli. Gap junctions are pores between adjacent cells constituted by connexin proteins that provide means of communication and transfer of small molecules. While the PKA signaling is known to promote human trophoblast cell fusion, the gap junction communication through connexin 43 (Cx43) is a prerequisite for this process. We recently demonstrated that trophoblast fusion is regulated by ezrin, a known AKAP, which binds to Cx43 and delivers PKA in the vicinity gap junctions. We found that disruption of the ezrin-Cx43 interaction abolished PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43 as well as gap junction communication and subsequently cell fusion. We propose that the PKA-ezrin-Cx43 macromolecular complex regulating gap junction communication constitutes a general mechanism to control opening of Cx43 gap junctions by phosphorylation in response to cAMP signaling in various cell types.

  7. Density control of dodecamanganese clusters anchored on silicon(100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, Guglielmo G; Motta, Alessandro; Favazza, Maria; Nativo, Paola; Fragalà, Ignazio L; Gatteschi, Dante

    2006-04-24

    A synthetic strategy to control the density of Mn12 clusters anchored on silicon(100) was investigated. Diluted monolayers suitable for Mn12 anchoring were prepared by Si-grafting mixtures of the methyl 10-undecylenoate precursor ligand with 1-decene spectator spacers. Different ratios of these mixtures were tested. The grafted surfaces were hydrolyzed to reveal the carboxylic groups available for the subsequent exchange with the [Mn12O12(OAc)16(H2O)4]4 H2O2 AcOH cluster. Modified surfaces were analyzed by attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), and AFM imaging. Results of XPS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy show that the surface mole ratio between grafted ester and decene is higher than in the source solution. The surface density of the Mn12 cluster is, in turn, strictly proportional to the ester mole fraction. Well-resolved and isolated clusters were observed by AFM, using a diluted ester/decene 1:1 solution.

  8. Suture anchor tenodesis in repair of distal Achilles tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçoğlu, Onder; Türker, Mehmet; Yildız, Fatih; Akalan, Ekin; Temelli, Yener

    2014-01-01

    Distal Achilles tendon avulsions are in the form of either bony and nonbony avulsion of Achilles tendon from its calcaneal insertion. Four patients with distal Achilles tendon avulsions or ruptures which were treated with tendon to bone repair using suture anchors are presented here. Operated leg was immobilized in above-knee cast for 4 weeks while the patient walked non-weight-bearing. Then, cast was changed to below knee, and full weight-bearing was allowed. Patients underwent gait analysis minimum at first postoperative year. Mean American Orthopedics Foot Ankle Society ankle/hindfoot score of patients at last visit was 88.75 (range 85-100), and Achilles tendon total rupture score was 77.75 (range 58-87). Mean passive dorsiflexion of injured ankles (14° ± 5°) was lower than uninjured ankles (23° ± 9°). All the kinematic parameters of gait analysis were comparable to the uninjured side. Maximum plantar flexion power of injured ankle was 1.40 W/kg, and this was significantly lower than the contralateral side value 2.38 W/kg; (P = 0.0143). There were no visually altered gait or problems in daily life. Suture anchor tenodesis technique of distal Achilles tendon avulsions was successful in achieving durable osteotendinous repairs.

  9. Studies on the mechanical behavior of rock anchors. ; Results of in-situ pull-out tests. Rock anchor no rikigaku kyodo ni kansuru kenkyu. ; Gen prime ichi shiken ni okeru anchor no kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto, K.; Ebisu, S.; Nakagawa, M.; Usui, M.; Someya, T.; Machida, N. (Okumura Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-31

    The rock anchor method is planned to apply to some permanent structures but since this method was developed for temporary structures, the clarification of the transferring mechanism of force from an anchor to a rockmass, the fracture mechanism and the development of the dynamic model have not been established. This paper arranged the data obtained by a full-scale, in-situ pulling out test of a rock anchor as the first step to understand the dynamic behavior and analyzed by paying attetion to the modulus of deformation of the rockmass where the anchor was embedded to elucidate the affecting degree of rockmass modulus of deformation, the embedded length and the tendon diameter on the dynamic behavior of the anchor. The rock anchor behavior could be expressed accurately by applying a theoretical solution derived by the balancing condition of forces at the boundary face. Especially, when the rockmass is uniform and the fracture occurrs at the interface between the tendon and grout, this approach can express the fracture with the accuracy similar to that made by the finite element method. 6 refs., 11 figs.,1 tab.

