WorldWideScience

Sample records for walking speed results

  1. IMU-based ambulatory walking speed estimation in constrained treadmill and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the performance of a walking speed estimation system based on using an inertial measurement unit (IMU), a combination of accelerometers and gyroscopes. The walking speed estimation algorithm segments the walking sequence into individual stride cycles (two steps) based on the inverted pendulum-like behaviour of the stance leg during walking and it integrates the angular velocity and linear accelerations of the shank to determine the displacement of each stride. The evaluation was performed in both treadmill and overground walking experiments with various constraints on walking speed, step length and step frequency to provide a relatively comprehensive assessment of the system. Promising results were obtained in providing accurate and consistent walking speed/step length estimation in different walking conditions. An overall percentage root mean squared error (%RMSE) of 4.2 and 4.0% was achieved in treadmill and overground walking experiments, respectively. With an increasing interest in understanding human walking biomechanics, the IMU-based ambulatory system could provide a useful walking speed/step length measurement/control tool for constrained walking studies.

  2. Establishing the Range of Perceptually Natural Visual Walking Speeds for Virtual Walking-In-Place Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    from 1.0 to 3.0. Thus, the slowest speed was equal to an estimate of the subjects normal walking speed, while the highest speed was three times greater. The perceived naturalness of the visual speed was assessed using self-reports. The first study compared four different types of movement, namely...... to virtual motion. This paper describes two within-subjects studies performed with the intention of establishing the range of perceptually natural walking speeds for WIP locomotion. In both studies, subjects performed a series of virtual walks while exposed to visual gains (optic flow multipliers) ranging......, no leg movement, walking on a treadmill, and two forms of gestural input for WIP locomotion. The results suggest that WIP locomotion is accompanied by a perceptual distortion of the speed of optic flow. The second study was performed using a 4×2 factorial design and compared four different display field...

  3. Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijmker, Trienke; Houdijk, Han; Lamoth, Claudine J C; Beek, Peter J; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2013-09-03

    Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present study, we applied this method to test two hypotheses: (1) the effect of external stabilization on energy cost depends on the stiffness of the stabilizing springs, and (2) the energy cost for balance control, and consequently the effect of external stabilization on energy cost, depends on walking speed. Fourteen healthy young adults walked on a motor driven treadmill without stabilization and with stabilization with four different spring stiffnesses (between 760 and 1820 Nm(-1)) at three walking speeds (70%, 100%, and 130% of preferred speed). Energy cost was calculated from breath-by-breath oxygen consumption. Gait parameters (mean and variability of step width and stride length, and variability of trunk accelerations) were calculated from kinematic data. On average external stabilization led to a decrease in energy cost of 6% (pwalking speed (p=0.111). These results show that active lateral stabilization during walking involves an energetic cost, which is independent of walking speed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Speed dependence of averaged EMG profiles in walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Elzinga, H; Grimmius, W; Halbertsma, JPK

    2002-01-01

    Electromyogram (EMG) profiles strongly depend on walking speed and, in pathological gait, patients do not usually walk at normal speeds. EMG data was collected from 14 muscles in two groups of healthy young subjects who walked at five different speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.75 ms(-1). We found that

  5. Speed dependence of averaged EMG profiles in walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL; Elzinga, H; Grimmius, W; Halbertsma, JPK

    Electromyogram (EMG) profiles strongly depend on walking speed and, in pathological gait, patients do not usually walk at normal speeds. EMG data was collected from 14 muscles in two groups of healthy young subjects who walked at five different speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.75 ms(-1). We found that

  6. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes.

  7. Reliability and Validity of Ten Consumer Activity Trackers Depend on Walking Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea J M; Krijnen, Wim P; VAN DER Schans, Cees P; DE Groot, Martijn

    2017-04-01

    To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge HR, Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, Samsung Gear S, Misfit Flash, Jawbone Up Move, Flyfit, and Moves). Participants walked three walking speeds for 10 min each; slow (3.2 km·h), average (4.8 km·h), and vigorous (6.4 km·h). To measure test-retest reliability, intraclass correlations (ICC) were determined between the first and second treadmill test. Validity was determined by comparing the trackers with the gold standard (hand counting), using mean differences, mean absolute percentage errors, and ICC. Statistical differences were calculated by paired-sample t tests, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and by constructing Bland-Altman plots. Test-retest reliability varied with ICC ranging from -0.02 to 0.97. Validity varied between trackers and different walking speeds with mean differences between the gold standard and activity trackers ranging from 0.0 to 26.4%. Most trackers showed relatively low ICC and broad limits of agreement of the Bland-Altman plots at the different speeds. For the slow walking speed, the Garmin Vivosmart and Fitbit Charge HR showed the most accurate results. The Garmin Vivosmart and Apple Watch Sport demonstrated the best accuracy at an average walking speed. For vigorous walking, the Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, and Samsung Gear S exhibited the most accurate results. Test-retest reliability and validity of activity trackers depends on walking speed. In general, consumer activity trackers perform better at an average and vigorous walking speed than at a slower walking speed.

  8. Improvement of walking speed prediction by accelerometry and altimetry, validated by satellite positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, O; Terrier, P; Ladetto, Q; Merminod, B; Schutz, Y

    2000-03-01

    Activity monitors based on accelerometry are used to predict the speed and energy cost of walking at 0% slope, but not at other inclinations. Parallel measurements of body accelerations and altitude variation were studied to determine whether walking speed prediction could be improved. Fourteen subjects walked twice along a 1.3 km circuit with substantial slope variations (-17% to +17%). The parameters recorded were body acceleration using a uni-axial accelerometer, altitude variation using differential barometry, and walking speed using satellite positioning (DGPS). Linear regressions were calculated between acceleration and walking speed, and between acceleration/altitude and walking speed. These predictive models, calculated using the data from the first circuit run, were used to predict speed during the second circuit. Finally the predicted velocity was compared with the measured one. The result was that acceleration alone failed to predict speed (mean r = 0.4). Adding altitude variation improved the prediction (mean r = 0.7). With regard to the altitude/acceleration-speed relationship, substantial inter-individual variation was found. It is concluded that accelerometry, combined with altitude measurement, can assess position variations of humans provided inter-individual variation is taken into account. It is also confirmed that DGPS can be used for outdoor walking speed measurements, opening up new perspectives in the field of biomechanics.

  9. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eFranek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al. 1999 on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of movement

  10. The Effect of Priming with Photographs of Environmental Settings on Walking Speed in an Outdoor Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franěk, Marek; Režný, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effect of priming with photographs of various environmental settings on the speed of a subsequent outdoor walk in an urban environment. Either photographs of urban greenery, conifer forests, or shopping malls were presented or no prime was employed. Three experiments were conducted (N = 126, N = 88, and N = 121). After being exposed to the priming or no-priming conditions, the participants were asked to walk along an urban route 1.9 km long with vegetation and mature trees (Experiment 1, Experiment 3) or along a route in a modern suburb (Experiment 2). In accord with the concept of approach-avoidance behavior, it was expected that priming with photographs congruent with the environmental setting of the walking route would result in slower walking speed. Conversely, priming with photographs incongruent with the environmental setting should result in faster walking speed. The results showed that priming with the photographs with vegetation caused a decrease in overall walking speed on the route relative to other experimental conditions. However, priming with incongruent primes did not lead to a significant increase in walking speed. In all experimental conditions, the slowest walking speed was found in sections with the highest natural character. The results are explained in terms of congruency between the prime and the environment, as well as by the positive psychological effects of viewing nature.

  11. Comprehensive quantitative investigation of arm swing during walking at various speed and surface slope conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejrati, Babak; Chesebrough, Sam; Bo Foreman, K; Abbott, Jake J; Merryweather, Andrew S

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that inclusion of arm swing in gait rehabilitation leads to more effective walking recovery in patients with walking impairments. However, little is known about the correct arm-swing trajectories to be used in gait rehabilitation given the fact that changes in walking conditions affect arm-swing patterns. In this paper we present a comprehensive look at the effects of a variety of conditions on arm-swing patterns during walking. The results describe the effects of surface slope, walking speed, and physical characteristics on arm-swing patterns in healthy individuals. We propose data-driven mathematical models to describe arm-swing trajectories. Thirty individuals (fifteen females and fifteen males) with a wide range of height (1.58-1.91m) and body mass (49-98kg), participated in our study. Based on their self-selected walking speed, each participant performed walking trials with four speeds on five surface slopes while their whole-body kinematics were recorded. Statistical analysis showed that walking speed, surface slope, and height were the major factors influencing arm swing during locomotion. The results demonstrate that data-driven models can successfully describe arm-swing trajectories for normal gait under varying walking conditions. The findings also provide insight into the behavior of the elbow during walking.

  12. Modulation of walking speed by changing optic flow in persons with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamontagne Anouk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Walking speed, which is often reduced after stroke, can be influenced by the perception of optic flow (OF speed. The present study aims to: 1 compare the modulation of walking speed in response to OF speed changes between persons with stroke and healthy controls and 2 investigate whether virtual environments (VE manipulating OF speed can be used to promote volitional changes in walking speed post stroke. Methods Twelve persons with stroke and 12 healthy individuals walked on a self-paced treadmill while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Two experiments were carried out on the same day. In experiment 1, the speed of an expanding OF was varied sinusoidally at 0.017 Hz (sine duration = 60 s, from 0 to 2 times the subject's comfortable walking speed, for a total duration of 5 minutes. In experiment 2, subjects were exposed to expanding OFs at discrete speeds that ranged from 0.25 to 2 times their comfortable speed. Each test trial was paired with a control trial performed at comfortable speed with matching OF. For each of the test trials, subjects were instructed to walk the distance within the same time as during the immediately preceding control trial. VEs were controlled by the CAREN-2 system (Motek. Instantaneous changes in gait speed (experiment 1 and the ratio of speed changes in the test trial over the control trial (experiment 2 were contrasted between the two groups of subjects. Results When OF speed was changing continuously (experiment 1, an out-of-phase modulation was observed in the gait speed of healthy subjects, such that slower OFs induced faster walking speeds, and vice versa. Persons with stroke displayed weaker (p 0.05, T-test. Conclusion Stroke affects the modulation of gait speed in response to changes in the perception of movement through different OF speeds. Nevertheless, the preservation of even a modest modulation enabled the persons with stroke to increase walking speed when

  13. Predicting the walking speed of pedestrians on stairs

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiyama, T.; Tyler, N.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework in which the behaviour of a pedestrian is predicted based on the characteristics of both the pedestrian and the facility the pedestrian uses. As an example of its application, we develop a model to predict the walking speed of a pedestrian on stairs. We examine the physiology and biomechanics of walking on stairs, and then develop a model that predicts walking speed based on the weight and leg extensor power of the pedestrian, and the gradient of the stai...

  14. The Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds during WIP Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    perceived as natural. All seven studies compared treadmill and WIP locomotion and higher speeds were generally preferred during treadmill walking, but only some studies found a significant effect. Meta-analyses of the differences between the two movement types revealed a significant difference and provided......It is well established that individuals tend to underestimate visually presented walking speeds when relying on treadmills for virtual walking. However, prior to the present studies this perceptual distortion had not been observed in relation to Walking-in-Place (WIP) locomotion, and a number...... to how gait cycle characteristics, visual display properties, and methodological differences affect speed underestimation during treadmill and WIP locomotion. The studies suggested the following: A significant main effect was found for step frequency; both display and geometric field of view were...

  15. Walking speed and distance in different environments of subjects in the later stage post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiane; Sunnerhagen, Katharina S; Willén, Carin

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess short- and long-distance walking performance in indoor and outdoor environments of slow and fast walkers' subjects living in the community in the later stage post-stroke. Thirty-six subjects with at least 6 months post-stroke were included and divided into two groups based on their walking speed in the clinical setting. Thirty-meter walk tests (30 mWT) at self-selected and maximum speeds were assessed in three environments: (1) clinical setting; (2) basement setting; and (3) outdoor setting. Six-minute walk test (6 MWT) distance was assessed in the clinical and outdoor settings. The differences between the 30 mWT and the 6 MWT, as measured by the actual distance obtained in the 6 MWT and the predicted distance calculated for the 30 mWT, were also investigated. There was no difference in walking speed when subjects performed short-distance walking in different environments. However, a difference was found in performance of long-distance walking. Subjects who walked 0.8 m/s or faster also walked further in the outdoor setting. The findings of our study demonstrate that in those who scored below 0.8 m/s, performance of short- and long-distance walking evaluated in an indoor environment reflects the results obtained in an outdoor environment. However, for subjects post-stroke who score 0.8 m/s or faster, distance was increased in the outdoor environments during long-distance walking. Walking speed obtained over a short distance seemed to overestimate long-distance walking capacity for the slow walkers, despite the environment.

  16. The application of multilevel modelling to account for the influence of walking speed in gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, David J; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Differences in gait performance can be explained by variations in walking speed, which is a major analytical problem. Some investigators have standardised speed during testing, but this can result in an unnatural control of gait characteristics. Other investigators have developed test procedures where participants walking at their self-selected slow, preferred and fast speeds, with computation of gait characteristics at a standardised speed. However, this analysis is dependent upon an overlap in the ranges of gait speed observed within and between participants, and this is difficult to achieve under self-selected conditions. In this report a statistical analysis procedure is introduced that utilises multilevel modelling to analyse data from walking tests at self-selected speeds, without requiring an overlap in the range of speeds observed or the routine use of data transformations.

  17. Dynamics of longitudinal arch support in relation to walking speed: contribution of the plantar aponeurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggi, Paolo; Pataky, Todd; Günther, Michael; Savage, Russell; Crompton, Robin

    2010-09-01

    The plantar aponeurosis (PA), in spanning the whole length of the plantar aspect of the foot, is clearly identified as one of the key structures that is likely to affect compliance and stability of the longitudinal arch. A recent study performed in our laboratory showed that tension/elongation in the PA can be predicted from the kinematics of the segments to which the PA is attached. In the present investigation, stereophotogrammetry and inverse kinematics were employed to shed light on the mechanics of the longitudinal arch and its main passive stabilizer, the PA, in relation to walking speed. When compared with a neutral unloaded position, the medial longitudinal arch underwent greater collapse during the weight-acceptance phase of stance at higher walking speed (0.1 degrees +/-1.9 degrees in slow walking; 0.9 degrees +/-2.6 degrees in fast walking; P = 0.0368). During late stance the arch was higher (3.4 degrees +/-3.1 degrees in slow walking; 2.8 degrees +/-2.7 degrees in fast walking; P = 0.0227) and the metatarsophalangeal joints more dorsiflexed (e.g. at the first metatarsophalangeal joint, 52 degrees +/-5 degrees in slow walking; 64 degrees +/-4 degrees in fast walking; P walking. Early-stance tension in the PA increased with speed, whereas maximum tension during late stance did not seem to be significantly affected by walking speed. Although, on the one hand, these results give evidence for the existence of a pre-heel-strike, speed-dependent, arch-stiffening mechanism, on the other hand they suggest that augmentation of arch height in late stance is enhanced by higher forces exerted by the intrinsic muscles on the plantar aspect of the foot when walking at faster speeds.

  18. Optimal speeds for walking and running, and walking on a moving walkway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    2009-06-01

    Many aspects of steady human locomotion are thought to be constrained by a tendency to minimize the expenditure of metabolic cost. This paper has three parts related to the theme of energetic optimality: (1) a brief review of energetic optimality in legged locomotion, (2) an examination of the notion of optimal locomotion speed, and (3) an analysis of walking on moving walkways, such as those found in some airports. First, I describe two possible connotations of the term "optimal locomotion speed:" that which minimizes the total metabolic cost per unit distance and that which minimizes the net cost per unit distance (total minus resting cost). Minimizing the total cost per distance gives the maximum range speed and is a much better predictor of the speeds at which people and horses prefer to walk naturally. Minimizing the net cost per distance is equivalent to minimizing the total daily energy intake given an idealized modern lifestyle that requires one to walk a given distance every day—but it is not a good predictor of animals' walking speeds. Next, I critique the notion that there is no energy-optimal speed for running, making use of some recent experiments and a review of past literature. Finally, I consider the problem of predicting the speeds at which people walk on moving walkways—such as those found in some airports. I present two substantially different theories to make predictions. The first theory, minimizing total energy per distance, predicts that for a range of low walkway speeds, the optimal absolute speed of travel will be greater—but the speed relative to the walkway smaller—than the optimal walking speed on stationary ground. At higher walkway speeds, this theory predicts that the person will stand still. The second theory is based on the assumption that the human optimally reconciles the sensory conflict between the forward speed that the eye sees and the walking speed that the legs feel and tries to equate the best estimate of the

  19. Ascending evacuation in long stairways: Physical exertion, walking speed and behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Ronchi, Enrico; Norén, Johan; Delin, Mattias; Kuklane, Kalev; Halder, Amitava; Arias, Silvia; Fridolf, Karl

    2015-01-01

    This is the final report of the project “Ascending evacuation in long stairways: Physical exertion, walking speed and behaviour”. This project investigated the effects of fatigue on walking speeds, physiological performance and behaviours in case of long ascending evacuation. The report includes a literature review on, at the time when the project began, existing material on ascending evacuation on long stairs and escalators. Experimental research was conducted and the results are presented i...

  20. Overground walking speed changes when subjected to body weight support conditions for nonimpaired and post stroke individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibel Gwendolyn C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown that body weight support (BWS has the potential to improve gait speed for individuals post-stroke. However, body weight support also reduces the optimal walking speed at which energy use is minimized over the gait cycle indicating that BWS should reduce walking speed capability. Methods Nonimpaired subjects and subjects post-stroke walked at a self-selected speed over a 15 m walkway. Body weight support (BWS was provided to subjects at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of the subject's weight while they walked overground using a robotic body weight support system. Gait speed, cadence, and average step length were calculated for each subject using recorded data on their time to walk 10 m and the number of steps taken. Results When subjected to greater levels of BWS, self-selected walking speed decreased for the nonimpaired subjects. However, subjects post-stroke showed an average increase of 17% in self-selected walking speed when subjected to some level of BWS compared to the 0% BWS condition. Most subjects showed this increase at the 10% BWS level. Gait speed increases corresponded to an increase in step length, but not cadence. Conclusions The BWS training environment results in decreased self-selected walking speed in nonimpaired individuals, however self-selected overground walking speed is facilitated when provided with a small percentage of body weight support for people post-stroke.

  1. The influence of step frequency on the range of perceptually natural visual walking speeds during walking-in-place and treadmill locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    and virtual walking speeds. This paper details a study investigating the effects of movement type (treadmill walking and WIP) and step frequency (1.4, 1.8 and 2.2 steps per second) on the range of perceptually natural visual walking speeds. The results suggests statistically significant main effects of both...... movement type and step frequency but no significant interaction between the two variables....

  2. Regression Model-Based Walking Speed Estimation Using Wrist-Worn Inertial Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Walking speed is widely used to study human health status. Wearable inertial measurement units (IMU) are promising tools for the ambulatory measurement of walking speed. Among wearable inertial sensors, the ones worn on the wrist, such as a watch or band, have relatively higher potential to be easily incorporated into daily lifestyle. Using the arm swing motion in walking, this paper proposes a regression model-based method for longitudinal walking speed estimation using a wrist-worn IMU. A novel kinematic variable is proposed, which finds the wrist acceleration in the principal axis (i.e. the direction of the arm swing). This variable (called pca-acc) is obtained by applying sensor fusion on IMU data to find the orientation followed by the use of principal component analysis. An experimental evaluation was performed on 15 healthy young subjects during free walking trials. The experimental results show that the use of the proposed pca-acc variable can significantly improve the walking speed estimation accuracy when compared to the use of raw acceleration information (p<0.01). When Gaussian process regression is used, the resulting walking speed estimation accuracy and precision is about 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively. PMID:27764231

  3. Reliability and Validity of Bilateral Ankle Accelerometer Algorithms for Activity Recognition and Walking Speed After Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Bruce H.; Xu, Xiaoyu; Batalin, Maxim; Thomas, Seth; Kaiser, William

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Outcome measures of mobility for large stroke trials are limited to timed walks for short distances in a laboratory, step counters and ordinal scales of disability and quality of life. Continuous monitoring and outcome measurements of the type and quantity of activity in the community would provide direct data about daily performance, including compliance with exercise and skills practice during routine care and clinical trials. Methods Twelve adults with impaired ambulation from hemiparetic stroke and 6 healthy controls wore triaxial accelerometers on their ankles. Walking speed for repeated outdoor walks was determined by machine-learning algorithms and compared to a stopwatch calculation of speed for distances not known to the algorithm. The reliability of recognizing walking, exercise, and cycling by the algorithms was compared to activity logs. Results A high correlation was found between stopwatch-measured outdoor walking speed and algorithm-calculated speed (Pearson coefficient, 0.98; P=0.001) and for repeated measures of algorithm-derived walking speed (P=0.01). Bouts of walking >5 steps, variations in walking speed, cycling, stair climbing, and leg exercises were correctly identified during a day in the community. Compared to healthy subjects, those with stroke were, as expected, more sedentary and slower, and their gait revealed high paretic-to-unaffected leg swing ratios. Conclusions Test–retest reliability and concurrent and construct validity are high for activity pattern-recognition Bayesian algorithms developed from inertial sensors. This ratio scale data can provide real-world monitoring and outcome measurements of lower extremity activities and walking speed for stroke and rehabilitation studies. PMID:21636815

  4. Chronic venous disorders and injection drug use: impact on balance, gait, and walk speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Injection drug users are at high risk for chronic venous disorders (CVD), a condition resulting in a progressive deterioration of venous function of the legs. However, the effects of CVD on walking mobility in this population have not been studied. We examined a causal model of the relationship between injection drug use, CVD, and Walking Mobility. The validity of the Tinetti Balance and Gait scales and walk speed as a composite measure of Walking Mobility was also explored. The participants were 104 men and women from a methadone maintenance treatment center. Drug use included 18 persons who injected drugs only in the hands, arms, and above the waist; 70 who injected all over the body including the lower extremities; and 16 who never injected drugs but used illegal substances by other routes. Forty-nine percent of participants had moderate to severe CVD. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to their history of injection drug use: (a) those who injected in the lower extremities (n = 70) and (b) those who injected in the arms plus those who did not inject (n = 34). All measurements were obtained at baseline and again approximately 6.5 weeks later. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the causal effect of CVD on Walking Mobility. The validity of the Balance and Gait scales and the walk time variable as measures of a Walking Mobility factor was examined using a second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Questionnaires included the Demographic and Health History and Drug History. The lower extremities were evaluated with the clinical portion of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology classification. Participants completed the Tinetti Balance and Gait test. A timed 6-m walk at the person's normal pace was used to calculate walk speed. Test-retest reliability of the Tinetti Balance and Gait test and walk speed ranged from 0.79 to 0.86. Balance and gait scores were skewed toward the high end of the scale. Walking speed was slow. The leg

  5. Excited random walks: results, methods, open problems

    CERN Document Server

    Kosygina, Elena

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of self-interacting random walks in deterministic or random environments, known as excited random walks or cookie walks, on the d-dimensional integer lattice. The main purpose of this paper is two-fold: to give a survey of known results and some of the methods and to present several new results. The latter include functional limit theorems for transient one-dimensional excited random walks in bounded i.i.d. cookie environments as well as some zero-one laws. Several open problems are stated.

  6. "Feeling younger, walking faster": subjective age and walking speed in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Yannick; Sutin, Angelina R; Terracciano, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Walking speed is a key vital sign in older people. Given the implications of slower gait speed, a large literature has identified health-related, behavioral, cognitive, and biological factors that moderate age-related decline in mobility. The present study aims to contribute to existing knowledge by examining whether subjective age, how old or young individuals experience themselves to be relative to their chronological age, contributes to walking speed. Participants were drawn from the 2008 and 2012 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS, N = 2970) and the 2011 and 2013 waves of the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS, N = 5423). In both the HRS and the NHATS, linear regression analysis revealed that a younger subjective age was associated with faster walking speed at baseline and with less decline over time, controlling for age, sex, education, and race. These associations were partly accounted for by depressive symptoms, disease burden, physical activity, cognition, body mass index, and smoking. Additional analysis revealed that feeling younger than one's age was associated with a reduced risk of walking slower than the frailty-related threshold of 0.6 m/s at follow-up in the HRS. The present study provides novel and consistent evidence across two large prospective studies for an association between the subjective experience of age and walking speed of older adults. Subjective age may help identify individuals at risk for mobility limitations in old age and may be a target for interventions designed to mitigate functional decline.

  7. Effect of walking speed on gait sub phase durations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, Felix; Leibold, Andreas; Krinner, Sebastian; Welsch, Götz; Lochmann, Matthias; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2015-10-01

    Gait phase durations are important spatiotemporal parameters in different contexts such as discrimination between healthy and pathological gait and monitoring of treatment outcomes after interventions. Although gait phases strongly depend on walking speed, the influence of different speeds has rarely been investigated in literature. In this work, we examined the durations of the stance sub phases and the swing phase for 12 different walking speeds ranging from 0.6 to 1.7 m/s in 21 healthy subjects using infrared cinematography and an instrumented treadmill. We separated the stance phase into loading response, mid stance, terminal stance and pre-swing phase and we performed regression modeling of all phase durations with speed to determine general trends. With an increasing speed of 0.1m/s, stance duration decreased while swing duration increased by 0.3%. All distinct stance sub phases changed significantly with speed. These findings suggest the importance of including all distinct gait sub phases in spatiotemporal analyses, especially when different walking speeds are involved.

  8. The Effect of Head Mounted Display Weight and Locomotion Method on the Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    This poster details a study investigating the effect of Head Mounted Display (HMD) weight and locomotion method (Walking-In-Place and treadmill walking) on the perceived naturalness of virtual walking speeds. The results revealed significant main effects of movement type, but no significant effects...

  9. The Effect of Head Mounted Display Weight and Locomotion Method on the Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    This poster details a study investigating the effect of Head Mounted Display (HMD) weight and locomotion method (Walking-In-Place and treadmill walking) on the perceived naturalness of virtual walking speeds. The results revealed significant main effects of movement type, but no significant effects...

  10. Attuning one's steps to visual targets reduces comfortable walking speed in both young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, C Lieke E; de Dreu, Miek J; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2015-03-01

    Comfortable walking speed (CWS) is indicative of clinically relevant factors in the elderly, such as fall risk and mortality. Standard CWS tests involve walking on a straight, unobstructed surface, while in reality surfaces are uneven and cluttered and so walkers rely on visually guided adaptations to avoid trips or slips. Hence, the predictive value of CWS may be expected to increase when assessed for walking in more realistic (visually guided) conditions. We examined CWS in young (n=18) and older (n=18) adults for both overground and treadmill walking. Overground CWS was assessed using the 10-meter walk test with and without visual stepping targets. For treadmill walking, four conditions were examined: (i) uncued walking, and (ii-iv) cued walking with visual stepping targets where the inter-stepping target distance varied by 0%, 20%, or 40%. Pre-experimental measures were taken so that the average inter-stepping target distance could be adjusted for each belt speed based on each participant's self-selected gait characteristics. Results showed that CWS was significantly slower when stepping targets were present in both overground (pCWS, even when the patterning of these targets matched the participant's own gait pattern (viz. 0%-treadmill-walking condition). Results from the treadmill-walking task showed that the amount of variation in inter-stepping target distance did not differentially affect CWS. Our results suggest that it may be worthwhile in clinical assessments to not only determine walking speed using standard conditions but also in situations that require visually guided stepping.

  11. Maximum walking speeds obtained using treadmill and overground robot system in persons with post-stroke hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capó-Lugo Carmen E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies demonstrated that stroke survivors have a limited capacity to increase their walking speeds beyond their self-selected maximum walking speed (SMWS. The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of stroke survivors to reach faster speeds than their SMWS while walking on a treadmill belt or while being pushed by a robotic system (i.e. “push mode”. Methods Eighteen chronic stroke survivors with hemiplegia were involved in the study. We calculated their self-selected comfortable walking speed (SCWS and SMWS overground using a 5-meter walk test (5-MWT. Then, they were exposed to walking at increased speeds, on a treadmill and while in “push mode” in an overground robotic device, the KineAssist, until they were tested at a speed that they could not sustain without losing balance. We recorded the time and number of steps during each trial and calculated gait speed, average cadence and average step length. Results Maximum walking speed in the “push mode” was 13% higher than the maximum walking speed on the treadmill and both were higher (“push mode”: 61%; treadmill: 40% than the maximum walking speed overground. Subjects achieved these faster speeds by initially increasing both step length and cadence and, once individuals stopped increasing their step length, by only increasing cadence. Conclusions With post-stroke hemiplegia, individuals are able to walk at faster speeds than their SMWS overground, when provided with a safe environment that provides external forces that requires them to attempt dynamic stability maintenance at higher gait speeds. Therefore, this study suggests the possibility that, given the appropriate conditions, people post-stroke can be trained at higher speeds than previously attempted.

  12. EFFECTS OF UNSTABLE SHOES ON ENERGY COST DURING TREADMILL WALKING AT VARIOUS SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Koyama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, shoes having rounded soles in the anterior- posterior direction have been commercially introduced, which are commonly known as unstable shoes (US. However, physiological responses during walking in US, particularly at various speeds, have not been extensively studied to date. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of wearing unstable shoes while walking at low to high speeds on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE, muscle activation, oxygen consumption (VO2, and optimum speed. Healthy male adults wore US or normal walking shoes (WS, and walked at various speeds on a treadmill with no inclination. In experiment 1, subjects walked at 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 km·h-1 (duration, 3 min for all speeds and were recorded on video from the right sagittal plane to calculate the step length and cadence. Simultaneously, electromyogram (EMG was recorded from six different thigh and calf muscles, and the integrated EMG (iEMG was calculated. In experiment 2, RPE, heart rate and VO2 were measured with the walking speed being increased from 3.6 to 7.2 km·h-1 incrementally by 0.9 km·h-1 every 6 min. The optimum speed, defined by the least oxygen cost, was calculated from the fitted quadratic relationship between walking speed and oxygen cost. Wearing US resulted in significantly longer step length and lower cadence compared with WS condition at any given speed. For all speeds, iEMG in the medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, heart rate, and VO2 were significantly higher in US than WS. However, RPE and optimum speed (US, 4.75 ± 0.32 km·h-1; WS, 4. 79 ± 0.18 km·h-1 did not differ significantly between the two conditions. These results suggest that unstable shoes can increase muscle activity of lower legs and energy cost without influencing RPE and optimum speed during walking at various speeds

  13. Robust Gait-Based Person Identification against Walking Speed Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqmar, Muhammad Rasyid; Shinoda, Koichi; Furui, Sadaoki

    Variations in walking speed have a strong impact on gait-based person identification. We propose a method that is robust against walking-speed variations. It is based on a combination of cubic higher-order local auto-correlation (CHLAC), gait silhouette-based principal component analysis (GSP), and a statistical framework using hidden Markov models (HMMs). The CHLAC features capture the within-phase spatio-temporal characteristics of each individual, the GSP features retain more shape/phase information for better gait sequence alignment, and the HMMs classify the ID of each gait even when walking speed changes nonlinearly. We compared the performance of our method with other conventional methods using five different databases, SOTON, USF-NIST, CMU-MoBo, TokyoTech A and TokyoTech B. The proposed method was equal to or better than the others when the speed did not change greatly, and it was significantly better when the speed varied across and within a gait sequence.

  14. The effect of walking speed on gait kinematics and kinetics after endoprosthetic knee replacement following bone tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yusuke; Tatematsu, Noriatsu; Nagai, Koutatsu; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamata, Takeharu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Toguchida, Junya; Ichihashi, Noriaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsuboyama, Tadao

    2014-09-01

    Gait function is one of the most important components of functional outcome evaluation in patients with a tumor around the knee. In addition to walking at a preferred speed, the patients might be sometimes required to walk fast in daily life (e.g., schooling and working) because the major types of bone tumors often occur in adolescence and young adults. Therefore, recovering the ability to walk fast would increase the quality of life of these patients. To clarify which parts of the lower limb are exerted while walking fast, we investigated the kinematic and kinetic changes during fast walking in patients who underwent endoprosthetic knee replacement after bone tumor resection. Laboratory-based gait analysis was performed on eight patients who had undergone endoprosthetic knee replacement following resection of a tumor around the knee. Patients walked at a preferred and faster speed, and the gait parameters were compared between the two walking speeds for each leg. To increase walking speed, patients tended to rely on the bilateral hip, ankle, and contralateral knee to generate additional power. Kinetic analysis showed that involved-side vertical body support was not significantly increased during late stance to increase walking speed, which was associated with a small increase in ankle plantarflexion moment and concentric power. These results suggest to patients after knee reconstruction how to effectively increase their walking speed or redistribute the mechanical load on the muscles and joints to prevent excessive stress on the lower limbs.

  15. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Leman

    Full Text Available Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  16. Activating and Relaxing Music Entrains the Speed of Beat Synchronized Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is ‘activating’ in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is ‘relaxing’ in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation. PMID:23874469

  17. Physiological Cost Index and Comfort Walking Speed in Two Level Lower Limb Amputees Having No Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vllasolli, Teuta Osmani; Orovcanec, Nikola; Zafirova, Beti; Krasniqi, Blerim; Murtezani, Ardiana; Krasniqi, Valbona; Rama, Bukurije

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Physiological Cost Index (PCI) was introduced by MacGregor to estimate the energy cost in walking of healthy people, also it has been reported for persons with lower limb amputation, walking with prosthesis. Objective: To assess energy cost and walking speed in two level lower limb amputation: transfemoral and transtibial amputation and to determine if the age and prosthetic walking supported with walking aids have impact on energy cost and walking speed. Methods: A prospective cross sectional study was performed in two level lower limb amputees with no vascular disease who were rehabilitated at the Department of Prosthetics and Orthotics at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo. The Physiological Cost Index (PCI) was assessed by five minutes of continuous indoor walking at Comfort Walking Speed (CWS). Results: Eighty three lower limb amputees were recruited. It is shown relevant impact of level of amputation in PCI (t=6.8, pamputation. Conclusions: Walking with transfemoral prosthesis or using walking aids during prosthetic ambulation is matched with higher cost of energy and slower walking speed. Advanced age was shown with high impact on PCI and CWS in both groups of amputees. PMID:25870485

  18. Balance impairment limits ability to increase walking speed in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Braun, Carty H; Lewek, Michael D; Fritz, Stacy L

    2017-03-01

    Purpose Determine the relationship between balance impairments and the ability to increase walking speed (WS) on demand in individuals with chronic stroke. Methods WS and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) data were collected on 124 individuals with chronic stroke (>6 months). The ability to increase WS on demand (walking speed reserve, WSR) was quantified as the difference between participants' self-selected (SSWS) and maximal (MWS) walking speeds. Correlation, regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed to investigate the relationship between balance and the ability to increase WS. Results Of sample, 58.9% were unable to increase WS on demand (WSR increase WS [odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 0.67-0.84]. The AUC for the ROC curve constructed to assess the accuracy of BBS to discriminate between able/unable to increase WS was 0.85 (0.78-0.92). A BBS cutscore of 47 points was identified [sensitivity: 72.6%, specificity: 90.2%, +likelihood ratio (LR): 7.41, -LR: 0.30]. Conclusions The inability to increase WS on demand is common in individuals with chronic stroke, and balance appears to be a significant contributor to this difficulty. A BBS cutscore of 47 points can identify individuals who may benefit from balance interventions to improve the ability to increase their WS. Implications for Rehabilitation A majority of individuals with chronic stroke may be unable to increase their walking speed beyond their self-selected speed on demand. This may limit functional ambulation, as these individuals are walking "at capacity". Balance impairments contribute to the inability to increase walking speed. A Berg Balance Scale score <47 points can be used to identify individuals with chronic stroke walking "at capacity" due to balance impairments.

  19. Effects of obesity on lower extremity muscle function during walking at two speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Zachary F; Board, Wayne J; Browning, Raymond C

    2014-03-01

    Walking is a recommended form of physical activity for obese adults, yet the effects of obesity and walking speed on the biomechanics of walking are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine joint kinematics, muscle force requirements and individual muscle contributions to the walking ground reaction forces (GRFs) at two speeds (1.25 ms(-1) and 1.50 ms(-1)) in obese and nonobese adults. Vasti (VAS), gluteus medius (GMED), gastrocnemius (GAST), and soleus (SOL) forces and their contributions to the GRFs were estimated using three-dimensional musculoskeletal models scaled to the anthropometrics of nine obese (35.0 (3.78 kg m(-2))); body mass index mean (SD)) and 10 nonobese (22.1 (1.02 kg m(-2))) subjects. The obese individuals walked with a straighter knee in early stance at the faster speed and greater pelvic obliquity during single limb support at both speeds. Absolute force requirements were generally greater in obese vs. nonobese adults, the main exception being VAS, which was similar between groups. At both speeds, lean mass (LM) normalized force output for GMED was greater in the obese group. Obese individuals appear to adopt a gait pattern that reduces VAS force output, especially at speeds greater than their preferred walking velocity. Greater relative GMED force requirements in obese individuals may contribute to altered kinematics and increased risk of musculoskeletal injury/pathology. Our results suggest that obese individuals may have relative weakness of the VAS and hip abductor muscles, specifically GMED, which may act to increase their risk of musculoskeletal injury/pathology during walking, and therefore may benefit from targeted muscle strengthening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Arm Swing during Walking at Different Speeds in Children with Cerebral Palsy and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, Pieter; Van Gestel, Leen; Massaad, Firas; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) have difficulties walking at a normal or high speed. It is known that arm movements play an important role to achieve higher walking speeds in healthy subjects. However, the role played by arm movements while walking at different speeds has received no attention in children with CP. Therefore we investigated the…

  1. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  2. Motor fatigue measurement by distance-induced slow down of walking speed in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Phan-Ba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS. We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed on short and long distance would allow a better delineation and quantification of gait fatigability in pMS. Our objectives were to compare 4 walking paradigms: the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW, a corrected version of the T25FW with dynamic start (T25FW(+, the timed 100-meter walk (T100MW and the timed 500-meter walk (T500MW. METHODS: Thirty controls and 81 pMS performed the 4 walking tests in a single study visit. RESULTS: The 4 walking tests were performed with a slower WS in pMS compared to controls even in subgroups with minimal disability. The finishing speed of the last 100-meter of the T500MW was the slowest measurable WS whereas the T25FW(+ provided the fastest measurable WS. The ratio between such slowest and fastest WS (Deceleration Index, DI was significantly lower only in pMS with EDSS 4.0-6.0, a pyramidal or cerebellar functional system score reaching 3 or a maximum reported walking distance ≤ 4000 m. CONCLUSION: The motor fatigue which triggers gait deceleration over a sustained effort in pMS can be measured by the WS ratio between performances on a very short distance and the finishing pace on a longer more demanding task. The absolute walking speed is abnormal early in MS whatever the distance of effort when patients are unaware of ambulation impairment. In contrast, the DI-measured ambulation fatigability appears to take place later in the disease course.

  3. A novel walking speed estimation scheme and its application to treadmill control for gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jungwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual reality (VR technology along with treadmill training (TT can effectively provide goal-oriented practice and promote improved motor learning in patients with neurological disorders. Moreover, the VR + TT scheme may enhance cognitive engagement for more effective gait rehabilitation and greater transfer to over ground walking. For this purpose, we developed an individualized treadmill controller with a novel speed estimation scheme using swing foot velocity, which can enable user-driven treadmill walking (UDW to more closely simulate over ground walking (OGW during treadmill training. OGW involves a cyclic acceleration-deceleration profile of pelvic velocity that contrasts with typical treadmill-driven walking (TDW, which constrains a person to walk at a preset constant speed. In this study, we investigated the effects of the proposed speed adaptation controller by analyzing the gait kinematics of UDW and TDW, which were compared to those of OGW at three pre-determined velocities. Methods Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk in each mode (TDW, UDW, and OGW at three pre-determined speeds (0.5 m/s, 1.0 m/s, and 1.5 m/s with real time feedback provided through visual displays. Temporal-spatial gait data and 3D pelvic kinematics were analyzed and comparisons were made between UDW on a treadmill, TDW, and OGW. Results The observed step length, cadence, and walk ratio defined as the ratio of stride length to cadence were not significantly different between UDW and TDW. Additionally, the average magnitude of pelvic acceleration peak values along the anterior-posterior direction for each step and the associated standard deviations (variability were not significantly different between the two modalities. The differences between OGW and UDW and TDW were mainly in swing time and cadence, as have been reported previously. Also, step lengths between OGW and TDW were different for 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s gait velocities

  4. GAIT VARIABILITY IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE: INFLUENCE OF WALKING SPEED AND DOPAMINERGIC TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Mon S; Rintala, Diana H; Hou, Jyhgong G; Charness, Ann L; Fernandez, Angel L; Collins, Robert L; Baker, Jeff; Lai, Eugene C; Protas, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of levodopa and walking speed on gait variability in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods Thirty-three individuals with PD were studied. Their mean age was 70.61 ± 9.23 yr. The average time since diagnosis was 9.65 ± 5.80 yr years. Gait variability was studied while “OFF” and “ON” dopaminergic medication when the subjects walked at their usual and fastest speeds. Results Variability of step time, double support time, stride length and stride velocity decreased significantly (p = .037; p = .037; p = .022; p = .043, respectively) after dopaminergic treatment. When subjects increased walking speed, the variability of stride length and stride velocity decreased significantly (p = .038 and p = .004, respectively) both while “OFF” and “ON” levodopa. Increasing walking speed did not change the variability of step time and double support time regardless of medication status. Conclusions Levodopa decreased gait variability in persons with PD. Stride length and stride velocity variability appeared to be speed dependent parameters, whereas, the variability of step time and double support time appeared to be speed independent measures. Levodopa had positive effects on gait stability in PD. PMID:22080998

  5. The combined effects of body weight support and gait speed on gait related muscle activity: a comparison between walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton and regular treadmill walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaske Van Kammen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. METHODS: Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants' body weight and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h, while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. RESULTS: The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged, but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. CONCLUSION: Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible.

