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Sample records for wall anchored proteinase

  1. Streptococcus thermophilus cell wall-anchored proteinase: release, purification, and biochemical and genetic characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Espla, M D; Garault, P; Monnet, V; Rul, F

    2000-11-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ 385 expresses a cell envelope proteinase (PrtS), which is characterized in the present work, both at the biochemical and genetic levels. Since PrtS is resistant to most classical methods of extraction from the cell envelopes, we developed a three-step process based on loosening of the cell wall by cultivation of the cells in the presence of glycine (20 mM), mechanical disruption (with alumina powder), and enzymatic treatment (lysozyme). The pure enzyme is a serine proteinase highly activated by Ca(2+) ions. Its activity was optimal at 37 degrees C and pH 7.5 with acetyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-paranitroanilide as substrate. The study of the hydrolysis of the chromogenic and casein substrates indicated that PrtS presented an intermediate specificity between the most divergent types of cell envelope proteinases from lactococci, known as the PI and PIII types. This result was confirmed by the sequence determination of the regions involved in substrate specificity, which were a mix between those of PI and PIII types, and also had unique residues. Sequence analysis of the PrtS encoding gene revealed that PrtS is a member of the subtilase family. It is a multidomain protein which is maturated and tightly anchored to the cell wall via a mechanism involving an LPXTG motif. PrtS bears similarities to cell envelope proteinases from pyogenic streptococci (C5a peptidase and cell surface proteinase) and lactic acid bacteria (PrtP, PrtH, and PrtB). The highest homologies were found with streptococcal proteinases which lack, as PrtS, one domain (the B domain) present in cell envelope proteinases from all other lactic acid bacteria.

  2. Positive role of cell wall anchored proteinase PrtP in adhesion of lactococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habimana, Olivier; Le Goff, Carine; Juillard, Vincent; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noelle; Buist, Girbe; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Briandet, Romain

    2007-01-01

    Background: The first step in biofilm formation is bacterial attachment to solid surfaces, which is dependent on the cell surface physico-chemical properties. Cell wall anchored proteins (CWAP) are among the known adhesins that confer the adhesive properties to pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria. To

  3. Reinforcement mechanism of multi-anchor wall with double wall facing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kouta; Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo

    2017-10-01

    The reinforced soil wall has high seismic performance as generally known. However, the seismic behavior has not been clarified accurately yet, especially on multi-anchor wall with double wall facing. Indefinite behavior of reinforced soil wall during earthquake make us complicated in case with adopting to the abutment, because of arrangement of anchor plate as reinforcement often different according to the width of roads. In this study, a series of centrifuge model tests were carried out to investigate the reinforcement mechanism of multi anchor wall with double wall facing from the perspective of the vertical earth pressure. Several types of reinforce arrangement and rigid wall were applied in order to verify the arch function in the reinforced regions. The test results show unique behavior of vertical earth pressure, which was affected by arch action. All the vertical earth pressure placed behind facing panel, are larger than that of middle part between facing panel despite of friction between backfill and facing panel. Similar results were obtained in case using rigid wall. On the other hands, the vertical earth pressure, which were measured at the 3cm high from bottom of model container, shows larger than that of bottom. This results show the existence of arch action between double walls. In addition, it implies that the wall facing of such soil structure confined the backfill as pseudo wall, which is very reason that the multi anchor wall with double wall facing has high seismic performance.

  4. Comprehensive Evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis Cell Wall-Anchored Proteins in Early Infective Endocarditis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L.; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified—a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (∼2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention. PMID:19703977

  5. Bacillus anthracis Sortase A (SrtA) Anchors LPXTG Motif-Containing Surface Proteins to the Cell Wall Envelope

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Andrew H.; Marraffini, Luciano A.; Glass, Elizabeth M.; DeBord, Kristin L.; Ton-That, Hung; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Cell wall-anchored surface proteins of gram-positive pathogens play important roles during the establishment of many infectious diseases, but the contributions of surface proteins to the pathogenesis of anthrax have not yet been revealed. Cell wall anchoring in Staphylococcus aureus occurs by a transpeptidation mechanism requiring surface proteins with C-terminal sorting signals as well as sortase enzymes. The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis encodes three sortase genes and eleven surfac...

  6. Uncertainty assessment of a dike with an anchored sheet pile wall using FEM

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    Rippi Aikaterini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dutch design codes for the dikes with retaining walls rely on Finite Element Analysis (FEM in combination with partial safety factors. However, this can lead to conservative designs. For this reason, in this study, a reliability analysis is carried out with FEM calculations aiming to demonstrate the feasibility of reliability analysis for a dike with an anchored sheet pile wall modelled in the 2D FEM, Plaxis. Sensitivity and reliability analyses were carried out and enabled by coupling the uncertainty package, OpenTURNS and Plaxis. The most relevant (ultimate limit states concern the anchor, the sheet pile wall, the soil body failure (global instability and finally the system. The case was used to investigate the applicability of the First Order Reliability Method (FORM and Directional Sampling (DS to analysing these limit states. The final goal is to estimate the probability of failure and identify the most important soil properties that affect the behaviour of each component and the system as a whole. The results of this research can be used to assess and optimize the current design procedure for dikes with retaining walls.

  7. Effect of historical earthquakes on pre-stressed anchor tie back diaphragm wall and on near-by building

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    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-stressed tie back anchored diaphragm walls are considered one of the safest lateral supports which help in overall stability when there is a significant difference in land level between back and front of these walls. Permanent lateral supports to these walls are frequently represented by supporting it laterally with foundation and floor slabs of the building. In this paper a special study of one raw anchor diaphragm wall subjected to different earthquake dynamic loads will be presented. The wall retains an excavation of 9.5 m and supports laterally a near-by 5 floor building. Five historical strong motions with different fundamental frequencies are subjected on the wall. The wall displacement, straining actions, anchor extreme force and the influence of variation of anchor stiffness are calculated using a dynamic Plaxis finite element program. The soil is considered as elasto-plastic material and represented using Mohr–Coulomb criteria, the wall and the anchor are considered to behave elastically. Prescribed displacement at the lower bottom boundary represents the earthquake motion. Far left and right absorbent boundaries are assumed to prevent dynamic wave reflection. Four static phases representing construction procedure and one dynamic loading phase are considered. It is found that the straining actions of different historical earthquakes match in shape with each other, the only change is in the amplitude which is affected by earthquake fundamental frequency and its intensity. The maximum dynamic lateral displacement of the wall is at its free top. The near-by building shows a differential settlement towards the wall which causes a change in the sign and amplitude of the straining actions. Increasing the stiffness of anchor was also studied and it was found that it reduces too much the maximum dynamic top wall lateral displacement.

  8. Study of Individual Characteristic Abdominal Wall Thickness Based on Magnetic Anchored Surgical Instruments

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    Ding-Hui Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic anchored surgical instruments (MASI, relying on magnetic force, can break through the limitations of the single port approach in dexterity. Individual characteristic abdominal wall thickness (ICAWT deeply influences magnetic force that determines the safety of MASI. The purpose of this study was to research the abdominal wall characteristics in MASI applied environment to find ICAWT, and then construct an artful method to predict ICAWT, resulting in better safety and feasibility for MASI. Methods: For MASI, ICAWT is referred to the thickness of thickest point in the applied environment. We determined ICAWT through finding the thickest point in computed tomography scans. We also investigated the traits of abdominal wall thickness to discover the factor that can be used to predict ICAWT. Results: Abdominal wall at C point in the middle third lumbar vertebra plane (L3 is the thickest during chosen points. Fat layer thickness plays a more important role in abdominal wall thickness than muscle layer thickness. "BMI-ICAWT" curve was obtained based on abdominal wall thickness of C point in L3 plane, and the expression was as follow: f(x = P1 × x 2 + P2 × x + P3, where P1 = 0.03916 (0.01776, 0.06056, P2 = 1.098 (0.03197, 2.164, P3 = −18.52 (−31.64, −5.412, R-square: 0.99. Conclusions: Abdominal wall thickness of C point at L3 could be regarded as ICAWT. BMI could be a reliable predictor of ICAWT. In the light of "BMI-ICAWT" curve, we may conveniently predict ICAWT by BMI, resulting a better safety and feasibility for MASI.

  9. Mesh fixation with a barbed anchor suture results in significantly less strangulation of the abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Calvin; Joseph, Rohan; Salas, Nilson; Reardon, Patrick R; Bass, Barbara L; Dunkin, Brian J

    2012-05-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair using an underlay mesh frequently requires suture fixation across the abdominal wall, which results in significant postoperative pain. This study investigates the utility of a novel mesh fixation technique to reduce the strangulation force on the abdominal wall. Multiple 2-cm(2) pieces of polyester mesh (Parietex Composite, Covidien) were placed as an underlay against a porcine abdominal wall. Fixation was accomplished using either the standard 0-polyglyconate or the 0-polyglyconate barbed anchor suture designed to hold in tissue without the need to tie a knot (V-Loc 180; Covidien). Suture fixation began with a stab wound incision in the skin. A suture-passing device then was used to pass the suture across the abdominal wall and through the mesh. The suture passer was removed and reintroduced through the same stab wound incision but at a different fascial entry point 1.5 cm away. The tail of the suture was grasped and pulled up through both the mesh and the abdominal wall, creating a full-thickness U-stitch. One tail of the suture was attached to a tensiometer, and the strangulation force on the abdominal wall was measured while the suture was tied (standard) or looped (barbed). To compare pullout force, the tensiometer was attached to either the mesh or the suture, and traction was applied until material failure or suture pull through. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Comparisons were performed using Student's t-test. Eight pieces of mesh were placed for each suture. The average force required to secure the barbed suture (0.59 ± 0.08 kg) was significantly less than the force needed to secure the standard suture (2.17 ± 0.58 kg) (P suture pullout forces with the mesh failure forces. Although the pullout force for the standard suture is significantly greater than for the barbed suture, both sutures have a pullout strength significantly greater than the mesh failure force. Table 1 Suture fixation forces for

  10. Automatic Thickness and Volume Estimation of Sprayed Concrete on Anchored Retaining Walls from Terrestrial LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Puente, I.; GonzálezJorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2016-06-01

    When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain), resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  11. AUTOMATIC THICKNESS AND VOLUME ESTIMATION OF SPRAYED CONCRETE ON ANCHORED RETAINING WALLS FROM TERRESTRIAL LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Martínez-Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain, resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  12. Sortase A substrate specificity in GBS pilus 2a cell wall anchoring.

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    Francesca Necchi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae, also referred to as Group B Streptococcus (GBS, is one of the most common causes of life-threatening bacterial infections in infants. In recent years cell surface pili have been identified in several Gram-positive bacteria, including GBS, as important virulence factors and promising vaccine candidates. In GBS, three structurally distinct types of pili have been discovered (pilus 1, 2a and 2b, whose structural subunits are assembled in high-molecular weight polymers by specific class C sortases. In addition, the highly conserved housekeeping sortase A (SrtA, whose main role is to link surface proteins to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan by a transpeptidation reaction, is also involved in pili cell wall anchoring in many bacteria. Through in vivo mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the LPXTG sorting signal of the minor ancillary protein (AP2 is essential for pilus 2a anchoring. We successfully produced a highly purified recombinant SrtA (SrtA(ΔN40 able to specifically hydrolyze the sorting signal of pilus 2a minor ancillary protein (AP2-2a and catalyze in vitro the transpeptidation reaction between peptidoglycan analogues and the LPXTG motif, using both synthetic fluorescent peptides and recombinant proteins. By contrast, SrtA(ΔN40 does not catalyze the transpeptidation reaction with substrate-peptides mimicking sorting signals of the other pilus 2a subunits (the backbone protein and the major ancillary protein. Thus, our results add further insight into the proposed model of GBS pilus 2a assembly, in which SrtA is required for pili cell wall covalent attachment, acting exclusively on the minor accessory pilin, representing the terminal subunit located at the base of the pilus.

  13. Regulated shift from helical to polar localization of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall-anchored proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Serawit; Personnic, Nicolas; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2011-09-01

    Many virulence factors of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens are covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan (PG) by sortase enzymes. However, for rod-shaped bacteria little is known about the spatiotemporal organization of these surface proteins in the cell wall. Here we report the three-dimensional (3D) localization of the PG-bound virulence factors InlA, InlH, InlJ, and SvpA in the envelope of Listeria monocytogenes under different growth conditions. We found that all PG-anchored proteins are positioned along the lateral cell wall in nonoverlapping helices. However, these surface proteins can also become localized at the pole and asymmetrically distributed when specific regulatory pathways are activated. InlA and InlJ are enriched at poles when expressed at high levels in exponential-phase bacteria. InlA and InlH, which are σ(B)dependent, specifically relocalize to the septal cell wall and subsequently to the new pole in cells entering stationary phase. The accumulation of InlA and InlH in the septal region also occurs when oxidative stress impairs bacterial growth. In contrast, the iron-dependent protein SvpA is present at the old pole and is excluded from the septum and new pole of bacteria grown under low-iron conditions. We conclude that L. monocytogenes rapidly reorganizes the spatial localization of its PG proteins in response to changes in environmental conditions such as nutrient deprivation or other stresses. This dynamic control would distribute virulence factors at specific sites during the infectious process.

  14. Analysis of Flexible Anchored Hollow WPC Quay Walls of the New Berth in Tur, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ayman

    2017-10-01

    A seawall, also known as a bulkhead or retaining wall, is a structure built to reduce the effects of strong waves and to defend costal land from erosion. Traditionally, seawalls are made of steel, timber or concrete construction. Composite materials, however, have been recently introduced for their ease of installation/maintenance in dry processing, low cost, and environmentally friendly materials. A wood plastic composite (WPC) seawall system has been developed and patented for its unique hollow structure that can give greater stiffness and stability under various external stresses. This paper describes the development of design method used in the analysis of the WPC walls. The main challenge during the physical excavation works is to limit the deformations involved in order to minimize damage on adjacent structures. The deformations depend largely on the excavation and strutting procedures, but also on the properties of the structural elements like the soil, the sheet pile and strutting members. The detailed design procedure involves numerical analyses, national regulations and common practice considerations. The contribution of finite element method in this field was used herein to determine the lateral movements, the bending moments of the wall, the passive earth pressure of the soil and the tensile force exerted by the anchor rods. The overall objectives of this research can be divided into two categories, First calibration of the finite element model for the new Tur quay walls (the case study) and reviewing the results of the steel cross section that chosen and the suggested one. Second, analysis and comparing the results of WPC cross-sections with the designed Steel sheet pile wall (SPW).

  15. Domain walls and anchoring transitions mimicking nematic biaxiality in the oxadiazole bent-core liquid crystal C7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ki; Cukrov, Greta; Xiang, Jie; Shin, Sung-Tae; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-05-28

    We investigate the origin of "secondary disclinations" that were recently described as new evidence of a biaxial nematic phase in an oxadiazole bent-core thermotropic liquid crystal C7. Using an assortment of optical techniques such as polarizing optical microscopy, LC PolScope, and fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary disclinations represent non-singular domain walls formed in a uniaxial nematic phase during the surface anchoring transition, in which surface orientation of the director changes from tangential (parallel to the bounding plates) to tilted. Each domain wall separates two regions with the director tilted in opposite azimuthal directions. At the centre of the wall, the director remains parallel to the bounding plates. The domain walls can be easily removed by applying a moderate electric field. The anchoring transition is explained by the balance of (a) the intrinsic perpendicular surface anchoring produced by the polyimide aligning layer and (b) tangential alignment caused by ionic impurities forming electric double layers. The model is supported by the fact that the temperature of the tangentially tilted anchoring transition decreases as the cell thickness increases and as the concentration of ionic species (added salt) increases. We also demonstrate that the surface alignment is strongly affected by thermal degradation of the samples. This study shows that C7 exhibits only a uniaxial nematic phase and demonstrates yet another mechanism (formation of "secondary disclinations") by which a uniaxial nematic phase can mimic a biaxial nematic behaviour.

  16. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  17. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins.

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    Sarah Ghamrawi

    Full Text Available Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins. We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence.

  18. Effect of dewatering on seismic performance of multi-anchor wall due to high ground water level

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    Kobayashi, Makoto; Miura, Kinya; Konami, Takeharu; Hayashi, Taketo; Sato, Hiroki

    2017-10-01

    Previous research reported that the ground water in the backfill of reinforced soil wall made it deteriorate. According to the damage investigation of Great East Earthquake 2011, the reinforced soil structure due to high ground water level by seismic wave were deformed remarkably. Some of them classified ultimate limit state or restorability limit state. However, more than 90% of reinforced soil structure, which suffered from this earthquake, were classified into no damage condition. Therefore, it is necessary that the seismic behaviors of multi-anchor wall due to seepage flow should be clarified in order to adopt the performance-based design in such reinforced soil structure. In this study, a series of centrifugal shaking table tests were conducted to investigate the seismic behavior of multi-anchor wall due to high ground water level. The reinforced drainage pipes were installed into the backfill in order to verify the dewatering effect and additional reinforcement. Furthermore, to check only the dewatering effect, the model tests was carried out with several ground water table that was modeled the case reinforced drainage pipes installed. The test results show unique behavior of reinforced region that moved integrally. This implies that the reinforced region has been behaved as if it became one mass, and this behavior make this structure increase seismic performance. Thus, the effectiveness of dewatering was observed remarkably because of decreasing the inertial force during earthquake.

  19. C lostridium difficile surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall using CWB2 motifs that recognise the anionic polymer PSII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willing, Stephanie E.; Candela, Thomas; Shaw, Helen Alexandra; Seager, Zoe; Mesnage, Stéphane; Fagan, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gram‐positive surface proteins can be covalently or non‐covalently anchored to the cell wall and can impart important properties on the bacterium in respect of cell envelope organisation and interaction with the environment. We describe here a mechanism of protein anchoring involving tandem CWB2 motifs found in a large number of cell wall proteins in the Firmicutes. In the Clostridium difficile cell wall protein family, we show the three tandem repeats of the CWB2 motif are essential for correct anchoring to the cell wall. CWB2 repeats are non‐identical and cannot substitute for each other, as shown by the secretion into the culture supernatant of proteins containing variations in the patterns of repeats. A conserved Ile Leu Leu sequence within the CWB2 repeats is essential for correct anchoring, although a preceding proline residue is dispensable. We propose a likely genetic locus encoding synthesis of the anionic polymer PSII and, using RNA knock‐down of key genes, reveal subtle effects on cell wall composition. We show that the anionic polymer PSII binds two cell wall proteins, SlpA and Cwp2, and these interactions require the CWB2 repeats, defining a new mechanism of protein anchoring in Gram‐positive bacteria. PMID:25649385

  20. Evaluation of performance of analytical and numerical methods to account for liquefaction effects on the seismic response of anchored quay walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elsäcker, W.A.; Besseling, F.; Lengkeek, H.J.; Brinkgreve, R.B.J.; de Gijt, J.G.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Liquefaction induced by earthquakes has shown to have potential devastating influence on seismic performance of anchored quay walls. Therefore, measures to mitigate liquefaction are commonly part of the design of quay walls in
    seismically active regions. Such mitigation measures are costly.

  1. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    2006-01-01

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anch...

  2. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anch...

  3. Wood cell-wall structure requires local 2D-microtubule disassembly by a novel plasma membrane-anchored protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Yoshihisa; Iida, Yuki; Kondo, Yuki; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2010-07-13

    Plant cells have evolved cortical microtubules, in a two-dimensional space beneath the plasma membrane, that regulate patterning of cellulose deposition. Although recent studies have revealed that several microtubule-associated proteins facilitate self-organization of transverse cortical microtubules, it is still unknown how diverse patterns of cortical microtubules are organized in different xylem cells, which are the major components of wood. Using our newly established in vitro xylem cell differentiation system, we found that a novel microtubule end-tracking protein, microtubule depletion domain 1 (MIDD1), was anchored to distinct plasma membrane domains and promoted local microtubule disassembly, resulting in pits on xylem cell walls. The introduction of RNA interference for MIDD1 resulted in the failure of local microtubule depletion and the formation of secondary walls without pits. Conversely, the overexpression of MIDD1 reduced microtubule density. MIDD1 has two coiled-coil domains for the binding to microtubules and for the anchorage to plasma membrane domains, respectively. Combination of the two coils caused end tracking of microtubules during shrinkage and suppressed their rescue events. Our results indicate that MIDD1 integrates spatial information in the plasma membrane with cortical microtubule dynamics for determining xylem cell wall pattern. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Uncertainty assessment of a dike with an anchored sheet pile wall using FEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rippi, Aikaterini; Nuttall, Jonathan; Teixeira, Ana; Schweckendiek, T.; Lang, M.; Klijn, F.; Samuels, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch design codes for the dikes with retaining walls rely on Finite Element Analysis (FEM) in combination with partial safety factors. However, this can lead to conservative designs. For this reason, in this study, a reliability analysis is carried out with FEM calculations aiming to

  5. Model Solutions for Performance-Based Seismic Analysis of an Anchored Sheet Pile Quay Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, C.J.W.; Peters, D.J.; de Gijt, J.G.; Metrikine, A.; Jonkman, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional seismic designs of quay walls in ports are mostly based on pseudo-static analysis. A more advanced alternative is the Performance-Based Design (PBD) method, which evaluates permanent deformations and amounts of (repairable) damage under seismic loading. The aim of this study is to

  6. Cell Wall-anchored Proteins of Enterococcus faecium: Exploring a Novel Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, A.P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304820741

    2009-01-01

    The past 4 years my research focussed on the identification, expression and function of surface-exposed LPXTG proteins and filamentous structures (also called pili or fimbriae) at the Enterococcus faecium cell wall. E. faecium is a commensal organism of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but the

  7. The cell envelope subtilisin-like proteinase is a virulence determinant for Streptococcus suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottschalk Marcelo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus suis is a major swine pathogen and zoonotic agent that mainly causes septicemia, meningitis, and endocarditis. It has recently been suggested that proteinases produced by S. suis (serotype 2 are potential virulence determinants. In the present study, we screened a S. suis mutant library created by the insertion of Tn917 transposon in order to isolate a mutant deficient in a cell surface proteinase. We characterized the gene and assessed the proteinase for its potential as a virulence factor. Results Two mutants (G6G and M3G possessing a single Tn917 insertion were isolated. The affected gene coded for a protein (SSU0757 that shared a high degree of identity with Streptococccus thermophilus PrtS (95.9% and, to a lesser extent, with Streptococcus agalactiae CspA (49.5%, which are cell surface serine proteinases. The SSU0757 protein had a calculated molecular mass of 169.6 kDa and contained the catalytic triad characteristic of subtilisin family proteinases: motif I (Asp200, motif II (His239, and motif III (Ser568. SSU0757 also had the Gram-positive cell wall anchoring motif (Leu-Pro-X-Thr-Gly at the carboxy-terminus, which was followed by a hydrophobic domain. All the S. suis isolates tested, which belonged to different serotypes, possessed the gene encoding the SSU0757 protein. The two mutants devoid of subtilisin-like proteinase activity had longer generation times and were more susceptible to killing by whole blood than the wild-type parent strain P1/7. The virulence of the G6G and M3G mutants was compared to the wild-type strain in the CD1 mouse model. Significant differences in mortality rates were noted between the P1/7 group and the M3G and G6G groups (p Conclusion In summary, we identified a gene coding for a cell surface subtilisin-like serine proteinase that is widely distributed in S. suis. Evidences were brought for the involvement of this proteinase in S. suis virulence.

  8. Surface-Anchored Poly(4-vinylpyridine)–Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube–Metal Composites for Gas Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Bora

    2016-08-05

    A platform for chemiresistive gas detectors based upon single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersions stabilized by poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) covalently immobilized onto a glass substrate was developed. To fabricate these devices, a glass substrate with gold electrodes is treated with 3-bromopropyltrichlorosilane. The resulting alkyl bromide coating presents groups that can react with the P4VP to covalently bond (anchor) the polymer–SWCNT composite to the substrate. Residual pyridyl groups in P4VP not consumed in this quaternization reaction are available to coordinate metal nanoparticles or ions chosen to confer selectivity and sensitivity to target gas analytes. Generation of P4VP coordinated to silver nanoparticles produces an enhanced response to ammonia gas. The incorporation of soft Lewis acidic Pd2+ cations by binding PdCl2 to P4VP yields a selective and highly sensitive device that changes resistance upon exposure to vapors of thioethers. The latter materials have utility for odorized fuel leak detection, microbial activity, and breath diagnostics. A third demonstration makes use of permanganate incorporation to produce devices with large responses to vapors of volatile organic compounds that are susceptible to oxidation.

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall-Anchored Protein Clumping Factor A Is an Important T Cell Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Keenan A; Leech, John M; Lalor, Stephen J; McCormack, Niamh; Geoghegan, Joan A; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2017-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, and vaccines offer a potential solution to this epidemic of antimicrobial resistance. Targeting of specific T cell subsets is now considered crucial for next-generation anti- S. aureus vaccines; however, there is a paucity of information regarding T cell antigens of S. aureus This study highlights the importance of cell wall-anchored proteins as human CD4 + T cell activators capable of driving antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 cell activation. Clumping factor A (ClfA), which contains N1, N2, and N3 binding domains, was found to be a potent human T cell activator. We further investigated which subdomains of ClfA were involved in T cell activation and found that the full-length ClfA N123 and N23 were potent Th1 and Th17 activators. Interestingly, the N1 subdomain was capable of exclusively activating Th1 cells. Furthermore, when these subdomains were used in a model vaccine, N23 and N1 offered Th1- and Th17-mediated systemic protection in mice upon intraperitoneal challenge. Overall, however, full-length ClfA N123 is required for maximal protection both locally and systemically. Copyright © 2017 Lacey et al.

  10. Deletion of MCD 4 involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor synthesis leads to an increase in beta-1,6-glucan level and a decrease in GPI-anchored protein and mannan levels in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneesri, Jaruwan; Azuma, Masayuki; Sakai, Yumiko; Igarashi, Koichi; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko; Ooshima, Hiroshi

    2005-04-01

    Most proteins involved in the synthesis of the GPI core structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are essential for growth. To explore the relationship between the GPI anchor structure and beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, we screened deletion mutants in genes involved in GPI synthesis for osmotic remedial growth. Heterozygous diploid strains were dissected on medium with osmotic support and slow growth of the mcd 4 deletion mutant was observed. The mcd 4 mutant showed abnormal morphology and cell aggregation, and was hypersensitive to SDS, hygromycin B and K1 killer toxin. Incorporation of GPI cell wall proteins was examined using a GPI-Flo 1 fusion protein. The result suggested that the mcd 4 deletion causes a decrease in GPI cell wall proteins levels. The mutation also caused a decrease in mannan levels and an increase in alkali-insoluble beta-1,6-glucan and chitin levels in the cell wall.

  11. Cdc1 removes the ethanolamine phosphate of the first mannose of GPI anchors and thereby facilitates the integration of GPI proteins into the yeast cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Hector M; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Temperature-sensitive cdc1(ts) mutants are reported to stop the cell cycle upon a shift to 30°C in early G2, that is, as small budded cells having completed DNA replication but unable to duplicate the spindle pole body. A recent report showed that PGAP5, a human homologue of CDC1, acts as a phosphodiesterase removing an ethanolamine phosphate (EtN-P) from mannose 2 of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, thus permitting efficient endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport of GPI proteins. We find that the essential CDC1 gene can be deleted in mcd4∆ cells, which do not attach EtN-P to mannose 1 of the GPI anchor, suggesting that Cdc1 removes the EtN-P added by Mcd4. Cdc1-314(ts) mutants do not accumulate GPI proteins in the ER but have a partial secretion block later in the secretory pathway. Growth tests and the genetic interaction profile of cdc1-314(ts) pinpoint a distinct cell wall defect. Osmotic support restores GPI protein secretion and actin polarization but not growth. Cell walls of cdc1-314(ts) mutants contain large amounts of GPI proteins that are easily released by β-glucanases and not attached to cell wall β1,6-glucans and that retain their original GPI anchor lipid. This suggests that the presumed transglycosidases Dfg5 and Dcw1 of cdc1-314(ts) transfer GPI proteins to cell wall β1,6-glucans inefficiently. © 2014 Vazquez et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Trapping of defect point to improve response time via controlled azimuthal anchoring in a vertically aligned liquid crystal cell with polymer wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Youn Sik; Lee, Hee Kyu; Lee, Seung Hee [Polymer BIN Fusion Research Center, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Chonju, Chonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Jae-Jin; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon [AMLCD Division, Samsung Electronics, Kiheung, Kyunggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lu, Ruibo; Wu, Shin-Tson [College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: lsh1@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2008-03-07

    Conventional multi-domain vertically aligned liquid crystal (LC) cells have defect points due to the collision of LC directors during the formation of multiple domains. In addition, the location of defects changes with time resulting in a slow response time. This paper proposes a robust vertically aligned LC cell, where the LCs are locked by polymer walls, and the azimuthal anchoring on the surface of the alignment layer is controlled by the polymerization of a UV curable reactive mesogen monomer. As a result, the defect points are trapped at a single position, resulting in a greatly improved response time.

  13. Improved methods for binding acma-type protein anchor fusions yo cell-wall material of micro-organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis; Ramasamy, R.; Steen, Anton; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Kuipers, Oscar

    2002-01-01

    The invention provides a method for improving binding of a proteinaceous substance to cell-wall material of a Gram-positive bacterium, said substance comprising an AcmA cell wall binding domain or homolog or functional derivative thereof, said method comprising treating said cell-wall material with

  14. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  15. In silicio identification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, L H; Tettelin, H; Vossen, J H; Ram, A F; van den Ende, H; Klis, F M

    1997-12-01

    Use of the Von Heijne algorithm allowed the identification of 686 open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode proteins with a potential N-terminal signal sequence for entering the secretory pathway. On further analysis, 51 of these proteins contain a potential glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attachment signal. Seven additional ORFs were found to belong to this group. Upon examination of the possible GPI-attachment sites, it was found that in yeast the most probable amino acids for GPI-attachment as asparagine and glycine. In yeast, GPI-proteins are found at the cell surface, either attached to the plasma-membrane or as an intrinsic part of the cell wall. It was noted that plasma-membrane GPI-proteins possess a dibasic residue motif just before their predicted GPI-attachment site. Based on this, and on homologies between proteins, families of plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins were assigned, revealing 20 potential plasma-membrane and 38 potential cell wall proteins. For members of three plasma-membrane protein families, a function has been described. On the other hand, most of the cell wall proteins seem to be structural components of the wall, responsive to different growth conditions. The GPI-attachment site of yeast slightly differs from mammalian cells. This might be of use in the development of anti-fungal drugs.

  16. One repeat of the cell wall binding domain is sufficient for anchoring the Lactobacillus acidophilus surface layer protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, E.; Pouwels, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    The N-terminal repeat (SAC1) of the S-protein of Lactobacillus acidophilus bound efficiently and specifically to cell wall fragments (CWFs) when fused to green fluorescent protein, whereas the C-terminal repeat (SAC2) did not. Treatment of CWFs with hydrofluoric acid, but not phenol, prevented

  17. Increase of the adhesion ability and display of a rumen fungal xylanase on the cell surface of Lactobacillus casei by using a listerial cell-wall-anchoring protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Hsiang-Yun; Yu, Bi; Liu, Chi-Te; Liu, Je-Ruei

    2014-02-01

    Lactobacillus, which has great adhesion ability to intestinal mucosa and is able to hydrolyse plant cell walls, can be used more efficiently as a feed additive. To increase the adhesion ability and display a fungal xylanase on the cell surface of Lactobacillus casei, the Listeria monocytogenes cell-wall-anchoring protein gene, mub, was introduced into L. casei ATCC 393 cells and used as a fusion partner to display the rumen fungal xylanase XynCDBFV on the cell surface of the transformed strains. The transformed strain L. casei pNZ-mub, which harboured mub gene, displayed recombinant Mub on its cell surface and showed greater adhesion ability to Caco-2 cells than the parental strain. The transformed strain L. casei pNZ-mub/xyn, which harboured mub-xynCDBFV fusion gene, acquired the capacity to break down oat spelt xylan and exhibited greater competition ability against the adhesion of L. monocytogenes to Caco-2 cells, in comparison with the parental strain. Mub has a potential to be used as a fusion partner to display heterologous proteins on the cell surface of Lactobacillus. Moreover, this is the first report of the successful display of xylanase on the cell surface of Lactobacillus. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Functional Characterization and Localization of a Bacillus subtilis Sortase and Its Substrate and Use of This Sortase System To Covalently Anchor a Heterologous Protein to the B. subtilis Cell Wall for Surface Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Pei Xiong; Wang, Christopher L. C.

    2012-01-01

    Sortases catalyze the covalent anchoring of proteins to the cell surface on Gram-positive bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis suggests the presence of structural genes encoding sortases and their substrates in the Bacillus subtilis genome. In this study, a β-lactamase reporter was fused to the cell wall anchoring domain from a putative sortase substrate, YhcR. Covalent anchoring of this fusion protein to the cell wall was confirmed by using the eight-protease-deficient B. subtilis strain WB800 as the host. Inactivation of yhcS abolished the cell wall anchoring reaction. The amounts of fusion protein anchored to the cell wall were proportional to the levels of YhcS. These data demonstrate that YhcS and YhcR are the sortase and sortase substrate, respectively, in B. subtilis. Furthermore, yhcS is not essential for the survival of B. subtilis under the cultivation condition tested. YhcR fusions were distributed helically in the lateral cell wall. Interestingly, when viewed with an epifluorescence microscope, YhcS also appeared to form short helical arcs. This is the first report to illustrate such distribution of sortases in a rod-shaped bacterium. Models for the spatial distribution of both the sortase and its substrate are discussed. The amount of the reporters displayed on the surface was unambiguously quantified via a unique strategy. Under optimal conditions with the overproduction of YhcS, 47,300 YhcR fusions could be displayed per cell. Displayed reporters were biologically functional and surface accessible. Characterization of the sortase-substrate system allowed the successful development of a YhcR-based covalent surface display system. This system may have various biotechnological applications. PMID:22020651

  19. Potyviral NIa proteinase, a proteinase with novel deoxyribonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anindya, Roy; Savithri, Handanahal S

    2004-07-30

    The NIa proteinase from pepper vein banding virus (PVBV) is a sequence-specific proteinase required for processing of viral polyprotein in the cytoplasm. It accumulates in the nucleus of the infected plant cell and forms inclusion bodies. The function of this protein in the nucleus is not clear. The purified recombinant NIa proteinase was active, and the mutation of the catalytic residues His-46, Asp-81, and Cys-151 resulted in complete loss of activity. Most interesting, the PVBV NIa proteinase exhibited previously unidentified activity, namely nonspecific double-stranded DNA degradation. This DNase activity of the NIa proteinase showed an absolute requirement for Mg(2+). Site-specific mutational analysis showed that of the three catalytic residues, Asp-81 was the crucial residue for DNase activity. Mutation of His-46 and Cys-151 had no effect on the DNase activity, whereas mutant D81N was partially active, and D81G was completely inactive. Based on kinetic analysis and molecular modeling, a metal ion-dependent catalysis similar to that observed in other nonspecific DNases is proposed. Similar results were obtained with glutathione S-transferase-fused PVBV NIa proteinase and tobacco etch virus NIa proteinase, confirming that the DNase function is an intrinsic property of potyviral NIa proteinase. The NIa protein present in the infected plant nuclear extract also showed the proteinase and the DNase activities, suggesting that the PVBV NIa protein that accumulates in the nucleus late in the infection cycle might serve to degrade the host DNA. Thus the dual function of the NIa proteinase could play an important role in the life cycle of the virus.

  20. Non-covalently anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes with hexa-decafluorinated zinc phthalocyanine as ppb level chemiresistive chlorine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar; Mahajan, Aman; Bedi, R. K.; Kumar, Subodh; Debnath, A. K.; Aswal, D. K.

    2018-01-01

    A cost effective solution assembly method has been explored for preparing zinc(II)1,2,3,4,8,9,10,11,15,16,17,18,22,23,24,25-hexa-decafluoro-29H,31H-phthalocyanine/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH) hybrid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) investigations confirm the non-covalent anchoring of F16ZnPc onto MWCNTs-COOH through п-п stacking interactions. Further, a highly sensitive and selective chemiresistive Cl2 sensor has been fabricated using F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH hybrid. The response of sensor is found to be 21.28% for 2 ppm of Cl2 with a response time of 14 s and theoretical detection limit of the sensor is found down to 0.06 ppb. The improved Cl2 sensing characteristics of hybrid are found to be originated from the synergetic interaction between F16ZnPc and MWCNTs-COOH. The underlying mechanism for improved gas sensing performance of F16ZnPc/MWCNTs-COOH sensor towards Cl2 has been explained using Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies.

  1. Three-Dimensional Graphene/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Anchored with SnO2 Nanoparticles for High Performance Lithium Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Fang, Fang; Yuan, Tao; Yang, Junhe; Chen, Liang; Yao, Chi; Zheng, Shiyou; Sun, Dalin

    2017-02-01

    A unique 3D graphene-single walled carbon nanotube (G-SWNT) aerogel anchored with SnO2 nanoparticles (SnO2@G-SWCNT) is fabricated by the hydrothermal self-assembly process. The influences of mass ratio of SWCNT to graphene on structure and electrochemical properties of SnO2@G-SWCNT are investigated systematically. The SnO2@G-SWCNT composites show excellent electrochemical performance in Li-ion batteries; for instance, at a current density of 100 mA g(-1), a specific capacity of 758 mAh g(-1) was obtained for the SnO2@G-SWCNT with 50% SWCNT in G-SWCNT and the Coulombic efficiency is close to 100% after 200 cycles; even at current density of 1 A g(-1), it can still maintain a stable specific capacity of 537 mAh g(-1) after 300 cycles. It is believed that the 3D G-SWNT architecture provides a flexible conductive matrix for loading the SnO2, facilitating the electronic and ionic transportation and mitigating the volume variation of the SnO2 during lithiation/delithiation. This work also provides a facile and reasonable strategy to solve the pulverization and agglomeration problem of other transition metal oxides as electrode materials.

  2. Digestive proteinases of larvae of the corn earworm, Heliothis zea: characterization, distribution, and dietary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, C J; Kang, J; Rice, W C; McIntosh, A H; Chippendale, G M; Schubert, K R

    1991-01-01

    Proteinases and peptidases from the intestinal tract of fifth-instar larvae of Heliothis (= Helicoverpa) zea (Boddie) (Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) were characterized based on their substrate specificity, tissue of origin, and pH optimum. Activity corresponding to trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidases A and B, and leucine aminopeptidase was detected in regurgitated fluids, midgut contents, and midgut wall. High levels of proteinase activity were detected in whole midgut homogenates, with much lower levels being observed in foregut and salivary gland homogenates. In addition, enzyme levels were determined from midgut lumen contents, midgut wall homogenates, and regurgitated fluids. Proteinase activities were highest in the regurgitated fluids and midgut lumen contents, with the exception of leucine aminopeptidase activity, which was found primarily in the midgut wall. Larvae fed their natural diet of soybean leaves had digestive proteinase levels that were similar to those of larvae fed artificial diet. No major differences in midgut proteinase activity were detected between larvae reared under axenic or xenic conditions, indicating that the larvae are capable of digesting proteins in the absence of gut microorganisms. The effect of pH on the activity of each proteinase was studied. The pH optima for the major proteinases were determined to be pH 8.0-8.5 for trypsin, when tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester was used as the substrate; and pH 7.5-8.0 for chymotrypsin, when benzoyl-L-tyrosine ethyl ester was used as the substrate.

  3. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelai...

  4. Anchor Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Olle; Rönnbäck, Lars; Bergholtz, Maria; Johannesson, Paul; Wohed, Petia

    Maintaining and evolving data warehouses is a complex, error prone, and time consuming activity. The main reason for this state of affairs is that the environment of a data warehouse is in constant change, while the warehouse itself needs to provide a stable and consistent interface to information spanning extended periods of time. In this paper, we propose a modeling technique for data warehousing, called anchor modeling, that offers non-destructive extensibility mechanisms, thereby enabling robust and flexible management of changes in source systems. A key benefit of anchor modeling is that changes in a data warehouse environment only require extensions, not modifications, to the data warehouse. This ensures that existing data warehouse applications will remain unaffected by the evolution of the data warehouse, i.e. existing views and functions will not have to be modified as a result of changes in the warehouse model.

  5. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  6. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  7. Serine proteinase from Cucurbita ficifolia seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryjański, M; Otlewski, J; Wilusz, T

    1990-01-01

    A new serine proteinase was isolated from Cucurbita ficifolia seeds by the purification procedure, which includes: extraction, salting out with ammonium sulphate, chromatography on CM-cellulose. Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration and h.p.l.c. on DEAE-2SW TSK column. The enzyme was homogeneous both in native and SDS PAGE. Three independent methods showed its molecular mass to be approximately 77 kDa. The enzyme was inhibited by specific serine proteinase organic inhibitors, and was active in the presence of inhibitors specific for other proteinase classes. Surprisingly, squash proteinase exhibited a very high and broad pH optimum with a maximum at 10.7. It hydrolysed many different peptide bonds in B-chain of insulin and was able to cleave four bonds in endogenous serine proteinase inhibitor (CMTI).

  8. Proteinase inhibitors in Brazilian leguminosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. M. Sampaio

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine proteinase inhitors, in the seeds of several Leguminosae from the Pantanal region (West Brazil, were studied using bovine trypsin, a digestive enzyme, Factor XIIa and human plasma Kallikrein, two blood clotting factors. The inhibitors were purified from Enterolobium contortisiliquum (Mr=23,000, Torresea cearensis (Mr = 13,000, Bauhinia pentandra (Mr = 20,000 and Bauhinia bauhinioides (Mr = 20,000. E. contortisiliquum inhibitor inactivates all three enzymes, whereas the T. cearensis inhibitor inactivates trypsin and Factor XSSa, but does nor affect plasma kallikrein; both Bauhinia inhibitors, on the other hand, inactivate trypsin and plasma kallikrein but only the Bpentandra inhibitor affects Factor XIIa. Ki values were calculated between 10 [raised to the power of] -7 and 10 [raised to the power of] -8 M.

  9. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  10. Contribution of muscle proteinases to meat tenderization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S T

    1998-07-01

    The exact mechanisms involved in the postmortem meat tenderization process and the nature of changes associated with improvement in tenderness are complex and not fully understood. Based on the relevant evidence thus far obtained, the focus of this review is on clarifying the factors affecting meat tenderness, particularly the toughening and tenderness phases, possible endogenous proteinases involved in meat tenderization and how these proteinases contribute to meat tenderization. Of the different biochemical and ultrastructural changes occurring in the meat tenderization process, myofibril disruption at the Z-disk and contractile proteins are discussed in detail. This myofibril disruption can perhaps be ascribed to the synergistic action of calcium-dependent proteinases (both mu- and m-calpains) and lysosomal proteinases, especially the cathepsins B and L.

  11. Structural and Functional Analyses of the Secondary Cell Wall Polymer of Bacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 That Serves as an S-Layer-Specific Anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk, Nicola; Kosma, Paul; Puchberger, Michael; Egelseer, Eva M.; Mayer, Harald F.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Sára, Margit

    1999-01-01

    Sacculi of Bacillus sphaericus CCM 2177 contain a secondary cell wall polymer which was completely extracted with 48% hydrofluoric acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that the polymer is composed of repeating units, as follows: →3)-[4,6-O-(1-carboxyethylidene)]∼0.5-β-d-ManpNAc-(1→4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→. The N-terminal part of the S-layer protein carrying S-layer homologous motifs recognizes this polymer as a binding site. PMID:10601228

  12. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  13. Cathepsin D inactivates cysteine proteinase inhibitors, cystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarcic, B; Kos, J; Dolenc, I; Lucovnik, P; Krizaj, I; Turk, V

    1988-07-29

    The formation of inactive complexes in excess molar amounts of human cathepsins H and L with their protein inhibitors human stefin A, human stefin B and chicken cystatin at pH 5.6 has been shown by measurement of enzyme activity coupled with reverse-phase HPLC not to involve covalent cleavage of the inhibitors. Inhibition must be the direct result of binding. On the contrary the interaction of cystatins with aspartic proteinase cathepsin D at pH 3.5 for 60 min followed by HPLC resulted in their inactivation accompanied by peptide bond cleavage at several sites, preferentially those involving hydrophobic amino acid residues. The released peptides do not inhibit papain and cathepsin L. These results explain reported elevated levels of cysteine proteinases and lead to the proposal that cathepsin D exerts an important function, through inactivation of cystatins, in the increased activities of cysteine proteinases in human diseases including muscular distrophy.

  14. Autoactivation of proteinase A initiates activation of yeast vacuolar zymogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1992-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PEP4 gene encodes proteinase A, an aspartyl protease. pep4 mutants are defective in the activation of many vacuolar hydrolases, including proteinase B. We have expressed a pep4 mutation which directs the accumulation of pro-proteinase A with a defective active site. C...

  15. Proteinase genes of cheese starter cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan

    The proteolytic enzymes of lactococci are of eminent importance for milk fermentations. By the combined action of proteinases and peptidases milk protein is degraded to peptides and amino acids which are required for cell growth and contribute to the organoleptic properties of the foods. The

  16. Hypersensitivity to Suture Anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Goto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity to suture anchor is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case in which hypersensitivity to suture anchor was strongly suspected. The right rotator cuff of a 50-year-old woman was repaired with a metal suture anchor. Three weeks after the surgery, she developed erythema around her face, trunk, and hands, accompanied by itching. Infection was unlikely because no abnormalities were detected by blood testing or by medical examination. Suspicious of a metallic allergy, a dermatologist performed a patch testing 6 months after the first surgery. The patient had negative reactions to tests for titanium, aluminum, and vanadium, which were the principal components of the suture anchor. The anchor was removed 7 months after the first surgery, and the erythema disappeared immediately. When allergic symptoms occur and persist after the use of a metal anchor, removal should be considered as a treatment option even if the patch test result is negative.

  17. Hypersensitivity to Suture Anchors

    OpenAIRE

    Masafumi Goto; Masafumi Gotoh; Yasuhiro Mitsui; Ryo Tanesue; Takahiro Okawa; Fujio Higuchi; Naoto Shiba

    2013-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to suture anchor is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case in which hypersensitivity to suture anchor was strongly suspected. The right rotator cuff of a 50-year-old woman was repaired with a metal suture anchor. Three weeks after the surgery, she developed erythema around her face, trunk, and hands, accompanied by itching. Infection was unlikely because no abnormalities were detected by blood testing or by medical examination. Suspicious of a metallic allergy, a dermatolo...