  10. The urinary excretion of epidermal growth factor in the rat is reduced by aprotinin, a proteinase inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, P E; Raaberg, Lasse; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1990-01-01

    in vivo is processed by an aprotinin inhibitable proteinase. EGF is produced in the kidneys as a precursor with a molecular weight of approximately 130 kDa. In rat urine, nanomolar amounts of 6 kDa EGF are excreted per 24 h together with small amounts of high molecular weight forms of EGF. During i...... of immunoreactive EGF in the kidney tissue is increased after aprotinin administration (median amount 0.11 pmol EGF/mg protein versus less than 0.04 pmol EGF/mg protein, P less than 0.001). Neither the creatinine clearance, the total urinary protein output, nor the volume of urine produced was affected by aprotinin....

  11. Synthesis of the proteinase inhibitor LEKTI domain 6 by the fragment condensation method and regioselective disulfide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas K; Gatos, Dimitrios; Adermann, Knut; Deraison, Celine; Barlos, Kleomenis

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are of high pharmaceutical interest and are drug candidates for a variety of indications. Specific kallikrein inhibitors are important for their antitumor activity and their potential application to the treatment of skin diseases. In this study we describe the synthesis of domain 6 of the kallikrein inhibitor Lympho-Epithilial Kazal-Type Inhibitor (LEKTI) by the fragment condensation method and site-directed cystine bridge formation. To obtain the linear LEKTI precursor, the condensation was best performed in solution, coupling the protected fragment 1-22 to 23-68. This method yielded LEKTI domain 6 of high purity and equipotent to the recombinantly produced peptide. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Novel Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors from the skin secretion of the Splendid leaf frog, Cruziohyla calcarifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Proaño-Bolaños

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Peptidase inhibitors have an important role controlling a variety of biological processes. Here, we employed a peptidomic approach including molecular cloning, tandem mass spectrometry and enzymatic assays to reveal 7 Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (CCKPs (18 variants in the skin secretion of the unexplored frog, Cruziohyla calcarifer. All 18 proteins shared the Kazal pattern C-X(7-C-X(6,7-C-X(6,7-Y-X(3-C-X(2-C-X(15-21-C and 3 disulphide bridges. Based on structural comparative analysis, we deemed trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activity in CCKP-1, 4 and CCKP 2, 5, 7, respectively. These peptidase inhibitors presumably play a role to control the balance between other functional peptides produced in the amphibian skin secretions.

  13. The 3D structure and function of digestive cathepsin L-like proteinases of Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beton, Daniela; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Farah, Chuck S; Terra, Walter R

    2012-09-01

    Cathepsin L-like proteinases (CAL) are major digestive proteinases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Procathepsin Ls 2 (pCAL2) and 3 (pCAL3) were expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, purified and activated under acidic conditions. Immunoblot analyses of different T. molitor larval tissues demonstrated that a polyclonal antibody to pCAL3 recognized pCAL3 and cathepsin L 3 (CAL3) only in the anterior two-thirds of midgut tissue and midgut luminal contents of T. molitor larvae. Furthermore, immunocytolocalization data indicated that pCAL3 occurs in secretory vesicles and microvilli in anterior midgut. Therefore CAL3, like cathepsin L 2 (CAL2), is a digestive enzyme secreted by T. molitor anterior midgut. CAL3 hydrolyses Z-FR-MCA and Z-RR-MCA (typical cathepsin substrates), whereas CAL2 hydrolyses only Z-FR-MCA. Active site mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were constructed by replacing the catalytic cysteine with serine to prevent autocatalytic processing. Recombinant pCAL2 and pCAL3 mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were prepared, crystallized and their 3D structures determined at 1.85 and 2.1 Å, respectively. While the overall structure of these enzymes is similar to other members of the papain superfamily, structural differences in the S2 subsite explain their substrate specificities. The data also supported models for CAL trafficking to lysosomes and to secretory vesicles to be discharged into midgut contents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant Proteinase Inhibitor BbCI Modulates Lung Inflammatory Responses and Mechanic and Remodeling Alterations Induced by Elastase in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Almeida-Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proteinases play a key role in emphysema. Bauhinia bauhinioides cruzipain inhibitor (BbCI is a serine-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. We evaluated BbCI treatment in elastase-induced pulmonary alterations. Methods.  C57BL/6 mice received intratracheal elastase (ELA group or saline (SAL group. One group of mice was treated with BbCI (days 1, 15, and 21 after elastase instillation, ELABC group. Controls received saline and BbCI (SALBC group. After 28 days, we evaluated respiratory mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In lung tissue we measured airspace enlargement, quantified neutrophils, TNFα-, MMP-9-, MMP-12-, TIMP-1-, iNOS-, and eNOS-positive cells, 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in alveolar septa and airways. MUC-5-positive cells were quantified only in airways. Results. BbCI reduced elastase-induced changes in pulmonary mechanics, airspace enlargement and elastase-induced increases in total cells, and neutrophils in BALF. BbCI reduced macrophages and neutrophils positive cells in alveolar septa and neutrophils and TNFα-positive cells in airways. BbCI attenuated elastic and collagen fibers, MMP-9- and MMP-12-positive cells, and isoprostane and iNOS-positive cells in alveolar septa and airways. BbCI reduced MUC5ac-positive cells in airways. Conclusions. BbCI improved lung mechanics and reduced lung inflammation and airspace enlargement and increased oxidative stress levels induced by elastase. BbCI may have therapeutic potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  15. Identification of cis-elements for ethylene and circadian regulation of the Solanum melongena gene encoding cysteine proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Reetika; Xu, Zeng-Fu; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Chye, Mee-Len