  6. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  7. Perception of Self-Motion and Regulation of Walking Speed in Young-Old Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde-Parsi, Marie-Jasmine; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2015-07-01

    Whether a reduced perception of self-motion contributes to poor walking speed adaptations in older adults is unknown. In this study, speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual task) and walking speed adaptations (walking task) were compared between young (19-27 years) and young-old individuals (63-74 years), and the relationship between the performance on the two tasks was examined. Participants were evaluated while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Speed discrimination thresholds were determined using a staircase procedure. Walking speed modulation was assessed on a self-paced treadmill while exposed to different self-motion speeds ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the participants' comfortable speed. For each speed, participants were instructed to match the self-motion speed described by the moving corridor. On the walking task, participants displayed smaller walking speed errors at comfortable walking speeds compared with slower of faster speeds. The young-old adults presented larger speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual experiment) and larger walking speed errors (walking experiment) compared with young adults. Larger walking speed errors were associated with higher discrimination thresholds. The enhanced performance on the walking task at comfortable speed suggests that intersensory calibration processes are influenced by experience, hence optimized for frequently encountered conditions. The altered performance of the young-old adults on the perceptual and walking tasks, as well as the relationship observed between the two tasks, suggest that a poor perception of visual motion information may contribute to the poor walking speed adaptations that arise with aging.

  8. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Stanley, Michelle; Smith, Mike; Price, Michael J; Wright, Sheila Leddington

    2015-01-01

    This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT) performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60-76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P = 0.0001) whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise) enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  9. Coincidence Anticipation Timing Performance during an Acute Bout of Brisk Walking in Older Adults: Effect of Stimulus Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined coincidence anticipation timing (CAT performance at slow and fast stimulus speeds before, during, and after an acute bout of walking in adults aged 60–76 years. Results from a series of repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant rest versus exercise × stimulus speed × time interactions for absolute and variable errors (both P=0.0001 whereby absolute and variable error scores, when stimulus speed was slow, improved as the duration of exercise increased. When stimulus speed was fast there were significantly greater absolute and variable errors at 18 minutes of the walking bout. There was also greater error at 18 minutes during walking compared to rest. These results suggest that, in a task involving walking and CAT, stimulus speeds plays an important role; specifically walking (exercise enhances CAT performance at slow stimulus speeds but reduces CAT performance at fast stimulus speeds. The implications are that in everyday situations, where events require dual-task responses to be made at different speeds, for example, walking on the pavement whilst avoiding a crowd, compared to crossing a busy road, an understanding of how different stimulus speeds influence dual-task performance is extremely important, particularly in the older adult population.

  10. Neuromuscular determinants of maximum walking speed in well-functioning older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Manini, Todd M; Fielding, Roger A; Patten, Carolynn

    2013-03-01

    Maximum walking speed may offer an advantage over usual walking speed for clinical assessment of age-related declines in mobility function that are due to neuromuscular impairment. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which maximum walking speed is affected by neuromuscular function of the lower extremities in older adults. We recruited two groups of healthy, well functioning older adults who differed primarily on maximum walking speed. We hypothesized that individuals with slower maximum walking speed would exhibit reduced lower extremity muscle size and impaired plantarflexion force production and neuromuscular activation during a rapid contraction of the triceps surae muscle group (soleus (SO) and gastrocnemius (MG)). All participants were required to have usual 10-meter walking speed of >1.0m/s. If the difference between usual and maximum 10m walking speed was 0.6m/s, the individual was assigned to the "Faster" group (n=12). Peak rate of force development (RFD) and rate of neuromuscular activation (rate of EMG rise) of the triceps surae muscle group were assessed during a rapid plantarflexion movement. Muscle cross sectional area of the right triceps surae, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle groups was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Across participants, the difference between usual and maximal walking speed was predominantly dictated by maximum walking speed (r=.85). We therefore report maximum walking speed (1.76 and 2.17m/s in Slower and Faster, ptriceps surae (p=.44), quadriceps (p=.76) and hamstrings (p=.98). MG rate of EMG rise was positively associated with RFD and maximum 10m walking speed, but not the usual 10m walking speed. These findings support the conclusion that maximum walking speed is limited by impaired neuromuscular force and activation of the triceps surae muscle group. Future research should further evaluate the utility of maximum walking speed for use in clinical assessment to detect and monitor age

  11. Slower Walking Speed in Older Men Improves Triceps Surae Force Generation Ability

    OpenAIRE

    Stenroth, Lauri; Sipilä, Sarianna; Finni Juutinen, Taija; Cronin, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Older adults walk slower than young adults, but it is not known why. Previous research suggests that ankle plantarflexors may have a crucial role in the reduction of walking speed. The purpose of this study was to investigate age-related differences in triceps surae muscle–tendon function during walking to further investigate the role of plantarflexors in the age-related reduction of walking speed. Methods: Medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscle fascicle lengths were measured usi...

  12. Influence of backpack load and gait speed on plantar forces during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the differences in plantar force associated with changes in backpack load and gait speed during walking. The F-scan tethered system was used to collect plantar pressure data. Subjects were asked to walk on a treadmill with varied levels of backpack load (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% of body mass) and gait speed (4, 5, and 6 km/h). We found that an increase in gait speed and backpack load lead to increase in the magnitude of the first vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) peak. Greater magnitudes of the second vGRF peak were only associated with an increase when gait speeds were 4 km/h and 5 km/h. There was no speed-related change in the magnitudes of the second vGRF peak at the speed of 6 km/h. The results of this study may be important for the purpose of constituting a load-bearing walking program for protecting against osteoporosis.

  13. Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M.; Puig-Perez, Sara; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS). The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93), we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase), but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people. PMID:27191847

  14. Is perception of self-motion speed a necessary condition for intercepting a moving target while walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Antoine H P; Wallet, Grégory; Montagne, Gilles

    2014-04-30

    While it has been shown that the Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) is used in the control of self-motion speed, this study examined its relevance in the control of interceptive actions while walking. We asked participants to intercept approaching targets by adjusting their walking speed in a virtual environment, and predicted that the influence of the GOFR depended on their interception strategy. Indeed, unlike the Constant Bearing Angle (CBA), the Modified Required Velocity (MRV) strategy relies on the perception of self-displacement speed. On the other hand, the CBA strategy involves specific speed adjustments depending on the curvature of the target's trajectory, whereas the MRV does not. We hypothesized that one strategy is selected among the two depending on the informational content of the environment. We thus manipulated the curvature and display of the target's trajectory, and the relationship between physical walking speed and the GOFR (through eye height manipulations). Our results showed that when the target trajectory was not displayed, walking speed profiles were affected by curvature manipulations. Otherwise, walking speed profiles were less affected by curvature manipulations and were affected by the GOFR manipulations. Taken together, these results show that the use of the GOFR for intercepting a moving target while walking depends on the informational content of the environment. Finally we discuss the complementary roles of these two perceptual-motor strategies.

  15. IMPACT OF BODY WEIGHT SUPPORTED BACKWARD TREADMILL TRAINING ON WALKING SPEED IN CHILDREN WITH SPASTIC DIPLEGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada El Sayed Abd Allah Ayoub

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A lot of the ambulating children with spastic diplegia were able to walk with flexed hips, knees and ankles this gait pattern is known as crouch gait. The most needed functional achievement of diplegic children habilitation is to be able to walk appropriately. The development of an independent and efficient walking is one of the main objectives for children with cerebral palsy especially those with spastic diplegia. Method: Twenty children with spastic diplegia enrolled in this study, they were classified into two groups of equal number, eligibility to our study were ages ranged from seven to ten years, were able to ambulate, They had gait problems and abnormal gait kinematics. The control group (A received selected physical therapy program based on neurodevelopmental approach for such cases, while the study group (B received partial body weight supported backward treadmill training in addition to regular exercise program. Gait pattern was assessed using the Biodex Gait Trainer II for each group pre and post three months of the treatment program. Results: There was statistically significant improvement in walking speed in the study group (P<0.05 with significant difference when comparing post treatment results between groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings suggested that partial body weight supported backward treadmill training can be included as a supplementary therapeutic modality to improve walking speed and functional abilities of children with diplegic cerebral palsy.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Energetics Are Associated With Maximal Aerobic Capacity and Walking Speed in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background. Lower ambulatory performance with aging may be related to a reduced oxidative capacity within skeletal muscle. This study examined the associations between skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity and efficiency with walking performance in a group of older adults. Methods. Thirty-seven older adults (mean age 78 years; 21 men and 16 women) completed an aerobic capacity (VO2 peak) test and measurement of preferred walking speed over 400 m. Maximal coupled (State 3; St3) mitochondrial respiration was determined by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized myofibers obtained from percutanous biopsies of vastus lateralis (n = 22). Maximal phosphorylation capacity (ATPmax) of vastus lateralis was determined in vivo by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (n = 30). Quadriceps contractile volume was determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Mitochondrial efficiency (max ATP production/max O2 consumption) was characterized using ATPmax per St3 respiration (ATPmax/St3). Results. In vitro St3 respiration was significantly correlated with in vivo ATPmax (r 2 = .47, p = .004). Total oxidative capacity of the quadriceps (St3*quadriceps contractile volume) was a determinant of VO2 peak (r 2 = .33, p = .006). ATPmax (r 2 = .158, p = .03) and VO2 peak (r 2 = .475, p VO2 peak in a multiple linear regression model improved the prediction of preferred walking speed (r 2 = .647, p < .0001), suggesting that mitochondrial efficiency is an important determinant for preferred walking speed. Conclusions. Lower mitochondrial capacity and efficiency were both associated with slower walking speed within a group of older participants with a wide range of function. In addition to aerobic capacity, lower mitochondrial capacity and efficiency likely play roles in slowing gait speed with age. PMID:23051977

  17. Walking at speeds close to the preferred transition speed as an approach to obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Duško

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increasing energy expenditure through certain exercise is an important component of effective interventions to enhance initial weight loss and prevent weight regain. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 16-week weight loss exercise programme on morpho-functional changes in female adults and to examine the programme effects on two subpopulations with different levels of obesity. Methods. Fifty-six middle-aged women were divided into 2 groups according to their body mass index (BMI: 25-29.9 kg/m2 - overweight (OW and ≥30 kg/m2 - obese (OB. The exercise protocol included a walking technique based on hip rotation at horizontal plane at speeds close to the preferred transition speed (PTS. At the initiation of the study and after 16 weeks of the programme, anthropometric, morphological and cardiovascular parameters of all subjects were assessed. The main effects of Group (OW and OB and Time and the interaction effect of Group by Time were tested by time repeated measures General Linear Model (mixed between-within subjects ANOVA. Results. Mean weight loss during the programme was 10.3 kg and 20.1 kg in OW and OB, respectively. The average fat mass (FM loss was 9.4 kg in OW and 16.9 kg in OB. The Mixed ANOVA revealed a significant Group by Time interaction effects for waist circumference, body weight, body water, fat free mass, FM, %FM and BMI (p<0.05. Conclusion. The applied exercise protocol has proved as beneficial in the treatment of obesity, since it resulted in a significant weight loss and body composition changes. The reduction in body weight was achieved mainly on account of the loss of fat mass.

  18. Self-Selected and Maximal Walking Speeds Provide Greater Insight Into Fall Status Than Walking Speed Reserve Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Fulk, George D; Herter, Troy M; Beets, Michael W; Donley, Jonathan; Fritz, Stacy L

    2016-07-01

    To determine the degree to which self-selected walking speed (SSWS), maximal walking speed (MWS), and walking speed reserve (WSR) are associated with fall status among community-dwelling older adults. WS and 1-year falls history data were collected on 217 community-dwelling older adults (median age = 82, range 65-93 years) at a local outpatient PT clinic and local retirement communities and senior centers. WSR was calculated as a difference (WSRdiff = MWS - SSWS) and ratio (WSRratio = MWS/SSWS). SSWS (P risk assessment. Combining SSWS and MWS to calculate an individual's WSR does not provide additional insight into fall status in this population. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Describe the different methods for calculating walking speed reserve and discuss the potential of the metric as an outcome measure; (2) Explain the degree to which self-selected walking speed, maximal walking speed, and walking speed reserve are associated with fall status among community-dwelling older adults; and (3) Discuss potential limitations to using walking speed reserve to identify fall status in populations without mobility restrictions. Advanced : The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

  19. An Evaluation of Commercial Pedometers for Monitoring Slow Walking Speed Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevi, Femina H A; Miranda, Jorge; Pedersen, Christian F; Wagner, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Pedometers are considered desirable devices for monitoring physical activity. Two population groups of interest include patients having undergone surgery in the lower extremities or who are otherwise weakened through disease, medical treatment, or surgery procedures, as well as the slow walking senior population. For these population groups, pedometers must be able to perform reliably and accurately at slow walking speeds. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the step count accuracy of three commercially available pedometers, the Yamax (Tokyo, Japan) Digi-Walker(®) SW-200 (YM), the Omron (Kyoto, Japan) HJ-720 (OM), and the Fitbit (San Francisco, CA) Zip (FB), at slow walking speeds, specifically at 1, 2, and 3 km/h, and to raise awareness of the necessity of focusing research on step-counting devices and algorithms for slow walking populations. Fourteen participants 29.93 ±4.93 years of age were requested to walk on a treadmill at the three specified speeds, in four trials of 100 steps each. The devices were worn by the participants on the waist belt. The pedometer counts were recorded, and the error percentage was calculated. The error rate of all three evaluated pedometers decreased with the increase of speed: at 1 km/h the error rates varied from 87.11% (YM) to 95.98% (FB), at 2 km/h the error rates varied from 17.27% (FB) to 46.46% (YM), and at 3 km/h the error rates varied from 22.46% (YM) to a slight overcount of 0.70% (FB). It was observed that all the evaluated devices have high error rates at 1 km/h and mixed error rates at 2 km/h, and at 3 km/h the error rates are the smallest of the three assessed speeds, with the OM and the FB having a slight overcount. These results show that research on pedometers' software and hardware should focus more on accurate step detection at slow walking speeds.

  20. Compass gait mechanics account for top walking speeds in ducks and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usherwood, James R; Szymanek, Katie L; Daley, Monica A

    2008-12-01

    The constraints to maximum walking speed and the underlying cause of the walk-run transition remains controversial. However, the motions of the body and legs can be reduced to a few mechanical principles, which, if valid, impose simple physics-based limits to walking speed. Bipedal walking may be viewed as a vaulting gait, with the centre of mass (CoM) passing over a stiff stance leg (an 'inverted pendulum'), while the swing leg swings forward (as a pendulum). At its simplest, this forms a 'compass gait' walker, which has a maximum walking speed constrained by simple mechanics: walk too fast, or with too high a step length, and gravity fails to keep the stance foot attached to the floor. But how useful is such an extremely reductionist model? In the present study, we report measurements on a range of duck breeds as example unspecialized, non-planar, crouch-limbed walkers and contrast these findings with previous measurements on humans, using the theoretical framework of compass gait walking. Ducks walked as inverted pendulums with near-passive swing legs up to relative velocities around 0.5, remarkably consistent with the theoretical model. By contrast, top walking speeds in humans cannot be achieved with passive swing legs: humans, while still constrained by compass gait mechanics, extend their envelope of walking speeds by using relatively high step frequencies. Therefore, the capacity to drive the swing leg forward by walking humans may be a specialization for walking, allowing near-passive vaulting of the CoM at walking speeds 4/3 that possible with a passive (duck-like) swing leg.

  1. The effect of waist twisting on walking speed of an amphibious salamander like robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin-Yan; Jia, Li-Chao; Wang, Chen; Xie, Guang-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Amphibious salamanders often swing their waist to coordinate quadruped walking in order to improve their crawling speed. A robot with a swing waist joint, like an amphibious salamander, is used to mimic this locomotion. A control method is designed to allow the robot to maintain the rotational speed of its legs continuous and avoid impact between its legs and the ground. An analytical expression is established between the amplitude of the waist joint and the step length. Further, an optimization amplitude is obtained corresponding to the maximum stride. The simulation results based on automatic dynamic analysis of mechanical systems (ADAMS) and physical experiments verify the rationality and validity of this expression.

  2. The effect of waist twisting on walking speed of an amphibious salamander like robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yan Yin; Li-Chao Jia; Chen Wang; Guang-Ming Xie

    2016-01-01

    Amphibious salamanders often swing their waist to coordinate quadruped walking in order to improve their crawling speed. A robot with a swing waist joint, like an amphibious salamander, is used to mimic this locomotion. A control method is designed to allow the robot to maintain the rotational speed of its legs continuous and avoid impact between its legs and the ground. An analytical expression is established between the amplitude of the waist joint and the step length. Further, an optimization amplitude is obtained corresponding to the maximum stride. The simulation results based on automatic dynamic analysis of mechanical systems (ADAMS) and physical experiments verify the rationality and validity of this expression.

  3. A feedback-controlled treadmill (treadmill-on-demand) and the spontaneous speed of walking and running in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Alberto E; Boldrini, Lorenzo; Brusamolin, Laura; Zamparo, Paola; McKee, Tom

    2003-08-01

    A novel apparatus, composed by a controllable treadmill, a computer, and an ultrasonic range finder, is here proposed to help investigation of many aspects of spontaneous locomotion. The acceleration or deceleration of the subject, detected by the sensor and processed by the computer, is used to accelerate or decelerate the treadmill in real time. The system has been used to assess, in eight subjects, the self-selected speed of walking and running, the maximum "reasonable" speed of walking, and the minimum reasonable speed of running at different gradients (from level up to +25%). This evidenced the speed range at which humans neither walk nor run, from 7.2 +/- 0.6 to 8.4 +/- 1.1 km/h for level locomotion, slightly narrowing at steeper slopes. These data confirm previous results, obtained indirectly from stride frequency recordings. The self-selected speed of walking decreases with increasing gradient (from 5.0 +/- 0.8 km/h at 0% to 3.0 +/- 0.9 km/h at +25%) and seems to be approximately 30% higher than the speed that minimizes the metabolic energy cost of walking, obtained from the literature, at all the investigated gradients. The advantages, limitations, and potential applications of the newly proposed methodology in physiology, biomechanics, and pathology of locomotion are discussed in this paper.

  4. Hexapod Walking Robot Energy Consumption Dependence On Different Gaits And Speed While Moving On Even Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Luneckas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of robotic energetics while moving on rough terrain becomes a difficult task without having the information about the movement on even terrain. The problem appears in selection of gaits depending on how much power robot consumes. In this paper, energy consumption of a hexapod walking robot dependence on different gaits and speed is observed. Three most common gaits were used in this experiment: tripod gait, bipod gait and wave gait. Results clearly show that while moving at slow speed, the least energy is consumed by wave gait. As the speed increases, bipod gait selection is required to lower energy consumption. Finally, tripod gait must be selected at even higher speed.

  5. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edith M; Hamner, Samuel R; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L

    2013-06-01

    The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle-tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0-1.75 m s(-1) and ran at speeds of 2.0-5.0 m s(-1). We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force-length and force-velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle-tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running.

  6. Differences in association of walking for recreation and for transport with maximum walking speed in an elderly Japanese community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Masamitsu; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Shiwaku, Kuninori; Inoue, Shigeru; Okada, Shimpei; Mutoh, Yoshiteru

    2011-08-01

    Physical activity contributes to maintaining functional ability later in life. Specific relationships between walking for particular purposes (eg, recreation or transport) and functional ability are not clear. It is useful for planning health promotion strategies to clarify whether walking time for recreation, or walking time for transport has the stronger relationship with maximum walking speed (MWS), a determinant of functional ability later in life in the elderly. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 using a sample of 372 community-dwelling elderly people aged 60 to 87 years in Mitoya Town, Unnan City, rural Japan. Associations with MWS were examined for self-reported weekly times of walking for recreation and for transport using multiple linear regression analyses. Both in men and women, walking time for recreation was significantly associated with MWS after controlling for age, height, weight, hip and knee pain, and a number of chronic diseases (men: β = 0.18, P = .024; women: β = 0.17, P < .01). However, walking time for transport was not significantly associated with MWS (men: β = -0.094, P = .24; women: β = -0.040, P = .50). Walking for recreation may contribute to maintaining functional abilities such as MWS in the elderly.

  7. Preferred gait and walk-run transition speeds in ostriches measured using GPS-IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Monica A; Channon, Anthony J; Nolan, Grant S; Hall, Jade

    2016-10-15

    The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is widely appreciated as a fast and agile bipedal athlete, and is a useful comparative bipedal model for human locomotion. Here, we used GPS-IMU sensors to measure naturally selected gait dynamics of ostriches roaming freely over a wide range of speeds in an open field and developed a quantitative method for distinguishing walking and running using accelerometry. We compared freely selected gait-speed distributions with previous laboratory measures of gait dynamics and energetics. We also measured the walk-run and run-walk transition speeds and compared them with those reported for humans. We found that ostriches prefer to walk remarkably slowly, with a narrow walking speed distribution consistent with minimizing cost of transport (CoT) according to a rigid-legged walking model. The dimensionless speeds of the walk-run and run-walk transitions are slower than those observed in humans. Unlike humans, ostriches transition to a run well below the mechanical limit necessitating an aerial phase, as predicted by a compass-gait walking model. When running, ostriches use a broad speed distribution, consistent with previous observations that ostriches are relatively economical runners and have a flat curve for CoT against speed. In contrast, horses exhibit U-shaped curves for CoT against speed, with a narrow speed range within each gait for minimizing CoT. Overall, the gait dynamics of ostriches moving freely over natural terrain are consistent with previous lab-based measures of locomotion. Nonetheless, ostriches, like humans, exhibit a gait-transition hysteresis that is not explained by steady-state locomotor dynamics and energetics. Further study is required to understand the dynamics of gait transitions.

  8. Gait Parameter Adjustments for Walking on a Treadmill at Preferred, Slower, and Faster Speeds in Older Adults with Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of ligamentous laxity, hypotonia, and decrements associated with aging lead to stability-enhancing foot placement adaptations during routine overground walking at a younger age in adults with Down syndrome (DS compared to their peers with typical development (TD. Our purpose here was to examine real-time adaptations in older adults with DS by testing their responses to walking on a treadmill at their preferred speed and at speeds slower and faster than preferred. We found that older adults with DS were able to adapt their gait to slower and faster than preferred treadmill speeds; however, they maintained their stability-enhancing foot placements at all speeds compared to their peers with TD. All adults adapted their gait patterns similarly in response to faster and slower than preferred treadmill-walking speeds. They increased stride frequency and stride length, maintained step width, and decreased percent stance as treadmill speed increased. Older adults with DS, however, adjusted their stride frequencies significantly less than their peers with TD. Our results show that older adults with DS have the capacity to adapt their gait parameters in response to different walking speeds while also supporting the need for intervention to increase gait stability.

  9. Prefrontal, posterior parietal and sensorimotor network activity underlying speed control during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Bulea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests cortical circuits may contribute to control of human locomotion. Here, noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG recorded from able-bodied volunteers during a novel treadmill walking paradigm was used to assess neural correlates of walking. A systematic processing method, including a recently developed subspace reconstruction algorithm, reduced movement-related EEG artifact prior to independent component analysis and dipole source localization. We quantified cortical activity while participants tracked slow and fast target speeds across two treadmill conditions: an active mode that adjusted belt speed based on user movements and a passive mode reflecting a typical treadmill. Our results reveal frequency specific, multi-focal task related changes in cortical oscillations elicited by active walking. Low γ band power, localized to the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices, was significantly increased during double support and early swing phases, critical points in the gait cycle since the active controller adjusted speed based on pelvis position and swing foot velocity. These phasic γ band synchronizations provide evidence that prefrontal and posterior parietal networks, previously implicated in visuo-spatial and somotosensory integration, are engaged to enhance lower limb control during gait. Sustained μ and β band desynchronization within sensorimotor cortex, a neural correlate for movement, was observed during walking thereby validating our methods for isolating cortical activity. Our results also demonstrate the utility of EEG recorded during locomotion for probing the multi-regional cortical networks which underpin its execution. For example, the cortical network engagement elicited by the active treadmill suggests that it may enhance neuroplasticity for more effective motor training.

  10. Development and validation of a new method to measure walking speed in free-living environments using the actibelt® platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Schimpl

    Full Text Available Walking speed is a fundamental indicator for human well-being. In a clinical setting, walking speed is typically measured by means of walking tests using different protocols. However, walking speed obtained in this way is unlikely to be representative of the conditions in a free-living environment. Recently, mobile accelerometry has opened up the possibility to extract walking speed from long-time observations in free-living individuals, but the validity of these measurements needs to be determined. In this investigation, we have developed algorithms for walking speed prediction based on 3D accelerometry data (actibelt® and created a framework using a standardized data set with gold standard annotations to facilitate the validation and comparison of these algorithms. For this purpose 17 healthy subjects operated a newly developed mobile gold standard while walking/running on an indoor track. Subsequently, the validity of 12 candidate algorithms for walking speed prediction ranging from well-known simple approaches like combining step length with frequency to more sophisticated algorithms such as linear and non-linear models was assessed using statistical measures. As a result, a novel algorithm employing support vector regression was found to perform best with a concordance correlation coefficient of 0.93 (95%CI 0.92-0.94 and a coverage probability CP1 of 0.46 (95%CI 0.12-0.70 for a deviation of 0.1 m/s (CP2 0.78, CP3 0.94 when compared to the mobile gold standard while walking indoors. A smaller outdoor experiment confirmed those results with even better coverage probability. We conclude that walking speed thus obtained has the potential to help establish walking speed in free-living environments as a patient-oriented outcome measure.

  11. EEG Single-Trial Detection of Gait Speed Changes during Treadmill Walk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lisi

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyse the electroencephalography (EEG signal associated with gait speed changes (i.e. acceleration or deceleration. For data acquisition, healthy subjects were asked to perform volitional speed changes between 0, 1, and 2 Km/h, during treadmill walk. Simultaneously, the treadmill controller modified the speed of the belt according to the subject's linear speed. A classifier is trained to distinguish between the EEG signal associated with constant speed gait and with gait speed changes, respectively. Results indicate that the classification performance is fair to good for the majority of the subjects, with accuracies always above chance level, in both batch and pseudo-online approaches. Feature visualisation and equivalent dipole localisation suggest that the information used by the classifier is associated with increased activity in parietal areas, where mu and beta rhythms are suppressed during gait speed changes. Specifically, the parietal cortex may be involved in motor planning and visuomotor transformations throughout the online gait adaptation, which is in agreement with previous research. The findings of this study may help to shed light on the cortical involvement in human gait control, and represent a step towards a BMI for applications in post-stroke gait rehabilitation.

  12. EEG Single-Trial Detection of Gait Speed Changes during Treadmill Walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Giuseppe; Morimoto, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyse the electroencephalography (EEG) signal associated with gait speed changes (i.e. acceleration or deceleration). For data acquisition, healthy subjects were asked to perform volitional speed changes between 0, 1, and 2 Km/h, during treadmill walk. Simultaneously, the treadmill controller modified the speed of the belt according to the subject's linear speed. A classifier is trained to distinguish between the EEG signal associated with constant speed gait and with gait speed changes, respectively. Results indicate that the classification performance is fair to good for the majority of the subjects, with accuracies always above chance level, in both batch and pseudo-online approaches. Feature visualisation and equivalent dipole localisation suggest that the information used by the classifier is associated with increased activity in parietal areas, where mu and beta rhythms are suppressed during gait speed changes. Specifically, the parietal cortex may be involved in motor planning and visuomotor transformations throughout the online gait adaptation, which is in agreement with previous research. The findings of this study may help to shed light on the cortical involvement in human gait control, and represent a step towards a BMI for applications in post-stroke gait rehabilitation.

  13. Human Skeleton Model Based Dynamic Features for Walking Speed Invariant Gait Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Kovač

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to recognize small number of people they know well by the way they walk. This ability represents basic motivation for using human gait as the means for biometric identification. Such biometrics can be captured at public places from a distance without subject's collaboration, awareness, and even consent. Although current approaches give encouraging results, we are still far from effective use in real-life applications. In general, methods set various constraints to circumvent the influence of covariate factors like changes of walking speed, view, clothing, footwear, and object carrying, that have negative impact on recognition performance. In this paper we propose a skeleton model based gait recognition system focusing on modelling gait dynamics and eliminating the influence of subjects appearance on recognition. Furthermore, we tackle the problem of walking speed variation and propose space transformation and feature fusion that mitigates its influence on recognition performance. With the evaluation on OU-ISIR gait dataset, we demonstrate state of the art performance of proposed methods.

  14. Muscle contributions to support and progression over a range of walking speeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, May Q.; Anderson, Frank C.; Schwartz, Michael H.; Delp, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    ,Muscles actuate walking-by providing vertical support and forward progression of the mass center. To quantify muscle contributions to vertical support and forward progression (i.e., vertical and fore-aft accelerations of the mass center) over a rang e of walking speeds, three-dimensional

  15. Reliability and Validity of Ten Consumer Activity Trackers Depend on Walking Speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea J. M.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Van der Schans, Cees P.; De Groot, Martijn

    Purpose: To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Methods: Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge

  16. Muscle contributions to support and progression over a range of walking speeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, May Q.; Anderson, Frank C.; Schwartz, Michael H.; Delp, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    ,Muscles actuate walking-by providing vertical support and forward progression of the mass center. To quantify muscle contributions to vertical support and forward progression (i.e., vertical and fore-aft accelerations of the mass center) over a rang e of walking speeds, three-dimensional muscle-act

  17. Inertial Sensor-Based Methods in Walking Speed Estimation: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Li

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-selected walking speed is an important measure of ambulation ability used in various clinical gait experiments. Inertial sensors, i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes, have been gradually introduced to estimate walking speed. This research area has attracted a lot of attention for the past two decades, and the trend is continuing due to the improvement of performance and decrease in cost of the miniature inertial sensors. With the intention of understanding the state of the art of current development in this area, a systematic review on the exiting methods was done in the following electronic engines/databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Sixteen journal articles and papers in proceedings focusing on inertial sensor based walking speed estimation were fully reviewed. The existing methods were categorized by sensor specification, sensor attachment location, experimental design, and walking speed estimation algorithm.

  18. Inertial sensor-based methods in walking speed estimation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    Self-selected walking speed is an important measure of ambulation ability used in various clinical gait experiments. Inertial sensors, i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes, have been gradually introduced to estimate walking speed. This research area has attracted a lot of attention for the past two decades, and the trend is continuing due to the improvement of performance and decrease in cost of the miniature inertial sensors. With the intention of understanding the state of the art of current development in this area, a systematic review on the exiting methods was done in the following electronic engines/databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Sixteen journal articles and papers in proceedings focusing on inertial sensor based walking speed estimation were fully reviewed. The existing methods were categorized by sensor specification, sensor attachment location, experimental design, and walking speed estimation algorithm.

  19. Investigation on Walking and Pacing Stability of German Shepherd Dog for Different Locomotion Speeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijun Tian; Qian Cong; Carlo Menon

    2011-01-01

    The motion of three German Shepherd Dogs on a treadmill was recorded using a three-dimensional motion capture system.The locomotion speed of the dog was respectively set at 4 km·h-1, 5.5 km·h-1, 7 km·h-1 and 8.5 km·h-1 By processing the acquired data, the joint trajectories of the dogs' hind limbs were computed and a time series analysis was conducted. Joint angle-angle diagrams were obtained and the Lyapunov exponents were computed. Results show that the stability decreased when speed increased, which can be attributed to the decrease in the stance phase respect to the swing phase when speed is increased. Results also show that the dogs changed gait during the tests, namely walking in the range of 4 km·h-1 to 7 km·h-1 and pacing at 8.5 km·h-1. A significant drop in stability was observed from walking to pacing.

  20. The pendular mechanism does not determine the optimal speed of loaded walking on gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomeñuka, Natalia Andrea; Bona, Renata Luisa; da Rosa, Rodrigo Gomes; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    The pendular mechanism does not act as a primary mechanism in uphill walking due to the monotonic behavior of the mechanical energies of the center of mass. Nevertheless, recent evidence shows that there is an important minimization of energy expenditure by the pendular mechanism during walking on uphill gradients. In this study, we analyzed the optimum speed (OPT) of loaded human walking and the pendulum-like determining variables (Recovery R, Instantaneous pendular re-conversion Rint, and Congruity percentage %Cong). Ten young men walked on a treadmill at five different speeds and at three different treadmill incline gradients (0, +7 and +15%), with and without a load carried in their backpacks. We used indirect calorimetry and 3D motion analysis, and all of the data were analyzed by computational algorithms. Rint increased at higher speeds and decreased with increasing gradient. R and %Cong decreased with increasing gradient and increased with speed, independent of load. Thus, energy conversion by the pendular mechanism during walking on a 15% gradient is supported, and although this mechanism can explain the maintenance of OPT at low walking speeds, the pendular mechanism does not fully explain the energy minimization at higher speeds.

  1. Gait in male trans-tibial amputees: a comparative study with healthy subjects in relation to walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermodsson, Y; Ekdahl, C; Persson, B M; Roxendal, G

    1994-08-01

    Walking speed, stance duration and ground reaction forces were studied with the use of a stable force platform (Kistler) in 24 male transtibial amputees and 12 healthy subjects matched for sex and age. The aim of the study was to compare the gait performance of two groups with unilateral trans-tibial amputations for either vascular disease or trauma and also to compare the results of the two groups with the results of a group of healthy subjects. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to compare the stance duration and the ground reaction forces in relation to walking speed. The vascular and traumatic amputees had significantly reduced walking speeds compared with the healthy subjects, 0.85 +/- 0.2 m/s and 0.99 +/- 0.2 m/s. respectively, as compared to 1.42 +/- 0.2 m/s. By comparing the vascular and traumatic amputees with the healthy subjects in relation to walking speed, it was shown that the gait performance of the vascular amputee differed from that of the traumatic amputee, a difference that was not caused by the reduced walking speed. The active forces during push off on both the healthy (p = 0.02) and the prosthetic leg (p = 0.003) in the trauma group were not found in the vascular group. This disparity could be an effect of the systemic disease. It may be argued that the results of this study contribute to the understanding of the reduced walking ability of the vascular amputee and should be borne in mind when planning rehabilitation.

  2. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... healthy males. The muscle activation strategy and walking economy were also assessed. The movement dynamics was investigated using a combination of the largest Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension. We observed an intermediate stage of the movement dynamics of the knee joint angle and the anterior...

  3. Changes in axial stiffness of the trunk as a function of walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Masayoshi; Holt, Kenneth G; Saltzman, Elliot; Wagenaar, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that abnormal coordination patterns between the thorax and pelvis in the transverse plane observed in patients with Parkinson's disease and the elderly might be due to alteration in axial trunk stiffness. The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to estimate axial trunk stiffness during walking and to investigate its functional role. Fourteen healthy young subjects participated in this study. They were instructed to walk on the treadmill and kinematic data was collected by 3D motion analysis system. Axial trunk stiffness was estimated from the angular displacement between trunk segments and the amount of torque around vertical axis of rotation. The torque due to arm swing cancelled out the torque due to the axial trunk stiffness during walking and the thoracic rotation was of low amplitude independent of changes in walking speeds within the range used in this study (0.85-1.52 m/s). Estimated axial trunk stiffness increased with increasing walking speed. Functionally, the suppression of axial rotation of thorax may have a positive influence on head stability as well as allowing recoil between trunk segments. Furthermore, the increased stiffness at increased walking speed would facilitate the higher frequency rotation of the trunk in the transverse plane required at the higher walking speeds.

  4. Contributions of muscles and passive dynamics to swing initiation over a range of walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Melanie D; Delp, Scott L

    2010-05-28

    Stiff-knee gait is a common walking problem in cerebral palsy characterized by insufficient knee flexion during swing. To identify factors that may limit knee flexion in swing, it is necessary to understand how unimpaired subjects successfully coordinate muscles and passive dynamics (gravity and velocity-related forces) to accelerate the knee into flexion during double support, a critical phase just prior to swing that establishes the conditions for achieving sufficient knee flexion during swing. It is also necessary to understand how contributions to swing initiation change with walking speed, since patients with stiff-knee gait often walk slowly. We analyzed muscle-driven dynamic simulations of eight unimpaired subjects walking at four speeds to quantify the contributions of muscles, gravity, and velocity-related forces (i.e. Coriolis and centrifugal forces) to preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support at each speed. Analysis of the simulations revealed contributions from muscles and passive dynamics varied systematically with walking speed. Preswing knee flexion acceleration was achieved primarily by hip flexor muscles on the preswing leg with assistance from biceps femoris short head. Hip flexors on the preswing leg were primarily responsible for the increase in preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support with faster walking speed. The hip extensors and abductors on the contralateral leg and velocity-related forces opposed preswing knee flexion acceleration during double support. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. In-home walking speeds and variability trajectories associated with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, H H; Mattek, N C; Austin, D; Hayes, T L; Kaye, J A

    2012-06-12

    To determine whether unobtrusive long-term in-home assessment of walking speed and its variability can distinguish those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from those with intact cognition. Walking speed was assessed using passive infrared sensors fixed in series on the ceiling of the homes of elderly individuals participating in the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Change (ISAAC) cohort study. Latent trajectory models were used to analyze weekly mean speed and walking speed variability (coefficient of variation [COV]). ISAAC participants living alone included 54 participants with intact cognition, 31 participants with nonamnestic MCI (naMCI), and 8 participants with amnestic MCI at baseline, with a mean follow-up of 2.6 ± 1.0 years. Trajectory models identified 3 distinct trajectories (fast, moderate, and slow) of mean weekly walking speed. Participants with naMCI were more likely to be in the slow speed group than in the fast (p = 0.01) or moderate (p = 0.04) speed groups. For COV, 4 distinct trajectories were identified: group 1, the highest baseline and increasing COV followed by a sharply declining COV; groups 2 and 3, relatively stable COV; and group 4, the lowest baseline and decreasing COV. Participants with naMCI were more likely to be members of either highest or lowest baseline COV groups (groups 1 or 4), possibly representing the trajectory of walking speed variability for early- and late-stage MCI, respectively. Walking speed and its daily variability may be an early marker of the development of MCI. These and other real-time measures of function may offer novel ways of detecting transition phases leading to dementia.

  6. Construct validity of RT3 accelerometer: A comparison of level-ground and treadmill walking at self-selected speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Hendrick, MPhty

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined differences in accelerometer output when subjects walked on level ground and on a treadmill. We asked 25 nondisabled participants to wear an RT3 triaxial accelerometer (StayHealthy, Inc; Monrovia, California and walk at their "normal" and "brisk" walking speeds for 10 minutes. These activities were repeated on a treadmill using the individual speeds from level-ground walking on two occasions 1 week apart. Paired t-tests found a difference in RT3 accelerometer vector magnitude (VM counts/min between the two walking speeds on both surfaces on days 1 and 2 (p 0.05, we found wide limits of agreement between level ground and treadmill walking at both speeds. Measurement and discrimination of walking intensity employing RT3 accelerometer VM counts/min on the treadmill demonstrated reasonable validity and stability over two time points compared with level-ground walking.

  7. Changing the demand on specific muscle groups affects the walk-run transition speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jamie L; Kram, Rodger

    2008-04-01

    It has been proposed that muscle-specific factors trigger the human walk-run transition. We investigated if changing the demand on trigger muscles alters the preferred walk-run transition speed. We hypothesized that (1) reducing the demand on trigger muscles would increase the transition speed and (2) increasing the demand on trigger muscles would decrease the transition speed. We first determined the normal preferred walk-run transition speed (PTS) using a step-wise protocol with a randomized speed order. We then determined PTS while subjects walked with external devices that decreased or increased the demand on specific muscle groups. We concurrently measured the electromyographic activity of five leg muscles (tibialis anterior, soleus, rectus femoris, medial and lateral gastrocnemius) at each speed and condition. For this study, we developed a dorsiflexor assist device that aids the dorsiflexor muscles. A leg swing assist device applied forward pulling forces at the feet thus aiding the hip flexors during swing. A third device applied a horizontal force near the center of mass, which impedes or aids forward progression thus overloading or unloading the plantarflexor muscles. We found that when demand was decreased in the muscles measured, the PTS significantly increased. Conversely, when muscle demand was increased in the plantar flexors, the PTS decreased. However, combining assistive devices did not produce an even faster PTS. We conclude that altering the demand on specific muscles can change the preferred walk-run transition speed. However, the lack of a summation effect with multiple external devices, suggests that another underlying factor ultimately determines the preferred walk-run transition speed.