  18. Anchors for Education Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and…

  19. The main proteinases in Dermatobia hominis second and third instars larvae are serine-proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, F A; Moya-Borja, G E; Barreira, J D; Pinho, R T; Alves, C R

    2007-04-30

    We performed a combination of proteinase assay, either in solution or immobilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin, to detect and quantify proteinases of Dermatobia hominis second (L2) and third (L3) instar larvae. In the quantitative assay, we examined proteinase activity by hydrolysis of a panel of peptide bonds specific for the main proteinase classes. We verified that the pGlu-Phe-Leu p-nitroanilide substrate was hydrolyzed by crude extracts of L2 (3.0+/-0.2 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)) and L3 (7.7+/-0.1 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)) and that both activities were partially inhibited by trans-epoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane, 15% and 3%, respectively. Also, we demonstrated that the Nalpha-p-Tosyl-l-Arg methyl ester substrate was hydrolyzed by crude extracts of L2 (117+/-24 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)) and L3 (111+/-10 nmol h(-1)mg of protein(-1)), suggesting a predominance of esterase activity in the crude larval preparation. Interestingly, the specific activity of serine-proteinases was totally inhibited by phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride in the L3 crude extract, while only 10% of this enzyme class activity was inhibited in the L2 crude extract. The results of the qualitative assays with substrate gels suggested that L2 and L3 larvae express serine-proteinases with similar (13 and 22 kDa) and distinct (50 kDa in L2 and 30 kDa in L3) relative molecular masses. These findings contribute to the biochemical characterization of D. hominis L2 and L3 larvae.

  20. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide...... of proteinase A. We found that sorting of such a hybrid protein is dependent on the vacuolar protein-sorting receptor Vps10p. This was unexpected, as strains disrupted for VPS10 sort more than 85% of the proteinase A to the vacuole. Consistent with a role for Vps10p in sorting of proteinase A, we found that 1...

  1. Anchor Trial Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  2. Picornaviral 3C cysteine proteinases have a fold similar to the chymotrypsin-like serine proteinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaire,M.; Chernaia, M.; Malcolm, B.; James, M.

    1994-01-01

    The picornavirus family includes several pathogens such as poliovirus, rhinovirus (the major cause of the common cold), hepatitis A virus and the foot-and-mouth disease virus. Picornaviral proteins are expressed by direct translation of the genomic RNA into a single, large polyprotein precursor. Proteolysis of the viral polyprotein into the mature proteins is assured by the viral 3C enzymes, which are cysteine proteinases. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution of the 3C proteinase from hepatitis A virus (HAV-3C). The overall architecture of HAV-3C reveals a fold resembling that of the chymotrypsin family of serine proteinases, which is consistent with earlier predictions. Catalytic residues include Cys 172 as nucleophile and His 44 as general base. The 3C cleavage specificity for glutamine residues is defined primarily by His 191. The overall structure suggests that an inter-molecular (trans) cleavage releases 3C and that there is an active proteinase in the polyprotein.

  3. Antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, P J; Olson, J E; Lee, G K; Palmer, J T; Klaus, J L; Rasnick, D

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors. A number of vinyl sulfones strongly inhibited falcipain, a Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteinase that is a critical hemoglobinase. In studies of cultured parasites, nanomolar concentrations of three vinyl sulfones inhibited parasite hemoglobin degradation, metabolic activity, and development. The antimalarial effects correlated with the inhibition of falcipain. Our results suggest that vinyl sulfones or...

  4. Electropermanent magnetic anchoring for surgery and endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugwell, Josef; Brennan, Philip; O'Shea, Conor; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Griffiths, James; Cahill, Ronan; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets for anchoring of instrumentation in minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy has become of increased interest in recent years. Permanent magnets have significant advantages over electromagnets for these applications; larger anchoring and retraction force for comparable size and volume without the need for any external power supply. However, permanent magnets represent a potential hazard in the operating field where inadvertent attraction to surgical instrumentation is often undesirable. The current work proposes an interesting hybrid approach which marries the high forces of permanent magnets with the control of electromagnetic technology including the ability to turn the magnet OFF when necessary. This is achieved through the use of an electropermanent magnet, which is designed for surgical retraction across the abdominal and gastric walls. Our electropermanent magnet, which is hand-held and does not require continuous power, is designed with a center lumen which may be used for trocar or needle insertion. The device in this application has been demonstrated successfully in the porcine model where coupling between an intraluminal ring magnet and our electropermanent magnet facilitated guided insertion of an 18 Fr Tuohy needle for guidewire placement. Subsequent investigations have demonstrated the ability to control the coupling distance of the system alleviating shortcomings with current methods of magnetic coupling due to variation in transabdominal wall thicknesses. With further refinement, the magnet may find application in the anchoring of endoscopic and surgical instrumentation for minimally invasive interventions in the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  6. Comparison of a suture anchor and a toggle rod for use in toggle pin fixation of coxofemoral luxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranklin, David; Elder, Steven; Boyle, Carolyn; McLaughlin, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical characteristics of toggle rods and Bone Biter anchors inserted through the medial acetabular wall for toggle pin repair of coxofemoral luxations were compared in 16 canine cadaver pelves. No differences were detected in maximum load to failure, displacement at failure, or energy to failure between the two constructs. Toggle rod constructs failed primarily by breakage of the suture at the rod eyelet. All of the Bone Biter anchor constructs failed when the anchors pulled through the medial acetabular wall.

  7. Isolation, cloning and structural characterisation of boophilin, a multifunctional Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from the cattle tick.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Macedo-Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of coagulation factors from blood-feeding animals display a wide variety of structural motifs and inhibition mechanisms. We have isolated a novel inhibitor from the cattle tick Boophilus microplus, one of the most widespread parasites of farm animals. The inhibitor, which we have termed boophilin, has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Mature boophilin is composed of two canonical Kunitz-type domains, and inhibits not only the major procoagulant enzyme, thrombin, but in addition, and by contrast to all other previously characterised natural thrombin inhibitors, significantly interferes with the proteolytic activity of other serine proteinases such as trypsin and plasmin. The crystal structure of the bovine alpha-thrombin.boophilin complex, refined at 2.35 A resolution reveals a non-canonical binding mode to the proteinase. The N-terminal region of the mature inhibitor, Q16-R17-N18, binds in a parallel manner across the active site of the proteinase, with the guanidinium group of R17 anchored in the S(1 pocket, while the C-terminal Kunitz domain is negatively charged and docks into the basic exosite I of thrombin. This binding mode resembles the previously characterised thrombin inhibitor, ornithodorin which, unlike boophilin, is composed of two distorted Kunitz modules. Unexpectedly, both boophilin domains adopt markedly different orientations when compared to those of ornithodorin, in its complex with thrombin. The N-terminal boophilin domain rotates 9 degrees and is displaced by 6 A, while the C-terminal domain rotates almost 6 degrees accompanied by a 3 A displacement. The reactive-site loop of the N-terminal Kunitz domain of boophilin with its P(1 residue, K31, is fully solvent exposed and could thus bind a second trypsin-like proteinase without sterical restraints. This finding explains the formation of a ternary thrombin.boophilin.trypsin complex, and suggests a mechanism for prothrombinase inhibition in vivo.

  8. The kinetics of proteinase K digestion of linear prion polymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joanna Masel; Vincent A. A. Jansen

    1999-01-01

    ...conversion. Prion digestion by proteinase K (PK) is predicted to be biphasic. The second phase of digestion should be virtually independent of the PK concentration and should depend on the initial size distribution of prion polymers...

  9. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza V. Oliva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.Obtidas de sementes leguminosas, várias proteínas inibem proteinases de origem animal, incluindo humanas, e podem ser consideradas para o desenvolvimento de compostos com atividade biológica. Inibidores da família Bowman-Birk e da família Kunitz vegetal tem sido caracterizados em relação a especificidade para proteinase, estrutura primária e sitio reativo. O nosso grupo majoritariamente vem estudando o gênero Bauhinia, principalmente as espécies bauhinioides, rufa, ungulatae variegata. Em algumas espécies, mais de um inibidor com propriedades diferentes foi caracterizado. Embora tais proteínas apresentem alta similaridade estrutural, diferem quanto à inibição de proteinases, e foram exploradas em estudos utilizando diversos modelos biológicos.

  10. Effects of endogenous cysteine proteinases on structures of collagen fibres from dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Yan-Fei; Song, Liang; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Li, Dong-Mei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Konno, Kunihiko; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2017-10-01

    Autolysis of sea cucumber, caused by endogenous enzymes, leads to postharvest quality deterioration of sea cucumber. However, the effects of endogenous proteinases on structures of collagen fibres, the major biologically relevant substrates in the body wall of sea cucumber, are less clear. Collagen fibres were prepared from the dermis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus), and the structural consequences of degradation of the collagen fibres caused by endogenous cysteine proteinases (ECP) from Stichopus japonicus were examined. Scanning electron microscopic images showed that ECP caused partial disaggregation of collagen fibres into collagen fibrils by disrupting interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed increased structural disorder of fibrillar collagen caused by ECP. SDS-PAGE and chemical analysis indicated that ECP can liberate glycosaminoglycan, hydroxyproline and collagen fragments from collagen fibres. Thus ECP can cause disintegration of collagen fibres by degrading interfibrillar proteoglycan bridges. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anchoring visions in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    as by those involved in the actual implementation. A model depicting a recent trend within systems development is presented: Organizations rely on purchasing generic software products and/or software development outsourced to external contractors. A contemporary method for participatory design, where......This paper introduces the term 'anchoring' within systems development: Visions, developed through early systems design within an organization, need to be deeply rooted in the organization. A vision's rationale needs to be understood by those who decide if the vision should be implemented as well...

  12. Career anchors of dentist leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, Tiina; Lammintakanen, Johanna; Suominen, Anna Liisa

    2016-08-01

    The work of a health care leader is demanding; in order to cope, leaders need motivation and support. The occurrence of intrinsic factors called career anchors (combination of one's competence, motives and values) could be a contributing factor in dentist leaders' career decisions. The aim of our study was to identify dentist leaders' career anchors and their association to dentist leaders' retention or turnover of the leadership position. Materials were gathered in 2014 via an electronic questionnaire from 156 current (Leaders) or former (Leavers) Finnish dentist leaders. Career anchor evaluation was conducted by the questionnaire and scoring-table taken from Edgar Schein's Career Anchors Self-Assessment. Both the most and the least important career anchors were detected by the highest and lowest scores and their occurrence reported as percentages. Associations between career anchor scores and tendency to stay were analyzed with logistic regression. 'Technical/Functional Competence' and 'Lifestyle' were most frequently reported as the most important and 'Entrepreneurial Creativity' and 'General Managerial Competence' as the least important career anchors. However, a higher level of 'General Managerial Competence' anchor was most significantly associated with staying in a leadership position. Instead, 'Pure Challenge' and 'Lifestyle' decreased the odds to stay. The knowledge of the important and essential career anchors of dentist leaders' and individuals' could perform crucial part in career choices and also in planning education, work opportunities and human resource policies promoting retention of dentist leaders and probably also other health care leaders.

  13. Lightness, brightness, and anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Barton L; Whitbread, Michael; de Silva, Chamila

    2014-08-07

    The majority of work in lightness perception has evaluated the perception of lightness using flat, matte, two-dimensional surfaces. In such contexts, the amount of light reaching the eye contains a conflated mixture of the illuminant and surface lightness. A fundamental puzzle of lightness perception is understanding how it is possible to experience achromatic surfaces as specific achromatic shades in the face of this ambiguity. It has been argued that the perception of lightness in such contexts implies that the visual system imposes an "anchoring rule" whereby a specific relative luminance (the highest) serves as a fixed point in the mapping of image luminance onto the lightness scale ("white"). We conducted a series of experiments to explicitly test this assertion in contexts where this mapping seemed most unlikely-namely, low-contrast images viewed in dim illumination. Our results provide evidence that the computational ambiguity in mapping luminance onto lightness is reflected in perceptual experience. The perception of the highest luminance in a two-dimensional Mondrian display varied monotonically with its brightness, ranging from midgray to white. Similar scaling occurred for the lowest luminance and, by implication, all other luminance values. We conclude that the conflation between brightness and lightness in two-dimensional Mondrian displays is reflected in perception and find no support for the claim that any specific relative luminance value acts as a fixed anchor point in this mapping function. © 2014 ARVO.

  14. Vertical Equilibrium of Sheet Pile Walls with Emphasis on Toe Capacity and Plugging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Augustesen, Anders Hust; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    at the pile toe to fulfil vertical equilibrium. The paper describes a case study of sheet pile walls in Aalborg Clay, and the amount of loads transferred as point loads at the pile toe for free and anchored walls is estimated. A parametric study is made for the free wall with regards to the height...... and the roughness of the wall. Due to limitations of the calculation method, the study of the anchored wall only includes variation of the roughness. For the case study, it is found that the vertical equilibrium is fulfilled for the considered free wall. An anchored wall needs a plug forming at the pile toe...

  15. Epstein on Anchors and Grounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guala Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between anchors and grounds is one of the most innovative contributions of The Ant Trap. In this commentary I will argue that the distinction suffers from an ambiguity between tokens and types. This leads Epstein to endorse pluralism about anchors and grounds, a position that is not justified in the book and to which there are plausible alternatives.

  16. Entamoeba histolytica: cysteine proteinase activity and virulence. Focus on cysteine proteinase 5 expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Michelle A R; Fernandes, Helen C; Calixto, Viviane C; Martins, Almir S; Silva, Edward F; Pesquero, Jorge L; Gomes, Maria A

    2009-08-01

    Cysteine proteinase (CP) activity and CP5 mRNA levels were analyzed in eleven samples of Entamoeba histolytica isolated from patients presenting different clinical profiles. The virulence degree of the isolates, determined in hamster liver, correlated well with the clinical form of the patient and culture conditions. CP5 mRNA levels were also determined in sample freshly picked up directly from liver amoebic abscess. Differences were not observed in the levels of CP5 mRNA and CP specific activity among the cultured samples. However, different levels of CP5 mRNA were observed in trophozoite freshly isolated from hepatic amoebic lesions. These results reinforce the importance of CP5 for the virulence of amoebae and the need for studies with the parasite present in lesions to validate mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of amoebiasis.

  17. Not all Anchors Weigh Equally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstein, Michael; Velazquez, Alexandra

    2017-11-01

    The anchoring bias is a reliable effect wherein a person's judgments are affected by initially presented information, but it is unknown specifically why this effect occurs. Research examining this bias suggests that elements of both numeric and semantic priming may be involved. To examine this, the present research used a phenomenon wherein people treat numeric information presented differently in Arabic numeral or verbal formats. We presented participants with one of many forms of an anchor that represented the same value (e.g., twelve hundred or 1,200). Thus, we could examine how a concept's meaning and its absolute numeric value affect anchoring. Experiments 1 and 2 showed that people respond to Arabic and verbal anchors differently. Experiment 3 showed that these differences occurred largely because people tend to think of numbers in digit format. This suggests that one's conceptual understanding of the anchored information matters more than its strict numeric value.

  18. Intelligent Educational Systems for Anchored Instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David D.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the potential for using Intelligent Educational Systems (IES) for anchoring instruction in macro contexts in science education. Topics include anchored instruction; situated cognition; problem solving; cognitivism; interactive video environments; and examples of combining IES and anchored instruction. (LRW)

  19. Assessing Tether Anchor Labeling and Usability in Pickup Trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinich, Kathleen D; Manary, Miriam A; Malik, Laura A; Flannagan, Carol A; Jermakian, Jessica S

    2017-10-30

    Investigate vehicle factors associated with child restraint tether use and misuse in pickup trucks and evaluate four labeling interventions designed to educate consumers on proper tether use. Volunteer testing was performed with 24 subjects and four different pickup trucks. Each subject performed eight child restraint installations among the four pickups using two forward-facing restraints: a Britax Marathon G4.1 and an Evenflo Triumph. Vehicles were selected to represent four different implementations of tether anchors among pickups: plastic loop routers (Chevrolet Silverado), webbing routers (Ram), back wall anchors (Nissan Frontier), and webbing routers plus metal anchors (Toyota Tundra). Interventions included a diagram label, QR Code linked to video instruction, coordinating text label, and contrasting text tag. Subjects used the child restraint tether in 93 percent of trials. However, tether use was completely correct in only 9 percent of trials. An installation was considered functional if the subject attached the tether to a tether anchor and had a tight installation (ignoring routing and head restraint position); 28 percent of subjects achieved a functional installation. The most common installation error was attaching the tether hook to the anchor/router; directly behind the child restraint (near the top of the seatback) rather than placing the tether through the router and attaching it to the anchor in the adjacent seating position. The Nissan Frontier, with the anchor located on the back wall of the cab, had the highest rate of correct installations but also had the highest rate of attaching the tether to components other than the tether anchor (seat adjustor, child restraint storage hook, around head restraint). None of the labeling interventions had a significant effect on correct installation; not a single subject scanned the QR Code to access the video instruction. Subjects with the most successful installations spent extensive time reviewing the

  20. In vitro evaluation of proteinase, phospholipase and haemolysin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The present study aimed to determine phospholipase, proteinase and haemolysin activities in Candida species isolated from various clinical samples. Material and Method: A total of 110 Candida species isolated from various clinical specimens were identified up to species level by standard mycological techniques ...

  1. Chromosomal Stabilization of the Proteinase Genes in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, Cornelis; Gietema, Jan; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus

    The plasmid-encoded proteinase genes prtP and prtM of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 were integrated by a Campbell-like mechanism into the L. lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 chromosome by using the insertion vector pKLG610. Two transformants were obtained that differed in the number of amplified

  2. Human seminal proteinase and prostate-specific antigen are the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on published studies and the present results, the broad proteolytic specificity of human seminal proteinase suggests a role for this protein in several ... St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63104, USA; Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110 025, ...

  3. Career anchors of dentist leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Tuononen Tiina; Lammintakanen Johanna; Suominen Anna Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The work of a health care leader is demanding; in order to cope, leaders need motivation and support. The occurrence of intrinsic factors called career anchors (combination of one’s competence, motives and values) could be a contributing factor in dentist leaders’ career decisions. The aim of our study was to identify dentist leaders’ career anchors and their association to dentist leaders’ retention or turnover of the leadership position. Material and methods: Materials were g...

  4. The Holding Power of Anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The essential principle in the action of all anchors is that a surface set at an acute angle to the ground will dig in if pulled horizontally. In order that an anchor may function properly it must satisfy two conditions. The first is that in whatever position it may fall as it strikes the sea floor, it must begin to dig in as soon as the pull ...

  5. 77 FR 65496 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION 48 CFR Part 1812 RIN 2700-AD64 Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy AGENCY... limited conditions, to issue Anchor Tenancy contracts. Anchor Tenancy means ``an arrangement in which the... inaccurate prohibition on anchor tenancy contracts. The prohibition is included in the NFS based on The Space...

  6. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  7. Anchoring International sets new water depth record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, H.J.

    1983-07-01

    Santa Barbara Channel has a history steeped in firsts in techniques for the production of offshore oil. Landscaped drilling and production islands, production piers, and directional drilling from land rigs to production under the channel, to name a few. The latest such project was handled by Anchoring International, Inc., a pipe line anchoring company headquartered in Houston, Texas. Contracted by Healy Tibbets Construction Company, prime contractor, Anchoring was commissioned to handle a new deep water record breaking anchoring job. The job was to anchor J-tube extensions in 820 feet of water--the deepest pipe line anchoring job ever undertaken. In most shallow water pipe line anchoring jobs, anchors and anchor installation unit placement over the pipe line is handled from a crane topside with visual assist from divers. However, due to the extreme depth of this project, the installation unit with anchors had to be modified for submersible operator-assisted placement capability. Anchoring International handled the anchor design and installation equipment, and submersible operator assistance was furnished by Oceaneering, International. WASP and JIM atmospheric diving systems were used. All ocean bottom activities were monitored topside with the JERED video-equipped remote controlled vehicle. Since the weight of the anchor sets and power installation unit are minimum, the entire operation was conducted from a small boat sufficient to carry dive equipment and the anchor installation unit power supply. A small pedestal crane was used to lower and retrieve the anchor installation unit.

  8. Roles for proteinases in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A Owen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Caroline A OwenDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Since the early 1960s, a compelling body of evidence has accumulated to show that proteinases play critical roles in airspace enlargement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, until recently the causative enzymes and their exact roles in pathologic processes in COPD have not been clear. Recent studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of COPD have confirmed roles for proteinases not only in airspace enlargement, but also in airway pathologies in COPD. These studies have also shed light on the specific proteinases involved in COPD pathogenesis, and the mechanisms by which these proteinases injure the lung. They have also identified important interactions between different classes of proteinases, and between proteinases and other molecules that amplify lung inflammation and injury. This review will discuss the biology of proteinases and the mechanisms by which they contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition, I will discuss the potential of proteinase inhibitors and anti-inflammatory drugs as new treatment strategies for COPD patients.Keywords: proteinase, proteinase inhibitor, proteolysis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammation, mucus hypersecretion

  9. Mechanism of Excretion of a Bacterial Proteinase: Factors Controlling Accumulation of the Extracellular Proteinase of a Sarcina Strain (Coccus P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BISSELL, MINA J.; TOSI, ROBERTO; GORINI, LUIGI

    1970-06-29

    It has been known that the extracellular proteinase of Coccus P is found only in cultures grown in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. It is now shown that this cation is required neither for synthesis, excretion, or activation of a zymogen nor as a prosthetic factor necessary for enzymatic activity. The only function of Ca{sup 2+} is to stabilize the active structure of the enzyme molecule, presumably by substituting for absence of S-S bridges. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+} , the excreted proteinase undergoes rapid autodigestion and, instead of the active protein, its hydrolytic products are accumulated in the culture fluid. In minimal medium and under conditions of enzyme stability [presence of Ca{sup 2+} and Ficoll (Pharmacia)], Coccus P accumulates the proteinase at a gradually reduced speed although the rate of cultural growth remains constant. It is shown that this decline in rate of accumulation is caused by the excreted proteinase itself, possibly acting on its own precursor emerging from the cell in a form susceptible to proteolytic attack and not amenable to Ca{sup 2+} protection. A proteinase precursor is actually demonstrable in a calciumless culture at the onset of the enzyme accumulation which follows Ca{sup 2+} addition. It is suggested that excreted proteins require an unfolded (or incompletely folded) structure to cross the cell envelope. The proteinase excreted by a Sarcina strain (Coccus P) is found only in cultures containing Ca{sup 2+} ions (1), a feature common to proteinases of other bacteria (4, 12, 18) and to other excreted enzymes (14). Among the nontoxic divalent cations, Ca{sup 2+} is rather specific in this effect. Other ions such as Mn{sup 2+} or Mg{sup 2+}, the latter being present in all media as an indispensible growth factor, are ineffective. Addition of Ca{sup 2+} to the proteolytically inactive supernatant fluid of a calcium- free culture does not result in the appearance of the missing enzyme activity. The early assumption that Ca{sup 2

  10. Evolutionary patterns of proteinase activity in attine ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semenova, Tatyana; Hughes, David Peter; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Attine ants live in symbiosis with a basidiomycetous fungus that they rear on a substrate of plant material. This indirect herbivory implies that the symbiosis is likely to be nitrogen deprived, so that specific mechanisms may have evolved to enhance protein availability. We therefore...... of these classes of proteolytic enzymes suggest that substrate specificity may be important and that trade-offs may prevent the simultaneous upregulation of both classes of enzymes.......Background: Attine ants live in symbiosis with a basidiomycetous fungus that they rear on a substrate of plant material. This indirect herbivory implies that the symbiosis is likely to be nitrogen deprived, so that specific mechanisms may have evolved to enhance protein availability. We therefore...... hypothesized that fungal proteinase activity may have been under selection for efficiency and that different classes of proteinases might be involved. Results: We determined proteinase activity profiles across a wide pH range for fungus gardens of 14 Panamanian species of fungus-growing ants, representing...

  11. Production of a heterologous proteinase A by Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, K; Tidemand, L D; Winther, Jakob R.

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of Saccharomyces kluyveri for heterologous protein production, S. kluyveri Y159 was transformed with a S. cerevisiae-based multi-copy plasmid containing the S. cerevisiae PEP4 gene, which encodes proteinase A, under the control of its native promoter......, compared to a yield of 0.40 g/g in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of PEP4 led to the secretion of active proteinase A in both S. kluyveri and S. cerevisiae. The yield of active proteinase A during growth on glucose was found to be 3.6-fold higher in S. kluyveri than in the S. cerevisiae reference strain........ As a reference, S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-5D was transformed with the same plasmid and the two strains were characterised in batch cultivations on glucose. The glucose metabolism was found to be less fermentative in S. kluyveri than in S. cerevisiae. The yield of ethanol on glucose was 0.11 g/g in S. kluyveri...

  12. Production of a heterologous proteinase A by Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper; Tidemand, L.D.; Winther, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the potential of Saccharomyces kluyveri for heterologous protein production, S. kluyveri Y159 was transformed with a S. cerevisiae-based multi-copy plasmid containing the S. cerevisiae PEP4 gene, which encodes proteinase A, under the control of its native promoter......, compared to a yield of 0.40 g/g in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of PEP4 led to the secretion of active proteinase A in both S. kluyveri and S. cerevisiae. The yield of active proteinase A during growth on glucose was found to be 3.6-fold higher in S. kluyveri than in the S. cerevisiae reference strain........ As a reference. S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-5D was transformed with the same plasmid and the two strains were characterised in batch cultivations on glucose. The glucose metabolism was found to be less fermentative in S. kluyveri than in S. cerevisiae. The yield of ethanol on glucose was 0.11 g/g in S. kluyveri...

  13. Mechanism and ion-dependence of in vitro autoactivation of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Hazel, H; Wolff, A M; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1997-01-01

    Yeast proteinase A is synthesized as a zymogen which transits through the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi complex and the endosome to the vacuole. On arrival in the vacuole, activation takes place. It has previously been found that proteinase A can activate autocatalytically; however......, the propeptide of proteinase A shows essentially no similarity to other known aspartic proteinase propeptides. To understand why proteinase A activation occurs rapidly in the vacuole but not at all in earlier compartments, we have purified the zymogen and investigated the conditions that trigger autoactivation...... the pH- and ionic-strength-dependence and the predominance of a product-catalysed mechanism are well adapted to the situation in vivo, since slow activation in the absence of active proteinase A helps to prevent activation in prevacuolar compartments, whereas, on delivery to the vacuole, lower p...

  14. Wound and methyl jasmonate induced pigeon pea defensive proteinase inhibitor has potency to inhibit insect digestive proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomate, Purushottam R; Hivrale, Vandana K

    2012-08-01

    Wounding of plants by chewing insects or other damage induces the synthesis of defensive proteinase inhibitors (PI) in both wounded and distal unwounded leaves. In the present paper we report the characterization of inducible defensive PI from pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) and its in vitro interaction with Helicoverpa armigera gut proteinases (HGP). We found that PI activity was induced in local as well as systemic leaves of pigeon pea by the wounding and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) application. Consistent induction of PI was observed in two wild cultivars of pigeon pea at various growth stages. The estimated molecular weight of inducible PI was ~16.5 kDa. Electrophoretic analysis and enzyme assays revealed that the induced PI significantly inhibited total gut proteinase as well as trypsin-like activity from the midgut of H. armigera. The induced PI was found to be inhibitor of trypsin as well as chymotrypsin. Study could be important to know the further roles of defensive PIs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Trichoderma harzianum transformant has high extracellular alkaline proteinase expression during specific mycoparasitic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Maria Helena S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycoparasite Trichoderma harzianum produces an alkaline proteinase that may be specifically involved in mycoparasitism. We have constructed transformant strains of this fungus that overexpress this alkaline proteinase. Some of the transformants were assessed for alkaline proteinase activity, and those with higher activity than the wild type were selected for further studies. One of these transformant strains produced an elevated and constitutive pbr1 mRNA level during mycoparasitic interactions with Rhizoctonia solani.

  16. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  17. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to deliver heterologous antigens to the bird immune system. Additionally, the analysis of the structure and immunogenicity of the generated rCjaAD hybrid protein showed that the CjaA antigen can be considered as a starting point to construct multiepitope anti-Campylobacter vaccines.

  18. A new device for bone anchor fixation in laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy: the Franciscan laparoscopic bone anchor inserter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiden, R.M. van der; Withagen, M.I.J.; Bergkamp, A.B.; Mannaerts, G.H.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A laparoscopic modification of the sacrocolpopexy procedure with mesh and bone anchor fixation with the Franciscan laparoscopic bone anchor inserter was developed. METHODS: We developed a laparoscopic bone anchor inserter for the placement of a titanium bone anchor in sacral segment 3 as

  19. 76 FR 30301 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ...-AD64 Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... Competitiveness Act (CSCA) of 1992. NASA may enter into multi-year anchor tenancy contracts for commercial space goods or services. Anchor Tenancy means ``an arrangement in which the United States Government agrees to...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A preformed anchor is a device made of austenitic alloys or alloys containing 75 percent or greater gold or metals of...

  1. On the Theory of Ground Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    the A.B. Chance Company (Fig. 57). These anchors were geometrically similar to the familiar Never-Creep anchors on the market today. However, in an...1. part ’. Sandegren. E.. P.O. Sahlstrom and If. Sutile (1973) Behavior of anchored sheet-pile %.til exposed to frost action. Sartryck och

  2. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  3. Identification of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH) involved in immune defense in the mud crab Scylla paramamosain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiu-xia; Liu, Hai-peng; Chen, Rong-yuan; Shen, Kai-li; Wang, Ke-jian

    2013-01-01

    Clip domain serine proteinase homologs are involved in many biological processes including immune response. To identify the immune function of a serine proteinase homolog (Sp-SPH), originally isolated from hemocytes of the mud crab, Scylla paramamosain, the Sp-SPH was expressed recombinantly and purified for further studies. It was found that the Sp-SPH protein could bind to a number of bacteria (including Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahemolyticus), bacterial cell wall components such as lipopolysaccharide or peptidoglycan (PGN), and β-1, 3-glucan of fungus. But no direct antibacterial activity of Sp-SPH protein was shown by using minimum inhibitory concentration or minimum bactericidal concentration assays. Nevertheless, the Sp-SPH protein was found to significantly enhance the crab hemocyte adhesion activity (paired t-test, PSPH protein was demonstrated to promote the survival rate of the animals after challenge with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus which were both recognized by Sp-SPH protein, if pre-incubated with Sp-SPH protein, respectively. Whereas, the crabs died much faster when challenged with Vibrio alginolyiicus, a pathogenic bacterium not recognized by Sp-SPH protein, compared to those of crabs challenged with A. hydrophila or V. parahemolyticus when pre-coated with Sp-SPH protein. Taken together, these data suggested that Sp-SPH molecule might play an important role in immune defense against bacterial infection in the mud crab S. paramamosain.

  4. Anchoring bias in online voting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2012-12-01

    Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather and other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called anchoring bias is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with voting interval in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgments, auctions, and so on.

  5. Anchoring Vignettes and Response Consistency

    OpenAIRE

    Arie Kapteyn; Smith, James P.; Arthur van Soest

    2011-01-01

    The use of anchoring vignettes to correct for differential item functioning rests upon two identifying assumptions: vignette equivalence and response consistency. To test the second assumption the authors conduct an experiment in which respondents in an Internet panel are asked to both describe their health in a number of domains and rate their health in these domains. In a subsequent interview respondents are shown vignettes that are in fact descriptions of their own health. Under response c...

  6. Structure and function of invertebrate Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2010-04-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. The proteinase inhibitors function as modulators for controlling the extent of deleterious proteinase activity. The Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) in family I1 are among the well-known families of proteinase inhibitors, widely found in mammals, avian and a variety of invertebrates. Like those classical KPIs, the invertebrate KPIs can be single or multiple domain proteins containing one or more Kazal inhibitory domains linked together by peptide spacers of variable length. All invertebrate Kazal domains of about 40-60 amino acids in length share a common structure which is dictated by six conserved cysteine residues forming three intra-domain disulfide cross-links despite the variability of amino acid sequences between the half-cystines. Invertebrate KPIs are strong inhibitors as shown by their extremely high association constant of 10(7)-10(13)M(-1). The inhibitory specificity of a Kazal domain varies widely with a different reactive P(1) amino acid. Different invertebrate KPI domains may arise from gene duplication but several KPI proteins can also be derived from alternative splicing. The invertebrate KPIs function as anticoagulants in blood-sucking animals such as leech, mosquitoes and ticks. Several KPIs are likely involved in protecting host from microbial proteinases while some from the parasitic protozoa help protecting the parasites from the host digestive proteinase enzymes. Silk moths produce KPIs to protect their cocoon from predators and microbial destruction.

  7. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium-Linens ATCC-9174

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8,5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis...

  8. An aspartic proteinase gene family in the filamentous fungus Botrytis cinerea contains members with novel features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten A.; Dekkers, E.; Kay, J.; Phylip, L.H.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea, an important fungal plant pathogen, secretes aspartic proteinase (AP) activity in axenic cultures. No cysteine, serine or metalloproteinase activity could be detected. Proteinase activity was higher in culture medium containing BSA or wheat germ extract, as compared to minimal

  9. Electrostatically anchored branched brush layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Rutland, Mark; Thormann, Esben; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2012-11-06

    A novel type of block copolymer has been synthesized. It consists of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The nonionic bottle-brush block contains 45 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains. This polymer was synthesized with the intention of creating branched brush layers firmly physisorbed to negatively charged surfaces via the cationic block, mimicking the architecture (but not the chemistry) of bottle-brush molecules suggested to be present on the cartilage surface, and contributing to the efficient lubrication of synovial joints. The adsorption properties of the diblock copolymer as well as of the two blocks separately were studied on silica surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry. The adsorption kinetics data highlight that the diblock copolymers initially adsorb preferentially parallel to the surface with both the cationic block and the uncharged bottle-brush block in contact with the surface. However, as the adsorption proceeds, a structural change occurs within the layer, and the PEO bottle-brush block extends toward solution, forming a surface-anchored branched brush layer. As the adsorption plateau is reached, the diblock copolymer layer is 46-48 nm thick, and the water content in the layer is above 90 wt %. The combination of strong electrostatic anchoring and highly hydrated branched brush structures provide strong steric repulsion, low friction forces, and high load bearing capacity. The strong electrostatic anchoring also provides high stability of preadsorbed layers under different ionic strength conditions.

  10. Use of a cysteine proteinase from Carica candamarcensis as a protective agent during DNA extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Genelhu

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the use of a plant cysteine proteinase isolated from latex of Carica candamarcensis as a protective agent during isolation of bacterial DNA following growth in culture of these cells. Between 100 to 720 units of proteinase (1 µg = 6 units afforded good DNA protection when incubated with various kinds of microorganisms. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the resulting DNA was similar in size to DNA preparations obtained by treatment with proteinase K. The viability of the resulting material was checked by PCR amplification using species-specific primers. After standing at room temperature (25oC for 35 days, the enzyme lost 10% of its initial activity. The enzyme stability and good yield of DNA suggest the use of this proteinase as an alternative to proteinase K.

  11. Coronavirus 3CL(pro) proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Lund, Ole; Brunak, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Background: Despite the passing of more than a year since the first outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), efficient counter-measures are still few and many believe that reappearance of SARS, or a similar disease caused by a coronavirus, is not unlikely. For other virus families like...... the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection....... Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results: We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network...

  12. Proteinase inhibitory activities of two two-domain Kazal proteinase inhibitors from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the importance of the P(2) position in proteinase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donpudsa, Suchao; Söderhäll, Irene; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Cerenius, Lage; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    2010-11-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors are found ubiquitously in living organisms and involved in homeostasis of processes using proteinases as well as innate immune defense. Two two-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors (KPIs), KPI2 and KPI8, have been identified from the hemocyte cDNA library of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Unlike other KPIs from P. leniusculus, they are found specific to the hemocytes and contain an uncommon P(2) amino acid residue, Gly. To unveil their inhibitory activities, the two KPIs and their domains were over-expressed. By testing against subtilisin, trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase, the KPI2 was found to inhibit strongly against subtilisin and weakly against trypsin, while the KPI8 was strongly active against only trypsin. With their P(1) Ser and Lys residues, the KPI2_domain2 and KPI8_domain2 were responsible for strong inhibition against subtilisin and trypsin, respectively. Mutagenesis of KPI8_domain1 at P(2) amino acid residue from Gly to Pro, mimicking the P(2) residue of KPI8_domain2, rendered the KPI8_domain1 strongly active against trypsin, indicating the important role of P(2) residue in inhibitory activities of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors. Only the KPI2 was found to inhibit against the extracellular serine proteinases from the pathogenic oomycete of the freshwater crayfish, Aphanomyces astaci. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering proteinase K using machine learning and synthetic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Rebecca P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Altering a protein's function by changing its sequence allows natural proteins to be converted into useful molecular tools. Current protein engineering methods are limited by a lack of high throughput physical or computational tests that can accurately predict protein activity under conditions relevant to its final application. Here we describe a new synthetic biology approach to protein engineering that avoids these limitations by combining high throughput gene synthesis with machine learning-based design algorithms. Results We selected 24 amino acid substitutions to make in proteinase K from alignments of homologous sequences. We then designed and synthesized 59 specific proteinase K variants containing different combinations of the selected substitutions. The 59 variants were tested for their ability to hydrolyze a tetrapeptide substrate after the enzyme was first heated to 68°C for 5 minutes. Sequence and activity data was analyzed using machine learning algorithms. This analysis was used to design a new set of variants predicted to have increased activity over the training set, that were then synthesized and tested. By performing two cycles of machine learning analysis and variant design we obtained 20-fold improved proteinase K variants while only testing a total of 95 variant enzymes. Conclusion The number of protein variants that must be tested to obtain significant functional improvements determines the type of tests that can be performed. Protein engineers wishing to modify the property of a protein to shrink tumours or catalyze chemical reactions under industrial conditions have until now been forced to accept high throughput surrogate screens to measure protein properties that they hope will correlate with the functionalities that they intend to modify. By reducing the number of variants that must be tested to fewer than 100, machine learning algorithms make it possible to use more complex and expensive tests so

  14. Are Proteinase 3 and Cathepsin C Enzymes Related to Pathogenesis of Periodontitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Türkoğlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cathepsin C is the activator of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived proteinase 3, which contributes to inflammatory processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate gingival crevicular fluid (GCF proteinase 3 and cathepsin C levels in periodontal diseases. Design. Eighteen patients with chronic periodontitis (CP, 20 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP, 20 patients with gingivitis, and 18 healthy subjects were included in the study. Periodontal parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment level, papilla bleeding index, and plaque index were assessed in all study subjects. GCF proteinase 3 and cathepsin C levels were analyzed by ELISA. Results. GCF proteinase 3 total amount was significantly higher in diseased groups compared to control group, after adjusting age P0.05. Periodontal parameters of sampling sites were positively correlated with GCF proteinase 3 total amounts P0.05. Conclusions. Elevated levels of GCF proteinase 3 in CP, G-AgP, and gingivitis might suggest that proteinase 3 plays a role during inflammatory periodontal events in host response. However, cathepsin C in GCF does not seem to have an effect on the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  15. Anchor handling tug operations: a practical guide to the operation of modern anchor handling tugs engaged in anchor handling and towing operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clark, I.C; Hancox, M

    2012-01-01

    ... --Turning and manoeuvring modern anchor handling vessels --The AHTS design and towing operations --The dangers of very high speed loads during deep water anchor handling operations --The dangers...

  16. Influence of transient flooding on steel strip reinforced soil walls

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miyata, Yoshihisa; Bathurst, Richard J; Otani, Yoshinori; Ohta, Hitoshi; Miyatake, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    ... for transient flooding ( Kuwano et al., 2014 ). In an earlier related study, Miyata et al. (2010) described a series of full-scale laboratory tests that involved the flooding and rapid drawdown loading of three 6 m-high instrumented steel multi-anchor walls (MAWs). Each wall was nominally identical but was constructed with a different backfill soil...

  17. Novel distribution of the secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor in kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Ohlsson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI is a low molecular weight, tissue-specific inhibitor of, for example, elastase and cathepsin G, which also have antimicrobial capacity. SLPI has been localised to the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genital tracts, but so far not to the kidney. The presence of SLPI in renal tubuli cells was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry and, by means of in situ hybridisation on human renal biopsies, we were able to demonstrate SLPI production. In various inflammatory conditions in the kidneys, the protease-antiprotease balance is disturbed. For this reason, as well as the possible role in the defence against ascending urinary tract infections, it is interesting to establish a source of SLPI in renal tubuli cells.

  18. Homology models of main proteinase from coronavirus associated with SARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Lin, Jin-Chung; Ho, Yih; Chen, Chin-Wen

    2005-01-01

    In this study, two homology models of the main proteinase (M pro) from the novel coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) were constructed. These models reveal three distinct functional domains, in which an intervening loop connecting domains II and III as well as a catalytic cleft containing the substrate binding subsites S1 and S2 between domains I and II are observed. S2 exhibits structural variations more significantly than S1 during the 200 ps molecular dynamics simulations because it is located at the open mouth of the catalytic cleft and the amino acid residues lining up this subsite are least conserved. In addition, the higher structural variation of S2 makes it flexible enough to accommodate a bulky hydrophobic residue from the substrate.

  19. Inhibition of bone resorption by selective inactivators of cysteine proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, P A; Buttle, D J; Jones, S J; Boyde, A; Murata, M; Reynolds, J J; Meikle, M C

    1994-09-01

    Inactivators of cysteine proteinases (CPs) were tested as inhibitors of bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. The following four CP inactivators were tested: Ep475, a compound with low membrane permeability which inhibits cathepsins B, L, S, H, and calpain; Ep453, the membrane-permeant prodrug of Ep475; CA074, a compound with low membrane permeability which selectively inactivates cathepsin B; and CA074Me, the membrane-permeant prodrug of CA074. The test systems consisted of 1) monitoring the release of radioisotope from prelabelled mouse calvarial explants and 2) assessing the extent of bone resorption in an isolated osteoclast assay using confocal laser microscopy. Ep453, Ep475, and CA074Me inhibited both stimulated and basal bone resorption in vitro while CA074 was without effect; the inhibition was reversible and dose dependent. None of the inhibitors affected protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, the PTH-enhanced secretion of beta-glucuronidase, and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, or the spontaneous release of lactate dehydrogenase. Ep453, Ep475, and CA074Me dose-dependently inhibited the resorptive activity of isolated rat osteoclasts cultured on bone slices with a maximal effect at 50 microM. The number of resorption pits and their mean volume was reduced, whilst the mean surface area remained unaffected. Again, CA074 was without effect. Ep453, Ep475, and CA074Me, but not CA074, when administered subcutaneously at a dose of 60 micrograms/g body weight inhibited bone resorption in vivo as measured by an in vivo/in vitro assay, by about 20%. This study demonstrates that cathepsins B, L, and/or S are involved in bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. Whilst cathepsin L and/or S act extracellularly, and possibly intracellularly, cathepsin B mediates its effects intracellularly perhaps through the activation of other proteinases involved in subosteoclastic collagen degradation.

  20. Murasaki: a fast, parallelizable algorithm to find anchors from multiple genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Popendorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the number of available genome sequences increasing rapidly, the magnitude of sequence data required for multiple-genome analyses is a challenging problem. When large-scale rearrangements break the collinearity of gene orders among genomes, genome comparison algorithms must first identify sets of short well-conserved sequences present in each genome, termed anchors. Previously, anchor identification among multiple genomes has been achieved using pairwise alignment tools like BLASTZ through progressive alignment tools like TBA, but the computational requirements for sequence comparisons of multiple genomes quickly becomes a limiting factor as the number and scale of genomes grows. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our algorithm, named Murasaki, makes it possible to identify anchors within multiple large sequences on the scale of several hundred megabases in few minutes using a single CPU. Two advanced features of Murasaki are (1 adaptive hash function generation, which enables efficient use of arbitrary mismatch patterns (spaced seeds and therefore the comparison of multiple mammalian genomes in a practical amount of computation time, and (2 parallelizable execution that decreases the required wall-clock and CPU times. Murasaki can perform a sensitive anchoring of eight mammalian genomes (human, chimp, rhesus, orangutan, mouse, rat, dog, and cow in 21 hours CPU time (42 minutes wall time. This is the first single-pass in-core anchoring of multiple mammalian genomes. We evaluated Murasaki by comparing it with the genome alignment programs BLASTZ and TBA. We show that Murasaki can anchor multiple genomes in near linear time, compared to the quadratic time requirements of BLASTZ and TBA, while improving overall accuracy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Murasaki provides an open source platform to take advantage of long patterns, cluster computing, and novel hash algorithms to produce accurate anchors across multiple genomes with

  1. 33 CFR 164.19 - Requirements for vessels at anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... anchor. 164.19 Section 164.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... vessels at anchor. The master or person in charge of each vessel that is anchored shall ensure that: (a) A proper anchor watch is maintained; (b) Procedures are followed to detect a dragging anchor; and (c...

  2. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ground anchor installations. 3285....402 Ground anchor installations. (a) Ground anchor certification and testing. Each ground anchor must... registered architect must certify, the ground anchor for use in a classified soil (refer to § 3285.202...

  3. Anchor Bolt Position in Base Plate In Terms Of T and J Anchor Bolt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    b Osman Mohamad Hairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generally, L anchor bolt system has been used for a long period of time in construction industry as one of the distributing load structures. However, there are some weaknesses in L anchor bolt which may straighten and pullup when charged with tensile load. Current practices prefer to use other types of anchor bolt systems, such as headed studs anchor bolt system to replace the L anchor bolt design. There has been lack of studies to prove that it is more effective in terms of performance. A new T anchor bolt which was basically modified from headed studs anchor bolt was proposed in this study to compare its performance of tensile loading in concrete failure to typical L design. This study aims to determine whether the T anchor bolt system gives better performance as compared to an L anchor bolt system. The performance was rated based on tensile loading on concrete failure pattern. A pullout test was conducted on two different anchor bolt systems, namely L and T. The anchor bolt embedded depth, h in concrete were varied according to their hook or bend radius. Each sample was repeated twice. There were totally eight samples. The hook or bend radius used were 50 mm and 57.5 mm for sample L1 and L2, respectively. 90-degree bend were used on sample T1 and T2. Based on test results, it can be seen that the performance of concrete failure pattern under tensile load on both L and T anchor bolt design samples with 200 mm embedment depth was better than deeper embedment depth of 230 mm. But the L anchor bolt design gives the best results as compared to T design. Although T anchor bolt design shows higher resistance before first bond failure to the concrete sample. T anchor bolt was analysed and needed deeper embedment depth to allow formation of cone pull-out shape to acquire better performance.