    2005-03-01

    We have previously shown that the expression of SmCP which encodes Solanum melongena cysteine proteinase is ethylene-inducible and is under circadian control. To understand the regulation of SmCP, a 1.34-kb SmCP 5'-flanking region and its deletion derivatives were analyzed for cis-elements using GUS and luc fusions and by in vitro binding assays. Analysis of transgenic tobacco transformed with SmCP promoter-GUS constructs confirmed that the promoter region -415/+54 containing Ethylene Responsive Element ERE(-355/-348) conferred threefold ethylene-induction of GUS expression, while -827/+54 which also contains ERE(-683/-676), produced fivefold induction. Using gel mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that each ERE binds nuclear proteins from both ethephon-treated and untreated 5-week-old seedlings, suggesting that different transcriptions factors bind each ERE under varying physiological conditions. Binding was also observed in extracts from senescent, but not young, fruits. The variation in binding at the EREs in fruits and seedlings imply that organ-specific factors may participate in binding. Analysis of transgenic tobacco expressing various SmCP promoter-luc constructs containing wild-type or mutant Evening Elements (EEs) confirmed that both conserved EEs at -795/-787 and -785/-777 are important in circadian control. We confirmed the binding of total nuclear proteins to EEs in gel mobility shift assays and in DNase I footprinting. Our results suggest that multiple proteins bind the EEs which are conserved in plants other than Arabidopsis and that functional EEs and EREs are present in the 5'-flanking region of a gene encoding cysteine proteinase.

  16. An osteoblast-derived proteinase controls tumor cell survival via TGF-beta activation in the bone microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiolloy, Sophie; Edwards, James R; Fingleton, Barbara; Rifkin, Daniel B; Matrisian, Lynn M; Lynch, Conor C

    2012-01-01

    Breast to bone metastases frequently induce a "vicious cycle" in which osteoclast mediated bone resorption and proteolysis results in the release of bone matrix sequestered factors that drive tumor growth. While osteoclasts express numerous proteinases, analysis of human breast to bone metastases unexpectedly revealed that bone forming osteoblasts were consistently positive for the proteinase, MMP-2. Given the role of MMP-2 in extracellular matrix degradation and growth factor/cytokine processing, we tested whether osteoblast derived MMP-2 contributed to the vicious cycle of tumor progression in the bone microenvironment. To test our hypothesis, we utilized murine models of the osteolytic tumor-bone microenvironment in immunocompetent wild type and MMP-2 null mice. In longitudinal studies, we found that host MMP-2 significantly contributed to tumor progression in bone by protecting against apoptosis and promoting cancer cell survival (caspase-3; immunohistochemistry). Our data also indicate that host MMP-2 contributes to tumor induced osteolysis (μCT, histomorphometry). Further ex vivo/in vitro experiments with wild type and MMP-2 null osteoclast and osteoblast cultures identified that 1) the absence of MMP-2 did not have a deleterious effect on osteoclast function (cd11B isolation, osteoclast differentiation, transwell migration and dentin resorption assay); and 2) that osteoblast derived MMP-2 promoted tumor survival by regulating the bioavailability of TGFβ, a factor critical for cell-cell communication in the bone (ELISA, immunoblot assay, clonal and soft agar assays). Collectively, these studies identify a novel "mini-vicious cycle" between the osteoblast and metastatic cancer cells that is key for initial tumor survival in the bone microenvironment. In conclusion, the findings of our study suggest that the targeted inhibition of MMP-2 and/or TGFβ would be beneficial for the treatment of bone metastases.