  8. Association between walking speed and age in healthy, free-living individuals using mobile accelerometry--a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Schimpl

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Walking speed is a fundamental parameter of human motion and is increasingly considered as an important indicator of individuals' health status. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship of gait parameters, and demographic and physical characteristics in healthy men and women. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Recruitment of a subsample (n = 358 of male and female blood donors taking part in the Cambridge CardioResource study. Collection of demographic data, measurement of physical characteristics (height, weight and blood pressure and assessment of 7-day, free-living activity parameters using accelerometry and a novel algorithm to measure walking speed. Participants were a median (interquartile range[IQR] age of 49 (16 years; 45% women; and had a median (IQR BMI of 26 (5.4. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Walking speed. RESULTS: In this study, the hypothesis that walking speed declines with age was generated using an initial 'open' dataset. This was subsequently validated in a separate 'closed' dataset that showed a decrease of walking speed of -0.0037 m/s per year. This is equivalent to a difference of 1.2 minutes, when walking a distance of 1 km aged 20 compared to 60 years. Associations between walking speed and other participant characteristics (i.e. gender, BMI and blood pressure were non-significant. BMI was negatively correlated with the number of walking and running steps and longest non-stop distance. CONCLUSION: This is the first study using accelerometry which shows an association between walking speed and age in free-living, healthy individuals. Absolute values of gait speed are comparable to published normal ranges in clinical settings. This study highlights the potential use of mobile accelerometry to assess gait parameters which may be indicative of future health outcomes in healthy individuals.

  9. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness, carotid plaques, and walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Alexis; Ripert, Mahaut; Tavernier, Béatrice; Février, Benoît; Zureik, Mahmoud; Gariépy, Jérôme; Alpérovitch, Annick; Tzourio, Christophe

    2005-10-01

    Gait dysfunction is an important cause of disability among the elderly and may be, in part, of vascular origin. We studied the association between carotid ultrasound parameters and measures of gait and balance in subjects 65 to 85 years of age who participated in the baseline phase of the Three-City Study in the Dijon center. The study population comprised 2572 noninstitutionalized individuals. Carotid plaques and common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) were measured using ultrasonography. Gait and balance measures included walking speed and a modified version of the Tinetti scale. Mean maximum walking speed (MWS) decreased with increasing CCA-IMT and number of plaques (PTinetti score score of > or =16 (P=0.006). The proportion of subjects in the lowest MWS quartile (P=0.006) or with a modified Tinetti score <16 (P=0.05) increased with the number of plaques. These relations were attenuated after adjustment for vascular risk factors. Carotid plaques and higher CCA-IMT values are associated with worse performances on gait and balance tests. Our results suggest that vascular factors may play an important and under-recognized role in motor function.

  10. Energy cost of balance control during walking decreases with external stabilizer stiffness independent of walking speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijmker, Trienke; Houdijk, Han; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.; Beek, Peter J.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.

    2013-01-01

    Human walking requires active neuromuscular control to ensure stability in the lateral direction, which inflicts a certain metabolic load. The magnitude of this metabolic load has previously been investigated by means of passive external lateral stabilization via spring-like cords. In the present

  11. Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sallinen, Janne; Mänty, Minna; Leinonen, Raija

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Relative contribution of different domains on walking speed is largely unknown. This study investigated what are the central factors associated with maximal walking speed among older people. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the SCAMOB study (ISRCTN...... 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75-81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported using...... explained to 38%. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by additional 7%. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms in the model. In the final model, the single most...

  12. Speed and entropy of an interacting continuous time quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    De Falco, D; Falco, Diego de; Tamascelli, Dario

    2006-01-01

    We present some dynamic and entropic considerations about the evolution of a continuous time quantum walk implementing the clock of an autonomous machine. On a simple model, we study in quite explicit terms the Lindblad evolution of the clocked subsystem, relating the evolution of its entropy to the spreading of the wave packet of the clock. We explore possible ways of reducing the generation of entropy in the clocked subsystem, as it amounts to a deficit in the probability of finding the target state of the computation. We are thus lead to examine the benefits of abandoning some classical prejudice about how a clocking mechanism should operate.

  13. The effect of walking speed on local dynamic stability is sensitive to calculation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenum, Jan; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-01-01

    Local dynamic stability has been assessed by the short-term local divergence exponent (λS), which quantifies the average rate of logarithmic divergence of infinitesimally close trajectories in state space. Both increased and decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds have been......% and 140% of preferred walking speed) for 3min each, while upper body accelerations in three directions were sampled. From these time-series, λS was calculated by three different methods using: (a) a fixed time interval and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-a), (b) a fixed number...... of strides and expressed as logarithmic divergence per time (λS-b) and (c) a fixed number of strides and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-c). Mean preferred walking speed was 1.16±0.09m/s. There was only a minor effect of walking speed on λS-a. λS-b increased with increasing walking...

  14. Maximum walking speeds obtained using treadmill and overground robot system in persons with post-stroke hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capó-Lugo, Carmen E; Mullens, Christopher H; Brown, David A

    2012-10-11

    Previous studies demonstrated that stroke survivors have a limited capacity to increase their walking speeds beyond their self-selected maximum walking speed (SMWS). The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of stroke survivors to reach faster speeds than their SMWS while walking on a treadmill belt or while being pushed by a robotic system (i.e. "push mode"). Eighteen chronic stroke survivors with hemiplegia were involved in the study. We calculated their self-selected comfortable walking speed (SCWS) and SMWS overground using a 5-meter walk test (5-MWT). Then, they were exposed to walking at increased speeds, on a treadmill and while in "push mode" in an overground robotic device, the KineAssist, until they were tested at a speed that they could not sustain without losing balance. We recorded the time and number of steps during each trial and calculated gait speed, average cadence and average step length. Maximum walking speed in the "push mode" was 13% higher than the maximum walking speed on the treadmill and both were higher ("push mode": 61%; treadmill: 40%) than the maximum walking speed overground. Subjects achieved these faster speeds by initially increasing both step length and cadence and, once individuals stopped increasing their step length, by only increasing cadence. With post-stroke hemiplegia, individuals are able to walk at faster speeds than their SMWS overground, when provided with a safe environment that provides external forces that requires them to attempt dynamic stability maintenance at higher gait speeds. Therefore, this study suggests the possibility that, given the appropriate conditions, people post-stroke can be trained at higher speeds than previously attempted.

  15. Walking speed related joint kinetic alterations in trans-tibial amputees: impact of hydraulic 'ankle' damping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Asha, Alan R; Munjal, Ramesh; Kulkarni, Jai; Buckley, John G

    2013-10-17

    Passive prosthetic devices are set up to provide optimal function at customary walking speed and thus may function less effectively at other speeds. This partly explains why joint kinetic adaptations become more apparent in lower-limb amputees when walking at speeds other than customary. The present study determined whether a trans-tibial prosthesis incorporating a dynamic-response foot that was attached to the shank via an articulating hydraulic device (hyA-F) lessened speed-related adaptations in joint kinetics compared to when the foot was attached via a rigid, non-articulating attachment (rigF). Eight active unilateral trans-tibial amputees completed walking trials at their customary walking speed, and at speeds they deemed to be slow-comfortable and fast-comfortable whilst using each type of foot attachment. Moments and powers at the distal end of the prosthetic shank and at the intact joints of both limbs were compared between attachment conditions. There was no change in the amount of intact-limb ankle work across speed or attachment conditions. As speed level increased there was an increase on both limbs in the amount of hip and knee joint work done, and increases on the prosthetic side were greater when using the hyA-F. However, because all walking speed levels were higher when using the hyA-F, the intact-limb ankle and combined joints work per meter travelled were significantly lower; particularly so at the customary speed level. This was the case despite the hyA-F dissipating more energy during stance. In addition, the amount of eccentric work done per meter travelled became increased at the residual knee when using the hyA-F, with increases again greatest at customary speed. Findings indicate that a trans-tibial prosthesis incorporating a dynamic-response foot reduced speed-related changes in compensatory intact-limb joint kinetics when the foot was attached via an articulating hydraulic device compared to rigid attachment. As differences between

  16. Effects of Walking Speed and Visual-Target Distance on Toe Trajectory During Swing Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Brady, Rachel; Warren, Liz; Richards, Jason; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Sung, Hsi-Guang; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    After spaceflight, astronauts experience disturbances in their ability to walk and maintain postural stability (Bloomberg, et al., 1997). One of the post-flight neurovestibular assessments requires that the astronaut walk on a treadmill at 1.8 m/sec (4.0 mph), while performing a visual acuity test, set at two different distances ( far and near ). For the first few days after landing, some crewmembers can not maintain the required pace, so a lower speed may be used. The slower velocity must be considered in the kinematic analysis, because Andriacchi, et al. (1977) showed that in clinical populations, changes in gait parameters may be attributable more to slower gait speed than pathology. Studying toe trajectory gives a global view of control of the leg, since it involves coordination of muscles and joints in both the swing and stance legs (Karst, et al., 1999). Winter (1992) and Murray, et al. (1984) reported that toe clearance during overground walking increased slightly as speed increased, but not significantly. Also, toe vertical peaks in both early and late swing phase did increase significantly with increasing speed. During conventional testing of overground locomotion, subjects are usually asked to fix their gaze on the end of the walkway a far target. But target (i.e., visual fixation) distance has been shown to affect head and trunk motion during treadmill walking (Bloomberg, et al., 1992; Peters, et al., in review). Since the head and trunk can not maintain stable gaze without proper coordination with the lower body (Mulavara & Bloomberg, 2003), it would stand to reason that lower body kinematics may be altered as well when target distance is modified. The purpose of this study was to determine changes in toe vertical trajectory during treadmill walking due to changes in walking speed and target distance.

  17. Walking speed and high blood pressure mortality risk in a Spanish elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Misis, A; Sánchez-Santos, M T; Banegas, J R; Castell, M V; González-Montalvo, J I; Otero, A

    2015-09-01

    This study analyzed the relationship between blood pressure and all-cause mortality according to objectively measured walking speed in a Mediterranean population-based sample of older persons. We used data from the longitudinal 'Peñagrande' Cohort Study, initiated in 2008 in a sex- and age-stratified random sample of 1250 people aged ⩾65 years living in Madrid (Spain). A total of 814 individuals participated in the first study wave. The average of two standardized blood pressure readings was used. Walking speed was measured over a 3-m walk and classified as faster (⩾0.8 m s(-1)) or slower. A total of 314 individuals were slower walkers, 475 were faster walkers and 25 did not complete the walk test. Cox proportional hazards models stratified by walking speed were used to assess the association between blood pressure and all-cause death. Non-linear relationship between BP and mortality was explored by a restricted cubic spline analysis. There were 171 deaths from study entry through 31 March 2013. Systolic blood pressure blood pressure blood pressure values above 140 and 90 mm Hg, respectively, but this association reached statistical significance only for systolic blood pressure and only in the slower walkers. In conclusion, systolic blood pressure levels risk of total mortality among slower walkers in an old Spaniard population cohort.

  18. Effects of visual focus and gait speed on walking balance in the frontal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodworth, Adam; Perrone, Kathryn; Pillsbury, Mark; Yargeau, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    We investigated how head position and gait speed influenced frontal plane balance responses to external perturbations during gait. Thirteen healthy participants walked on a treadmill at three different gait speeds. Visual conditions included either focus downward on lower extremities and walking surface only or focus forward on a stationary scene with horizontal and vertical lines. The treadmill was positioned on a platform that was stationary (non-perturbed) or moving in a pattern that appeared random to the subjects (perturbed). In non-perturbed walking, medial-lateral upper body motion was very similar between visual conditions. However, in perturbed walking, there was significantly less body motion when focus was on the stationary visual scene, suggesting visual feedback of stationary vertical and horizontal cues are particularly important when balance is challenged. Sensitivity of body motion to perturbations was significantly decreased by increasing gait speed, suggesting that faster walking was less sensitive to frontal plane perturbations. Finally, our use of external perturbations supported the idea that certain differences in balance control mechanisms can only be detected in more challenging situations, which is an important consideration for approaches to investigating sensory contribution to balance during gait.

  19. The validity of two Omron pedometers during treadmill walking is speed dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidou, Dimitra M; Kambas, Antonis; Ageloussis, Nikolaos; Fatouros, Ioannis; Christoforidis, Christos; Venetsanou, Fotini; Douroudos, Ioannis; Taxildaris, Kyriakos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of walking speed on the accuracy of measurement of steps, distance, and energy expenditure of two commercially available Omron pedometers [HJ-720IT-E2 (HJ-720) and HJ-113-E (HJ-113)]. Twenty-four untrained males (age, 22.7 ± 2.8 years; BMI, 24.38 ± 2.19 kg m(-2); body fat (%), 16 ± 2.2; VO(2max), 40.2 ± 6.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and 18 females (age, 22.4 ± 2.9 years; BMI, 21.68 ± 2.43 kg m(-2); body fat (%), 23% ± 1.8; VO(2max), 35.9 ± 2.8 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) walked at five different velocities (54, 67, 80, 94 and 107 m min(-1)) on a treadmill in 5-min stages while wearing three types of pedometers: (a) HJ-720, (b) HJ-113, and (c) Yamax Digi-Walker SW-200 (YAM). Step-count for each pedometer was recorded at the end of each stage and compared with the value of a hand counter. Additionally, Omron pedometers were evaluated on their distance and energy expenditure (against VO(2) measurement with a gas-exchange analyzer) accuracy during each stage. HJ-720 and HJ-113 demonstrated high accuracy (r = 0.80-0.99) at all speeds. YAM underestimated step-count only at 54 m min(-1) (r = 0.46). HJ-720 and HJ-113 overestimated distance at slower speeds and underestimated distance at faster speeds, providing mean distance values that where to within 1.5-4% at 80 m min(-1). HJ-720 and HJ-113 underestimated energy expenditure (gross kilocalories) by 28%, when compared to indirect calorimetry. These results suggest that although the Omron HJ-720 and HJ-113 pedometers are accurate in the measurement of step-count, they demonstrate limited accuracy in the assessment of traveled distance and energy expenditure in a speed-dependent manner.

  20. Are the average gait speeds during the 10meter and 6minute walk tests redundant in Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Ryan P; Combs-Miller, Stephanie A; McNeely, Marie E; Leddy, Abigail L; Cavanaugh, James T; Dibble, Leland E; Ellis, Terry D; Ford, Matthew P; Foreman, K Bo; Earhart, Gammon M

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the relationships between average gait speed collected with the 10Meter Walk Test (Comfortable and Fast) and 6Minute Walk Test (6MWT) in 346 people with Parkinson disease (PD) and how the relationships change with increasing disease severity. Pearson correlation and linear regression analyses determined relationships between 10Meter Walk Test and 6MWT gait speed values for the entire sample and for sub-samples stratified by Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) stage I (n=53), II (n=141), III (n=135) and IV (n=17). We hypothesized that redundant tests would be highly and significantly correlated (i.e. r>0.70, pMeter Walk Test (r=0.75) and Fast 10Meter Walk Test (r=0.79) gait speed, with 56% and 62% of the variance in 6MWT gait speed explained, respectively. The regression model of 6MWT gait speed predicted by Comfortable 10 Meter Walk gait speed produced slope and intercept values near 1 and 0, respectively, especially for participants in H&Y stages II-IV. In contrast, slope and intercept values were further from 1 and 0, respectively, for the Fast 10Meter Walk Test. Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test and 6MWT gait speeds appeared to be redundant in people with moderate to severe PD, suggesting the Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test can be used to estimate 6MWT distance in this population.

  1. Does use of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis restore whole-body angular momentum during walking at different speeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Susan; Wilhelm, Natalie; Silverman, Anne K; Grabowski, Alena M

    2014-10-01

    Whole-body angular momentum (H) influences fall risk, is tightly regulated during walking, and is primarily controlled by muscle force generation. People with transtibial amputations using passive-elastic prostheses typically have greater H compared with nonamputees. (1) Do people with unilateral transtibial amputations using passive-elastic prostheses have greater sagittal and frontal plane H ranges of motion during walking compared with nonamputees and compared with using powered prostheses? (2) Does use of powered ankle-foot prostheses result in equivalent H ranges in all planes of motion compared with nonamputees during walking as a result of normative prosthetic ankle power generation? Eight patients with a unilateral transtibial amputation and eight nonamputees walked 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75 m/s while we measured kinematics and ground reaction forces. We calculated H for participants using their passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis and for nonamputees at each speed. Patients using passive-elastic prostheses had 32% to 59% greater sagittal H ranges during the affected leg stance phase compared with nonamputees at 1.00 to 1.75 m/s (p passive-elastic prostheses had 5% and 9% greater sagittal H ranges compared with using powered prostheses at 1.25 and 1.50 m/s, respectively (p passive-elastic prostheses had 29% and 17% greater frontal H ranges at 0.75 and 1.50 m/s, respectively, compared with nonamputees (p walking speeds when using powered compared with passive-elastic prostheses. Our results support the hypothesis that an ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive work during the stance phase of walking reduces sagittal plane H; future studies are needed to validate our biomechanical findings with larger numbers of patients and should determine whether powered prostheses can decrease the risk of falls in patients with a transtibial amputation.

  2. Synergistic Structure in the Speed Dependent Modulation of Muscle Activity in Human Walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurke, Tom J W; Lamoth, Claudine J C; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Otter, den A. Rob

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a modular organisation has been proposed to simplify control of the large number of muscles involved in human walking. Although previous research indicates that a single set of modular activation patterns can account for muscle activity at different speeds, these studies only provide indir

  3. Genetic Analysis of Daily Maximum Milking Speed by a Random Walk Model in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karacaören, Burak; Janss, Luc; Kadarmideen, Haja

    Data were obtained from dairy cows stationed at research farm ETH Zurich for maximum milking speed. The main aims of this paper are a) to evaluate if the Wood curve is suitable to model mean lactation curve b) to predict longitudinal breeding values by random regression and random walk models...

  4. Synergistic Structure in the Speed Dependent Modulation of Muscle Activity in Human Walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurke, Tom J. W.; Lamoth, Claudine J C; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Otter, den A. Rob

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a modular organisation has been proposed to simplify control of the large number of muscles involved in human walking. Although previous research indicates that a single set of modular activation patterns can account for muscle activity at different speeds, these studies only provide

  5. Step-Detection and Adaptive Step-Length Estimation for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning at Various Walking Speeds Using a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ngoc-Huynh; Truong, Phuc Huu; Jeong, Gu-Min

    2016-09-02

    We propose a walking distance estimation method based on an adaptive step-length estimator at various walking speeds using a smartphone. First, we apply a fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based smoother on the acceleration data collected by the smartphone to remove the interference signals. Then, we analyze these data using a set of step-detection rules in order to detect walking steps. Using an adaptive estimator, which is based on a model of average step speed, we accurately obtain the walking step length. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we examine the distance estimation for four different distances and three speed levels. The experimental results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms conventional estimation methods in terms of accuracy.

  6. Step-Detection and Adaptive Step-Length Estimation for Pedestrian Dead-Reckoning at Various Walking Speeds Using a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Huynh Ho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose a walking distance estimation method based on an adaptive step-length estimator at various walking speeds using a smartphone. First, we apply a fast Fourier transform (FFT-based smoother on the acceleration data collected by the smartphone to remove the interference signals. Then, we analyze these data using a set of step-detection rules in order to detect walking steps. Using an adaptive estimator, which is based on a model of average step speed, we accurately obtain the walking step length. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, we examine the distance estimation for four different distances and three speed levels. The experimental results show that the proposed method significantly outperforms conventional estimation methods in terms of accuracy.

  7. Changes in Energy Cost and Total External Work of Muscles in Elite Race Walkers Walking at Different Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwała Wiesław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess energy cost and total external work (total energy depending on the speed of race walking. Another objective was to determine the contribution of external work to total energy cost of walking at technical, threshold and racing speed in elite competitive race walkers.

  8. Effects of walking speed and age on the muscle forces of unimpaired gait subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliger, Carlos G.; Crespo, Marcos J.; Braidot, Ariel A.; Ravera, Emiliano P.

    2016-04-01

    Clinical gait analysis provides great contributions to the understanding of gait disorders and also provides a mean for a more comprehensive treatment plan. However, direct measures of muscle forces are difficult to obtain in clinical settings because it generally requires invasive techniques. Techniques of musculoskeletal modeling have been used for several decades to improve the benefits of clinical gait analysis, but many of the previous studies were focused on analyzing separately the muscle forces distribution of children or adult subjects with only one condition of walking speed. For these reason, the present study aims to enhance the current literature by describing the age and speed gait effects on muscle forces during walking. We used a musculoskeletal model with 23 degrees of freedom and 92 musculotendon actuators to represent 76 muscles in the lower extremities and torso. The computed muscle control algorithm was used to estimate the muscle forces from the kinematics and to adjust the model obtained in the residual reduction algorithm. We find that hamstrings has an important peak in the mid-stance phase in the adult group but this peak disappears in the children group with the same walking speed condition. Furthermore, the rectus femoris presents an increase in the muscle force during the pre- and mid-swing in concordance with the increment in the walking speed of subjects. This behavior could be associated with the role that the rectus femoris has in the acceleration of the knee joint. Finally, we show that the soleus is the muscle that perform the major force throughout the gait cycle regardless of age and walking speed.

  9. Spatiotemporal characteristics of the walk-to-run and run-to-walk transition when gradually changing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segers, V; Aerts, P; Lenoir, M; De Clercq, D

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine spatiotemporal parameters of the walk-to-run transition (WRT) and run-to-walk transition (RWT) when speed is altered with different constant accelerations. Twenty women (height: 168.9+/-3.36cm) performed three accelerations (0.05, 0.07 and 0.1ms(-2)) and three decelerations (-0.05, -0.07 and -0.1ms(-2)) on a motor-driven treadmill. The transition step in the WRT (first step with a flight phase) and RWT (first step with a double stance phase) occurred at the same speed for all accelerations but these did not occur in the same way. The most striking difference was the presence of a transition step with specific spatiotemporal characteristics in the WRT, whereas this was not observed in the RWT. The transition is not a sudden one-step-event. WRT occurred before transition and consisted of a "pre-transition period" and the transition step whereas RWT occurred after transition and consisted of the transition step and a "post-transition period". Both transition periods were characterized by an exponential evolution of step frequency and step length. Step frequency and step length showed a linear evolution before and after transition. The flight phase of the transition step in the WRT reached a minimum with comparable duration of the last flight phase in the RWT. The flight phase could be considered as an intrinsic dynamical factor of transition. Further research in kinematics, the trajectory of the body centre of mass and energy fluctuations will give more insight in these transitions.

  10. Locomotion Mode Affects the Physiological Strain during Exercise at Walk-Run Transition Speed inElderly Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Raul; Farinatti, Paulo; Cunha, Felipe; Silva, Brenno; Monteiro, Walace

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated cardiorespiratory responses and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during prolonged walking and running exercise performed at the walk-run transition speed (WRTS) in untrained healthy elderly men. 20 volunteers (mean±SE, age: 68.4±1.2 yrs; height: 170.0±0.02 cm; body mass: 74.7±2.3 kg) performed the following bouts of exercise: a) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET); b) specific protocol to detect WRTS; and c) two 30-min walking and running bouts at WRTS. Expired gases were collected during exercise bouts via the Ultima CardiO2 metabolic analyzer. Compared to walking, running at the WRTS resulted in higher oxygen uptake (>0.27 L·min(-1)), pulmonary ventilation (>7.7 L·min(-1)), carbon dioxide output (>0.23 L·min(-1)), heart rate (>15 beats·min(-1)), oxygen pulse (>0.88 15 mL·beats(-1)), energy expenditure (>27 kcal) and cost of oxygen transport (>43 mL·kg(-1)·km(-1)·bout(-1)). The increase of overall and local RPEs with exercise duration was similar across locomotion modes (Prunning bouts were around or above the gas exchange threshold. In conclusion, elderly men exhibited higher cardiorespiratory responses during 30-min bouts of running than walking at WRTS. Nevertheless, walking corresponded to relative metabolic intensities compatible with preservation or improvement of cardiorespiratory fitness and should be preferable over running at WRTS in the untrained elderly characterized by poor fitness and reduced exercise tolerance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Fatigue and Muscle Strength Involving Walking Speed in Parkinson’s Disease: Insights for Developing Rehabilitation Strategy for PD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Zu Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Problems with gait in Parkinson’s disease (PD are a challenge in neurorehabilitation, partly because the mechanisms causing the walking disability are unclear. Weakness and fatigue, which may significantly influence gait, are commonly reported by patients with PD. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between weakness and fatigue and walking ability in patients with PD. Methods. We recruited 25 patients with idiopathic PD and 25 age-matched healthy adults. The maximum voluntary contraction (MVC, twitch force, and voluntary activation levels were measured before and after a knee fatigue exercise. General fatigue, central fatigue, and peripheral fatigue were quantified by exercise-induced changes in MVC, twitch force, and activation level. In addition, subjective fatigue was measured using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Results. The patients with PD had lower activation levels, more central fatigue, and more subjective fatigue than the healthy controls. There were no significant differences in twitch force or peripheral fatigue index between the two groups. The reduction in walking speed was related to the loss of peripheral strength and PD itself. Conclusion. Fatigue and weakness of central origin were related to PD, while peripheral strength was important for walking ability. The results suggest that rehabilitation programs for PD should focus on improving both central and peripheral components of force.

  12. Fatigue and Muscle Strength Involving Walking Speed in Parkinson's Disease: Insights for Developing Rehabilitation Strategy for PD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Yu; Liu, Wei-Chia; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Chuang, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background. Problems with gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) are a challenge in neurorehabilitation, partly because the mechanisms causing the walking disability are unclear. Weakness and fatigue, which may significantly influence gait, are commonly reported by patients with PD. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between weakness and fatigue and walking ability in patients with PD. Methods. We recruited 25 patients with idiopathic PD and 25 age-matched healthy adults. The maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), twitch force, and voluntary activation levels were measured before and after a knee fatigue exercise. General fatigue, central fatigue, and peripheral fatigue were quantified by exercise-induced changes in MVC, twitch force, and activation level. In addition, subjective fatigue was measured using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Results. The patients with PD had lower activation levels, more central fatigue, and more subjective fatigue than the healthy controls. There were no significant differences in twitch force or peripheral fatigue index between the two groups. The reduction in walking speed was related to the loss of peripheral strength and PD itself. Conclusion. Fatigue and weakness of central origin were related to PD, while peripheral strength was important for walking ability. The results suggest that rehabilitation programs for PD should focus on improving both central and peripheral components of force. PMID:28321339

  13. Self-Selected Walking Speed is Predictive of Daily Ambulatory Activity in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Fulk, George D; Beets, Michael W; Herter, Troy M; Fritz, Stacy L

    2016-04-01

    Daily ambulatory activity is associated with health and functional status in older adults; however, assessment requires multiple days of activity monitoring. The objective of this study was to determine the relative capabilities of self-selected walking speed (SSWS), maximal walking speed (MWS), and walking speed reserve (WSR) to provide insight into daily ambulatory activity (steps per day) in community-dwelling older adults. Sixty-seven older adults completed testing and activity monitoring (age 80.39 [6.73] years). SSWS (R2 = .51), MWS (R2 = .35), and WSR calculated as a ratio (R2 = .06) were significant predictors of daily ambulatory activity in unadjusted linear regression. Cutpoints for participants achieving < 8,000 steps/day were identified for SSWS (≤ 0.97 m/s, 44.2% sensitivity, 95.7% specificity, 10.28 +LR, 0.58 -LR) and MWS (≤ 1.39 m/s, 60.5% sensitivity, 78.3% specificity, 2.79 +LR, 0.50 -LR). SSWS may be a feasible proxy for assessing and monitoring daily ambulatory activity in older adults.

  14. Effect of walking speed on the gait of king penguins: An accelerometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willener, Astrid S T; Handrich, Yves; Halsey, Lewis G; Strike, Siobhán

    2015-12-21

    Little is known about non-human bipedal gaits. This is probably due to the fact that most large animals are quadrupedal and that non-human bipedal animals are mostly birds, whose primary form of locomotion is flight. Very little research has been conducted on penguin pedestrian locomotion with the focus instead on their associated high energy expenditure. In animals, tri-axial accelerometers are frequently used to estimate physiological energy cost, as well as to define the behaviour pattern of a species, or the kinematics of swimming. In this study, we showed how an accelerometer-based technique could be used to determine the biomechanical characteristics of pedestrian locomotion. Eight king penguins, which represent the only family of birds to have an upright bipedal gait, were trained to walk on a treadmill. The trunk tri-axial accelerations were recorded while the bird was walking at four different speeds (1.0, 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6km/h), enabling the amplitude of dynamic body acceleration along the three axes (amplitude of DBAx, DBAy and DBAz), stride frequency, waddling and leaning amplitude, as well as the leaning angle to be defined. The magnitude of the measured variables showed a significant increase with increasing speed, apart from the backwards angle of lean, which decreased with increasing speed. The variability of the measured variables also showed a significant increase with speed apart from the DBAz amplitude, the waddling amplitude, and the leaning angle, where no significant effect of the walking speed was found. This paper is the first approach to describe 3D biomechanics with an accelerometer on wild animals, demonstrating the potential of this technique.

  15. Walking economy is predictably determined by speed, grade and gravitational load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Lindsay W; Weyand, Peter G

    2017-07-20

    The metabolic energy human walking requires can vary by more than 10-fold depending on the speed, surface gradient and load carried. Although the mechanical factors determining economy are generally considered to be numerous and complex, we tested a minimum-mechanics hypothesis that only three variables are needed for broad, accurate prediction: speed, surface grade, and total gravitational load. We first measured steady-state rates of oxygen uptake in 20 healthy adult subjects during unloaded treadmill trials from 0.4-1.6 m•s(-1) on six gradients: -6º, -3º, 0º, 3º, 6º, and 9º. Next, we tested a second set of 20 subjects under three torso-loading conditions (no-load, +18, and +31% body weight) at speeds from 0.6-1.4 m•s(-1) on the same six gradients. Metabolic rates spanned a 14-fold range from supine rest to the greatest single-trial, walking mean (3.1±0.1 to 43.3±0.5 mls O2•kg-body(-1)•min(-1), respectively). As theorized, the walking portion (VO2-walk=VO2-gross-VO2-supine-rest) of the body's gross metabolic rate increased in direct proportion to load and largely in accordance with support force requirements across both speed and grade. Consequently, a single minimum-mechanics equation was derived from the data of 10 unloaded-condition subjects to predict the pooled mass-specific economy (VO2-gross, mls O2•kg-body+load(-1)•min(-1)) of all the remaining loaded and unloaded trials combined (n=1412 trials from 90 speed-grade-load conditions). The accuracy of prediction achieved (R(2)=0.99, SEE=1.06 mls O2•kg(-1)•min(-1)) leads us to conclude that human walking economy is predictably determined by the minimum mechanical requirements present across a broad range of conditions. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  16. Pay as You Speed, ISA with incentive for not speeding: results and interpretation of speed data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahrmann, Harry; Agerholm, Niels; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Berthelsen, Kasper K; Harms, Lisbeth

    2012-09-01

    To simulate a market introduction of Intelligent Speed Adaptation (ISA) and to study the effect of a Pay as You Speed (PAYS) concept, a field trial with 153 drivers was conducted during 2007-2009. The participants drove under PAYS conditions for a shorter or a longer period. The PAYS concept consisted of informative ISA linked with economic incentive for not speeding, measured through automatic count of penalty points whenever the speed limit was exceeded. The full incentive was set to 30% of a participant's insurance premium. The participants were exposed to different treatments, with and without incentive crossed with informative ISA present or absent. The results showed that ISA is an efficient tool for reducing speeding particularly on rural roads. The analysis of speed data demonstrated that the proportion of distance driven above the speed where the ISA equipment responded (PDA) was a sensitive measure for reflecting the effect of ISA, whereas mean free flow speed and the 85th percentile speed, were less sensitive to ISA effects. The PDA increased a little over time but still remained at a low level; however, when ISA was turned off, the participants' speeding relapsed to the baseline level. Both informative ISA and incentive ISA reduced the PDA, but there was no statistically significant interaction. Informative reduced it more than the incentive.

  17. Determining an influencing area affecting walking speed on footpath: A case study of a footpath in CBD Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipakornkiat, Chalat; Limanond, Thirayoot; Kim, Hyunmyung

    2012-11-01

    Intuitively, the crowd density in front of a pedestrian will affect his walking speed along a footpath. Nevertheless, the size of the influencing area affecting walking speed has rarely been scrutinized in the past. This study attempts to determine the distance in front of pedestrians that principally affects their walking speed under normal conditions, using a case study of a footpath in Bangkok. We recorded pedestrian activities along a test section of 20 m, with an effective walking width of 2.45 m in the morning and at noon. The morning dataset was extracted for analyzing various influencing distances, ranging from 1 to 20 m in front of the pedestrian. The bi-directional walking speed-pedestrian density models were developed, for each tested distance, using linear regression analysis. It was found that an influencing length in the range of 5-8 m yields the highest correlation coefficients. In the case of high density conditions, the walking speed of the equally-split flow (50:50) was found to be higher than other proportional flow analyzed. The finding has useful implications on the improvement of the walking simulations in mesoscopic models.

  18. Walking at non-constant speeds: mechanical work, pendular transduction, and energy congruity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbinot, G

    2017-05-01

    Although almost half of all walking bouts in urban environments consist of less than 12 consecutive steps and several day-to-day gait activities contain transient gait responses, in most studies gait analysis is performed at steady-state. This study aimed to analyze external (Wext ) and internal mechanical work (Wint ), pendulum-like mechanics, and elastic energy usage during constant and non-constant speeds. The mechanical work, pendular transduction, and energy congruity (an estimate of storage and release of elastic energy) during walking were computed using two force platforms. We found that during accelerating gait (+NCS) energy recovery is maintained, besides extra W(+)ext , for decelerating gait (-NCS) poor energy recovery was counterbalanced by W(-)ext and C% predominance. We report an increase in elastic energy usage with speed (4-11%). Both W(-)ext and %C suggests that elastic energy usage is higher at faster speeds and related to -NCS (≈20% of elastic energy usage). This study was the first to show evidences of elastic energy usage during constant and non-constant speeds.

  19. Speed and duration of walking and other leisure time physical activity and the risk of heart failure: a prospective cohort study from the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Askelund Saevereid

    Full Text Available AIM: Physical activity (PA confers some protection against development of heart failure (HF but little is known of the role of intensity and duration of exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective cohort study of men and women free of previous MI, stroke or HF with one or more examinations in 1976-2003, we studied the association between updated self-assessed leisure-time PA, speed and duration of walking and subsequent hospitalization or death from HF. Light and moderate/high level of leisure-time PA and brisk walking were associated with reduced risk of HF in both genders whereas no consistent association with duration of walking was seen. In 18,209 subjects age 20-80 with 1580 cases of HF, using the lowest activity level as reference, the confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HR for light and moderate/high leisure-time physical activity were 0.75 (0.66-0.86 and 0.80 (0.69-0.93, respectively. In 9,937 subjects with information on walking available and 542 cases of HF, moderate and high walking speed were associated with adjusted HRs of 0.53 (0.43-0.66 and 0.30 (0.21-0.44, respectively, and daily walking of ½-1 hrs, 1-2 and >2 hrs with HR of 0.80 (0.61-1.06, 0.82 (0.62-1.06, and 0.96 (0.73-1.27, respectively. Results were similar for both genders and remained robust after exclusion of HF related to coronary heart disease and after a series of sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Speed rather than duration of walking was associated with reduced risk of HF. Walking is the most wide-spread PA and public health measures to curb the increase in HF may benefit from this information.

  20. The Effect of Visual Display Properties and Gain Presentation Mode on the Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Individuals tend to find realistic walking speeds too slow when relying on treadmill walking or Walking-In-Place (WIP) techniques for virtual travel. This paper details three studies investigating the effects of visual display properties and gain presentation mode on the perceived naturalness...... of virtual walking speeds: The first study compared three different degrees of peripheral occlusion; the second study compared three different degrees of perceptual distortion produced by varying the geometric field of view (GFOV); and the third study compared three different ways of presenting visual gains...... of the visual speed. The third study found a significant main effect of gain presentation mode. Allowing participants to interactively adjust the gain led to a smaller range of perceptually natural gains and this approach was significantly faster. However, the efficiency may come at the expense of confidence...

  1. Mobility-Related Fatigue, Walking Speed, and Muscle Strength in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rantanen, Taina

    2012-01-01

    Background. Fatigue is an important early marker of functional decline among older people, but the mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood. The purpose of the present study was to examine the association between mobility-related fatigue and walking speed and to test...... the degree to which muscle strength accounts for this association. Methods. The study is based on baseline (n = 523) and 5-year follow-up data (n = 292) from a cohort of 75-year-old persons. Standardized assessments include self-report measures of mobility-related fatigue (score range 0–6) and medical...

  2. The biomechanical mechanism of how strength and power training improves walking speed in old adults remains unknown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, C. M. I.; Granacher, U.; Vandervoort, A. A.; DeVita, P.; Hortobagyi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining and increasing walking speed in old age is clinically important because this activity of daily living predicts functional and clinical state. We reviewed evidence for the biomechanical mechanisms of how strength and power training increase gait speed in old adults. A systematic search yi

  3. Differences in physical aging measured by walking speed: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela

    2016-01-28

    Physical functioning and mobility of older populations are of increasing interest when populations are aging. Lower body functioning such as walking is a fundamental part of many actions in daily life. Limitations in mobility threaten independent living as well as quality of life in old age. In this study we examine differences in physical aging and convert those differences into the everyday measure of single years of age. We use the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, which was collected biennially between 2002 and 2012. Data on physical performance, health as well as information on economics and demographics of participants were collected. Lower body performance was assessed with two timed walks at normal pace each of 8 ft (2.4 m) of survey participants aged at least 60 years. We employed growth curve models to study differences in physical aging and followed the characteristic-based age approach to illustrate those differences in single years of age. First, we examined walking speed of about 11,700 English individuals, and identified differences in aging trajectories by sex and other characteristics (e.g. education, occupation, regional wealth). Interestingly, higher educated and non-manual workers outperformed their counterparts for both men and women. Moreover, we transformed the differences between subpopulations into single years of age to demonstrate the magnitude of those gaps, which appear particularly high at early older ages. This paper expands research on aging and physical performance. In conclusion, higher education provides an advantage in walking of up to 15 years for men and 10 years for women. Thus, enhancements in higher education have the potential to ensure better mobility and independent living in old age for a longer period.

  4. Association between dual task-related decrease in walking speed and real versus imagined Timed Up and Go test performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Beauchet, Olivier; Annweiler, Cédric; Allali, Gilles; Herrmann, François; Kressig, Reto W

    2013-06-01

    To examine whether older people with markedly dual task-related decreases in walking speed - a marker of disturbed higher-level gait control and falls - have a larger discrepancy between real and imagined Timed Up and Go (TUG) test times than those with less dual task-related decreases in walking speed. Based on a prospective cross-sectional study, 193 older adults (mean age 77.4 ± 5.9 years; 44.0 % women) referred to and consecutively assessed at a Swiss university clinic for a gait analysis to assess either gait disorders, fall risk or memory disorders were included. For all participants, walking speed was measured using a GAITRite(®) electronic walkway system during usual walking at self-selected pace and while dual tasking (i.e., usual walking and simultaneously counting backwards out loud). In addition, real Timed Up and Go (TUGr) and imagined Timed Up and Go (TUGi) (i.e., the time needed to imagine performing the TUGr) times were measured with a stopwatch. Differences between both walking conditions for walking speed (delta of walking speed) and both TUG conditions (delta of TUG time) were calculated. Age, gender, height, total number drugs taken per day, daily use of psychoactive drugs, use of walking aid, history of falls, Mini-Mental State Examination score, near vision and education level were used as covariables in this analysis. Participants were categorized into two groups based on being in the lowest tertian (i.e., times were similar (P = .169 and P = .839). In both groups, TUGi was faster than TUGr (P time was significantly greater in group B compared to group A (P time (P = time, whereas an increased MMSE score (P = .030) was associated with a decrease in delta of TUG time. These findings show that a large discrepancy between real and imagined TUG performances is significantly correlated with a decrease in walking speed while dual tasking, and thus may also be a surrogate marker of disturbed higher-level gait control. The

  5. Comparison of forward walking and backward walking in stroke hemiplegia patients focusing on the paretic side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Misato; Takami, Akiyoshi; Oda, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the features of backward walking in stroke patients with hemiplegia by focusing on the joint movements and moments of the paretic side, walking speed, stride length, and cadence. [Subjects and Methods] Nine stroke patients performed forward walking and backward walking along a 5-m walkway. Walking speed and stride length were self-selected. Movements were measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and a force plate. One walking cycle of the paretic side was analyzed. [Results] Walking speed, stride length, and cadence were significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking. Peak hip extension was significantly lower in backward walking and peak hip flexion moment, knee extension moment, and ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion moments were lower in backward walking. [Conclusion] Unlike forward walking, backward walking requires conscious hip joint extension. Conscious extension of the hip joint is hard for stroke patients with hemiplegia. Therefore, the range of hip joint movement declined in backward walking, and walking speed and stride length also declined. The peak ankle plantar flexion moment was significantly lower in backward walking than in forward walking, and it was hard to generate propulsion power in backward walking. These difficulties also affected the walking speed. PMID:28265136

  6. FRACTAL DIMENSION RESULTS FOR CONTINUOUS TIME RANDOM WALKS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Nane, Erkan; Xiao, Yimin

    2013-04-01

    Continuous time random walks impose random waiting times between particle jumps. This paper computes the fractal dimensions of their process limits, which represent particle traces in anomalous diffusion.