  4. Observed Score Equating Using a Mini-Version Anchor and an Anchor with Less Spread of Difficulty: A Comparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul; Feigenbaum, Miriam; Curley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Two different types of anchors are investigated in this study: a mini-version anchor and an anchor that has a less spread of difficulty than the tests to be equated. The latter is referred to as a midi anchor. The impact of these two different types of anchors on observed score equating are evaluated and compared with respect to systematic error…

  5. Rapid method for DNA extraction from the honey bee Apis mellifera and the parasitic bee mite Varroa destructor using lysis buffer and proteinase K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, M R C; Figueiredo, V L C; De Jong, D; Sakamoto, C H; Simões, Z L P

    2013-10-22

    We developed a rapid method for extraction of DNA from honey bees, Apis mellifera, and from the parasitic bee mite, Varroa destructor. The advantages include fast processing and low toxicity of the substances that are utilized. We used lysis buffer with nonionic detergents to lyse cell walls and proteinase K to digest proteins. We tested whole thorax, thoracic muscle mass, legs, and antennae from individual bees; the mites were processed whole (1 mite/sample). Each thorax was incubated whole, without cutting, because exocuticle color pigment darkened the extraction solution, interfering with PCR results. The procedure was performed with autoclaved equipment and laboratory gloves. For each sample, we used 100 µL lysis buffer (2 mL stock solution of 0.5 M Tris/HCl, pH 8.5, 10 mL stock solution of 2 M KCl, 500 µL solution of 1 M MgCl2, 2 mL NP40, and 27.6 g sucrose, completed to 200 mL with bidistilled water and autoclaved) and 2 µL proteinase K (10 mg/mL in bidistilled water previously autoclaved, as proteinase K cannot be autoclaved). Tissues were incubated in the solutions for 1-2 h in a water bath (62°-68 °C) or overnight at 37 °C. After incubation, the tissues were removed from the extraction solution (lysis buffer + proteinase K) and the solution heated to 92 °C for 10 min, for proteinase K inactivation. Then, the solution with the extracted DNA was stored in a refrigerator (4°-8 °C) or a freezer (-20 °C). This method does not require centrifugation or phenol/chloroform extraction. The reduced number of steps allowed us to sample many individuals/day. Whole mites and bee antennae were the most rapidly processed. All bee tissues gave the same quality DNA. This method, even using a single bee antenna or a single mite, was adequate for extraction and analysis of bee genomic and mitochondrial DNA and mite genomic DNA.

  6. Coordination of Industrial Symbiosis through Anchoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to contribute to understanding the dynamics of industrial symbiosis. More specifically, we focus on the dynamics of anchoring as they can be observed in the Chinese context of eco-industrial development. We define anchoring as those activities that (typically local actors perform to create local physical and institutional conditions conducive to the emergence and further development of industrial symbiosis in a specific regional industrial system. We argue that, in the study of industrial symbiosis dynamics, it is conceptually more useful to focus on anchoring as an activity, rather than anchor tenants as actors. Based on a systematic literature review, we distinguish two types of anchoring activities: institutional and physical. We analyze anchoring dynamics in the case of Qijiang Industrial Symbiosis (Chongqing Municipality in China. We have identified the physical and institutional anchoring activities, the actors responsible for these activities, and how different anchoring activities build on each other over time. Our case study shows that the attempt to bring about industrial symbiosis in the Qijiang industrial park can be described in a richer way than just ‘governmental planning’.

  7. Anchoring of proteins to lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, K; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The anchoring of proteins to the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) using genetic techniques is an exciting and emerging research area that holds great promise for a wide variety of biotechnological applications. This paper reviews five different types of anchoring domains that have been

  8. Coordination of industrial symbiosis through anchoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Li; Spekkink, Wouter; Cuppen, E.H.W.J.; Korevaar, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to understanding the dynamics of industrial symbiosis. More specifically, we focus on the dynamics of anchoring as they can be observed in the Chinese context of eco-industrial development. We define anchoring as those activities that (typically local) actors perform

  9. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  10. Ringstone anchors from Gujarat, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    of Dwarka and Somanath have yielded several ringstone anchors along with other stone anchors such as triangular and grapnel types. The raw material used for these ring stones comprises basalt, sandstone and limestone. Earlier, these anchors were identified...

  11. Circular dichroism of stem bromelain: a third spectral class within the family of cysteine proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Reyna, A; Hernandez-Arana, A; Arreguin-Espinosa, R

    1994-01-01

    Two forms of stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.4) were isolated from commercial, crude and chromatographically purified preparations of the enzyme by means of gel-filtration and cation-exchange liquid chromatography. These forms possess nearly identical secondary and tertiary structures, as judged from their circular dichroism (c.d.) spectra. The spectral characteristics of stem bromelain suggest that this enzyme belongs to the alpha + beta protein class, as other cysteine proteinases do. In agreement with these results, quantitative estimation of secondary structures yielded amounts similar to those for papain and proteinase omega. However, the bromelain c.d. curve is clearly distinguishable from those reported for papain and proteinase omega, on one hand, and that of chymopapain, on the other. Thus, it is apparent that there are at least three types of c.d. spectra associated with the family of cysteine proteinases. PMID:8198520

  12. The effect of accuracy motivation on anchoring and adjustment: do people adjust from provided anchors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Joseph P; LeBoeuf, Robyn A; Nelson, Leif D

    2010-12-01

    Increasing accuracy motivation (e.g., by providing monetary incentives for accuracy) often fails to increase adjustment away from provided anchors, a result that has led researchers to conclude that people do not effortfully adjust away from such anchors. We challenge this conclusion. First, we show that people are typically uncertain about which way to adjust from provided anchors and that this uncertainty often causes people to believe that they have initially adjusted too far away from such anchors (Studies 1a and 1b). Then, we show that although accuracy motivation fails to increase the gap between anchors and final estimates when people are uncertain about the direction of adjustment, accuracy motivation does increase anchor-estimate gaps when people are certain about the direction of adjustment, and that this is true regardless of whether the anchors are provided or self-generated (Studies 2, 3a, 3b, and 5). These results suggest that people do effortfully adjust away from provided anchors but that uncertainty about the direction of adjustment makes that adjustment harder to detect than previously assumed. This conclusion has important theoretical implications, suggesting that currently emphasized distinctions between anchor types (self-generated vs. provided) are not fundamental and that ostensibly competing theories of anchoring (selective accessibility and anchoring-and-adjustment) are complementary. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepelley Maud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is

  14. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepelley, Maud; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Martineau, Nelly; Cheminade, Gerald; Caillet, Victoria; McCarthy, James

    2012-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role in the programmed cell death

  15. Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and toxicity of a Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis proteinase fraction with pharmacological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda O. Lemos

    Full Text Available Abstract Prior studies demonstrate that a proteinase fraction from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis V.M. Badillo, Caricaceae, exhibits wound healing activity in gastric and cutaneous models and antitumoral/antimetastatic effects. Here, we present the toxicity, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution data for this proteinase fraction following a single dose into Swiss mice by i.v., s.c. or p.o. routes. The i.v. and s.c. toxicity assays demonstrate that proteinase fraction at ≤20 mg/kg is non-lethal after single injection, while parental administration (p.o. of ≤300 mg/kg does not cause death. Based on p.o. acute toxicity dose using Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development protocols, proteinase fraction ranks as Class IV “harmful” substance. Proteinase fraction shows high uptake determined as Kp (distribution tissue/blood in organs linked to metabolism and excretion. Also, high bioavailability (≈100% was observed by s.c. administration. The blood contents following i.v. dose fits into a pharmacokinetic bi-compartmental model, consisting of high removal constants – kel 0.22 h−1 and kd 2.32 h−1and a half-life – t½ = 3.13 h. The Ames test of proteinase fraction (0.01–1% demonstrates absence of mutagenic activity. Likewise, genotoxic evaluation of proteinase fraction (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p. shows no influence in micronuclei frequency. In conclusion, the acute doses for proteinase fraction lack mutagenic and genotoxic activity, clearing the way for clinical assays.

  16. Structural organization of precursors of thermolysin-like proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidyuk, Ilya V; Gasanov, Eugene V; Safina, Dina R; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2008-09-01

    The primary structures of the full-length precursors of thermolysin-like proteinases (TLPs) were systemically analyzed. Structural comparison of the precursor amino-terminal regions (ATRs) removed during maturation allowed us to divide the family into two groups: peptidases with short (about 50 amino acids) and long (about 200 amino acids) ATRs. The accumulation of mutations in the ATRs of both types proved to correlate with that in the catalytic domains. No classical signal peptides were identified in the short ATRs, but they contained a conserved PPL-motif near the initiation methionine. The functional role of the short ATRs and PPL-motif is currently unclear. The C-terminal regions (CTRs) of TLP precursors, which are often removed during maturation, too, are found in about a half of precursors with long ATRs, but occur more rarely in precursors with short ATRs. CTRs in TLP precursors contain previously identified conserved domains typical for many other proteins and likely underlie the interaction with high molecular weight substrates.

  17. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener granulomatosis): A proteinase-3 driven disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2018-03-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener granulomatosis) is a systemic autoimmune vasculitis that affects small arteries, arterioles, and capillaries, most notably in the kidneys and lungs. In this disease, proteinase-3 (PR3), produced by neutrophils, is targeted by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Recent work by our group has shown how PR3 impairs the resolution of inflammation and deregulates the immune system. Normally, the clearance of activated neutrophils triggers an anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution process. In patients with GPA, however, macrophages phagocytose apoptotic neutrophils then release massive amounts of pro-inflammatory mediators, notably interleukin-1, thereby generating a pro-inflammatory microenvironment conducive to autoimmunity. This deregulation of immune processes is accompanied with activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and with polarization of T-helper-2 (Th2), Th9, and Th17 cells. These recent data highlight the dual role of PR3, both auto-antigenic and auto-inflammatory, thus potentially opening up new therapeutic avenues. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Anchoring Revisited: The Role of the Comparative Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Ina; Bohner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    When people estimate a numeric value after judging whether it is larger or smaller than a high or low anchor value (comparative question), estimates are biased in the direction of the anchor. One explanation for this anchoring effect is that people selectively access knowledge consistent with the anchor value as part of a positive test strategy. Two studies (total N = 184) supported the alternative explanation that people access knowledge consistent with their own answer to the comparative question. Specifically, anchoring effects emerged when the answer to the comparative question was unexpected (lower than the low anchor or higher than the high anchor). For expected answers (lower than the high anchor or higher than the low anchor), however, anchoring effects were attenuated or reversed. The anchor value itself was almost never reported as an absolute estimate. PMID:24454953

  19. Stone anchors from Minicoy Island, Lakshadweep, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    mariners. The logo of the Nautical Archaeology Society, seen on the cover of IJNA, has been taken from a bichrome Cypriot jug of the 7th century BC. It depicts a vessel with two oars, with a helmsman at the stern, and another crewman raising or lowering... a ring-stone anchor at the bow (Fig. 9) (Fenwick, 2000). This anchor is tied with a rope, without a wooden stock, and the size of the hole appears to be wide. In the Maldives, such anchors are made of round coral stones with a forked timber...

  20. Sutures and suture anchors--update 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Coons, David A; Boothby, Michael H

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate recently introduced sutures and suture anchors for single pull load to failure strength and failure mode. Suture anchors were tested in fresh porcine metaphyseal cortex and cancellous troughs with the use of an established protocol. An Instron machine applied tensile loads parallel to the axis of insertion at a rate of 12.5 mm/sec until failure, and mean anchor failure strengths were calculated. The mode of failure (anchor pull-out, suture eyelet cut-out, or suture failure) was recorded. Anchors tested included the BioRaptor 2.9, BioZip, Super Revo, Impact, Allograft cortical anchor, SpiraLok, Herculon, AxyaLoop titanium anchors 3, 5, and 6.5 mm, AxyaLoop bioabsorbable anchors 3, 5, and 6.5, ParaFix titanium anchors 3, 5, and 6.5, ParaSorb BioAnchors 3, 5.5, and 6.5, and Bio-Corkscrew FT. Sutures were also tested through an established protocol for load to failure. Sutures tested consisted of Orthocord, Ultrabraid (White and CoBraid), ForceFiber, Hi-Fi, MagnumWire, and Maxbraid Polyethylene Plus. Mean failure loads were as follows: BioRaptor 238 N, BioZip 366 N, double-loaded Super Revo 486 N, triple-loaded Super Revo 362 N, Impact 202 N, Allograft cortical anchor 240 N, SpiraLok 289 N, Herculon 819 N, AxyaLoop titanium anchors 3.0 (335 N), 5.0 (485 N), and 6.5 mm (465 N), AxyaLoop bioabsorbable anchors 3 (143 N), 5 (395 N), and 6.5 (369 N), ParaFix titanium anchors 3 (335 N), 5 (485 N), and 6.5 (465 N), ParaSorb BioAnchors 3 (143 N), 5.5 (395 N), and 6.5 (369 N), and Bio-Corkscrew FT (260 N). The sutures all broke at the mid point of their tested strands away from the grips. Mean suture strength for No. 2 Orthocord was 92 N; for No. 2 Ultrabraid CoBraid and White, strengths were 265 N and 280 N, respectively; strength for No. 2 Force Fiber was 289 N, for No. 2 Hi-Fi 250 N, for No. 2 MagnumWire 303 N, and for No. 2 Maxbraid Polyethylene Plus 256 N. Newer suture products showed significant improvements in load to failure values when compared with braided

  1. Secondary anchor targeted cell release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Ali; Lee-Montiel, Felipe T; Amos, Jennifer R; Imoukhuede, P I

    2015-11-01

    Personalized medicine offers the promise of tailoring therapy to patients, based on their cellular biomarkers. To achieve this goal, cellular profiling systems are needed that can quickly and efficiently isolate specific cell types without disrupting cellular biomarkers. Here we describe the development of a unique platform that facilitates gentle cell capture via a secondary, surface-anchoring moiety, and cell release. The cellular capture system consists of a glass surface functionalized with APTES, d-desthiobiotin, and streptavidin. Biotinylated mCD11b and hIgG antibodies are used to capture mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human breast cancer (MCF7-GFP) cell lines, respectively. The surface functionalization is optimized by altering assay components, such as streptavidin, d-desthiobiotin, and APTES, to achieve cell capture on 80% of the functionalized surface and cell release upon biotin treatment. We also demonstrate an ability to capture 50% of target cells within a dual-cell mixture. This engineering advancement is a critical step towards achieving cell isolation platforms for personalized medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Miniature magnetically anchored and controlled camera system for trocar-less laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ding-Hui; Zhu, Hao-Yang; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Hong-Ke; Xiang, Jun-Xi; Xue, Fei; Wu, Rong-Qian; Lv, Yi

    2017-03-28

    To design a miniature magnetically anchored and controlled camera system to reduce the number of trocars which are required for laparoscopy. The system consists of a miniature magnetically anchored camera with a 30° downward angle, an external magnetically anchored unit, and a vision output device. The camera weighs 12 g, measures Φ10.5 mm × 55 mm and has two magnets, a vision model, a light source, and a metal hexagonal nut. To test the prototype, the camera was inserted through a 12-mm conventional trocar in an ex vivo real liver laparoscopic training system. A trocar-less laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed 6 times using a 12-mm and a 5-mm conventional trocar. In addition, the same procedure was performed in four canine models. Both procedures were successfully performed using only two conventional laparoscopic trocars. The cholecystectomy was completed without any major complication in 42 min (38-45 min) in vitro and in 50 min (45-53 min) using an animal model. This camera was anchored and controlled by an external unit magnetically anchored on the abdominal wall. The camera could generate excellent image. with no instrument collisions. The camera system we designed provides excellent optics and can be easily maneuvered. The number of conventional trocars is reduced without adding technical difficulties.

  3. Starting point anchoring effects in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Anchoring is acknowledged as a potential source of considerable bias in Dichotomous Choice Contingent Valuation studies. Recently, another stated preference method known as Choice Experiments has gained in popularity as well as the number of applied studies. However, as the elicitation...... of preferences in Choice Experiments resembles the Dichotomous Choice format, there is reason to suspect that Choice Experiments are equally vulnerable to anchoring bias. Employing different sets of price levels in a so-called Instruction Choice Set presented prior to the actual choice sets, the present study...... finds that preferences elicited by Choice Experiments can be subject to starting point anchoring bias. Different price levels provoked significantly different distributions of choice in two otherwise identical choice set designs. On a more specific level, the results indicate that the anchoring...

  4. Experimental and theoretical analysis of CFRP reinforced concrete beam anchored by CF anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ning; Ma, Ye-ming; Dong, Hong-han; Chen, Da

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets is used to strengthen RC members widely. However, in the actual projects, premature separation of the CFRP sheet from the concrete surface is observed frequently, key issue in CFRP application is the performance of the connection between the CFRP sheet and the peripheral RC members. This paper presented the results of an experimental study to investigate mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF) anchor dowels, a new CFRP anchoring method, and based on the experimental results, obtained the bearing capacity calculation formula of concrete beam strengthened with CFRP anchoring by carbon fiber anchor dowels .

  5. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  7. Further Study of the Choice of Anchor Tests in Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trierweiler, Tammy J.; Lewis, Charles; Smith, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe what factors influence the observed score correlation between an (external) anchor test and a total test. We show that the anchor to full-test observed score correlation is based on two components: the true score correlation between the anchor and total test, and the reliability of the anchor test. Findings using an…

  8. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-10-01

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  9. Plant Proteinase Inhibitors in Therapeutics – Focus on Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Srikanth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants are known to have many secondary metabolites and phytochemical compounds which are highly explored at biochemical and molecular genetics level and exploited enormously in the human health care sector. However, there are other less explored small molecular weight proteins, which inhibit proteases/proteinases. Plants are good sources of protease inhibitors (PIs which protect them against diseases, insects, pests, and herbivores. In the past, proteinaceous PIs were considered primarily as protein-degrading enzymes. Nevertheless, this view has significantly changed and PIs are now treated as very important signaling molecules in many biological activities such as inflammation, apoptosis, blood clotting and hormone processing. In recent years, PIs have been examined extensively as therapeutic agents, primarily to deal with various human cancers. Interestingly, many plant-based PIs are also found to be effective against cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory diseases and neurological disorders. Several plant PIs are under further evaluation in in vitro clinical trials. Among all types of PIs, Bowman-Birk inhibitors (BBI has been studied extensively in the treatment of many diseases, especially in the field of cancer prevention. So far, crops such as beans, potatoes, barley, squash, millet, wheat, buckwheat, groundnut, chickpea, pigeonpea, corn and pineapple have been identified as good sources of PIs. The PI content of such foods has a significant influence on human health disorders, particularly in the regions where people mostly depend on these kind of foods. These natural PIs vary in concentration, protease specificity, heat stability, and sometimes several PIs may be present in the same species or tissue. However, it is important to carry out individual studies to identify the potential effects of each PI on human health. PIs in plants make them incredible sources to determine novel PIs with specific pharmacological and

  10. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) as targets for antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret; McIntosh, Kathryn; Bushell, Trevor; Sloan, Graeme; Plevin, Robin

    2016-04-15

    Since the identification of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family as mediators of serine protease activity in the 1990s, there has been tremendous progress in the elucidation of their pathophysiological roles. The development of drugs that target PARs has been the focus of many laboratories for the potential treatment of thrombosis, cancer and other inflammatory diseases. Understanding the mechanisms of PAR activation and G protein signalling pathways evoked in response to the growing list of endogenous proteases has yielded great insight into receptor regulation at the molecular level. This has led to the development of new selective modulators of PAR activity, particularly PAR1. The mixed success of targeting PARs has been best exemplified in the context of inhibiting PAR1 as a new antiplatelet therapy. The development of the competitive PAR1 antagonist, vorapaxar (Zontivity), has clearly shown the value in targeting PAR1 in acute coronary syndrome (ACS); however the severity of associated bleeding with this drug has limited its use in the clinic. Due to the efficacy of thrombin acting via PAR1, strategies to selectively inhibit specific PAR1-mediated G protein signalling pathways or to target the second thrombin platelet receptor, PAR4, are being devised. The rationale behind these alternative approaches is to bias downstream thrombin activity via PARs to allow for inhibition of pro-thrombotic pathways but maintain other pathways that may preserve haemostatic balance and improve bleeding profiles for widespread clinical use. This review summarizes the structural determinants that regulate PARs and the modulators of PAR activity developed to date. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  11. Energy dissipation and high-strain rate dynamic response of E-glass fiber composites with anchored carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the mechanical properties of an E-glass fabric composite reinforced with anchored multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on the E-glass fabric using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition procedure. The E-glass fabric with attached CNTs was then incorpor...

  12. The role of anchor-tipped larval hairs in the organization of ant colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint A Penick

    Full Text Available The spatial organization within a social insect colony is a key component of colony life. It influences individual interaction rates, resource distribution, and division of labor within the nest. Yet studies of social insect behavior are most often carried out in artificial constructions, which may change worker behavior and colony organization. We observed how workers of the ant Pheidole rhea organized brood in nests with deep chambers and textured walls that were designed to mimic their natural constructions more closely. Instead of clumping larvae into piles on the chamber floor, workers suspended fourth-instar larvae from the vertical walls and ceiling of each chamber while young larvae and pupae were clumped at the base. Fourth-instar larvae possess five rows of anchor-tipped hairs on their dorsal side, and we predicted that these hairs functioned to attach larvae to the nest walls. We gave larvae "haircuts," where only the anchor-tipped hairs were removed, and then tested their ability to adhere to a textured surface raised to an angle of 90° and then 120° with respect to the horizontal plane. Larvae whose hairs had been clipped came unattached in almost all trials, while larvae whose hairs remained intact stayed attached. This confirmed that anchor-tipped hairs functioned to attach larvae to the walls of the nest. The presence of anchor-tipped hairs is widespread and has been documented in at least 22 genera from the ant subfamily Myrmicinae, including species that occur in a variety of environments and represent a broad range of nesting habits. Based on our results, it is likely that many species exhibit this larval hanging behavior, and this could impact colony characteristics such as spatial organization and the care of developing larvae by nurse workers.

  13. The Role of Anchor-Tipped Larval Hairs in the Organization of Ant Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penick, Clint A.; Copple, R. Neale; Mendez, Raymond A.; Smith, Adrian A.

    2012-01-01

    The spatial organization within a social insect colony is a key component of colony life. It influences individual interaction rates, resource distribution, and division of labor within the nest. Yet studies of social insect behavior are most often carried out in artificial constructions, which may change worker behavior and colony organization. We observed how workers of the ant Pheidole rhea organized brood in nests with deep chambers and textured walls that were designed to mimic their natural constructions more closely. Instead of clumping larvae into piles on the chamber floor, workers suspended fourth-instar larvae from the vertical walls and ceiling of each chamber while young larvae and pupae were clumped at the base. Fourth-instar larvae possess five rows of anchor-tipped hairs on their dorsal side, and we predicted that these hairs functioned to attach larvae to the nest walls. We gave larvae “haircuts,” where only the anchor-tipped hairs were removed, and then tested their ability to adhere to a textured surface raised to an angle of 90° and then 120° with respect to the horizontal plane. Larvae whose hairs had been clipped came unattached in almost all trials, while larvae whose hairs remained intact stayed attached. This confirmed that anchor-tipped hairs functioned to attach larvae to the walls of the nest. The presence of anchor-tipped hairs is widespread and has been documented in at least 22 genera from the ant subfamily Myrmicinae, including species that occur in a variety of environments and represent a broad range of nesting habits. Based on our results, it is likely that many species exhibit this larval hanging behavior, and this could impact colony characteristics such as spatial organization and the care of developing larvae by nurse workers. PMID:22848539

  14. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

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    Leah Theresa Sigle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2. Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania.

  15. Determination of germ tube, phospholipase, and proteinase production by bloodstream isolates of Candida albicans

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    Antonella Souza Mattei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Candida albicans is a commensal and opportunistic agent that causes infection in immunocompromised individuals. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of this yeast, including the production of germ tubes (GTs and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate GT production and phospholipase and proteinase activities in bloodstream isolates of C. albicans. Methods One hundred fifty-three C. albicans isolates were obtained from blood samples and analyzed for GT, phospholipase, and proteinase production. The assays were performed in duplicate in egg yolk medium containing bovine serum albumin and human serum. Results Detectable amounts of proteinase were produced by 97% of the isolates, and 78% of the isolates produced phospholipase. GTs were produced by 95% of the isolates. A majority of the isolates exhibited low levels of phospholipase production and high levels of proteinase production. Conclusions Bloodstream isolates of C. albicans produce virulence factors such as GT and hydrolytic enzymes that enable them to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  16. Differential antibiosis against Helicoverpa armigera exerted by distinct inhibitory repeat domains of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-05-01

    Plant defensive serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are known to have negative impact on digestive physiology of herbivore insects and thus have a crucial role in plant protection. Here, we have assessed the efficacy and specificity of three previously characterized inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) variants from Capsicum annuum PIs viz., IRD-7, -9 and -12 against gut proteinases from Helicoverpa armigera. Comparative study of in silico binding energy revealed that IRD-9 possesses higher affinity towards H. armigera serine proteinases as compared to IRD-7 and -12. H. armigera fed on artificial diet containing 5 TIU/g of recombinant IRD proteins exhibited differential effects on larval growth, survival rate and other nutritional parameters. Major digestive gut trypsin and chymotrypsin genes were down regulated in the IRD fed larvae, while few of them were up-regulated, this indicate alterations in insect digestive physiology. The results corroborated with proteinase activity assays and zymography. These findings suggest that the sequence variations among PIs reflect in their efficacy against proteinases in vitro and in vivo, which also could be used for developing tailor-made multi-domain inhibitor gene(s). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of wetting and anchoring on capillary phenomena in a confined liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, D.; Velasco, E.; Mederos, L.

    2004-03-01

    A fluid of hard spherocylinders of length-to-breadth ratio L/D=5 confined between two identical planar, parallel walls—forming a pore of slit geometry—has been studied using a version of the Onsager density-functional theory. The walls impose an exclusion boundary condition over the particle's centers of mass, while at the same time favoring a particular anchoring at the walls, either parallel or perpendicular to the substrate. We observe the occurrence of a capillary transition, i.e., a phase transition associated with the formation of a nematic film inside the pore at a chemical potential different from μb—the chemical potential at the bulk isotropic-nematic transition. This transition terminates at an Ising-type surface critical point. In line with previous studies based on the macroscopic Kelvin equation and the mesoscopic Landau-de Gennes approach, our microscopic model indicates that the capillary transition is greatly affected by the wetting and anchoring properties of the semi-infinite system, i.e., when the fluid is in contact with a single wall or, equivalently, the walls are at a very large distance. Specifically, in a situation where the walls are preferentially wetted by the nematic phase in the semi-infinite system, one has the standard scenario with the capillary transition taking place at chemical potentials less than μb (capillary nematization transition or capillary ordering transition). By contrast, if the walls tend to orientationally disorder the fluid, the capillary transition may occur at chemical potentials larger than μb, in what may be called a capillary isotropization transition or capillary disordering transition. Moreover, the anchoring transition that occurs in the semi-infinite system may affect very decisively the confinement properties of the liquid crystal and the capillary transitions may become considerably more complicated.

  18. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Ma

    Full Text Available Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants' WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain.

  19. NS2B-3 proteinase-mediated processing in the yellow fever virus structural region: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amberg, S M; Nestorowicz, A; McCourt, D W; Rice, C M

    1994-06-01

    Several of the cleavages required to generate the mature nonstructural proteins from the flaviviral polyprotein are known to be mediated by a complex consisting of NS2B and a serine proteinase domain located in the N-terminal one-third of NS3. These cleavages typically occur after two basic residues followed by a short side chain residue. Cleavage at a similar dibasic site in the structural region is believed to produce the C terminus of the virion capsid protein. To study this cleavage, we developed a cell-free trans cleavage assay for yellow fever virus (YF)-specific proteolytic activity by using a substrate spanning the C protein dibasic site. Cleavage at the predicted site was observed when the substrate was incubated with detergent-solubilized lysates from YF-infected BHK cells. NS2B and the NS3 proteinase domain were the only YF-specific proteins required for this cleavage. Cell fractionation studies demonstrated that the YF-specific proteolytic activity was membrane associated and that activity could be detected only after detergent solubilization. Previous cell-free studies led to a hypothesis that processing in the C-prM region involves (i) translation of C followed by translocation and core glycosylation of prM by using an internal signal sequence, (ii) signalase cleavage to produce a membrane-anchored form of the C protein (anchC) and the N terminus of prM, and (iii) NS2B-3-mediated cleavage at the anchC dibasic site to produce the C terminus of the virion C protein. However, the results of in vivo transient-expression studies do not support this temporal cleavage order. Rather, expression of a YF polyprotein extending from C through the N-terminal one-third of NS3 revealed that C-prM processing, but not translocation, was dependent on an active NS2B-3 proteinase. This suggests that signalase-mediated cleavage in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum may be dependent on prior cleavage at the anchC dibasic site. Possible pathways for processing in the C

  20. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  1. The Enteric Nervous System in Inflammation and Pain: The Role of Proteinase-Activated Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vergnolle

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS plays a pivotal role in inflammatory and nociceptive processes. Drugs that interact with the ENS have recently raised considerable interest because of their capacity to regulate numerous aspects of the gut physiology and pathophysiology. The present article summarizes recent research on proteinases and proteinase-activated receptors (PARs as signalling molecules in the ENS. In particular, experiments in animal models suggest that PAR2 is important to neurogenic inflammation in the intestine. Moreover, PAR2 agonists seem to induce intestinal hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic states, suggesting a role for this receptor in visceral pain perception. Thus, PARs, together with the proteinases that activate them, represent exciting new targets for therapeutic intervention on the ENS.

  2. Biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Hilda M.; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human trichomonosis, infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The host-parasite interaction and pathophysiological processes of trichomonosis remain incompletely understood. This review focuses on the advancements reached in the area of the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis, especially in the role of the cysteine proteinases. It highlights various approaches made in this field and lists a group of trichomonad cysteine proteinases involved in diverse processes such as invasion of the mucous layer, cytoadherence, cytotoxicity, cytoskeleton disruption of red blood cells, hemolysis, and evasion of the host immune response. A better understanding of the biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of this parasite could be used in the identification of new chemotherapeutic targets. An additional advantage could be the development of a vaccine in order to reduce transmission of T. vaginalis. PMID:25348828

  3. The aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae folds its own inhibitor into a helix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M; Phylip, L H; Lees, W E

    2000-01-01

    .2 and 1.8 A, respectively, for complexes of proteinase A with full-length IA3 and with a truncated form consisting only of residues 2-34, reveal an unprecedented mode of inhibitor-enzyme interactions. Neither form of the free inhibitor has detectable intrinsic secondary structure in solution. However......, upon contact with the enzyme, residues 2-32 become ordered and adopt a near-perfect alpha-helical conformation. Thus, the proteinase acts as a folding template, stabilizing the helical conformation in the inhibitor, which results in the potent and specific blockage of the proteolytic activity.......Aspartic proteinase A from yeast is specifically and potently inhibited by a small protein called IA3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although this inhibitor consists of 68 residues, we show that the inhibitory activity resides within the N-terminal half of the molecule. Structures solved at 2...

  4. Coronavirus 3CLpro proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

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    Blom Nikolaj

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the passing of more than a year since the first outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS, efficient counter-measures are still few and many believe that reappearance of SARS, or a similar disease caused by a coronavirus, is not unlikely. For other virus families like the picornaviruses it is known that pathology is related to proteolytic cleavage of host proteins by viral proteinases. Furthermore, several studies indicate that virus proliferation can be arrested using specific proteinase inhibitors supporting the belief that proteinases are indeed important during infection. Prompted by this, we set out to analyse and predict cleavage by the coronavirus main proteinase using computational methods. Results We retrieved sequence data on seven fully sequenced coronaviruses and identified the main 3CL proteinase cleavage sites in polyproteins using alignments. A neural network was trained to recognise the cleavage sites in the genomes obtaining a sensitivity of 87.0% and a specificity of 99.0%. Several proteins known to be cleaved by other viruses were submitted to prediction as well as proteins suspected relevant in coronavirus pathology. Cleavage sites were predicted in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-1, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage candidates were identified which might be important to elucidate coronavirus pathology. Furthermore, the method might assist in design of proteinase inhibitors for treatment of SARS and possible future diseases caused by coronaviruses. It is made available for public use at our website: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetCorona/.

  5. Human Rhinovirus Proteinase 2A Induces Th1 and Th2 Immunity in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manisha; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Porter, Paul; Xu, Chuang; Ohno, Ayako; Atmar, Robert L.; Greenberg, Stephen B.; Bandi, Venkata; Gern, Jim; Amineva, Svetlana; Aminev, Alex; Skern, Tim; Smithwick, Pamela; Perusich, Sarah; Barrow, Nadia; Roberts, Luz; Corry, David B.; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2010-01-01

    Background Tobacco related lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are major causes of lung-related disability and death worldwide. Acute exacerbation of COPD (AE-COPD) is commonly associated with upper and lower respiratory viral infections and may result in respiratory failure in those with advanced lung disease. Objective We sought to determine the mechanism underlying COPD exacerbation, and host response to pathogen-derived factors. Methods Over a 24 months period, we assessed the viral causes for upper and lower respiratory infections in COPD (n=155) and control (n=103) subjects. We collected nasal and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and peripheral blood under baseline and exacerbated condition. We determined the effect of human rhinovirus (HRV) proteinases on T cell activation in humans, and in mice. Results HRVs are isolated from nasal and lung fluid from subjects with AE-COPD. BAL fluid, and CD4 T cells from COPD patients exhibited a type 1 T helper (Th1), and Th2 cell cytokine phenotype during acute infection. HRV-encoded proteinase 2A activated monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, and induced strong Th1, and Th2 immune responses from CD4 T cells. Intranasal administration of recombinant rhinovirus proteinase 2A in mice resulted in an increase in airway hyperreactivity, lung inflammation, and IL-4 and IFN-γ production from CD4 T cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that patients with severe COPD show Th1 and Th2 bias responses during AE-COPD. HRV-encoded proteinase 2A, like other microbial proteinases, could provide a Th1 and Th2-biasing adjuvant factor during upper and lower respiratory infection in patients with severe COPD. Alteration of the immune response to secreted viral proteinases may contribute to worsening of dyspnea and respiratory failure in COPD. PMID:20430426

  6. The Characterization of SaPIN2b, a Plant Trichome-Localized Proteinase Inhibitor from Solanum americanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng-Fu Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase inhibitors play an important role in plant resistance of insects and pathogens. In this study, we characterized the serine proteinase inhibitor SaPIN2b, which is constitutively expressed in Solanum americanum trichomes and contains two conserved motifs of the proteinase inhibitor II (PIN2 family. The recombinant SaPIN2b (rSaPIN2b, which was expressed in Escherichia coli, was demonstrated to be a potent proteinase inhibitor against a panel of serine proteinases, including subtilisin A, chymotrypsin and trypsin. Moreover, rSaPIN2b also effectively inhibited the proteinase activities of midgut trypsin-like proteinases that were extracted from the devastating pest Helicoverpa armigera. Furthermore, the overexpression of SaPIN2b in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced resistance against H. armigera. Taken together, our results demonstrated that SaPIN2b is a potent serine proteinase inhibitor that may act as a protective protein in plant defense against insect attacks.

  7. Th1 Cell Development Induced by Cysteine Proteinases A and B in Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Due to Leishmania guyanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascalis, Hervé; Lavergne, Anne; Bourreau, Eliane; Prévot-Linguet, Ghislaine; Kariminia, Amina; Pradinaud, Roger; Rafati, Sima; Launois, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    The cysteine proteinases CPA and CPB from Leishmania major induced Th1 responses in patients with leishmaniasis due to Leishmania guyanensis. Furthermore, cysteine proteinases induced neither interleukin 4 (IL-4) nor IL-13 and low levels of IL-10 in controls and patients. The results suggest that CPs would be quite good candidates for a vaccine against different Leishmania species. PMID:12704171

  8. The potency and specificity of the interaction between the IA3 inhibitor and its target aspartic proteinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phylip, L H; Lees, W E; Brownsey, B G

    2001-01-01

    The yeast IA3 polypeptide consists of only 68 residues, and the free inhibitor has little intrinsic secondary structure. IA3 showed subnanomolar potency toward its target, proteinase A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and did not inhibit any of a large number of aspartic proteinases with similar se...

  9. Participation of intracellular cysteine proteinases, in particular cathepsin B, in degradation of collagen in periosteal tissue explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Hoeben, K. A.; Jansen, D. C.; Buttle, D. J.; Beertsen, W.; Everts, V.

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of cysteine proteinases in the degradation of soft connective tissue collagen was studied in cultured periosteal explants. Using cysteine proteinase inhibitors that were active intracellularly or extracellularly (Ep453 and Ep475, respectively), it was shown that over-all collagen

  10. Molecular investigation on the interaction of spermine with proteinase K by multispectroscopic techniques and molecular simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Koupaei, Mansoore; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Davar, Fateme

    2017-01-01

    The alteration in structure, function and stability of proteinase K in the presence of spermine was investigated using spectroscopic methods and simulation techniques. The stability and enzyme activity of proteinase K-spermine complex were significantly enhanced as compared to that of the pure enzyme. The increase in the value of Vmax and the catalytic efficiency of Proteinase K in presence of spermine confirmed that the polyamine could bring the enzyme hyperactivation. UV-vis spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism methods demonstrated that the binding of spermine changed the microenvironment and structure of proteinase K. The fluorescence studies, showing that spermine quenched the intensity of proteinase K with static mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters analysis suggested that hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces play a key role in complex stability which is in agreement with modeling studies. The CD spectra represented the secondary structure alteration of proteinase K with an increase in α-helicity and a decrease in β-sheet of proteinase K upon spermine conjugation. The molecular simulation results proposed that spermine could interact with proteinase K spontaneously at single binding site, which is in agreement with spectroscopic results. This agreement between experimental and theoretical results may be a worth method for protein-ligand complex studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Career anchors and learning plan (part one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is divided into three parts. The first part concentrates on how important career is for an individual, organization and society. The author establishes that understanding of career has changed dramatically and does not only refer to climbing up the career ladder, but also moving off or even down the career ladder. The notion of career, as a lifelong and professional path, encompasses all aspects of human personality and their roles acquired through one's life. On basis of vast and longitudinal research, where the author has studied career anchors of individuals, it is the objective of the author to find out on basis of what grounds do the individuals decide to take certain directions in their careers and how learning contributes to such decisions. As a source the author has used Shein's theory of career anchors. Part one describes in greater detail 8 different career anchors and introduces their main features with the findings of the research, which refer to the analysis of professions (work positions and established career anchors. The author thus verifies the hypothesis that career anchors do exist in our area.

  12. Amino acid sequences of mammalian kazal-type proteinase inhibitors from salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstrasser, K; Wachter, E; Reisinger, P W; Greim, M; Albrecht, G J; Gebhard, W

    1993-09-01

    1. The amino acid sequences of bikazins (the double-headed Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors from submandibular glands) isolated from the snow leopard (Unica unica), the European mink (Mustela lutreola), and the European pine marten (Martes martes) were determined. 2. N-terminal domains of bikazins are characterized by a cysteine residue spacing that differs from that of C-terminal domains of bikazins and other Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor domains. 3. N-terminal sequences of bikazins seem to be specific for, and highly conserved within, each Carnivora family.

  13. Surface display of heterologous proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Hao

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that the lysin motif (LysM domains of bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes are able to bind to peptidoglycan moieties of the cell wall. This suggests an approach for a cell surface display system in Gram-positive bacteria using a LysM-containing protein as the anchoring motif. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in B. thuringiensis using a LysM-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase, endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Mbg, as the anchor protein. Results Homology searching in the B. thuringiensis YBT-1520 genome revealed a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase gene. The encoded protein, Mbg, exhibited substantial cell-wall binding capacity. The deduced amino acid sequence of Mbg was structurally distinguished as an N-terminal domain with two tandemly aligned LysMs and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A GFP-fusion protein was expressed and used to verify the surface localization by Western blot, flow cytometry, protease accessibility, SDS sensitivity, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy assays. Low-level constitutive expression of Mbg was elevated by introducing a sporulation-independent promoter of cry3Aa. Truncated Mbg domains with separate N-terminus (Mbgn, C-terminus (Mbgc, LysM1, or LysM2 were further compared for their cell-wall displaying efficiencies. The Mbgn moiety contributed to cell-wall anchoring, while LysM1 was the active domain. Two tandemly repeated Mbgns exhibited the highest display activity, while the activity of three repeated Mbgns was decreased. A heterologous bacterial multicopper oxidase (WlacD was successfully displayed onto the surface of B. thuringiensis target cells using the optimum (Mbgn2 anchor, without radically altering its catalytic activity. Conclusion Mbg can be a functional anchor protein to target different heterologous proteins onto the surface of B. thuringiensis cells. Since the LysM domain appears to be universal in Gram-positive bacteria

  14. Does the design of mini slings anchoring systems really matter? A biomechanical comparison between Mini Arc™ and Ophira™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Souza, R; Rodrigues-Palma, P C; Goulart-Fernandes-Dias, F; Teixeira-Siniscalchi, R; Zanettini-Riccetto, C L

    2016-11-01

    Currently, a sling implant is the standard treatment for stress urinary incontinence in women. To be effective, they require an adequate anchoring system. The aim of this study is compare biomechanical features of fixation systems of two mini slings models available on the market (Ophira™ and Mini Arc™) through a tensile test. Anchoring devices of each sling were surgically implanted in abdominal wall of 15 rats divided into three groups of five animals which were arranged according to the date of post implant euthanasia on 7, 14 and 30 days. Abdominal walls of rats were extracted on bloc containing the anchoring system and were submitted to a tensile strength test to measure the maximum load and elongation until device avulsion from the tissue. The results were compared using Student test t and a 5% cut off was considered significant. The Ophira™ mini sling fixation system demanded a greater maximum load and developed a longer stretch for avulsion from the implanted site at all moments evaluated (p value less than 0.05). There were significant differences in fixation patterns of the anchoring systems, which were exclusively related to their designs. The Ophira™ mini sling fixation device provided better fixation to the abdominal wall of rats compared to the Mini Arc™ device, even in the late post implant period. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Magnetic anchoring guidance system in video-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, Agnese; Solli, Piergiorgio; Bertolaccini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic anchoring guidance system (MAGS) is one of the most promising technological innovations in minimally invasive surgery and consists in two magnetic elements matched through the abdominal or thoracic wall. The internal magnet can be inserted into the abdominal or chest cavity through a small single incision and then moved into position by manipulating the external component. In addition to a video camera system, the inner magnetic platform can house remotely controlled surgical tools thus reducing instruments fencing, a serious inconvenience of the uniportal access. The latest prototypes are equipped with self-light-emitting diode (LED) illumination and a wireless antenna for signal transmission and device controlling, which allows bypassing the obstacle of wires crossing the field of view (FOV). Despite being originally designed for laparoscopic surgery, the MAGS seems to suit optimally the characteristics of the chest wall and might meet the specific demands of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) surgery in terms of ergonomics, visualization and surgical performance; moreover, it involves less risks for the patients and an improved aesthetic outcome.

  16. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung Fei Khang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530 were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the

  17. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Tsung Fei; Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams's K mult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  18. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  19. Leucocyte membrane expression of proteinase 3 correlates with disease activity in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobold, ACM; Kallenberg, CGM; Tervaert, JWC

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is an inflammatory disorder characterized by granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis, and is strongly associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). ANCA in patients with WG an directed against proteinase 3 (Pr3) in most of the cases. In vine, upon

  20. Proteinase K and the structure of PrPse: the good, the bad, and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious proteins (prions) are, ironically, defined by their resistance to proteolytic digestion. A defining characteristic of the transmissible isoform of the prion protein (PrPSc) is its partial resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. Diagnosis of prion disease typically relies upon immunod...

  1. In vivo and in vitro effect of Acacia nilotica seed proteinase inhibitors ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Acacia nilotica proteinase inhibitor (AnPI) was isolated by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and resulted in a purification of 10.68-fold with a 19.5% yield. Electrophoretic analysis of purified AnPI protein resolved into a single band with molecular weight of ...

  2. Human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in squamous metaplastic epithelium of bronchial airways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Schadewijk, A. van; Stolk, J.; Sont, J.K.; Boer, W.I.; Rabe, K.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Mauad, T.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze a possible contribution of human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to the induction of airway epithelial changes such as squamous cell metaplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The presence of these molecules and the

  3. Recombinant protein to analyze autoantibodies to proteinase 3 in systemic vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rarok, AA; Huitema, MG; van der Leij, MJ; van der Geld, YM; Berthold, H; Schmitt, J; Stegeman, CA; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    2003-01-01

    The presence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies with specificity for proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) usually is detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with purified PR3 as a substrate. We studied the technical performance of direct and capture ELISA using a recombinant

  4. Serum proteinase inhibitors and other serum proteins in protein-energy malnutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelp, F.P.; Migasena, P.; Pongpaew, P.; SCHREURS W.H.P

    1977-01-01

    1. The concentrations of serum protein albumin, prealbumin and transferrin were determined in twenty-eight cases of protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) with infection, together with the levels of serum proteinase inhibitors (PI), alpha1-antitrypsin (AT), alpha1-antichymotrypsin (Ach),

  5. Purification and characterization of a milk-clotting aspartic proteinase from globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Berta E; Brutti, Cristina B; Caffini, Néstor O

    2004-12-29

    The study of proteinase expression in crude extracts from different organs of the globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) disclosed that enzymes with proteolytic and milk-clotting activity are mainly located in mature flowers. Maximum proteolytic activity was recorded at pH 5.0, and inhibition studies showed that only pepstatin, specific for aspartic proteinases, presented a significant inhibitory effect. Such properties, in addition to easy enzyme inactivation by moderate heating, make this crude protease extract potentially useful for cheese production. Adsorption with activated carbon, together with anion exchange and affinity chromatography, led to the isolation of a heterodimeric milk-clotting proteinase consisting of 30- and 15-kDa subunits. MALDI-TOF MS of the 15-kDa chain determined a 15.358-Da mass, and the terminal amino sequence presented 96% homology with the smaller cardosin A subunit. The amino terminal sequence of the 30-kDa chain proved to be identical to the larger cardosin A subunit. Electrophoresis evidenced proteinase self-processing that was confirmed by immunoblots presenting 62-, 30-, and 15-kDa bands.

  6. Human anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies to proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) bind to neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rossum, AP; van der Geld, YM; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    Human anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies to proteinase 3 (PR3-ANCA) bind to neutrophils. Background. Recently, the in vivo pathogenic role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) in ANCA-associated vasculitis has been challenged by Abdel-Salam et al. In their report, they observed

  7. Nutritional Requirements and Nitrogen-Dependent Regulation of Proteinase Activity of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Elvira M.; Raya, Raul R.; De Giori, Graciela S.