  17. An osteoblast-derived proteinase controls tumor cell survival via TGF-beta activation in the bone microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Thiolloy

    Full Text Available Breast to bone metastases frequently induce a "vicious cycle" in which osteoclast mediated bone resorption and proteolysis results in the release of bone matrix sequestered factors that drive tumor growth. While osteoclasts express numerous proteinases, analysis of human breast to bone metastases unexpectedly revealed that bone forming osteoblasts were consistently positive for the proteinase, MMP-2. Given the role of MMP-2 in extracellular matrix degradation and growth factor/cytokine processing, we tested whether osteoblast derived MMP-2 contributed to the vicious cycle of tumor progression in the bone microenvironment.To test our hypothesis, we utilized murine models of the osteolytic tumor-bone microenvironment in immunocompetent wild type and MMP-2 null mice. In longitudinal studies, we found that host MMP-2 significantly contributed to tumor progression in bone by protecting against apoptosis and promoting cancer cell survival (caspase-3; immunohistochemistry. Our data also indicate that host MMP-2 contributes to tumor induced osteolysis (μCT, histomorphometry. Further ex vivo/in vitro experiments with wild type and MMP-2 null osteoclast and osteoblast cultures identified that 1 the absence of MMP-2 did not have a deleterious effect on osteoclast function (cd11B isolation, osteoclast differentiation, transwell migration and dentin resorption assay; and 2 that osteoblast derived MMP-2 promoted tumor survival by regulating the bioavailability of TGFβ, a factor critical for cell-cell communication in the bone (ELISA, immunoblot assay, clonal and soft agar assays.Collectively, these studies identify a novel "mini-vicious cycle" between the osteoblast and metastatic cancer cells that is key for initial tumor survival in the bone microenvironment. In conclusion, the findings of our study suggest that the targeted inhibition of MMP-2 and/or TGFβ would be beneficial for the treatment of bone metastases.

  18. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  19. Fusion: first wall problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the relevant elementary atomic processes which are expected to be of significance to the first wall of a fusion reactor are reviewed. Up to the present, most investigations have been performed at relatively high ion energies, typically E greater than 5 keV, and even in this range the available data are very poor. If the plasma wall interaction takes place at energies of E greater than 1 keV the impurity introduction and first wall erosion which will take place predominantly by sputtering, will be large and may severely limit the burning time of the plasma. The wall bombardment and surface erosion will presumably not decrease substantially by introducing a divertor. The erosion can only be kept low if the energy of the bombarding ions and neutrals can be kept below the threshold for sputtering of 1 to 10 eV. 93 refs

  20. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  1. Dynamic wall demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsui, L.; Mayhew, W.