  7. Superficial warming and cooling of the leg affects walking speed and neuromuscular impairments in people with spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, A; Bunn, L; Hough, A; Bugmann, G; Marsden, J

    2016-12-01

    People with hereditary and spontaneous spastic paraparesis (HSSP) report that their legs are stiffer and walking is slower when their legs are cold. This study explored the effects of prolonged superficial cooling and warming of the lower leg on walking speed and local measures of neuromuscular impairments. This was a randomised pre- and post-intervention study of 22 HSSP participants and 19 matched healthy controls. On 2 separate occasions, one lower leg was cooled or warmed. Measurements included walking speed and measures of lower limb impairment: ankle movement, passive muscle stiffness, spasticity (stretch reflex size), amplitude and rate of force generation in dorsi- and plantarflexors and central and peripheral nerve conduction time/velocity. For both participants and controls, cooling decreased walking speed, especially for HSSP participants. For both groups, cooling decreased the dorsiflexor rate and amplitude of force generation and peripheral nerve conduction velocity and increased spasticity. Warming increased dorsiflexor rate of force generation and nerve conduction velocity and decreased spasticity. Superficial cooling significantly reduced walking speed for people with HSSP. Temperature changes were associated with changes in neuromuscular impairments for both people with spastic paraparesis and controls. This study does not support the use of localised cooling in rehabilitation for people with spastic paraparesis as reported in other neurological conditions. Rehabilitation interventions that help prevent heat loss (insulation) or improve limb temperature via passive or active means, particularly when the legs and/or environment are cool, may benefit people with spastic paraparesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of the optimal walking speed for neural relaxation in healthy elderly women using electromyogram and electroencephalogram analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, M; Shimura, M; Shibata, S; Wakamura, T; Moritani, T

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the walking speed which has the greatest influence on neural relaxation in healthy elderly women as determined by electromyogram (EMG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) analyses. Seven elderly female volunteers [mean age 68.5 (SD 3.95) years] served as subjects for this study. The EMG signals were recorded from the gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (SL) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles while walking on a treadmill, starting at 40 m.min-1 and increasing 6 m.min-1 incrementally for 10 min. The turning point of muscle activities (by integrated EMG. iEMGtp) was determined as the walking speed at the point at which the mean rate of change of iEMG (MG + SL + TA) abruptly increased. After the determination of iEMGtp. the treadmill was set at three constant speeds, one corresponding to the speed for the iEMGtp and two others 20% higher or lower than that for the iEMGtp. The subjects then walked for 20 min at each of these speeds on 3 separate days and their EEG power spectrum data were obtained for frequencies from the 8 to 13 Hz (z-wave component, AWC). The mean of iEMGtp for our subjects was at a mean walking speed of 64.7 (SD 7.9) m.min-1. Considering the subjects' age and height, iEMGtp was somewhat faster than their expected self-paced normal walking speed. There were no differences between the mean AWC values of the subjects prior to exercising at each of the three speeds. The mean AWC values after exercise were significantly (P < 0.01) greater than before. The extent of the increase in AWC at iEMGtp was greater than those at slower speeds. Our data would suggest that walking exercise at the speed which corresponds with EMG evidence of iEMGtp may induce the most significant relaxing effects in elderly women.

  9. Speed and efficiency in walking and wheeling with novel stimulation and bracing systems after spinal cord injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Richard B; Hayday, Frank; Chong, Suling; Thompson, Aiko K; Rolf, Robert; James, Kelvin B; Bell, Gordon

    2005-10-01

    To compare various novel and conventional systems for locomotion, a 25-year-old man was studied with motor complete spinal cord injury at the T4/5 level. He used various devices in the community, and changes in speed, physiological cost index (PCI), and oxygen consumption were measured periodically. Speed was fastest with a conventional manual wheelchair (nearly 120 m/min in a 4-min test). Speed was about 30% less, but the PCI was lowest (highest efficiency) using functional electrical stimulation (FES) of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles to propel a novel wheelchair. He walked with knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFO) at much lower speed (8.8 m/min) and higher PCI. He walked with an alternating gait using a new stance-control KAFO with FES. The speed was still slow (5 m/min), but he prefers the more normal-looking gait and uses it daily. Walking with FES and ankle-foot orthoses (AFO) was slowest (3.5 m/min) and had the highest PCI. In conclusion, the leg-propelled wheelchair provides a more efficient method of locomotion. A new stance-controlled KAFO with FES may provide a more acceptable walking system, but must be tested on other subjects.

  10. Impact of excess body weight on walking at the preferred speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, Janusz W; Plewa, Michał; Cieślinska-Swider, Joanna; Bacik, Bogdan; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The implications of a long-lasting mechanical load on the locomotor activity are poorly understood. The objective of the present studies was to determine an impact of excess body weight on basic spatiotemporal gait measures and to test the hypothesis that leg swing phase may account for a load-related adaptation of the stride characteristics. To this end the basic spatial and temporal stride measures were assessed in 100 obese and 36 lean women (age range between 18 and 67 years) walking with their self-selected pace on a 10-meter long and 1 meter wide instrumented pathway. Among the subjects there were: 44 with class I obesity, 27 with class II obesity, and 29 with class III. Subjects' stance and swing times as well as the stride lengths were recorded by means of contact copper-film electrodes attached to a sole of subject' footwear. The acquired gait measures were used then to compute: a mean velocity of walking, double support times and a mean velocity of a foot during swing phase. Data analysis showed that subjects from every experimental groups walked with a very similar speed (1.08 +/- 0.2 m/s) and cadence (106 +/- 10 steps/min). Their stance time was not affected by body weight and it remained at the mean level of 746 +/- 90 ms for all groups. The temporal stride characteristics and the stance-to-swing ratio were, however, substantially modified in obese individuals due to attenuation of the swing time. As a consequence, the remaining normalized (i.e., expressed as percentage of gait cycle time) phases of stride: the stance and the double support were relatively longer. While the swing time negatively correlated with the body mass index (BMI), the normalized stance and the double support exhibited strong positive correlation (r=0.46) with the BMI. The increase of leg swing velocity seems the main and unique adaptation mechanism that is utilized in the preferred walking gait in obese women.

  11. Speed and duration of walking and other leisure time physical activity and the risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askelund Sævereid, Hans; Schnohr, Peter; Prescott, Eva

    2014-01-01

    in 1976-2003, we studied the association between updated self-assessed leisure-time PA, speed and duration of walking and subsequent hospitalization or death from HF. Light and moderate/high level of leisure-time PA and brisk walking were associated with reduced risk of HF in both genders whereas...... no consistent association with duration of walking was seen. In 18,209 subjects age 20-80 with 1580 cases of HF, using the lowest activity level as reference, the confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for light and moderate/high leisure-time physical activity were 0.75 (0.66-0.86) and 0.80 (0.......69-0.93), respectively. In 9,937 subjects with information on walking available and 542 cases of HF, moderate and high walking speed were associated with adjusted HRs of 0.53 (0.43-0.66) and 0.30 (0.21-0.44), respectively, and daily walking of ½-1 hrs, 1-2 and >2 hrs with HR of 0.80 (0.61-1.06), 0.82 (0.62-1.06), and 0...

  12. 30 min of treadmill walking at self-selected speed does not increase gait variability in independent elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Emmanuel S; Kunzler, Marcos R; Bobbert, Maarten F; Duysens, Jacques; Carpes, Felipe P

    2017-09-04

    Walking is one of the preferred exercises among elderly, but could a prolonged walking increase gait variability, a risk factor for a fall in the elderly? Here we determine whether 30 min of treadmill walking increases coefficient of variation of gait in elderly. Because gait responses to exercise depend on fitness level, we included 15 sedentary and 15 active elderly. Sedentary participants preferred a lower gait speed and made smaller steps than the actives. Step length coefficient of variation decreased ~16.9% by the end of the exercise in both the groups. Stride length coefficient of variation decreased ~9% after 10 minutes of walking, and sedentary elderly showed a slightly larger step width coefficient of variation (~2%) at 10 min than active elderly. Active elderly showed higher walk ratio (step length/cadence) than sedentary in all times of walking, but the times did not differ in both the groups. In conclusion, treadmill gait kinematics differ between sedentary and active elderly, but changes over time are similar in sedentary and active elderly. As a practical implication, 30 min of walking might be a good strategy of exercise for elderly, independently of the fitness level, because it did not increase variability in step and stride kinematics, which is considered a risk of fall in this population.

  13. A randomized controlled trial of an implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator on walking speed and activity in poststroke hemiplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, A.I.R.; Kottink, Anke I.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Nene, A.V.; Tenniglo, Martinus Johannes Bernardus; van der Aa, Hans E.; Buschman, H.P.J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    Objective To determine the effect of a new implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator on walking speed and daily activities, in comparison with the usual treatment in chronic stroke survivors with a drop foot. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting All subjects were measured 5 times in the

  14. Reference values of maximum walking speed among independent community-dwelling Danish adults aged 60 to 79 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, S; Holmestad-Bechmann, N; Pedersen, Trine B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish reference values for maximum walking speed over 10m for independent community-dwelling Danish adults, aged 60 to 79 years, and to evaluate the effects of gender and age. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish companies and senior citizens clubs. PARTICIPANTS: Two ...

  15. Walking speed and balance performance are associated with Short-Form 8 bodily pain domain in Brazilian older female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Aurélio Carvalho Sampaio

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In summary, bodily pain is significantly associated with poor maximum walking speed, balance, and QOL physical functioning; these findings are reflective of poor QOL. Assessing bodily pain is simple and can help diagnose further problems. Moreover, improvements in physical conditioning may promote greater health and QOL in this population.

  16. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corbetta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Intervention: Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Outcome measures: Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. Results: In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19, balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5 and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4. When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1, but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial and balance (high heterogeneity. Conclusion: Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. [Corbetta D, Imeri F, Gatti R (2015 Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard

  17. Effect of balance training on walking speed and cardiac events in elderly patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Wang, Guoqin; Hoshi, Keika; Kamiya, Kentaro; Noda, Chiharu; Kimura, Masahiko; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Masuda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of standing balance training on walking speed (short-term outcome) and cardiac events (long-term outcome) in elderly ischemic heart disease (IHD) patients. This was a retrospective cohort study. Ninety-two elderly (≥ 65 years) IHD patients who underwent an inpatient cardiac rehabilitation program were assigned to two groups: a balance group that received standing balance training in addition to conventional (aerobic and resistance) training and a conventional group. Standing balance was assessed by one-leg standing time and a postural stability index reflecting dynamic balance, and normal walking speed was measured at baseline and hospital discharge. Patients were followed for up to 3 years or until a cardiac event occurred. There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the groups. Both groups showed a significant change in normal walking speed from baseline to hospital discharge (P balance group compared to the conventional group (P = 0.001). The postural stability index improved significantly only in the balance group (P = 0.005). Multivariable analyses using Cox proportional hazards model confirmed that standing balance training (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.408; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.162-1.029; P = 0.058) and fast walking speed (HR: 0.362; 95% CI: 0.137-0.957; P = 0.041) were associated with cardiac events. These findings show that standing balance training improves walking speed and reduces cardiac events, and suggests that such training can be an effective intervention for elderly IHD patients.

  18. Distance to achieve steady state walking speed in frail elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindemann, U.; Najafi, B.; Zijlstra, W.; Hauer, K.; Muche, R.; Becker, C.; Aminian, K.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to determine the length of the gait initiation phase before achieving steady state walking in frail older people. Based on body fixed sensors, habitual walking was analysed in 116 community-dwelling older persons (mean age 83.1 years, 84% women). The start of steady state walking was

  19. Comparison between Mother, ActiGraph wGT3X-BT, and a hand tally for measuring steps at various walking speeds under controlled conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Riel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Walking is endorsed as health enhancing and is the most common type of physical activity among older adults. Accelerometers are superior to self-reports when measuring steps, however, if they are to be used by clinicians the validity is of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the criterion validity of Mother and ActiGraph wGT3X-BT in measuring steps by comparing the devices to a hand tally under controlled conditions in healthy participants. Methods Thirty healthy participants were fitted with a belt containing the sensor of Mother (Motion Cookie and ActiGraph. Participants walked on a treadmill for two minutes at each of the following speeds; 3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 km/h. The treadmill walking was video recorded and actual steps were subsequently determined by using a hand tally. Wilcoxon’s signed ranks test was used to determine whether Mother and ActiGraph measured an identical number of steps compared to the hand tally. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationship and Root Mean Square error was calculated to investigate the average error between the devices and the hand tally. Percent differences (PD were calculated for between-instrument agreement (Mother vs. the hand tally and ActiGraph vs. the hand tally and PDs below 3% were interpreted as acceptable and clinically irrelevant. Results Mother and ActiGraph under-counted steps significantly compared to the hand tally at all walking speeds (p < 0.001. Mother had a median of total differences of 9.5 steps (IQR = 10 and ActiGraph 59 steps (IQR = 77. Mother had smaller PDs at all speeds especially at 3.2 km/h (2.5% compared to 26.7%. Mother showed excellent ICC values ≥0.88 (0.51–0.96 at all speeds whilst ActiGraph had poor and fair to good ICC values ranging from 0.03 (−0.09–0.21 at a speed of 3.2 km/h to 0.64 (0.16–0.84 at a speed of 6.4 km/h. Conclusion Mother provides valid measures of steps at walking speeds

  20. Differences in whole-body angular momentum between below-knee amputees and non-amputees across walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, A K; Neptune, R R

    2011-02-01

    Unilateral, below-knee amputees have an increased risk of falling compared to non-amputees. The regulation of whole-body angular momentum is important for preventing falls, but little is known about how amputees regulate angular momentum during walking. This study analyzed three-dimensional, whole-body angular momentum at four walking speeds in 12 amputees and 10 non-amputees. The range of angular momentum in all planes significantly decreased with increasing walking speed for both groups. However, the range of frontal-plane angular momentum was greater in amputees compared to non-amputees at the first three walking speeds. This range was correlated with a reduced second vertical ground reaction force peak in both the intact and residual legs. In the sagittal plane, the amputee range of angular momentum in the first half of the residual leg gait cycle was significantly larger than in the non-amputees at the three highest speeds. In the second half of the gait cycle, the range of sagittal-plane angular momentum was significantly smaller in amputees compared to the non-amputees at all speeds. Correlation analyses suggested that the greater range of angular momentum in the first half of the amputee gait cycle is associated with reduced residual leg braking and that the smaller range of angular momentum in the second half of the gait cycle is associated with reduced residual leg propulsion. Thus, reducing residual leg braking appears to be a compensatory mechanism to help regulate sagittal-plane angular momentum over the gait cycle, but may lead to an increased risk of falling.

  1. Effect of anaemia on hand grip strength, walking speed, functionality and 1 year mortality in older hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Etienne; Detroyer, Elke; Milisen, Koen

    2016-08-19

    Anaemia is a common problem in hospitalized older patients and is recognized as a risk factor for a significant number of adverse outcomes. Data of the effect of anaemia on functional status during hospitalization and mortality after discharge are limited. Aim of the study is to examine whether there is an association between anaemia, hand grip strength, gait speed and basic activities of daily living (ADL) during hospitalization and mortality 1 year after discharge in geriatric patients. In a prospective study, data on age, sex, body mass index, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), main clinical diagnosis, number of comorbidities, hand grip strength, gait speed, ADL, haemoglobin, C-reactive protein and estimated Glomerular filtration ratio (eGFR) were recorded in 220 older patients, admitted to the acute geriatric ward of a university hospital. Anaemia was defined as a haemoglobin level anaemia (haemoglobin between 10 and 12 g/dL for women and 10 and 13 g/dL for men). Gait speed (in meters per second) was calculated after a 4.5 m walk and hand grip strength (in kilogram) was assessed with a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Functionality was assessed in the six basic activities of daily living. Information about the vital status was obtained 1 year after discharge with a telephone call. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine the effect of the anaemia status on the walking speed, hand grip strength and premorbid ADL index and logistic regression analysis was used to examine whether anaemia could be identified as risk factors for mortality 12 months after discharge. Overall, 106 (48 %) patients had anaemia. Hand-grip strength, gait speed and ADL score were not significantly different between anaemic and non-anaemic hospitalized geriatric patients. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, eGFR, MMSE, number of comorbidities and main clinical diagnosis, the means for hand-grip strength were 17.3, 19.9 and 19.1 kg (p = 0.38); for gait speed 0

  2. Does walking speed mediate the association between visual impairment and self-report of mobility disability? The Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenor, Bonnielin K; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Muñoz, Beatriz; West, Sheila K

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether performance speeds mediate the association between visual impairment and self-reported mobility disability over an 8-year period. Longitudinal analysis. Salisbury, Maryland. Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study participants aged 65 and older (N=2,520). Visual impairment was defined as best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye or visual field less than 20°. Self-reported mobility disability on three tasks was assessed: walking up stairs, walking down stairs, and walking 150 feet. Performance speed on three similar tasks was measured: walking up steps (steps/s), walking down steps (steps/s), and walking 4 m (m/s). For each year of observation, the odds of reporting mobility disability was significantly greater for participants who were visually impaired (VI) than for those who were not (NVI) (odds ratio (OR) difficulty walking up steps=1.58, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.32-1.89; OR difficulty walking down steps=1.90, 95% CI=1.59-2.28; OR difficulty walking 150 feet=2.11, 95% CI=1.77-2.51). Once performance speed on a similar mobility task was included in the models, VI participants were no longer more likely to report mobility disability than those who were NVI (OR difficulty walking up steps=0.84, 95% CI=0.65-1.11; OR difficulty walking down steps=0.96, 95% CI=0.74-1.24; OR difficulty walking 150 feet=1.22, 95% CI=0.98-1.50). Slower performance speed in VI individuals largely accounted for the difference in the odds of reporting mobility disability, suggesting that VI older adults walk slower and are therefore more likely to report mobility disability than those who are NVI. Improving mobility performance in older adults with visual impairment may minimize the perception of mobility disability. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Walking economy during cued versus non-cued self-selected treadmill walking in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paul M; McIsaac, Tara L; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2014-01-01

    Gait impairments related to Parkinson's disease (PD) include variable step length and decreased walking velocity, which may result in poorer walking economy. Auditory cueing is a common method used to improve gait mechanics in PD that has been shown to worsen walking economy at set treadmill walking speeds. It is unknown if auditory cueing has the same effects on walking economy at self-selected treadmill walking speeds. To determine if auditory cueing will affect walking economy at self-selected treadmill walking speeds and at speeds slightly faster and slower than self-selected. Twenty-two participants with moderate PD performed three, 6-minute bouts of treadmill walking at three speeds (self-selected and ± 0.22 m·sec-1). One session used cueing and the other without cueing. Energy expenditure was measured and walking economy was calculated (energy expenditure/power). Poorer walking economy and higher energy expenditure occurred during cued walking at a self-selected and a slightly faster walking speed, but there was no apparent difference at the slightly slower speed. These results suggest that potential gait benefits of auditory cueing may come at an energy cost and poorer walking economy for persons with PD at least at some treadmill walking speeds.

  4. Speed-related spinal excitation from ankle dorsiflexors to knee extensors during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Caroline; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    Automatic adjustments of muscle activity throughout the body are required for the maintenance of balance during human walking. One mechanism that is likely to contribute to this control is the heteronymous spinal excitation between human ankle dorsiflexors and knee extensors (CPQ-reflex). Here, we...

  5. Control entropy identifies differential changes in complexity of walking and running gait patterns with increasing speed in highly trained runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Stephen J.; Busa, Michael A.; Skufca, Joseph; Yaggie, James A.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2009-06-01

    Regularity statistics have been previously applied to walking gait measures in the hope of gaining insight into the complexity of gait under different conditions and in different populations. Traditional regularity statistics are subject to the requirement of stationarity, a limitation for examining changes in complexity under dynamic conditions such as exhaustive exercise. Using a novel measure, control entropy (CE), applied to triaxial continuous accelerometry, we report changes in complexity of walking and running during increasing speeds up to exhaustion in highly trained runners. We further apply Karhunen-Loeve analysis in a new and novel way to the patterns of CE responses in each of the three axes to identify dominant modes of CE responses in the vertical, mediolateral, and anterior/posterior planes. The differential CE responses observed between the different axes in this select population provide insight into the constraints of walking and running in those who may have optimized locomotion. Future comparisons between athletes, healthy untrained, and clinical populations using this approach may help elucidate differences between optimized and diseased locomotor control.

  6. Estimating pedestrian speed using aggregated literature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosina, Ernst; Weidmann, Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    Since about 80 years, human walking speed has been measured for different purposes. The comparability of the results of these measurements is low, as the walking speed is influenced by a vast amount of parameters and no standardised measurement conditions exist. This work describes the most important factors influencing walking speed based on existing literature and estimates their impact. For this purpose, all walking speed measurements available in the literature were collected and reviewed. Using this data, the parameter values for different influences were computed and grouped according to their strength, which enables to determine the most important measurement parameters in future walking speed experiments. In addition, standardised measurement conditions are proposed which would provide a baseline for future studies and thus enhance their scientific value. For each of these conditions average walking speeds are calculated and the significance of the walking speed differences was determined.

  7. Field Test: Results of Tandem Walk Performance Following Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Reschke, M. F.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Gadd, N. E.; May-Phillips, T. R.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Tomilovskaya, E.

    2016-01-01

    performed as part of pilot FT. To perform the Tandem Walk, subjects begin with their feet together, their arms crossed at their chest and eyes closed. When ready, they brought one foot forward and touched the heel of their foot to their toe, repeating with the other foot, and continuing for about 10 steps. Three trials were collected with the eyes closed and a fourth trial was collected with eyes open. There are four metrics which are used to determine the performance level of the Tandem Walk. The first is percent correct steps. For a step to be counted as correct, the foot could not touch the ground while bringing it forward (no side stepping), eyes must stay closed during the eyes closed trials, the heel and toe should be touching, or almost touching (no large gaps) and there shouldn't be more than a three second pause between steps. Three judges score each step and the median of the three scores is kept. The second metric is the average step speed, or the number of steps/time to complete them. Thirdly, the root mean squared (RMS) error in the resultant trunk acceleration is used to determine the amount of upper body instability observed during the task. Finally, the RMS error of the mediolateral center of pressure as measured by the Moticon insoles is used to determine the mediolateral instability at the foot level. These four parameters are combined into a new overall Tandem Walk Parameter. RESULTS: Preliminary results show that crewmembers perform the Tandem Walk significantly worse the first 24 hours after landing as compared to their baseline performance. We find that each of the four performance metrics is significantly worse immediately after landing. We will present the results of tandem walk performance during the FT thus far. We will also combine these with the 18 crewmembers that participated in the pilot FT, concentrating on the level of performance and recovery rate. CONCLUSION: The Tandem Walk data collected as part of the FT experiment will provide

  8. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Plantar Flexor Muscle Spasticity and Walking Speed in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laddha, Darshan; Ganesh, G Shankar; Pattnaik, Monalisa; Mohanty, Patitapaban; Mishra, Chittaranjan

    2016-12-01

    Spasticity is a major disabling symptom in patients post stroke. Although studies have demonstrated that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can reduce spasticity, the duration of single session TENS is a subject of debate. The purpose of this study was to determine the sustainability of the effects of TENS applied over common peroneal nerve in the reduction of ankle plantar-flexor spasticity and improving gait speed in patients post stroke. Thirty patients (11 women and 19 men) (mean age of 46.46 years) were randomly assigned to group 1 (task oriented exercises), group 2 (TENS for 30 min and task oriented exercises) and group 3 (TENS for 60 min and task oriented exercises) for a period of five sessions per week for 6 weeks. All patients were assessed for ankle plantar-flexor spasticity, passive ankle dorsi-flexion range of motion, clonus and timed up and go test at the time of recruitment to study, at 3 and 6 weeks of therapeutic intervention. The overall results of the study suggest that there was a decrease in ankle plantar flexor spasticity, ankle clonus and timed up and go score in all the groups. A greater reduction of spasticity was seen in TENS groups (groups 2 and 3) when compared to control. No significant improvement was found in timed up and go test (TUG) scores between groups. Both 30 min and 60 min of application of TENS are effective in reducing spasticity of ankle plantar flexors, improving walking ability and increase the effectiveness of task related training. Based on the effect size, we would recommend a longer duration application for the reduction of spasticity. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Slower Walking Speed Forecasts Increased Postoperative Morbidity and One-Year Mortality Across Surgical Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Thomas N; Wu, Daniel S; Sauaia, Angela; Dunn, Christina L; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E; Moss, Marc; Stiegmann, Greg V; Gajdos, Csaba; Cleveland, Joseph C; Inouye, Sharon K

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the timed up-and-go test and postoperative morbidity and one-year mortality, and to compare the timed up-and-go to the standard-of-care surgical risk calculators for prediction of postoperative complications. Methods In this prospective cohort study, patients 65 years and older undergoing elective colorectal and cardiac operations with a minimum of one-year follow-up were included. The timed up-and-go test was performed preoperatively. This timed test starts with the subject standing from a chair, walking ten feet, returning to the chair, and ends after the subject sits. Timed up-and-go results were grouped: Fast≤10 sec, Intermediate=11-14 sec, Slow≥15 sec. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the three timed-up-and-go groups to current standard-of-care surgical risk calculators at forecasting postoperative complications. Results This study included 272 subjects (mean age of 74±6 years). Slower timed up-and-go was associated with an increased postoperative complications following colorectal (fast-13%, intermediate-29% and slow-77%;ptimed up-and-go was associated with increased one-year mortality following both colorectal (fast-3%, intermediate-10% and slow-31%;p=0.006) and cardiac (fast-2%, intermediate-3% and slow-12%;p=0.039) operations. Receiver operating characteristic area under curve of the timed up-and-go and the risk calculators for the colorectal group was 0.775 (95% CI:0.670,0.880) and 0.554 (95% CI:0.499,0.609), and for the cardiac group was 0.684 (95% CI:0.603,0.766) and 0.552 (95% CI:0.477,0.626). Conclusions Slower timed up-and-go forecasted increased postoperative complications and one-year mortality across surgical specialties. Regardless of operation performed, the timed up-and-go compared favorably to the more complex risk calculators at forecasting postoperative complications. PMID:23979272

  10. The influence of step frequency on the range of perceptually natural visual walking speeds during walking-in-place and treadmill locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Walking-In-Place (WIP) techniques make relatively natural walking experiences within immersive virtual environments possible when the physical interaction space is limited in size. In order to facilitate such experiences it is necessary to establish a natural connection between steps in place and...

  11. Toward high-speed access technologies: results from MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, Jeroen; Smets, Rob; Hellenthal, Wim; Lepley, Jason; Tsalamanis, Ioannis; Walker, Stuart; Ng'oma, Anthony; Rijckenberg, Gert-Jan; Koonen, Ton; Habel, Kai; Langer, Klaus-Dieter

    2006-10-01

    The European MUSE project, which aims to enable "MUlti Service and access Everywhere", studies architectures, technologies and business scenarios facilitating the deployment of new Broadband Access Networks and Services. This paper gives an overview and particularly discusses results of some of the high-speed access technologies that are developed.

  12. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, Davide; Imeri, Federico; Gatti, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR) improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19), balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5) and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4). When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1), but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial) and balance (high heterogeneity). Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on spasticity, balance, and walking speed in stroke patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuqin; Sun, Qi; Wang, Haifeng; Xie, Guomin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with stroke through a systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation vs placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on stroke were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was modified Ashworth scale (MAS). Meta-analysis was performed using the random-effect model. Seven randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with placebo transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation significantly reduced MAS (standard mean difference (SMD) = -0.71; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = -1.11 to -0.30; p = 0.0006), improved static balance with open eyes (SMD = -1.26; 95% CI = -1.83 to -0.69; p<0.0001) and closed eyes (SMD = -1.74; 95% CI = -2.36 to -1.12; p < 0.00001), and increased walking speed (SMD = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.84; p = 0.03), but did not improve results on the Timed Up and Go Test (SMD = -0.60; 95% CI=-1.22 to 0.03; p = 0.06). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is associated with significantly reduced spasticity, increased static balance and walking speed, but has no influence on dynamic balance.

  14. Physiological Cost Index and Comfort Walking Speed in Two Level Lower Limb Amputees Having No Vascular Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teuta Osmani Vllasolli; Nikola Orovcanec; Beti Zafirova; Blerim Krasniqi; Ardiana Murtezani; Bukurije Rama

    2015-01-01

      Background: The Physiological Cost Index (PCI) was introduced by MacGregor to estimate the energy cost in walking of healthy people, also it has been reported for persons with lower limb amputation, walking with prosthesis. Objective...

  15. Aggregation and spatial analysis of walking activity in an urban area: results from the Halifax space-time activity survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neatt, K.; Millward, H.; Spinney, J.

    2016-04-01

    This study examines neighborhood characteristics affecting the incidence of walking trips in urban and suburban areas of Halifax, Canada. We employ data from the Space-Time Activity Research (STAR) survey, conducted in 2007-8. Primary respondents completed a two- day time-diary survey, and their movements were tracked using a GPS data logger. Primary respondents logged a total of 5,005 walking trips, specified by 781,205 individual GPS points. Redundant and erroneous points, such as those with zero or excessive speed, were removed. Data points were then imported into ArcGIS, converted from points to linear features, visually inspected for data quality, and cleaned appropriately. From mapped walking tracks we developed hypotheses regarding variations in walking density. To test these, walking distances were aggregated by census tracts (CTs), and expressed as walking densities (per resident, per metre of road, and per developed area). We employed multivariate regression to examine which neighborhood (CT) variables are most useful as estimators of walking densities. Contrary to much of the planning literature, built-environment measures of road connectivity and dwelling density were found to have little estimating power. Office and institutional land uses are more useful estimators, as are the income and age characteristics of the resident population.

  16. Optimal spectral tracking - with application to speed dependent neural modulation of tibialis anterior during human treadmill walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittain, John-Stuart; Catton, Celia; Conway, Bernard A.

    2009-01-01

    are derived in both empiric and numerical form. Analysis of the pre-synaptic drive to TA under the modulation of treadmill belt speed follows, with results demonstrating clear speed dependent influences on the spectral content of TA, suggesting dynamic neural modulation of the locomotor drive. Findings...... to track slow varying or dynamic responses with any statistical certainty. Presented is a complete framework for the non-stationary analysis of trial-varying data. Theory is introduced and developed in the characterisation of speed dependent neural modulation of the locomotor drive to tibialis anterior (TA...

  17. The Effect of High- and Low-Damping Prosthetic Foot Structures on Knee Loading in the Uninvolved Limb Across Different Walking Speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Li; Adamczyk, Peter G; Roland, Michelle; Hahn, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    Lower limb amputation has been associated with secondary impairments such as knee osteoarthritis in the uninvolved limb. Greater knee loading in the frontal plane has been related to severity and rate of progression in knee osteoarthritis. Reduced push-off work from the involved limb can increase uninvolved limb knee loading. However, little is known about specific effects that prosthetic foot damping may have on uninvolved limb loading. We hypothesized that uninvolved limb peak knee internal abduction moment (IAM) and loading rates would be greater when using a high-damping foot compared with a low-damping foot, across walking speeds. Eight healthy, young subjects walked in a prosthesis simulator boot using the experimental feet. Greater uninvolved limb first peak IAM (+16% in fast speed, P = .002; +11% in slow speed, P = .001) and loading rates (+11% in fast speed, P = .003) were observed when using the high-damping foot compared with low-damping foot. Within each foot, uninvolved limb first peak IAM and loading rates had a trend to increase with increased walking speed. These findings suggest that damping properties of prosthetic feet are related to uninvolved limb peak knee IAM and loading rates.

  18. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  19. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III-V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video surveillance and the inked footprint technique to record usual walking speed and maximum speed patterns both in subjects' homes and during the 10-meter walking test. From these methods, walking speed, stride length, and step rate were calculated. [Results] While both usual and maximum walking speeds of the 10-meter walking test correlated with stride length and step rate, at-home walking speeds only significantly correlated with stride length. [Conclusion] Walking patterns of the 10-meter walking test are quantifiably distinct from those demonstrated in patients' homes, and this difference is mainly characterized by stride length. In order to enhance in-home walking ability, exercises that improve length of stride rather than step rate should be recommended.

  20. How important is the land use mix measure in understanding walking behaviour? Results from the RESIDE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooper Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the relationship between urban design and physical activity is a high priority. Different representations of land use diversity may impact the association between neighbourhood design and specific walking behaviours. This study examined different entropy based computations of land use mix (LUM used in the development of walkability indices (WIs and their association with walking behaviour. Methods Participants in the RESIDential Environments project (RESIDE self-reported mins/week of recreational, transport and total walking using the Neighbourhood Physical Activity Questionnaire (n = 1798. Land use categories were incrementally added to test five different LUM models to identify the strongest associations with recreational, transport and total walking. Logistic regression was used to analyse associations between WIs and walking behaviour using three cut points: any (> 0 mins, ≥ 60 mins and ≥ 150 mins walking/week. Results Participants in high (vs. low walkable neighbourhoods reported up to almost twice the amount of walking, irrespective of the LUM measure used. However, different computations of LUM were found to be relevant for different types and amounts of walking (i.e., > 0, ≥ 60 or ≥ 150 mins/week. Transport walking (≥ 60 mins/week had the strongest and most significant association (OR = 2.24; 95% CI:1.58-3.18 with the WI when the LUM included 'residential', 'retail', 'office', 'health, welfare and community', and 'entertainment, culture and recreation'. However, any (> 0 mins/week recreational walking was more strongly associated with the WI (OR = 1.36; 95% CI:1.04-1.78 when land use categories included 'public open space', 'sporting infrastructure' and 'primary and rural' land uses. The observed associations were generally stronger for ≥ 60 mins/week compared with > 0 mins/week of transport walking and total walking but this relationship was not seen for recreational walking. Conclusions

  1. Accelerometric assessment of different dimensions of natural walking during the first year after stroke : Recovery of amount, distribution, quality and speed of walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Sánchez (Marina Castel); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); W.G.M. Janssen (Wim); H.L.D. Horemans (Herwin); S. Chastin (Sebastian); M. Heijenbrok (Majanka); H.J. Stam (Henk)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To describe the course of walking behaviour over a period of 1 year after stroke, using accelerometry, and to compare 1-year data with those from a healthy group. Design: One-year follow-up cohort study. Subjects: Twenty-three stroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjec

  2. [Physiological reasoning and results of using the functional electrostimulation of muscles in pathological walking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitenzon, A S; Petrushanskaia, K A

    2004-01-01

    The ideology of a method of muscle electrostimulation (MES) in walking up and down the stairs is under discussion in the paper. It is pointed out that the above locomotor acts, which are based on the central innervation program, are principally similar; periods and zones of muscle excitation and inhibition during the locomotor cycle are specified; MES is shown to be a variety of phase muscle electrostimulation. A hypothesis is put forward on the MES significance in normalizing the locomotor skills. The main MES function are described, i.e. therapy, diagnostics and prognostication. The key indication for MES administration in pathological walking is defined, i.e. a deficit of the muscle function (DMF). A new method is suggested for DMF determination through examining the muscle-force moments estimated by mathematic modeling. The MES technique is shown to comprise 5 main stages: choice of corrected movements and muscle stimulation as well as setting-up of the amplitude and temporal MES parameters, of electrode parameters and of a stimulation regime in walking. Medical contraindications to MES stages of patients' rehabilitation are defined. The results of a successful treatment of above 6000 patients with different pathological conditions of the support-motor apparatus are summarized.

  3. Cerebral Microbleeds and Lacunar Infarcts Are Associated with Walking Speed Independent of Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged to Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijntjes, Marjon; de Craen, Anton J M; van der Grond, Jeroen; Meskers, Carel G M; Slagboom, P Eline; Maier, Andrea B

    2016-01-01

    The positive relationship between cognitive and physical performance has been widely established. The influence of brain structure on both domains has been shown as well. We studied whether the relationship between brain structure and physical performance is independent of cognitive performance. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 297 middle-aged to older adults (mean age ± SD 65.4 ± 6.8 years). Memory function, executive function and physical performance measured by the Tandem Stance Test, Chair Stand Test, 4-meter walk and 25-meter walk were assessed. Magnetic resonance imaging was available in 237 participants and used to determine the (sub)cortical gray matter, white matter, hippocampal and basal ganglia volumes and the presence of cerebral small-vessel disease, i.e. white matter hyperintensities, cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and lacunar infarcts (LIs). Regression analysis was used adjusting for age, gender, education and whole-brain volume. A Bonferroni correction was applied considering p values cognitive performance. The presence of CMBs and LIs was associated with a slower 25-meter walking speed (p cognitive performance. In middle-aged to older adults, CMBs and LIs are associated with walking speed independent of cognitive performance. This emphasizes the clinical relevance of identifying each of the possible underlying mechanisms of physical performance, which is required for the development of timely and targeted therapies. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Analysing the Hydraulic Actuator-based Knee Unit Kinematics and Correlating the Numerical Results and Walking Human Knee Joint Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Trukhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art machinery development enables people with lost lower limb to continue their previous life despite a loss. International companies dealing with this area pursue a minimization of human behaviour problems because of amputation. Researches to create an optimal design of the artificial knee joint are under way.The work task was to define analytical relationships of changing kinematic parameters of the human walking on the flat surface such as an angle of the knee joint, knee point (moment, definition of reduced knee actuator (A load, as well as to compare obtained results with experimental data.As an A in created design, the article proposes to use a controlled shock absorber based on the hydraulic cylinder.A knee unit is a kinematic two-tier mechanism. One of the mechanism links performs rotational motion, and the other is rotation-translational to provide a rotation of the first one.When studying the hydraulic actuator device dynamics, as a generalized coordinate a coordinate of the piston x (or ρ position is chosen while in the study of link movements an angle β is preferable.Experimental data are obtained for a human with the body weight of 57.6 kg walking on the flat surface to estimate a value of the knee joint angle, speed, acceleration, torque, and capacity in the knee joint and are taken from the published works of foreign authors.A trigonometric approximation was used for fitting the experimental data. The resulting dependence of the reduced load on the stock of A is necessary to perform the synthesis of A. The criterion for linear mechanisms mentioned in the D.N. Popov’s work is advisable to use as a possible criterion for optimization of A.The results obtained are as follows:1. Kinematics linkage mechanism is described using relationships for dependencies of its geometrical parameters, namely a cylinder piston stroke x (or ρ and a links angle β.2. Obtained polynomials of kinematic relationships allow a synthesis of

  5. Assessment of dairy cow locomotion in a commercial farm setting: the effects of walking speed on ground reaction forces and temporal and linear stride characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A M; Pfau, T; Channon, A; Wilson, A

    2010-02-01

    Objectives of this study were to determine the effects of walking speed on ground reaction force (GRF) parameters and to explore inter- and intra-individual variability with unsupervised data collection in a commercial farm setting. We used eight high producing loose-housed Holstein Friesian cows consistently scored sound, with no veterinary treatment during the collection period. Cows walked freely (0.52-1.37 m/s) over a five force platform array, twice daily, following milking. GRF data were split into speed categories and temporal and kinetic gait parameters extracted. A general linear model was carried out to determine effects of speed. Variation in parameters between cows is inconsistent, while between speed categories (containing data from multiple cows) the parameters which vary are consistent. Stance and stride time were reduced with increasing speed but no change in peak vertical GRF or duty factor was found. This ability to track parameters within an individual over time aids detection of subtle changes associated with lameness. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The 3D trajectory of the body centre of mass during adult human walking: evidence for a speed-curvature power law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesio, Luigi; Rota, Viviana; Perucca, Laura

    2011-02-24

    During straight walking, the body centre of mass (CM) follows a 3D figure-of-eight ("bow-tie") trajectory about 0.2 m long and with sizes around 0.05 m on each orthogonal axis. This was shown in 18 healthy adults walking at 0.3 to 1.4 ms⁻¹ on a force-treadmill (Tesio and Rota, 2008). Double integration of force signals can provide both the changes of mechanical energy of the CM and its 3D displacements (Tesio et al., 2010). In the same subjects, the relationship between the tangential speed of the CM, Vt, the curvature, C, and its inverse--the radius of curvature, r(c), were analyzed. A "power law" (PL) model was applied, i.e. logVt was regressed over logr(c). A PL is known to apply to the most various goal-directed planar movements (e.g. drawing), where the coefficient of logr(c), β, usually takes values around 13. When the PL was fitted to the whole dataset, β was 0.346 and variance explanation, R², was 59.8%. However, when the data were split into low- and high-curvature subsets (LC, HC, arbitrary cut-off of C=0.05 mm⁻¹, r(c)=20mm), β was 0.185 in the LC (R² 0.214) and 0.486 in the HC (R² 0.536) tracts. R² on the whole dataset increased to 0.763 if the LC-HC classification of the forward speed and their interaction entered the model. The β coefficient, the curvature C, and the pendulum-like recovery of mechanical energy were lower during the double foot-ground contact phase, compared to the single contact. Along the CM trajectory, curvature and muscle power output peaked together around the inversions of lateral direction. Non-zero torsion values were randomly distributed along 60% of the trajectory, suggesting that this is not segmented into piecewise planar tracts. It is proposed that the trajectory can be segmented into one tract that is more actively controlled (tie) where a PL fits poorly and another tract which is more ballistic (bow) where a PL fits well. Results need confirmation through more appropriate 3D PL modelling. Copyright © 2010

  7. Validity of the Nike+ device during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N A; Simmons, M C; John, D; Thompson, D L; Bassett, D R; Basset, D R

    2010-02-01

    We determined the validity of the Nike+ device for estimating speed, distance, and energy expenditure (EE) during walking and running. Twenty trained individuals performed a maximal oxygen uptake test and underwent anthropometric and body composition testing. Each participant was outfitted with a Nike+ sensor inserted into the shoe and an Apple iPod nano. They performed eight 6-min stages on the treadmill, including level walking at 55, 82, and 107 m x min(-1), inclined walking (82 m x min(-1)) at 5 and 10% grades, and level running at 134, 161, and 188 m x min(-1). Speed was measured using a tachometer and EE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results showed that the Nike+ device overestimated the speed of level walking at 55 m x min(-1) by 20%, underestimated the speed of level walking at 107 m x min(-1) by 12%, but closely estimated the speed of level walking at 82 m x min(-1), and level running at all speeds (p<0.05). Similar results were found for distance. The Nike+ device overestimated the EE of level walking by 18-37%, but closely estimated the EE of level running (p<0.05). In conclusion the Nike+ in-shoe device provided reasonable estimates of speed and distance during level running at the three speeds tested in this study. However, it overestimated EE during level walking and it did not detect the increased cost of inclined locomotion.