    2000-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of Lactobacillus helveticus CRL 1062 were determined with a simplified chemically defined medium (SCDM) and compared with those of L. helveticus CRL 974 (ATCC 15009). Both strains were found to be prototrophic for alanine, glycine, asparagine, glutamine, and cysteine. In addition, CRL 1062 also showed prototrophy for lysine and serine. The microorganisms also required riboflavin, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxal, nicotinic acid, and uracil for growth in liquid SCDM. The growth rate and the synthesis of their cell membrane-bound serine proteinases, but not of their intracellular leucyl-aminopeptidases, were influenced by the peptide content of the medium. The highest proteinase levels were found during cell growth in basal SCDM, while the synthesis of this enzyme was inhibited in SCDM supplemented with Casitone, Casamino Acids, or β-casein. Low-molecular-mass peptides (<3,000 Da), extracted from Casitone, and the dipeptide leucylproline (final concentration, 5 mM) play important roles in the medium-dependent regulation of proteinase activity. The addition of the dipeptide leucylproline (5 mM) to SCDM reduced proteinase activity by 25%. PMID:11097908

  8. Allicin from garlic strongly inhibits cysteine proteinases and cytopathic effects of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankri, S; Miron, T; Rabinkov, A; Wilchek, M; Mirelman, D

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to destroy monolayers of baby hamster kidney cells is inhibited by allicin, one of the active principles of garlic. Cysteine proteinases, an important contributor to amebic virulence, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase, are strongly inhibited by allicin. PMID:9333064

  9. Allicin from garlic strongly inhibits cysteine proteinases and cytopathic effects of Entamoeba histolytica.

    OpenAIRE

    Ankri, S; Miron, T; Rabinkov, A; Wilchek, M; Mirelman, D

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to destroy monolayers of baby hamster kidney cells is inhibited by allicin, one of the active principles of garlic. Cysteine proteinases, an important contributor to amebic virulence, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase, are strongly inhibited by allicin.

  10. The digestion of phagocytosed collagen is inhibited by the proteinase inhibitors leupeptin and E-64

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, V.; Beertsen, W.; Tigchelaar-Gutter, W.

    1985-01-01

    Using morphometric methods the effects of the thiol-proteinase inhibitors leupeptin and E-64 on the digestion of intracytoplasmic collagen fibrils were studied in cultured mouse bone explants. Both drugs caused a dose-dependent increase of lysosomal structures containing cross-banded collagen

  11. Modeling the growth and proteinase A production in continuous cultures of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Jochumsen, Kirsten Væver; Emborg, Claus

    1997-01-01

    Overexpression of the homologous protein proteinase A (PrA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been achieved by inserting the PrA gene (PEP4) with its own promoter on a 2 mu multicopy plasmid. With this system the specific PrA production rate was found to be described well by a linear function...

  12. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L proteinase-based synthetic peptide for immunodiagnosis and prevention of sheep fasciolosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; El Ridi, R.; Salah, M.; Wagih, A.; Aziz, H. W.; Tallima, H.; El Shafie, M. H.; Khalek, T. A.; Ammou, F. F. A.; Strongylis, C.; Moussis, V.; Tsikaris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 3 (2008), s. 349-357 ISSN 0006-3525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cathepsin L proteinase * peptides * sequential oligopeptide carriers * synthetic peptide vaccine * Fasciiola gigantica Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.823, year: 2008

  13. [Purification of extracellular proteinases from B. subtilis SKB 256 by biospecific chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzhabov, U R; Davranov, K D; Rakhimov, M M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract-A simple and efficient method of preparing highly purified extracellular proteinases of B. subtilis B-1 (SKB 256) has been developed. A sorbent based on sorsilen impregnated with hemoglobin or cytochrome c has been synthesized for this purpose. A significant difference between the efficiency of hemoglobin and cytochrome c as biospecific ligands has been observed: the enzyme yield amounted to 40.6 and 65.6% of the total amount of enzyme adsorbed, respectively. The culture was shown to contain two major proteinase forms with different molecular masses that could be separated by chromatography on a Sephadex G-50 but gave only one band with MW 27 kDa upon denaturing electrophoresis in 12.5% PAG in the presence of 0.1% SDS. The influence of eluent pH, ionic strength and ethanol concentration on the sorption of the proteinases on the biospecific sorbent, as well as on the desorption from it, has been investigated. Positive influence of 20% ethanol on proteinase desorption has been demonstrated.

  14. SARS CoV main proteinase: The monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Vito; McGrath, William J; Yang, Lin; Mangel, Walter F

    2006-12-12

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, have varied more than 65,0000-fold, from equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded KD values of 5.8 +/- 0.8 microM (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 +/- 2.2 microM (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 +/- 1.5 microM (obtained from the forward scattering). The KD from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 +/- 1.1 microM, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 +/- 0.4 microM. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar KD values.

  15. Miltpain, a cysteine proteinase, from milt of Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus): purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, C; Doi, Y; Ichishima, E

    2000-04-01

    Miltpain (EC.3.4.22.-) is a cysteine proteinase that preferentially hydrolyzes basic proteins, previously found in the milt of chum salmon. Here we report a similar cysteine proteinase in the milt of the marine Pacific cod. The enzyme was isolated and purified 6900-fold and with an estimated mass of 63 kDa by gel filtration chromatography and 72 kDa by SDS/PAGE. Cod miltpain has an optimum pH of 6.0 for Z-Arg-Arg-MCA hydrolysis, and Km of 11.5 microM and kcat of 19.0 s-1 with Z-Arg-Arg-MCA. It requires a thiol-inducing reagent for activation and is inhibited by E-64, iodoacetamide, CA-074, PCMB, NEM, TLCK, TPCK, ZPCK and o-phenanthroline. This proteinase strongly hydrolyzes basic proteins such as salmine, clupeine and histone, and exhibits unique substrate specificity toward paired basic residues such as Lys-Arg, Arg-Arg on the substrates of P2-P1. The isoelectric point is 5.2 by isoelectric focusing. N-Terminal sequencing gave a sequence of < EVPVEVVRXYVTSAPEK. The cysteine proteinase from Pacific cod very closely matches the previously reported miltpain from chum salmon.

  16. The helper component-proteinase of cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlotshwa, S.

    2000-01-01

    Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic potyvirus causes severe yield losses in cowpea, an important legume crop in semi-arid regions of Africa. We have elucidated the genomic sequence of the virus and subsequently focused our attention on the so-called helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro), a

  17. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  18. Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia. Philanthropy in Singapore has traditionally had a charitable and local orientation. However, given the country's growing wealth and strong ties (trade, investment, migration) with its less advantaged neighbours, it is expected that considerable philanthropic capital will ...

  19. Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Anchoring Singapore Philanthropy in Southeast Asia. Philanthropy in Singapore has traditionally had a charitable and local orientation. However, given the country's growing wealth and strong ties (trade, investment, migration) with its less advantaged neighbours, it is expected that considerable philanthropic capital will ...

  20. Multimodality of Learning Through Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Mary Susan

    2004-01-01

    Multimodality of learning results from the intertextual relationship between multimodal design and other meaning-making modes. Meaning making is becoming more multimodal because language is continually reshaped by new forms of communication media. This article examines anchored instruction from a multimodal perspective. The first section includes…

  1. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  2. The bone-anchored hearing aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sound...

  3. Anchored Narratives in Reasoning about Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, F.J.; Prakken, H; Verheij, B; van Engers, T M

    2006-01-01

    This paper concerns the reasoning with stories, evidence and generalisations in a legal context. We will make some notions from the existing Anchored Narratives theory more clear by making use of two formal techniques from Al. namely causal-abductive reasoning and default-style argumentation. We

  4. Anchored narratives in reasoning about evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, F.J.; Prakken, H.; Verheij, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper concerns the reasoning with stories, evidence and generalisations in a legal context. We will make some notions from the existing Anchored Narratives theory more clear by making use of two formal techniques from AI, namely causal-abductive reasoning and default-style argumentation. We

  5. Metabolic anchor reactions for robust biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhten, Paula; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Bork, Peer; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2017-03-01

    Microbial cell factories based on renewable carbon sources are fundamental to a sustainable bio-economy. The economic feasibility of producer cells requires robust performance balancing growth and production. However, the inherent competition between these two objectives often leads to instability and reduces productivity. While algorithms exist to design metabolic network reduction strategies for aligning these objectives, the biochemical basis of the growth-product coupling has remained unresolved. Here, we reveal key reactions in the cellular biochemical repertoire as universal anchor reactions for aligning cell growth and production. A necessary condition for a reaction to be an anchor is that it splits a substrate into two or more molecules. By searching the currently known biochemical reaction space, we identify 62 C-C cleaving anchor reactions, such as isocitrate lyase (EC 4.1.3.1) and L-tryptophan indole-lyase (EC 4.1.99.1), which are relevant for biorefining. The here identified anchor reactions mark network nodes for basing growth-coupled metabolic engineering and novel pathway designs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the United States' contribution to the International Lunar Network (ILN) project, the Anchor Nodes project. The ILN is an initiative of 9 national space agencies to establish a set of robotic geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon. The project is aimed at furthering the understanding of the lunar composition, and interior structure.

  7. Weighing Anchor in the "Ragged Times"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tonya B.

    2012-01-01

    In today's middle school classroom, grouping is an essential learning tool that enhances students' ability to collaborate with others and deepen their own thinking. Implementing group work effectively, though, can be a challenge, especially since groups tend to end their work at "ragged" or staggered times. Creating "anchor activities"--respectful…

  8. Stone anchors from the Okhamandal region, Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sundaresh; Gaur, A.S.; Gudigar, P.; Tripati, S.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    During marine archaeological explorations since 1983, off Dwarka, a large number of stone anchors were discovered and dated to 1400 BC, comparing with anchors found in Mediterranean waters. In recent archaeological explorations off Dwarka, Bet...

  9. Murein and pseudomurein cell wall binding domains of bacteria and archaea-a comparative view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall, a major barrier protecting cells from their environment, is an essential compartment of both bacteria and archaea. It protects the organism from internal turgor pressure and gives a defined shape to the cell. The cell wall serves also as an anchoring surface for various proteins and

  10. Pest Protection Conferred by a Beta vulgaris Serine Proteinase Inhibitor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigocki, Ann C.; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases. PMID:23468963

  11. Hydrolytic activity of Virgibacillus sp. SK37, a starter culture of fish sauce fermentation, and its cell-bound proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsuwan, Sornchai; Rodtong, Sureelak; Yongsawatdigul, Jirawat

    2012-08-01

    Fish sauce production relies on a natural fermentation process requiring 12-18 months for process completion. Virgibacillus sp. SK37 has been shown to be a potential strain for fish sauce acceleration. However, hydrolytic activity of proteinases bound at cell surface of this strain has not been well elucidated. Addition of 0.2 % CaCl(2) (w/w) in conjunction with starter cultures of Virgibacillus sp. SK 37 increased protein hydrolysis as measured by α-amino group content throughout fermentation (P bound proteinases from Virgibacillus sp. SK 37 were extracted into a free form by incubating the washed cells in Ca(2+)-free buffer at 37 °C for 2 h. Cell-bound proteinases revealed molecular mass of 19, 20, 22, 32, 34, and 44 kDa based on a synthetic peptide zymogram. The proteinases showed subtilisin-like serine characteristics with the highest activity at 50 °C and pH 8 and 11. Activity of the extracted proteinases increased ~4 times at ≥100 mM CaCl(2). In addition, CaCl(2) enhanced thermal stability of the extracted proteinases. Enzymes showed proteolytic activity in either the absence or presence of 10 and 25 % NaCl toward fish muscle, soy protein isolate, and casein substrates. Cell-bound proteinases were likely to play an important role in protein hydrolysis during fish sauce fermentation.

  12. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  13. Students' Anchoring Predisposition: An Illustration from Spring Training Baseball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    The anchoring tendency results when decision makers anchor on initial values and then make final assessments that are adjusted insufficiently away from the initial values. The professional literature recognizes that auditors often risk falling into the judgment trap of anchoring and adjusting (Ranzilla et al., 2011). Students may also be unaware…

  14. 33 CFR 401.14 - Anchor marking buoys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchor marking buoys. 401.14... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.14 Anchor marking buoys. A highly visible anchor marking buoy of a type approved by the Manager and the Corporation...

  15. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  16. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Sydney, Australia. December 6, 1990. Lumley, J. L. A dynamical-systems-theory approach to the wall region. Environmental Engineering Laboratory, CSIRO...Nonlinear Science. Holmes, P. Editor in Chief, Nonlinear Scinece Today. Holmes, P. Reviewer for Physica D, J. Sound Vib., J. Phys., Q. Appl. Math, Phys...Spring, 1994; Organizing committee member. Holmes, P. Editorial Board Member: Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis; Journal of Nonlinear Scinece

  17. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  18. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  19. Scale Anchoring with the Rasch Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Adam E

    Scale anchoring is a method to provide additional meaning to particular scores at different points along a score scale by identifying representative items associated with the particular scores. These items are then analyzed to write statements of what types of performance can be expected of a person with the particular scores to help test takers and other stakeholders better understand what it means to achieve the different scores. This article provides simple formulas that can be used to identify possible items to serve as scale anchors with the Rasch model. Specific attention is given to practical considerations and challenges that may be encountered when applying the formulas in different contexts. An illustrative example using data from a medical imaging certification program demonstrates how the formulas can be applied in practice.

  20. Electrochromic mirror using viologen-anchored nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han Na [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Nature-mimic I/O interface Research Section, 218 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, Advanced Device Technology, 217 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seong M.; Ah, Chil Seong; Song, Juhee; Ryu, Hojun; Kim, Yong Hae [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Nature-mimic I/O interface Research Section, 218 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Youb, E-mail: youby@etri.re.kr [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Nature-mimic I/O interface Research Section, 218 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); University of Science and Technology, Advanced Device Technology, 217 Gajeong-roYuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Three types of ECM device were fabricated using viologen-anchored ECDs. • The devices were investigated according to their optical structures. • The anti-reflection material affects the reflectance and the coloration efficiency. • The device design of ECMs is a crucial factor for clear reflected images. - Abstract: Electrochromic mirrors (ECMs) that are used in automobile mirrors need to have high reflectance, a high contrast ratio, and a clear image. In particular, it is critical that distortions of clear images are minimized for safety. Therefore, an ECM is fabricated using viologen-anchored nanoparticles and a magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) layer with an anti-reflection function. The ECM has approximately 30.42% in the reflectance dynamic range and 125 cm{sup 2}/C high coloration efficiency.

  1. Running sutures anchored with square knots are unreliable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanning, H L; Van Osdol, Andrew; Allamargot, Chantal; Becker, Brandt E; Howard, Thomas C; Likness, Micah L; Merkwan, Courtney E; Tarver, Dan D

    2012-09-01

    A previous study showed that running polypropylene sutures anchored with square knots retain only 75% of their strength compared with half hitches. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anchor knot geometry similarly affects the tensile strength of other types of sutures used in continuous closures. Monofilament and multifilament sutures (all 3-0) were anchored with either square knots or half hitches to 1 tensionometer post, and the running ends were secured to the other. The force required to break the running suture and the site of suture failure were recorded. The running sutures anchored with square knots retained only 50% to 84% of the strength of the identical sutures secured with half hitches (P suture anchored with half hitches is stronger and safer in comparison with the same suture anchored with square knots. This study provokes a fundamental reconsideration of the use of square knots to anchor running sutures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Resisting anchoring effects: The roles of metric and mapping knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew R; Windschitl, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The biasing influence of anchors on numerical estimates is well established, but the relationship between knowledge level and the susceptibility to anchoring effects is less clear. In two studies, we addressed the potential mitigating effects of having knowledge in a domain on vulnerability to anchoring effects in that domain. Of critical interest was a distinction between two forms of knowledge-metric and mapping knowledge. In Study 1, participants who had studied question-relevant information-that is, high-knowledge participants-were less influenced by anchors than were participants who had studied irrelevant information. The results from knowledge measures suggested that the reduction in anchoring was tied to increases in metric rather than mapping knowledge. In Study 2, participants studied information specifically designed to influence different types of knowledge. As we predicted, increases in metric knowledge-and not mapping knowledge-led to reduced anchoring effects. Implications for debiasing anchoring effects are discussed.

  3. Test Score Equating Using a Mini-Version Anchor and a Midi Anchor: A Case Study Using SAT[R] Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.; Curley, Edward; Feigenbaum, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    This study explores an anchor that is different from the traditional miniature anchor in test score equating. In contrast to a traditional "mini" anchor that has the same spread of item difficulties as the tests to be equated, the studied anchor, referred to as a "midi" anchor (Sinharay & Holland), has a smaller spread of…

  4. pH-dependent processing of yeast procarboxypeptidase Y by proteinase A in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, S O; van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    procarboxypeptidase Y by purified proteinase A. This has identified two different processing intermediates; one active and one inactive. The intermediates define a 33 amino acid segment of the 91 amino acid propeptide as sufficient for maintaining the enzyme in an inactive state. The inactive intermediate...... activity. Efficient processing of procarboxypeptidase Y in the absence of proteinase B is dependent on acidic vacuolar pH, and the processing at neutral pH is slow and takes place in two steps similar to those identified in vitro.......Carboxypeptidase Y is a vacuolar enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It enters the vacuole as a zymogen, procarboxypeptidase Y, which is immediately processed in a reaction involving two endoproteases, proteinase A and proteinase B. We have investigated the in vitro activation of purified...

  5. Chemical biology of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    PTEN and SHIP2 expressed in wide variety of cells. SHIP is expressed only in blood cells. SHIP i. d i t ll. sSHIP is expressed in stem cells. Approx 50% of human cancers contain PTEN mutations. Page 6. CSIR-IIIM. Relationship of PI and GPI anchors. (biosynthesis and topology). O. HO. HO. OH. O. P. O. O. O-. H2N. HO. O.

  6. BAHA: Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid

    OpenAIRE

    Hagr, Abdulrahman

    2007-01-01

    Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) has proven performance and advantages for patients with aural atresia or chronic ear drainage who cannot wear air-conduction hearing aids. The BAHA has both cosmetic and acoustic advantages over most conventional hearing aids and hence is becoming increasingly popular. Moreover, BAHA improves the quality of life and has also significantly reduces ear discharge. This extensive review of the literature pertaining to BAHA discus the history, the indications, the ...

  7. Bone anchored hearing aids "BAHAs" in children

    OpenAIRE

    Priwin, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The technique for applying bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) by the use of osseointegration is today widely established for both adults and children. The BAHA concept is suitable for patients with recurrent ear infections or car malformations who cannot use conventional hearing aids, which are placed altogether or partially in the ear canal. Long-term results are well documented in adults but are lacking in children. Most patients are fitted with unilateral BAHA...

  8. Anchored design of protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Lewis

    Full Text Available Few existing protein-protein interface design methods allow for extensive backbone rearrangements during the design process. There is also a dichotomy between redesign methods, which take advantage of the native interface, and de novo methods, which produce novel binders.Here, we propose a new method for designing novel protein reagents that combines advantages of redesign and de novo methods and allows for extensive backbone motion. This method requires a bound structure of a target and one of its natural binding partners. A key interaction in this interface, the anchor, is computationally grafted out of the partner and into a surface loop on the design scaffold. The design scaffold's surface is then redesigned with backbone flexibility to create a new binding partner for the target. Careful choice of a scaffold will bring experimentally desirable characteristics into the new complex. The use of an anchor both expedites the design process and ensures that binding proceeds against a known location on the target. The use of surface loops on the scaffold allows for flexible-backbone redesign to properly search conformational space.This protocol was implemented within the Rosetta3 software suite. To demonstrate and evaluate this protocol, we have developed a benchmarking set of structures from the PDB with loop-mediated interfaces. This protocol can recover the correct loop-mediated interface in 15 out of 16 tested structures, using only a single residue as an anchor.

  9. BMP-1/tolloid-like proteinases synchronize matrix assembly with growth factor activation to promote morphogenesis and tissue remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Hulmes, David J. S.; Moali, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1)/tolloid-like proteinases, here called BTPs, include the proteases originally identified for their roles in the C-terminal maturation of fibrillar procollagens ("procollagen C-proteinase"). Though numerous other substrates have since been discovered, the BTPs remain the main proteases involved in extracellular matrix assembly with little or no implication in matrix degradation. During the same period however, the BTPs have also become established as importa...

  10. Luminal proteinases from Plodia interpunctella and the hydrolysis of Bacillus thuringiensis CryIA(c) protoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, B; Kramer, K J; Johnson, D; Upton, S J; Mcgaughey, W H

    1996-06-01

    The ability of proteinases in gut extracts of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella, to hydrolyze Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protoxin, casein, and rho-nitroanilide substrates was investigated. A polyclonal antiserum to protoxin CryIA(c) was used in Western blots to demonstrate slower protoxin processing by gut enzymes from Bt subspecies entomocidus-resistant larvae than enzymes from susceptible or kurstaki-resistant strains. Enzymes from all three strains hydrolyzed N-alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine rho-nitroanilide, N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-phenylalanine rho-nitroanilide, and N-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-leucine rho-nitroanilide. Zymograms and activity blots were used to estimate the apparent molecular masses, number of enzymes, and relative activities in each strain. Several serine proteinase inhibitors reduced gut enzyme activities, with two soybean trypsin inhibitors, two potato inhibitors, and chymostatin the most effective in preventing protoxin hydrolysis.

  11. A preliminary neutron crystallographic study of proteinase K at pD 6.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardberg, Anna S [ORNL; Blakeley, Matthew P. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Myles, Dean A A [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    AbstractA preliminary neutron crystallographic study of the proteolytic enzyme proteinase K is presented. Large hydrogenated crystals were prepared in deuterated crystallization buffer using the vapour-diffusion method. Data were collected to a resolution of 2.3 on the LADI-III diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin (ILL) in 2.5 days. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a full neutron crystallographic analysis of this structure aimed at providing relevant information on the location of H atoms, particularly at the active site. This information will contribute to further understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying proteinase K's catalytic activity and to an enriched understanding of the subtilisin clan of serine proteases.

  12. Structure, chromosomal assignment, and expression of the gene for proteinase-3. The Wegener's granulomatosis autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, A B; Franklin, K F; Rao, G; Marshall, B C; Rebentisch, M B; Lemons, R S; Hoidal, J R

    1992-10-15

    Proteinase-3 (PR-3) is a neutral serine proteinase present in the azurophil granules of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It degrades a variety of extracellular matrix proteins including elastin in vitro and causes emphysema when administered by tracheal insufflation to hamsters. It is identical to the target autoantigen (c-ANCA) associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and to myeloblastin, a serine proteinase first identified in HL-60 leukemia cells. In this study, the gene encoding PR-3 was cloned and sequenced. The gene spans approximately 6.5 kilobase pairs and consists of five exons and four introns. The genomic organization of PR-3 is similar to that of the other serine proteinases expressed in hemopoietic cells. Each residue of the catalytic triad of PR-3 is located on a separate exon, and the positions of the residues within the exons are similar to those in human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. The phase and placement of the introns in the PR-3 gene are also similar to those in human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. The 400-base pair (bp) 5'-flanking sequence of the PR-3 gene contains a TATA box at position 379. There is no CAAT box promoter element. The 3'-untranslated region is 200 bp, extending from a TGA stop codon to the site of polyadenylation 10 bp after the canonical AATAAA signal. Amplification of PR-3 from a human/hamster hybrid cell line localizes the gene to human chromosome 19. Evidence from Northern analysis suggests that PR-3 expression is primarily confined to the promyelocytic/myelocytic stage of bone marrow development.

  13. In vitro differential activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases of clinical isolates of Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurean D'Eça Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Candida yeasts are commensals; however, if the balance of normal flora is disrupted or the immune defenses are compromised, Candida species can cause disease manifestations. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida, including the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases in clinical isolates of Candida spp. METHODS: Eighty-two isolates from hospitalized patients collected from various sites of origin were analyzed. Phospholipase production was performed in egg yolk medium and the production of proteinase was verified in a medium containing bovine serum albumin. The study was performed in triplicate. RESULTS: Fifty-six (68.3% of isolates tested were phospholipase positive and 16 (44.4% were positive for proteinase activity. C. tropicalis was the species with the highest number of positive isolates for phospholipase (91.7%. Statistically significant differences were observed in relation to production of phospholipases among species (p<0,0001 and among the strains from different sites of origin (p=0.014. Regarding the production of acid protease, the isolates of C. parapsilosis tested presented a larger number of producers (69.2%. Among the species analyzed, the percentage of protease producing isolates did not differ statistically (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901 (χ2=1.9 p=0.5901. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of C. non-albicans and all C. albicans isolates were great producers of hydrolytic enzymes and, consequently, might be able to cause infection under favorable conditions.

  14. Bioprocessing and immobilization of cell envelope proteinases from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis 313, for protein degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Agyei, Dominic

    2017-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are a useful class of biomolecules due to their ubiquity and the plethora of physiological roles they play in living systems. These enzymes are esponsible for the breakdown of proteins to peptides and have several applications in food, pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, photographic, waste treatments, bioremediation, and in the textile industry. Cell-envelope proteinases (CEPs) are a special class of industrially relevant extracellular proteolytic enzymes obtained from la...

  15. Extending crystallographic information with semiempirical quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics: a case of aspartic proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblum, A; Rayan, A; Fliess, A; Glick, M

    1993-01-01

    The results of crystallographic analysis of a complex between an aspartic proteinase, endothiapepsin, and an inhibitor have been extended through the assignment of protons in the active site, to study various steps in the reaction with a substrate. Mechanistic implications are suggested as a consequence of semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations, indicating that most of the activation energy is required to bring the substrate from an initial binding mode to close distance to a water molecule.

  16. SARS CoV Main Proteinase: The Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium Dissociation Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano,V.; McGrath, W.; Yang, L.; Mangel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The SARS coronavirus main proteinase (SARS CoV main proteinase) is required for the replication of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS CoV), the virus that causes SARS. One function of the enzyme is to process viral polyproteins. The active form of the SARS CoV main proteinase is a homodimer. In the literature, estimates of the monomer-dimer equilibrium dissociation constant, K{sub D}, have varied more than 650000-fold, from <1 nM to more than 200 {mu}M. Because of these discrepancies and because compounds that interfere with activation of the enzyme by dimerization may be potential antiviral agents, we investigated the monomer-dimer equilibrium by three different techniques: small-angle X-ray scattering, chemical cross-linking, and enzyme kinetics. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data from a series of measurements at different SARS CoV main proteinase concentrations yielded K{sub D} values of 5.8 {+-} 0.8 {mu}M (obtained from the entire scattering curve), 6.5 {+-} 2.2 {mu}M (obtained from the radii of gyration), and 6.8 {+-} 1.5 {mu}M (obtained from the forward scattering). The K{sub D} from chemical cross-linking was 12.7 {+-} 1.1 {mu}M, and from enzyme kinetics, it was 5.2 {+-} 0.4 {mu}M. While each of these three techniques can present different, potential limitations, they all yielded similar K{sub D} values.

  17. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jutta; Kontaxis, Georg; Rancan, Chiara; Skern, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb(pro)) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb(pro) L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. (15)N-HSQC measurements of Lb(pro) L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb(pro), lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb(pro), stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb(pro) and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb(pro). Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell-matrix interactions: focus on proteoglycan-proteinase interplay and pharmacological targeting in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Gialeli, Chrisostomi; Bouris, Panagiotis; Giannopoulou, Efstathia; Skandalis, Spyros S; Aletras, Alexios J; Iozzo, Renato V; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2014-11-01

    Proteoglycans are major constituents of extracellular matrices, as well as cell surfaces and basement membranes. They play key roles in supporting the dynamic extracellular matrix by generating complex structural networks with other macromolecules and by regulating cellular phenotypes and signaling. It is becoming evident, however, that proteolytic enzymes are required partners for matrix remodeling and for modulating cell signaling via matrix constituents. Proteinases contribute to all stages of diseases, particularly cancer development and progression, and contextually participate in either the removal of damaged products or in the processing of matrix molecules and signaling receptors. The dynamic interplay between proteoglycans and proteolytic enzymes is a crucial biological step that contributes to the pathophysiology of cancer and inflammation. Moreover, proteoglycans are implicated in the expression and secretion of proteolytic enzymes and often modulate their activities. In this review, we describe the emerging biological roles of proteoglycans and proteinases, with a special emphasis on their complex interplay. We critically evaluate this important proteoglycan-proteinase interactome and discuss future challenges with respect to targeting this axis in the treatment of cancer. © 2014 FEBS.

  19. Involvement of papain and legumain proteinase in the senescence process of Medicago truncatula nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Olivier; Hopkins, Julie; Combier, Maud; Baldacci, Fabien; Engler, Gilbert; Brouquisse, Renaud; Hérouart, Didier; Boncompagni, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and Rhizobiaceae leads to the formation of new root organs called nodules. Within the nodule, Rhizobiaceae differentiate into nitrogen-fixing bacteroids. However, this symbiotic interaction is time-limited as a result of the initiation of a senescence process, leading to a complete degradation of bacteroids and host plant cells. The increase in proteolytic activity is one of the key features of this process. In this study, we analysed the involvement of two different classes of cysteine proteinases, MtCP6 and MtVPE, in the senescence process of Medicago truncatula nodules. Spatiotemporal expression of MtCP6 and MtVPE was investigated using promoter- β-glucuronidase fusions. Corresponding gene inductions were observed during both developmental and stress-induced nodule senescence. Both MtCP6 and MtVPE proteolytic activities were increased during stress-induced senescence. Down-regulation of both proteinases mediated by RNAi in the senescence zone delayed nodule senescence and increased nitrogen fixation, while their early expression promoted nodule senescence. Using green fluorescent protein fusions, in vivo confocal imaging showed that both proteinases accumulated in the vacuole of uninfected cells or the symbiosomes of infected cells. These data enlighten the crucial role of MtCP6 and MtVPE in the onset of nodule senescence. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Treponema denticola chymotrypsin-like proteinase may contribute to orodigestive carcinogenesis through immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Mikko T; Listyarifah, Dyah; Hagström, Jaana; Haglund, Caj; Grenier, Daniel; Nordström, Dan; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Hernandez, Marcela; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay; Tervahartiala, Taina; Ainola, Mari; Sorsa, Timo

    2018-02-06

    Periodontal pathogens have been linked to oral and gastrointestinal (orodigestive) carcinogenesis. However, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. Treponema denticola (Td) is associated with severe periodontitis, a chronic inflammatory disease leading to tooth loss. The anaerobic spirochete Td is an invasive bacteria due to its major virulence factor chymotrypsin-like proteinase. Here we aimed to investigate the presence of Td chymotrypsin-like proteinase (Td-CTLP) in major orodigestive tumours and to elucidate potential mechanisms for Td to contribute to carcinogenesis. The presence of Td-CTLP within orodigestive tumour tissues was examined using immunohistochemistry. Oral, tonsillar, and oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas, alongside gastric, pancreatic, and colon adenocarcinomas were stained with a Td-CTLP-specific antibody. Gingival tissue from periodontitis patients served as positive controls. SDS-PAGE and immunoblot were used to analyse the immumodulatory activity of Td-CTLP in vitro. Td-CTLP was present in majority of orodigestive tumour samples. Td-CTLP was found to convert pro MMP-8 and -9 into their active forms. In addition, Td-CTLP was able to degrade the proteinase inhibitors TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and α-1-antichymotrypsin, as well as complement C1q. Because of its presence within tumours and regulatory activity on proteins critical for the regulation of tumour microenvironment and inflammation, the Td-CTLP may contribute to orodigestive carcinogenesis.

  1. Implantation Serine Proteinases heterodimerize and are critical in hatching and implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Guoliang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have recently reported the expression of murine Implantation Serine Proteinase genes in pre-implantation embryos (ISP1 and uterus (ISP1 and ISP2. These proteinases belong to the S1 proteinase family and are similar to mast cell tryptases, which function as multimers. Results Here, we report the purification and initial characterization of ISP1 and 2 with respect to their physico-chemical properties and physiological function. In addition to being co-expressed in uterus, we show that ISP1 and ISP2 are also co-expressed in the pre-implantation embryo. Together, they form a heterodimer with an approximate molecular weight of 63 kD. This complex is the active form of the enzyme, which we have further characterized as being trypsin-like, based on substrate and inhibitor specificities. In addition to having a role in embryo hatching and outgrowth, we demonstrate that ISP enzyme is localized to the site of embryo invasion during implantation and that its activity is important for successful implantation in vivo. Conclusion On the basis of similarities in structural, chemical, and functional properties, we suggest that this ISP enzyme complex represents the classical hatching enzyme, strypsin. Our results demonstrate a critical role for ISP in embryo hatching and implantation.

  2. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized.

  3. Fibronectin-degrading activity of Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteinase plays a role in host cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz; Yoshida, Nobuko

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Early anchor displacement after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaliczki, Gábor; Paladini, Paolo; Merolla, Giovanni; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a success and became the mainstream method of reconstruction in recent years. Due to the technical development in shoulder surgery, novel suture anchors and high-strength sutures are widely used providing convincing fixation, however anchor pullout still remains a problem. The aim of our study was to observe early anchor movement on a large patient cohort, and identify clinical, biological and technical variables that can lead to this complication. A total of 5,327 patients who had arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction for full thickness tear were included in the study. Radiographs taken immediately after surgery were observed and occurrent anchor displacement was recorded. Patient-specific, tendon-specific, bone-specific and implant-specific variables were studied. Any possible relationship between these factors and anchor displacement was investigated. Early anchor movement occurred in six cases (0.1%). The involvement of two or more tendons, retraction of the tendon by more than 2 cm and the use of four anchors was associated with higher incidence of anchor displacement, however the difference was not significant. Based on our study, anchor pullout occurring immediately after surgery is a relatively rare complication. Instead of timing the radiologic examination directly after the procedure, assessment of the anchors' position four to six weeks after surgery should be considered.

  6. [Phospholipase and proteinase production by Malassezia pachydermatis isolated in dogs with and without otitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gustavo; Martín, M Carmen; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso J; Payá, M Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is part of the skin microbiota of dogs and cats. M. pachydermatis has been associated with external otitis and seborrhoeic dermatitis, reported more often in dogs than in cats. When the physical, chemical or immunological mechanisms of the skin are altered, M. pachydermatis could act as a pathogen. Thus, several virulence factors, such as the ability to produce esterase, lipase, lipoxygenase, protease, chondroitin sulphatase, and hyaluronidase, have been studied. In the present study, we aim to identify the phospholipase activity measured at pH 6.3, and the proteinase activity measured at pH 6.3 and pH 6.8 (pH from ears of dogs with external otitis) of M. pachydermatis strains isolated from dogs with and without external otitis. The phospholipase activity was measured using a semi-quantitative method with egg yolk, and the proteinase activity with a semi-quantitative method using bovine serum albumin agar. The study was performed on 96 isolates of M. pachydermatis, 43 isolated from dogs without clinical symptoms of otitis, and 52 isolated from dogs with otitis. In our study, 75.8% of the isolates showed phospholipase activity at pH 6.3, and 81 and 97.9% of them showed proteinase activity measured at pH 6.3 and 6.8, respectively. A higher phospholipase activity was detected in strains isolated from dogs with otitis. The proteinase activity was increased at a pH of 6.8 (97.9%) in comparison to a pH of 6.3 (81%). Our results suggest that the phospholipase activity may play an important role in the invasion of host tissues in chronic canine otitis cases. The proteinase activity results obtained in this study suggest that a reduction in the pH of the treatment may improve its efficacy in the resolution of M. pachydermatis otitis. Copyright © 2012 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Anchoring of FRET Sensors-A Requirement for Spatiotemporal Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Elena V; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Gatsinzi, Tom; Hallberg, Einar; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2016-05-16

    FRET biosensors have become a routine tool for investigating mechanisms and components of cell signaling. Strategies for improving them for particular applications are continuously sought. One important aspect to consider when designing FRET probes is the dynamic distribution and propagation of signals within living cells. We have addressed this issue by directly comparing an anchored (taFS) to a non-anchored (naFS) cleavable FRET sensor. We chose a microtubule-associated protein tau as an anchor, as microtubules are abundant throughout the cytosol of cells. We show that tau-anchored FRET sensors are concentrated at the cytoskeleton and enriched in the neurite-like processes of cells, providing high intensity of the total signal. In addition, anchoring limits the diffusion of the sensor, enabling spatiotemporally resolved monitoring of subcellular variations in enzyme activity. Thus, anchoring is an important aspect to consider when designing FRET sensors for deeper understanding of cell signaling.

  8. [The bone-anchored hearing aid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-08-11

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sound vibrations are led directly to the inner ear via the mastoid bone, bypassing the middle ear. This is achieved via an osseointegrated implant and a skin-penetrating abutment. Studies report high success rates and a majority of complications as typically minor in nature.

  9. BAHA: Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagr, Abdulrahman

    2007-07-01

    Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) has proven performance and advantages for patients with aural atresia or chronic ear drainage who cannot wear air-conduction hearing aids. The BAHA has both cosmetic and acoustic advantages over most conventional hearing aids and hence is becoming increasingly popular. Moreover, BAHA improves the quality of life and has also significantly reduces ear discharge. This extensive review of the literature pertaining to BAHA discus the history, the indications, the advantages, the prediction of the outcome and the complications of this device as well as comparing it to the conventional hearing aids.

  10. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  11. ANCHORING IN THE POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana L. Shklyar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of marketing, both ineconomy and in politics is to attract themaximum number of customers or voters, maximizing customer satisfaction and ,ideally, improve the quality of life.The author, in various aspects, thetechnology of anchoring used in NLP, to attract customers and voters, both in the economy and in politics.In different examples demonstrate theoverall impact on the psychology of the consumer. Separating policy and the economy, marketers are missing something. The author proposes to look at how psychologicalanchors affect these two, at fi rst glance, different vector.

  12. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  13. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Disc Repositioning Using an Orthopedic Suture Anchor: A Modified Disc Anchoring Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, K; Mukhopadhyay, P; Sinha, Ramen

    2016-09-01

    The study assessed the efficacy of orthopedic suture anchor as a modified suture anchor for disc repositioning in case of a closed lock of TMJ. Disc repositioning was undertaken via a mini preauricular approach. The disc was repositioned on the surface of the condyle and stabilized using an orthopedic suture anchor. Postoperatively functional outcomes were assessed in terms of reduction in pain, joint movement and absence of joint noise and clicking sounds. Postoperative MRI was used to assess the disc position and morphological changes in the disc and arthritic changes in the condyle at the end of six months. Patients were post surgically followed up at regular intervals of 1, 3 and 6 months. Patient experienced significant improvement in mouth opening with good functional outcomes and stable repositioning of disc as noticed By MRI at the end of six months. We describe a modified technique of disc repositioning using an orthopedic suture anchor for more favorable disc position and joint function. However the long term functional sequel of the procedure and changes in the articular disc needs to be assessed.

  15. Increase in net activity of serine proteinases but not gelatinases after local endotoxin exposure in the peripheral airways of healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaretha E Smith

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that activation of the innate immune response induces an imbalance in the proteolytic homeostasis in the peripheral airways of healthy subjects, towards excess serine or gelatinase proteinase activity. During bronchoscopy, 18 healthy human subjects underwent intra-bronchial exposure to endotoxin and contra-lateral exposure to vehicle. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL samples were harvested 24 or 48 hours (h later. We quantified archetype proteinases, anti-proteinases, inflammatory BAL cells, and, importantly, total plus net proteinase activities using functional substrate assays. As expected, endotoxin exposure increased the concentrations of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's and macrophages, of proteinases and the anti-proteinases tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, α-1-antitrypsin and, to a lesser extent, secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor, at both time points. Notably, at these time points, endotoxin exposure substantially increased the quantitative NE/SLPI ratio and the net serine proteinase activity corresponding to neutrophil elastase (NE. Endotoxin exposure also increased the total gelatinase activity corresponding to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9; an activity dominating over that of MMP-2. However, endotoxin exposure had no impact on net gelatinolytic activity at 24 or 48 h after exposure. Thus, local activation of the innate immune response induces an imbalance towards increased net serine proteinase activity in the proteolytic homeostasis of the peripheral airways in healthy subjects. Hypothetically, this serine proteinase activity can contribute to tissue remodelling and hypersecretion via NE from PMN's, if it is triggered repeatedly, as might be the case in chronic inflammatory airway disorders.

  16. Moody experts --- How mood and expertise influence judgmental anchoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birte Englich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Anchoring effects, the assimilation of numerical estimates to previously considered standards, are highly robust. Two studies examined whether mood and expertise jointly moderate the magnitude of anchoring. Previous research has demonstrated that happy mood induces judges to process information in a less thorough manner than sad mood, which means that happy judges tend to be more susceptible to unwanted influences. However, this may not be true for anchoring effects. Because anchoring results from an elaborate process of selective knowledge activation, more thorough processing should lead to more anchoring; as a result, sad judges should show stronger anchoring effects than happy judges and happy judges may even remain uninfluenced by the given anchors. Because information processing of experts may be relatively independent of their mood, however, mood may influence anchoring only in non-experts. Results of two studies on legal decision-making (Study 1 and numeric estimates (Study 2 are consistent with these expectations. These findings suggest that, at least for non-experts, positive mood may eliminate the otherwise robust anchoring effect.

  17. Infrastructure anchor bolt inspection program with NDE applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Philip E.

    1996-11-01

    In 1990, Wisconsin Department of Transportation found a high mast light pole with two of six anchor bolts failed. This failure along with published reports from Michigan DOT about anchor bolt failures on cantilever sign structures, raised concern about the quality and condition of anchor bolts on the Wisconsin DOT system. Wisconsin Department of Transportation implemented an Anchor Bolt Inspection Program in 1990 for cantilever sign structures, high mast light towers, interstate light towers, and signal masts. The program requires an experienced inspection team and a practical inspection approach. Inspection preparation includes review of all background information such as design plans, design computations, construction plans, shop plans, and maintenance history. An inspection plan is developed. Special emphasis is placed on determining material type, cut or rolled threads, and type of coating for anchor bolts. Inspection emphasis are on "hands on" and Nondestructive evaluation. Special emphasis is placed on visual conditions of anchor bolts (cut or rolled threads, straightness, corrosion, nut tension etc.) along with ultrasonic inspection. This program places a strong emphasis on Non Destructive Testing (NDT), especially ultrasonic. Procedures and inspection calibrations are developed from similar anchor bolt geometry and material type. Cut notches are placed in the anchor bolts at locations of possible failure. NDT inspection calibrations are performed from these bolts. Report documentation includes all design plans, pictorial documentation of structural deficiencies, sketches, nondestructive evaluation reports, conclusions, and recommendations. This program has been successful in locating failed anchor bolts and critical cracks before failure of an entire structure.

  18. Anchoring strategies for bimetallic species in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bein, T.

    1993-03-01

    We explore a new approach by introducing heterobinuclear organometallic compounds for linking catalytic functions to zeolite frameworks. With two different metals present, the complexes are being anchored to the support via one oxophilic metal, ligand exchange and catalytic reactions may proceed at the second metal center. Anchoring chemistry, thermal stability and reactivity of Me[sub 3]SnMn(CO)[sub 5] in zeolite NaY and acid forms of zeolite Y was studied with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Sn, Mn edge EXAFS) and in-situ FTIR/TPD-MS techniques. Subsequently, the tin-cobalt complex Me[sub 3]SnCo(CO)[sub 4] has been a focus of detailed synthetic and spectroscopic studies. The reactivity of tricarbonyl (cyclopentadienyl) (trimethylstannyl) molybdenum in new mesoporous hosts has been explored. A recent development is the design of vanadium oxo species in different micro- and mesoporous hosts. These are of great interest for the selective reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia, and selective oxidation of different hydrocarbons, such as xylenes, olefines and alkanes. Combination analytical techniques used to probe local structural changes at the molecular level, include EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy utilizing synchrotron radiation, in situ FT-IR coupled to thermodesorption/MS, UV-NIR, and CCD Raman.

  19. Comparison of self-processing of foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader proteinase nsp1α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberger, Jutta [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Kontaxis, Georg [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Campus Vienna Biocenter 5, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Rancan, Chiara [Helmholtz Zentrum München, Department of Gene Vectors, Haematologikum, Marchioninistrasse 25, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Skern, Tim, E-mail: timothy.skern@meduniwien.ac.at [Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/3, A-1030 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase (Lb{sup pro}) cleaves itself off the nascent viral polyprotein. NMR studies on the monomeric variant Lb{sup pro} L200F provide structural evidence for intramolecular self-processing. {sup 15}N-HSQC measurements of Lb{sup pro} L200F showed specifically shifted backbone signals in the active and substrate binding sites compared to the monomeric variant sLb{sup pro}, lacking six C-terminal residues. This indicates transient intramolecular interactions between the C-terminal extension (CTE) of one molecule and its own active site. Contrastingly, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) leader proteinase nsp1α, with a papain-like fold like Lb{sup pro}, stably binds its own CTE. Parts of the β-sheet domains but none of the α-helical domains of Lb{sup pro} and nsp1α superimpose; consequently, the α-helical domain of nsp1α is oriented differently relative to its β-sheet domain. This provides a large interaction surface for the CTE with the globular domain, stabilising the intramolecular complex. Consequently, self-processing inactivates nsp1α but not Lb{sup pro}. - Highlights: • We examine self-processing of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus. • NMR analysis strongly supports intramolecular self-processing. • Self-processing is a dynamic process with no stable complex. • Structural comparison with nsp1α of PRRSV which forms stable intramolecular complex. • Subdomain orientation explains differences in stability of intramolecular complexes.

  20. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  1. Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles loaded by cysteine proteinase genes as a novel anti-leishmaniasis DNA vaccine delivery system: characterization and in vitro evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroud, Delaram; Vatanara, Alireza; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Gholami, Elham; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Rouholamini Najafabadi, Abdolhossein; Rafati, Sima

    2010-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries and development of a safe and easily-available vaccine has high priority. Although several antigens potentially capable of inducing protective immunity have been studied, in the absence of pharmaceutical industry interest they have remained as fine publications only. Amongst them, Cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinases (CPs) have received considerable attention and type I and II CPs have been used in a heterologous prime-boost vaccination regime for experimental visceral leishmaniasis in dogs. Due to the promising results of the mentioned vaccination regime, we aimed to evaluate cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLNs) for in vitro delivery of cpa, cpb and cpb(CTE) intended to be used as a cocktail DNA vaccine in our forthcoming studies. cSLNs were formulated of cetyl palmitate, cholesterol, DOTAP and Tween 80 via melt emulsification method followed by high shear homogenization. Different formulations were prepared by anchoring pDNAs on the surface of cSLNs via charge interaction. The formulations were characterized according to their size and zeta potential as well as pDNA integrity and stability against DNase I treatment. Lipoplexes' cytotoxicity was investigated on COS-7 cells by MTT test. The effect of the DOTAP:pDNA ratio on protection ability and cytotoxicity was also studied. In vitro transfection efficiency was qualified by fluorescent microscopy and quantified using flow cytometry technique. cSLN-pDNA complexes were formulated with suitable size and zeta potential. Efficiency/cytotoxicity ratio of cSLN-pDNAs formulations was comparable to linear PEI-25KD-pDNAs polyplexes while exhibiting significantly lower cytotoxicity. Tested formulations were able to deliver immunogenic CP genes efficiently. This data proves the ability of this system as a promising DNA vaccine carrier for leishmaniasis to cover the main drawback of naked pDNA delivery that is rapid elimination from the

  2. Design of SC walls and slabs for impulsive loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Amit H. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-11

    Reinforced concrete (RC) structures have historically been the preferred choice for blast resistant structures because of their mass and the ductility provided by steel reinforcement. Steel-plate composite (SC) walls are a viable alternative to RC for protecting the infrastructure against explosive threats. SC structures consist of two steel faceplates with a plain concrete core between them. The steel faceplates are anchored to the concrete using stud anchors and connected to each other using tie bars. SC structures provide mass from the concrete infill and ductility from the continuous external steel faceplates. This dissertation presents findings and recommendations from experimental and analytical investigations of the performance of SC walls subjected to far-field blast loads.