    1990-12-01

    The dynamic wall concept is a ventilation strategy that can be applied to a single family dwelling. With suitable construction, outside air can be admitted through the exterior walls of the house to the interior space to function as ventilation air. The construction and performance monitoring of a demonstration house built to test the dynamic wall concept in Sherwood Park, Alberta, is described. The project had the objectives of demonstrating and assessing the construction methods; determining the cost-effectiveness of the concept in Alberta; analyzing the operation of the dynamic wall system; and determining how other components and systems in the house interact with the dynamic wall. The exterior wall construction consisted of vinyl siding, spun-bonded polyolefin-backed (SBPO) rigid fiberglass sheathing, 38 mm by 89 mm framing, fiberglass batt insulation and 12.7 mm drywall. The mechanical system was designed to operate in the dynamic (negative pressure) mode, however flexibility was provided to allow operation in the static (balanced pressure) mode to permit monitoring of the walls as if they were in a conventional house. The house was monitored by an extensive computerized monitoring system. Dynamic wall operation was dependent on pressure and temperature differentials between indoor and outdoor as well as wind speed and direction. The degree of heat gain was found to be ca 74% of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Temperature of incoming dynamic air was significantly affected by solar radiation and measurement of indoor air pollutants found no significant levels. 4 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Orbital wall fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Toshitaka; Ishio, Ken-ichirou; Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Kuriyama, Jun-ichi; Hirota, Yoshiharu.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 59 cases of mild facial fractures (simple orbital wall fractures, 34 cases, other facial fractures, 25 cases) with the clinical suspects of orbital wall fractures were evaluated both by conventional views (Waters' and Caldwell views) and coronal CT scans. Conventional views were obtained, as an average, after 4 days and CT after 7 days of injuries. Both the medial wall and the floor were evaluated at two sites, i.e., anterior and posterior. The ethmoid-maxillary plate was also included in the study. The degree of fractures was classified as, no fractures, fractures of discontinuity, dislocation and fragmentation. The coronal CT images in bone window condition was used as reference and the findings were compared between conventional views and CT. The correct diagnosis was obtained as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 78%, posterior, 73%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 72%, posterior, 72%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (64%). The false positive diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior only, 13%), medial orbital wall (anterior only, 7%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (11%). The false negative diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 9%, posterior, 10%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 21%, posterior, 28%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (21%). The results were compared with those of others in the past. (author)

  3. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambani Rohit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Impingement syndrome following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuffs using double row suture anchor has not been widely reported. This is the first such case where anchoring has resulted in impingement syndrome.

  4. Fracture Mechanics Models for Brittle Failure of Bottom Rails due to Uplift in Timber Frame Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joergen L. Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In partially anchored timber frame shear walls, hold-down devices are not provided; hence the uplift forces are transferred by the fasteners of the sheathing-to-framing joints into the bottom rail and via anchor bolts from the bottom rail into the foundation. Since the force in the anchor bolts and the sheathing-to-framing joints do not act in the same vertical plane, the bottom rail is subjected to tensile stresses perpendicular to the grain and splitting of the bottom rail may occur. This paper presents simple analytical models based on fracture mechanics for the analysis of such bottom rails. An existing model is reviewed and several alternative models are derived and compared qualitatively and with experimental data. It is concluded that several of the fracture mechanics models lead to failure load predictions which seem in sufficiently good agreement with the experimental results to justify their application in practical design.

  5. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  6. Model test of anchoring effect on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Qiang-Yong; Wang, Yuan; Liu, De-Jun; Zhang, Ning

    2013-01-01

    The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  7. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed

  8. Chemical Reactive Anchoring Lipids with Different Performance for Cell Surface Re-engineering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbilisetty, Pratima; Boron, Mallorie; Nie, Huan; Ozhegov, Evgeny; Sun, Xue-Long

    2018-02-28

    Introduction of selectively chemical reactive groups at the cell surface enables site-specific cell surface labeling and modification opportunity, thus facilitating the capability to study the cell surface molecular structure and function and the molecular mechanism it underlies. Further, it offers the opportunity to change or improve a cell's functionality for interest of choice. In this study, two chemical reactive anchor lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-dibenzocyclooctyne (DSPE-PEG 2000 -DBCO) and cholesterol-PEG-dibenzocyclooctyne (CHOL-PEG 2000 -DBCO) were synthesized and their potential application for cell surface re-engineering via lipid fusion were assessed with RAW 264.7 cells as a model cell. Briefly, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with anchor lipids under various concentrations and at different incubation times. The successful incorporation of the chemical reactive anchor lipids was confirmed by biotinylation via copper-free click chemistry, followed by streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. In comparison, the cholesterol-based anchor lipid afforded a higher cell membrane incorporation efficiency with less internalization than the phospholipid-based anchor lipid. Low cytotoxicity of both anchor lipids upon incorporation into the RAW 264.7 cells was observed. Further, the cell membrane residence time of the cholesterol-based anchor lipid was evaluated with confocal microscopy. This study suggests the potential cell surface re-engineering applications of the chemical reactive anchor lipids.