  8. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejczyk Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group and lean body mass (HLBM group. In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and maximal heart rate were measured. Walking economy was evaluated during two walks performed at two different speeds (4.8 and 6.0 km ‧ h-1. Results. The VO2max was similar in both groups, as were the physiological responses during slow walking. The absolute oxygen uptake or oxygen uptake relative to body mass did not significantly differentiate the studied groups. The only indicator significantly differentiating the two groups was oxygen uptake relative to LBM. Conclusions. Body composition does not significantly affect walking economy at low speed, while during brisk walking, the economy is better in the HLBM vs. HBF group, provided that walking economy is presented as oxygen uptake relative to LBM. For this reason, we recommend this manner of oxygen uptake normalization in the evaluation of walking economy.

  9. Speed test results and hardware/software study of computational speed problem, appendix D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The HP9845C is a desktop computer which is tested and evaluated for processing speed. A study was made to determine the availability and approximate cost of computers and/or hardware accessories necessary to meet the 20 ms sample period speed requirements. Additional requirements were that the control algorithm could be programmed in a high language and that the machine have sufficient storage to store the data from a complete experiment.

  10. Branching and annihilating random walks: exact results at low branching rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Federico; Wschebor, Nicolás

    2013-05-01

    We present some exact results on the behavior of branching and annihilating random walks, both in the directed percolation and parity conserving universality classes. Contrary to usual perturbation theory, we perform an expansion in the branching rate around the nontrivial pure annihilation (PA) model, whose correlation and response function we compute exactly. With this, the nonuniversal threshold value for having a phase transition in the simplest system belonging to the directed percolation universality class is found to coincide with previous nonperturbative renormalization group (RG) approximate results. We also show that the parity conserving universality class has an unexpected RG fixed point structure, with a PA fixed point which is unstable in all dimensions of physical interest.

  11. Built environmental correlates of walking and cycling in dutch urban children: Results from the SPACE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, S.I. de; Hopman-Rock, M.; Bakker, I.; Hirasing, R.A.; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    This study examined built environmental correlates of children's walking and cycling behavior. Four hundred and forty-eight children from 10 Dutch neighborhoods completed a seven-day physical activity diary in which the number of walking and cycling trips for transportation, to school, and for recre

  12. Built environmental correlates of walking and cycling in dutch urban children: Results from the SPACE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, S.I. de; Hopman-Rock, M.; Bakker, I.; Hirasing, R.A.; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    This study examined built environmental correlates of children's walking and cycling behavior. Four hundred and forty-eight children from 10 Dutch neighborhoods completed a seven-day physical activity diary in which the number of walking and cycling trips for transportation, to school, and for recre

  13. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizzi Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies. In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%. Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules, as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns.

  14. An exploration of impaired walking dynamics and fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burschka Janina M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS is frequently characterized by impaired ambulation. Although walking tests have been successfully employed to assess walking ability in MS patients, data analytic procedures have predominantly relied on result-oriented parameters (e.g. total distance covered during a given amount of time, whereas process-oriented, dynamic walking patterns have mostly been ignored. This is striking, since healthy individuals have been observed to display a stereotypical U-shaped pattern of walking speed during timed walking, characterized by relatively high speed during the initial phase, subsequent slowing and final acceleration. Objective of the current study was to test the utility of the 6 min Walk (6MW and the 12 min Walk (12MW for revealing putatively abnormal temporal dynamic features of walking in MS. Methods A group of 37 MS patients was divided into subgroups with regard to their level of disability analyzed with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS; Mild MS Group, n = 20, EDSS 0 – 3.5; Moderate MS Group, n = 17, EDSS 4 – 5. Subsequently, both groups were compared to age-matched healthy controls (n = 25 on both tests with regard to result-oriented characteristics (mean walking speed, as well as dynamic features (mean decline in walking speed, degree of observed U-shape. Results Both MS groups showed a significantly lower mean walking speed than healthy controls, independent of test duration. Compared to controls, the Moderate MS Group also slowed down more rapidly throughout both tests. The same pronounced decline in walking speed was observed for the Mild MS Group in case of the 12MW. Additionally, for both MS groups an attenuated U-shaped velocity pattern was observed relative to controls in the 6MW. Patients' subjective fatigue scores were more strongly correlated with the decline in walking speed than with the common parameter of mean walking speed in the 6MW

  15. Cognitive Functioning and Walking Speed in Older Adults as Predictors of Limitations in Self-Reported Instrumental Activity of Daily Living: Prospective Findings from the Obu Study of Health Promotion for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuma Makizako

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to determine whether baseline measures of cognitive functioning, walking speed, and depressive status are independent predictors of limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL in older adults. The cross-sectional study involved 1329 community-dwelling adults, aged 75 years or older. At baseline, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Symbol Digit Substitution Test (SDST, Geriatric Depressive Scale (GDS, and a word list memory task were completed, and self-reported IADLs and walking speed were recorded. The longitudinal study involved 948 participants without baseline IADL limitation, which was assessed at baseline and 15-month follow up, using the three Kihon Checklist subitems. In cross-sectional analyses, participants with IADL limitation demonstrated greater GDS scores, slower walking speeds, and lower MMSE, word list memory task, and SDST (only for women scores relative to those without IADL limitation. In the longitudinal analyses, baseline walking speed (men: OR 0.98; women: OR 0.97, p < 0.05 and word list memory task scores (men: OR 0.84; women: OR 0.83, p < 0.05 in both sexes and SDST scores in women (OR 0.96, p = 0.04 were independent predictors of subsequent IADL limitation. Walking speed, memory, and processing speed may be independent predictors of IADL limitation in older adults.

  16. The relationship of walking intensity to total and cause-specific mortality. Results from the National Walkers' Health Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Test whether: 1 walking intensity predicts mortality when adjusted for walking energy expenditure, and 2 slow walking pace (≥24-minute mile identifies subjects at substantially elevated risk for mortality. METHODS: Hazard ratios from Cox proportional survival analyses of all-cause and cause-specific mortality vs. usual walking pace (min/mile in 7,374 male and 31,607 female recreational walkers. Survival times were left censored for age at entry into the study. Other causes of death were treated as a competing risk for the analyses of cause-specific mortality. All analyses were adjusted for sex, education, baseline smoking, prior heart attack, aspirin use, diet, BMI, and walking energy expenditure. Deaths within one year of baseline were excluded. RESULTS: The National Death Index identified 1968 deaths during the average 9.4-year mortality surveillance. Each additional minute per mile in walking pace was associated with an increased risk of mortality due to all causes (1.8% increase, P=10(-5, cardiovascular diseases (2.4% increase, P=0.001, 637 deaths, ischemic heart disease (2.8% increase, P=0.003, 336 deaths, heart failure (6.5% increase, P=0.001, 36 deaths, hypertensive heart disease (6.2% increase, P=0.01, 31 deaths, diabetes (6.3% increase, P=0.004, 32 deaths, and dementia (6.6% increase, P=0.0004, 44 deaths. Those reporting a pace slower than a 24-minute mile were at increased risk for mortality due to all-causes (44.3% increased risk, P=0.0001, cardiovascular diseases (43.9% increased risk, P=0.03, and dementia (5.0-fold increased risk, P=0.0002 even though they satisfied the current exercise recommendations by walking ≥7.5 metabolic equivalent (MET-hours per week. CONCLUSIONS: The risk for mortality: 1 decreases in association with walking intensity, and 2 increases substantially in association for walking pace ≥24 minute mile (equivalent to <400 m during a six-minute walk test even among subjects who exercise regularly.

  17. Walking economy during cued versus non-cued treadmill walking in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paul M; McIsaac, Tara L; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2013-01-01

    Gait impairment is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may result in greater energy expenditure, poorer walking economy, and fatigue during activities of daily living. Auditory cueing is an effective technique to improve gait; but the effects on energy expenditure are unknown. To determine whether energy expenditure differs in individuals with PD compared with healthy controls and if auditory cueing improves walking economy in PD. Twenty participants (10 PD and 10 controls) came to the laboratory for three sessions. Participants performed two, 6-minute bouts of treadmill walking at two speeds (1.12 m·sec-1 and 0.67 m·sec-1). One session used cueing and the other without cueing. A metabolic cart measured energy expenditure and walking economy was calculated (energy expenditure/power). PD had worse walking economy and higher energy expenditure than control participants during cued and non-cued walking at the 0.67 m·sec-1 speed and during non-cued walking at the 1.12 m·sec-1. With auditory cueing, energy expenditure and walking economy worsened in both participant groups. People with PD use more energy and have worse walking economy than adults without PD. Walking economy declines further with auditory cuing in persons with PD.

  18. Trends in changes of elite sportswomen’ technique, specializing in 20 km race walk, considering rising of their sports results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sovenko S.P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: on the base of bio-mechanical characteristics’ analysis determination of trends in technique’s changes of elite sportswomen, specializing in 20 kilometers’ race walk, with rising of their sport results. Material: the research covered 13 elite sportswomen, specializing in 20 kilometers’ race walk (396 measurements. Results: bio-mechanical characteristics of the best 20 kilometers’ race walk sportswomen at Ukrainian championships 2014-2015 have been elucidated. Comparative analysis of elite sportswomen, having different sport results, has been conducted. Conclusions: improvement of sportsmanship to world level (from 1:38:37 to 1:31:35 takes place at the account of increasing of step length to 1.10 m (S = 0,01; shortening of phase of single support X average = 0.26 sec.; S = 0.01 owing to reduction of shock absorption time to 0.08 sec.

  19. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  20. [Gait speed and the appearance of neurocognitive disorders in older adults: Results of a Peruvian cohort].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, José F; Nieto-Gutierrez, Wendy; Tellez, Walter A; Ventocilla-Gonzales, Iris; Runzer-Colmenares, Fernando M; Taype-Rondan, Alvaro

    2017-09-07

    The prevention and management of neurocognitive disorders (NCD) among older adults can be improved by early identification of risk factors such as walking speed. The objective of the study is to assess the association between gait speed and NCD onset in a population of Peruvian older adults. Cohort conducted in older adults who attended the geriatrics service of Naval Medical Center (Callao, Peru). During the baseline assessment, participants' gait speed was recorded. Subsequently, participants were followed-up annually for 5 years, with a mean of 21 months. NCD onset was defined as the occurrence of a score ≤24 points on the Mini Mental State Examination (screening test) during follow-up. The hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using Cox regression. The study included 657 participants, with a mean age of 73.4±9.2 (SD) years, of whom 47.0% were male, 47.8% had a gait speed <0.8 m/s, and 20.1% developed NCD during the follow up. It was found that older adults who had gait speed <0.8 m/s at baseline were more likely to develop NCD than those who had a gait speed ≥0.8 m/s (adjusted HR=1.41, 95% CI=1.34-1.47). A longitudinal association was found between decreased gait speed and NCD onset, suggesting that gait speed could be useful to identify patients at risk of NCD onset. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking.

  2. Effects of walking trainings on walking function among stroke survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilunga Tshiswaka, Daudet; Bennett, Crystal; Franklin, Cheyanne

    2017-08-29

    Physical function is often compromised as a result of stroke event. Although interventions propose different strategies that seek to improve stroke survivors' physical function, a need remains to evaluate walking training studies aimed at improving such physical function. The aim of this review was to assess the available literature that highlights the impact of walking training on enhancing walking for stroke survivors. We performed a systematic literature review of online databases - Google Scholar, PubMed, CINHAL, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and EBSCO - with the following inclusion criteria: manuscript published from 2005 to 2016, written in English, with treatment and control groups, for walking training studies aimed at improving physical function among stroke survivors. Findings indicated that walking speed, walking distance, and gait speed were the most used outcome variables for measuring improved physical function among stroke survivors. Importantly, proposed interventions involved either overground or treadmill walking trainings, if not both. Preserved locomotor improvements were not noted in all interventions at follow-up. Some interventions that used walking treadmill training augmented by auditory stimulations reported significant improvements in physical function compared with overground walking training augmented by auditory stimulations. The imperative to improve physical function among stroke survivors with physical impairment is paramount, as it allows survivors to be socially, emotionally, and physically more independent. In general, we note an insufficiency of research on the interaction between physical function and socialization among stroke survivors.

  3. Preliminary results from the Danish Intelligent Speed Adaptation project Pay as You Speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Niels; Waagepetersen, Rasmus; Tradisauskas, Nerius

    2008-01-01

    ') and applies penalty points which decrease the driver's chance of a potential 30% discount on the cost of his/her automobile insurance (`incentive'). The results presented are based on the first 38 of 180 participants. The key result is that the combination of `information' and `incentive' almost eliminated...

  4. Impact of a short walking exercise on gait kinematics in children with cerebral palsy who walk in a crouch gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Audrey; Raison, Maxime; Pouliot-Laforte, Annie; Marois, Pierre; Maltais, Désirée B; Ballaz, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Crouch gait results in an increase of the joint stress due to an excessive knee flexion. Daily walking exercises, even when performed at a self-selected speed, may result in a decrease of the extensor muscle strength which could lead to a more severe crouch gait pattern. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a short walking exercise on gait kinematics in children with cerebral palsy who walk with a crouch gait. Seven children with cerebral palsy who walk with a crouch gait were asked to walk for 6min at a self-selected speed. The spatio-temporal and kinematic measures, as well as the center of mass position were compared before and after the exercise. There was no significant difference between walking speed before and after the walking exercise. Knee flexion and the maximal ankle dorsiflexion increased after the walking exercise. The vertical position of the center of mass decreased. No significant difference was found at the hip. Children with cerebral palsy who walk with a crouch gait were more crouched after a 6-min walking exercise performed at their self-selected speed. These gait modifications could be due to fatigue of the extensor muscle groups. This study highlighted that a short walking exercise, corresponding to daily mobility, results in gait pattern modifications. Since therapies in children with cerebral palsy aim to improve motor function in everyday life situations, it could be relevant to evaluate gait adaptation after a few minutes of walking exercise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 years, N = 20) could learn a specific sequence...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...... at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task like walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during...

  6. Mall Walking as a Physical Activity Option: Results of a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culos-Reed, S. Nicole; Stephenson, Lynette; Doyle-Baker, Patricia K.; Dickinson, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and benefits (fitness and quality of life) of an 8-week mall-walking program. A total of 52 participants ( n = 39 at post-testing) took part in the pilot project (mean age = 66.4; range 46-83 years), with an overall attendance rate of 62.4 per cent. Participants self-selected pace, time, and…

  7. Identifying the Probability for Ward Walking Independency in Stroke Patients Using the Berg Balance Scale and Walking Speed%用 Berg 平衡量表和步行速度判别脑卒中患者病区步行自立度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘迎晨; 瓮长水

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨Berg平衡量表(Berg balance scale ,BBS)和步行速度(walking speed ,WS)对脑卒中患者病区步行自立度的判定价值。方法对80例脑卒中的BBS和WS进行测量和分析。结果 BBS和WS对病区步行自立度具有良好的判别效力,预测病区步行自立度正确率为91.3%;ROC曲线分析提示判断病区步行自立度的最佳BBS临界值为46.5分,敏感性5%,特异性为77.8%,ROC曲线下面积为0.900;判断病区步行自立度的最佳WS临界值为0.51 m/s ,其相应的敏感性为86.8%,特异性为88.9%,ROC 曲线下面积为0.956。结论 BBS和WS可以较好的判别脑卒中患者的病区步行自立度。%Objective To study the value of the Berg Balance Scale(BBS)and the walking speed(WS)for the identification about the ward walking independency in the stroke patients .Methods The BBS and the 10-m WS of 80 stroke patients were measured and analyzed . Results Using discriminate analysis ,the BBS and the 10m WS were found to be the good discriminators of independency and non-independ-ence group(accuracy 91.3% ) .Receiver operating characteristic(ROC)curves were employed to suggest cut-off scores and to determine over-all predictability ,for BBS :cut-off point 46.5 ,sensitivity 92.5% ,specificity 77.8% and area under ROC curve 0.900 ;and for WS :cut-off point 0.51 m/s ,sensitivity 86.8% ,specificity 88.9% % ,and area under ROC curve 0.956.Conclusion This study suggests that the BBS and the WS were a good measure for discriminating ward walking independency in the stroke patients .

  8. Effect of concurrent walking and interlocutor distance on conversational speech intensity and rate in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, Cassandra M; Adams, Scott G; Dykstra, Allyson D; Jog, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a negative effect of concurrent walking and talking on gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) but there is limited information about the effect of concurrent walking on speech production. The present study examined the effect of sitting, standing, and three concurrent walking tasks (slow, normal, fast) on conversational speech intensity and speech rate in fifteen individuals with hypophonia related to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and fourteen age-equivalent controls. Interlocuter (talker-to-talker) distance effects and walking speed were also examined. Concurrent walking was found to produce a significant increase in speech intensity, relative to standing and sitting, in both the control and PD groups. Faster walking produced significantly greater speech intensity than slower walking. Concurrent walking had no effect on speech rate. Concurrent walking and talking produced significant reductions in walking speed in both the control and PD groups. In general, the results of the present study indicate that concurrent walking tasks and the speed of concurrent walking can have a significant positive effect on conversational speech intensity. These positive, "energizing" effects need to be given consideration in future attempts to develop a comprehensive model of speech intensity regulation and they may have important implications for the development of new evaluation and treatment procedures for individuals with hypophonia related to PD.

  9. Intelligent speed adaptation: Preliminary results of on-road study in Penang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.R. Ghadiri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The first field experiment with intelligent speed adaptation (ISA in Malaysia was held in December 2010 in the State of Penang. Eleven private cars were instrumented with an advisory system. The system used in the present study included a vocal warning message and a visual text message that is activated when the driver attempts to exceed the speed limit. When the driver decreases the speed, the warning stops; otherwise it is continuously repeated. The test drivers drove the vehicles for three months with the installed system, and the speed was continuously logged in all vehicles. The warning was however only activated in the second month of the three month period. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of an advisory ISA on driving speed, traffic safety, and drivers' attitude, behavior, and acceptance of the system. To examine these effects, both the survey and the logged speed data were analyzed and explored. The results show a significant reduction in the mean, maximum and 85th percentile speed due to the use of the system. However, there was no long-lasting effect on the speed when the system was deactivated. In the post-trial survey, drivers declared that the system helped them well in following the speed limits and that it assisted them in driving more comfortably. Furthermore, the warning method was more accepted compared to a supportive system, such as active accelerator pedal (AAP. After the trial, most drivers were willing to keep an ISA system.

  10. Effect of street connectivity and density on adult BMI: results from the Twin Cities Walking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kelsey N; Oakes, J Michael; Forsyth, Ann

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in the US population has risen dramatically in recent years. To try to explain this, some studies have examined the association between the built environment and obesity (measured using the body mass index (BMI)). Most of these studies have not sought to identify causal effects, but rather correlations. Data from the Twin Cities Walking Study were used to examine the effect of population density and block size on BMI. Although the Twin Cities Walking Study is a cross-sectional observational study, the matched-sampling design is novel in that it maximises environmental variance while minimising person variance to enhance exchangeability of subjects and more closely mimic an experimental study. Contrary to expectations, the hypothesised most walkable neighbourhood (high density, small block stratum) had the greatest mean and median BMI. After adjusting for demographic covariates, physical activity and clustering due to neighbourhood, no conclusive effect of population density by block size on BMI was found (β=-1.024, 95% CI -2.408 to 0.359). There is no evidence of an effect of population density by block size on BMI.

  11. Effects of Initial Stance of Quadruped Trotting on Walking Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peisun Ma

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for quadruped walking machine to keep its stability in high speed walking. It has been indicated that moment around the supporting diagonal line of quadruped in trotting gait largely influences walking stability. In this paper, moment around the supporting diagonal line of quadruped in trotting gait is modeled and its effects on body attitude are analyzed. The degree of influence varies with different initial stances of quadruped and we get the optimal initial stance of quadruped in trotting gait with maximal walking stability. Simulation results are presented.

  12. Walking control of small size humanoid robot: HAJIME ROBOT 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hajime; Nakatsu, Ryohei

    2007-12-01

    HAJIME ROBOT 18 is a fully autonomous biped robot. It has been developed for RoboCup which is a worldwide soccer competition of robots. It is necessary for a robot to have high mobility to play soccer. High speed walking and all directional walking are important to approach and to locate in front of a ball. HAJIME ROBOT achieved these walking. This paper describes walking control of a small size humanoid robot 'HAJIME ROBOT 18' and shows the measurement result of ZMP (Zero Moment Point). HAJIME ROBOT won the Robotics Society of Japan Award in RoboCup 2005 and in RoboCup 2006 Japan Open.

  13. Walking...A Step in the Right Direction!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts: Warm up by walking slowly. Increase your speed to a brisk walk. Brisk walking means walking fast enough to raise your heart ... go faster and farther. Add hills or some stairs to make your walks more challenging. Review the sample walking plan that follows for an idea of how ...

  14. Resolution of the hind leg dragging problem of a quadrupedal robot in high-speed dynamic walking%四足机器人高速动态行走中后腿拖地问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀丽; 曾翔宇; 郑浩峻

    2011-01-01

    This study presented two methods, adding a balance weight and performing postural adjustment, to deal with the hind-leg dragging problem of a quadrupedal robot due to the offset of its center of gravity during high-speed dynamic walking. The effectiveness of the two methods was confirmed by the dynamic simulation using a virtual prototype and conducting the experiments using a physical quadmpedal robot, Biosbot. The results of the study show that the method of adding a balance weight will increase extra load to the joints of the robot so as to make them worn down easily, while the method of adjusting the robot's posture has a better effectiveness but retracts the swing legs and the body so as to reduce the velocity and efficiency of walking, and these disadvantages can be reduced by increasing the walking frequency. In conclusion, combining the postural adjustment with the walking frequency increase is a better way to tackle the hind-legs dragging problem.%进行了用配重法和姿态调整法消除四足机器人Biosbot高速动态行走时由于重心偏置产生的后腿拖地现象的研究.进行的虚拟样机仿真及实物机器人实验验证了这两种方法的有效性.研究发现,配重法使机器人腿关节承受额外负载,极易造成轴联接件磨损、变形;姿态调整法效果比较明显,但也存在摆动腿足端回缩、质心回缩振荡等问题,会导致机器人运动速度和行走效率降低,这些问题可以通过提高机器人运动频率得到一定程度的改善.因此,将调整姿态和提高步行频率结合起来,是解决后腿拖地问题的较好方法.

  15. The Effect of 12 Weeks Individualized Combined Exercise Rehabilitation Training on Physiological Cost Index (PCI and Walking Speed in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis at all Levels of Physical Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Narimani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Most research on the effects of exercise on people with MS rehabilitation exercises sclerosis (MS  have been carried out on patients with low to moderate disability, but research on patients with different severity of disability (physical disability scale of zero to 10 still has to be carefully considered. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of twelve weeks of rehabilitation exercises personalized compound exercise on physiological cost index (PCI and average speed walking in patients with MS at various levels of disability. Methods: The present research was a semi-experimental practical study. Thus among female patients admitted to the MS Association of Shahrekord city, 96 people were chosen on the basis of physical disability scores and divided into three groups. The first group consisted of less than 5/4 a total of 44 people, the second group between 5/65 and 5/6 up third of each 26 patients were then randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. Afterwards each group was divided randomly into an experimental group and a control group. The first group (the scale of disability less than 4.5, N= 44. The second group (the scale of disability 5 - 6.5, N=26. Also 26 patients were in the third group (the scale of disability 6.5 and above. In addition, they were divided into 6 experimental and control groups. Training programs for experimental groups were 12 weeks, three sessions per week and one hour for each session. Factors such as physiological cost index and walking speed were measured with the appropriate tools before and after training. The experimental groups of 1, 2 and 3 each did their own intervention, while the control groups received only stretching exercises. Analysis of data obtained from 96 patients studied was done using descriptive statistics and the analysis of covariance and paired comparing of the adjusted means (P<0.05. ‌‌‌ Results: A significant difference in walking

  16. Shared muscle synergies in human walking and cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Filipe O; Torricelli, Diego; Moreno, Juan C; Taylor, Julian; Gomez-Soriano, Julio; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Piazza, Stefano; Santos, Cristina; Pons, José L

    2014-10-15

    The motor system may rely on a modular organization (muscle synergies activated in time) to execute different tasks. We investigated the common control features of walking and cycling in healthy humans from the perspective of muscle synergies. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) muscle synergies extracted from walking trials are similar to those extracted during cycling; 2) muscle synergies extracted from one of these motor tasks can be used to mathematically reconstruct the electromyographic (EMG) patterns of the other task; 3) muscle synergies of cycling can result from merging synergies of walking. A secondary objective was to identify the speed (and cadence) at which higher similarities emerged. EMG activity from eight muscles of the dominant leg was recorded in eight healthy subjects during walking and cycling at four matched cadences. A factorization technique [nonnegative matrix factorization (NNMF)] was applied to extract individual muscle synergy vectors and the respective activation coefficients behind the global muscular activity of each condition. Results corroborated hypotheses 2 and 3, showing that 1) four synergies from walking and cycling can successfully explain most of the EMG variability of cycling and walking, respectively, and 2) two of four synergies from walking appear to merge together to reconstruct one individual synergy of cycling, with best reconstruction values found for higher speeds. Direct comparison of the muscle synergy vectors of walking and the muscle synergy vectors of cycling (hypothesis 1) produced moderated values of similarity. This study provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that cycling and walking share common neuromuscular mechanisms.

  17. Swing- and support-related muscle actions differentially trigger human walk-run and run-walk transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prilutsky, B I; Gregor, R J

    2001-07-01

    There has been no consistent explanation as to why humans prefer changing their gait from walking to running and from running to walking at increasing and decreasing speeds, respectively. This study examined muscle activation as a possible determinant of these gait transitions. Seven subjects walked and ran on a motor-driven treadmill for 40s at speeds of 55, 70, 85, 100, 115, 130 and 145% of the preferred transition speed. The movements of subjects were videotaped, and surface electromyographic activity was recorded from seven major leg muscles. Resultant moments at the leg joints during the swing phase were calculated. During the swing phase of locomotion at preferred running speeds (115, 130, 145%), swing-related activation of the ankle, knee and hip flexors and peaks of flexion moments were typically lower (Prunning than during walking. At preferred walking speeds (55, 70, 85%), support-related activation of the ankle and knee extensors was typically lower during stance of walking than during stance of running (Prun transition might be triggered by the increased sense of effort due to the exaggerated swing-related activation of the tibialis anterior, rectus femoris and hamstrings; this increased activation is necessary to meet the higher joint moment demands to move the swing leg during fast walking. The preferred run-walk transition might be similarly triggered by the sense of effort due to the higher support-related activation of the soleus, gastrocnemius and vastii that must generate higher forces during slow running than during walking at the same speed.

  18. The Natural Interactive Walking Project and Emergence of Its Results in Research on Rhythmic Walking Interaction and the Role of Footsteps in Affecting Body Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Sikström, Erik; Serafin, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    which are interesting in a broader context of interactive walking with audio and haptic feedback to present and discuss the developed systems for gait analysis and feedback presentation, but also, what is even more interesting to show how it influence humans behavior and perception. We hope also to open...

  19. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients.

  20. Effects of Virtual Walking Treatment on Spinal Cord Injury-Related Neuropathic Pain: Pilot Results and Trends Related to Location of Pain and at-level Neuronal Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Melissa; Richardson, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that virtual walking to treat spinal cord injury-related neuropathic pain (SCI-NP) can be beneficial, although the type of SCI-NP that may benefit the most is unclear. This study's aims were to (1) determine the effect of location of SCI-NP on pain outcomes after virtual walking treatment and (2) examine the potential relationship between neuronal hyperexcitability, as measured by quantitative sensory testing, and pain reduction after virtual walking treatment. Participants were recruited from a larger ongoing trial examining the benefits of virtual walking in SCI-NP. Neuropathic pain was classified according to location of pain (at- or below-level). In addition, quantitative sensory testing was performed on a subset of individuals at a nonpainful area corresponding to the level of their injury before virtual walking treatment and was used to characterize treatment response. These pilot results suggest that when considered as a group, SCI-NP was responsive to treatment irrespective of the location of pain (F1, 44 = 4.82, P = 0.03), with a trend for the greatest reduction occurring in at-level SCI-NP (F1, 44 = 3.18, P = 0.08). These pilot results also potentially implicate cold, innocuous cool, and pressure hypersensitivity at the level of injury in attenuating the benefits of virtual walking to below-level pain, suggesting certain SCI-NP sensory profiles may be less responsive to virtual walking.

  1. Inverse association between insulin resistance and gait speed in nondiabetic older men: results from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yau-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have revealed the associations between insulin resistance (IR and geriatric conditions such as frailty and cognitive impairment. However, little is known about the relation of IR to physical impairment and limitation in the aging process, eg. slow gait speed and poor muscle strength. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of IR in performance-based physical function, specifically gait speed and leg strength, among nondiabetic older adults. Methods Cross-sectional data were from the population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2002. A total of 1168 nondiabetic adults (≥ 50 years with nonmissing values in fasting measures of insulin and glucose, habitual gait speed (HGS, and leg strength were analyzed. IR was assessed by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR, whereas HGS and peak leg strength by the 20-foot timed walk test and an isokinetic dynamometer, respectively. We used multiple linear regression to examine the association between IR and performance-based physical function. Results IR was inversely associated with gait speed among the men. After adjusting demographics, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status, chronic co-morbidities, and markers of nutrition and cardiovascular risk, each increment of 1 standard deviation in the HOMA-IR level was associated with a 0.04 m/sec decrease (p = 0.003 in the HGS in men. We did not find such association among the women. The IR-HGS association was not changed after further adjustment of leg strength. Last, HOMA-IR was not demonstrated in association with peak leg strength. Conclusion IR is inversely associated with HGS among older men without diabetes. The results suggest that IR, an important indicator of gait function among men, could be further investigated as an intervenable target to prevent walking limitation.

  2. Impact of loaded sit-to-stand exercises at different speeds on the physiological cost of walking in children with spastic diplegia: A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu; Takaki, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we aimed to determine whether similarly loaded sit-to-stand exercises at different speeds improve the physiological cost of walking in children with spastic diplegia. This design was a single-blind randomized clinical trial. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 12-18 years, with a diagnosis of spastic diplegia, were randomly allocated to a slow loaded sit-to-stand exercise group (n=8) and a self-paced loaded sit-to-stand exercise group (n=8). Loaded sit-to-stand exercise was conducted at home for 15min, 4 sets per day, 3-4days per week, for 6 weeks. The patients were evaluated immediately before the intervention and after the training. Lower limb muscle strength using a hand-held dynamometer, selective voluntary motor control using SCALE, 6-min walk distance (6MWD), and Physiological Cost Index (PCI) were measured. The 6MWD showed a significant difference before and after intervention. PCI showed a significant difference between the two groups and the two time points. 6MWD and the PCI improved after intervention in the slow sit-to-stand exercise group. Compared to loaded sit-to-stand exercise at a regular speed, slow low-loaded sit-to-stand exercise improved the 6MWD and PCI in children with CP, suggesting that this decrease in speed during exercise improves the physiological cost of walking in these children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of Pattern Classification Algorithms to Interpret Passive and Active Data Streams from a Walking-Speed Robotic Sensor Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckman, Eric Allen

    In order to perform useful tasks for us, robots must have the ability to notice, recognize, and respond to objects and events in their environment. This requires the acquisition and synthesis of information from a variety of sensors. Here we investigate the performance of a number of sensor modalities in an unstructured outdoor environment, including the Microsoft Kinect, thermal infrared camera, and coffee can radar. Special attention is given to acoustic echolocation measurements of approaching vehicles, where an acoustic parametric array propagates an audible signal to the oncoming target and the Kinect microphone array records the reflected backscattered signal. Although useful information about the target is hidden inside the noisy time domain measurements, the Dynamic Wavelet Fingerprint process (DWFP) is used to create a time-frequency representation of the data. A small-dimensional feature vector is created for each measurement using an intelligent feature selection process for use in statistical pattern classification routines. Using our experimentally measured data from real vehicles at 50 m, this process is able to correctly classify vehicles into one of five classes with 94% accuracy. Fully three-dimensional simulations allow us to study the nonlinear beam propagation and interaction with real-world targets to improve classification results.

  4. Influence of Gait Speeds on Contact Forces of Lower Limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While walking with fast speed aims to promote health and fitness of individuals, the potential risk on lower limb joint loading across walking speed is still unknown. In order to determine the joint contact force loading associated with different walking speeds, fifteen young male and fifteen female participants performed barefoot walking across different speeds (regular = 1.1 m/s, medium = 1.4 m/s, and fast = 1.7 m/s. The synchronized motion and ground reaction force (GRF data were captured by Codamotion capture system and AMTI force platform. All kinematics and GRF information were input to the AnyBody musculoskeletal model to determine 3-dimensional knee contact forces. The results showed that increased walking speed was associated with a greater proximal-distal and anterior-posterior GRF during early impact phase, implying that the joint stability is more demanding at higher walking speed conditions (P<0.05. In addition, higher proximal-distal and anterior-posterior knee contact forces were found when participants were walking at higher speeds (P<0.05. Therefore, the risk of knee cartilage and ligament damage associated with the increased knee contact forces should require further attention.

  5. 超重成年女性相同速度梯度健步走与慢跑能量消耗的比较%Energy Expenditure Comparison of Overweight Adult Women at the Same Speed Gradient of Walking and Jogging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张培珍; 岳书芳; 洪平

    2016-01-01

    This paper probes into characteristics of energy consumption and physiology of over‐weight adult women at the same speed gradient of walking and jogging .The subjects were o‐verweight and normal weight adult women .Their maximal oxygen uptake was measured by a maximal treadmill exercise test using a modified Bruce protocol .The resting energy expenditure and the energy expenditure of overground walking and jogging were measured by Cortex porta‐ble gas metabolism system .The overground walking speed from low to high were 4 .0km/h , 4 .5km/h ,5 .0km/h ,5 .5km/h ,6 .0km/h ,6 .5km/h and 7 .0km/h .The overground jogging speed were 6 .0km/h ,7 .0km/h and 8 .0km/h .The duration of each speed was 6 minutes . Net energy expenditure of each speed was calculated as energy expenditure minus resting ener‐gy expenditure .The result showed that when the walking speed over 5 .5km/h (including 5 .5 km/h) and jogging speed over 7 .0km/h (including 7 .0km/h) ,the energy expenditure ,net energy expenditure and heart rate of overweight women were significantly higher than normal weight women (P< 0 .05 ,P<0 .01) .When walking speed was 6 .0km/h ,energy expenditure and net energy expenditure of overweight women were significantly lower than jogging at the speed of 6 .0km/h ( P<0 .05 ,P< 0 .01 ) .However ,when walking speed was 7 .0km/h ,en‐ergy expenditure ,net energy expenditure ,heart rate and RPE of overweight women were sig‐nificantly higher than jogging at the speed of 7 .0km/h ( P< 0 .05 ,P< 0 .01 ) .These results demonstrate that the differences of BMI will result in differentiations of energy consumption and physiological indexes of women when walking and jogging at a certain speed .When speed reach and exceed 7 .0km/h ,walking will consume more energy than jogging .As far as the weight control of overweight people is concerned ,the effect of walking at this speed is better than that of jogging .%探讨超重人群在相同速度梯度下进行健步走和慢跑运

  6. A Lunchtime Walk in Nature Enhances Restoration of Autonomic Control during Night-Time Sleep: Results from a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladwell, Valerie F; Kuoppa, Pekka; Tarvainen, Mika P; Rogerson, Mike

    2016-03-03

    Walking within nature (Green Exercise) has been shown to immediately enhance mental well-being but less is known about the impact on physiology and longer lasting effects. Heart rate variability (HRV) gives an indication of autonomic control of the heart, in particular vagal activity, with reduced HRV identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Night-time HRV allows vagal activity to be assessed whilst minimizing confounding influences of physical and mental activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a lunchtime walk in nature increases night-time HRV. Participants (n = 13) attended on two occasions to walk a 1.8 km route through a built or a natural environment. Pace was similar between the two walks. HRV was measured during sleep using a RR interval sensor (eMotion sensor) and was assessed at 1-2 h after participants noted that they had fallen asleep. Markers for vagal activity were significantly greater after the walk in nature compared to the built walk. Lunchtime walks in nature-based environments may provide a greater restorative effect as shown by vagal activity than equivalent built walks. Nature walks may improve essential recovery during night-time sleep, potentially enhancing physiological health.

  7. A Lunchtime Walk in Nature Enhances Restoration of Autonomic Control during Night-Time Sleep: Results from a Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie F. Gladwell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Walking within nature (Green Exercise has been shown to immediately enhance mental well-being but less is known about the impact on physiology and longer lasting effects. Heart rate variability (HRV gives an indication of autonomic control of the heart, in particular vagal activity, with reduced HRV identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Night-time HRV allows vagal activity to be assessed whilst minimizing confounding influences of physical and mental activity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a lunchtime walk in nature increases night-time HRV. Participants (n = 13 attended on two occasions to walk a 1.8 km route through a built or a natural environment. Pace was similar between the two walks. HRV was measured during sleep using a RR interval sensor (eMotion sensor and was assessed at 1–2 h after participants noted that they had fallen asleep. Markers for vagal activity were significantly greater after the walk in nature compared to the built walk. Lunchtime walks in nature-based environments may provide a greater restorative effect as shown by vagal activity than equivalent built walks. Nature walks may improve essential recovery during night-time sleep, potentially enhancing physiological health.

  8. Simulation Platform of Underwater Quadruped Walking Robot Based on MotionGenesis Kane 5 3 and Central Pattern Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Yang; XuYang Wang; Tong Ge; Chao Wu

    2014-01-01

    It will still in lack of a simulation platform used to learn the walking of underwater quadruped walking robot. In order to alleviate this shortage, a simulation platform for the underwater quadruped walking robot based on Kane dynamic model and CPG-based controller is constructed. The Kane dynamic model of the underwater quadruped walking robot is processed with a commercial package MotionGenesis Kane 5�3. The forces between the feet and ground are represented as a spring and damper. The relation between coefficients of spring and damper and stability of underwater quadruped walking robot in the stationary state is studied. The CPG-based controller consisted of Central Pattern Generator ( CPG) and PD controller is presented, which can be used to control walking of the underwater quadruped walking robot. The relation between CPG parameters and walking speed of underwater quadruped walking robot is investigated. The relation between coefficients of spring and damper and walking speed of underwater quadruped walking robot is studied. The results show that the simulation platform can imitate the stable walking of the underwater quadruped walking robot.

  9. Predicting metabolic rate during level and uphill outdoor walking using a low-cost GPS receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Müllenheim, Pierre-Yves; Dumond, Rémy; Gernigon, Marie; Mahé, Guillaume; Lavenu, Audrey; Bickert, Sandrine; Prioux, Jacques; Noury-Desvaux, Bénédicte; Le Faucheur, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of using speed and grade data obtained from a low-cost global positioning system (GPS) receiver to estimate metabolic rate (MR) during level and uphill outdoor walking. Thirty young, healthy adults performed randomized outdoor walking for 6-min periods at 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 km/h and on three different grades: 1) level walking, 2) uphill walking on a 3.7% mean grade, and 3) uphill walking on a 10.8% mean grade. The reference MR [metabolic equivalents (METs) and oxygen uptake (V̇o2)] values were obtained using a portable metabolic system. The speed and grade were obtained using a low-cost GPS receiver (1-Hz recording). The GPS grade (Δ altitude/distance walked) was calculated using both uncorrected GPS altitude data and GPS altitude data corrected with map projection software. The accuracy of predictions using reference speed and grade (actual[SPEED/GRADE]) data was high [R(2) = 0.85, root-mean-square error (RMSE) = 0.68 MET]. The accuracy decreased when GPS speed and uncorrected grade (GPS[UNCORRECTED]) data were used, although it remained substantial (R(2) = 0.66, RMSE = 1.00 MET). The accuracy was greatly improved when the GPS speed and corrected grade (GPS[CORRECTED]) data were used (R(2) = 0.82, RMSE = 0.79 MET). Published predictive equations for walking MR were also cross-validated using actual or GPS speed and grade data when appropriate. The prediction accuracy was very close when either actual[SPEED/GRADE] values or GPS[CORRECTED] values (for level and uphill combined) or GPS speed values (for level walking only) were used. These results offer promising research and clinical applications related to the assessment of energy expenditure during free-living walking.

  10. Crossover from random walk to self-avoiding walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Jens

    1988-11-01

    A one-dimensional n-step random walk on openZ1 which must not visit a vertex more than k times is studied via Monte Carlo methods. The dependences of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the walk and of the fraction of trapped walks on λ=(k-1)/n will be given for the range from λ=0 (self-avoiding walk) to λ=1 (unrestricted random walk). From the results it is conjectured that in the limit n-->∞ the walk obeys simple random walk statistics with respect to its static properties for all λ>0.