  3. The expression of cathepsin B and other lysosomal proteinases in normal tissues and in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, F; Chan, S J; Gong, Q M; Bajkowski, A S; Steiner, D F; Frankfater, A

    1991-01-01

    The mRNA for the lysosomal proteinases cathepsins B, D, H, L, and S are broadly distributed in normal rodent tissues. Although total cathepsin mRNA levels generally parallel the protein catabolic activity of the tissues, the expressions of the individual enzymes do not appear to be linked. Thus, the relative proportions of the individual messages are found to vary from tissue to tissue. Further evidence for the independent regulation of lysosomal proteinase expression is derived from observations of selective increases in mRNA levels for individual proteinases in rodent tumors. Only cathepsin B mRNA is elevated in a highly metastatic murine B16a melanoma and in a Walker-256 rat carcinosarcoma, while Moloney murine sarcoma virus-transformed fibroblasts express increased mRNA for cathepsins B, D, and L and normal levels for H and S. To address the regulation of cathepsin B expression, the mouse cathepsin B gene and its 5'-upstream region were cloned. The gene has 10 exons and 9 introns spanning about 20 kilobases. The 5'-upstream region and exon 1 are GC-rich with several potential Sp1 binding sites. TATA and CAAT motifs adjacent to the transcription start site are not evident. These properties are characteristic of mammalian "housekeeping" genes. B16 melanoma cells contain three cathepsin B transcripts of 2.2, 4.0 and 5.0 kilobases. The two larger messages, which were not found in normal tissues, contain unusually long 3'-untranslated regions resulting from the alternative cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3' end of the cathepsin B pre-mRNA in B16 melanomas. As all three messages encoded normal preprocathepsin B, cathepsin B secretion by melanoma cells is probably due to posttranslational mechanisms and not to alternative splicing or gene mutation.

  4. [Studies on periodontal pathogenic proteinases from Porphyromonas gingivalis and host cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K

    1995-05-01

    Progressive periodontal disease is characterized by acute progressive lesions of gingival connective tissues, excessive leukocyte infiltration, and occurrence of a characteristic microflora. A variety of proteolytic enzymes derived from oral bacteria and host cells are found in gingival crevices and thought to play an important role in the onset and development of progressive periodontal disease. The anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated in the etiology of the disease. Recently, we have purified a novel arginine-specific cysteine proteinase, termed "argingipain", from the culture supernatant of the organism. The enzyme was shown to have two important abilities related to the virulence of the organism. One is direct association with periodontal tissue breakdown through its abilities to degrade physiologically important proteins such as human collagens (type I and IV) and to evade inactivation by internal protease inhibitors. The other is associated with disruption of the normal host defense mechanisms through its abilities to degrade immunoglobulins and to inhibit the bactericidal activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The virulence of argingipain was further substantiated by disruption of argingipain-encoding genes on the chromosome by use of suicide plasmid systems. On the other hand, we have studied roles of host cell-derived proteinases in the periodontal tissue breakdown. Levels of lysosomal proteinases such as cathepsins B, H, L, G and medullasin were determined in gingival crevicular fluid from periodontitis patients and experimental gingivitis subjects by activity measurement and sensitive immunoassay. The results suggested that all of these enzymes would be involved in the development of both gingivitis and periodontitis.

  5. Use of Jackknifing to Evaluate Effects of Anchor Item Selection on Equating with the Nonequivalent Groups with Anchor Test (NEAT) Design. Research Report. ETS RR-15-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ru; Haberman, Shelby; Guo, Hongwen; Liu, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we apply jackknifing to anchor items to evaluate the impact of anchor selection on equating stability. In an ideal world, the choice of anchor items should have little impact on equating results. When this ideal does not correspond to reality, selection of anchor items can strongly influence equating results. This influence does not…

  6. Comparison of the Effects of Discrete Anchor Items and Assage-Based Anchor Items on Observed-Score Equating Results. Research Report. ETS RR-09-44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Jiyun; Liu, Jinghua

    2009-01-01

    Equating of tests composed of both discrete and passage-based items using the nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) design is popular in practice. This study investigated the impact of discrete anchor items and passage-based anchor items on observed score equating via simulation. Results suggested that an anchor with a larger proportion of…

  7. Test Score Equating Using Discrete Anchor Items versus Passage-Based Anchor Items: A Case Study Using "SAT"® Data. Research Report. ETS RR-14-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Zu, Jiyun; Curley, Edward; Carey, Jill

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of discrete anchor items versus passage-based anchor items on observed score equating using empirical data.This study compares an "SAT"® critical reading anchor that contains more discrete items proportionally, compared to the total tests to be equated, to another anchor that…

  8. Characterization of kininogenase activity of an acidic proteinase isolated from human kidney

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, RAS; Juliano, L. [UNIFESP; Chagas, JR [UNIFESP; Hial, V

    1997-01-01

    An acidic proteinase was purified from human kidney cortex. the enzyme showed a molecular mass of 31 kDa by SDS-PAGE, 36 kDa by gel filtration, and isoelectric points of 5.2 and 6.1. the optimum pH for hydrolysis of bovine hemoglobin was about 3.5. Reverse-phase KPLC analysis of the incubation mixture of the enzyme with human plasma showed the presence of an active peptide on rat uterus muscle with the same retention time as the methionyl-lysyl-bradykinin (MLBK) standard. the specific activit...

  9. Biochemical and biological characterization of two serine proteinases from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño, Arley Camilo; Pereañez, Jaime Andrés; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2013-03-01

    Two clotting serine proteinases, named Cdc SI and Cdc SII, were isolated and characterized for the first time from Colombian Crotalus durissus cumanensis snake venom. The enzymes were purified using two chromatographic steps: molecular exclusion on Sephacryl S-200 and RP-HPLC on C8 Column. The molecular masses of the proteins, determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, were 28,561.4 and 28,799.2 Da for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. The aim of the present study was to evaluate enzymatic, coagulant and toxic properties of the two enzymes. The serine proteinases hydrolyzed specific chromogenic substrate (BaPNA) and exhibited a Michaelis-Menten behavior. Cdc SI had V(max) of 0.038 ± 0.003 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.034 ± 0.017 mM, while Cdc SII displayed values of V(max) of 0.267 ± 0.011 nmol/min and K(M) of 0.145 ± 0.023 mM. N-terminal sequences were VIGGDEXNIN and VIGGDICNINEHNFLVALYE for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Molecular masses, N-terminal sequences, inhibition assays, and enzymatic profile suggest that Cdc SI and Cdc SII belong to the family of snake venom thrombin-like enzymes. These serine proteinases differed in their clotting activity on human plasma, showing a minimum coagulant dose of 25 μg and 0.571 μg for Cdc SI and Cdc SII, respectively. Enzymes also showed coagulant activity on bovine fibrinogen and degraded chain α of this protein. Toxins lack hemorrhagic and myotoxic activities, but are capable to induce defibrin(ogen)ation, moderate edema, and an increase in vascular permeability. These serine proteinases may contribute indirectly to the local hemorrhage induced by metalloproteinases, by causing blood clotting disturbances, and might also contribute to cardiovascular alterations characteristic of patients envenomed by C. d. cumanensis in Colombia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  11. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, L R; Rømer, J; Thomasset, N; Solberg, H; Pyke, C; Bissell, M J; Danø, K; Werb, Z

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when beta-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when beta-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin-1 and

  12. Adapting Roof Support Methods for Anchoring Satellites on Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Grant B.

    The use of anchorage in satellite and spacecraft design has been largely restricted to harpoon-inspired technology based on anticipated low strengths of cometary and asteroid material. Initial results from the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov- Gerasimenko, however, have demonstrated both larger-than-expected compressive strengths of cometary materials and the importance of adequate anchorage to mitigate the risk of mission failure. The field of rock mechanics can provide unique insight into the design of these satellite and lander anchors by drawing on existing roof bolt technology. This study compared the behavior of tensioned point anchor and untensioned fully-grouted roof bolts with a polyurethane-anchored bolt under environmental conditions similar to those anticipated in space. These conditions include variation in possible material types as well as variations in regolith properties, anchorage length, and low operating temperatures. Using a Box-Behnken experimental design, this study first compared the effects of anchor depth and rock strength on each of the three anchorage types in a competent rock strength regime. The study then examined the effects of compaction, water content, and temperature on each anchor type in a regolith environment. The subsequent data analysis identified one anchor type as the overall best anchor for these environments. This finding has led to a preliminary design recommendation to advise space agencies on satellite anchor construction based on the target orbital body's anticipated environmental and "exogeologic" conditions.

  13. Stone anchors of India: Findings, classification and significance.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    Various types of stone anchors have been observed during inshore and offshore explorations along the east and west coasts of India. The earliest stone anchors of India have been recorded from the Harappan sites (3rd millennium BC), but their shape...

  14. Synthesis, magnetic and spectral studies on polystyrene-anchored ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polystyrene-anchored coordination compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, reflectance, ESR and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The per cent reaction conversion of polystyrene anchored Schiff base to polystyrene supported coordination compounds lies between 28.98 and 85.9.

  15. Proteomic analysis of GPI-anchored membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Hye Ryung; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) represent a subset of post-translationally modified proteins that are tethered to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane via a C-terminal GPI anchor. GPI-APs are found in a variety of eukaryote species, from pathogenic microorganisms...

  16. Equating Subscores under the Nonequivalent Anchor Test (NEAT) Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Gautam; Liang, Longjuan

    2011-01-01

    The study examined two approaches for equating subscores. They are (1) equating subscores using internal common items as the anchor to conduct the equating, and (2) equating subscores using equated and scaled total scores as the anchor to conduct the equating. Since equated total scores are comparable across the new and old forms, they can be used…

  17. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  18. The Critical Role of Anchor Paper Selection in Writing Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn Popp, Sharon E.; Ryan, Joseph M.; Thompson, Marilyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Scoring rubrics are routinely used to evaluate the quality of writing samples produced for writing performance assessments, with anchor papers chosen to represent score points defined in the rubric. Although the careful selection of anchor papers is associated with best practices for scoring, little research has been conducted on the role of…

  19. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  20. Biased calculations: Numeric anchors influence answers to math equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Smith

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available People must often perform calculations in order to produce a numeric estimate (e.g., a grocery-store shopper estimating the total price of his or her shopping cart contents. The current studies were designed to test whether estimates based on calculations are influenced by comparisons with irrelevant anchors. Previous research has demonstrated that estimates across a wide range of contexts assimilate toward anchors, but none has examined estimates based on calculations. In two studies, we had participants compare the answers to math problems with anchors. In both studies, participants' estimates assimilated toward the anchor values. This effect was moderated by time limit such that the anchoring effects were larger when the participants' ability to engage in calculations was limited by a restrictive time limit.

  1. Evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase gene (EhCP5) antigen in Minipig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang-Zhi; Deng, Shu-Xuan; Tian, Wei-Yi; Feng, Yong

    2012-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase gene 5(EhCP5) is one of the major proteinase genes of all EhCP-transcripts. The amebiasis cysteine proteinase gene encoding an antigen from E. histolytica, as well as the recombinant EhCP5, obtained by cloning and expression of the EhCP5 gene in heterologous host Escherichia coli BL-21 (DE3), were used to evaluate their ability to induce immune protective responses in Minipig against challenge infection in a minipig-E. histolytica model. There was a 52.27% reduction (P<0.001) in the group of recovery of challenged E. histolytica compared with that in the control group. Specific anti-EhCP5 antibodies from immune protected minipig had significantly higher levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (P<0.0001). Our data will help to know the mechanism of vaccinal protection of E. histolytica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of ACE inhibitory activity in skimmed goat and cow milk hydrolyzed by alcalase, flavourzyme, neutral protease and proteinase K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Chunju

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory peptides derived from milk proteins have obvious effect of lowering blood pressure, safe and non-toxic side effects. This study compared four commercial proteases, namely alcalase, flavourzyme, neutral protease and proteinase K for their ACE inhibitory activity in skimmed goat and cow milk and identified the best one with higher ACE inhibitory activity. The degree of hydrolysis (DH of alcalase and proteinase K were much higher than flavourzyme, neutral protease for both skimmed goat and cow milk. Alcalase was the best enzyme to produce ACE inhibitory peptides from goat milk, with the ACE inhibitory activity 95.31%, while proteinase K was the optimal protease for hydrolyzing cow milk, with 81.28% ACE inhibitory activity. Furthermore, no correlation was obtained between the ACE inhibitory activity and DH for both goat and cow milk.

  3. Centroid search optimization of cultural conditions affecting the production of extracellular proteinase by Pseudomonas fragi ATCC 4973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhara, R M; Skura, B

    1990-10-01

    The production of extracellular proteinase by Pseudomonas fragi ATCC 4973 grown in a defined citrate medium, containing glutamine as the sole nitrogen source, was determined under varying cultural conditions. Simultaneous evaluation of cultural conditions using a 'centroid search' optimization technique showed that the optimum cultural conditions for proteinase production by Ps. fragi were: incubation temperature, 12.5 degrees C; incubation time, 38 h; initial pH, 6.8; organic nitrogen concentration, 314 mmol nitrogen/l (glutamine); a gas mixture containing 16.4% oxygen flowing over the medium (7.42 ppm dissolved oxygen). Oxygen was the major factor influencing proteinase production by Ps. fragi. The results may have applications in the storage of fluid milk. Centroid search optimization was shown to be suitable for microbiological experiments.

  4. Pyramidal anchor stone from Baga waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    Underwater exploration in the coastal region off Baga (Goa, India) led to the recovery of an isolated stone artefact, which resembles a pyramidal type of anchor stone. This anchor stone is unlike to other pyramidal anchor stones found elsewhere...

  5. Grapnel stone anchors from Saurashtra: Remnants of Indo-Arab trade on the Indian coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.

    Stone anchors have been used as a primary source of information on ancient navigation by marine archaeologists since long. These anchors used by ancient mariners are often noticed underwater at various places across the world. Stone anchors are also...

  6. High-level expression of Proteinase K from Tritirachium album Limber in Pichia pastoris using multi-copy expression strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hu; Zhai, Chao; Yu, Xianhong; Li, Zhezhe; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yunyun; Ma, Xiaojian; Zhong, Xing; Li, Guolong; Wu, Di; Ma, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Proteinase K is widely used in scientific research and industries. This report was aimed to achieve high-level expression of proteinase K using Pichia pastoris GS115 as the host strain. The coding sequence of a variant of proteinase K that has higher activity than the wild type protein was chosen and optimized based on the codon usage preference of P. pastoris. The novel open reading frame was synthesized and a series of multi-copy expression vectors were constructed based on the pHBM905BDM plasmid, allowing for the tandem integration of multiple copies of the target gene into the genome of P. pastoris with a single recombination. These strains were used to study the correlation between the gene copy number and the expression level of proteinase K. The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) indicated that the tandem expression cassettes were integrated into the host genome stably. Meanwhile, the results of qPCR and enzyme activity assays indicated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of the target gene increased as the gene copy number increased. Moreover, the effect of gene dosage on the expression level of the recombinant protein was more obvious using high-density fermentation. The maximum expression level and enzyme activity of proteinase K, which were obtained from the recombinant yeast strain bearing 5 copies of the target gene after an 84-h induction, were approximately 8.069 mg/mL and 108,295 U/mL, respectively. The recombinant proteinase was purified and characterized. The optimum pH and temperature for the activity of this protease were approximately pH 11 and 55 °C, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteins of the kidney microvillar membrane. Aspartate aminopeptidase: purification by immunoadsorbent chromatography and properties of the detergent- and proteinase-solubilized forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Erik Michael; Norén, O; Sjöström, H

    1980-01-01

    immunoelectrophoresis when anionic or cationic detergents were present. On gel filtration, mol.wts. of 350000--400000 and 270000 were calculated for the detergent and proteinase forms. Electron microscopy after negative staining of the proteinase form revealed a dimeric structure. Electrophoresis of either form...

  8. The Use of Two Anchors in Nonequivalent Groups with Anchor Test (NEAT) Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-10-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tim; Deng, Weiling; Zhang, Yu-Li

    2010-01-01

    In the equating literature, a recurring concern is that equating functions that utilize a single anchor to account for examinee groups' nonequivalence are biased when the groups are extremely different and/or when the anchor only weakly measures what the tests measure. Several proposals have been made to address this equating bias by incorporating…

  9. Brewer's spent grain and corn steep liquor as alternative culture medium substrates for proteinase production by Streptomyces malaysiensis AMT-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pires do Nascimento

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Brewer's spent grain and corn steep liquor or yeast extract were used as the sole organic forms for proteinase production by Streptomyces malaysiensis in submerged fermentation. The influence of the C and N concentrations, as well as the incubation periods, were assessed. Eight proteolytic bands were detected through gelatin-gel-electrophoresis in the various extracts obtained from the different media and after different incubation periods, with apparent molecular masses of 20, 35, 43, 50, 70, 100, 116 and 212 kDa. The results obtained suggest an opportunity for exploring this alternative strategy for proteinases production by actinomycetes, using BSG and CSL as economically feasible substrates.

  10. Involvement of a cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinase in platelet aggregation induced by tumor cells and their shed membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, P G; Sloane, B F; Bajkowski, A S; Gasic, G J; Gasic, T B; Honn, K V

    1983-01-01

    Murine 15091A mammary adenocarcinoma cells and membrane vesicles spontaneously shed from these tumor cells in culture can induce aggregation of washed human platelets. A spectrum of proteinase inhibitors was tested for their ability to inhibit 15091A induced platelet aggregation. Of the inhibitors tested the most effective were those selective for cysteine proteinases. The effect of the spectrum of proteinase inhibitors on 15091A induced platelet aggregation was compared to the effect on cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinase activity in homogenates of 15091A tumor cells and their spontaneously shed vesicles. The results suggest that there is a correlation between activity of a cathepsin B-like proteinase in 15091A cells and vesicles and the ability of these cells and vesicles to induce aggregation of washed human platelets.

  11. The effect of proteinases on phenylalanine ammonia-lyase from the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H J; Jack, G W

    1981-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4.3.1.5) of the yeast Rhodotorula glutinis was rapidly inactivated by duodenal juice. It was susceptible to chymotrypsin and subtilisin and to a lesser extent trypsin. Initial proteolysis of the enzyme by chymotrypsin and trypsin resulted in cleavage of the monomeric subunit (75 000 Mr) into a large (65 000 Mr) and a small (10 000 Mr) peptide. The small peptide was rapidly degraded. The 65 000-Mr fragment was resistant to prolonged incubation with chymotrypsin, but was degraded by trypsin under the same conditions. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase was cleaved into several polypeptides by subtilisin, the 65 000-Mr peptide being totally absent. The N-terminal region of the enzyme was contained in the 65 000-Mr fragment, as was the dehydroalanine moiety, the prosthetic group. Active-site-binding ligands protect the enzyme from inactivation by the three proteinases, and peptide-bond cleavage by trypsin and chymotrypsin. Several chemical modifications were performed on phenylalanine ammonia-lyase. Some decreased its antigenicity, and ethyl acetimidate decreased the rate of degradation of the 65 000-Mr peptide by trypsin. The modification did not protect the enzyme from proteolytic inactivation of the enzymic activity. These observations are discussed in terms of the structure of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and site of action of the proteinases. PMID:7041889

  12. Poliovirus proteinase 2A induces cleavage of eucaryotic initiation factor 4F polypeptide p220.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräusslich, H G; Nicklin, M J; Toyoda, H; Etchison, D; Wimmer, E

    1987-01-01

    Poliovirus infection of HeLa cells induces rapid shutoff of host protein synthesis, whereas translation of poliovirus RNA is not inhibited. It is presumed that shutoff is the result of proteolytic cleavage of component p220 of eucaryotic initiation factor 4F. To study whether poliovirus proteinase 2A is involved in this cleavage, we translated synthetic RNAs that contained the coding region for poliovirus-specific polypeptides P1 and 2A in vitro and assayed for cleavage of p220. We report here that cleavage of p220 occurred in all cases when active proteinase 2A was translated and that disruption of the coding sequence of 2A by linker insertion or deletion prevented processing of p220 in vitro. Activity of 2A was determined by its ability to cleave at the P1-P2 site of a segment of the poliovirus polyprotein. We also constructed a plasmid in which the 3'-most 500 nucleotides of the nontranslated region of encephalomyocarditis virus were linked to the coding sequence for poliovirus polypeptide 2A. Translation of the RNA transcript of this clone was very efficient and yielded a fusion protein that included 2A; this polypeptide also induced cleavage of p220. In vitro translation in the presence of antibodies against 2A specifically inhibited processing of p220, whereas incubation of in vitro translation products with antibodies against 2A after translation was completed did not prevent proteolysis of p220. Images PMID:3039165

  13. Bio-physical evaluation and in vivo delivery of plant proteinase inhibitor immobilized on silica nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Neha; Doke, Dhananjay S; Khandare, Jayant J; Jawale, Priyanka V; Biradar, Ankush V; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant expression of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors (CanPI-13) and its application via synthetic carrier for the crop protection is the prime objective of our study. Herein, we explored proteinase inhibitor peptide immobilization on silica based nanospheres and rods followed by its pH mediated release in vitro and in vivo. Initial studies suggested silica nanospheres to be a suitable candidate for peptide immobilization. Furthermore, the interactions were characterized biophysically to ascertain their conformational stability and biological activity. Interestingly, bioactive peptide loading at acidic pH on nanospheres was found to be 62% and showed 56% of peptide release at pH 10, simulating gut milieu of the target pest Helicoverpa armigera. Additionally, in vivo study demonstrated significant reduction in insect body mass (158 mg) as compared to the control insects (265 mg) on 8th day after feeding with CanPI-13 based silica nanospheres. The study confirms that peptide immobilized silica nanosphere is capable of affecting overall growth and development of the feeding insects, which is known to hamper fecundity and fertility of the insects. Our study illustrates the utility and development of peptide-nanocarrier based platform in delivering diverse biologically active complexes specific to gut pH of H. armigera. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Midgut serine proteinases and alternative host plant utilization in Pieris brassicae L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh eKumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pieris brassicae L. is a serious pest of cultivated crucifers in several parts of theworld. Larvae of P. brassicae also feed prolifically on garden nasturtium (Tropaeolummajus L., of the family Tropaeolaceae. Proteolytic digestion was studied in larvaefeeding on multiple hosts. Fourth instars were collected from cauliflower fields beforetransfer onto detached, aerial tissues of selected host plants in the lab. Variable levels ofmidgut serine proteinases were detected in larvae fed on different hosts using proteinsubstrates (casein and recombinant RBCL cloned from cauliflower and diagnostic,synthetic substrates. Qualitative changes in midgut trypsin activities and quantitativechanges in midgut chymotrypsin activities were implicated in physiological adaptation oflarvae transferred to T. majus. Midgut proteolytic activities were inhibited to differentextents by serine proteinase inhibitors, including putative trypsin inhibitors isolated fromherbivore-attacked and herbivore-free leaves of cauliflower (CfTI and T. majus (TpTI.Transfer of larvae to T. majus significantly influenced feeding parameters but notnecessarily when transferred to different tissues of the same host. Results obtained arerelevant for devising sustainable pest management strategies, including transgenicapproaches using genes encoding plant protease inhibitors.

  15. Renin inhibition by substituted piperidines: a novel paradigm for the inhibition of monomeric aspartic proteinases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oefner, C; Binggeli, A; Breu, V; Bur, D; Clozel, J P; D'Arcy, A; Dorn, A; Fischli, W; Grüninger, F; Güller, R; Hirth, G; Märki, H; Mathews, S; M ller, M; Ridley, R G; Stadler, H; Vieira, E; Wilhelm, M; Winkler, F; Wostl, W

    1999-03-01

    The aspartic proteinase renin catalyses the first and rate-limiting step in the conversion of angiotensinogen to the hormone angiotensin II, and therefore plays an important physiological role in the regulation of blood pressure. Numerous potent peptidomimetic inhibitors of this important drug target have been developed, but none of these compounds have progressed past clinical phase II trials. Limited oral bioavailability or excessive production costs have prevented these inhibitors from becoming new antihypertensive drugs. We were interested in developing new nonpeptidomimetic renin inhibitors. High-throughput screening of the Roche compound library identified a simple 3, 4-disubstituted piperidine lead compound. We determined the crystal structures of recombinant human renin complexed with two representatives of this new class. Binding of these substituted piperidine derivatives is accompanied by major induced-fit adaptations around the enzyme's active site. The efficient optimisation of the piperidine inhibitors was facilitated by structural analysis of the renin active site in two renin-inhibitor complexes (some of the piperidine derivatives have picomolar affinities for renin). These structural changes provide the basis for a novel paradigm for inhibition of monomeric aspartic proteinases.

  16. The murine alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor gene family: polymorphism, chromosomal location, and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Karen W; Wei, FuSheng; Brannan, Camilynn; Flotte, Terence R; Baumann, Heinz; Berger, Franklin G

    2002-11-01

    alpha(1)-Proteinase inhibitor (alpha(1)-PI) is a member of the serpin superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors, which function in maintaining homeostasis through regulation of numerous proteolytic processes. In laboratory mice (Mus musculus domesticus), alpha(1)-PI occurs in multiple isoforms encoded by a family of three to five genes that are polymorphic among inbred strains and that are located at the Serpina1 locus on chromosome 12. In the present study, we have characterized the alpha(1)-PI gene family of inbred mice in more detail. We show that mice express seven isoforms, all of which are encoded by genes that map to the Serpina1 locus. In addition, polymorphism at the locus is defined by three haplotypes (Serpina1(b), Serpina1(c), and Serpina1(l)) that differ with regard to both the number and identity of alpha(1)-PI genes. Finally, we present the complete sequence of an 84-kb region of Serpina1 containing a tandem repeat of two alpha(1)-PI genes.

  17. A serine proteinase homologue, SPH-3, plays a central role in insect immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felföldi, Gabriella; Eleftherianos, Ioannis; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H; Venekei, István

    2011-04-15

    Numerous vertebrate and invertebrate genes encode serine proteinase homologues (SPHs) similar to members of the serine proteinase family, but lacking one or more residues of the catalytic triad. These SPH proteins are thought to play a role in immunity, but their precise functions are poorly understood. In this study, we show that SPH-3 (an insect non-clip domain-containing SPH) is of central importance in the immune response of a model lepidopteran, Manduca sexta. We examine M. sexta infection with a virulent, insect-specific, Gram-negative bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. RNA interference suppression of bacteria-induced SPH-3 synthesis severely compromises the insect's ability to defend itself against infection by preventing the transcription of multiple antimicrobial effector genes, but, surprisingly, not the transcription of immune recognition genes. Upregulation of the gene encoding prophenoloxidase and the activity of the phenoloxidase enzyme are among the antimicrobial responses that are severely attenuated on SPH-3 knockdown. These findings suggest the existence of two largely independent signaling pathways controlling immune recognition by the fat body, one governing effector gene transcription, and the other regulating genes encoding pattern recognition proteins.

  18. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 to identify a potent inhibitor of amebic invasion in a human colonic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L; Reed, Sharon L

    2007-07-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis.

  20. A comparison of lateral ankle ligament suture anchor strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Crates, John M

    2013-06-01

    Lateral ankle ligament repairs increasingly use suture anchors instead of bone tunnels. Our purpose was to compare the biomechanical properties of a knotted and knotless suture anchor appropriate for a lateral ankle ligament reconstruction. In porcine distal fibulae, 10 samples of 2 different PEEK anchors were inserted. The attached sutures were cyclically loaded between 10N and 60N for 200 cycles. A destructive pull was performed and failure loads, cyclic displacement, stiffness, and failure mode recorded. PushLock 2.5 anchors failed before 200 cycles. PushLock 100 cycle displacement was less than Morphix 2.5 displacement (panchors completing 200 cycles was 86.5N (PushLock) and 252.1N (Morphix) (psuture breaking for all PushLocks while the Morphix failed equally by anchor breaking and suture breakage. The knotted Morphix demonstrated more displacement and greater failure strength than the knotless PushLock. The PushLock failed consistently with suture breaking. The Morphix anchor failed both by anchor breaking and by suture breaking. Copyright © 2012 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Suture Anchor Biomechanics After Rotator Cuff Footprint Decortication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Adam E; Lavery, Kyle; Mino, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman

    2016-04-01

    To identify the biomechanical consequences of violating the cortical shelf when preparing the greater tuberosity for suture anchor repair. Demographic information and bone mineral density were obtained for 20 fresh-frozen human humeri (10 matched pairs). Suture anchors were placed at a predetermined location in decorticated and non-decorticated settings after randomization. Anchors were tested under cyclic loads followed by load-to-failure testing. The number of cycles, failure mode, stiffness, and final pullout strength were recorded. Nineteen specimens met the inclusion criteria for final testing. A significant difference in mean ultimate load to failure was seen between the non-decorticated specimens (244.04 ± 89.06 N/mm) and the decorticated humeri (62.84 ± 38.04 N/mm, P suture anchor. Gender and bone mineral density also play a significant role in bone-anchor biomechanics and should be considered during repair. Caution should be exercised when preparing the rotator cuff footprint before suture anchor placement because of the significant risk of early repair failure at the bone-anchor interface. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. New sutures and suture anchors in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Barber, F; Boothby, Michael H; Richards, David P

    2006-09-01

    Arthroscopic surgery requires appropriate surgical implants for effective fixation of tendons and ligaments to bone. Biodegradable suture anchors are being used with increasing frequency for various procedures in sports medicine. As companions to these biodegradable suture anchors, new sutures have been developed which possess greater strength and different material properties from the conventional braided polyester suture. Biodegradable polymers currently found in sutures and suture anchors include poly-L-lactic acid, poly-D, L lactic acid, polydioxanone, polyglycolic acid and their copolymers. Suture anchors are now available preloaded with a choice of conventional braided polyester sutures or some version of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene ("super") sutures. Most new suture anchors come with 2 sutures. The manner in which these sutures are attached to the anchor varies and may consist of 2 separate eyelets or 2 slots either parallel to one another or at different angles to one another. Some anchors have a very large single eyelet that allows for 2 or more sutures.

  3. Spin selection at organic spinterface by anchoring group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhao; Qiu, Shuai; Miao, Yuan-yuan; Ren, Jun-feng; Wang, Chuan-kui [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Hu, Gui-chao, E-mail: hgc@sdnu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The sign of interfacial spin polarization can be selected by using different anchoring groups. • A sp{sup 3}-d or sp-d hybridization may occur and induce spin polarization when the anchoring group changes. • Interfacial spin polarization depends on both the type of the outer orbital of the anchoring atom as well as its energy. - Abstract: Control of organic interfacial spin polarization is crucial in organic spintronics. Based on ab initio theory, here we proposed a spin selection at organic interface via anchoring group by adsorbing an organic molecule onto Ni(111) surface. The results demonstrate that either a positive or negative interfacial spin polarization may be obtained by choosing different anchoring groups. The orbital analysis via the projected density of states shows that the interfacial spin polarization is sensitive to the hybridization of the outer orbital of the anchoring atom as well as its energy relative to the d orbital of the ferromagnetic atom. The work indicates a feasible way to realize spin selection at the organic spinterface by anchoring group.

  4. Quantifying Heuristic Bias: Anchoring, Availability, and Representativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan; Josephson, S Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Construct: Authors examined whether a new vignette-based instrument could isolate and quantify heuristic bias. Heuristics are cognitive shortcuts that may introduce bias and contribute to error. There is no standardized instrument available to quantify heuristic bias in clinical decision making, limiting future study of educational interventions designed to improve calibration of medical decisions. This study presents validity data to support a vignette-based instrument quantifying bias due to the anchoring, availability, and representativeness heuristics. Participants completed questionnaires requiring assignment of probabilities to potential outcomes of medical and nonmedical scenarios. The instrument randomly presented scenarios in one of two versions: Version A, encouraging heuristic bias, and Version B, worded neutrally. The primary outcome was the difference in probability judgments for Version A versus Version B scenario options. Of 167 participants recruited, 139 enrolled. Participants assigned significantly higher mean probability values to Version A scenario options (M = 9.56, SD = 3.75) than Version B (M = 8.98, SD = 3.76), t(1801) = 3.27, p = .001. This result remained significant analyzing medical scenarios alone (Version A, M = 9.41, SD = 3.92; Version B, M = 8.86, SD = 4.09), t(1204) = 2.36, p = .02. Analyzing medical scenarios by heuristic revealed a significant difference between Version A and B for availability (Version A, M = 6.52, SD = 3.32; Version B, M = 5.52, SD = 3.05), t(404) = 3.04, p = .003, and representativeness (Version A, M = 11.45, SD = 3.12; Version B, M = 10.67, SD = 3.71), t(396) = 2.28, p = .02, but not anchoring. Stratifying by training level, students maintained a significant difference between Version A and B medical scenarios (Version A, M = 9.83, SD = 3.75; Version B, M = 9.00, SD = 3.98), t(465) = 2.29, p = .02, but not residents or attendings. Stratifying by heuristic and training level, availability maintained

  5. In vitro differential activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases of clinical isolates of Candida Atividade diferencial in vitro de fosfolipases e proteinases ácidas de isolados clínicos de Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurean D'Eça Júnior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Candida yeasts are commensals; however, if the balance of normal flora is disrupted or the immune defenses are compromised, Candida species can cause disease manifestations. Several attributes contribute to the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida, including the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, particularly phospholipase and proteinase. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro activity of phospholipases and acid proteinases in clinical isolates of Candida spp. METHODS: Eighty-two isolates from hospitalized patients collected from various sites of origin were analyzed. Phospholipase production was performed in egg yolk medium and the production of proteinase was verified in a medium containing bovine serum albumin. The study was performed in triplicate. RESULTS: Fifty-six (68.3% of isolates tested were phospholipase positive and 16 (44.4% were positive for proteinase activity. C. tropicalis was the species with the highest number of positive isolates for phospholipase (91.7%. Statistically significant differences were observed in relation to production of phospholipases among species (pINTRODUÇÃO: Candida são leveduras comensais, porém, se o equilíbrio da flora normal for interrompido ou as defesas imunitárias estiverem comprometidas, espécies de Candida podem causar manifestações de doença. Vários atributos contribuem na virulência e patogenicidade de Candida, inclusive a produção de enzimas extracelulares hidrolíticas, especialmente fosfolipases e proteinases. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a atividade in vitro de fosfolipases e proteinases ácidas em isolados clínicos de Candida spp. MÉTODOS: Oitenta e dois isolados provenientes de pacientes hospitalizados coletados a partir de sítios de origem diversos foram analisados. A produção de fosfolipase foi verificada em meio egg yolk e a de proteinase em meio contendo soro albumina bovina. O estudo foi feito em triplicata. RESULTADOS

  6. Molecular basis of Colorado potato beetle adaptation to potato plant defence at the level of digestive cysteine proteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruden, K.; Kuipers, A.G.J.; Guncar, G.; Slapar, N.; Strukelj, B.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Potato synthesises high levels of proteinase inhibitors in response to insect attack. This can adversely affect protein digestion in the insects, leading to reduced growth, delayed development and lowered fecundity. Colorado potato beetle overcomes this defence mechanism by changing the composition

  7. Digestive proteinase activity in corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) after molting and in response to lowered redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K S; Felton, G W

    2000-08-01

    Insect digestive proteinases are often strongly influenced by ambient physicochemical conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, and oxidation-reduction potential. Although the effects of the former two parameters are well documented, the influence of redox potential on catalytic rates of digestive enzymes is not well understood. In this study, we manipulated the midgut redox potential of a generalist caterpillar (the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea) by augmenting artificial diet with dithiothreitol, a powerful thiol reducing agent that lowers the redox potential in the lumen by 40-45 mV. Effects on total proteolytic activity, as well as on elastase, chymotrypsin, trypsin, leucine aminopeptidase, and carboxypeptidase A and B activities were measured using azocasein and nitroanilide model substrates. The profiles of proteinase activities in the epithelium and lumen were also monitored on days 1, 2, and 3 after the molt in penultimate instar larvae. Although the reducing agent strongly inhibited the activity of some proteinases in vitro, ingestion of the reducing diet failed to affect in vivo proteinase activities. There was also no effect on larval relative growth, consumption, or digestive efficiencies. We conclude that dietary reducing agents must lower midgut redox potential to below -40 mV to significantly impact digestive efficiency. Arch. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Lipases and proteinases in milk : occurrence, heat inactivation, and their importance for the keeping quality of milk products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The occurrence and heat inactivation of native and bacterial lipases and proteinases in milk were studied.

    Production of these enzymes by Gram-negative psychrotrophic bacteria in milk was found to take place towards the end of exponential growth and in the stationary growth

  9. Antisense inhibition of expression of cysteine proteinases affects Entamoeba histolytica-induced formation of liver abscess in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankri, S; Stolarsky, T; Bracha, R; Padilla-Vaca, F; Mirelman, D

    1999-01-01

    Trophozoites of virulent Entamoeba histolytica transfected with the antisense gene encoding cysteine proteinase 5 (CP5) have only 10% of the CP activity but retain their cytopathic activity on mammalian monolayers. In the present study we found that the transfected trophozoites with low levels of CP activity were incapable of inducing the formation of liver lesions in hamsters.

  10. Serine proteinase from Cucurbita ficifolia seed; purification, properties, substrate specificity and action on native squash trypsin inhibitor (CMTI I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryjanski, M; Otlewski, J; Polanowski, A; Wilusz, T

    1990-09-01

    A proteinase was purified from resting seeds of Cucurbita ficifolia by ammonium sulfate fractionation and successive chromatography on CM-cellulose, Sephacryl S-300 and TSK DEAE-2SW (HPLC) columns. Inhibition by DFP and PMSF suggests that the enzyme is a serine proteinase. The apparent molecular mass of this enzyme is ca. 77 kDa. The optimum activity for hydrolysis of casein and Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA is around pH 10.5. The following peptide bonds in the oxidized insulin B-chain were hydrolysed by the proteinase: Phe1-Val2, Asn3-Gln4, Gln4-His5, Cya7-Gly8, Glu13-Ala14, Ala14-Leu15, Cya19-Gly20, Pro28-Lys29 and Lys29-Ala30. The proteinase is more selective towards the native squash seed trypsin inhibitor (CMTI I) and primarily cuts off only its N-terminal arginine. The inhibitor devoided of the N-terminal arginine residue is still active against trypsin.

  11. Estimation of biofilm, proteinase & phospholipase production of the Candida species isolated from the oropharyngeal samples in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Lahkar

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Although C. albicans was the most common Candida species identified in HIV positive patients, the emergence of NAC was of special concern. Virulence factors such as biofilms, proteinases and phospholipases were noted in both these groups. Further research is required for better understanding of the pathogenic role of Candida species so as to aid in therapeutic interventions.

  12. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Mansoor Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM, often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I and proteinase K. Methods: F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results: Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion: DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions.

  13. Constitutive membrane expression of proteinase 3 (PR3) and neutrophil activation by anti-PR3 antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, AP; Rarok, AA; Huitema, MG; Fassina, G; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    2004-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies with specificity for proteinase 3 (PR3) are thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG), presumably by their potential to activate neutrophils. In patients with WG, high expression of PR3 on the surface of nonprimed

  14. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular cloning and functional characterisation of a cathepsin L-like proteinases from the fish kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma carassii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruszczyk, A.; Forlenza, M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma carassii is a fish kinetoplastid parasite that belongs to the family Trypanosomatida. In the present study we cloned a cathepsin L-like proteinase from T. carassii. The nucleotide sequence of 1371 bp translated into a preproprotein of 456 amino acids. The preproprotein contained the

  16. Kinetic modelling of enzyme inactivation : kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F was studied. It was established, by making use of kinetic modelling, that heat inactivation in the temperature range 35 - 70 °C was most likely caused

  17. The association of two recombinant proteinases of a feline strain of Porphyromonas gingivalis with periodontal disease in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J M; Love, D N

    2000-01-01

    Serum from 40 domestic cats with various grades of periodontal disease was used to probe two recombinant functional proteinases from feline strain VPB 3457 of Porphyromonas gingivalis expressed in E. coli. One recombinant proteinase (VPB 2856) was constructed using polymerase chain reaction and had 91% DNA identity with the prtC collagenase gene of the human type strain of P. gingivalis, while the other proteinase (VPB 2814) was isolated from a size selected genomic library and had an amino-terminal sequence with no significant identity with deposited sequences. Thirteen of 40 cats showed a serum antibody response to VPB 2856 using Western immunoblot detection. All the 13 cats had an overall periodontal grade of 3 or greater and greater than 1.68x10(5) cfu P. gingivalis at the canine and premolar periodontium sample sites. Fourteen of 40 cats showed a serum antibody response to VPB 2814. Thirteen of these 14 cats had an overall periodontal grade of 3 or greater. Regression analysis of overall periodontal grade against the serum antibody response showed significant positive relationships for both VPB 2856 (r2 = 0.351; pgrade of serum antibody response showed a positive relationship for both VPB 2856 (r2 = 0.662; p<0.001) and VPB 2814 (r2 = 0.531; p<0.001). These data provide strong evidence that the recombinant proteinases of feline P. gingivalis expressed in E. coli clones VPB 2856 and VPB 2814 are associated with periodontal disease in cats.

  18. Gelatinase A (MMP-2) and cysteine proteinases are essential for the degradation of collagen in soft connective tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Jansen, I. D.; Docherty, A. J.; Reynolds, J. J.; Beertsen, W.; Everts, V.

    1998-01-01

    The degradation of soft connective tissue collagen is considered to depend on the activity of various proteolytic enzymes, particularly those belonging to the group of matrix metalloproteinases and cysteine proteinases. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of these enzymes to this

  19. Osteoclastic bone degradation and the role of different cysteine proteinases and matrix metalloproteinases: differences between calvaria and long bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, V.; Korper, W.; Hoeben, K.A.; Jansen, I.D.C.; Bromme, D.; Cleutjens, K.B.J.M.; Heeneman, S.; Peters, C.; Reinheckel, T.; Saftig, P.; Beertsen, W.

    2006-01-01

    Osteoclastic bone degradation involves the activity of cathepsin K. We found that in addition to this enzyme other, yet unknown, cysteine proteinases participate in digestion. The results support the notion that osteoclasts from different bone sites use different enzymes to degrade the collagenous

  20. Degradation of collagen in the bone-resorbing compartment underlying the osteoclast involves both cysteine-proteinases and matrix metalloproteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, V.; Delaissé, J. M.; Korper, W.; Niehof, A.; Vaes, G.; Beertsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    The site of action of cysteine-proteinases (CPs) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the degradation of bone collagen by osteoclasts was investigated by evaluating the effects of the CP-inhibitor trans-epoxy-succinyl-L-leucylamido (4-guanidino)-butane (E-64) and the MMP-inhibitor

  1. Rats and mice immunised with chimeric human/mouse proteinase 3 produce autoantibodies to mouse Pr3 and rat granulocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geld, Ymke M.; Hellmark, Thomas; Selga, Daina; Heeringa, Peter; Huitema, Minke G.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: In this study, we employed chimeric human/ mouse Proteinase 3 ( PR3) proteins as tools to induce an autoantibody response to PR3 in rats and mice. Method: Rats and mice were immunised with recombinant human PR3 ( HPR3), recombinant murine PR3 ( mPR3), single chimeric human/ mouse PR3 ( HHm,

  2. Anchor placement and subsequent movement in a mesh kit with self-fixating tips: 6-month follow-up of a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennand, E A; Bhayana, D; Tang, S; Birch, C; Murphy, M; Cenaiko, D; Ross, S; Robert, M

    2014-04-01

    To describe the initial placement of Elevate single-incision mesh kit device tips relative to the sacrospinous ligament, and to measure tip movement over a 6-month period from initial placement. Prospective cohort. Tertiary care urogynaecology centre in Calgary, Canada. Women electing for surgical management of anterior vaginal wall prolapse. Ten women underwent anterior prolapse repair using the Elevate single-incision mesh kit with a metallic fiducial marker attached to the tips of the surgical device. Women were imaged by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 48 hours of surgery, and again 6 months later to investigate the position of the device tips and change ≥4 mm over the 6-month postoperative period. Position of self-fixating tips within 48 hours of surgery, and at six months post-operative. Anchor insertion was directly into the sacrospinous ligament in 10 of 20 insertion points (50%, 95% CI 27-73%). Movement was most often noted in the cranial-caudal direction: a change in location of ≥4 mm was observed for 8/20 anchors (40%, 95% CI 19-64%). Cranial-caudal movement was observed less frequently among sacrospinous anchors than among anchors inserted into other pelvic structures (1/10 versus 7/10, P = 0.020, difference in proportion -60%, 95% CI -94 to -26%). PFDI-20 scores improved statistically significantly by 6 months (P = 0.008, mean change -62.9%, 95% CI -105.1 to -20.7%), but PFIQ-7 scores did not change statistically significantly over the same time period (P = 0.523, mean change -12.4%, 95% CI -54.5 to 29.8%). The novel self-fixating anchoring tips of this single-incision mesh kit do not reliably anchor into the sacrospinous ligament. The tips have been shown to move with time, although not all cases of anchor movement were associated with recurrent prolapse. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  4. Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitors Limit Water Stress Responses in White Clover (Trifolium repens L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsana Islam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The response of plants to water deficiency or drought is a complex process, the perception of which is triggered at the molecular level before any visible morphological responses are detected. It was found that different groups of plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs are induced and play an active role during abiotic stress conditions such as drought. Our previous work with the white clover (Trifolium repens L. Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitor (Tr-KPI gene family showed that Tr-KPIs are differentially regulated to ontogenetic and biotic stress associated cues and that, at least some members of this gene family may be required to maintain cellular homeostasis. Altered cellular homeostasis may also affect abiotic stress responses and therefore, we aimed to understand if distinct Tr-PKI members function during drought stress. First, the expression level of three Tr-KPI genes, Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, and Tr-KPI5, was measured in two cultivars and one white clover ecotype with differing capacity to tolerate drought. The expression of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 increased in response to water deficiency and this was exaggerated when the plants were treated with a previous period of water deficiency. In contrast, proline accumulation and increased expression of Tr-NCED1, a gene encoding a protein involved in ABA biosynthesis, was delayed in plants that experienced a previous drought period. RNAi knock-down of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 resulted in increased proline accumulation in leaf tissue of plants grown under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions. In addition, increased expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis was found. The data suggests that Tr-KPIs, particularly Tr-KPI5, have an explicit function during water limitation. The results also imply that the Tr-KPI family has different in planta proteinase targets and that the functions of this protein family are not solely restricted to one of storage proteins or in response to biotic stress.