  9. Thermal anchoring of wires in large scale superconducting coil test experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Dipak; Sharma, A.N.; Prasad, Upendra; Khristi, Yohan; Varmora, Pankaj; Doshi, Kalpesh; Pradhan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We addressed how thermal anchoring in large scale coil test is different compare to small cryogenic apparatus? • We did precise estimation of thermal anchoring length at 77 K and 4.2 K heat sink in large scale superconducting coil test experiment. • We addressed, the quality of anchoring without covering entire wires using Kapton/Teflon tape. • We obtained excellent results in temperature measurement without using GE Varnish by doubling estimated anchoring length. -- Abstract: Effective and precise thermal anchoring of wires in cryogenic experiment is mandatory to measure temperature in milikelvin accuracy and to avoid unnecessary cooling power due to additional heat conduction from room temperature (RT) to operating temperature (OT) through potential, field, displacement and stress measurement instrumentation wires. Instrumentation wires used in large scale superconducting coil test experiments are different compare to cryogenic apparatus in terms of unique construction and overall diameter/area due to errorless measurement in large time-varying magnetic field compare to small cryogenic apparatus, often shielded wires are used. Hence, along with other variables, anchoring techniques and required thermal anchoring length are entirely different in this experiment compare to cryogenic apparatus. In present paper, estimation of thermal anchoring length of five different types of instrumentation wires used in coils test campaign at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India has been discussed and some temperature measurement results of coils test campaign have been presented

  10. Career Anchors: Distribution and Impact on Job Satisfaction, the Israeli Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, Nira; Valency, Rony

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the career anchor concept developed by Edgar Schein. Design/methodology/approach: The paper focuses on the distribution of the eight career anchors, on a large heterogeneous sample and the differences in the distribution by gender and type of employment; and the impact of the congruence on job…

  11. Unintended anchors: Building rating systems and energy performance goals for U.S. buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Leidy; Mack, Daniel; Klapthor, Brent; Tunstall, Casey; Harrison, Jennilee

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., where buildings account for 40% of energy use, commercial buildings use more energy per unit area than ever before. However, exemplary buildings demonstrate the feasibility of much better energy performance at no additional first cost. This research examines one possible explanation for this inconsistency. The aim is to investigate whether the anchoring bias, which refers to our tendency to gravitate towards a pre-defined standard regardless of its relevance, influences energy performance goals in building design. The scope examines professionals who help set energy performance goals for U.S. buildings. Prior to being asked to set an energy performance goal, these professionals were randomly directed to one of three series of questions. One series set an anchor of 90% energy reduction beyond standard practice, one set a 30% anchor, and one set no anchor. Respondents exposed to the 90% anchor, and respondents exposed to no anchor at all, set higher energy performance goals than respondents exposed to the 30% anchor. These results suggest that building rating systems that only reward incremental energy improvements may inadvertently create anchors, thereby discouraging more advanced energy performance goals and inhibiting energy performance that is technically and economically feasible.

  12. Development of a New Nondestructive Inspection Strategy for Corroded Multistrand Anchor Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    parking structures, rock and soil anchors, houses, and many other structures. Figure 1 (left) and (middle) show a typical cable and multistrand anchor...primary tool to identify the ideal propagating modes, the inspection itself is typically carried out in the time domain. The selected tone- burst

  13. Model Test of Anchoring Effect on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Guang Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep rock masses show a different mechanical behavior compared with the shallow rock masses. They are classified into alternating fractured and intact zones during the excavation, which is known as zonal disintegration. Such phenomenon is a great disaster and will induce the different excavation and anchoring methodology. In this study, a 3D geomechanics model test was conducted to research the anchoring effect of zonal disintegration. The model was constructed with anchoring in a half and nonanchoring in the other half, to compare with each other. The optical extensometer and optical sensor were adopted to measure the displacement and strain changing law in the model test. The displacement laws of the deep surrounding rocks were obtained and found to be nonmonotonic versus the distance to the periphery. Zonal disintegration occurs in the area without anchoring and did not occur in the model under anchoring condition. By contrasting the phenomenon, the anchor effect of restraining zonal disintegration was revealed. And the formation condition of zonal disintegration was decided. In the procedure of tunnel excavation, the anchor strain was found to be alternation in tension and compression. It indicates that anchor will show the nonmonotonic law during suppressing the zonal disintegration.

  14. Membrane curvature enables N-Ras lipid anchor sorting to liquid-ordered membrane phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jannik Bruun; Jensen, Martin Borch; Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller

    2015-01-01

    Trafficking and sorting of membrane-anchored Ras GTPases are regulated by partitioning between distinct membrane domains. Here, in vitro experiments and microscopic molecular theory reveal membrane curvature as a new modulator of N-Ras lipid anchor and palmitoyl chain partitioning. Membrane...