  11. A foot drop correcting FES envelope design method using tibialis anterior EMG during healthy gait with a new walking speed control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M; Wang, Q B; Lou, X X; Xu, K; Zheng, X X

    2010-01-01

    Restoring walking functions will greatly improve the foot-drop patients' life quality. In this work, we sampled 10 healthy subjects' gait data when walking in 4 different stride frequency overground and developed a dynamic Functional Electrical Stimulation (dFES) system for foot-drop patients' walk training, using the processed tibialis anterior (TA) muscle EMG signal. The data sampled under the new strategy can be used by FES system directly. And the dFES system can provide dynamic Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) FES serial according to the healthy subjects' TA EMG intensity features.

  12. Correlates of time spent walking and cycling to and from work: baseline results from the commuting and health in Cambridge study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panter Jenna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Environmental perceptions and psychological measures appear to be associated with walking and cycling behaviour; however, their influence is still unclear. We assessed these associations using baseline data from a quasi-experimental cohort study of the effects of major transport infrastructural developments in Cambridge, UK. Methods Postal surveys were sent to adults who travel to work in Cambridge (n = 1582. Questions asked about travel modes and time spent travelling to and from work in the last week, perceptions of the route, psychological measures regarding car use and socio-demographic characteristics. Participants were classified into one of two categories according to time spent walking for commuting ('no walking' or 'some walking' and one of three categories for cycling ('no cycling', '1-149 min/wk' and ' ≥ 150 min/wk'. Results Of the 1164 respondents (68% female, mean (SD age: 42.3 (11.4 years 30% reported any walking and 53% reported any cycling to or from work. In multiple regression models, short distance to work and not having access to a car showed strong positive associations with both walking and cycling. Furthermore, those who reported that it was pleasant to walk were more likely to walk to or from work (OR = 4.18, 95% CI 3.02 to 5.78 and those who reported that it was convenient to cycle on the route between home and work were more likely to do so (1-149 min/wk: OR = 4.60, 95% CI 2.88 to 7.34; ≥ 150 min/wk: OR = 3.14, 95% CI 2.11 to 4.66. Positive attitudes in favour of car use were positively associated with time spent walking to or from work but negatively associated with cycling to or from work. Strong perceived behavioural control for car use was negatively associated with walking. Conclusions In this relatively affluent sample of commuters, a range of individual and household characteristics, perceptions of the route environment and psychological measures relating to car use were associated with

  13. The effect of foot progression angle on knee joint compression force during walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblauch, Henrik; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Alkjær, Tine;

    2013-01-01

    males walked at a fixed speed of 4.5 km/h under three conditions: Normal walking, internally rotated and externally rotated. All gait trials were recorded by six infrared cameras. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. The results revealed that the medial knee joint compartment...

  14. Respostas cardiorrespiratórias e perceptivas para as mesmas velocidades de caminhada e corrida Respuestas cardiorrespiratorias y perceptivas para las mismas velocidades de caminata y carrera Cardiorespiratory and perceptual responses to walking and running at the same speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walace David Monteiro

    2009-10-01

    seleccionaron 12 hombres adultos jóvenes y homogeneizados criteriosamente en cuanto a sexo, edad, características antropométricas, condición aeróbica y experiencia en ejercicios en cinta sin fin. En sesiones preliminares, se determinó individualmente la VTCC. Posteriormente, en tres días diferentes, los individuos caminaron y corrieron, en orden balanceado, a cada una de las siguientes velocidades: VTCC, VTCC - 0,5 km/h y VTCC + 0,5 km/h, con obtención de medidas de gases expirados, de la frecuencia cardíaca (FC y de la percepción de esfuerzo. RESULTADOS: El protocolo para detección de la VTCC se mostró altamente reproducible (r=0,92; p0,05. CONCLUSIÓN: La caminata a velocidades superiores a la VTCC tiende a ser más estresante desde el punto de vista fisiológico y perceptivo. Parece conveniente determinar individualmente la VTCC y normalizar la forma de locomoción para una prescripción más fisiológica y fidedigna de la intensidad de los ejercicios aeróbicos.BACKGROUND: It is possible that different forms of locomotion, when carried out at the same speed, may have a distinct influence on the physiological and perceptual responses to exercise. OBJECTIVE: To compare the cardiorespiratory responses and the subjective perception of the effort to walk and run at the same speed, as determined from the walk-run transition speed (WRTS. METHODS: From an initial sample of 453 subjects enrolled in the compulsory military service, 12 young adult men were selected and carefully homogenized as to age, sex, anthropometric characteristics, aerobic condition and experience in a treadmill. In preliminary sessions, the individual WRTS was determined. Thereafter, on three different days, the subjects walked and ran in balanced order, in each of the following speeds: WRTS; WRTS - 0.5 km/h; WRTS + 0.5 km/h, so as to obtain exhaled gases, heart rate (HR and perception of effort measurements. RESULTS: The protocol for WRTS detection was highly reproducible (r = 0.92, p 0

  15. Speed Rhythm Feature Analysis of Men's Full Stage of 20km Race Walking%男子20km 竞走全程四阶段速度节奏特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓雪

    2015-01-01

    运用灰色关联分析法,依据多次比赛运动员相对速度变化特征,总结男子20km 竞走速度节奏的制胜规律。结果表明:男子20 km 竞走全程四个阶段的制胜速度节奏为:第一阶段采用低速启动;第二阶段积极加速,争夺更好的比赛位置;第三阶段调整节奏保持有利位置;第四阶段选择适当的加速冲刺时机。%Through using the grey correlation analysis method and on the basis of multiple game athletes relative speed variation characteristics, this paper sums up the winning rule of men's 20 km race walking pace. The results show that the men's entire 20 km race walking’s winning pace of four stages are as follows: the first phase begins with a slow start; the second phase positive acceleration, for better positions; the third phase adjusts rhythm to keep good position; the fourth stage chooses appropriate spurt timing.

  16. How gravity and muscle action control mediolateral center of mass excursion during slow walking: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Karen; De Groote, Friedl; Duysens, Jacques; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining mediolateral (ML) balance is very important to prevent falling during walking, especially at very slow speeds. The effect of walking speed on support and propulsion of the center of mass (COM) has been focus of previous studies. However, the influence of speed on ML COM control and the associated coupling with sagittal plane control remains unclear. Simulations of walking at very slow and normal speeds were generated for twelve healthy subjects. Our results show that gluteus medius (GMED) contributions to ML stability decrease, while its contributions to sagittal plane accelerations increase during very slow compared to normal walking. Simultaneously the destabilizing influence of gravity increases in ML direction at a very slow walking speed. This emphasizes the need for a tight balance between gravity and gluteus medius action to ensure ML stability. When walking speed increases, GMED has a unique role in controlling ML acceleration and therefore stabilizing ML COM excursion. Contributions of other muscles decrease in all directions during very slow speed. Increased contributions of these muscles are therefore required to provide for both stability and propulsion when walking speed increases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Pay-As-You-Drive vehicle insurance on young drivers' speed choice : Results of a Dutch field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolderdijk, J.W.; Knockaert, J.; Steg, L.; Verhoef, E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Speeding is an important cause for young drivers' involvement in traffic accidents. A reduction in driving speeds of this group could result in fewer accidents. One way of reducing driving speed is offering explicit financial incentives. In collaboration with five Dutch car insurance companies, we t

  18. Walking abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safety reasons, especially on uneven ground. See a physical therapist for exercise therapy and walking retraining. For a ... the right position for standing and walking. A physical therapist can supply these and provide exercise therapy, if ...

  19. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Linda H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects. Methods The walking pattern during walking with and without rollator was analyzed using a three-dimensional inverse dynamics method. Sagittal joint dynamics and kinematics of the ankle, knee and hip were calculated. In addition, hip joint dynamics and kinematics in the frontal plane were calculated. Seven healthy women participated in the study. Results The hip was more flexed while the knee and ankle joints were less flexed/dorsiflexed during rollator walking. The ROM of the ankle and knee joints was reduced during rollator-walking. Rollator-walking caused a reduction in the knee extensor moment by 50% when compared to normal walking. The ankle plantarflexor and hip abductor moments were smaller when walking with a rollator. In contrast, the angular impulse of the hip extensors was significantly increased during rollator-walking. Conclusion Walking with a rollator unloaded the ankle and especially the knee extensors, increased the hip flexion and thus the contribution of hip extensors to produce movement. Thus, rollator walking did not result in an overall unloading of the muscles and joints of the lower extremities. However, the long-term effect of rollator walking is unknown and further investigation in this field is needed.

  20. Exit times for a class of random walks: exact distribution results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    the exit possible has a Laplace transform which is a rational function. The expected exit time is also determined and the paper concludes with exact distribution results concerning exits from bounded intervals. The proofs use simple martingale techniques together with some classical expansions...

  1. Results and conclusions: perception sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anne; LaCelle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Close, Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has presented work on sensor requirements, specifications, and testing, to evaluate the feasibility of increasing autonomous vehicle system speeds. Discussions included the theoretical background for determining sensor requirements, and the basic test setup and evaluation criteria for comparing existing and prototype sensor designs. This paper will present and discuss the continuation of this work. In particular, this paper will focus on analyzing the problem via a real-world comparison of various sensor technology testing results, as opposed to previous work that utilized more of a theoretical approach. LADAR/LIDAR, radar, visual, and infrared sensors are considered in this research. Results are evaluated against the theoretical, desired perception specifications. Conclusions for utilizing a suite of perception sensors, to achieve the goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds, is also discussed.

  2. Random walks based multi-image segmentation: Quasiconvexity results and GPU-based solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Maxwell D; Xu, Jia; Grady, Leo; Singh, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    We recast the Cosegmentation problem using Random Walker (RW) segmentation as the core segmentation algorithm, rather than the traditional MRF approach adopted in the literature so far. Our formulation is similar to previous approaches in the sense that it also permits Cosegmentation constraints (which impose consistency between the extracted objects from ≥ 2 images) using a nonparametric model. However, several previous nonparametric cosegmentation methods have the serious limitation that they require adding one auxiliary node (or variable) for every pair of pixels that are similar (which effectively limits such methods to describing only those objects that have high entropy appearance models). In contrast, our proposed model completely eliminates this restrictive dependence -the resulting improvements are quite significant. Our model further allows an optimization scheme exploiting quasiconvexity for model-based segmentation with no dependence on the scale of the segmented foreground. Finally, we show that the optimization can be expressed in terms of linear algebra operations on sparse matrices which are easily mapped to GPU architecture. We provide a highly specialized CUDA library for Cosegmentation exploiting this special structure, and report experimental results showing these advantages.

  3. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nicholas; Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity.

  4. Quadriceps Strength, Quadriceps Power, and Gait Speed in Older U.S. Adults with Diabetes: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999–2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Tra, Yolande; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Egan, Josephine M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the independent association of diabetes (and its duration and severity) with quadriceps strength, quadriceps power, and gait speed in a national population of older adults. Design Cross-sectional nationally representative survey. Setting U.S. Participants We examined 2573 adults ≥50 years of age in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002 who had assessment of quadriceps strength. Methods Diabetes was ascertained by questionnaire. Measurement of isokinetic knee extensors (quadriceps) strength was performed at 60 degrees/second. Gait speed was assessed using a 20-foot walk test. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes status and outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders or mediators. Results Among older U.S. adults, those with versus without diabetes had significantly slower gait speed (0.96±0.02 versus 1.08±0.01 m/s; p<0.001). After adjusting for demographics, weight, and height, diabetes was also associated with significantly lower quadriceps strength (−4.6±1.9 Newton-meters; p=0.02), quadriceps power (−4.9±2.0 Watts; p=0.02), in addition to gait speed (−0.05±0.02 m/s; p=0.002). Associations remained significant after adjusting for physical activity and C-reactive protein. After accounting for comorbidities (cardiovascular disease, peripheral neuropathy, amputation, cancer, arthritis, fracture, COPD), diabetes was only independently associated with gait speed (−0.04±0.02 m/s; p=0.02). Diabetes duration in men and women was negatively associated with age-adjusted quadriceps strength (−5.7 and −3.5 Newton-meters/decade of diabetes, respectively) and power (−6.1 and −3.8 Watts/decade of diabetes, respectively) (all p≤0.001, no significant interactions by gender). Hemoglobin A1c was not associated with outcomes accounting for body weight. Conclusion Compared to persons without diabetes, older U.S. adults with diabetes have lower quadriceps

  5. Attentional costs of walking are not affected by variations in lateral balance demands in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Masood; Roerdink, Melvyn; Duysens, Jacques; Beek, Peter J; Peper, C Lieke E

    2016-05-01

    Increased attentional costs of walking in older adults have been attributed to age-related changes in visuomotor and/or balance control of walking. The present experiment was conducted to examine the hypothesis that attentional costs of walking vary with lateral balance demands during walking in young and older adults. Twenty young and twenty older adults walked on a treadmill at their preferred walking speed under five conditions: unconstrained normal walking, walking on projected visual lines corresponding to either the participant's preferred step width or 50% thereof (i.e. increased balance demand), and walking within low- and high-stiffness lateral stabilization frames (i.e. lower balance demands). Attentional costs were assessed using a probe reaction-time task during these five walking conditions, normalized to baseline performance as obtained during sitting. Both imposed step-width conditions were more attentionally demanding than the three other conditions, in the absence of any other significant differences between conditions. These effects were similar in the two groups. The results indicate that the attentional costs of walking were, in contrast to what has been postulated previously, not influenced by lateral balance demands. The observed difference in attentional costs between normal walking and both visual lines conditions suggests that visuomotor control processes, rather than balance control, strongly affect the attentional costs of walking. A tentative explanation of these results may be that visuomotor control processes are mainly governed by attention-demanding cortical processes, whereas balance is regulated predominantly subcortically.

  6. The combined effects of guidance force, bodyweight support and gait speed on muscle activity during able-bodied walking in the Lokomat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Anne M.; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Reinders - Messelink, Heelen; den Otter, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ability to provide automated movement guidance is unique for robot assisted gait trainers such as the Lokomat. For the design of training protocols for the Lokomat it is crucial to understand how movement guidance affects the patterning of muscle activity that underlies walking, and

  7. The combined effects of guidance force, bodyweight support and gait speed on muscle activity during able-bodied walking in the Lokomat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Anne M; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; den Otter, Rob

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability to provide automated movement guidance is unique for robot assisted gait trainers such as the Lokomat. For the design of training protocols for the Lokomat it is crucial to understand how movement guidance affects the patterning of muscle activity that underlies walking, and

  8. Effectiveness of an innovative hip energy storage walking orthosis for improving paraplegic walking: A pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingliang; Li, Jianjun; Guan, Xinyu; Gao, Lianjun; Gao, Feng; Du, Liangjie; Zhao, Hongmei; Yang, Degang; Yu, Yan; Wang, Qimin; Wang, Rencheng; Ji, Linhong

    2017-09-01

    The high energy cost of paraplegic walking using a reciprocating gait orthosis (RGO) is attributed to limited hip motion and excessive upper limb loading for support. To address the limitation, we designed the hip energy storage walking orthosis (HESWO) which uses a spring assembly on the pelvic shell to store energy from the movements of the healthy upper limbs and flexion-extension of the lumbar spine and hip and returns this energy to lift the pelvis and lower limb to assist with the swing and stance components of a stride. Our aim was to evaluate gait and energy cost indices for the HESWO compared to the RGO in patients with paraplegia. The cross-over design was used in the pilot study. Twelve patients with a complete T4-L5 chronic spinal cord injury underwent gait training using the HESWO and RGO. Gait performance (continuous walking distance, as well as the maximum and comfortable walking speeds) and energy expenditure (at a walking speed of 3.3m/min on a treadmill) were measured at the end of the 4-week training session. Compared to the RGO, the HESWO increased continuous walking distance by 24.7% (Penergy expenditure by 13.9% (P<0.05). Our preliminary results provide support for the use of the HESWO as an alternative support for paraplegic walking. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND INFLUENCE OF SPEED POWER ON RESULTS PROGRESSION OF LOW VISION JAVELIN THROWERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Matić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Power is a motor skill important for low vision javelin throwers. The motor skill development (power, speed, endurance etc. linked to the fact that javelin is the lightest throwing device, we come to conclusion that the result in this discipline depends much more on the speed and flexibility than on the power. Nevertheless, development of speed power significantly influences the acquiring of good results in above mentioned discipline. While working with low vision sportsmen the attention should be focused on possible limitations in training of power that could be determined by some kind of illness or injury primarly caused the low vision. Experimental method od survey based on one sample was applied (case study. Equipment used in the experiments were adjusted to the needs, age and level of condition of examinee- Grlica Miloš (current European Record Breaker, 3rd on the World’s Championship 2012 in New Zealand, discipline of javlin throwing, category F12. The survey consisted of two-months cycle in the period from 01/04/2012 until 01/06/2012 as a part of preparation for Paralympic Games in London 2012. Measured variables include: 5kg ball throwing in front and above, standing long jump, 4kg ball throwing exercise aut. Based on the applied tests a conclusion can be made that the impact of force on acquiring better results, in this discipline, is very strong. Regardless the acquired results, in our opinion too big and too fast improvement in this area of physical preparation can be contraproductive due to the occurence of inadequate movements in joints which are esential for the discipline. Power development is definitely crucial segment in modeling of training process for javelin throwers. There are many surveys and articles about this topic but very little focusing on disabled people. Future work should examine special characteristics and differences regarding this population.

  10. The influence of urban design on neighbourhood walking following residential relocation: longitudinal results from the RESIDE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles-Corti, Billie; Bull, Fiona; Knuiman, Matthew; McCormack, Gavin; Van Niel, Kimberly; Timperio, Anna; Christian, Hayley; Foster, Sarah; Divitini, Mark; Middleton, Nick; Boruff, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The design of urban environments has the potential to enhance the health and well-being of residents by impacting social determinants of health including access to public transport, green space and local amenities. Commencing in 2003, RESIDE is a longitudinal natural experiment examining the impact of urban planning on active living in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia. Participants building homes in new housing developments were surveyed before relocation (n = 1813; 34·6% recruitment rate); and approximately 12 months later (n = 1437). Changes in perceived and objective neighbourhood characteristics associated with walking following relocation were examined, adjusted for changes in demographic, intrapersonal, interpersonal and baseline reasons for residential location choice. Self-reported walking was measured using the Neighbourhood Physical Activity Questionnaire. Following relocation, transport-related walking declined overall (p perceived neighbourhood attractiveness: when changes in 'enjoyment' and 'attitude' towards local walking were removed from the multivariate model, recreational walking returned to 20.1 min/week (p = 0.040) for each type of recreational destination that increased. This study provides longitudinal evidence that both transport and recreational-walking behaviours respond to changes in the availability and diversity of local transport- and recreational destinations, and demonstrates the potential of local infrastructure to support health-enhancing behaviours. As neighbourhoods evolve, longer-term follow-up is required to fully capture changes that occur, and the impact on residents. The potential for using policies, incentives and infrastructure levies to enable the early introduction of recreational and transport-related facilities into new housing developments warrants further investigation.

  11. Quantum walks on general graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Kendon, V

    2003-01-01

    A scheme for a discrete time quantum walk on a general graph of N vertices with undirected edges is given, and compared with the continuous time quantum walk on a general graph introduced by Farhi and Gutmann [PRA 58 915 (1998)]. Both walks are contrasted with the examples of quantum walks in the literature treating graphs of fixed, small (< log N) degree. This illustrates the way in which extra information about the graph allows more efficient algorithms to be designed. To obtain a quantum speed up over classical for comparable resources it is necessary to code the position space of the quantum walk into a qubit register (or equivalent). The role of the oracle is also discussed and an efficient gate sequence is presented for implementing a discrete quantum walk given one copy of a quantum state encoding the adjacency matrix of the graph.

  12. Treadmill walking is not equivalent to overground walking for the study of walking smoothness and rhythmicity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row Lazzarini, Brandi S; Kataras, Theodore J

    2016-05-01

    Treadmills are appealing for gait studies, but some gait mechanics are disrupted during treadmill walking. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of speed and treadmill walking on walking smoothness and rhythmicity of 40 men and women between the ages of 70-96 years. Gait smoothness was examined during overground (OG) and treadmill (TM) walking by calculating the harmonic ratio from linear accelerations measured at the level of the lumbar spine. Rhythmicity was quantified as the stride time standard deviation. TM walking was performed at two speeds: a speed matching the natural OG walk speed (TM-OG), and a preferred TM speed (PTM). A dual-task OG condition (OG-DT) was evaluated to determine if TM walking posed a similar cognitive challenge. Statistical analysis included a one-way Analysis of Variance with Bonferroni corrected post hoc comparisons and the Wilcoxon signed rank test for non-normally distributed variables. Average PTM speed was slower than OG. Compared to OG, those who could reach the TM-OG speed (74.3% of sample) exhibited improved ML smoothness and rhythmicity, and the slower PTM caused worsened vertical and AP smoothness, but did not affect rhythmicity. PTM disrupted smoothness and rhythmicity differently than the OG-DT condition, likely due to reduced speed. The use of treadmills for gait smoothness and rhythmicity studies in older adults is problematic; some participants will not achieve OG speed during TM walking, walking at the TM-OG speed artificially improves rhythmicity and ML smoothness, and walking at the slower PTM speed worsens vertical and AP gait smoothness.

  13. Bouchaud walks with variable drift

    CERN Document Server

    Parra, Manuel Cabezas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a sequence of Bouchaud trap models on $\\mathbb{Z}$ with drift. We analyze the possible scaling limits for a sequence of walks, where we make the drift decay to 0 as we rescale the walks. Depending on the speed of the decay of the drift we obtain three different scaling limits. If the drift decays slowly as we rescale the walks we obtain the inverse of an \\alpha$-stable subordinator as scaling limit. If the drift decays quickly as we rescale the walks, we obtain the F.I.N. diffusion as scaling limit. There is a critical speed of decay separating these two main regimes, where a new process appears as scaling limit. This critical speed is related to the index $\\alpha$ of the inhomogeneity of the environment.

  14. Einstein's random walk and thermal diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Thermal diffusion has been studied for over 150 years. Despite of the long history and the increasing importance of the phenomenon, the physics of thermal diffusion remains poorly understood. In this paper Ludwig's thermal diffusion is explained using Einstein's random walk. The only new structure added is the spatial heterogeneity of the random walk to reflect the temperature gradient of thermal diffusion. Hence, the walk length and the walk speed are location dependent functions in this pap...

  15. From Walking to Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Juergen; Blum, Yvonne; Seyfarth, Andre

    The implementation of bipedal gaits in legged robots is still a challenge in state-of-the-art engineering. Human gaits could be realized by imitating human leg dynamics where a spring-like leg behavior is found as represented in the bipedal spring-mass model. In this study we explore the gap between walking and running by investigating periodic gait patterns. We found an almost continuous morphing of gait patterns between walking and running. The technical feasibility of this transition is, however, restricted by the duration of swing phase. In practice, this requires an abrupt gait transition between both gaits, while a change of speed is not necessary.

  16. Walking behaviour of healthy elderly: attention should be paid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt André

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported an association between executive function (EF and measures of gait, particularly among older adults. This study examined the relationship between specific components of executive functions and the relative dual task costs of gait (DTC in community-dwelling non-demented older adults, aged 65 years and older. Methods Temporal (stride time, stride velocity and spatial (stride length gait characteristics were measured using a GAITRite®-System among 62 healthy community dwelling older adults while walking with and without backward counting (BC at preferred and fast walking speeds. Specific executive functions divided attention, memory and inhibition were assessed using the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP. Other measures included Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, amount of daily medications taken, educational level and sociodemographic characteristics. Adjusted and unadjusted multivariable linear regression models were developed to assess the relations between variables. Results High relative DTC for stride time, stride velocity and stride length were associated with divided attention at fast walking speed. High relative DTC for stride time was associated with divided attention at preferred walking speed. The association between high DTC of stride length and memory was less robust and only observable at preferred walking speed. None of the gait measures was associated with inhibition. Conclusions Spatial and temporal dual task cost characteristics of gait are especially associated with divided attention in older adults. The results showed that the associated DTC differ by executive function and the nature of the task (preferred versus fast walking. Further research is warranted to determine whether improvement in divided attention translates to better performance on selected complex walking tasks.

  17. Do functional walk tests reflect cardiorespiratory fitness in sub-acute stroke?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayley Mark T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose The Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT has been employed as a measure of functional capacity, but its relationship to cardiorespiratory fitness in stroke is not well established. Gait speed measured over short distances is commonly used as an index of walking competency following stroke. We evaluated the relationship between the 6MWT, aerobic fitness (VO2peak and walking competency in sub-acute stroke. Methods Thirty-six individuals (mean age ± SD, 64.6 ± 14.4 years; time post-stroke 16.2 ± 13.3 days were evaluated using the 6MWT (distance, speed, heart rate, a maximal exercise test (VO2peak, heart rate, exercise test duration, and walking competency using a five meter walk (speed, symmetry ratio. Correlation analyses were used to examine the relationships between these outcomes. Results There was a strong correlation between the 6MWT and five meter walk velocity for preferred (r = 0.79 and fast (r = 0.82 speed (p 2peak (r = 0.56, p Conclusion The speed selected during the 6MWT was strongly related to the velocities selected during the five meter walk distance (intermediate to the selected preferred and fast speeds. Although the 6MWT may be challenging to the cardiorespiratory system, it appears to be more strongly influenced by potential limits to walking speed rather than cardiorespiratory capacity. As a result, this test is not, by itself, an adequate measure of aerobic fitness early after stroke.

  18. An upper-body can improve the stability and efficiency of passive dynamic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyou, T; Liddell, G F; Paulin, M G

    2011-09-21

    The compass-gait walker proposed by McGeer can walk down a shallow slope with a self-stabilizing gait that requires no actuation or control. However, as the slope goes to zero so does the walking speed, and dynamic gait stability is only possible over a very narrow range of slopes. Gomes and Ruina have results demonstrating that by adding a torso to the compass-gait walker, it can walk passively on level-ground with a non-infinitesimal constant average speed. However, the gait involves exaggerated joint movements, and for energetic reasons horizontal passive dynamic walking cannot be stable. We show in this research that in addition to collision-free walking, adding a torso improves stability and walking speed when walking downhill. Furthermore, adding arms to the torso results in a collision-free periodic gait with natural-looking torso and limb movements. Overall, in contrast to the suggestions that active control may be needed to balance an upper-body on legs, it turns out that the upper and lower bodies can be integrated to improve the stability, efficiency and speed of a passive dynamic walker. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Active and passive contributions to joint kinetics during walking in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silder, Amy; Heiderscheit, Bryan; Thelen, Darryl G

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the active and passive contributions to joint kinetics during walking in healthy young and older adults, and assess whether isokinetic ankle strength is associated with ankle power output during walking. Twenty healthy young (18-35 years) and 20 healthy older (65-85 years) adults participated in this study. We measured subject-specific passive-elastic joint moment-angle relationships in the lower extremity and tested maximum isokinetic ankle strength at 30 deg/s. Passive moment-angle relationships were used to estimate active and passive joint moment, power, and work quantities during walking at 80%, 100% and 120% of preferred walking speed. There were no significant differences in walking speed, step length, or cadence between the older and young adults. However, the older adults produced significantly more net positive work at the hip but less net positive work at the ankle at all walking speeds. Passive contributions to hip and ankle work did not significantly differ between groups, inferring that the older adults generated the additional hip work actively. Maximum isokinetic ankle strength was significantly less in the older adults, and correlated with peak positive plantar-flexor power at both the preferred and fast walking speeds. The results of this study suggest that age-related shifts in joint kinetics do not arise as a result of increased passive hip joint stiffness, but seem to be reflected in plantar-flexor weakness.

  20. Walking execution is not affected by divided attention in patients with multiple sclerosis with no disability, but there is a motor planning impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Alberto Calazans Nogueira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We analysed the cognitive influence on walking in multiple sclerosis (MS patients, in the absence of clinical disability. Method: A case-control study was conducted with 12 MS patients with no disability and 12 matched healthy controls. Subjects were referred for completion a timed walk test of 10 m and a 3D-kinematic analysis. Participants were instructed to walk at a comfortable speed in a dual-task (arithmetic task condition, and motor planning was measured by mental chronometry. Results: Scores of walking speed and cadence showed no statistically significant differences between the groups in the three conditions. The dual-task condition showed an increase in the double support duration in both groups. Motor imagery analysis showed statistically significant differences between real and imagined walking in patients. Conclusion: MS patients with no disability did not show any influence of divided attention on walking execution. However, motor planning was overestimated as compared with real walking.

  1. More than 10 million steps in the right direction: results from the first American Heart Association scientific sessions walking challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Robert A; Arena, Ross; Després, Jean-Pierre; Ciarochi, Amy; Croll, Elizabeth; Bloch, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, the Global Congress theme at the American Heart Association (AHA) Annual Scientific Sessions was Physical Activity (PA). As a key component of the Congress, iHealth working in collaboration with AHA provided a Bluetooth-enabled wireless PA and sleep tracker to up to 2,000 Scientific Sessions attendees. Approximately 1850 Scientific Sessions attendees registered for, received a PA tracker and participated in the Walking Challenge. More than 10 million steps were walked by participants (10,703,504) during the 2.5 days of the Walking Challenge. This translates into almost 6000 miles walked (5976.3 miles) and 656,716 calories burned by participants during the Challenge. The Global Congress of PA held at Scientific Sessions 2013 not only extensively reviewed the science of PA as a powerful/independent and, most importantly, modifiable cardiovascular risk factor, but it also provided evidence from a fun and entertaining challenge that PA as a risk behavior can be assessed and targeted. We just took 10 million steps in the right direction. Join us and make your steps count!

  2. How many walking and cycling trips made by elderly are beyond commonly used buffer sizes: Results from a GPS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, R.G.; Pierik, F.; Etman, A.; Sterkenburg, R.P.; Kamphuis, C.B.M.; Lenthe, F.J. van

    2014-01-01

    In choosing appropriate buffer sizes to study environmental influences on physical activity, studies are hampered by insufficient insight into the distance elderly travel actively. This study aims at getting insight into the number of trips walked and cycled within various buffer sizes using GPS mea

  3. Effects of walking velocity on vertical head and body movements during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasaki, E.; Moore, S. T.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    1999-01-01

    Trunk and head movements were characterized over a wide range of walking speeds to determine the relationship between stride length, stepping frequency, vertical head translation, pitch rotation of the head, and pitch trunk rotation as a function of gait velocity. Subjects (26-44 years old) walked on a linear treadmill at velocities of 0.6-2.2 m/s. The head and trunk were modeled as rigid bodies, and rotation and translation were determined using a video-based motion analysis system. At walking speeds up to 1.2 m/s there was little head pitch movement in space, and the head pitch relative to the trunk was compensatory for trunk pitch. As walking velocity increased, trunk pitch remained approximately invariant, but a significant head translation developed. This head translation induced compensatory head pitch in space, which tended to point the head at a fixed point in front of the subject that remained approximately invariant with regard to walking speed. The predominant frequency of head translation and rotation was restricted to a narrow range from 1.4 Hz at 0.6 m/s to 2.5 Hz at 2.2 m/s. Within the range of 0.8-1.8 m/s, subjects tended to increase their stride length rather than step frequency to walk faster, maintaining the predominant frequency of head movement at close to 2.0 Hz. At walking speeds above 1.2 m/s, head pitch in space was highly coherent with, and compensatory for, vertical head translation. In the range 1.2-1.8 m/s, the power spectrum of vertical head translation was the most highly tuned, and the relationship between walking speed and head and trunk movements was the most linear. We define this as an optimal range of walking velocity with regard to head-trunk coordination. The coordination of head and trunk movement was less coherent at walking velocities below 1.2 m/s and above 1.8 m/s. These results suggest that two mechanisms are utilized to maintain a stable head fixation distance over the optimal range of walking velocities. The relative

  4. Effects of walking velocity on vertical head and body movements during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasaki, E.; Moore, S. T.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    1999-01-01

    Trunk and head movements were characterized over a wide range of walking speeds to determine the relationship between stride length, stepping frequency, vertical head translation, pitch rotation of the head, and pitch trunk rotation as a function of gait velocity. Subjects (26-44 years old) walked on a linear treadmill at velocities of 0.6-2.2 m/s. The head and trunk were modeled as rigid bodies, and rotation and translation were determined using a video-based motion analysis system. At walking speeds up to 1.2 m/s there was little head pitch movement in space, and the head pitch relative to the trunk was compensatory for trunk pitch. As walking velocity increased, trunk pitch remained approximately invariant, but a significant head translation developed. This head translation induced compensatory head pitch in space, which tended to point the head at a fixed point in front of the subject that remained approximately invariant with regard to walking speed. The predominant frequency of head translation and rotation was restricted to a narrow range from 1.4 Hz at 0.6 m/s to 2.5 Hz at 2.2 m/s. Within the range of 0.8-1.8 m/s, subjects tended to increase their stride length rather than step frequency to walk faster, maintaining the predominant frequency of head movement at close to 2.0 Hz. At walking speeds above 1.2 m/s, head pitch in space was highly coherent with, and compensatory for, vertical head translation. In the range 1.2-1.8 m/s, the power spectrum of vertical head translation was the most highly tuned, and the relationship between walking speed and head and trunk movements was the most linear. We define this as an optimal range of walking velocity with regard to head-trunk coordination. The coordination of head and trunk movement was less coherent at walking velocities below 1.2 m/s and above 1.8 m/s. These results suggest that two mechanisms are utilized to maintain a stable head fixation distance over the optimal range of walking velocities. The relative

  5. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward and Backward Walking on Land and in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadenas-Sanchez Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (p<0.05. At initial contact, knees and hips were more flexed during walking forward in water, whilst, ankles were more dorsiflexed during walking backward in water. At final stance, knees and ankles were more flexed during forward walking, whilst the hip was more flexed during backward walking. These results show how walking in water differs from walking on land, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs.

  6. Kinematic Adaptations of Forward And Backward Walking on Land and in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina; Arellano, Raúl; Vanrenterghem, Jos; López-Contreras, Gracia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare sagittal plane lower limb kinematics during walking on land and submerged to the hip in water. Eight healthy adults (age 22.1 ± 1.1 years, body height 174.8 ± 7.1 cm, body mass 63.4 ± 6.2 kg) were asked to cover a distance of 10 m at comfortable speed with controlled step frequency, walking forward or backward. Sagittal plane lower limb kinematics were obtained from three dimensional video analysis to compare spatiotemporal gait parameters and joint angles at selected events using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Key findings were a reduced walking speed, stride length, step length and a support phase in water, and step length asymmetry was higher compared to the land condition (p<0.05). At initial contact, knees and hips were more flexed during walking forward in water, whilst, ankles were more dorsiflexed during walking backward in water. At final stance, knees and ankles were more flexed during forward walking, whilst the hip was more flexed during backward walking. These results show how walking in water differs from walking on land, and provide valuable insights into the development and prescription of rehabilitation and training programs. PMID:26839602

  7. Biomechanical conditions of walking

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y F; Luo, L P; Li, Z Y; Han, S Y; Lv, C S; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The development of rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury does not usually include gait pattern design. This paper introduced a gait pattern design by using equations (conditions of walking). Following the requirements of reducing force to the injured side to avoid further injury, we developed a lower limb gait pattern to shorten the stride length so as to reduce walking speed, to delay the stance phase of the uninjured side and to reduce step length of the uninjured side. This gait pattern was then verified by the practice of a rehabilitation training of an Achilles tendon rupture patient, whose two-year rehabilitation training (with 24 tests) has proven that this pattern worked as intended. This indicates that rehabilitation training program for lower limb injury can rest on biomechanical conditions of walking based on experimental evidence.

  8. Bouncing and walking droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molacek, Jan; Bush, John

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the hydrodynamic quantum analogue system of Yves Couder, we examine the dynamics of silicone oil drops bouncing on a vertically vibrating liquid bath. We report regime diagrams indicating the dependence of the vertical drop motion on the system parameters. A logarithmic spring model for the interface is developed, and provides new rationale for the regime diagrams. We further examine the spatio-temporal evolution of the standing waves created on the bath surface by repeated drop impacts. Measurement of the tangential coefficient of restitution of drops bouncing on a quiescent bath enables us to accurately determine all the major forces acting on the drop during flight and impact. By combining the horizontal and vertical dynamics, we thus develop a model for the walking drops that enables us to rationalize both the extent of the walking regime and the walking speeds. The model predictions compare favorably with experimental data in the parameter range explored.

  9. Follow the leader: visual control of speed in pedestrian following.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Kevin W; Rhea, Christopher K; Warren, William H

    2014-02-07

    When people walk together in groups or crowds they must coordinate their walking speed and direction with their neighbors. This paper investigates how a pedestrian visually controls speed when following a leader on a straight path (one-dimensional following). To model the behavioral dynamics of following, participants in Experiment 1 walked behind a confederate who randomly increased or decreased his walking speed. The data were used to test six models of speed control that used the leader's speed, distance, or combinations of both to regulate the follower's acceleration. To test the optical information used to control speed, participants in Experiment 2 walked behind a virtual moving pole, whose visual angle and binocular disparity were independently manipulated. The results indicate the followers match the speed of the leader, and do so using a visual control law that primarily nulls the leader's optical expansion (change in visual angle), with little influence of change in disparity. This finding has direct applications to understanding the coordination among neighbors in human crowds.

  10. Comparison between Mother, ActiGraph wGT3X-BT, and a hand tally for measuring steps at various walking speeds under controlled conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riel, Henrik; Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Kalstrup, Pernille Møller

    2016-01-01

    Walking is endorsed as health enhancing and is the most common type of physical activity among older adults. Accelerometers are superior to self-reports when measuring steps, however, if they are to be used by clinicians the validity is of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigate...... the criterion validity of Mother and ActiGraph wGT3X-BT in measuring steps by comparing the devices to a hand tally under controlled conditions in healthy participants....

  11. EFFECTS OF THE GENIUM MICROPROCESSOR KNEE SYSTEM ON KNEE MOMENT SYMMETRY DURING HILL WALKING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M Jason; Klenow, Tyler D; Kahle, Jason T; Wernke, Matthew M; Carey, Stephanie L; Miro, Rebecca M; Lura, Derek J

    2016-09-01

    Use of the Genium microprocessor knee (MPK) system reportedly improves knee kinematics during walking and other functional tasks compared to other MPK systems. This improved kinematic pattern was observed when walking on different hill conditions and at different speeds. Given the improved kinematics associated with hill walking while using the Genium, a similar improvement in the symmetry of knee kinetics is also feasible. The purpose of this study was to determine if Genium MPK use would reduce the degree of asymmetry (DoA) of peak stance knee flexion moment compared to the C-Leg MPK in transfemoral amputation (TFA) patients. This study used a randomized experimental crossover of TFA patients using Genium and C-Leg MPKs (n = 20). Biomechanical gait analysis by 3D motion tracking with floor mounted force plates of TFA patients ambulating at different speeds on 5° ramps was completed. Knee moment DoA was significantly different between MPK conditions in the slow and fast uphill as well as the slow and self-selected downhill conditions. In a sample of high-functioning TFA patients, Genium knee system accommodation and use improved knee moment symmetry in slow speed walking up and down a five degree ramp compared with C-Leg. Additionally, the Genium improved knee moment symmetry when walking downhill at comfortable speed. These results likely have application in other patients who could benefit from more consistent knee function, such as older patients and others who have slower walking speeds.

  12. Assimilation of wind speed and direction observations: results from real observation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The assimilation of wind observations in the form of speed and direction (asm_sd by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Data Assimilation System (WRFDA was performed using real data and employing a series of cycling assimilation experiments for a 2-week period, as a follow-up for an idealised post hoc assimilation experiment. The satellite-derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV and surface dataset in Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS were assimilated. This new method takes into account the observation errors of both wind speed (spd and direction (dir, and WRFDA background quality control (BKG-QC influences the choice of wind observations, due to data conversions between (u,v and (spd, dir. The impacts of BKG-QC, as well as the new method, on the wind analysis were analysed separately. Because the dir observational errors produced by different platforms are not known or tuned well in WRFDA, a practical method, which uses similar assimilation weights in comparative trials, was employed to estimate the spd and dir observation errors. The asm_sd produces positive impacts on analyses and short-range forecasts of spd and dir with smaller root-mean-square errors than the u,v-based system. The bias of spd analysis decreases by 54.8%. These improvements result partly from BKG-QC screening of spd and dir observations in a direct way, but mainly from the independent impact of spd (dir data assimilation on spd (dir analysis, which is the primary distinction from the standard WRFDA method. The potential impacts of asm_sd on precipitation forecasts were evaluated. Results demonstrate that the asm_sd is able to indirectly improve the precipitation forecasts by improving the prediction accuracies of key wind-related factors leading to precipitation (e.g. warm moist advection and frontogenesis.