  5. Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitors Limit Water Stress Responses in White Clover (Trifolium repens L.) Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Afsana; Leung, Susanna; Nikmatullah, Aluh; Dijkwel, Paul P; McManus, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    The response of plants to water deficiency or drought is a complex process, the perception of which is triggered at the molecular level before any visible morphological responses are detected. It was found that different groups of plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are induced and play an active role during abiotic stress conditions such as drought. Our previous work with the white clover (Trifolium repens L.) Kunitz Proteinase Inhibitor (Tr-KPI) gene family showed that Tr-KPIs are differentially regulated to ontogenetic and biotic stress associated cues and that, at least some members of this gene family may be required to maintain cellular homeostasis. Altered cellular homeostasis may also affect abiotic stress responses and therefore, we aimed to understand if distinct Tr-PKI members function during drought stress. First, the expression level of three Tr-KPI genes, Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, and Tr-KPI5, was measured in two cultivars and one white clover ecotype with differing capacity to tolerate drought. The expression of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 increased in response to water deficiency and this was exaggerated when the plants were treated with a previous period of water deficiency. In contrast, proline accumulation and increased expression of Tr-NCED1, a gene encoding a protein involved in ABA biosynthesis, was delayed in plants that experienced a previous drought period. RNAi knock-down of Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI5 resulted in increased proline accumulation in leaf tissue of plants grown under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions. In addition, increased expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis was found. The data suggests that Tr-KPIs, particularly Tr-KPI5, have an explicit function during water limitation. The results also imply that the Tr-KPI family has different in planta proteinase targets and that the functions of this protein family are not solely restricted to one of storage proteins or in response to biotic stress.

  6. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be at risk for suture cutting through osteopenic bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Y; Woodmass, J M; Nelson, A A; Boorman, R S; Thornton, G M; Lo, I K Y

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the mechanical performance, under low-load cyclic loading, of two different knotless suture anchor designs: sutures completely internal to the anchor body (SpeedScrew) and sutures external to the anchor body and adjacent to bone (MultiFIX P). Using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the rotator cuff (approximately 60°), anchors were tested in cadaveric bone and foam blocks representing normal to osteopenic bone. Mechanical testing included preloading to 10 N and cyclic loading for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min. The parameters evaluated were initial displacement, cyclic displacement and number of cycles and load at 3 mm displacement relative to preload. Video recording throughout testing documented the predominant source of suture displacement and the distance of 'suture cutting through bone'. In cadaveric bone and foam blocks, MultiFIX P anchors had significantly greater initial displacement, and lower number of cycles and lower load at 3 mm displacement than SpeedScrew anchors. Video analysis revealed 'suture cutting through bone' as the predominant source of suture displacement in cadaveric bone (qualitative) and greater 'suture cutting through bone' comparing MultiFIX P with SpeedScrew anchors in foam blocks (quantitative). The greater suture displacement in MultiFIX P anchors was predominantly from suture cutting through bone, which was enhanced in an osteopenic bone model. Anchors with sutures external to the anchor body are at risk for suture cutting through bone since the suture eyelet is at the distal tip of the implant and the suture directly abrades against the bone edge during cyclic loading. Suture cutting through bone may be a significant source of fixation failure, particularly in osteopenic bone.Cite this article: Y. Ono, J. M. Woodmass, A. A. Nelson, R. S. Boorman, G. M. Thornton, I. K. Y. Lo. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be at risk for suture cutting through osteopenic bone

  7. Anchored but not internalized: shape dependent endocytosis of nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bokai; Feng, Xi; Yin, Hang; Ge, Zhenpeng; Wang, Yanhuan; Chu, Zhiqin; Raabova, Helena; Vavra, Jan; Cigler, Petr; Liu, Renbao; Wang, Yi; Li, Quan

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticle-cell interactions begin with the cellular uptake of the nanoparticles, a process that eventually determines their cellular fate. In the present work, we show that the morphological features of nanodiamonds (NDs) affect both the anchoring and internalization stages of their endocytosis. While a prickly ND (with sharp edges/corners) has no trouble of anchoring onto the plasma membrane, it suffers from difficult internalization afterwards. In comparison, the internalization of a round ND (obtained by selective etching of the prickly ND) is not limited by its lower anchoring amount and presents a much higher endocytosis amount. Molecular dynamics simulation and continuum modelling results suggest that the observed difference in the anchoring of round and prickly NDs likely results from the reduced contact surface area with the cell membrane of the former, while the energy penalty associated with membrane curvature generation, which is lower for a round ND, may explain its higher probability of the subsequent internalization.

  8. The relation between career anchors, emotional intelligence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dedication to a cause and autonomy career anchors to be significant predictors of .... individuals' need for congruence between their work and personal interests, as well as the shift of ...... 'Sources of job stress, work engagement and career.

  9. The anchoring bias reflects rational use of cognitive resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Falk; Griffiths, Thomas L; M Huys, Quentin J; Goodman, Noah D

    2017-05-08

    Cognitive biases, such as the anchoring bias, pose a serious challenge to rational accounts of human cognition. We investigate whether rational theories can meet this challenge by taking into account the mind's bounded cognitive resources. We asked what reasoning under uncertainty would look like if people made rational use of their finite time and limited cognitive resources. To answer this question, we applied a mathematical theory of bounded rationality to the problem of numerical estimation. Our analysis led to a rational process model that can be interpreted in terms of anchoring-and-adjustment. This model provided a unifying explanation for ten anchoring phenomena including the differential effect of accuracy motivation on the bias towards provided versus self-generated anchors. Our results illustrate the potential of resource-rational analysis to provide formal theories that can unify a wide range of empirical results and reconcile the impressive capacities of the human mind with its apparently irrational cognitive biases.

  10. Anchor coil technique for arteriovenous fistula embolization. A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Ezura, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Takashi; Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Fukumoto, Yuichiro; Horikoshi, Toru; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) successfully treated by coil embolization with an anchor coil inserted in the varix to facilitate dense packing at the shunting site. AVF of the left anterior choroidal artery (AChoA) draining into the ipsilateral basal vein of Rosenthal was incidentally found in a newborn female. A single detachable coil was inserted as an anchor into the varix adjacent to the shunt, and the microcatheter was pulled back to the shunting point. Three more detachable coils were delivered at the shunting point without migration under the support of the anchor coil, and the AVF was successfully obliterated with preservation of AChoA blood flow. The anchor coil technique can reduce the risk of coil migration and the number of coils required.

  11. Reaching the top: career anchors and professional development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Ruth; Shmulevitz, Carmela; Raviv, Dennie

    2009-01-01

    This study, based on Shein's conceptual theory of career anchors, examined the relationship between career anchors, professional development and emerging career patterns for graduates of 12 consecutive two year second career programs in nursing (N=231) compared to graduates of concurrent four year academic programs (N=273). A 2-group comparison design was used and data collection tools included a demographic profile, a professional profile and a career anchor questionnaire. Statistically significant differences were found in regard to career anchors (padministrative specialization (34%) compared to the second career tract (6.5%). Researchers propose that each group develops differently and contributes to the workplace and the importance of both certification and academic incentives to ensure recruitment.

  12. Involvement of Sortase Anchoring of Cell Wall Proteins in Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    OpenAIRE

    Lévesque, Céline M.; Voronejskaia, Elena; Huang, Yi-Chen Cathy; Mair, Richard W.; Ellen, Richard P.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the best-known biofilm-forming organisms associated with humans. We investigated the role of the sortase gene (srtA) in monospecies biofilm formation and observed that inactivation of srtA caused a decrease in biofilm formation. Genes encoding three putative sortase-dependent proteins were also found to be up-regulated in biofilms versus planktonic cells and mutations in these genes resulted in reduced biofilm biomass.

  13. Processing of predicted substrates of fungal Kex2 proteinases from Candida albicans, C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Oliver

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kexin-like proteinases are a subfamily of the subtilisin-like serine proteinases with multiple regulatory functions in eukaryotes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the Kex2 protein is biochemically well investigated, however, with the exception of a few well known proteins such as the α-pheromone precursors, killer toxin precursors and aspartic proteinase propeptides, very few substrates are known. Fungal kex2 deletion mutants display pleiotropic phenotypes that are thought to result from the failure to proteolytically activate such substrates. Results In this study we have aimed at providing an improved assembly of Kex2 target proteins to explain the phenotypes observed in fungal kex2 deletion mutants by in vitro digestion of recombinant substrates from Candida albicans and C. glabrata. We identified CaEce1, CA0365, one member of the Pry protein family and CaOps4-homolog proteins as novel Kex2 substrates. Conclusion Statistical analysis of the cleavage sites revealed extended subsite recognition of negatively charged residues in the P1', P2' and P4' positions, which is also reflected in construction of the respective binding pockets in the ScKex2 enzyme. Additionally, we provide evidence for the existence of structural constrains in potential substrates prohibiting proteolysis. Furthermore, by using purified Kex2 proteinases from S. cerevisiae, P. pastoris, C. albicans and C. glabrata, we show that while the substrate specificity is generally conserved between organisms, the proteinases are still distinct from each other and are likely to have additional unique substrate recognition.

  14. Arthroscopic Lateral Meniscus Root Repair With Soft Suture Anchor Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Prasathaporn, Niti; Kuptniratsaikul, Somsak; Kongrukgreatiyos, Kitiphong

    2013-01-01

    Meniscus root tear leads to circumferential hoop tension loss and increases femorotibial contact force, which causes irreversible cartilage degeneration. Biomechanical studies have shown that meniscus root repair provides better femorotibial contact force than meniscectomy. Many techniques for meniscus root repair have been published in recent years. The soft suture anchor is widely used in the glenoid labral repair. It is a small low-profile soft anchor. This article presents a new and simpl...

  15. Optimization Analysis Model of Self-Anchored Suspension Bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Pengzhen Lu; Jianting Chen; Jingru Zhong; Penglong Lu

    2014-01-01

    The hangers of self-anchored suspension bridge need to be tensioned suitably during construction. In view of this point, a simplified optimization calculation method of cable force for self-anchored suspension bridge has been developed based on optimization theories, such as minimum bending energy method, and internal force balanced method, influence matrix method. Meanwhile, combined with the weak coherence of main cable and the adjacently interaction of hanger forces, a simplified analysis ...

  16. Two Approaches for Using Multiple Anchors in NEAT Equating: A Description and Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tim; Deng, Weiling; Zhang, Yu-Li

    2011-01-01

    Nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) equating functions that use a single anchor can have accuracy problems when the groups are extremely different and/or when the anchor weakly correlates with the tests being equated. Proposals have been made to address these issues by incorporating more than one anchor into NEAT equating functions. These…

  17. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against the equine tapeworm, Anoplocephala perfoliata in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A E; Behnke, J M

    2016-09-01

    Papaya latex has been demonstrated to be an efficacious anthelmintic against murine, porcine, ovine and canine nematode parasites, and even those infecting poultry, and it has some efficacy against rodent cestodes. The active ingredients of papaya latex are known to be cysteine proteinases (CPs). The experiments described in this paper indicate that CPs in papaya latex, and also those in pineapples, are highly efficacious against the equine cestode Anoplocephala perfoliata in vitro, by causing a significant reduction in motility leading to death of the worms. The susceptibility of A. perfoliata to damage by CPs was considerably greater than that of the rodent cestodes Hymenolepis diminuta and H. microstoma. Our results are the first to report anthelmintic efficacy of CPs against an economically important equine helminth. Moreover, they provide further evidence that the spectrum of activity of CPs is not restricted to nematodes and support the idea that these plant-derived enzymes can be developed into useful broad-spectrum anthelmintics.

  18. Enhancement of native and phosphorylated TDP-43 immunoreactivity by proteinase K treatment following autoclave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    TDP-43 is a major disease protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP). To evaluate the effectiveness of proteinase K (PK) treatment in antigen retrieval for native and phosphorylated TDP-43 protein, we examined the temporal cortex and spinal cord from patients with sporadic ALS and FTLD-TDP and control subjects. PK treatment following heat retrieval enhanced the immunoreactivity for native TDP-43 in controls as well as for native and phosphorylated TDP-43 in ALS and FTLD-TDP. A significant number of TDP-43-positive neuropil threads were demonstrated in lesions, in which routine immunohistochemistry revealed that the predominant inclusions are cytoplasmic. This retrieval method is the best of immunohistochemical techniques for demonstrating TDP-43 pathology, especially in the neuropil. © 2010 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis Cysteine Proteinases: Iron Response in Gene Expression and Proteolytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Zamudio-Prieto, Olga; Ortega-López, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    We focus on the iron response of Trichomonas vaginalis to gene family products such as the cysteine proteinases (CPs) involved in virulence properties. In particular, we examined the effect of iron on the gene expression regulation and function of cathepsin L-like and asparaginyl endopeptidase-like CPs as virulence factors. We addressed some important aspects about CPs genomic organization and we offer possible explanations to the fact that only few members of this large gene family are expressed at the RNA and protein levels and the way to control their proteolytic activity. We also summarized all known iron regulations of CPs at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels along with new insights into the possible epigenetic and miRNA processes. PMID:26090464

  20. [Effect of proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors from potato tubers on the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revina, T A; Gerasimova, N G; Kladnitskaia, G V; Chalenko, G I; Valueva, T A

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of two proteins, PSPI-21 and PKSI, on the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms (Phytophthora infestans oomycete and Fusarium culmorum fungus). Both proteins were isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Istrinskii) and served as inhibitors of serine proteinases. These proteins differed in the ability to inhibit growth of Phytophthora infestans oomycete and Fusarium culmorum fungus. PSPI-21 was the most potent in modulating the growth of oomycete mycelium. PKSI primarily affected the growth of the fungal mycelium. The proteins under study induced complete destruction of oomycete zoospores and partial destruction of fungal macroconidia. Our results suggest that these proteins are involved in the protection of potato plants from phytopathogenic microorganisms.

  1. High sequence variability among hemocyte-specific Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors in decapod crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerenius, Lage; Liu, Haipeng; Zhang, Yanjiao; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Gunnar Andersson, M; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2010-01-01

    Crustacean hemocytes were found to produce a large number of transcripts coding for Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs). A detailed study performed with the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the shrimp Penaeus monodon revealed the presence of at least 26 and 20 different Kazal domains from the hemocyte KPIs, respectively. Comparisons with KPIs from other taxa indicate that the sequences of these domains evolve rapidly. A few conserved positions, e.g. six invariant cysteines were present in all domain sequences whereas the position of P1 amino acid, a determinant for substrate specificity, varied highly. A study with a single crayfish animal suggested that even at the individual level considerable sequence variability among hemocyte KPIs produced exist. Expression analysis of four crayfish KPI transcripts in hematopoietic tissue cells and different hemocyte types suggest that some of these KPIs are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis or hemocyte release as they were produced in particular hemocyte types or maturation stages only.

  2. Analysis of suture anchor eyelet position on suture failure load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktay, Sevima A; Kowaleski, Michael P

    2011-06-01

    To compare mechanical performance of 2 orientations of the 5 mm Corkscrew® suture anchor with #5 Fiberwire® . In vitro biomechanical study. Suture anchor-suture constructs (n=40). Acute and cyclic tensile loads were applied to suture threaded through eyelets of 40 anchors perpendicular to the long axis of the anchor. Eyelets were positioned so that the suture pull was in line with (anchor rotation angle of 0° [ARA 0]) or 90° (ARA 90) to the eyelet plane. Load at failure, stiffness, and cycles to failure were determined. All constructs failed by suture breakage at the eyelet. Mean load at failure was significantly higher in the ARA 90 group (634 ± 93 N) compared with the ARA 0 group (495 ± 52 N; P=.0015). No significant difference was found between groups for mean number of cycles to failure (270 ± 177 versus 178 ± 109; P=.2166) and stiffness (50 ± 4 versus 48 ± 5 N/mm; P=.3141). The Corkscrew® 5 mm suture anchor with Fiberwire® suture fails via suture breakage at the eyelet under higher acute loads if the suture is loaded at an angle of 90° compared with 0° with respect to the plane of the eyelet. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Poor anchoring limits dyslexics' perceptual, memory, and reading skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-07-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin, Putter-Katz, & Banai, 2006), which suggests that dyslexics have a general difficulty in automatic extraction of stimulus regularities from auditory inputs. This hypothesis explained a broad range of dyslexics' verbal and non-verbal difficulties. However, it was not directly tested in the context of reading and verbal memory, which poses the main stumbling blocks to dyslexics. Here we assessed the abilities of adult dyslexics to efficiently benefit from ("anchor to") regularities embedded in repeated tones, orally presented syllables, and written words. We also compared dyslexics' performance to that of individuals with attention disorder (ADHD), but no reading disability. We found an anchoring effect in all groups: all gained from stimulus repetition. However, in line with the anchoring-deficit hypothesis, controls and ADHD participants showed a significantly larger anchoring effect in all tasks. This study is the first that directly shows that the same domain-general deficit, poor anchoring, characterizes dyslexics' performance in perceptual, working memory and reading tasks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of mitral valve replacement anchoring in a phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Lang, Pencilla; Bainbridge, Dan; Campbell, Gordon; Jones, Doug L.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional mitral valve replacement requires a median sternotomy and cardio-pulmonary bypass with aortic crossclamping and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity which could be reduced by performing the procedure off-pump. Replacing the mitral valve in the closed, off-pump, beating heart requires extensive development and validation of surgical and imaging techniques. Image guidance systems and surgical access for off-pump mitral valve replacement have been previously developed, allowing the prosthetic valve to be safely introduced into the left atrium and inserted into the mitral annulus. The major remaining challenge is to design a method of securely anchoring the prosthetic valve inside the beating heart. The development of anchoring techniques has been hampered by the expense and difficulty in conducting large animal studies. In this paper, we demonstrate how prosthetic valve anchoring may be evaluated in a dynamic phantom. The phantom provides a consistent testing environment where pressure measurements and Doppler ultrasound can be used to monitor and assess the valve anchoring procedures, detecting pararvalvular leak when valve anchoring is inadequate. Minimally invasive anchoring techniques may be directly compared to the current gold standard of valves sutured under direct vision, providing a useful tool for the validation of new surgical instruments.

  5. Peptide-Mediated Liposome Fusion: The Effect of Anchor Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Niek S A; Minnee, Dirk; Kros, Alexander; Boyle, Aimee L

    2018-01-10

    A minimal model system for membrane fusion, comprising two complementary peptides dubbed "E" and "K" joined to a cholesterol anchor via a polyethyleneglycol spacer, has previously been developed in our group. This system promotes the fusion of large unilamellar vesicles and facilitates liposome-cell fusion both in vitro and in vivo. Whilst several aspects of the system have previously been investigated to provide an insight as to how fusion is facilitated, anchor positioning has not yet been considered. In this study, the effects of placing the anchor at either the N-terminus or in the center of the peptide are investigated using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence assays. It was discovered that anchoring the "K" peptide in the center of the sequence had no effect on its structure, its ability to interact with membranes, or its ability to promote fusion, whereas anchoring the 'E' peptide in the middle of the sequence dramatically decreases fusion efficiency. We postulate that anchoring the 'E' peptide in the middle of the sequence disrupts its ability to form homodimers with peptides on the same membrane, leading to aggregation and content leakage.

  6. Peptide-Mediated Liposome Fusion: The Effect of Anchor Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek S. A. Crone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A minimal model system for membrane fusion, comprising two complementary peptides dubbed “E” and “K” joined to a cholesterol anchor via a polyethyleneglycol spacer, has previously been developed in our group. This system promotes the fusion of large unilamellar vesicles and facilitates liposome-cell fusion both in vitro and in vivo. Whilst several aspects of the system have previously been investigated to provide an insight as to how fusion is facilitated, anchor positioning has not yet been considered. In this study, the effects of placing the anchor at either the N-terminus or in the center of the peptide are investigated using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence assays. It was discovered that anchoring the “K” peptide in the center of the sequence had no effect on its structure, its ability to interact with membranes, or its ability to promote fusion, whereas anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence dramatically decreases fusion efficiency. We postulate that anchoring the ‘E’ peptide in the middle of the sequence disrupts its ability to form homodimers with peptides on the same membrane, leading to aggregation and content leakage.

  7. Anchoring like octopus: biologically inspired soft artificial sucker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareh, Sina; Althoefer, Kaspar; Li, Min; Noh, Yohan; Tramacere, Francesca; Sareh, Pooya; Mazzolai, Barbara; Kovac, Mirko

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a robotic anchoring module, a sensorized mechanism for attachment to the environment that can be integrated into robots to enable or enhance various functions such as robot mobility, remaining on location or its ability to manipulate objects. The body of the anchoring module consists of two portions with a mechanical stiffness transition from hard to soft. The hard portion is capable of containing vacuum pressure used for actuation while the soft portion is highly conformable to create a seal to contact surfaces. The module is integrated with a single sensory unit which exploits a fibre-optic sensing principle to seamlessly measure proximity and tactile information for use in robot motion planning as well as measuring the state of firmness of its anchor. In an experiment, a variable set of physical loads representing the weights of potential robot bodies were attached to the module and its ability to maintain the anchor was quantified under constant and variable vacuum pressure signals. The experiment shows the effectiveness of the module in quantifying the state of firmness of the anchor and discriminating between different amounts of physical loads attached to it. The proposed anchoring module can enable many industrial and medical applications where attachment to environment is of crucial importance for robot control. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Application of Asian pumpkin (Cucurbita ficifolia) serine proteinase for production of biologically active peptides from casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Szołtysik, Marek; Babij, Konrad; Pokora, Marta; Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Chrzanowska, Józefa

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine potential application of a serine proteinase derived from Asian pumpkin for obtaining biologically active peptides from casein. The course of casein hydrolysis by three doses of the enzyme (50, 150, 300 U/mg of protein) was monitored for 24 hours by the determinations of: hydrolysis degree DH (%), free amino group content (μmole Gly/g), RP HPLC peptide profiles and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all hydrolyzates analyzed antioxidant activities were determined using three tests: the ability to reduce iron ions in FRAP test, the ability to scavenge free radicals in DPPH test, and Fe(2+) chelating activity. The antimicrobial activity of obtained peptide fractions was determined as the ability to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in a diffusion plate test. The deepest degradation, expressed as the DH [%] and the free amino group content (67% and 7528 µmole Gly/mg, respectively), was noted in samples hydrolyzed with 300 U/ml of enzyme for 24 hours, while in other samples the determined values were about three and two times lower. The results were in agreement with the peptide profiles obtained by RP HPLC. The highest antioxidative activities determined in all tests were seen for the casein hydrolysate obtained with 300 U/mg protein of serine proteinase after 24 h of reaction (2.15 µM Trolox/mg, 96.15 µg Fe(3+)/mg, 814.97 µg Fe(2+)/mg). Antimicrobial activity was presented in three preparations. In other samples no antimicrobial activity was detected.

  9. Digestive proteinases of red shrimp Pleoticus muelleri (Decapoda, Penaeoidea): partial characterization and relationship with molting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Gimenez, A V; García-Carreño, F L; Navarrete del Toro, M A; Fenucci, J L

    2001-10-01

    The present study describes the activity and some characteristics of proteinases in the hepatopancreas of red shrimp Pleoticus muelleri during the different stages of the molting cycle. Proteolytic activity was highest between pH 7.5 and 8. The hepatopancreatic protein content in the premolt stage was higher than in the other stages of the molting cycle (P.05). No significant differences were found in total proteolytic activity in the hepatopancreas when comparing molting stages. The proteolytic activity of the P. muelleri hepatopancreas enzyme preparations is the main responsibility of serine proteinases. TLCK, a trypsin inhibitor, reduced azocasein hydrolysis between 26% (intermolt) and 37% (premolt). TPCK, a chymotrypsin inhibitor, did not decrease hydrolytic activity, except for in postmolt. Low trypsin and chymotrypsin activities were found during intermolt, and increased in postmolt. The electrophoretogram of the enzyme extracts shows 12 bands of activity during intermolt (from 16.6 to 53.1 kDa). Some fractions were not detected in the postmolt and premolt stages. Three low molecular weight trypsin forms (17.4, 19.1 and 20 kDa) were found in all molting stages. One band of chymotrypsin (21.9 kDa) was observed in all molting stages. High molecular mass active bands (66-205 kDa) could not be characterized with inhibitors. Comparison of the protease-specific activity of the hepatopancreas of some species indicated a relationship between digestive enzyme activity and feeding habits of the shrimp. Omnivorous shrimp, such as Penaeus vannamei (syn: Litopenaeus vannamei) and Penaeus monodon, showed higher protease activity than the carnivorous shrimp, Penaeus californiensis (syn: Farfantepenaeus californiensis) and P. muelleri. In fact, the enzymatic activity in the hepatopancreas of P. muelleri showed variations in relation to feeding habit and molting cycle.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a proteinase K-sensitive PrPSc fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastrana, Miguel A; Sajnani, Gustavo; Onisko, Bruce; Castilla, Joaquín; Morales, Rodrigo; Soto, Claudio; Requena, Jesús R

    2006-12-26

    Recent studies have shown that a sizable fraction of PrPSc present in prion-infected tissues is, contrary to previous conceptions, sensitive to digestion by proteinase K (PK). This finding has important implications in the context of diagnosis of prion disease, as PK has been extensively used in attempts to distinguish between PrPSc and PrPC. Even more importantly, PK-sensitive PrPSc (sPrPSc) might be essential to understand the process of conversion and aggregation of PrPC leading to infectivity. We have isolated a fraction of sPrPSc. This material was obtained by differential centrifugation at an intermediate speed of Syrian hamster PrPSc obtained through a conventional procedure based on ultracentrifugation in the presence of detergents. PK-sensitive PrPSc is completely degraded under standard conditions (50 mug/mL of proteinase K at 37 degrees C for 1 h) and can also be digested with trypsin. Centrifugation in a sucrose gradient showed sPrPSc to correspond to the lower molecular weight fractions of the continuous range of oligomers that constitute PrPSc. PK-sensitive PrPSc has the ability to convert PrPC into protease-resistant PrPSc, as assessed by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay (PMCA). Limited proteolysis of sPrPSc using trypsin allows for identification of regions that are particularly susceptible to digestion, i.e., are partially exposed and flexible; we have identified as such the regions around residues K110, R136, R151, K220, and R229. PK-sensitive PrPSc isolates should prove useful for structural studies to help understand fundamental issues of the molecular biology of PrPSc and in the quest to design tests to detect preclinical prion disease.

  11. Near-field interaction of colloid near wavy walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yimin; Serra, Francesca; Wong, Denise; Steager, Edward; Stebe, Kathleen

    Anisotropic media can be used to manipulate colloids, in tandem with carefully designed boundary conditions. For example, in bulk nematic liquid crystal, a wall with homeotropic anchoring repels a colloid with the same anchoring; yet by changing the surface topography from planar to concave, one can turn repulsion into attraction. We explore the behaviors of micro-particles with associated topological defects (hedgehogs or Saturn rings) near wavy walls. The walls locally excite disturbance, which decays into bulk. The range of influence is related to the curvature. The distortion can be used to position particles, either directly on the structure or at a distance away, based on the ``splay-matching'' rules. When distortion becomes stronger through the deepening of the well, the splay field created by the wall can prompt transformation from a Saturn ring to a hedgehog. We combine wells of different wavelength and depth to direct colloid movement. We apply a magnetic field to reset the initial position of ferromagnetic colloids and subsequently release them to probe the elastic energy landscape. Our platform enables manipulation, particle selection, and a detailed study of defect structure under the influence of curvature. Army Research Office.

  12. A prominent anchoring effect on the kinetic control of drug release from mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vy Anh; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2018-01-15

    This work demonstrated kinetically controlled release of model drugs (ibuprofen, FITC) from well-tailored mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) depending on the surface charges and molecular sizes of the drugs. The molecular interactions between entrapped drugs and the pore walls of MSNs controlled the release of the drugs through the pore channels of MSNs. Also, polydopamine (PDA) layer-coated MSNs (MSNs@PDA) was quite effective to retard the release of large FITC, in contrast to a slight retardation effect on relatively small Ibuprofen. Of all things, FITC (Fluorescein isothiocyanate)-labeled APTMS (3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane) (APTMS-FITC conjugates) grafted onto the MSNs generate a pinch-effect on the pore channel (so-called a prominent anchoring effect), which was highly effective in trapping (or blocking) drug molecules at the pore mouth of the MSNs. The anchored APTMS-FITC conjugates provided not only tortuous pathways to the diffusing molecules, but also sustained release of the ibuprofen over a long period of time (∼7days). The fast release kinetics was predicted by an exponential equation based on Fick's law, while the slow release kinetics was predicted by Higuchi model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of asymmetric flow in nematic liquid crystals with finite anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Roberts, Tyler; Aranson, Igor S; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-02-28

    Liquid crystals (LCs) display many of the flow characteristics of liquids but exhibit long range orientational order. In the nematic phase, the coupling of structure and flow leads to complex hydrodynamic effects that remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we consider the hydrodynamics of a nematic LC in a hybrid cell, where opposite walls have conflicting anchoring boundary conditions, and we employ a 3D lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the time-dependent flow patterns that can arise. Due to the symmetry breaking of the director field within the hybrid cell, we observe that at low to moderate shear rates, the volumetric flow rate under Couette and Poiseuille flows is different for opposite flow directions. At high shear rates, the director field may undergo a topological transition which leads to symmetric flows. By applying an oscillatory pressure gradient to the channel, a net volumetric flow rate is found to depend on the magnitude and frequency of the oscillation, as well as the anchoring strength. Taken together, our findings suggest several intriguing new applications for LCs in microfluidic devices.

  14. Sustained load performance of adhesive anchor systems in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd Marshall

    Stemming from a tragic failure of an adhesive anchor system, this research project investigated the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors in concrete under different installation and in-service conditions. The literature review investigated the current state of art of adhesive anchors. Extensive discussion was devoted to the behavior of adhesive anchors in concrete as well as the many factors that can affect their short-term and sustained load strength. Existing standards and specifications for the testing, design, construction, and inspection of adhesive anchors were covered. Based on the results of the literature review and the experience of the research group, a triage was conducted on many parameters identified as possibly affecting the sustained load performance of adhesive anchors and the highest priority parameters were investigated in this project. A stress versus time-to-failure approach was used to evaluate sensitivity of three ICC-ES AC 308 approved adhesive anchor systems. Of the various parameters investigated, only elevated in-service temperature and manufacturer's cure time was shown to exhibit adverse effects on sustained loads more than that predicted by short-term tests of fully cured adhesive over a reasonable structure lifetime of 75 years. In a related study, various tests were conducted on the adhesive alone (time-temperature superposition, time-stress superposition, and dogbone tensile tests). The results of that study were used to investigate the existence of a correlation with long-term anchor pullout testing in concrete. No consistent correlations were detected for the adhesives in the study. Tests were also conducted on the effect of early-age concrete on adhesive anchor bond strength. On the basis of confined test bond-strength alone, adhesive A (vinyl ester) did not show any significant increase after 14 days (102% of 28 day strength at 14 days), and adhesive B and C (epoxies) did not show any significant increase after 7 days

  15. Perceptual anchoring in preschool children: not adultlike, but there.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Banai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that human auditory perception follows a prolonged developmental trajectory, sometimes continuing well into adolescence. Whereas both sensory and cognitive accounts have been proposed, the development of the ability to base current perceptual decisions on prior information, an ability that strongly benefits adult perception, has not been directly explored. Here we ask whether the auditory frequency discrimination of preschool children also improves when given the opportunity to use previously presented standard stimuli as perceptual anchors, and whether the magnitude of this anchoring effect undergoes developmental changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Frequency discrimination was tested using two adaptive same/different protocols. In one protocol (with-reference, a repeated 1-kHz standard tone was presented repeatedly across trials. In the other (no-reference, no such repetitions occurred. Verbal memory and early reading skills were also evaluated to determine if the pattern of correlations between frequency discrimination, memory and literacy is similar to that previously reported in older children and adults. Preschool children were significantly more sensitive in the with-reference than in the no-reference condition, but the magnitude of this anchoring effect was smaller than that observed in adults. The pattern of correlations among discrimination thresholds, memory and literacy replicated previous reports in older children. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The processes allowing the use of context to form perceptual anchors are already functional among preschool children, albeit to a lesser extent than in adults. Nevertheless, immature anchoring cannot fully account for the poorer frequency discrimination abilities of young children. That anchoring is present among the majority of typically developing preschool children suggests that the anchoring deficits observed among individuals with dyslexia represent a

  16. [Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein from Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qin-Yan; Xue, Yan-Feng; Shen, Li

    2012-10-30

    To identify glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein of Schistosoma japonicum. Based on the gene sequence of Schistosoma mansoni GPI anchored protein Sm200 (GenBank Assess No: XM_002569560.1), bioinformatics analysis was performed to find out its homologous gene sequence in S. japonicum, then a selected partial coding sequence (SjGPIs, about 933 bp) from the homologous gene sequence were amplified, and cloned into PET-28a(+) vector. The recombinant plasmid pET-28a(+)SjGPIs were transformed into E. coli Top10 cells and induced with IPTG for protein expression. The recombinant protein SjGPIs was purified with Ni-NTA resin, and the purified recombinant SjGPIs protein was used as antigen to prepare antiserum in New Zealand rabbit. The antiserum was used to detect S. japonicum GPI-anchored protein. To identify a GPI-anchored protein, the detected protein were identified by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) digestion. White blood cells from S. japonicum-infected mice was examined whether they endocytosed GPI-anchored proteins by Western blotting. The homologous gene sequence of S. mansoni GPI Sm200 gene was found in S. japonicum genome. A 3 495 bp coding sequence was obtained, containing the complete C-terminal sequence. The selected gene sequence (SjGPIs) were amplified and the recombinant plasmid pET-28a(+)-SjGPIs was established. According to the analysis of C-terminal sequence, Western blotting and enzyme digestion of PI-PLC, a GPI-anchored protein was present in S. japonicum tegument (about 1M(r)200000), named SjGPI200. The protein was detected in white blood cells of infected mice. SjGPI200 protein exists in S. japonicum, and anchored to parasite tegument via GPI.

  17. Charged Domain Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Fogli, G. L.; Tedesco, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate Charged Domain Walls (CDW's), topological defects that acquire surface charge density $Q$ induced by fermion states localized on the walls. The presence of an electric and magnetic field on the walls is also discussed. We find a relation in which the value of the surface charge density $Q$ is connected with the existence of such topological defects.

  18. Large glazing in curtain walls – study on impact of fixing methods on fire resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinowski Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents curtain walls fire resistance tests results comparison. Considered tests specimens were of similar system solution regarding profiles material, shape, dimension and insulation, glass pane family group and dimensions and glazing arrangement, fixing of framing system (anchoring but differ in glazing fixing method. Collected study material allowed reliable comparison of glazing fixing method impact on whole construction fire resistance. Comparison was made for curtain walls glazed with glass panes fixed in standard way (by means of pressure plates with covering profiles and for curtain walls with structural glazing (fixed by means of steel clamps and structural silicone.

  19. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a serine proteinase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa : solving the structure - function anomaly of a reported aminopeptidase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, M.M

    2009-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequence of an aminopeptidase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa , was reported to have high similarity with that of a serine proteinase from basidiomycete, Agaricus bisporous...

  20. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a serine proteinase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa: solving the structure - function anomaly of a reported aminopeptidase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Islam, Mohammed M

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequence of an aminopeptidase from Japanese edible mushroom, Grifola frondosa, was reported to have high similarity with that of a serine proteinase from basidiomycete, Agaricus bisporous...

  1. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  2. Suture anchor materials, eyelets, and designs: update 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Beavis, R Cole; Barrera Oro, Fernando

    2008-08-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate recently introduced sutures and suture anchors for single pull load to failure strength and failure mode. Suture anchors were tested in fresh porcine metaphyseal cortex and cancellous troughs using an established protocol. An Instron machine applied tensile loads parallel to the axis of insertion at a rate of 12.5 mm per second until failure and mean anchor failure strengths were calculated. The mode of failure was recorded (anchor pullout, suture eyelet cut out, or suture failure). Anchors tested included the Kinsa, Kinsa RC, BioRaptor 2.3 PK, TwinFix PK FT 5.5 and 6.5, BioCleat, Healix Peek, VersaLok, BioKnotless, BioKnotless BR, Corkscrew FT III, SwiveLock C, and PEEK SutureTak. The mean cortical failure loads were as follows: Kinsa (219 N), Kinsa RC (222 N), BioRaptor 2.3 PK (172 N), TwinFix PK FT 5.5 (491 N) and 6.5 (503 N), BioCleat (218 N), Healix Peek (407 N), VersaLok (376 N), BioKnotless (249 N), BioKnotless BR (265 N), Corkscrew FT III (386 N), SwiveLock C (712 N), and PEEK SutureTak (168 N). Pullout was the predominant failure mode for the VersaLok, BioKnotless, BioKnotless BR, and BioRaptor 2.3PK anchors. Eyelet failure was the predominant failure mode for the Kinsa, Kinsa RC, BioCleat, Healix Peek, Corkscrew FT III, SwiveLock C, and PEEK SutureTak. The newer anchors showed markedly increased load to failure strengths. Two or more high-strength sutures are commonly used as well as new anchor materials (PEEK and Biocryl Rapide), new eyelet designs, and the increased use of a "knotless" concept. An anchor which fails principally by pull out at a low load to failure is at risk for creating an intra-articular loose body.

  3. A biomechanical analysis of anterior Bankart repair using suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Shane J; Frank, Rachel M; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Wang, Fan Chia; Wang, Vincent M; Provencher, Matthew T; Verma, Nikhil N

    2010-07-01

    Arthroscopic repair of anterior Bankart lesions is typically done with single-loaded suture anchors tied with simple stitch configuration. The knotless suture anchor will have similar biomechanical properties compared with two types of conventional suture anchors. Controlled laboratory study. Fresh-frozen shoulders were dissected and an anteroinferior Bankart lesion was created. For phase 1, specimens were randomized into either simple stitch (SSA) or knotless suture anchors (KSA) and loaded to failure. For phase 2, specimens were randomized into 1 of 4 repair techniques and cyclically loaded then loaded to failure: (1) SSA, (2) suture anchor with horizontal mattress configuration, (3) double-loaded suture anchor with simple stitch configuration, or (4) KSA. Data recorded included mode of failure, ultimate load to failure, load at 2 mm of displacement, as well as displacement during cyclical loading. For phase 1, the load required to 2 mm displacement of the repair construct was significantly greater in SSA (66.5 +/- 21.7 N) than KSA (35.0 +/- 12.5 N, P = .02). For phase 2, there was a statistically significant difference in ultimate load to failure among the 4groups, with both the single-loaded suture anchor with simple stitch (184.0 +/- 64.5 N), horizontal mattress stitch (189.0 +/- 65.3N), and double-loaded suture anchor with simple stitch (216.7 +/- 61.7 N) groups having significantly (P .05) among the 4 groups in displacement after cyclical loading or load at 2 mm of displacement. Both knotless and simple anchor configurations demonstrated similar single loads to failure (without cycling); however, the knotless device required less single load to displace 2 mm. All repair stitches, including simple, horizontal, and double-loaded performed similarly. The findings may suggest that with cyclical loading up to 25 N there is no difference in gapping greater than 2mm, but a macrotraumatic event may demonstrate a difference in fixation during the initial

  4. Arthroscopic Transtendinous Biceps Tenodesis With All-Suture Anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chien-An; Chiang, Florence L; Hong, Chih-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Ping-Hui; Jou, I-Ming; Su, Wei-Ren

    2017-06-01

    There are several methods for long head of the biceps (LHB) tenodesis, yet the optimal option is still debatable. Here we introduce a technique for arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis with an all-suture anchor, the transtendinous biceps tenodesis technique. The LHB tenodesis is performed by using the Y-Knot anchor (1.3-mm). A standard suprapectoral approach is used for the tenodesis. A 1.3-mm drill bit is used to drill through the midportion of the biceps tendon and underlying bone to make a pilot hole. Next, the Y-Knot anchor is passed through the tendon and anchored on the underlying bone. A wrapping suture technique is then used to wrap around, tension, and secure the LHB tendon with the aid of a shuttling polydioxanone suture. The construct is fixed by tying down both suture limbs in a nonsliding fashion. This Technical Note describes an alternative method for all-arthroscopic suprapectoral biceps tenodesis using an all-suture anchor with a small diameter to minimize trauma to the tendon.

  5. Unimpeded permeation of water through biocidal graphene oxide sheets anchored on to 3D porous polyolefinic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mural, Prasanna Kumar S.; Jain, Shubham; Kumar, Sachin; Madras, Giridhar; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-04-01

    3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and hot-pressed samples revealed a clear picture as to how the morphology develops and coarsens over a function of time during post-processing operations like compression molding. The coarsening of PE/PEO blends was traced using X-ray micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of annealed blends at different times. It is now understood from X-ray micro-computed tomography that by the addition of a compatibilizer (here lightly maleated PE), a stable morphology can be visualized in 3D. In order to anchor biocidal graphene oxide sheets onto these 3D porous membranes, the PE membranes were chemically modified with acid/ethylene diamine treatment to anchor the GO sheets which were further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface Raman mapping. The transport properties through the membrane clearly reveal unimpeded permeation of water which suggests that anchoring GO on to the membranes does not clog the pores. Antibacterial studies through the direct contact of bacteria with GO anchored PE membranes resulted in 99% of bacterial inactivation. The possible bacterial inactivation through physical disruption of the bacterial cell wall and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed herein. Thus this study opens new avenues in designing polyolefin based antibacterial 3D porous membranes for water purification.3D porous membranes were developed by etching one of the phases (here PEO, polyethylene oxide) from melt-mixed PE/PEO binary blends. Herein, we have systematically discussed the development of these membranes using X-ray micro-computed tomography. The 3D tomograms of the extruded strands and

  6. Production of proteinase A by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a cell-recycling fermentation system: Experiments and computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, S.; Biedermann, K.; Emborg, Claus

    1996-01-01

    experimentally and by computer simulations. Experiments and simulations showed that cell mass and product concentration were enhanced by high ratios of recycling. Additional simulations showed that the proteinase A concentration decreased drastically at high dilution rates and the optimal volumetric......Overproduction of proteinase A by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated by cultivations in a cell-recycling bioreactor. Membrane filtration was used to separate cells from the broth. Recycling ratios and dilution rates were varied and the effect on enzyme production was studied both...... productivities were at high dilution rates just below washout and at high ratios of recycling. Cell-recycling fermentation gave much higher volumetric productivities and stable product concentrations in contrast to simple continuous fermentation....

  7. Differential gene expression for suicide-substrate serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) in vegetative and grain tissues of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, T.H.; Marttila, S.; Rasmussen, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    tissues of roots, and to the phloem of coleoptiles and leaves. The identification of BSZ4 in vegetative tissues by western blotting was confirmed for the roots by purification and amino acid sequencing, and for the leaves by in vitro reactive-centre loop cleavage studies. Plant serpins are likely to use......Proteins of the serpin superfamily (similar to43 kDa) from mature cereal grains are in vitro suicide-substrate inhibitors of specific mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family. However, unlike the 'standard-mechanism' serine proteinase inhibitors (... centres in vitro, were ubiquitous at low levels, but the protein could not be detected. EST analysis showed that expression of genes for serpins with BSZx-type reactive centres in vegetative tissues is widespread in the plant kingdom, suggesting a common regulatory function. For BSZ4 and BSZ7, expression...

  8. Analysis of green kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa cv. Hayward) proteinases by two-dimensional zymography and direct identification of zymographic spots by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Marilena; Rossano, Rocco; Riccio, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    Proteinases present in kiwi fruits are potentially allergenic enzymes belonging to the papain family of cysteine proteinases. Actinidin is a prominent kiwi enzyme. The study of kiwi proteinases is important for the follow-up of fruit maturation, a deeper insight in the allergenic properties of individual proteins, and the application of kiwi proteinases for meat tenderisation and other industrial purposes. Kiwi crude extracts were analysed by two-dimensional zymography on gelatin-containing gels. The digestion by the reactivated proteolytic enzymes after electrophoresis resulted in insights into kiwi proteinases. A mixture of several enzyme isotypes with the same pI but different molecular mass was observed. Clear spots, corresponding to the proteolytic activities, were excised, digested with trypsin, and submitted to MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry for protein identification. The most representative enzyme was actinidin. The innovative achievements of the present study are the: (1) two-dimensional zymographic map of kiwi gelatinases without the need for extensive purification; and (2) direct identification of proteinase isotypes by means of direct MALDI-ToF MS analysis of the zymographic spots. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry

  9. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  10. The M358R variant of α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, William P., E-mail: sheffiel@mcmaster.ca [Canadian Blood Services, Centre for Innovation, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Bhakta, Varsha [Canadian Blood Services, Centre for Innovation, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-02-12

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 2} M{sup −1}sec{sup −1}. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.

  11. Proteinase-activated receptor 4 stimulation-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs; PAR1–4 that can be activated by serine proteinases such as thrombin and neutrophil catepsin G are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases including fibrosis. Among these PARs, especially PAR4, a newly identified subtype, is highly expressed in the lung. Here, we examined whether PAR4 stimulation plays a role in the formation of fibrotic response in the lung, through alveolar epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT which contributes to the increase in myofibroblast population. Methods EMT was assessed by measuring the changes in each specific cell markers, E-cadherin for epithelial cell, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA for myofibroblast, using primary cultured mouse alveolar epithelial cells and human lung carcinoma-derived alveolar epithelial cell line (A549 cells. Results Stimulation of PAR with thrombin (1 U/ml or a synthetic PAR4 agonist peptide (AYPGKF-NH2, 100 μM for 72 h induced morphological changes from cobblestone-like structure to elongated shape in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells and A549 cells. In immunocytochemical analyses of these cells, such PAR4 stimulation decreased E-cadherin-like immunoreactivity and increased α-SMA-like immunoreactivity, as observed with a typical EMT-inducer, tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β. Western blot analyses of PAR4-stimulated A549 cells also showed similar changes in expression of these EMT-related marker proteins. Such PAR4-mediated changes were attenuated by inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR kinase and Src. PAR4-mediated morphological changes in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells were reduced in the presence of these inhibitors. PAR4 stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylated EGFR or tyrosine phosphorylated Src level in A549 cells, and the former response being inhibited by Src inhibitor. Conclusion PAR4 stimulation of alveolar epithelial cells induced epithelial

  12. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

    OpenAIRE

    CB Toaldo; Steindel, M; MA Sousa; CC Tavares

    2001-01-01

    The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70) and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity...