  15. Analysis of timber and coating material on an iron anchor recovered off Aguada Bay, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Rao, B.R.; Shashikala, S.; Rao, R.V.; Khedekar, V.D.

    Shanked iron anchor measuring 3.30 m long with a 4.37 m wooden stock was recovered off Aguada Bay, Goa at a water depth of 11 m. The anchor has been tentatively dated contemporary with the maritime history of Goa and Portugal between the 16th and 17th...

  16. The Effect of Suture Anchor Insertion Angle on Calcaneus Pullout Strength: Challenging the Deadman's Angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, William M; Saucedo, Ramon P; Robinson, John D; Lo, Chung-Chieh Jason; Morris, Randal P; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2017-10-01

    Refractory cases of Achilles tendinopathy amenable to surgery may include reattachment of the tendon using suture anchors. However, there is paucity of information describing the optimal insertion angle to maximize the tendon footprint and anchor stability in the calcaneus. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the fixation strength of suture anchors inserted at 90° and 45° (the Deadman's angle) relative to the primary compressive trabeculae of the calcaneus. A total of 12 matched pairs of adult cadaveric calcanei were excised and potted to approximate their alignment in vivo. Each pair was implanted with 5.5-mm bioabsorbable suture anchors placed either perpendicular (90°) or oblique (45°) to the primary compressive trabeculae. A tensile load was applied until failure of anchor fixation. Differences in failure load and stiffness between anchor fixation angles were determined by paired t-tests. No significant differences were detected between perpendicular and oblique suture anchor insertion relative to primary compressive trabeculae in terms of load to failure or stiffness. This investigation suggests that the fixation strength of suture anchors inserted perpendicular to the primary compression trabeculae and at the Deadman's angle are possibly comparable. Biomechanical comparison study.

  17. Stone anchors from Sindhudurg Fort on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Gaur, A.S.

    , of which there are triangular and three grapnet-type, used to construct the jetty along with the locally available sand stone. The two remaining grapnet-type anchors are erected on the jetty for mooring purposes. It is found that none of the anchors were...

  18. Unlocking Hospitality Managers Career Transitions through Applying Schein's Career Anchors Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, David; Polla, Giovana; Heidl, Britta

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to unlock the career transitions of hospitality managers through applying Schein's career anchors theory. It seeks to understand how Schein's Career Anchors help explain the career transitions of managers in the Scottish hospitality industry. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts a non-sequential multi-method…

  19. Career Anchors: A New Concept in Career Development for the Professional Educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Thomas J.

    Created by Dr. Edgar Schein of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the career anchor model suggests that certain motivational/talent/value drives, formed through work experience, function to guide and constrain entire careers; and that such anchors are the source of stability that permits growth and change in other areas. The concept…

  20. Chemical Reactive Anchoring Lipids with Different Performance for Cell Surface Re-engineering Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Introduction of selectively chemical reactive groups at the cell surface enables site-specific cell surface labeling and modification opportunity, thus facilitating the capability to study the cell surface molecular structure and function and the molecular mechanism it underlies. Further, it offers the opportunity to change or improve a cell’s functionality for interest of choice. In this study, two chemical reactive anchor lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine–poly(ethylene glycol)–dibenzocyclooctyne (DSPE–PEG2000–DBCO) and cholesterol–PEG–dibenzocyclooctyne (CHOL–PEG2000–DBCO) were synthesized and their potential application for cell surface re-engineering via lipid fusion were assessed with RAW 264.7 cells as a model cell. Briefly, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with anchor lipids under various concentrations and at different incubation times. The successful incorporation of the chemical reactive anchor lipids was confirmed by biotinylation via copper-free click chemistry, followed by streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. In comparison, the cholesterol-based anchor lipid afforded a higher cell membrane incorporation efficiency with less internalization than the phospholipid-based anchor lipid. Low cytotoxicity of both anchor lipids upon incorporation into the RAW 264.7 cells was observed. Further, the cell membrane residence time of the cholesterol-based anchor lipid was evaluated with confocal microscopy. This study suggests the potential cell surface re-engineering applications of the chemical reactive anchor lipids. PMID:29503972