  13. Genetic effects on information processing speed are moderated by age--converging results from three samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ising, M; Mather, K A; Zimmermann, P; Brückl, T; Höhne, N; Heck, A; Schenk, L A; Rujescu, D; Armstrong, N J; Sachdev, P S; Reppermund, S

    2014-06-01

    Information processing is a cognitive trait forming the basis of complex abilities like executive function. The Trail Making Test (TMT) is a well-established test of information processing with moderate to high heritability. Age of the individual also plays an important role. A number of genetic association studies with the TMT have been performed, which, however, did not consider age as a moderating factor. We report the results of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on age-independent and age-dependent TMT performance in two population-representative community samples (Munich Antidepressant Response Signature, MARS: N1 = 540; Ludwig Maximilians University, LMU: N2 = 350). Age-dependent genome-wide findings were then evaluated in a third sample of healthy elderly subjects (Sydney Memory and Ageing Study, Sydney MAS: N3 = 448). While a meta-analysis on the GWAS findings did not reveal age-independent TMT associations withstanding correction for multiple testing, we found a genome-wide significant age-moderated effect between variants in the DSG1 gene region and TMT-A performance predominantly reflecting visual processing speed (rs2199301, P(meta-analysis) = 1.3 × 10(-7)). The direction of the interaction suggests for the minor allele a beneficial effect in younger adults turning into a detrimental effect in older adults. The detrimental effect of the missense single nucleotide polymorphism rs1426310 within the same DSG1 gene region could be replicated in Sydney MAS participants aged 70-79, but not in those aged 80 years and older, presumably a result of survivor bias. Our findings demonstrate opposing effects of DSG1 variants on information processing speed depending on age, which might be related to the complex processes that DSG1 is involved with, including cell adhesion and apoptosis.

  14. The Natural Interactive Walking Project and Emergence of Its Results in Research on Rhythmic Walking Interaction and the Role of Footsteps in Affecting Body Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Sikström, Erik; Serafin, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we describe how the results of the Natural Interactive Project, which was funded within the 7th Framework Programme and ended in 2011, started several research directions concerning the role of auditory and haptic feedback in footstep simulations. We chose elements of the project ...

  15. On the mechanics of functional asymmetry in bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Robert D; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Degani, Amir; Lynch, Kevin M

    2012-05-01

    This paper uses two symmetrical models, the passive compass-gait biped and a five-link 3-D biped, to computationally investigate the cause and function of gait asymmetry. We show that for a range of slope angles during passive 2-D walking and mass distributions during controlled 3-D walking, these models have asymmetric walking patterns between the left and right legs due to the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry-breaking. In both cases a stable asymmetric family of gaits emerges from a symmetric family of gaits as the total energy increases (e.g., fast speeds). The ground reaction forces of each leg reflect different roles, roughly corresponding to support, propulsion, and motion control as proposed by the hypothesis of functional asymmetry in able-bodied human walking. These results suggest that body mechanics, independent of neurophysiological mechanisms such as leg dominance, may contribute to able-bodied gait asymmetry.

  16. Preliminary study of novel, timed walking tests for children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Kyra J; Lanovaz, Joel; Bisaro, Derek; Oates, Alison; Musselman, Kristin E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Walking assessment is an important aspect of rehabilitation practice; yet, clinicians have few psychometrically sound options for evaluating walking in highly ambulatory children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of two new measures of walking function—the Obstacles and Curb tests—relative to the 10-Meter Walk test and Timed Up and Go test in children with spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Methods: A total of 16 ambulatory children with spina bifida (n=9) or cerebral palsy (n=7) (9 boys; mean age 7years, 7months; standard deviation 3years, 4months) and 16 age- and gender-matched typically developing children participated. Children completed the walking tests, at both self-selected and fast speeds, twice. To evaluate discriminative validity, scores were compared between typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy groups. Within the spina bifida/cerebral palsy group, inter-test correlations evaluated convergent validity and intraclass correlation coefficients evaluated within-session test–retest reliability. Results: At fast speeds, all tests showed discriminative validity (p<0.006 for typically developing and spina bifida/cerebral palsy comparisons) and convergent validity (rho=0.81–0.90, p⩽0.001, for inter-test correlations). At self-selected speeds, only the Obstacles test discriminated between groups (p=0.001). Moderately strong correlations (rho=0.73–0.78, p⩽0.001) were seen between the 10-Meter Walk test, Curb test, and Timed Up and Go test. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.81 to 0.97, with higher test–retest reliability for tests performed at fast speeds rather than self-selected speeds. Conclusion: The Obstacles and Curb tests are promising measures for assessing walking in this population. Performing tests at fast walking speeds may improve their validity and test–retest reliability for children with spina bifida/cerebral palsy. PMID:27493754

  17. Different instructions during the ten-meter walking test determined significant increases in maximum gait speed in individuals with chronic hemiparesis Diferentes instruções durante teste de velocidade de marcha determinam aumento significativo na velocidade máxima de indivíduos com hemiparesia crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R. Nascimento

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of different instructions for the assessment of maximum walking speed during the ten-meter walking test with chronic stroke subjects. METHODS: Participants were instructed to walk under four experimental conditions: (1 comfortable speed, (2 maximum speed (simple verbal command, (3 maximum speed (modified verbal command-"catch a bus" and (4 maximum speed (verbal command + demonstration. Participants walked three times in each condition and the mean time to cover the intermediate 10 meters of a 14-meter corridor was registered to calculate the gait speed (m/s. Repeated-measures ANOVAs, followed by planned contrasts, were employed to investigate differences between the conditions (α=5%. Means, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. RESULTS: The mean values for the four conditions were: (1 0.74m/s; (2 0.85 m/s; (3 0.93 m/s; (4 0.92 m/s, respectively, with significant differences between the conditions (F=40.9; pOBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos de diferentes instruções para avaliação da velocidade de marcha máxima de indivíduos hemiparéticos durante o teste de caminhada de 10 metros. MÉTODOS: Os indivíduos deambularam em quatro condições experimentais: (1 velocidade habitual, (2 velocidade máxima (comando verbal simples, (3 velocidade máxima (comando verbal modificado: pegar ônibus, (4 velocidade máxima (comando verbal + demonstração. Solicitou-se a cada participante que deambulasse três vezes em cada condição, e a média do tempo necessário para percorrer os 10 metros intermediários de um corredor de 14 metros foi utilizada para cálculo da velocidade (m/s. A ANOVA de medidas repetidas, com contrastes pré-planejados, foi utilizada para comparação dos dados (α=5%, sendo apresentados valores de média, desvio-padrão e intervalos de confiança (IC de 95%. RESULTADOS: As médias de velocidade para as quatro condições foram: (1 0,74m/s; (2 0,85m/s; (3 0,93m/s; (4

  18. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Acevedo, O [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France); Institut fuer Mathematik und Informatik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn Str.15a, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Gobron, T [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, 2 Avenue Adolphe Chauvin 95302 Cergy Pontoise Cedex (France)

    2006-01-20

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We completely characterize quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Some examples are given including a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford algebra.

  19. Walking Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your legs or feet Movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease Diseases such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis Vision or balance problems Treatment of walking problems depends on the cause. Physical therapy, surgery, or mobility aids may help.

  20. First test results of a high-speed beam conditions monitor for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pernegger, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the design and first test results of the high- speed beam conditions monitor (BCM) for the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). The goal of the BCM is to monitor instantaneous rates of collision and background and detect signs of beam instabilities. The detector is based on polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition (pCVD) diamond as active sensor material. We have chosen this detector material for its proven radiation hardness and fast signal properties. For the readout of the diamonds we developed front-end readout electronics based on high-bandwidth RF amplifiers. The signal response of the amplifier has been optimized for the ionization current signal of pCVD diamond in order to achieve a signal risetime of results which were obtained on prototype assemblies in source tests and test beam. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of such a detector system for the ATLAS BCM. The tests yield BCM signals w...

  1. Walking, bicycling, and sports in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors--results from a German patient cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Christina; Schmidt, Martina E; Vrieling, Alina; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Steindorf, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) is increasingly discussed as a means to achieve both physical and psychological benefits for breast cancer patients and survivors. However, little is known about activity-specific PA behavior following diagnosis. Our objectives were to describe sports and active transportation in the course of breast cancer and to identify factors associated with these activities. We used data from a German cohort study including 1067 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors aged 50-75 years. Data were collected about walking and bicycling for transportation purposes and sports before diagnosis, during therapy, and 1 year after surgery. Associations between these activities and clinical, behavioral, and social characteristics were analyzed with logistic regression. The proportions of physically active women decreased significantly during therapy compared with before diagnosis (walking: 75.1% vs. 89.7%; bicycling: 19.3% vs. 56.5%; sports: 14.8% vs. 64.5%; all p sport. Chemotherapy/radiotherapy was negatively associated with sports (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35 [0.17-0.73]) but positively associated with walking during therapy (OR: 2.08 [1.04-4.15]). Although sociodemographic factors showed weak associations with PA, participation in rehabilitation increased the likelihood for bicycling (OR: 1.48 [1.06-2.09]) and sports (OR: 1.88 [1.38-2.58]) 1 year after surgery. The majority of women stopped exercising and bicycling during breast cancer therapy. Interventions promoting in particular moderate activities after breast cancer diagnosis are required for this population. Increasing participation in rehabilitation might help to increase the proportion of women who bicycle and engage in sports after breast cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. An analysis of results of measuring the speed passing through a material in a technological process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Benková

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The process approach requires a smoothness and continuity for each individual technological /production process. From the viewpoint of ownership of each process a required input into the process technical and operation parameters for a required output of the process is important. From the viewpoint of monitoring a concrete process, the material entering the process having a temperature required by technological instruction is important.The speed of transition of a material through the technological mechanism should be constant and a product from the process should have required internal and external parameters. The speed is critical for the technological process. When using a measurement, values of speed are obtained, can be analysed from the point of view of variation in time and normality. For a comparison of real and required values, the box plot was prepared. The capability indexes were counted and the „overlaps” of tolerance interval for the required value of speed were compared.

  3. Older adults adopted more cautious gait patterns when walking in socks than barefoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Ju; Lin, Sang-I

    2013-01-01

    Walking barefoot or in socks is common for ambulating indoors and has been reported to be associated with increased risk of falls and related injuries in the elderly. This study sought to determine if gait patterns differed between these two conditions for young and older adults. A motion analysis system was used to record and calculate the stride characteristics and motion of the body's center of mass (COM) of 21 young and 20 older adults. For the walking tasks, the participants walked on a smooth floor surface at their preferred speed either barefoot or in socks in a random order. The socks were commercially available and commonly used. The results demonstrated that while walking in socks, compared with walking barefoot, older adults adopted a more cautious gait pattern including decreased walking speed and shortened stride length as well as reduced COM minimal velocity during the single limb support phase. Young adults, however, did not demonstrate significant changes. These findings suggest that walking with socks might present a greater balance threat for older adults. Clinically, safety precautions about walking in socks should be considered to be given to older adults, especially those with balance deficits.

  4. Preliminary result of P-wave speed tomography beneath North Sumatera region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatnika, Jajat; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Wandono

    2015-04-01

    The structure of P-wave speed beneath the North Sumatra region was determined using P-wave arrival times compiled by MCGA from time periods of January 2009 to December 2012 combining with PASSCAL data for February to May 1995. In total, there are 2,246 local earthquake events with 10,666 P-wave phases from 63 stations seismic around the study area. Ray tracing to estimate travel time from source to receiver in this study by applying pseudo-bending method while the damped LSQR method was used for the tomographic inversion. Based on assessment of ray coverage, earthquakes and stations distribution, horizontal grid nodes was set up of 30×30 km2 for inside the study area and 80×80 km2 for outside the study area. The tomographic inversion results show low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex region and around the Sumatra Fault Zones (SFZ). These features are consistent with previous study. The low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex are observed around Mt. Pusuk Bukit at depths of 5 km down to 100 km. The interpretation is these anomalies may be associated with ascending hot materials from subduction processes at depths of 80 km down to 100 km. The obtained Vp structure from local tomography will give valuable information to enhance understanding of tectonic and volcanic in this study area.

  5. Preliminary result of P-wave speed tomography beneath North Sumatera region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jatnika, Jajat [Earth Science Study Program, Institute of Technology Bandung (Indonesia); Indonesian Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jakarta (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Insitute of Technology Bandung (Indonesia); Wandono [Indonesian Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The structure of P-wave speed beneath the North Sumatra region was determined using P-wave arrival times compiled by MCGA from time periods of January 2009 to December 2012 combining with PASSCAL data for February to May 1995. In total, there are 2,246 local earthquake events with 10,666 P-wave phases from 63 stations seismic around the study area. Ray tracing to estimate travel time from source to receiver in this study by applying pseudo-bending method while the damped LSQR method was used for the tomographic inversion. Based on assessment of ray coverage, earthquakes and stations distribution, horizontal grid nodes was set up of 30×30 km2 for inside the study area and 80×80 km2 for outside the study area. The tomographic inversion results show low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex region and around the Sumatra Fault Zones (SFZ). These features are consistent with previous study. The low Vp anomaly beneath Toba caldera complex are observed around Mt. Pusuk Bukit at depths of 5 km down to 100 km. The interpretation is these anomalies may be associated with ascending hot materials from subduction processes at depths of 80 km down to 100 km. The obtained Vp structure from local tomography will give valuable information to enhance understanding of tectonic and volcanic in this study area.

  6. The shock-induced star formation sequence resulting from a constant spiral pattern speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, Eric E.; Puerari, Ivânio, E-mail: ericmartinez@inaoep.mx, E-mail: puerari@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    We utilize a suite of multiwavelength data of nine nearby spirals to analyze the shock-induced star formation sequence that may result from a constant spiral pattern speed. The sequence involves tracers as the H I, CO 24 μm, and FUV, where the spiral arms were analyzed with Fourier techniques in order to obtain their azimuthal phases as a function of radius. It was found that only two of the objects, NGC 628 and NGC 5194, present coherent phases resembling the theoretical expectations, as indicated by the phase shifts of CO- 24 μm. The evidence is more clear for NGC 5194 and moderate for NGC 628. It was also found that the phase shifts are different for the two spiral arms. With the exception on NGC 3627, a two-dimensional Fourier analysis showed that the rest of the objects do not exhibit bi-symmetric spiral structures of stellar mass, i.e., grand-design spirals. A phase order inversion indicates a corotation radius of ∼89'' for NGC 628 and ∼202'' for NGC 5194. For these two objects, the CO-Hα phase shifts corroborate the CO-24 μm azimuthal offsets. Also for NGC 5194, the CO-70 μm, CO-140 μm, and CO-250 μm phase shifts indicate a corotation region.

  7. Validation of satellite SAR offshore wind speed maps to in-situ data, microscala and mesoscale model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasager, C.B.; Astrup, P.; Barthelmie, R.; Dellwik, E.; Hoffmann Joergensen, B.; Gylling Mortensen, N.; Nielsen, M.; Pryor, S.; Rathmann, O.

    2002-05-01

    A validation study has been performed in order to investigate the precision and accuracy of the satellite-derived ERS-2 SAR wind products in offshore regions. The overall project goal is to develop a method for utilizing the satellite wind speed maps for offshore wind resources, e.g. in future planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysis in detail for three sites in Denmark, Italy and Egypt. The site in Norway is analyzed by the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre (NERSC). Wind speed maps and wind direction maps from Earth Observation data recorded by the ERS-2 SAR satellite have been obtained from the NERSC. For the Danish site the wind speed and wind direction maps have been compared to in-situ observations from a met-mast at Horns Rev in the North Sea located 14 km offshore. The SAR wind speeds have been area-averaged by simple and advanced footprint modelling, ie. the upwind conditions to the meteorological mast are explicitly averaged in the SAR wind speed maps before comparison. The comparison results are very promising with a standard error of {+-} 0.61 m s{sup -1}, a bias {approx}2 m s{sup -1} and R{sup 2} {approx}0.88 between in-situ wind speed observations and SAR footprint averaged values at 10 m level. Wind speeds predicted by the local scale model LINCOM and the mesoscale model KAMM2 have been compared to the spatial variations in the SAR wind speed maps. The finding is a good correspondence between SAR observations and model results. Near the coast is an 800 m wide band in which the SAR wind speed observations have a strong negative bias. The bathymetry of Horns Rev combined with tidal currents give rise to bias in the SAR wind speed maps near areas of shallow, complex bottom topography in some cases. A total of 16 cases were analyzed for Horns Rev. For Maddalena in Italy five cases were analyzed. At the Italian site the SAR wind speed maps were compared to WAsP and KAMM2 model results. The WAsP model

  8. When Human Walking is a Random Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.

    1998-03-01

    The complex, hierarchical locomotor system normally does a remarkable job of controlling an inherently unstable, multi-joint system. Nevertheless, the stride interval --- the duration of a gait cycle --- fluctuates from one stride to the next, even under stationary conditions. We used random walk analysis to study the dynamical properties of these fluctuations under normal conditions and how they change with disease and aging. Random walk analysis of the stride-to-stride fluctuations of healthy, young adult men surprisingly reveals a self-similar pattern: fluctuations at one time scale are statistically similar to those at multiple other time scales (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1995). To study the stability of this fractal property, we analyzed data obtained from healthy subjects who walked for 1 hour at their usual pace, as well as at slower and faster speeds. The stride interval fluctuations exhibited long-range correlations with power-law decay for up to a thousand strides at all three walking rates. In contrast, during metronomically-paced walking, these long-range correlations disappeared; variations in the stride interval were uncorrelated and non-fractal (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1996). To gain insight into the mechanism(s) responsible for this fractal property, we examined the effects of aging and neurological impairment. Using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we computed α, a measure of the degree to which one stride interval is correlated with previous and subsequent intervals over different time scales. α was significantly lower in healthy elderly subjects compared to young adults (p < .003) and in subjects with Huntington's disease, a neuro-degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, compared to disease-free controls (p < 0.005) (Hausdorff et al, J Appl Phsyiol, 1997). α was also significantly related to degree of functional impairment in subjects with Huntington's disease (r=0.78). Recently, we have observed that just as

  9. Comparison of elliptical training, stationary cycling, treadmill walking and overground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L; Norman, Tracy; Stanley, Christopher J; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2011-06-01

    The extent to which therapeutic, exercise or robotic devices can maximize gait function is a major unresolved issue in neurorehabilitation. Several factors may influence gait outcomes such as similarity of the task to overground walking, degree of coordination within and across limbs, and cycle-to-cycle variability in each device. Our objective was to compare lower extremity kinematics, coordination and variability during four locomotor tasks: overground walking, treadmill walking, elliptical training and stationary cycling in 10 non-disabled adults (6 male; mean age 22.7±2.9 yrs, range 20-29). All first performed four overground walking trials at self-selected speed with mean temporal-spatial data used to pace the other conditions. Joint positions, excursions, and the Gait Deviation Index (GDI) were compared across conditions to evaluate kinematic similarity. Time-series data were correlated within and across limbs to evaluate intralimb and interlimb coordination, respectively. Variability in cadence was quantified to assess how constrained the locomotor rhythm was compared to overground walking. Treadmill walking most closely resembled overground with GDI values nearly overlapping, reinforcing its appropriateness for gait training. Cycling showed the largest GDI difference from overground, with elliptical closer but still a significant distance from all three. Cycling showed greater hip reciprocation Cycling and elliptical showed stronger intralimb synergism at the hip and knee than the other two. Based on kinematics, results suggest that elliptical training may have greater transfer to overground walking than cycling and cycling may be more useful for enhancing reciprocal coordination. Further evaluation of these devices in neurological gait disorders is needed.

  10. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    individuals in Denmark conduct and experience walking, and the ‘rationalities’ (Giddens 1984) that lie behind their choice of mobility. It provides insight into how different lifestyles perceive and act walking in their everyday life. Kaufmann (2002) describes how the individual mobility is influenced......’ of mobility (Jensen 2013:111) such as the urban environment, and the infrastructures. Walking has indeed also a ‘software dimension’ as an embodied performance that trigger the human senses (Jensen 2013) and which is closely related to the habitus and identity of the individual (Halprin 1963). The individual...... by individual strategies, values, perceptions and habits, and how appropriation of mobility is constructed through the internalization of standards and values. The act of walking could thus be understood as the result of dynamic internal negotiation of individual, everyday mobility strategies (Lassen 2005...

  11. Human-like Three-dimensional Walking with Natural Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Natural dynamics can be exploited in the control of biped walking robots: the swing leg can swing passively, the compliant ankle can naturally transfer the center of pressure along the foot and help in toe off.These mechanisms simplify control and result in motion that is smooth and natural looking.Imitated human being's behavior, we presented a control strategy for HIT-III biped robot, in which active and passive motions were combined.The experiment result shows that robot walked at a faster speed (approximately 0.25m/s) than previous and had a natural and smooth looking gait.

  12. The transition between walking and running in humans: metabolic and mechanical aspects at different gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, A E; Ardigò, L P; Saibene, F

    1994-03-01

    Five subjects walked and ran at overlapping speeds and different gradients on a motorized treadmill. At each gradient the speed was obtained at which walking and running have the same metabolic cost (Sm) and the speed of spontaneous (Ss) transition between the two gaits was measured. Ss was found to be statistically lower than Sm at all gradients, the difference being in the range of 0.5-0.9 km h-1. The motion analysis of walking reveals that at all gradients and at increasing speed: (1) the percentage of recovery, an index of mechanical energy saving related to the pendulum-like characteristic of walking, decreases; (2) the lower limb spread reaches a limit in walking; and consequently (3) both the stride frequency and the internal mechanical work, due to limb acceleration in relation to the body centre of mass, increase much more in walking than in running. Switching to a run, although implying a higher frequency, makes the internal work decrease as a result of the lower limb spread. In this paper several influences, such as the 'ratings of perceived exertion' (RPE), on the choice of beginning to run when it is more economical to walk, are discussed. A tentative hypothesis on the determinants of Ss, which is emphasized to be a speed which has to be studied in detail but is generally avoided in locomotion, is based on a comfort criterion from peripheric afferences and is reflected by the fact that at Ss a running stride costs as much as a walking stride.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Waveless ships in the low speed limit: Results for multi-cornered hulls

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Philippe H

    2015-01-01

    In the low-speed limit, a blunt ship modeled as two-dimensional semi-infinite body with a single corner can never be made waveless. This was the conclusion of the previous part of our work in Trinh et al. (2011), which focused on the Dagan & Tulin (1972) model of ship waves in the low speed limit. In this accompanying paper, we continue our investigations with the study of more general, piecewise-linear, or multi-cornered ships. The low-speed or low-Froude limit, coupled with techniques in exponential asymptotics allows us to derive explicit formulae relating the geometry of the hull to the form of the waves. Configurations with closely spaced corners present a non-trivial extension of the theory, and we present the general methodology for their study. Lastly, numerical computations of the nonlinear ship-wave problem are presented in order to confirm the analytical predictions.

  14. Head and trunk stabilization strategies during forward and backward walking in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Sylvie; Amblard, Bernard; Mesure, Serge; Bourbonnais, Daniel

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the head and trunk equilibrium strategies while walking forwards and backwards under different conditions (eyes open vs. closed, hard vs. soft surface) in a sample of 11 consenting healthy adult subjects. Nine markers placed on the subject allowed us to record the kinematics of the head, spine and pelvis segments while walking. The data were acquired and analyzed using an optical TV-image processor (ELITE system). For each locomotor trial, the walking speed as well as the absolute angular dispersions and the anchoring indexes (AI) of six segments around the roll and pitch axes were calculated to assess the head and trunk equilibrium strategies. A three-way repeated measures analysis of variance was used to depict differences between the walking conditions. The results showed that the walking speed was affected by the locomotion tasks (P walking forwards on a hard surface, eyes open) to 0.79 +/- 0.15 m s(-1) for the most unusual conditions (walking backwards on a foam support, eyes closed). In general, walking backwards reduced the angular dispersion of the spine segments while the absolute angular dispersions of the head and pelvis did not vary significantly with any factors (P > 0.05). The AI around the roll axis indicated good stabilization in space of the head and pelvis with high positive values and this stability increased while the subject was walking backwards on a soft surface (foam). By contrast, the spinal segments were predominantly stabilized on the underlying segment (negative AI), and this stabilization even increased when the subjects walked backwards on a soft surface. Increasing the locomotion difficulty thus induced a generally rigid ('en bloc') functioning of the spinal segments and increased effectiveness of the head and pelvis stabilization strategies in space, especially when walking backwards on a soft surface.

  15. Walking with springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Thomas G.; Hollander, Kevin W.; Hitt, Joseph K.

    2011-04-01

    Developing bionic ankles poses great challenges due to the large moment, power, and energy that are required at the ankle. Researchers have added springs in series with a motor to reduce the peak power and energy requirements of a robotic ankle. We developed a "robotic tendon" that reduces the peak power by altering the required motor speed. By changing the required speed, the spring acts as a "load variable transmission." If a simple motor/gearbox solution is used, one walking step would require 38.8J and a peak motor power of 257 W. Using an optimized robotic tendon, the energy required is 21.2 J and the peak motor power is reduced to 96.6 W. We show that adding a passive spring in parallel with the robotic tendon reduces peak loads but the power and energy increase. Adding a passive spring in series with the robotic tendon reduces the energy requirements. We have built a prosthetic ankle SPARKy, Spring Ankle with Regenerative Kinetics, that allows a user to walk forwards, backwards, ascend and descend stairs, walk up and down slopes as well as jog.

  16. Patterns of trunk muscle activation during walking and pole walking using statistical non-parametric mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffoli, Luca; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Federici, Ario; Lucertini, Francesco

    2017-09-09

    This study used surface electromyography (EMG) to investigate the regions and patterns of activity of the external oblique (EO), erector spinae longissimus (ES), multifidus (MU) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles during walking (W) and pole walking (PW) performed at different speeds and grades. Eighteen healthy adults undertook W and PW on a motorized treadmill at 60% and 100% of their walk-to-run preferred transition speed at 0% and 7% treadmill grade. The Teager-Kaiser energy operator was employed to improve the muscle activity detection and statistical non-parametric mapping based on paired t-tests was used to highlight statistical differences in the EMG patterns corresponding to different trials. The activation amplitude of all trunk muscles increased at high speed, while no differences were recorded at 7% treadmill grade. ES and MU appeared to support the upper body at the heel-strike during both W and PW, with the latter resulting in elevated recruitment of EO and RA as required to control for the longer stride and the push of the pole. Accordingly, the greater activity of the abdominal muscles and the comparable intervention of the spine extensors supports the use of poles by walkers seeking higher engagement of the lower trunk region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The use of relative coupling intervals in horses during walk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Emil; Pfau, Thilo

    Walking speed varies between over-ground trials and a speed-independent gait-parameter does not exist for use in horses. We introduce relative (R) lateral (L) and diagonal (D) coupling intervals (CI) and hypothesize that both are independent of walking speed. Four horses were walked over 8 Kistler...... for either RLCI or RDCI. RLCI and RDCI can thus be applied as speed-independent stride-to-stride variability parameters in horses during walk over-ground. This might prove useful for detection of gait deficits caused by spinal cord injury....

  18. Sensor-based hip control with hybrid neuroprosthesis for walking in paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Curtis S; Kobetic, Rudi; Bulea, Thomas C; Audu, Musa L; Schnellenberger, John R; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test whether a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) with an exoskeletal variable-constraint hip mechanism (VCHM) combined with a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) controller can maintain upright posture with less upper-limb support and improve gait speed as compared with walking with either an isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis (IRGO) or FNS only. The results show that walking with the HNP significantly reduced forward lean in FNS-only walking and the maximum upper-limb forces by 42% and 19% as compared with the IRGO and FNS-only gait, respectively. Walking speed increased significantly with VCHM as compared with 1:1 reciprocal coupling and by 15% when using the sensor-based FNS controller as compared with HNP with fixed baseline stimulation without the controller active.

  19. Sensor-based hip control with hybrid neuroprosthesis for walking in paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis S. To, PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to test whether a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP with an exoskeletal variable-­constraint hip mechanism (VCHM combined with a functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS controller can maintain upright posture with less upper-limb support and improve gait speed as compared with walking with either an isocentric reciprocating gait orthosis (IRGO or FNS only. The results show that walking with the HNP significantly reduced forward lean in FNS-only walking and the maximum upper-limb forces by 42% and 19% as compared with the IRGO and FNS-only gait, respectively. Walking speed increased significantly with VCHM as compared with 1:1 reciprocal coupling and by 15% when using the sensor-based FNS controller as compared with HNP with fixed baseline stimulation without the controller active.

  20. A non-Levy random walk in chacma baboons: what does it mean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Sueur

    Full Text Available The Lévy walk is found from amoebas to humans and has been described as the optimal strategy for food research. Recent results, however, have generated controversy about this conclusion since animals also display alternatives to the Lévy walk such as the Brownian walk or mental maps and because movement patterns found in some species only seem to depend on food patches distribution. Here I show that movement patterns of chacma baboons do not follow a Lévy walk but a Brownian process. Moreover this Brownian walk is not the main process responsible for movement patterns of baboons. Findings about their speed and trajectories show that baboons use metal maps and memory to find resources. Thus the Brownian process found in this species appears to be more dependent on the environment or might be an alternative when known food patches are depleted and when animals have to find new resources.

  1. Metabolic cost of level-ground walking with a robotic transtibial prosthesis combining push-off power and nonlinear damping behaviors: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanggang Feng; Jinying Zhu; Qining Wang

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in robotic technology are facilitating the development of robotic prostheses. Our previous studies proposed a lightweight robotic transtibial prosthesis with a damping control strategy. To improve the performance of power assistance, in this paper, we redesign the prosthesis and improve the control strategy by supplying extra push-off power. A male transtibial amputee subject volunteered to participate in the study. Preliminary experimental results show that the proposed prosthesis with push-off control improves energy expenditure by a percentage ranged from 9.72 % to 14.99 % for level-ground walking compared with the one using non-push-off control.

  2. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nørreslet, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five...... digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...

  3. Law of large numbers for a transient random walk driven by a symmetric exclusion process

    CERN Document Server

    Avena, Luca; Völlering, Florian

    2011-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional simple symmetric exclusion process in equilibrium, constituting a dynamic random environment for a nearest-neighbor random walk that on occupied/vacant sites has two different local drifts to the right. We prove that the random walk has an a.s. positive constant global speed by using a regeneration-time argument. This result is part of an ongoing project aiming to analyze the behavior of random walks in slowly mixing dynamic random environments. A brief discussion on this topic is presented.

  4. A powered prosthetic ankle joint for walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, Martin; Holgate, Matthew; Holgate, Robert; Boehler, Alexander; Ward, Jeffrey; Hollander, Kevin; Sugar, Thomas; Seyfarth, André

    2016-12-19

    Current prosthetic ankle joints are designed either for walking or for running. In order to mimic the capabilities of an able-bodied, a powered prosthetic ankle for walking and running was designed. A powered system has the potential to reduce the limitations in range of motion and positive work output of passive walking and running feet. To perform the experiments a controller capable of transitions between standing, walking, and running with speed adaptations was developed. In the first case study the system was mounted on an ankle bypass in parallel with the foot of a non-amputee subject. By this method the functionality of hardware and controller was proven. The Walk-Run ankle was capable of mimicking desired torque and angle trajectories in walking and running up to 2.6 m/s. At 4 m/s running, ankle angle could be matched while ankle torque could not. Limited ankle output power resulting from a suboptimal spring stiffness value was identified as a main reason. Further studies have to show to what extent the findings can be transferred to amputees.

  5. Integration of Human Walking Gyroscopic Data Using Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Bonnet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at evaluating the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD method to estimate the 3D orientation of the lower trunk during walking using the angular velocity signals generated by a wearable inertial measurement unit (IMU and notably flawed by drift. The IMU was mounted on the lower trunk (L4-L5 with its active axes aligned with the relevant anatomical axes. The proposed method performs an offline analysis, but has the advantage of not requiring any parameter tuning. The method was validated in two groups of 15 subjects, one during overground walking, with 180° turns, and the other during treadmill walking, both for steady-state and transient speeds, using stereophotogrammetric data. Comparative analysis of the results showed that the IMU/EMD method is able to successfully detrend the integrated angular velocities and estimate lateral bending, flexion-extension as well as axial rotations of the lower trunk during walking with RMS errors of 1 deg for straight walking and lower than 2.5 deg for walking with turns.

  6. Changes in the built environment and changes in the amount of walking over time: longitudinal results from the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jana A; Moore, Kari A; Clarke, Philippa J; Rodriguez, Daniel A; Evenson, Kelly R; Brines, Shannon J; Zagorski, Melissa A; Diez Roux, Ana V

    2014-10-15

    Lack of longitudinal research hinders causal inference on the association between the built environment and walking. In the present study, we used data from 6,027 adults in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were 45-84 years of age at baseline to investigate the association of neighborhood built environment with trends in the amount of walking between 2000 and 2012. Walking for transportation and walking for leisure were assessed at baseline and at 3 follow-up visits (median follow-up = 9.15 years). Time-varying built environment measures (measures of population density, land use, number of destinations, bus access, and street connectivity) were created using geographic information systems. We used linear mixed models to estimate the associations between baseline levels of and a change in each built environment feature and a change in the frequency of walking. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found that higher baseline levels of population density, area zoned for retail, social destinations, walking destinations, and street connectivity were associated with greater increases in walking for transportation over time. Higher baseline levels of land zoned for residential use and distance to buses were associated with less pronounced increases (or decreases) in walking for transportation over time. Increases in the number of social destinations, the number of walking destinations, and street connectivity over time were associated with greater increases in walking for transportation. Higher baseline levels of both land zoned for retail and walking destinations were associated with greater increases in leisure walking, but no changes in built environment features were associated with leisure walking. The creation of mixed-use, dense developments may encourage adults to incorporate walking for transportation into their everyday lives.

  7. The biomechanics of race walking: literature overview and new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavei, Gaspare; Cazzola, Dario; La Torre, Antonio; Minetti, Alberto E

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to provide both researchers and coaches with a comprehensive overview of race walking biomechanics and to point out new viable route for future analyses. The examined literature has been divided into three categories according to the method of analysis: kinematics, ground reaction forces and joint power/efficiency. From an overall view, race walking athletes seem to adhere to the 'straightened knee' rule, but at race speed they do not observe the 'no-flight time' rule. The coach-oriented analysis highlights that stride length (SL) is more important than stride frequency (SF) for increasing speed and it is mainly obtained by ankle and hip joint power. Moreover, kinematic differences (SF, SL and flight time) between male and female athletes were shown. Also, we found that the maximal speed prediction according to dynamic similarity theory with walking (Froude number) is not applicable as the 3D trajectory of the body centre of mass does not follow an arc of circumference as in walking. The analysed literature shows some shortcomings: (1) the data collection is often unreliable because of the mixture of gender and performance level and (2) the analysis has sometimes been performed on a limited number of strides and speeds. These limitations lead to a scattered and incomplete gait description and a biased application of the results. The research strategy adopted so far is promising but further rigorous analyses need to be approached to obtain a fully comprehensive picture of race walking and to provide coaches with consistent results and reference values.

  8. Quantum walks on Cayley graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, O L

    2006-01-01

    We address the problem of the construction of quantum walks on Cayley graphs. Our main motivation is the relationship between quantum algorithms and quantum walks. Thus we consider quantum walks on a general basis and try to classify them as a preliminary step in the construction of new algorithms that could be devised in this way. In particular, we discuss the choice of the dimension of the local Hilbert space, and consider various classes of graphs on which the structure of quantum walks may differ. We characterize completely the quantum walks on free groups and present partial results on more general cases. Examples are given among which a family of quantum walks on the hypercube involving a Clifford Algebra.

  9. Spatial search by quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    Childs, A M; Childs, Andrew M.; Goldstone, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Grover's quantum search algorithm provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, but is not directly applicable to searching a physical database. Nevertheless, Aaronson and Ambainis showed that a database of N items laid out in d spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order sqrt(N) for d>2, and in time of order sqrt(N) poly(log N) for d=2. We consider an alternative search algorithm based on a continuous time quantum walk on a graph. The case of the complete graph gives the continuous time search algorithm of Farhi and Gutmann, and other previously known results can be used to show that sqrt(N) speedup can also be achieved on the hypercube. We show that full sqrt(N) speedup can be achieved on a d-dimensional periodic lattice for d>4. In d=4, the quantum walk search algorithm takes time of order sqrt(N) poly(log N), and in d<4, the algorithm provides no speedup.

  10. Comparison of direct and indirect measures of walking energy expenditure in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Daniel J; Tseh, Wayland; Caputo, Jennifer L; Apperson, Kathy; McGreal, Sheri; Morgan, Don W

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the heartrate (HR) version of the energy expenditure index (EEIHR) as a proxy for measurement of walking oxygen consumption (VO2) in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Thirteen children (eight males, five females; mean age 11 years 2 months [SD 3 years], age range 6 to 15 years) with hemiplegic CP, participated in this study. The study was conducted over three sessions. During session 1, participants were familiarized with testing procedures and given 5 minutes of treadmill walking practice. In session 2, participants completed three 5-minute walking bouts on the treadmill at 0.67m x s(-1) to familiarize themselves with treadmill locomotion. During the final session participants walked at 0.67, 0.89, and 1.12m x s(-1) for 5 minutes while gross oxygen consumption (gross VO2; walking VO2/speed), net VO2 ([walking VO2-resting VO2]/speed), and EEIHR ([walking HR-resting HR]/speed) were measured during the last 2 minutes of each bout. Correlational analyses indicated no relationship (p>0.05) between measures of gross VO2 and EEIHR at each speed. Although no association was evident between net VO2 and EEIHR at 0.67 and 0.89m x s(-1), a moderate relationship (r=0.64; p<0.05) was present between these variables at 1.12m x s(-1). Examination of individual data revealed that most participants displayed an unmatched pattern of response between net VO2 and EEIHR. Our results suggest that caution should be applied when using EEIHR to estimate walking energy expenditure in children with CP.

  11. A study on a robot chasing a human using Kinect while identifying walking parameters using the back view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, S.; Mita, A.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the demand of the building spaces to respond to increase of single aged households and the diversification of life style is increasing. Smart house is one of them, but it is difficult for them to be changed and renovated. Therefore, we suggest Biofied builing. In biofied building, we use a mobile robot to get concious and unconcious information about residents and try to make it more secure and comfort builing spaces by realizing the intraction between residents and builing spaces. Walking parameters are one of the most important unconscious information about residents. They are an indicator of autonomy of elderly, and changes of stride length and walking speed may be pridictive of a future fall and a cognitive impairment. By observing their walking and informing residents their walking state, they can forestall such dangers and it helps them to live more securely and autonomously. Many methods to estimate walking parameters have been studied. The famous ones are to use accelerometers and a motion capture camera. Walking parameters estimated by them are high precise but the sensors are attached to a human body in these method and it can make human's walk different from the original walk. Furthermore, some elderly feel it to invade them. In this work, Kinect which can get information about human untouchably was used on the mobile robot. A stride time, stride length, and walking speed were estimated from the back view of human by following him or her. Evaluation was done for 10m, 5m, 4m, and 3m in whole walking. As a result, the proposal system can estimate walking parameters of the walk more than 3m.

  12. THE BLOOD PRESSURE AND HEART RATE RESPONSE TO MODERATE-SPEED WALKING IN THE YOUTH STUDENTS AND ITS INFLUENCE FACTORS%青年学生中速步行的血压心率反应及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章志红; 王刚; 林少龙; 廖海荣; 熊艳; 万秀文; 苏海

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探索青年学生中速步行时血压和心率反应及相关影响因素.[方法]对青年学生采用9min900m的速度步行运动,运动中每3min用电子血压计重复测量血压及心率一次.计算步行中血压及心率的最大增幅和曲线下面积(AUC).观察性别、高血压家族史、运动习惯等因素.[结果]运动中收缩压(SBP),舒张压(DBP)和心率(HR)明显增加;不常运动组DBP增幅更大,DBP-AUC(33.7±78.6)min.mmHg明显高于常运动组(-5.6±45.2)min.mmHg,P﹤0.05;有高血压家族史组SBP增幅更大,SBP-AUC(47.8±47.5)min.mmHg明显高于无家族史组(3.9±31.9)min.mmHg,P﹤0.05.[结论]中速步行时青年学生的血压和心率明显增加;缺乏运动是运动血压增加的最主要危险因素,有高血压病家族史也可能是其促发因素.%[Objective]To explore the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) response to medium-speed walking and evaluate the influence factors.[Methods]Walking 900 meters during 9 minutes was performed.BP and HR were measured repeatedly per 3 minutes during the walking period with electronic sphygmomanometer in 70 healthy youth students.The largest increase amplitude and the area under the curve (AUC) of BP and HR within walking were calculated.Observed the sex, family history of hypertension, exercise habits and other factors.[Results]The systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure ( DBP) and HR were increased obviously.The DBP-AUC were significantly higher in absent physical activity group than in regular exercise group (33.7±78.6 min·mmHg vs -5.6±45.2 min·mmHg, P< 0.05).The SBP-AUC were significantly larger in hypertensive family history group than in non-family history group (47.8±47.5 min·mmHg vs 3.9±31.9 min·mmHg, P < 0.05).[Conclusion]Moderate -speed walking can induce BP and HR increasing in young students.Absent physical activity is the most important risk factor for stronger exercise BP reaction.The hypertensive family history may

  13. Impaired Economy of Gait and Decreased Six-Minute Walk Distance in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie I. Katzel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the biomechanics of gait may alter the energy requirements of walking in Parkinson's Disease (PD. This study investigated economy of gait during submaximal treadmill walking in 79 subjects with mild to moderate PD and the relationship between gait economy and 6-minute walk distance (6 MW. Oxygen consumption (VO2 at the self-selected treadmill walking speed averaged 64% of peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak. Submaximal VO2 levels exceeded 70% of VO2 peak in 30% of the subjects. Overall the mean submaximal VO2 was 51% higher than VO2 levels expected for the speed and grade consistent with severe impairment in economy of gait. There was an inverse relationship between economy of gait and 6MW (r=−0.31, P<0.01 and with the self-selected walking speed (r=−0.35, P<0.01. Thus, the impairment in economy of gait and decreased physiologic reserve result in routine walking being performed at a high percentage of VO2 peak.