  13. Anchoring effect on first passage process in Taiwan financial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsing; Liao, Chi-Yo; Ko, Jing-Yuan; Lih, Jiann-Shing

    2017-07-01

    Empirical analysis of the price fluctuations of financial markets has received extensive attention because a substantial amount of financial market data has been collected and because of advances in data-mining techniques. Price fluctuation trends can help investors to make informed trading decisions, but such decisions may also be affected by a psychological factors-the anchoring effect. This study explores the intraday price time series of Taiwan futures, and applies diffusion model and quantitative methods to analyze the relationship between the anchoring effect and price fluctuations during first passage process. Our results indicate that power-law scaling and anomalous diffusion for stock price fluctuations are related to the anchoring effect. Moreover, microscopic price fluctuations before switching point in first passage process correspond with long-term price fluctuations of Taiwan's stock market. We find that microscopic trends could provide useful information for understanding macroscopic trends in stock markets.

  14. Neutrophil proteinase 3 and dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) as pharmacological targets in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener granulomatosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Brice; Lesner, Adam; Letast, Stephanie; Mahdi, Yassir K; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Jenne, Dieter E; Gauthier, Francis

    2013-07-01

    Neutrophils are among the first cells implicated in acute inflammation. Leaving the blood circulation, they quickly migrate through the interstitial space of tissues and liberate oxidants and other antimicrobial proteins together with serine proteinases. Neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, proteinase 3 (PR3), and neutrophil serine protease 4 are four hematopoietic serine proteases activated by dipeptidyl peptidase I during neutrophil maturation and are mainly stored in cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They regulate inflammatory and immune responses after their release from activated neutrophils at inflammatory sites. Membrane-bound PR3 (mbPR3) at the neutrophil surface is the prime antigenic target of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), a vasculitis of small blood vessels and granulomatous inflammation of the upper and/or lower respiratory tracts. The interaction of ANCA with mbPR3 results in excessive activation of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species and liberation of granular proteinases to the pericellular environment. In this review, we focus on PR3 and dipeptidyl peptidase I as attractive pharmacological targets whose inhibition is expected to attenuate autoimmune activation of neutrophils in GPA.

  15. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craik Charles S

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins. A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora.

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Mireille; Lagarde, Stéphanie; Laflamme, Cynthia; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Marois, Louis; Naccache, Paul H.; Pouliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    We shed new light on the expression and function of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family, associated with inflammation and hyperalgesia, in human granulocytes. Resting cells expressed constitutive levels of PAR-2 and PAR-3 mRNA but not PAR-1 or PAR-4. Based on flow cytometry, stimulation with opsonized bacteria (Bop) specifically up-regulated cell surface expression of PAR-2 in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner, independent of transcription or de novo protein synthesis. Primary granules were identified as a source of preformed PAR-2 that can readily be mobilized at the surface on fusion with the plasma membrane. Cellular response to PAR-2 activation, measured as changes in intracellular calcium concentration, was enhanced in PAR-2 up-regulated cells. Increase of cell-surface PAR-2 and of cell responsiveness were dependent specifically on the engagement of immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding receptors. Together, our results reveal that mobilization of intracellular granules, in response to Ig-receptor activation, up-regulates PAR-2 surface expression and makes neutrophils more responsive to proteinase activity. This enhanced response to PAR-2 activation indicates that molecular communication between pain and inflammation may be more important than previously believed.—St-Onge, M., Lagarde, S., Laflamme, C., Rollet-Labelle, E., Marois, L., Naccache, P. H., Pouliot, M. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils. PMID:20154268

  17. Extracellular serine-proteinases isolated from Streptomyces alboniger: Partial characterization and effect of aprotinin on cellular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Andréa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces alboniger ATCC 12461 grown in brain heart infusion (BHI medium produced two extracellular serine-proteinases, denoted SP I and SP II, which were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and aprotinin-agarose affinity chromatography. SP I was purified 88,9-fold and SP II 66,7- fold, with 33.4% and 10.4% yield, respectively. The optimum pH for the proteinases activity, using a-N-p-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl ester (TAME as substrate, was 9-10 and the optimum temperature was 37ºC. The proteolytic activity of SP I and SP II was inhibited by aprotinin and SP I was partially inhibited by leupeptin, both serine-proteinase inhibitors. S. alboniger growth in BHI-liquid medium decreased when 5 mg/ml, 10 mg/ml of aprotinin was used, being completely inhibited with 20 mg/ml and 40 mg/ml. At the ultrastructural level, aprotinin-treated S. alboniger cells showed swelling of the bacterial body and condensation of the genetic material, probably related to the inhibition of its growth.

  18. Functional Properties of a Cysteine Proteinase from Pineapple Fruit with Improved Resistance to Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plant cells, many cysteine proteinases (CPs are synthesized as precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and then are subject to post-translational modifications to form the active mature proteinases. They participate in various cellular and physiological functions. Here, AcCP2, a CP from pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus L. belonging to the C1A subfamily is analyzed based on the molecular modeling and homology alignment. Transcripts of AcCP2 can be detected in the different parts of fruits (particularly outer sarcocarps, and gradually increased during fruit development until maturity. To analyze the substrate specificity of AcCP2, the recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from Pichia pastoris. The precursor of purified AcCP2 can be processed to a 25 kDa active form after acid treatment (pH 4.3. Its optimum proteolytic activity to Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-NH-Mec is at neutral pH. In addition, the overexpression of AcCP2 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana can improve the resistance to fungal pathogen of Botrytis cinerea. These data indicate that AcCP2 is a multifunctional proteinase, and its expression could cause fruit developmental characteristics of pineapple and resistance responses in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  19. Biomechanical Comparison of a First- and a Second-Generation All-Soft Suture Glenoid Anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John; Chiarappa, Frank; Haskel, Jonathan; Rice, Justin; Hyatt, Adam; Monica, James; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-07-01

    All-soft tissue suture anchors provide advantages of decreased removal of bone and decreased glenoid volume occupied compared with traditional tap or screw-in suture anchors. Previous published data have led to biomechanical concerns with the use of first-generation all-soft suture anchors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the load to 2-mm displacement and ultimate load to failure of a second-generation all-soft suture anchor, compared with a first-generation anchor and a traditional PEEK (polyether ether ketone) anchor. The null hypothesis was that the newer second-generation anchor will demonstrate no difference in loads to 2-mm displacement after cycling compared with first-generation all-soft suture anchors. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty human cadaveric glenoids were utilized to create 97 total suture anchor sites, and 1 of 3 anchors were randomized and placed into each site: (1) first-generation all-soft suture anchor (Juggerknot; Biomet), (2) second-generation all-soft suture anchor (Suturefix; Smith & Nephew), and (3) a control PEEK anchor (Bioraptor; Smith & Nephew). After initial cyclic loading, load to 2 mm of displacement and ultimate load to failure were measured for each anchor. After cyclic loading, the load to 2-mm displacement was significantly less in first-generation anchors compared with controls (P anchors compared with controls (P suture anchors (P > .05). The newer generation all-soft suture anchors with a theoretically more rigid construct and deployment configuration demonstrate biomechanical characteristics (specifically, with load to 2-mm displacement after cyclic loading) that are improved over first-generation all-soft suture anchors and similar to a traditional solid tap-in anchor. The configuration of these newer generation all-soft suture anchors appears to mitigate the biomechanical concerns of decreased load to failure with first-generation all-soft tissue suture anchors. The theoretical advantages of all-soft anchors

  20. Organization, 'Anchoring' of Knowledge, and Innovative Activity in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ina; Vinding, Anker Lund

    2006-01-01

    specialisation of construction workers. Latent class and regression analyses reveal that firms that make extensive use of partnering, together with internal product and process evaluation and knowledge diffusion (labelled 'knowledge-anchoring mechanisms'), are more likely to participate in innovative activities...... industry is used to investigate the importance of learning and 'anchoring' of project-specific knowledge at the firm level for participation in innovative activities. The data cover both the overall Danish construction industry and a specific region, North Jutland, which has a relatively high...

  1. Distal clavicular fracture treatment with suture anchor method

    OpenAIRE

    Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sadat, Mirmostafa; Golbakhsh, Mohammadreza; Mousavi, Mohammad Sadegh; Gholizadeh, Amirmohammad; Saghari, Sepehr

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of the suture anchor fixation in the treatment of distal clavicle fractures.Methods: This cross series study included 43 patients (27 males, 12 females; mean age: 40.1±10.18 years) with type II unstable distal clavicle fractures. The fractures were fixed by 2 pins and 1 suture anchor. All patients were followed at postoperative months 3, 6, and 12 and underwent clinical and radiographic evaluation after 1 year, ongoing at 6-month in...

  2. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  3. Posterior Wall Capture and Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Use of StarClose Closing Device: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir [Medical University of Lodz, First Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Elgalal, Marcin T., E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Second Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech; Grzelak, Piotr [Medical University of Lodz, First Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Poland); Majos, Agata [Medical University of Lodz, Second Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland)

    2013-10-15

    A case of femoral artery obstruction following application of a StarClose type arterial puncture closing device (APCD) is presented. Ultrasonographic and angiographic imaging of this complication was obtained. The posterior wall of the vessel was accidentally caught in the anchoring element of the nitinol clip. This complication was successfully resolved by endovascular treatment and the implantation of a stent.

  4. Computational study of some benzamidine-based inhibitors of thrombin-like snake venom proteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Elsa S.; Nascimento, Marco A. C.; Ramos, Maria João

    Pit viper venoms contain a number of serine proteinases that, despite their observed coagulant thrombin-like action in vitro, exhibit a paradoxical benign defibrinogenating (anticoagulant) action in vivo, with clinical applications in preventing thrombi and improved blood circulation. Considering that several benzamidine-based inhibitors, some highly selective to thrombin, also inhibit the enzymatic activity of such venombins, the modeling of their enzyme-inhibitor interactions could provide valuable information on the topological factors that determine the divergences in activity. The first step, and the object of the present study, was to derive the necessary set of parameters, consistent with the CHARMM force field, and to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a few selected representatives of the inhibitors in question under physiological conditions. Bonding and van der Waals parameters were derived by analogy to similar ones in the existing force field. Net atomic charges were obtained with a restrained fitting to the molecular electrostatic potential generated at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The parameters were refined to reproduce the available experimental geometries and crystal data, and the MD simulations of the free inhibitors in aqueous solution at 298 K provided an insightful description of their available conformational space.

  5. Role of cysteine proteinase of Entamoeba histolytica in target cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D; Naik, S R; Naik, S

    2004-08-01

    The bacterial flora of the intestine plays an important role in the virulence caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Cysteine proteinase (CP), an amoebic virulence factor, plays a major role in host cell destruction. The mechanism of increased virulence following bacterial co-association is not understood. We studied CP of E. histolytica HM1:IMSS which was co-associated with Escherichia coli K12 strain pre-incubated with GalNAc or CP specific inhibitor E 64. Co-association of E. histolytica with bacteria enhanced CP activity 3-6-fold as assessed by azocasein assay and substrate gel electrophoresis showed bands at molecular weights of 28, 35 and 56 kDa. Northern and Western blot analysis showed increase in ehcp2 and ehcp5 gene expression. Trophozoites co-associated with E. coli showed greater cytotoxicity of BHK cells by a 51Cr release assay than trophozoites that had not been co-associated; this enhancement was abolished by E-64 treatment. The killing of BHK 21 targets by E. histolytica was characterized by DNA laddering which was not inhibited with E-64. GalNAc pre-incubation of trophozoites reduced cytotoxicity and DNA laddering, while E. coli co-associated E. histolytica showed smearing with faint laddering of BHK implicating both necrosis and apoptosis. Hence, bacterial co-association increases CP activity and CP gene expression and contributes to the necrosis of the target cell.

  6. The electrophoretic mobility of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor: effects of proteolysis and cigarette smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockley, R.A.; Afford, S.C.; Brunett, D.

    1982-04-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of purified alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was compared with that of carbamoylated transferrin. The results ranged from 64.0 to 68.9% of the distance moved by the transferrin and was increased by cigarette smoke solution (range 70.4% to 75.0% of carbamoylated transferrin). The addition of leucocyte elastase produced a change in electrophoretic mobility only in the presence of excess enzyme when mobility fell (58.0 to 62.0%) and was associated with complete and not partial loss of inhibitory activity. No further change was seen over 24 h. Studies on sputum showed a wide range of mobility from 68.0 to 45.0% but only those with a mobility greater than 64.0% retained any inhibitory capacity against porcine pancreatic elastase. However, several samples had a mobility lower than that produced by proteolysis with leucocyte elastase and some showed continuing reduction with time. It is suggested that this is due to proteolysis by more than one enzyme.

  7. Characterization of a novel vaccine candidate and serine proteinase inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum (Sj serpin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yutao; Liu, Shuxian; Song, Guangcheng; Xu, Yixin; Dissous, Colette

    2005-07-15

    Serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) represent an important superfamily of endogenous inhibitors that regulate proteolytic events active in a variety of physiological functions. Immunological screening of a Schistosoma japonicum adult worm cDNA expression library with sera of Microtus fortis, a naturally resistant vertebrate host, has identified one clone that encoded for a sequence homologous to those of the serpin superfamily. The full-length sequence encoding S. japonicum serpin (Sj serpin) was amplified from adult worm cDNA by using 5'-RACE-PCR and subsequently cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET28c. The full-length Sj serpin fusion-protein with his-tag was expressed in E. coli, purified by affinity chromatography and used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits. Sj serpin is located on the tegument in S. japonicum adult worms. C57BL/6 mice immunized with Sj serpin induced the production of high levels of specific IgE and IgG1 subclass antibodies as well as a marked IL-4 response. Lymphocyte surface marker analysis revealed proliferation of CD19 expressing B cells, indicating a predominant Th2-type response to Sj serpin. Immunized mice developed moderate protection against infection of S. japonicum as demonstrated by a 36 and 39% reduction in the recovery of adult worms and eggs, respectively. These data suggested a role for Sj serpin as a vaccine candidate or as a novel target for anti-schistosome drugs.

  8. Proteinase K and the structure of PrPSc: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Christopher J; Vázquez-Fernández, Ester; Onisko, Bruce; Requena, Jesús R

    2015-09-02

    Infectious proteins (prions) are, ironically, defined by their resistance to proteolytic digestion. A defining characteristic of the transmissible isoform of the prion protein (PrP(Sc)) is its partial resistance to proteinase K (PK) digestion. Diagnosis of prion disease typically relies upon immunodetection of PK-digested PrP(Sc) by Western blot, ELISA or immunohistochemical detection. PK digestion has also been used to detect differences in prion strains. Thus, PK has been a crucial tool to detect and, thereby, control the spread of prions. PK has also been used as a tool to probe the structure of PrP(Sc). Mass spectrometry and antibodies have been used to identify PK cleavage sites in PrP(Sc). These results have been used to identify the more accessible, flexible stretches connecting the β-strand components in PrP(Sc). These data, combined with physical constraints imposed by spectroscopic results, were used to propose a qualitative model for the structure of PrP(Sc). Assuming that PrP(Sc) is a four rung β-solenoid, we have threaded the PrP sequence to satisfy the PK proteolysis data and other experimental constraints. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Circulating ADAM17 Level Reflects Disease Activity in Proteinase-3 ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Anna; Lovric, Svjetlana; Engel, Alissa; Beese, Michaela; Wyss, Kristin; Hertel, Barbara; Park, Joon-Keun; Becker, Jan U.; Kegel, Johanna; Haller, Hermann; Haubitz, Marion

    2015-01-01

    ANCA-associated vasculitides are characterized by inflammatory destruction of small vessels accompanied by enhanced cleavage of membrane-bound proteins. One of the main proteases responsible for ectodomain shedding is disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17). Given its potential role in aggravating vascular dysfunction, we examined the role of ADAM17 in active proteinase-3 (PR3)-positive ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). ADAM17 concentration was significantly increased in plasma samples from patients with active PR3-AAV compared with samples from patients in remission or from other controls with renal nonvascular diseases. Comparably, plasma levels of the ADAM17 substrate syndecan-1 were significantly enhanced in active AAV. We also observed that plasma-derived ADAM17 retained its specific proteolytic activity and was partly located on extracellular microparticles. Transcript levels of ADAM17 were increased in blood samples of patients with active AAV, but those of ADAM10 or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3, which inhibits ADAMs, were not. We also performed a microRNA (miR) screen and identified miR-634 as significantly upregulated in blood samples from patients with active AAV. In vitro, miR-634 mimics induced a proinflammatory phenotype in monocyte-derived macrophages, with enhanced expression and release of ADAM17 and IL-6. These data suggest that ADAM17 has a prominent role in AAV and might account for the vascular complications associated with this disease. PMID:25788529

  10. Conjugation of biogenic polyamine (putrescine) with proteinase K: Spectroscopic and theoretical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Koupaei, Mansoore; Shareghi, Behzad; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2017-05-01

    To understand the influence of polyamine on conformation, stabilization and function of proteins, we used multispectroscopic and simulation methods through structural, stability and kinetic measurements of proteinase K (PK) as a model enzyme combined with putrescine (Put). Structural variability of PK was investigated at different concentrations of Put, using circular dichroism, spectrofluorescence and UV-vis measurements. The secondary structure of PK was changed through β-sheet to α-helix switch induced by Put. Spontaneity of the PK-Put complexation, through hydrogen and van der Waals interactions, altered the microenvironment of aromatic residues due to the exposure of them to the solvent. UV-vis measurement also supported the secondary and tertiary structure alteration of PK as a function of Put concentration. Analysis of kinetic parameters and stability studies revealed that Put could act as an enhancer of activity and stabilizer of PK. Our experiments showed that stability and activity changes of enzyme were closely associated to the conformational alterations of enzyme. The molecular simulation results also demonstrated that Put could spontaneously bind and alter the structure of PK, thereby confirming the experimental results. Overall, the results showed that Put could bind to PK and improve its stability and activity, thereby promising various biotechnological and industrial applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The pep4 gene encoding proteinase A is involved in dimorphism and pathogenesis of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberanes-Gutiérrez, Cinthia V; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Olguín-Rodríguez, Omar; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Vacuole proteases have important functions in different physiological processes in fungi. Taking this aspect into consideration, and as a continuation of our studies on the analysis of the proteolytic system of Ustilago maydis, a phytopathogenic member of the Basidiomycota, we have analysed the role of the pep4 gene encoding the vacuolar acid proteinase PrA in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of the fungus. After confirmation of the location of the protease in the vacuole using fluorescent probes, we obtained deletion mutants of the gene in sexually compatible strains of U. maydis (FB1 and FB2), and analysed their phenotypes. It was observed that the yeast to mycelium dimorphic transition induced by a pH change in the medium, or the use of a fatty acid as sole carbon source, was severely reduced in Δpep4 mutants. In addition, the virulence of the mutants in maize seedlings was reduced, as revealed by the lower proportion of plants infected and the reduction in size of the tumours induced by the pathogen, when compared with wild-type strains. All of these phenotypic alterations were reversed by complementation of the mutant strains with the wild-type gene. These results provide evidence of the importance of the pep4 gene for the morphogenesis and virulence of U. maydis. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Suture slippage in knotless suture anchors as a potential failure mechanism in rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Karl; Farshad, Mazda; Vlachopoulos, Lazaros; Ruffieux, Kurt; Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C

    2012-11-01

    To quantify the strength of suture fixation of knotless suture anchors in relation to the anchors' pullout strength and to compare these results with the static friction between different sutures and anchor materials. Suture slippage within the anchor and pullout strength of 4 different knotless suture anchor models were assessed in a bovine bone model. Furthermore, the peak force before onset of slippage of different sutures trapped between increasingly loaded 4-mm rods made of commonly used anchor material (polyetheretherketone, poly-L-lactide acid, metal) was assessed. In all but 1 of the tested anchors, there was a relevantly lower load needed for slippage of the sutures than to pull out the anchor from bone. The mean load to anchor pullout ranged between 156 and 269 N. The load to suture slippage ranged between 66 and 109 N. All sutures were better held between the metal rods (mean, 21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 19.2 to 23.3) than with polyetheretherketone rods (mean, 17; 95% CI, 15.7 to 18.1) or poly-L-lactide acid rods (mean, 18; 95% CI, 17.6 to 18.4). In the case of suture anchors that hold the sutures by clamping, the hold of the suture in the anchor may be far lower than the pullout strength of the anchor from bone, because the sutures just slip out from the anchor through the clamping mechanism. This is well explained by the low static friction achieved between the tested sutures and the test rods made of anchor materials. The use of knotless suture anchors appears quick and easy to perform; however, most of the anchor systems could not even reach half of the anchor pullout strength from bone before suture slippage occurred. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  14. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in Fusarium graminearum: inventory, variability, and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenour, William R; Harris, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of cell surface proteins to plant pathogenicity of fungi is not well understood. As such, the objective of this study was to investigate the functions and importance of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in the wheat pathogen F. graminearum. GPI-APs are surface proteins that are attached to either the membrane or cell wall. In order to simultaneously disrupt several GPI-APs, a phosphoethanolamine transferase-encoding gene gpi7 was deleted and the resultant mutant characterized in terms of growth, development, and virulence. The Δgpi7 mutants exhibited slower radial growth rates and aberrantly shaped macroconidia. Furthermore, virulence tests and microscopic analyses indicated that Gpi7 is required for ramification of the fungus throughout the rachis of wheat heads. In parallel, bioinformatics tools were utilized to predict and inventory GPI-APs within the proteome of F. graminearum. Two of the genes identified in this screen (FGSG_01588 and FGSG_08844) displayed isolate-specific length variability as observed for other fungal cell wall adhesion genes. Nevertheless, deletion of these genes failed to reveal obvious defects in growth, development, or virulence. This research demonstrates the global importance of GPI-APs to in planta proliferation in F. graminearum, and also highlights the potential of individual GPI-APs as diagnostic markers.

  15. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in Fusarium graminearum: inventory, variability, and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rittenour

    Full Text Available The contribution of cell surface proteins to plant pathogenicity of fungi is not well understood. As such, the objective of this study was to investigate the functions and importance of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs in the wheat pathogen F. graminearum. GPI-APs are surface proteins that are attached to either the membrane or cell wall. In order to simultaneously disrupt several GPI-APs, a phosphoethanolamine transferase-encoding gene gpi7 was deleted and the resultant mutant characterized in terms of growth, development, and virulence. The Δgpi7 mutants exhibited slower radial growth rates and aberrantly shaped macroconidia. Furthermore, virulence tests and microscopic analyses indicated that Gpi7 is required for ramification of the fungus throughout the rachis of wheat heads. In parallel, bioinformatics tools were utilized to predict and inventory GPI-APs within the proteome of F. graminearum. Two of the genes identified in this screen (FGSG_01588 and FGSG_08844 displayed isolate-specific length variability as observed for other fungal cell wall adhesion genes. Nevertheless, deletion of these genes failed to reveal obvious defects in growth, development, or virulence. This research demonstrates the global importance of GPI-APs to in planta proliferation in F. graminearum, and also highlights the potential of individual GPI-APs as diagnostic markers.

  16. MASH test 3-37 of the TxDOT 31-inch W-beam downstream anchor terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a suitable replacement for the downstream turndown : guardrail anchor system. The turndown guardrail anchor system does not meet mandated test requirements : under MASH for upstream anchor applic...

  17. Local ecological knowledge (LEK) on fish behavior around anchored FADs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macusi, Edison D.; Abreo, Neil A.S.; Babaran, Ricardo P.

    2017-01-01

    The Fishing Industry in the Philippines plays an important role in the food and employment need of Filipino fishers. By using anchored Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs or payao), the Philippine tuna fisheries was transformed into a million-dollar industry. Minimal studies on exploitation rates and

  18. Experience-based, body-anchored qualitative research interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    -anchored interviewing, and second, by an interview guide that explores a research participant's personal experience with mindfulness meditation. An excerpt from an interview is discussed to illustrate the advantages of this interview form, namely its value as a methodological instrument for qualitative research...

  19. Development of Behaviorally-Anchored Rating Scales for Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussing, Paul G.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Seventeen behaviorally-anchored rating scales were developed for a comprehensive measure of performance in pharmacy practice, including pharmacist selection, performance appraisal, and promotion activities. The scales (which are included) were also used to evaluate extern performance, and to serve as a criterion measure in studies of concurrent…

  20. Modified Anchor Shaped Post Core Design for Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth is challenging to pedodontist. Many materials are tried as a post core but each one of them has its own drawbacks. This a case report describing a technique to restore severely damaged primary anterior teeth with a modified anchor shaped post. This technique is not only simple and inexpensive but also produces better retention.

  1. Ten Anchor Points for Teaching Principles of Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkovick, Chuck

    2004-01-01

    Effective marketing instructors commonly share a love for their students, an affinity for the subject matter, and a devotion to continuous quality improvement. The purpose of this article is to highlight 10 anchor points for teaching Principles of Marketing, which are designed to better engage students in the learning process. These anchor…

  2. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  3. The relation between career anchors, emotional intelligence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    random sample of 270 adults employed in the service industry. A quantitative survey design was used. Multiple regression analyses revealed significant relationships between the participants' career anchors, emotional intelligence and employability satisfaction. The results further showed the entrepreneurial creativity, ...

  4. The importance of anchor text for ad hoc search revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, M.; Kamps, J.; Chen, H.-H.; Efthimiadis, E.N.; Savoy, J.; Crestani, F.; Marchand-Maillet, S.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that propagated anchor text is very important for effective Web search as offered by the commercial search engines. "Google Bombs" are a notable illustration of this. However, many years of TREC Web retrieval research failed to establish the effectiveness of link evidence

  5. Bone-anchored hearing aids in unilateral inner ear deafness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosman, A.J.; Hol, M.K.S.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2003-01-01

    In nine patients with unilateral deafness and normal hearing in the contralateral ear, measurements of sound localization and speech perception were obtained before intervention, with a conventional contralateral routing of sound (CROS) hearing aid and later with a bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA)

  6. The bone-anchored hearing aid for children: recent developments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Leijendeckers, J.M.; Hol, M.K.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.

    2008-01-01

    In 1984 the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid, or BAHA, system was introduced. Its transducer is coupled directly to the skull percutaneously to form a highly effective bone-conduction hearing device. Clinical studies on adults with conductive hearing loss have shown that the BAHA system outperforms

  7. Candidacy for the bone-anchored hearing aid.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Bosman, A.J.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    The BAHA (bone-anchored hearing aid) is a bone conduction hearing aid with percutaneous transmission of sound vibrations to the skull. The device has been thoroughly evaluated by various implant groups. These studies showed that, in audiological terms, the BAHA is superior to conventional bone

  8. Empirical evidence for resource-rational anchoring and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Falk; Griffiths, Thomas L; M Huys, Quentin J; Goodman, Noah D

    2017-05-08

    People's estimates of numerical quantities are systematically biased towards their initial guess. This anchoring bias is usually interpreted as sign of human irrationality, but it has recently been suggested that the anchoring bias instead results from people's rational use of their finite time and limited cognitive resources. If this were true, then adjustment should decrease with the relative cost of time. To test this hypothesis, we designed a new numerical estimation paradigm that controls people's knowledge and varies the cost of time and error independently while allowing people to invest as much or as little time and effort into refining their estimate as they wish. Two experiments confirmed the prediction that adjustment decreases with time cost but increases with error cost regardless of whether the anchor was self-generated or provided. These results support the hypothesis that people rationally adapt their number of adjustments to achieve a near-optimal speed-accuracy tradeoff. This suggests that the anchoring bias might be a signature of the rational use of finite time and limited cognitive resources rather than a sign of human irrationality.

  9. Testing the specifications of parametric models using anchoring vignettes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest, A.H.O.; Vonkova, H.

    Comparing assessments on a subjective scale across countries or socio-economic groups is often hampered by differences in response scales across groups. Anchoring vignettes help to correct for such differences, either in parametric models (the compound hierarchical ordered probit (CHOPIT) model and

  10. Poor Anchoring Limits Dyslexics' Perceptual, Memory, and Reading Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-01-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin,…

  11. Towards anchoring hope | van Louw | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hope for Stellenbosch University probably lies in acknowledging that Botman's 'Pedagogy of Hope' emanates from and is embedded in Freire's idea that hope alone is not sufficient. Hope only becomes meaningful when there is a commitment to move beyond rhetoric towards strategic action – to anchor hope in practice.

  12. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-Out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, J. P.; Adamsen, P.

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assume that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...

  13. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Judit; Proctor, Thomas P.; Melican, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    In common-item equating the anchor block is generally built to represent a miniature form of the total test in terms of content and statistical specifications. The statistical properties frequently reflect equal mean and spread of item difficulty. Sinharay and Holland (2007) suggested that the requirement for equal spread of difficulty may be too…

  14. Equating without an Anchor for Nonequivalent Groups of Examinees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2015-01-01

    An equating procedure for a testing program with evolving distribution of examinee profiles is developed. No anchor is available because the original scoring scheme was based on expert judgment of the item difficulties. Pairs of examinees from two administrations are formed by matching on coarsened propensity scores derived from a set of…

  15. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, J. P.; Adamsen, P.

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assumed that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...

  16. The point-defect of carbon nanotubes anchoring Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Y. A.; Cui, Y. H.; Li, X. N.

    2010-01-01

    between Au clusters and CNTs by means of density functional theory calculations. Both experimental and theoretical studies show that point defects are the anchoring sites of Au nanoparticles. The mechanisms of enhanced bond between Au and CNTs via the point defects are explained by the analysis of density...

  17. Analytical Model for Hook Anchor Pull-Out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Ulfkjær, Jens Peder; Adamsen, Peter

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytical model for the pull-out of a hook anchor is presented. The model is based on a simplified version of the fictitious crack model. It is assumed that the fracture process is the pull-off of a cone shaped concrete part, simplifying the problem by assuming pure rigid body motions...

  18. Local and global anchor points, stepping stone analysis Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bois, P.G.; van Oosten, Jetske

    2011-01-01

    This report shows the results of research on the relation between local and global anchor points in the city of Amsterdam, executed by a small group of international students from Italy and Spain within the scope of two research modules in their Bachelor education at the University of Applied

  19. Stable Pt clusters anchored to monovacancies on graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medasani, Bharat K.; Liu, Jun; Sushko, Maria L.

    2017-10-09

    Abstract

    anchor'>

  20. Anchor balloons assisted deep intubation of 5F catheters for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-24

    Jul 24, 2015 ... other lesions that cannot be crossed, even with the aforementioned techniques. Here, we report four ..... balloon technique may damage the anchored branch. The 5F “child‑in‑mother” catheter would be another .... Rev Esp Cardiol (Engl Ed) 2013;66:636‑43. 2. Chambers JW, Feldman RL, Himmelstein SI, ...

  1. Historical period stone anchors from Vijaydurg on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Bandodkar, S.N.

    Stone anchors are the primary antiquites in marine archaeological studies. Evidences of their evolution are noticed in India since 2500 B.C. A number of stone anchors have been recovered during the recent marine archaeological explorations at Dwarka...

  2. Stone anchors from Sindhudurg Fort on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.; Gaur, A.S.

    Inshore explorations have been carried out in the Malvan region of Maharashtra (India). Present article discusses the triangular and grapnel stone anchors found during the explorations at Sindhudurg and Padamgad Forests. Eight anchors are found...

  3. Study on effective anchorage length of anchor cable based on Gauss's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Feng; WuShuai; Liu, Yan; Liu, Jun-yan

    2017-11-01

    In the current relevant codes and technical standards, the design of anchor cables (bars) is based on the assumption that the shear stress is distributed uniformly along the anchor segment. However, according to this assumption, the super-deep pit need a large uplift bearing capacity, which will lead to the long anchor segment and has great hidden danger in the actual engineering design. Therefore, this paper, based on the previous derived shear stress function between τ and the anchor length, we get a research suitable model-Gauss curve distribution model through the analysis of saturated clay drawing data, and strata anchor shear stress distribution is more suitable for the Gauss function model in saturated clay; at the same time, through the FLAC numerical simulation of Jinan Government Affairs Center project, we obtained the optimal anchor effective anchor length is about 10~12m, the foundation pit anchor is optimized.

  4. Anchor Levels as a New Tool for the Theory and Measurement of Multiattribute Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.; Jansen, S.J.T.; Stiggelbout, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper introduces anchor levels as a new tool for multiattribute utility theory. Anchor levels are attribute levels whose values are not affected by other attributes. They allow for new interpretations and generalizations of known representations and utility measurement techniques.

  5. Recycling Suture Limbs from Knotless Suture Anchors for Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Timothy S.; DiPompeo, Christine M.; Ismaeli, Zahra C.; Porter, Polly A.; Nicholson, Shannon L.; Johnson, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability often leads to labral abnormality that requires surgical intervention that may require fixation with suture anchors. The proposed surgical technique allows the surgeon to achieve 2 points of fixation around the labrum and/or capsule with a single suture secured to the glenoid with a knotless anchor. Instead of cutting and discarding the residual suture limbs after anchor insertion, this technique uses the residual suture limbs of the knotless anchor for a second...

  6. HKUST-1 Membranes Anchored on Porous Substrate by Hetero MIL-110 Nanorod Array Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yiyin; Cao, Wei; Li, Junwei; Sun, Luwei; Peng, Xinsheng

    2013-09-02

    Great anchors and seeds: Hetero-seeding growth processes and anchored nanorod arrays were successfully utilized in the synthesis of HKUST-1 membranes. These arrays were firmly anchored on porous substrates by using a MIL-110 nanorod array as both the anchor and seed. The resulting HKUST-1 membranes demonstrated good separation factors for binary gases exceeding the Knudson selectivity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal eCzapiewski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature ageing progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are 1 weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and 2 disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both.

  8. Characterizing the flow of stirred vessels with anchor type impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.C. Peixoto

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in chemical industries, there are few works which studies anchor type impellers and only a fraction of the works investigate these systems under a computational approach. The great majority refers to turbine impellers, specially Rushton turbines, under turbulent flow. Anchor impellers are used specially for highly viscous flow, typical of polymer reactions. The viscosity is normally in the range 1000-10000 cp. Since this range of viscosity describe highly viscous flows, the reactions for anchor agitated systems are normally carried out under laminar flow. This work presents a detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach to study the behaviour of stirred vessels using anchor impellers. The axial plane of the tank, which is being modelled, is divided into small control volumes, which collectively is referred to as the mesh, or grid. In each of these cells the momentum balance, energy and mass conservation, which describes the model, are rewritten algebraically using the finite volumes method to relate such variables as velocity, pressure and temperature to values in neighbouring cells. The equations are then solved numerically, and the results yield the flow corresponding to the model. Since the geometry of a vessel with anchor impellers strictly calls for a three dimensional method, an approximation is made to account for the effect of the blades (Kuncewics, 1992. The main objective of this work is to give a detailed description of the flow generated by this axial impeller with a view to indicate ways in which the design and operation of these systems can be improved.

  9. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  10. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  11. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  12. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  13. 78 FR 45104 - Model Manufactured Home Installation Standards: Ground Anchor Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... mechanisms as a function of soil type, anchor depth, and load configuration. In cohesive soils, excessive... resulting from the failure of anchor systems, particularly during high wind events, including hurricanes and... destroyed when Hurricane Andrew hit Louisiana, 55 percent of the structural failures were caused by anchor...

  14. A group of 20 stone anchors from the waters of Dwarka, on the Gujarat Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.; Gudigar, P.; Vora, K.H.; Bandodkar, S.N.

    A large number of stone anchors were discovered in a water depth of 10-14 m off Dwarka during the 1998-99 season. The seabed near the anchors consists of a ledge with an average height of 1 m. Several anchors were found trapped between the rocks...

  15. The biggest stone anchors (Indo-Arab type) from Mithi Virdi, Bhavnagar, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Kumar, B.

    of Mahabharata). They are the biggest stone anchors ever found from anywhere in the world. The average length of the anchor is 4.9 m and the average weight is estimated to be about 3800 kgs. These anchors are generally termed as Indo-Arab type. The paper...

  16. Biomimetic Mussel Adhesive Inspired Clickable Anchors Applied to the Functionalization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldmann, Anja S.; Schoedel, Christine; Walther, Andreas; Yuan, Jiayin; Loos, Katja; Mueller, Axel H. E.; Müller, Axel H.E.

    2010-01-01

    The functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with dopamine-derived clickable biomimetic anchors is reported. Herein, an alkyne-modified catechol-derivative is employed as the anchor, as i) the catechol-functional anchor groups possess irreversible covalent binding affinity to Fe3O4

  17. 33 CFR 401.83 - Reporting position at anchor, wharf, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting position at anchor, wharf, etc. 401.83 Section 401.83 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT... § 401.83 Reporting position at anchor, wharf, etc. A vessel anchoring in a designated anchorage area, or...

  18. 33 CFR 401.49 - Dropping anchor or tying to canal bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dropping anchor or tying to canal bank. 401.49 Section 401.49 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT... Dropping anchor or tying to canal bank. Except in an emergency, no vessel shall drop anchor in any canal or...

  19. Observed Score Equating Using Discrete and Passage-Based Anchor Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Jiyun; Liu, Jinghua

    2010-01-01

    Equating of tests composed of both discrete and passage-based multiple choice items using the nonequivalent groups with anchor test design is popular in practice. In this study, we compared the effect of discrete and passage-based anchor items on observed score equating via simulation. Results suggested that an anchor with a larger proportion of…

  20. 75 FR 2152 - Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Anchor Handling Tug Supply Vessel HOLIDAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Certificate of Alternative Compliance for the Anchor Handling Tug Supply Vessel... Alternative Compliance was issued for the anchor handling tug supply vessel HOLIDAY as required by 33 U.S.C.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background and Purpose The anchor handling tug supply vessel HOLIDAY will be used for...

  1. Secretory Aspartyl Proteinases Cause Vaginitis and Can Mediate Vaginitis Caused by Candida albicans in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Amacker, Mario; Kasper, Lydia; Roselletti, Elena; Luciano, Eugenio; Sabbatini, Samuele; Kaeser, Matthias; Moser, Christian; Hube, Bernhard; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Cassone, Antonio

    2015-06-02

    Vaginal inflammation (vaginitis) is the most common disease caused by the human-pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. Secretory aspartyl proteinases (Sap) are major virulence traits of C. albicans that have been suggested to play a role in vaginitis. To dissect the mechanisms by which Sap play this role, Sap2, a dominantly expressed member of the Sap family and a putative constituent of an anti-Candida vaccine, was used. Injection of full-length Sap2 into the mouse vagina caused local neutrophil influx and accumulation of the inflammasome-dependent interleukin-1β (IL-1β) but not of inflammasome-independent tumor necrosis factor alpha. Sap2 could be replaced by other Sap, while no inflammation was induced by the vaccine antigen, the N-terminal-truncated, enzymatically inactive tSap2. Anti-Sap2 antibodies, in particular Fab from a human combinatorial antibody library, inhibited or abolished the inflammatory response, provided the antibodies were able, like the Sap inhibitor Pepstatin A, to inhibit Sap enzyme activity. The same antibodies and Pepstatin A also inhibited neutrophil influx and cytokine production stimulated by C. albicans intravaginal injection, and a mutant strain lacking SAP1, SAP2, and SAP3 was unable to cause vaginal inflammation. Sap2 induced expression of activated caspase-1 in murine and human vaginal epithelial cells. Caspase-1 inhibition downregulated IL-1β and IL-18 production by vaginal epithelial cells, and blockade of the IL-1β receptor strongly reduced neutrophil influx. Overall, the data suggest that some Sap, particularly Sap2, are proinflammatory proteins in vivo and can mediate the inflammasome-dependent, acute inflammatory response of vaginal epithelial cells to C. albicans. These findings support the notion that vaccine-induced or passively administered anti-Sap antibodies could contribute to control vaginitis. Candidal vaginitis is an acute inflammatory disease that affects many women of fertile age, with no definitive cure and, in

  2. Mandatory role of proteinase-activated receptor 1 in experimental bladder inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Carole A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, inflammation plays a role in most bladder pathologies and represents a defense reaction to injury that often times is two edged. In particular, bladder neurogenic inflammation involves the participation of mast cells and sensory nerves. Increased mast cell numbers and tryptase release represent one of the prevalent etiologic theories for interstitial cystitis and other urinary bladder inflammatory conditions. The activity of mast cell-derived tryptase as well as thrombin is significantly increased during inflammation. Those enzymes activate specific G-protein coupled proteinase-activated receptors (PARs. Four PARs have been cloned so far, and not only are all four receptors highly expressed in different cell types of the mouse urinary bladder, but their expression is altered during experimental bladder inflammation. We hypothesize that PARs may link mast cell-derived proteases to bladder inflammation and, therefore, play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of cystitis. Results Here, we demonstrate that in addition to the mouse urinary bladder, all four PA receptors are also expressed in the J82 human urothelial cell line. Intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides in mice leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1-, and to a lesser extent, by PAR2-deficiency. Conclusion Our results reveal an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provide a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evoke testable hypotheses regarding the role of PARs in bladder inflammation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestations of cystitis.

  3. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  4. Characterization of a serine proteinase homologous (SPH) in Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuanjie; Chen, Liqiao; Qin, Jian G; Zhao, Daxian; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Ping; Li, Erchao

    2010-01-01

    The serine protease homologous (SPH) is an important cofactor of prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme (PPAE). The gene of SPH of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis (EsSPH) in hemocytes was cloned and characterized using reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The SPH cDNA consisted of 1386 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) encoded a protein of 378 amino acids, 154 bp 5'-untranslated region, and 95 bp 3'-untranslated region. Sequence comparisons against the GenBank database showed that EsSPH deduced amino acids had an overall identity to the gene of serine protease family from 41% to 70% of 15 invertebrate species. The protein had the structural characteristics of SPH, including the conserved six cysteine residues in the N-terminal clip domain and the functional activity (His157, Asp209, Gly311) in the C-terminal serine proteinase-like domain. To analyze the role of EsSPH in an acute infection, the temporal expression of the EsSPH gene after the Aeromonas hydrophila challenge was measured by real-time RT-PCR. The EsSPH transcripts in hemocytes significantly increased at 6 h, 12 h and 48 h over time after the A. hydrophila injection. This expression pattern shows that EsSPH has the potential to defend against invading microorganisms. The mRNA transcripts of EsSPH were detected in all tissues with the highest in the hepatopancreas. Interestingly, the mRNA transcripts of EsSPH and proPO were found in ova and expressed in oosperms, suggesting that the maternal transfer of EsSPH and proPO may exit in crab, but this warrants confirmation in further research.

  5. Wound-induced proteinase inhibitor in Salix viminalis and its association with defence against insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarikoski, P. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics

    1997-09-01

    For successful traditional breeding, the plant material has to be screened for genetic variation for the desired traits. By screening Salix clones for wound-induced proteinase inhibitor (PI) activity and ethylene evolution, it was possible to identify variation for both characters among the Salix clones tested. However, no correlation was observed with insect and pathogen resistance. Since there was no simple relationship between wound-induced ethylene production, accumulation of PI and pest resistance, a more systematic investigation of Salix PIs was begun. A gene (swin1.1) encoding a 21 kDa trypsin inhibitor with characteristics of Kunitz-type of PI was sequenced. The trypsin inhibitor encoded by the isolated swin1.1 gene was shown to be functional in vitro and exhibit specificity for trypsin. It is therefore likely that this PI is involved in the plant defence in Salix, since many insects have trypsin as their major digestive protease. In further support of this view, in bio-tests with poplar the mortality of the first instar larvae (Lymantria dispar) was significantly increased, both after application of the trypsin inhibitor encoded by swin1.1 directly on poplar leaves and after feeding the larvae with transgenic poplar over-expressing the swin1.1 gene. In Salix, the swin1.1 gene was shown to be induced by mechanical wounding, insect feeding and by treatment with the signalling substances salicylic and jasmonic acid. The locally wound-induced response (mechanical and insect) was greater than the systemic response. Other swin1 gene family members were also differentially expressed after the inductive treatment. 187 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Effects of proteinase A on cultivation and viability characteristics of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-bo; Zhang, Hai-feng; Chen, Qi-he; Ruan, Hui; Fu, Ming-liang; He, Guo-qing

    2009-10-01

    Proteinase A (PrA), encoded by PEP4 gene, is a key enzyme in the vacuoles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We characterized the effects of PrA on cell growth and glucose metabolism in the industrial S. cerevisiae WZ65. It was observed that the lag phase of cell growth of partial PEP4 gene deletion mutant (36 h) and PrA-negative mutant (48 h) was significantly extended, compared with the wild type strain (24 h) (Pcerevisiae cell growth, and PrA was found to promote cell growth against insufficient oxygen condition in steady state cultivation, but had no effect in shaking cultivation. The effects of glucose starvation on cell growth of partial PEP4 gene deletion strain and PrA-negative mutant were also evaluated. The results show that PrA partial deficiency increased the adaption of S. cerevisiae to unfavorable nutrient environment, but had no effect on glucose metabolism under the stress of low glucose. During heat shock test, at 60 degrees C the reduced cell viability rate (RCVR) was 10% for the wild type S. cerevisiae and 90% for both mutant strains (Pcerevisiae cells to survive under heat shock. As temperatures rose from 60 degrees C to 70 degrees C, the wild type S. cerevisiae had significantly lower relative glucose consumption rate (RGCR) (61.0% and 80.0%) than the partial mutant (78.0% and 98.5%) and the complete mutant (80.0% and 98.0%) (Pcerevisiae physiology is complex and needs to be further investigated.

  7. Seroprevalence of Fasciola gigantica infection in bovines using cysteine proteinase dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study was to know the seroprevalence status of Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle and buffaloes using cysteine proteinase (CP antigen in dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA format under field conditions. Materials and Methods: As per the standard protocol, the sera were collected from the blood of 112 cattle and 38 buffaloes of coastal areas of Navsari district, South Gujarat, India. The indirect ELISA was performed on the strip of nitrocellulose paper blotted with 1 μl of CP antigen, to detect F. gigantica seropositive animals. Results: The native CP of F. gigantica revealed a single visible band on 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was no any noted cross-reaction between the selected antigen and sera of Gastrothylax crumenifer-infected animals in ELISA. Out of 150 screened bovines, the sera of 47 (31.33% were found to be reactive in dot-ELISA, with a prevalence rate of 31.25% and 31.58% in cattle and buffaloes, respectively. The seropositive bovines with heavy, moderate, and light level of infection were 44.68%, 34.04%, and 21.28%, respectively (p0.05 between moderate and heavy or light. The share of F. gigantica seropositive and negative animals was 31% and 69%, respectively. The optical density at 450 nm of pooled sera of seropositive bovines with heavy, moderate, and light reactivity in plate-ELISA was significantly higher with field or reference negative sera. Conclusion: The CP-based dot-ELISA can be useful for field veterinarians for quick and timely isolation of the animals requiring urgent flukicide therapy.

  8. Seroprevalence of Fasciolagigantica infection in bovines using cysteine proteinase dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niranjan; Varghese, Anju; Solanki, J B

    2017-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to know the seroprevalence status of Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle and buffaloes using cysteine proteinase (CP) antigen in dot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format under field conditions. As per the standard protocol, the sera were collected from the blood of 112 cattle and 38 buffaloes of coastal areas of Navsari district, South Gujarat, India. The indirect ELISA was performed on the strip of nitrocellulose paper blotted with 1 µl of CP antigen, to detect F. gigantica seropositive animals. The native CP of F. gigantica revealed a single visible band on 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. There was no any noted cross-reaction between the selected antigen and sera of Gastrothylax crumenifer-infected animals in ELISA. Out of 150 screened bovines, the sera of 47 (31.33%) were found to be reactive in dot-ELISA, with a prevalence rate of 31.25% and 31.58% in cattle and buffaloes, respectively. The seropositive bovines with heavy, moderate, and light level of infection were 44.68%, 34.04%, and 21.28%, respectively (p0.05 between moderate and heavy or light). The share of F. gigantica seropositive and negative animals was 31% and 69%, respectively. The optical density at 450 nm of pooled sera of seropositive bovines with heavy, moderate, and light reactivity in plate-ELISA was significantly higher with field or reference -negative sera. The CP-based dot-ELISA can be useful for field veterinarians for quick and timely isolation of the animals requiring urgent flukicide therapy.

  9. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  10. Maximum load to failure and tensile displacement of an all-suture glenoid anchor compared with a screw-in glenoid anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Tim; Willett, Thomas L; Dold, Andrew P; Petrera, Massimo; Wasserstein, David; Whelan, Danny B; Theodoropoulos, John S

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of an all-suture glenoid anchor in comparison with a more conventional screw-in glenoid anchor, with regard to maximum load to failure and tensile displacement. All mechanical testing was performed using an Instron ElectroPuls E1000 mechanical machine, with a 10 N pre-load and displacement rate of 10 mm/min. Force-displacement curves were generated, with calculation of maximum load, maximum displacement, displacement at 50 N and stiffness. Pretesting of handset Y-Knots in bone analog models revealed low force displacement below 60 N of force. Subsequently, three groups of anchors were tested for pull out strength in bovine bone and cadaver glenoid bone: a bioabsorbable screw-in anchor (Bio Mini-Revo, ConMed Linvatec), a handset all-suture anchor (Y-Knot, ConMed Linvatec) and a 60 N pre-tensioned all-suture anchor (Y-Knot). A total of 8 anchors from each group was tested in proximal tibia of bovine bone and human glenoids (age range 50-90). In bovine bone, the Bio Mini-Revo displayed greater maximum load to failure (206 ± 77 N) than both the handset (140 ± 51 N; P = 0.01) and the pre-tensioned Y-Knot (135 ± 46 N; P = 0.001); no significant difference was seen between the three anchor groups in glenoid bone. Compared to the screw-in anchors, the handset all-suture anchor displayed inferior fixation, early displacement and greater laxity in the bovine bone and cadaveric bone (P suture anchor to 60 N eliminated this behavior in all bone models. Handset Y-Knots display low force anchor displacement, which is likely due to slippage in the pilot hole. Pre-tensioning the Y-Knot to 60 N eliminates this behavior. I.

  11. Suture Anchor Fixation in Osteoporotic Bone: A Biomechanical Study in an Ovine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoz, Levent; Hapa, Onur; Barber, F Alan; Hüsemoğlu, Buğra; Özkan, Mustafa; Havitçioğlu, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the load to failure strength of anchor techniques suitable for osteoporotic bone. Using an osteoporotic ovine model in 72 humeri, 6 fixation techniques were tested. Group 1: two interlocking 5-mm anchors with fewer, wider threads; group 2: one 5-mm anchor; group 3: one 5-mm anchor reinforced laterally by a 6.5-mm cancellous screw; group 4: one 5-mm anchor in an area reinforced with a cancellous plug; group 5: two interlocking 5-mm anchors with smaller threads; group 6: one 5-mm smaller threaded anchor. After a 10-N preload, the specimens were cyclically loaded between 10 N and 30 N for 50 cycles and then destructively tested. Peak-to-peak displacement, cyclic elongation, ultimate load, stiffness, and failure mode were recorded. Group 1 had lower peak-to-peak displacement than group 3 (P = .001), group 5 (P = .001), and group 6 (P = .033). In addition, group 1 showed lower cyclic elongation than group 3 (P = .001), group 5 (P = .035), and group 6 (P = .001). Group 1 had a higher ultimate load than group 2 (P = .002), group 3 (P = .019), and group 6 (P = .006). Group 1 also showed higher stiffness than group 2 (P = .007) and group 3 (P = .022). Mode of failure was predominantly caused by anchor pullout for all of the groups except group 3, which mainly failed by suture rupture. Two interlocking suture anchors are stronger than a single anchor in osteoporotic bone. The anchor with fewer, wider threads and a smaller core diameter showed greater strength and less elongation than the other constructs. Reinforcement by cancellous autografting increased suture anchor strength. Considering concerns about suture anchor pullout from osteoporotic bone, interlocking a second suture anchor with the first increases load to failure resistance. Anchors with small core diameters and fewer but wider threads are more efficient in osteoporotic bone. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Constrained Active Learning for Anchor Link Prediction Across Multiple Heterogeneous Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxing; Zhang, Jiawei; Wu, Quanyuan; Jia, Yan; Zhou, Bin; Wei, Xiaokai; Yu, Philip S

    2017-08-03

    Nowadays, people are usually involved in multiple heterogeneous social networks simultaneously. Discovering the anchor links between the accounts owned by the same users across different social networks is crucial for many important inter-network applications, e.g., cross-network link transfer and cross-network recommendation. Many different supervised models have been proposed to predict anchor links so far, but they are effective only when the labeled anchor links are abundant. However, in real scenarios, such a requirement can hardly be met and most anchor links are unlabeled, since manually labeling the inter-network anchor links is quite costly and tedious. To overcome such a problem and utilize the numerous unlabeled anchor links in model building, in this paper, we introduce the active learning based anchor link prediction problem. Different from the traditional active learning problems, due to the one-to-one constraint on anchor links, if an unlabeled anchor link a = ( u , v ) is identified as positive (i.e., existing), all the other unlabeled anchor links incident to account u or account v will be negative (i.e., non-existing) automatically. Viewed in such a perspective, asking for the labels of potential positive anchor links in the unlabeled set will be rewarding in the active anchor link prediction problem. Various novel anchor link information gain measures are defined in this paper, based on which several constraint active anchor link prediction methods are introduced. Extensive experiments have been done on real-world social network datasets to compare the performance of these methods with state-of-art anchor link prediction methods. The experimental results show that the proposed Mean-entropy-based Constrained Active Learning (MC) method can outperform other methods with significant advantages.

  13. Optimal suture anchor direction in arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Ichiro; Hagio, Tomonobu; Noda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Minokawa, So; Yamamoto, Takuaki

    2017-05-26

    In this study, the distance between the insertion point of the suture anchors and posterior surface of the fibula during arthroscopic lateral ankle ligament repair was investigated on computed tomography (CT) images. The hypothesis of this study was that there is an optimal insertional direction of the suture anchor to avoid anchor-related complications. One hundred eleven ankles of 98 patients who had undergone three-dimensional CT scans for foot or ankle disorders without deformity of the fibula were assessed (59 males, 52 females; median age 25.5 years; age range 12-78 years). The shortest distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the deepest point of the fossa/top of the convex aspect of the fibula was measured on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The distance from the insertion point of the suture anchor to the posterior surface of the fibula was also measured in a direction parallel to the sagittal plane of the lateral surface of the talus on the axial plane, tilting from the longitudinal axis of the fibula at 90°, 75°, 60°, and 45°. The posterior fossa was observed in all cases on the 90° and 75° images. The distance from the insertion point to the posterior surface of the fibula in the parallel direction was 15.0 ± 3.4 mm at 90°, 17.5 ± 3.2 mm at 75°, 21.7 ± 3.3 mm at 60°, and 25.7 ± 3.6 mm at 45°. The posterior points in the parallel direction were located on the posterior fossa in 36.0% of cases at 90°, in 12.6% at 75°, and in 0.0% at 60° and 45°. The suture anchor should be directed from anterior to posterior at an angle of <45° to the longitudinal axis of the fibula, parallel to the lateral surface of the talus, to avoid passing through the fibula. Cohort study, Level III.

  14. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...

  15. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Proteinase-Activated Receptor 2 Is a Novel Regulator of TGF-β Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Witte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TGF-β has a dual role in tumorigenesis, acting as a tumor suppressor in normal cells and in the early stages of tumor development while promoting carcinogenesis and metastasis in advanced tumor stages. The final outcome of the TGF-β response is determined by cell-autonomous mechanisms and genetic alterations such as genomic instability and somatic mutations, but also by a plethora of external signals derived from the tumor microenvironment, such as cell-to-cell interactions, growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins and proteolytic enzymes. Serine proteinases mediate their cellular effects via activation of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs, a subclass of G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolytic cleavage. We have recently identified PAR2 as a factor required for TGF-β1-dependent cell motility in ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. In this article, we review what is known on the TGF-β-PAR2 signaling crosstalk and its relevance for tumor growth and metastasis. Since PAR2 is activated through various serine proteinases, it may couple TGF-β signaling to a diverse range of other physiological processes, such as local inflammation, systemic coagulation or pathogen infection. Moreover, since PAR2 controls expression of the TGF-β type I receptor ALK5, PAR2 may also impact signaling by other TGF-β superfamily members that signal through ALK5, such as myostatin and GDF15/MIC-1. If so, PAR2 could represent a molecular linker between PDAC development and cancer-related cachexia.

  17. Evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase (EhCP112) antigen in minipig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang-Zhi; Deng, Shu-Xuan; An, Chuan-Wei

    2012-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases 112 (EhCP112) of Entamoeba histolytica are considered important for ameba pathogenicity. The recombinant gene was obtained by cloning and expression of the EhCP112 gene in heterologous host Escherichia coli BL-21 (DE3), were used to evaluate their ability to induce immune protective responses in minipig against challenge infection in a minipig-E. histolytica model. There was a 46.29% reduction (Pcoli, to immunize a minipig model of E. histolytica, and there is significant protection. This study may help to understand the EhCP112 for human in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Suture strength and angle of load application in a suture anchor eyelet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Mark; Stubbs, David; Bruce, Warwick; Goldberg, Jerome; Gillies, Ronald M; Walsh, William R

    2005-12-01

    To assess the effect of suture material, anchor orientation, and anchor eyelet design on the static loading properties of suture anchors. Biomechanical bench study. Two metallic suture anchors, Mitek GII (Mitek, Westwood, MA) and Corkscrew (Arthrex, Naples, FL) and a bioabsorbable anchor (Biocorkscrew; Arthrex) were tested with single strand of No. 2 Ethibond (Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany) or No. 2 FiberWire (Arthrex) suture. Suture pull angle was varied through 0 degrees, 45 degrees, and 90 degrees with the anchor rotation angle in either a sagittal or coronal plane. Constructs were tested to failure using an MTS 858 Bionix testing machine (Material Testing Systems, Eden Prairie, MN). Peak loads, stiffness, energy to peak load, and failure modes were determined for all samples. FiberWire showed superior static mechanical properties when compared with single-strand Ethibond over all testing conditions (P Suture pull angle had a significant effect on load to failure with both metallic anchors but not on the bioabsorbable anchor (P Suture pull angle and anchor rotation angle play an important role in the failure load of suture when placed in an eyelet. The polyaxial nature of the Biocorkscrew eyelet allows for increased degrees of freedom but introduces failure of the suture eyelet as a new failure mode. The loading direction and placement of the suture anchor plays a role in the performance of the suture anchor-suture complex.

  19. Optimization Analysis Model of Self-Anchored Suspension Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hangers of self-anchored suspension bridge need to be tensioned suitably during construction. In view of this point, a simplified optimization calculation method of cable force for self-anchored suspension bridge has been developed based on optimization theories, such as minimum bending energy method, and internal force balanced method, influence matrix method. Meanwhile, combined with the weak coherence of main cable and the adjacently interaction of hanger forces, a simplified analysis method is developed using MATLAB, which is then compared with the optimization method that consider the main cable's geometric nonlinearity with software ANSYS in an actual example bridge calculation. This contrast proves the weak coherence of main cable displacement and the limitation of the adjacent cable force influence. Furthermore, a tension program that is of great reference value has been developed; some important conclusions, advices, and attention points have been summarized.

  20. Delayed Repair of Infected Ruptured Patellar Tendon using Suture Anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Kataria

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Patellar tendon rupture are rare injuries that are easily missed in acute phases if careful clinical examination is not carried out. The delayed condition is further difficult to treat and augmentation of end to end repair is generally required. However, literature presents no such case of delayed presentation with presence of infection. We here present one such case of delayed presentation of patellar tendon rupture at three weeks in a 52-year-old male patient. Usual techniques were not sufficient to allow early rehabilitation. Technique of suture anchors was planned for repair after thorough debridement. After this intervention, patient was put on aggressive rehabilitation protocol and he gained excellent range of motion. Patient was followed for one year and he showed no loss of movement or signs of infection. We thus recommend using anchor suture repair of patellar tendon that provides a stable and rigid fixation with possibility of early active rehabilitation even in delayed setting.

  1. Fullerene-based Anchoring Groups for Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christian A.; Ding, Dapeng; Sørensen, Jakob Kryger

    2008-01-01

    We present results on a new fullerene-based anchoring group for molecular electronics. Using lithographic mechanically controllable break junctions in vacuum we have determined the conductance and stability of single-molecule junctions of 1,4-bis(fullero[c]pyrrolidin-1-yl)benzene. The compound can...... be self-assembled from solution and has a low-bias conductance of 3 × 10-4 G0. Compared to 1,4-benzenedithiol the fullerene-anchored molecule exhibits a considerably lower conductance spread. In addition, the signature of the new compound in histograms is more significant than that of 1,4-benzenediamine......, probably owing to a more stable adsorption motif. Statistical analyses of the breaking of the junctions confirm the stability of the fullerene-gold bond....

  2. Cognitive anchoring on self-generated decisions reduces operator reliance on automated diagnostic aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Poornima; Wiegmann, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    Automation users often disagree with diagnostic aids that are imperfectly reliable. The extent to which users' agreements with an aid are anchored to their personal, self-generated diagnoses was explored. Participants (N = 75) performed 200 trials in which they diagnosed pump failures using an imperfectly reliable automated aid. One group (nonforced anchor, n = 50) provided diagnoses only after consulting the aid. Another group (forced anchor, n = 25) provided diagnoses both before and after receiving feedback from the aid. Within the nonforced anchor group, participants' self-reported tendency to prediagnose system failures significantly predicted their tendency to disagree with the aid, revealing a cognitive anchoring effect. Agreement rates of participants in the forced anchor group indicated that public commitment to a diagnosis did not strengthen this effect. Potential applications include the development of methods for reducing cognitive anchoring effects and improving automation utilization in high-risk domains.

  3. Research on discrete element simulation of anchor frame beam reinforcement in bedding shale slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao yong; Xie, Xiao ting

    2017-11-01

    The anchor frame beam is a new type of composite support method, which is a kind of slope protection structure considering the interaction between the anchors and the slope. Based on the reinforcement project of a bedding shale slope in Chengzhang highway, the reinforced effect of anchor frame beam is studied by discrete element method. Firstly, the mesoscopic parameters of the rock mass are obtained by calibration while that of anchor frame beam are obtained by calculation. Then the slope model with the reinforcement of anchor frame beam is established by particle flow software PFC2D. Afterwards, the statement of slope can be analyzed and the reinforcement effect of anchor frame beam can be predicted. Results show that: there is no instability in the slope after reinforcement, and the sliding of slope can be effectively prevented by anchor frame beam. The simulation results can provide reference for the design and construction of the project.

  4. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  5. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  6. Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lisa; Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Durey, Guillaume; Darmon, Alexandre; Haase, Martin F.; Li, Ningwei; Lee, Daeyeon; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Kamien, Randall D.; Lopez-Leon, Teresa

    2017-10-01

    Chirality, ubiquitous in complex biological systems, can be controlled and quantified in synthetic materials such as cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) systems. In this work, we study spherical shells of CLC under weak anchoring conditions. We induce anchoring transitions at the inner and outer boundaries using two independent methods: by changing the surfactant concentration or by raising the temperature close to the clearing point. The shell confinement leads to new states and associated surface structures: a state where large stripes on the shell can be filled with smaller, perpendicular substripes, and a focal conic domain (FCD) state, where thin stripes wrap into at least two, topologically required, double spirals. Focusing on the latter state, we use a Landau-de Gennes model of the CLC to simulate its detailed configurations as a function of anchoring strength. By abruptly changing the topological constraints on the shell, we are able to study the interconversion between director defects and pitch defects, a phenomenon usually restricted by the complexity of the cholesteric phase. This work extends the knowledge of cholesteric patterns, structures that not only have potential for use as intricate, self-assembly blueprints but are also pervasive in biological systems.

  7. Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chirality, ubiquitous in complex biological systems, can be controlled and quantified in synthetic materials such as cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC systems. In this work, we study spherical shells of CLC under weak anchoring conditions. We induce anchoring transitions at the inner and outer boundaries using two independent methods: by changing the surfactant concentration or by raising the temperature close to the clearing point. The shell confinement leads to new states and associated surface structures: a state where large stripes on the shell can be filled with smaller, perpendicular substripes, and a focal conic domain (FCD state, where thin stripes wrap into at least two, topologically required, double spirals. Focusing on the latter state, we use a Landau–de Gennes model of the CLC to simulate its detailed configurations as a function of anchoring strength. By abruptly changing the topological constraints on the shell, we are able to study the interconversion between director defects and pitch defects, a phenomenon usually restricted by the complexity of the cholesteric phase. This work extends the knowledge of cholesteric patterns, structures that not only have potential for use as intricate, self-assembly blueprints but are also pervasive in biological systems.

  8. The anchor of the frameless intrauterine device does not migrate over time: an analysis in over 300 women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildemeersch D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dirk Wildemeersch,1 Ansgar Pett,2 Sohela Jandi,2 Kilian Nolte,3 Wolfgang Albrecht4 1Gynecological Outpatient Clinic and IUD Training Centre, Ghent, Belgium; 2Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Berlin, Germany; 3Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Uetze, Germany; 4Gynecological Outpatient Clinic, Feldkirchen, Austria Objective: To evaluate the correct position of the anchor at insertion and follow-up and assess if migration of the anchor occurs over time. Materials and methods: This was an insertion-related, prospective, postmarketing study in 309 women. Following insertion, women were followed up at 4–6 weeks, 6 months, and yearly thereafter. The position of the visualized anchor in the fundus of the uterus was evaluated using ultrasound by measuring its distance from the serosal surface of the uterus (SA-distance. Results: A total of 309 parous (n=115 and nulliparous (n=194 women were fitted with the frameless GyneFix 200 or the GyneFix 330 intrauterine device for contraception. The mean SA-distance in 306 parous and nulliparous women was 6.0 mm (range 2.0–24.0 mm at insertion in the parous group and 5.4 mm (range 1.3–11.0 mm in the nulliparous group. At the first follow-up in 281 women, the SA-distance was 6.0 mm (range 2.0–12.0 mm in the parous group and 5.5 mm (range 1.1–11.0 mm in the nulliparous group. The SA-distance was not significantly different. One patient had an exceptionally large SA-distance of 24 mm, probably due to insertion in the posterior wall. No follow-up could be done in this patient. In 77 women, the SA-distance was measured up to 42 months. The mean SA-distance at insertion in the parous group was 5.2 mm (range 3.0–8.5 mm and 4.8 mm (range 1.3–7.0 mm in the nulliparous group. At the last follow-up up to 36 months or longer, the SA-distance was 5.1 mm (range 3.0–8.5 mm in the parous group and 4.9 mm (range 1.3–7.0 mm in the nulliparous group. The SA-distance was not significantly different. The visualized

  9. Allosteric modulation of proteinase 3 activity by anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkofer, Lisa C; Hummel, Amber M; Stone, John H; Hoffman, Gary S; Merkel, Peter A; Spiera, E Robert F; St Clair, William; McCune, Joseph W; Davis, John C; Specks, Ulrich; Jenne, Dieter E

    2015-05-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) with proteinase 3 (PR3) specificity are a useful laboratory biomarker for the diagnosis of Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA) and are believed to be implicated in the pathogenesis. It has been repeatedly suggested that disease activity of GPA is more closely related to the appearance and rise of PR3-inhibiting ANCA than to an increase of total ANCA. Previous studies on a limited number of patient samples, however, have yielded inconclusive results. To overcome the previous methodological limitations, we established a new ultrasensitive method to quantify the inhibitory capacity of PR3-ANCA using small volumes of plasma from patients with GPA. A large collection of longitudinally-collected samples from the Wegener Granulomatosis Etanercept Trial (WGET) became available to us to determine the functional effects of ANCA on PR3 in comparison to clinical disease manifestations. In these patient samples we not only detected PR3-ANCA with inhibitory capacity, but also PR3-ANCA with enhancing effects on PR3 activity. However no correlation of these activity-modulating PR3-ANCA with disease activity at either the time of enrollment or over the course of disease was found. Only patients with pulmonary involvement, especially patients with nodule formation in the respiratory tract, showed a slight, but not significant, decrease of inhibitory capacity. Epitope mapping of the activity-modulating PR3-ANCA revealed a binding on the active site surface of PR3. Yet these ANCA were able to bind to PR3 with an occupied active site cleft, indicating an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. The recently described signal ratio between the MCPR3-3 and MCPR3-2 capture ELISA was consistent with the binding of activity-modulating ANCA to the active site surface. Evidence for a shared epitope between activity-modulating PR3-ANCA and MCPR3-7, however, was very limited, suggesting that a majority of PR3-ANCA species do not inhibit PR3 by the same

  10. Analysis of the VPg-proteinase (NIa) encoded by tobacco etch potyvirus: effects of mutations on subcellular transport, proteolytic processing, and genome amplification.

    OpenAIRE

    Schaad, M C; Haldeman-Cahill, R; Cronin, S; Carrington, J C

    1996-01-01

    A mutational analysis was conducted to investigate the functions of the tobacco etch potyvirus VPg-proteinase (NIa) protein in vivo. The NIa N-terminal domain contains the VPg attachment site, whereas the C-terminal domain contains a picornavirus 3C-like proteinase. Cleavage at an internal site separating the two domains occurs in a subset of NIa molecules. The majority of NIa molecules in TEV-infected cells accumulate within the nucleus. By using a reporter fusion strategy, the NIa nuclear l...

  11. Overexpression of a Weed (Solanum americanum) Proteinase Inhibitor in Transgenic Tobacco Results in Increased Glandular Trichome Density and Enhanced Resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Zhaoyu; Li, Huapeng; Xia, Kuai-Fei; Cai, Yinpeng; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2009-01-01

    In this study we produced transgenic tobacco plants by overexpressing a serine proteinase inhibitor gene, SaPIN2a, from the American black nightshade Solanum americanum under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. SaPIN2a was properly transcribed and translated as indicated by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. Functional integrity of SaPIN2a in transgenic plants was confirmed by proteinase inhibitory activity assay. Bioassays for i...

  12. The Effects of Different Types of Anchor Tests on Observed Score Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-09-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.; Feigenbaum, Miriam; Curley, Edward

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the use of a different type of anchor, a "midi anchor", that has a smaller spread of item difficulties than the tests to be equated, and then contrasts its use with the use of a "mini anchor". The impact of different anchors on observed score equating were evaluated and compared with respect to systematic…

  13. Seismic retroftting of RC columns with RC jackets and wing walls with different structural details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuenn-Yih; Chen, Ting-Wei; Tran, Ngoc-Cuong; Liao, Wen-I.

    2014-06-01

    An original reinforced concrete (RC) column and four strengthened specimens, two with RC jackets and two with wing walls, were tested in this study. The original column specimen was designed to comply with older (pre-1999) design standards so that the usual detailing deficiencies in existing school buildings in Taiwan could be simulated. Two different structural details were chosen to fabricate the full-scale specimens for each retrofitting technique. The study confirmed that either RC jacketing or the installation of wing walls with two different structural details can effectively improve the stiffness and strength of an existing column. RC jacketing shows a better improvement in energy dissipation and ductility when compared to the columns with wing walls installed. This is because the two RC jacketed columns experienced a flexural failure, while a shear failure was found in the two columns with the wing walls installed, and thus led to a drastic decrease of the maximum lateral strengths and ductility. Since many factors may affect the installation of a post-installed anchor, it is better to use standard hooks to replace post-installed anchors in some specific points when using RC jacketing or installing wing walls.

  14. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  15. Anchor methods for DIF detection: A comparison of the iterative forward, backward, constant and all-other anchor class

    OpenAIRE

    Kopf, Julia; Zeileis, Achim; Strobl, Carolin

    2013-01-01

    In the analysis of differential item functioning (DIF) using item response theory (IRT), a common metric is necessary to compare item parameters between groups of test-takers. In the Rasch model, the same restriction is placed on the item parameters in each group in order to define a common metric. However, the question how the items in the restriction - termed anchor items - are selected appropriately is still a major challenge. This article proposes a conceptual framework for categorizing ...

  16. Differential actions of proteinases and neuraminidase on mammalian erythrocyte surface and its impact on erythrocyte agglutination by concanavalin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2012-12-01

    Action of proteinases viz. trypsin and chymotrypsin, and neuraminidase on intact erythrocyte membrane proteins and glycophorins (sialoglycoproteins) exposed to cell surface and its impact on lectin (concanavalin A)-mediated agglutination were studied in Homo sapiens (human), Capra aegagrus hircus (goat) and Bubalus bubalis (buffalo). Membrane proteins and glycophorins analysis by SDS-PAGE as visualized by coomassie brilliant blue and periodic acid-schiff stains, respectively, and agglutination behaviour revealed marked differences: 1) there were prominent dissimilarities in the number and molecular weights of glycophorins in human, goat and buffalo erythrocyte membranes; 2) proteinase action(s) on human and buffalo erythrocyte surface membrane proteins and glycophorins showed similarity but was found different in goat; 3) significant differences in erythrocyte agglutinability with concanavalin A can be attributed to differences in membrane composition and alterations in the surface proteins after enzyme treatment; 4) a direct correlation was found between degradation of glycophorins and concanavalin A agglutinability; 5) action of neuraminidase specifically indicated the negative role of cell surface sialic acids in determining concanavalin A agglutinability of goat and buffalo erythrocytes, similar to human. Present studies clearly indicate that there are some basic differences in human, goat and buffalo erythrocyte membrane proteins, especially with respect to glycophorins, which determine the concanavalin A-mediated agglutination in enzyme treated erythrocytes.

  17. Contact of Entamoeba histolytica with baby hamster kidney-21 (BHK-21) cell line on cysteine proteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Divyendu; Naik, S R; Naik, Sita

    2004-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis and amoebic liver abscess, lyses host cells by direct contact using surface lectins and releases cysteine proteinase (CP). Virulence of E. histolytica is directly related to activity of its CP. The relationship of CP activity and cytotoxicity has not been established. The present study was carried out to explore the events following contact of E. histolytica with target cells. Protease activity of E. histolytica was measured by azocaseine and haemoglobin assays, and cysteine proteinase activity was assessed by substrate gel electrophoresis. Target cell lysis was measured by chromium release assay. Protease activity of E. histolytica was increased 2.5-fold following contact with BHK-21 cell line. CP activity of trophozoites alone was visualized at position 56, 35 and 29 kDa in substrate gel electrophoresis. Contact of trophozoites with target cells augmented the cytotoxic activity of amoebic CP. The increase in CP activity seen by substrate gel electrophoresis and cytotoxicity assay was blocked by pretreatment with E 64, a specific CP inhibitor and GalNAc, a contact inhibitor. The present data showed the involvement of amoebic CP in cytotoxicity and that the CP activity was enhanced on lectin-mediated contact of E. histolytica to the target cells. Further studies need to be done to understand the mechanism at the molecular level.

  18. Assessing Proteinase K Resistance of Fish Prion Proteins in a Scrapie-Infected Mouse Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenia Salta

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The key event in prion pathogenesis is the structural conversion of the normal cellular protein, PrPC, into an aberrant and partially proteinase K resistant isoform, PrPSc. Since the minimum requirement for a prion disease phenotype is the expression of endogenous PrP in the host, species carrying orthologue prion genes, such as fish, could in theory support prion pathogenesis. Our previous work has demonstrated the development of abnormal protein deposition in sea bream brain, following oral challenge of the fish with natural prion infectious material. In this study, we used a prion-infected mouse neuroblastoma cell line for the expression of three different mature fish PrP proteins and the evaluation of the resistance of the exogenously expressed proteins to proteinase K treatment (PK, as an indicator of a possible prion conversion. No evidence of resistance to PK was detected for any of the studied recombinant proteins. Although not indicative of an absolute inability of the fish PrPs to structurally convert to pathogenic isoforms, the absence of PK-resistance may be due to supramolecular and conformational differences between the mammalian and piscine PrPs.

  19. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli

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    CB Toaldo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of ß-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70 and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of ß-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  20. Molecular karyotype and chromosomal localization of genes encoding beta-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin in Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toaldo, C B; Steindel, M; Sousa, M A; Tavares, C C

    2001-01-01

    The molecular karyotype of nine Trypanosoma rangeli strains was analyzed by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, followed by the chromosomal localization of beta-tubulin, cysteine proteinase, 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp 70) and actin genes. The T. rangeli strains were isolated from either insects or mammals from El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and southern Brazil. Also, T. cruzi CL-Brener clone was included for comparison. Despite the great similarity observed among strains from Brazil, the molecular karyotype of all T. rangeli strains analyzed revealed extensive chromosome polymorphism. In addition, it was possible to distinguish T. rangeli from T. cruzi by the chromosomal DNA electrophoresis pattern. The localization of beta-tubulin genes revealed differences among T. rangeli strains and confirmed the similarity between the isolates from Brazil. Hybridization assays using probes directed to the cysteine proteinase, hsp 70 and actin genes discriminated T. rangeli from T. cruzi, proving that these genes are useful molecular markers for the differential diagnosis between these two species. Numerical analysis based on the molecular karyotype data revealed a high degree of polymorphism among T. rangeli strains isolated from southern Brazil and strains isolated from Central and the northern South America. The T. cruzi reference strain was not clustered with any T. rangeli strain.

  1. BMP-1/tolloid-like proteinases synchronize matrix assembly with growth factor activation to promote morphogenesis and tissue remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadon-Le Goff, Sandrine; Hulmes, David J S; Moali, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-1 (BMP-1)/tolloid-like proteinases, here called BTPs, include the proteases originally identified for their roles in the C-terminal maturation of fibrillar procollagens ("procollagen C-proteinase"). Though numerous other substrates have since been discovered, the BTPs remain the main proteases involved in extracellular matrix assembly with little or no implication in matrix degradation. During the same period however, the BTPs have also become established as important proteases in the activation of growth factors, including TGF-β1, BMP-2/-4, GDF-8/-11 and IGFs, as well as the release of anti-angiogenic fragments from parent proteins. The BTPs are therefore key players in many pathophysiological processes such as morphogenesis, tissue repair and tumor progression. This mini-review summarizes our current knowledge of the functions of BTPs, their substrates and unusual mechanisms of regulation, and discusses their potential as new targets for future therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato.

  3. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  4. Negative regulation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation by a clip-domain serine proteinase homolog (SPH) from endoparasitoid venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangmei; Lu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Haobo; Asgari, Sassan

    2004-05-01

    Most parasitic wasps inject maternal factors into the host hemocoel to suppress the host immune system and ensure successful development of their progeny. Melanization is one of the insect defence mechanisms against intruding pathogens or parasites. We previously isolated from the venom of Cotesia rubecula a 50 kDa protein that blocked melanization in the hemolymph of its host, Pieris rapae [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 33 (2003) 1017]. This protein, designated Vn50, is a serine proteinase homolog (SPH) containing an amino-terminal clip domain. In this work, we demonstrated that recombinant Vn50 bound P. rapae hemolymph components that were recognized by antisera to Tenebrio molitor prophenoloxidase (proPO) and Manduca sexta proPO-activating proteinase (PAP). Vn50 is stable in the host hemolymph-it remained intact for at least 72 h after parasitization. Using M. sexta as a model system, we found that Vn50 efficiently down-regulated proPO activation mediated by M. sexta PAP-1, SPH-1, and SPH-2. Vn50 did not inhibit active phenoloxidase (PO) or PAP-1, but it significantly reduced the proteolysis of proPO. If recombinant Vn50 binds P. rapae proPO and PAP (as suggested by the antibody reactions), it is likely that the molecular interactions among M. sexta proPO, PAP-1, and SPHs were impaired by this venom protein. A similar strategy might be employed by C. rubecula to negatively impact the proPO activation reaction in its natural host.

  5. Novel ultrasound assisted suture anchor system using the BoneWelding® technology yields a comparable primary stability in osteopenic and healthy human humeri as a benchmark anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güleçyüz, Mehmet F; Schröder, Christian; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Göbel, Stephanie; Lehmann, Mario; Mayer, Jörg; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E

    2017-12-28

    The aim of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the primary stability of the SportWelding® Sombrero 3.6 mm suture anchor system in osteopenic and healthy cadaveric humeri. The Sombrero® and BioCorkscrew® anchors were deployed in 8 osteopenic and 4 healthy cadaver humeri after the bone mineral density (BMD) measurements of the 32 specimens. Both anchors were loaded with a USP Nr. 2 FiberWire® suture. An established cyclic testing protocol was performed. The maximum failure load (Fmax), the system displacement and the modes of failure were recorded. The Fmax and system displacement of the Sombrero® in osteopenic and healthy humeri was equivalent to the Bio-Corkscrew® benchmark anchor; there were no significant differences in the maximum failure loads and system displacement values. Only anchor and suture dislocations were observed; suture ruptures did not occur. This study shows that the Sombrero® yields similar maximum failure loads and system displacement values as the established Bio-Corkscrew® benchmark anchor. The primary stability of the Sombrero® and Bio-Corkscrew® seems to be independent of the bone mineral quality. This relatively small-sized polymer anchor is independent of the BMD and may be an alternative to established suture anchors in rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding the low uptake of bone-anchored hearing aids: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R; Wearden, A; Pardesi, S M; Green, K

    2017-03-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids improve hearing for patients for whom conventional behind-the-ear aids are problematic. However, uptake of bone-anchored hearing aids is low and it is important to understand why this is the case. A narrative review was conducted. Studies examining why people accept or decline bone-anchored hearing aids and satisfaction levels of people with bone-anchored hearing aids were reviewed. Reasons for declining bone-anchored hearing aids included limited perceived benefits, concerns about surgery, aesthetic concerns and treatment cost. No studies providing in-depth analysis of the reasons for declining or accepting bone-anchored hearing aids were identified. Studies of patient satisfaction showed that most participants reported benefits with bone-anchored hearing aids. However, most studies used cross-sectional and/or retrospective designs and only included people with bone-anchored hearing aids. Important avenues for further research are in-depth qualitative research designed to fully understand the decision-making process for bone-anchored hearing aids and rigorous quantitative research comparing satisfaction of people who receive bone-anchored hearing aids with those who receive alternative (or no) treatments.

  7. Not all nutrition claims are perceived equal: anchoring effects and moderating mechanisms in food advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Yoon, Hye Jin; Hove, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Despite the increased use of health claims in food advertising, few studies have investigated how specific nutrition claims have differential effects depending on how they are presented. In this context, the current study tests the anchoring hypothesis. Anchoring refers to a common human tendency to evaluate information differently depending on the presence or absence of a numerical "anchor" or reference point. Two (pilot and main) experimental studies explore anchoring effects on audience response to food advertising both directly and moderated by cognitive, motivational, and message factors. The pilot study finds that food product ads employing nutrition claims with an anchor rather than without an anchor generate two results: First, participants perceive the product to have lower fat/lower calorie contents (anchoring hypothesis); second, they prefer the messages with an anchor over those without an anchor. The main study reports that when anchoring is successfully evoked, it produces favorable attitudes toward the ad, favorable attitudes toward the brand, and purchase intention-but only when moderated by health orientation, claim believability, and nutrition knowledge. Practical implications are provided with respect to regulatory guidelines and effective communication strategies for promoting low-fat and low-calorie products in food advertising.

  8. Acetabular All-Suture Anchor for Labral Repair: Incidence of Intraoperative Failure due to Pullout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, J W Thomas; Jones, Kay S; Loring, Cynthia L; Sparks, Stephanie L

    2018-01-17

    To report on the incidence and features of intraoperative anchor pullout in a consecutive series of patients undergoing arthroscopic labral repair of the hip. Over an 18-month period, 434 consecutive cases underwent labral repair by a single surgeon with a particular anchor system. The following data were recorded: (1) age and gender of all cases; (2) number of anchors used; (3) number of cases in which intraoperative anchor failure occurred; (4) number of anchors that failed; and (5) age and gender of those cases in which anchor failure occurred. Failures were reported for 3-month intervals. One patient underwent repair with an alternative anchor system during this time period and was excluded. Mean age was 34.2 (14-71) years with 180 males and 254 females. A total of 2,007 anchors were used, averaging 4.6 per case (1-8). Thirty-three anchors pulled out among 30 patients, representing a 1.6% incidence among all anchors. Mean age among pullouts was 37.8 (17-54) years with 11 males and 19 females. There was no difference compared with patient population in which no anchor pulled: mean 33.9 (14-71) years (P = .085) with 169 males and 235 females (P = .578). Pullouts were evenly distributed over the 3-month intervals (4, 4, 6, 6, 5, 8). Pullout was mostly due to failure to securely imbed the anchor in bone. Only 2 were known to pull out in the presence of being securely seated in bone. These data support that the security of this particular all-suture anchor at implantation is exceptionally reliable for a single experienced surgeon, and there is no demonstrable learning curve. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, retrospective review of a case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Praline-Like Flexible Interlayer with Highly Mounted Polysulfide Anchors for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Teng; Ye, Yusheng; Lao, Cheng-Yen; Divitini, Giorgio; Coxon, Paul R; Peng, Xiaoyu; He, Xiong; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Xi, Kai; Ducati, Caterina; Chen, Renjie; Liu, Yingjun; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Ramachandran Vasant

    2017-10-01

    The development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries is dogged by the rapid capacity decay arising from polysulfide dissolution and diffusion in organic electrolytes. To solve this critical issue, a praline-like flexible interlayer consisting of high-loading titanium oxide (TiO2 ) nanoparticles and relatively long carbon nanofibers is fabricated. TiO2 nanoparticles with a size gradient occupy both the external and internal of carbon fiber and serve as anchors that allow the chemical adsorption of polysulfides through a conductive nanoarchitecture. The porous conductive carbon backbone helps in the physical absorption of polysulfides and provides redox reaction sites to allow the polysulfides to be reused. More importantly, it offers enough mechanical strength to support a high load TiO2 nanoparticle (79 wt%) that maximizes their chemical role, and can accommodate the large volume changes. Significant enhancement in cycle stability and rate capability is achieved for a readily available sulfur/multi-walled carbon nanotube composite cathode simply by incorporating this hierarchically nanostructured interlayer. The design and synthesis of interlayers by in situ integration of metal oxides and carbon fibers via a simple route offers the potential to advance Li-S batteries for practical applications in the future. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Microbial Anchoring Systems for Cell-Surface Display of Lipolytic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Bielen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of microbial cell envelopes and particularly cell surface proteins and mechanisms of their localization brought about new biotechnological applications of the gained knowledge in surface display of homologous and heterologous proteins. By fusing surface proteins or their anchoring domains with different proteins of interest, their so-called genetic immobilization is achieved. Hybrid proteins are engineered in a way that they are expressed in the host cells, secreted to the cell surface and incorporated into the wall/ envelope moiety. In this way, laborious and often detrimental procedure of chemical immobilization of the protein is avoided by letting the cells do the whole procedure. Both bacterial and yeast cells have been used for this purpose and a number of potential biotechnological applications of surface-displayed proteins have been reported. Among the most frequently used passenger proteins are lipolytic enzymes, due to their great technological significance and numerous important applications. In this review, our current knowledge on mechanisms and molecular systems for surface display of lipolytic enzymes on bacterial and yeast cell surfaces is summarized.

  12. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  13. Fracture Mechanics Models for Brittle Failure of Bottom Rails due to Uplift in Timber Frame Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joergen L. Jensen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In partially anchored timber frame shear walls, hold-down devices are not provided; hence the uplift forces are transferred by the fasteners of the sheathing-to-framing joints into the bottom rail and via anchor bolts from the bottom rail into the foundation. Since the force in the anchor bolts and the sheathing-to-framing joints do not act in the same vertical plane, the bottom rail is subjected to tensile stresses perpendicular to the grain and splitting of the bottom rail may occur. This paper presents simple analytical models based on fracture mechanics for the analysis of such bottom rails. An existing model is reviewed and several alternative models are derived and compared qualitatively and with experimental data. It is concluded that several of the fracture mechanics models lead to failure load predictions which seem in sufficiently good agreement with the experimental results to justify their application in practical design.

  14. Mechanical properties of all-suture anchors for rotator cuff repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, N.; Smith, R. D. J.; Carr, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives All-suture anchors are increasingly used in rotator cuff repair procedures. Potential benefits include decreased bone damage. However, there is limited published evidence for the relative strength of fixation for all-suture anchors compared with traditional anchors. Materials and Methods A total of four commercially available all-suture anchors, the ‘Y-Knot’ (ConMed), Q-FIX (Smith & Nephew), ICONIX (Stryker) and JuggerKnot (Zimmer Biomet) and a traditional anchor control TWINFIX Ultra PK Suture Anchor (Smith & Nephew) were tested in cadaveric human humeral head rotator cuff repair models (n = 24). This construct underwent cyclic loading applied by a mechanical testing rig (Zwick/Roell). Ultimate load to failure, gap formation at 50, 100, 150 and 200 cycles, and failure mechanism were recorded. Significance was set at p anchor (181.0 N, standard error (se) 17.6) compared with the all-suture anchors (mean 133.1 N se 16.7) (p = 0.04). The JuggerKnot anchor had greatest displacement at 50, 100 and 150 cycles, and at failure, reaching statistical significance over the control at 100 and 150 cycles (22.6 mm se 2.5 versus 12.5 mm se 0.3; and 29.6 mm se 4.8 versus 17.0 mm se 0.7). Every all-suture anchor tested showed substantial (> 5 mm) displacement between 50 and 100 cycles (6.2 to 14.3). All-suture anchors predominantly failed due to anchor pull-out (95% versus 25% of traditional anchors), whereas a higher proportion of traditional anchors failed secondary to suture breakage. Conclusion We demonstrate decreased failure load, increased total displacement, and variable failure mechanisms in all-suture anchors, compared with traditional anchors designed for rotator cuff repair. These findings will aid the surgeon’s choice of implant, in the context of the clinical scenario. Cite this article: N. S. Nagra, N. Zargar, R. D. J. Smith, A. J. Carr. Mechanical properties of all-suture anchors for rotator cuff repair. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:82–89. DOI: 10

  15. [Effect of abrasion on three types of sutures in a metallic anchor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Rodríguez, Eduardo; Almazán Díaz, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    It is necessary to slide the suture into the articulation in the arthroscopic techniques, this produce friction and abrasion of the suture, this is the principal cause of failure in the union of anchor-suture. We used a Fastak 2.4 anchor, Sawbones, No 2 Ethibond, No 2 Fiberwire and No 2 Herculine. Each suture was introduce to the anchor eyelet and was cycled in four times with 40N. The angles of traction were 0 degrees and 45 degrees at the same direction of the anchor eyelet and 45 degrees with different direction of the anchor eyelet. Five sutures were used in every test. We performed the Kolmogorov-Smirnof and "t" Student tests. In all the tests there were a significant differences. The strength of the suture is affected by the abrasion in the anchor eyelet.

  16. Spectral Analysis of Surface Wave for Empirical Elastic Design of Anchored Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helical anchors are vital support components for power transmission lines. Failure of a single anchor can lead to the loss of an entire transmission line structure which results in the loss of power for downstream community. Despite being important, it is not practical to use conventional borehole method of subsurface exploration, which is labor intensive and costly, for estimating soil properties and anchor holding capacity. This paper describes the use of an empirical and elasticity-based design technique coupled with the spectral analysis of surface wave (SASW technique to provide subsurface information for anchor foundation designs. Based on small-strain wave propagation, SASW determines shear wave velocity profile which is then correlated to anchor holding capacity. A pilot project involving over 400 anchor installations has been performed and demonstrated that such technique is reliable and can be implemented into transmission line structure designs.

  17. Characterisation of cysteine proteinases responsible for digestive proteolysis in guts of larval Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) by expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bown, D.P.; Wilkinson, H.S.; Jongsma, M.A.; Gatehouse, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are the major class of enzymes responsible for digestive proteolysis in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), a serious pest of maize. A larval gut extract hydrolysed typical cathepsin substrates, such as Z-phe-arg-AMC and Z-arg-arg-AMC, and hydrolysis was inhibited by

  18. The propeptide is required for in vivo formation of stable active yeast proteinase A and can function even when not covalently linked to the mature region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1993-01-01

    The PEP4-encoded aspartate protease proteinase A from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized as a zymogen (Ammerer, G., Hunter, C. P., Rothman, J. H., Saari, G. C., Valls, L. A., and Stevens, T. H. (1986) Mol. Cell. Biol. 6, 2490-2499; Woolford, C. A., Daniels, L. B., Park, F. J., Jones, E. W., ...

  19. Interleukin-21, B cell activating factor and unmethylated CPG oligodeoxynucleotides synergize in promoting anti-proteinase 3 autoantibody production in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lepse, Nikola; Land, Judith; Rutgers, Abraham; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Stegeman, Coen A.; Heeringa, Peter; Abdulahad, Wayel H.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides (AAV) are characterized by the presence of circulating autoantibodies that are often directed against proteinase 3 (PR3). Although the mechanisms that lead to ANCA production in AAV are not clear, bacterial

  20. Elastase, but not proteinase 3 (PR3), induces proteinuria associated with loss of glomerular basement membrane heparan sulphate after in vivo renal perfusion in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, P; VanDenBorn, J; Brouwer, E; Dolman, KM; Klok, PA; Huitema, MG; Limburg, PC; Bakker, MAH; Berden, JHM; Daha, MR; Kallenberg, CGM

    Elastase, but not PR3, induces proteinuria associated with loss of glomerular basement membrane (GEM) heparan sulphate after in vivo renal perfusion in rats. PR3 and elastase are cationic neutral serine proteinases present in the azurophilic granules of polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Release of these