  14. Joint forces and torques when walking in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orselli, Maria Isabel Veras; Duarte, Marcos

    2011-04-01

    This study reports for the first time an estimation of the internal net joint forces and torques on adults' lower limbs and pelvis when walking in shallow water, taking into account the drag forces generated by the movement of their bodies in the water and the equivalent data when they walk on land. A force plate and a video camera were used to perform a two-dimensional gait analysis at the sagittal plane of 10 healthy young adults walking at comfortable speeds on land and in water at a chest-high level. We estimated the drag force on each body segment and the joint forces and torques at the ankle, knee, and hip of the right side of their bodies using inverse dynamics. The observed subjects' apparent weight in water was about 35% of their weight on land and they were about 2.7 times slower when walking in water. When the subjects walked in water compared with walking on land, there were no differences in the angular displacements but there was a significant reduction in the joint torques which was related to the water's depth. The greatest reduction was observed for the ankle and then the knee and no reduction was observed for the hip. All joint powers were significantly reduced in water. The compressive and shear joint forces were on average about three times lower during walking in water than on land. These quantitative results substantiate the use of water as a safe environment for practicing low-impact exercises, particularly walking.

  15. Parameterization of ice fall speeds in midlatitude cirrus: Results from SPartICus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Subhashree; Mitchell, David L.; Turner, David D.; Lawson, R. P.

    2014-04-01

    The climate sensitivity predicted in general circulation models can be sensitive to the treatment of the ice particle fall velocity. In this study, the mass-weighted ice fall speed (Vm) and the number concentration ice fall speed (Vn) in midlatitude cirrus clouds are computed from in situ measurements of ice particle area and number concentration made by the two-dimensional stereo probe during the Small Particles In Cirrus field campaign. For single-moment ice microphysical schemes, Vm and the ice particle size distribution effective diameter De were parameterized in terms of cloud temperature (T) and ice water content (IWC). For two-moment schemes, Vm and Vn were related to De and the mean maximum dimension¯D, respectively. For single-moment schemes, although the correlations of Vm and De with T were higher than the correlations of Vm and De with IWC, it is demonstrated that Vm and De are better predicted by using both T and IWC. The parameterization relating Vm to T and IWC is compared with another scheme relating Vm to T and IWC, with the latter based on millimeter cloud radar measurements. Regarding two-moment ice microphysical schemes, a strong correlation was found between De and Vm and between¯D and Vn owing to their similar weightings by ice particle mass and number concentration, respectively. Estimating Vm from De makes Vm a function of IWC and projected area, realistically coupling Vm with both the cloud microphysics and radiative properties.

  16. Speed of synchronization in complex networks of neural oscillators: analytic results based on Random Matrix Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Marc; Geisel, Theo; Wolf, Fred

    2006-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of networks of spiking neural oscillators. First, we present an exact linear stability theory of the synchronous state for networks of arbitrary connectivity. For general neuron rise functions, stability is determined by multiple operators, for which standard analysis is not suitable. We describe a general nonstandard solution to the multioperator problem. Subsequently, we derive a class of neuronal rise functions for which all stability operators become degenerate and standard eigenvalue analysis becomes a suitable tool. Interestingly, this class is found to consist of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. For random networks of inhibitory integrate-and-fire neurons, we then develop an analytical approach, based on the theory of random matrices, to precisely determine the eigenvalue distributions of the stability operators. This yields the asymptotic relaxation time for perturbations to the synchronous state which provides the characteristic time scale on which neurons can coordinate their activity in such networks. For networks with finite in-degree, i.e., finite number of presynaptic inputs per neuron, we find a speed limit to coordinating spiking activity. Even with arbitrarily strong interaction strengths neurons cannot synchronize faster than at a certain maximal speed determined by the typical in-degree.

  17. Limited transfer of newly acquired movement patterns across walking and running in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Ogawa

    Full Text Available The two major modes of locomotion in humans, walking and running, may be regarded as a function of different speed (walking as slower and running as faster. Recent results using motor learning tasks in humans, as well as more direct evidence from animal models, advocate for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying different locomotion tasks. In the current study, we investigated the possible independence of the neural mechanisms underlying human walking and running. Subjects were tested on a split-belt treadmill and adapted to walking or running on an asymmetrically driven treadmill surface. Despite the acquisition of asymmetrical movement patterns in the respective modes, the emergence of asymmetrical movement patterns in the subsequent trials was evident only within the same modes (walking after learning to walk and running after learning to run and only partial in the opposite modes (walking after learning to run and running after learning to walk (thus transferred only limitedly across the modes. Further, the storage of the acquired movement pattern in each mode was maintained independently of the opposite mode. Combined, these results provide indirect evidence for independence in the neural control mechanisms underlying the two locomotive modes.

  18. Persistence of random walk records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    We study records generated by Brownian particles in one dimension. Specifically, we investigate an ordinary random walk and define the record as the maximal position of the walk. We compare the record of an individual random walk with the mean record, obtained as an average over infinitely many realizations. We term the walk ‘superior’ if the record is always above average, and conversely, the walk is said to be ‘inferior’ if the record is always below average. We find that the fraction of superior walks, S, decays algebraically with time, S ˜ t-β, in the limit t → ∞, and that the persistence exponent is nontrivial, β = 0.382 258…. The fraction of inferior walks, I, also decays as a power law, I ˜ t-α, but the persistence exponent is smaller, α = 0.241 608…. Both exponents are roots of transcendental equations involving the parabolic cylinder function. To obtain these theoretical results, we analyze the joint density of superior walks with a given record and position, while for inferior walks it suffices to study the density as a function of position.

  19. A comparison of multi-segment foot kinematics during level overground and treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchin, Kirsten; Orendurff, Michael; Karol, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Previous work comparing treadmill and overground walking has focused on lower extremity motion and kinetics, with few identified differences. However, a comparison of multi-segment foot kinematics between these conditions has not been previously reported. Sagittal ankle motion using a single rigid body foot model and three-dimensional hindfoot and forefoot kinematics were compared during barefoot, level, overground walking at a self-selected speed and treadmill walking at a similar speed for 20 healthy adults. Slight differences were seen in ankle plantarflexion and hindfoot plantarflexion during first rocker, as well as peak forefoot eversion and abduction, however all changes were less than 3 degrees , and most were within the day-to-day repeatability. These results indicate that foot mechanics as determined using a multi-segment foot model were similar between overground and treadmill walking at similar speeds in healthy adults. Treadmill protocols may provide a controlled method to analyze a patient's ability to adapt to walking at different speeds and surface slopes, which are encountered often during ambulation of daily living.

  20. Resonant vibrations resulting from the re-engineering of a constant-speed 2-bladed turbine to a variable-speed 3-bladed turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleming, P.A.; Wright, A.D.; Fingersh, L.J.; Van Wingerden, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specifically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanc

  1. Walking With Meaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer McDuff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is beneficial for people with dementia, but little research explores subjective experiences of physical activity in this population. Interpretive description guided the analysis of 26 interviews conducted with 12 people with dementia. Three themes described the subjective meaning of everyday physical activity: Participants were attracted to activity because it improved physical well-being, provided social connections, gave opportunity to be in nature, and provided structure and focus; participants experienced impediments to activity because of physical discomfort, environmental factors, lack of enthusiasm, and memory loss; and participants made adjustments by choosing walking over other activities and by being active with others. Results show that physical activity remains important for people with dementia, although they encounter barriers. They may prefer walking with others as a form of activity. Findings could influence how nurses conceptualize wandering and suggest that walking programs could be well received by people with dementia.

  2. Relationship of Speed, Agility, Neuromuscular Power, and Selected Anthropometrical Variables and Performance Results of Male and Female Junior Tennis Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munivrana, Goran; Filipčić, Aleš; Filipčić, Tjaša

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyses the relation between the selected speed, agility, and neuromuscular power test items. The sample of subjects consisted of 154 male and 152 female young tennis players. Using six motor and three anthropometrical tests we investigate differences between males and females and between two age categories. Finally, we analyzed the relation between motor and anthropometrical tests and a player's tennis performance. The correlation between the two agility test items and 5-m sprint is very large in male players, while only moderate with 20-m sprint in female category. Male tennis players have higher correlations between speed test items and neuromuscular test items. The speed test item (5-m sprint) has large correlation with a player's tennis performance. One-way analysis of variance results indicated that young male tennis players performed significantly better than females in all motor test items. Significant differences between genders have not been revealed only in the body mass index. Differences between the males aged 18& under and 16& under have been noted as significant in all test items, except the vertical jump, while differences between the females have been noted as significant in three anthropometrical tests, quarter jump, and the fan-drill test. Regression analyses have shown that the system of prediction variables explains a relatively small part of variance (46%--males and 40%--females). In both genders, it has been revealed that test items measuring speed significantly influence a player's tennis performance.

  3. Walking while performing working memory tasks changes the prefrontal cortex hemodynamic activations and gait kinematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-I Brandon Lin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIncreasing evidence suggests that walking while performing a concurrent task negatively influences gait performance. However, it remains unclear how higher-level cognitive processes and coordination of limb movements are altered in challenging walking environments. This study investigated the influence of cognitive task complexity and walking road condition on the neutral correlates of executive function and postural control in dual-task walking. MethodsTwenty-four healthy young adults completed a series of overground walks with three walking road conditions (wide, narrow, with obstacles with and without the concurrent n-back working memory tasks of two complexity levels (1-back and 3-back. Prefrontal brain activation was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used simultaneously to measure gait performance and lower-extremity kinematics. Repeated measures analysis of variance were performed to examine the differences between the conditions. ResultsIn comparison with standing still, participants showed lower n-back task accuracy while walking, with the worst performance from the road with obstacles. Spatiotemporal gait parameters, lower-extremity joint movements, and the relative changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO concentration levels were all significantly different across the task complexity and walking path conditions. While dual-tasking participants were found to flex their hips and knees less, leading to a slower gait speed, longer stride time, shorter step length, and greater gait variability than during normal walking. For narrow-road walking, smaller ankle dorsiflexion and larger hip flexion were observed, along with a reduced gait speed. Obstacle negotiation was mainly characterized by increased gait variability than other conditions. HbO levels appeared to be lower during dual-task walking than normal walking. Compared to wide and obstacle conditions, walking on

  4. The effect of an arm sling on energy consumption while walking in hemiplegic patients: a randomized comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung Hoon; Kim, Taikon; Jang, Seong Ho; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si-bog; Yoon, Seoung Ic; Choi, Bong-Kun; Lee, Michael Y

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of an arm sling on gait speed and energy efficiency of patients with hemiplegia. Design: A randomized crossover design. Setting: A rehabilitation department of a university hospital. Subjects: Thirty-seven outpatients with hemiplegia were included in this study. Interventions: All patients walked on a 20-m walkway twice on the same day, randomly with and without an arm sling, at a self selected speed. Main measures: The heart rate, gait speed, oxygen cost and oxygen rate were measured on all patients. We analysed all values with and without an arm sling and also compared them after all patients being stratified according to demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: When we compared the heart rate between walking with (90.7 ± 17.2 beats/min) and without (91.2 ± 18.6 beats/min) the arm sling, it was significantly decreased while walking with the arm sling. When we compared the gait speed between walking with (32.8 m/min) and without (30.1 m/min), it was significantly increased with the arm sling walking. The O2 rate in hemiplegic patients walking with the arm sling was significantly decreased by 7%, compared to walking without arm sling (5.8 mL/kg min and 6.2 mL/kg min, respectively). The O2 cost in hemiplegic patients walking without arm sling was significantly 1.4 times greater than walking with it (0.2 mL/kg m and 0.3 mL/kg m, respectively). Conclusion: An arm sling can be used to improve the gait efficiency. PMID:21059662

  5. Are the 10 meter and 6 minute walk tests redundant in patients with spinal cord injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail F Forrest

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship and redundancy between gait speeds measured by the 10 Meter Walk Test (10MWT and 6 Minute Walk Test (6MWT after motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI. To identify gait speed thresholds supporting functional ambulation as measured with the Spinal Cord Injury Functional Ambulation Inventory (SCI-FAI. DESIGN: Prospective observational cohort. SETTING: Seven outpatient rehabilitation centers from the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation NeuroRecovery Network (NRN. PARTICIPANTS: 249 NRN patients with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS level C (n = 20, D (n = 179 and (n = 50 iSCI not AIS evaluated, from February 2008 through April 2011. INTERVENTIONS: Locomotor training using body weight support and walking on a treadmill, overground and home/community practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S: 10MWT and 6MWT collected at enrollment, approximately every 20 sessions, and upon discharge. RESULTS: The 10MWT and 6MWT speeds were highly correlated and the 10MWT speeds were generally faster. However, the predicted 6MWT gait speed from the 10MWT, revealed increasing error with increased gait speed. Regression lines remained significantly different from lines of agreement, when the group was divided into fast (≥0.44 m/s and slow walkers (<0.44 m/s. Significant differences between 6MWT and 10MWT gait speeds were observed across SCI-FAI walking mobility categories (Wilcoxon sign rank test p<.001, and mean speed thresholds for limited community ambulation differed for each measure. The smallest real difference for the 6MWT and 10MWT, as well as the minimally clinically important difference (MCID values, were also distinct for the two tests. CONCLUSIONS: While the speeds were correlated between the 6MWT and 10MWT, redundancy in the tests using predictive modeling was not observed. Different speed thresholds and separate MCIDs were defined for community ambulation for each test.

  6. Effect of the modulation of optic flow speed on gait parameters in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyungwon

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of modulation of the optic flow speed on gait parameters in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. [Methods] We examined 10 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. The children underwent gait analysis under 3 different conditions of optic flow speed: slow, normal, and fast optic flow speed. The children walked across the walkway of a GAITRite system, while watching a virtual reality screen, and walking velocity, cadence, stride length, step length, single support time, and double support time were recorded. [Results] Compared with the other applied flow speed conditions, the fast optic flow speed (2 times the normal speed) significantly increased walking velocity, cadence, normalized step length, base of support, and single support cycle of both the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs. Moreover, compared with the other applied flow speed conditions, the slow optic flow speed (0.25 times the normal speed) yielded a significantly decreased walking velocity, cadence, normalized step length, base of support, and single support cycle for both the paretic and non-paretic lower limbs. [Conclusion] The gait parameters of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy are altered by modulation of the optic flow speed. Thus, we believe that gait training involving modulation of the optic flow speed is feasible and suitable for resolving abnormal gait patterns in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

  7. The Street Level Built Environment and Physical Activity and Walking: Results of a Predictive Validity Study for the Irvine Minnesota Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarnet, Marlon G.; Forsyth, Ann; Day, Kristen; Oakes, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Irvine Minnesota Inventory (IMI) was designed to measure environmental features that may be associated with physical activity and particularly walking. This study assesses how well the IMI predicts physical activity and walking behavior and develops shortened, validated audit tools. A version of the IMI was used in the Twin Cities Walking…

  8. The cost of transport of human running is not affected, as in walking, by wide acceleration/deceleration cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, Alberto E; Gaudino, Paolo; Seminati, Elena; Cazzola, Dario

    2013-02-15

    Although most of the literature on locomotion energetics and biomechanics is about constant-speed experiments, humans and animals tend to move at variable speeds in their daily life. This study addresses the following questions: 1) how much extra metabolic energy is associated with traveling a unit distance by adopting acceleration/deceleration cycles in walking and running, with respect to constant speed, and 2) how can biomechanics explain those metabolic findings. Ten males and ten females walked and ran at fluctuating speeds (5 ± 0, ± 1, ± 1.5, ± 2, ± 2.5 km/h for treadmill walking, 11 ± 0, ± 1, ± 2, ± 3, ± 4 km/h for treadmill and field running) in cycles lasting 6 s. Field experiments, consisting of subjects following a laser spot projected from a computer-controlled astronomic telescope, were necessary to check the noninertial bias of the oscillating-speed treadmill. Metabolic cost of transport was found to be almost constant at all speed oscillations for running and up to ±2 km/h for walking, with no remarkable differences between laboratory and field results. The substantial constancy of the metabolic cost is not explained by the predicted cost of pure acceleration/deceleration. As for walking, results from speed-oscillation running suggest that the inherent within-stride, elastic energy-free accelerations/decelerations when moving at constant speed work as a mechanical buffer for among-stride speed fluctuations, with no extra metabolic cost. Also, a recent theory about the analogy between sprint (level) running and constant-speed running on gradients, together with the mechanical determinants of gradient locomotion, helps to interpret the present findings.

  9. Segment lengths influence hill walking strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Riley C; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2014-08-22

    Segment lengths are known to influence walking kinematics and muscle activity patterns. During level walking at the same speed, taller individuals take longer, slower strides than shorter individuals. Based on this, we sought to determine if segment lengths also influenced hill walking strategies. We hypothesized that individuals with longer segments would display more joint flexion going uphill and more extension going downhill as well as greater lateral gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis activity in both directions. Twenty young adults of varying heights (below 155 cm to above 188 cm) walked at 1.25 m/s on a level treadmill as well as 6° and 12° up and downhill slopes while we collected kinematic and muscle activity data. Subsequently, we ran linear regressions for each of the variables with height, leg, thigh, and shank length. Despite our population having twice the anthropometric variability, the level and hill walking patterns matched closely with previous studies. While there were significant differences between level and hill walking, there were few hill walking variables that were correlated with segment length. In support of our hypothesis, taller individuals had greater knee and ankle flexion during uphill walking. However, the majority of the correlations were between tibialis anterior and lateral gastrocnemius activities and shank length. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative step length and muscle activity decreased with segment length, specifically shank length. In summary, it appears that individuals with shorter segments require greater propulsion and toe clearance during uphill walking as well as greater braking and stability during downhill walking.

  10. Isolating gait-related movement artifacts in electroencephalography during human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Julia E.; Huang, Helen J.; Snyder, Kristine L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. High-density electroencephelography (EEG) can provide an insight into human brain function during real-world activities with walking. Some recent studies have used EEG to characterize brain activity during walking, but the relative contributions of movement artifact and electrocortical activity have been difficult to quantify. We aimed to characterize movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes at a range of walking speeds and to test the efficacy of artifact removal methods. We also quantified the similarity between movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes and a head-mounted accelerometer. Approach. We used a novel experimental method to isolate and record movement artifact with EEG electrodes during walking. We blocked electrophysiological signals using a nonconductive layer (silicone swim cap) and simulated an electrically conductive scalp on top of the swim cap using a wig coated with conductive gel. We recorded motion artifact EEG data from nine young human subjects walking on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4 to 1.6 m s-1. We then tested artifact removal methods including moving average and wavelet-based techniques. Main results. Movement artifact recorded with EEG electrodes varied considerably, across speed, subject, and electrode location. The movement artifact measured with EEG electrodes did not correlate well with head acceleration. All of the tested artifact removal methods attenuated low-frequency noise but did not completely remove movement artifact. The spectral power fluctuations in the movement artifact data resembled data from some previously published studies of EEG during walking. Significance. Our results suggest that EEG data recorded during walking likely contains substantial movement artifact that: cannot be explained by head accelerations; varies across speed, subject, and channel; and cannot be removed using traditional signal processing methods. Future studies should focus on more sophisticated methods for removal of EEG

  11. Effects of a Flexibility and Relaxation Programme, Walking, and Nordic Walking on Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reuter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD progress despite optimized medical treatment. The present study investigated the effects of a flexibility and relaxation programme, walking, and Nordic walking (NW on walking speed, stride length, stride length variability, Parkinson-specific disability (UPDRS, and health-related quality of life (PDQ 39. 90 PD patients were randomly allocated to the 3 treatment groups. Patients participated in a 6-month study with 3 exercise sessions per week, each lasting 70 min. Assessment after completion of the training showed that pain was reduced in all groups, and balance and health-related quality of life were improved. Furthermore, walking, and Nordic walking improved stride length, gait variability, maximal walking speed, exercise capacity at submaximal level, and PD disease-specific disability on the UPDRS in addition. Nordic walking was superior to the flexibility and relaxation programme and walking in improving postural stability, stride length, gait pattern and gait variability. No significant injuries occurred during the training. All patients of the Nordic walking group continued Nordic walking after completing the study.

  12. Deterministic Walks with Choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeler, Katy E.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Cooper, Joshua N.; Hunter, Meagan N.; Barr, Peter S.

    2014-01-10

    This paper studies deterministic movement over toroidal grids, integrating local information, bounded memory and choice at individual nodes. The research is motivated by recent work on deterministic random walks, and applications in multi-agent systems. Several results regarding passing tokens through toroidal grids are discussed, as well as some open questions.

  13. The effect of uphill and downhill walking on gait parameters: A self-paced treadmill study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimel-Naor, Shani; Gottlieb, Amihai; Plotnik, Meir

    2017-07-26

    It has been shown that gait parameters vary systematically with the slope of the surface when walking uphill (UH) or downhill (DH) (Andriacchi et al., 1977; Crowe et al., 1996; Kawamura et al., 1991; Kirtley et al., 1985; McIntosh et al., 2006; Sun et al., 1996). However, gait trials performed on inclined surfaces have been subject to certain technical limitations including using fixed speed treadmills (TMs) or, alternatively, sampling only a few gait cycles on inclined ramps. Further, prior work has not analyzed upper body kinematics. This study aims to investigate effects of slope on gait parameters using a self-paced TM (SPTM) which facilitates more natural walking, including measuring upper body kinematics and gait coordination parameters. Gait of 11 young healthy participants was sampled during walking in steady state speed. Measurements were made at slopes of +10°, 0° and -10°. Force plates and a motion capture system were used to reconstruct twenty spatiotemporal gait parameters. For validation, previously described parameters were compared with the literature, and novel parameters measuring upper body kinematics and bilateral gait coordination were also analyzed. Results showed that most lower and upper body gait parameters were affected by walking slope angle. Specifically, UH walking had a higher impact on gait kinematics than DH walking. However, gait coordination parameters were not affected by walking slope, suggesting that gait asymmetry, left-right coordination and gait variability are robust characteristics of walking. The findings of the study are discussed in reference to a potential combined effect of slope and gait speed. Follow-up studies are needed to explore the relative effects of each of these factors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Negligible motion artifacts in scalp electroencephalography (EEG during treadmill walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eNathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI techniques based on active electrode scalp electroencephalogram (EEG allow the acquisition and real-time analysis of brain dynamics during active unrestrained motor behavior involving whole body movements such as treadmill walking, over-ground walking and other locomotive and non-locomotive tasks. Unfortunately, MoBI protocols are prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts, including motion artifacts that may contaminate the EEG recordings. A few attempts have been made to quantify these artifacts during locomotion tasks but with inconclusive results due in part to methodological pitfalls. In this paper, we investigate the potential contributions of motion artifacts in scalp EEG during treadmill walking at three different speeds (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 km/h using a wireless 64 channel active EEG system and a wireless inertial sensor attached to the subject’s head. The experimental setup was designed according to good measurement practices using state-of-the-art commercially-available instruments, and the measurements were analyzed using Fourier analysis and wavelet coherence approaches. Contrary to prior claims, the subjects’ motion did not significantly affect their EEG during treadmill walking although precaution should be taken when gait speeds approach 4.5 km/h. Overall, these findings suggest how MoBI methods may be safely deployed in neural, cognitive, and rehabilitation engineering applications.

  15. Functional electrical stimulation-assisted walking for persons with incomplete spinal injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladouceur, M.; Barbeau, H.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in maximal overground walking speed (MOWS) that occurred during; walking training with a functional electrical stimulation (FES) orthosis by chronic spinal cord injured persons with incomplete motor function loss. The average walking: speed over a distance of 10...

  16. Muscle Synergies Facilitate Computational Prediction of Subject-specific Walking Motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Meyer

    2016-10-01

    the subject’s walking kinematics and kinetics well for the faster non-calibration speed of 0.8 m/s, with synergy controls predicting the new gait period the most accurately. When used to predict how the subject would walk at 1.1 m/s, synergy controls predicted a gait period close to that estimated from the linear relationship between gait speed and stride length. These findings suggest that our neuromusculoskeletal simulation framework may be able to bridge the gap between patient-specific muscle synergy information and resulting functional capabilities and limitations.

  17. Muscle Synergies Facilitate Computational Prediction of Subject-Specific Walking Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andrew J.; Eskinazi, Ilan; Jackson, Jennifer N.; Rao, Anil V.; Patten, Carolynn; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    subject’s walking kinematics and kinetics well for the faster non-calibration speed of 0.8 m/s, with synergy controls predicting the new gait period the most accurately. When used to predict how the subject would walk at 1.1 m/s, synergy controls predicted a gait period close to that estimated from the linear relationship between gait speed and stride length. These findings suggest that our neuromusculoskeletal simulation framework may be able to bridge the gap between patient-specific muscle synergy information and resulting functional capabilities and limitations. PMID:27790612

  18. Walking Versus Jogging in Stages III and IV of the Bruce Treadmill Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, D.; Schwane, J.

    Observations during research involving the Bruce Treadmill Test (BTMT) indicating that Stage III for females and Stage IV for males represented speeds which are intermediate between comfortable walking and confortable jogging for many subjects, prompted this study to determine ways to obtain more consistent group results. Twenty-eight subjects…

  19. Human treadmill walking needs attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study was to assess the attentional requirements of steady state treadmill walking in human subjects using a dual task paradigm. The extent of decrement of a secondary (cognitive RT task provides a measure of the attentional resources required to maintain performance of the primary (locomotor task. Varying the level of difficulty of the reaction time (RT task is used to verify the priority of allocation of attentional resources. Methods 11 healthy adult subjects were required to walk while simultaneously performing a RT task. Participants were instructed to bite a pressure transducer placed in the mouth as quickly as possible in response to an unpredictable electrical stimulation applied on the back of the neck. Each subject was tested under five different experimental conditions: simple RT task alone and while walking, recognition RT task alone and while walking, walking alone. A foot switch system composed of a pressure sensitive sensor was placed under the heel and forefoot of each foot to determine the gait cycle duration. Results Gait cycle duration was unchanged (p > 0.05 by the addition of the RT task. Regardless of the level of difficulty of the RT task, the RTs were longer during treadmill walking than in sitting conditions (p 0.05 was found between the attentional demand of the walking task and the decrement of performance found in the RT task under varying levels of difficulty. This finding suggests that the healthy subjects prioritized the control of walking at the expense of cognitive performance. Conclusion We conclude that treadmill walking in young adults is not a purely automatic task. The methodology and outcome measures used in this study provide an assessment of the attentional resources required by walking on the treadmill at a steady state.

  20. Biomechanical characteristics of adults walking in shallow water and on land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barela, Ana M F; Stolf, Sandro F; Duarte, Marcos

    2006-06-01

    Although water environment has been employed for different physical activities, there is little available information regarding the biomechanical characteristics of walking in shallow water. In the present study, we investigated the kinematics, ground reaction forces (GRF), and electromyographic (EMG) activation patterns of eight selected muscles of adults walking in shallow water and on land. Ten healthy adults were videotaped while walking at self-selected comfortable speeds on land and in water (at the Xiphoid process level). In both conditions there was a force plate embedded in the middle of each walkway to register the GRF components. Reflective markers were placed over main anatomical landmarks and they were digitalized later to obtain stride characteristics and joint angle information. In general, walking in water was different to walking on land in many aspects and these differences were attributed to the drag force, the apparent body weight reduction, and the lower comfortable speed during walking in shallow water. The joint range of motions (ROM) were not different, the segment ROM, magnitudes of GRF components, impact force, and impulse were different between the two conditions. The present results will contribute to a better understanding of this activity in the context of training and rehabilitation.

  1. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 1; Fan Stage Design and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Prahst, Patricia S.; Thorp, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is investigating turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems for access to space because it provides the potential for aircraft-like, space-launch operations that may significantly reduce launch costs and improve safety. To this end, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and General Electric (GE) teamed to design a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space. To enable the wide operating range of a Mach 4+ variable cycle turbofan ramjet required the development of a unique fan stage design capable of multi-point operation to accommodate variations in bypass ratio (10 ), fan speed (7 ), inlet mass flow (3.5 ), inlet pressure (8 ), and inlet temperature (3 ). In this paper, NASA has set out to characterize a TBCC engine fan stage aerodynamic performance and stability limits over a wide operating range including power-on and hypersonic-unique "windmill" operation. Herein, we will present the fan stage design, and the experimental test results of the fan stage operating from 15 to 100 percent corrected design speed. Whereas, in the companion paper, we will provide an assessment of NASA s APNASA code s ability to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speed and bypass ratio.

  2. Load controlling walk aiding apparatus. Report on results of research and development on medical and welfare device technologies; Kaju seigyoshiki hoko hojo sochi. Iryo fukushi kiki gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This paper reports a load controlling walk aiding apparatus developed by the Technology Research Association and the Medical and Welfare Device Research Institute under a consignment from NEDO. The development was purposed for physically handicapped people with remarkably deteriorated leg functions. This apparatus consists of a body trunk section with reduced size and weight, a reciprocating mechanism to facilitate moving out of a free leg, a stay varying mechanism to vary leg lengths, driving power supply and controls. The apparatus has realized smoother reciprocal walking motions than with conventional walk aiding systems by having the leg length of a free leg contract and extend matching with walking rhythms when the free leg is moved out. This paper describes the apparatus by dividing it into the following items: the course of research and development works (basic plans, execution of the research and development works, corporations taking charges, organizations, and committees), summary of the research and development (the summary of the developed system, and results of the walking tests), achievements (comparison of the targeted specifications with the results, practical usability, and commercial production), publicization of the research and the state of patent acquisition. 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Gait analysis of spastic walking in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maezawa, Y; Uchida, K; Baba, H

    2001-01-01

    To assess neurological status and to evaluate the effect of surgical decompression in patients with cervical myelopathy, we performed computerized gait analysis in 24 patients with cervical compressive myelopathy who showed spastic walking. Gait analysis was repeated during neurological follow-up that averaged 32.4 months. The gait pattern in patients with severe myelopathy was characterized by hyperextension of the knee in the stance phase without plantar flexion of the ankle in the swing phase, significantly reduced walking speed and step length, prolonged stance phase duration and decreased single-stance phase duration, and increased step width. The angle of flexion of the knee joint in the stance phase was significantly correlated with the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. Postoperative neurological improvement was associated with increased walking speed and decreased extension angle of the knee joint (single-stance phase and swing phase). Postoperatively, 12 patients had normalized extension of the knee in stance phase and their walking speed, cadence, stance phase duration, and single-stance phase duration, as well as step length and width, showed nonsignificant differences from these parameters in healthy controls. Our results show that kinesiological gait analysis is clinically useful for the functional assessment of the severity of spastic walking in cervical myelopathy.

  4. Spatial and temporal gait characteristics of elderly individuals during backward and forward walking with shoes and barefoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elboim-Gabyzon, Michal; Rotchild, Shira

    2017-02-01

    Backward walking (BW) is an inherent component of mobility and function in daily activities, particularly indoors, when it is more likely that a person is barefoot. No studies to date have compared the spatio-temporal characteristics of BW with and without shoes in elderly individuals. This study compared spatio-temporal measures of BW and forward walking (FW) among elderly individuals while barefoot or wearing shoes. Forty-seven elderly individuals (13 men and 34 women, 76.7±7.7years of age) were evaluated. Participants were requested to walk at a comfortable, self-selected pace across the GAITRite(®) walkway for three trials under each of four conditions: walking forward (FW) and BW wearing their own comfortable low-heeled walking shoes and FW and BW walking without shoes. Gait speed, stride length and cadence were significantly reduced in BW versus FW, with an increase in double limb support (DLS), both with and without shoes. Barefoot BW resulted in significantly increased gait speed and cadence, and decreased DLS compared to BW with shoes. BW stride length was not affected by footwear. While barefoot FW was also associated with a significant increase in cadence and decrease in DLS time compared to walking with shoes, it decreased stride length and had no detrimental effect on gait speed. Assessment of the spatio-temporal parameters of walking barefoot and with shoes during FW and BW can contribute to our understanding of the ability of elderly individuals to adapt to changing walking conditions, and should be included in the assessment of functional mobility of elderly individuals.

  5. Walking indoors, walking outdoors: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eDalla Volta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An observation/execution matching system for walking has not been assessed yet. The present fMRI study was aimed at assessing whether, as for object-directed actions, an observation/execution matching system is active for walking and whether the spatial context of walking (open or narrow space recruits different neural correlates. Two experimental conditions were employed. In the execution condition, while being scanned, participants performed walking on a rolling cylinder located just outside the scanner. The same action was performed also while observing a video presenting either an open space (a country field or a narrow space (a corridor. In the observation condition, participants observed a video presenting an individual walking on the same cylinder on which the actual action was executed, the open space video and the narrow space video, respectively. Results showed common bilateral activations in the dorsal premotor/supplementary motor areas and in the posterior parietal lobe for both execution and observation of walking, thus supporting a matching system for this action. Moreover, specific sectors of the occipital-temporal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus were consistently active when processing a narrow space versus an open one, thus suggesting their involvement in the visuo-motor transformation required when walking in a narrow space. We forward that the present findings may have implications for rehabilitation of gait and sport training.

  6. The High-Speed and Wide-Field TORTORA Camera: description & results .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, G.; Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Bondar, S.; Piccioni, A.; Molinari, E.

    We present the description and the most significant results of the wide-field and ultra-fast TORTORA camera devoted to the investigation of rapid changes in light intensity in a phenomenon occurring within an extremely short period of time and randomly distributed over the sky. In particular, the ground-based TORTORA observations synchronized with the gamma -ray BAT telescope on board of the Swift satellite has permitted to trace the optical burst time-structure of the Naked-Eye GRB 080319B with an unprecedented level of accuracy.

  7. Exertion during uphill, level and downhill walking with and without hiking poles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrey, Stephane; Fabre, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of poles when walking on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE), physiological and kinematics parameters, and upon the mean ratio between locomotor and respiratory rhythms. Twelve healthy male and female volunteers, aged 22 to 49 years old, completed on a motorized treadmill in a counterbalanced randomized order 12 walking trials for 10 min at an individually preferred walking speed, with three grades (horizontal level, uphill or downhill with a slope of 15%), with and without hiking poles and a load carriage of 15% of body mass. During all testing sessions, heart rate (HR), oxygen consumption (VO2), ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (Bf), and stride frequency were recorded continuously during the last 5-min of each trial. At the end of each trial, subjects were asked to give RPE. Energy cost (EC) and VE increased significantly with the grade (-15% walking speed. The average ratio between the locomotor and respiratory frequencies was significantly influenced by the three experimental factors tested. There was a significant relationship between average ratio of leg movement per breath and EC of walking among all conditions (r = 0.83, n = 12). These results suggest that the use of the hiking poles had a significant influence on the respiratory and energetic responses only during downhill walking. Key pointsEnergetic cost, respiratory responses, stride rate, respiratory to cycle rate ratio were significantly influenced by the use of hiking poles according to the grade at self-selected walking speed.Hiking poles induced an increase in respiratory frequency, VE and energetic cost during downhill, while little changes were observed during level and uphill terrain.The original results obtained in downhill necessitate supplementary studies in the field in order to confirm these first tendencies on treadmill.

  8. Accuracy of the Microsoft Kinect for measuring gait parameters during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; McGorry, Raymond W; Chou, Li-Shan; Lin, Jia-Hua; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of gait parameters normally requires motion tracking systems combined with force plates, which limits the measurement to laboratory settings. In some recent studies, the possibility of using the portable, low cost, and marker-less Microsoft Kinect sensor to measure gait parameters on over-ground walking has been examined. The current study further examined the accuracy level of the Kinect sensor for assessment of various gait parameters during treadmill walking under different walking speeds. Twenty healthy participants walked on the treadmill and their full body kinematics data were measured by a Kinect sensor and a motion tracking system, concurrently. Spatiotemporal gait parameters and knee and hip joint angles were extracted from the two devices and were compared. The results showed that the accuracy levels when using the Kinect sensor varied across the gait parameters. Average heel strike frame errors were 0.18 and 0.30 frames for the right and left foot, respectively, while average toe off frame errors were -2.25 and -2.61 frames, respectively, across all participants and all walking speeds. The temporal gait parameters based purely on heel strike have less error than the temporal gait parameters based on toe off. The Kinect sensor can follow the trend of the joint trajectories for the knee and hip joints, though there was substantial error in magnitudes. The walking speed was also found to significantly affect the identified timing of toe off. The results of the study suggest that the Kinect sensor may be used as an alternative device to measure some gait parameters for treadmill walking, depending on the desired accuracy level.

  9. Development of A Super High Speed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM Controller and Analysis of The Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Zhao

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a DSP-based controller for a super high-speed (>80,000 rpm permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM. The PMSM is a key component of the centrifugal compressor drive of a reverse Brayton cryocooler that is currently under development for NASA and Florida Solar Energy Center. The design of the PMSM open-loop control is presented. Experimental results with open-loop control schemes are presented. System optimization and analysis are also illustrated. They verify the effectiveness of the controller design and the optimization scheme.

  10. Fuel-rich, catalytic reaction experimental results. [fuel development for high-speed civil transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollbuhler, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Future aeropropulsion gas turbine combustion requirements call for operating at very high inlet temperatures, pressures, and large temperature rises. At the same time, the combustion process is to have minimum pollution effects on the environment. Aircraft gas turbine engines utilize liquid hydrocarbon fuels which are difficult to uniformly atomize and mix with combustion air. An approach for minimizing fuel related problems is to transform the liquid fuel into gaseous form prior to the completion of the combustion process. Experimentally obtained results are presented for vaporizing and partially oxidizing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel into burnable gaseous components. The presented experimental data show that 1200 to 1300 K reaction product gas, rich in hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and light-end hydrocarbons, is formed when flowing 0.3 to 0.6 fuel to air mixes through a catalyst reactor. The reaction temperatures are kept low enough that nitrogen oxides and carbon particles (soot) do not form. Results are reported for tests using different catalyst types and configurations, mass flowrates, input temperatures, and fuel to air ratios.

  11. Controlling the development of coherent structures in high speed jets and the resultant near field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Rachelle

    This work uses Large-Eddy Simulations to examine the effect of actuator parameters and jet exit properties on the evolution of coherent structures and their impact on the near-acoustic field without and with control. For the controlled cases, Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPAs) are considered, and modeled with a simple heating approach that successfully reproduces the main observations and trends of experiments. A parametric study is first conducted, using the flapping mode (m = +/-1), to investigate the sensitivity of the results to various actuator parameters including: actuator model temperature, actuator duty cycle, and excitation frequency. It is shown by considering a Mach 1.3 jet at Reynolds number of 1 x 106 that the response of the jet is relatively insensitive to actuator model temperature within the limits of the experimentally measured temperature values. Furthermore, duty cycles in the range of 20%--90% were observed to be effective in reproducing the characteristic coherent structures of the flapping mode. Next, jet flow parameters were explored to determine the control authority under different operating conditions. To begin, the effect of the laminar nozzle exit boundary layer thickness was examined by varying its value from essentially uniform flow to 25% of the diameter. In the absence of control, the distance between the nozzle lip and the initial appearance of breakdown is proportional to the boundary-layer thickness, which is consistent with theory and previous results obtained by other researchers at Mach 0.9. The second flow parameter studied was the effect of Reynolds number on a Mach 1.3 jet controlled by the flapping mode at an excitation Strouhal number of 0.3. The higher Reynolds number (Re=1,100,000) jet exhibited reduced control authority compared to the Re=100,000 jet. Like the effect of increasing the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness, increasing the Reynolds number cause a reduction in spreading on the flapping plane

  12. Accelerometry-enabled measurement of walking performance with a robotic exoskeleton: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lonini, Luca; Shawen, Nicholas; Scanlan, Kathleen; Rymer, William Z; Kording, Konrad P; Jayaraman, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Clinical scores for evaluating walking skills with lower limb exoskeletons are often based on a single variable, such as distance walked or speed, even in cases where a host of features are measured...

  13. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Maciejczyk Marcin; Wiecek Magdalena; Szymura Jadwiga; Szygula Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group) and lean body mass (HLBM group). In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and maximal heart rate were me...

  14. Kinesthetic taping improves walking function in patients with stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeskov, Birgitte; Carver, Line Tornehøj; von Essen-Leise, Anders

    2014-01-01

    walking speed and clinical indices of spasticity in patients with stroke. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (9 women) receiving rehabilitation after stroke (average, 50 days since stroke) who had impaired walking ability were recruited. Primary outcome was maximal walking speed measured by the 10-meter walk...... be a valuable adjunct in physical therapy and rehabilitation of patients with stroke.......BACKGROUND: Stroke is an important cause of severe disability and impaired motor function. Treatment modalities that improve motor function in patients with stroke are needed. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of kinesthetic taping of the anterior thigh and knee on maximal...

  15. Covering walks in graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fujie, Futaba

    2014-01-01

    Covering Walks  in Graphs is aimed at researchers and graduate students in the graph theory community and provides a comprehensive treatment on measures of two well studied graphical properties, namely Hamiltonicity and traversability in graphs. This text looks into the famous Kӧnigsberg Bridge Problem, the Chinese Postman Problem, the Icosian Game and the Traveling Salesman Problem as well as well-known mathematicians who were involved in these problems. The concepts of different spanning walks with examples and present classical results on Hamiltonian numbers and upper Hamiltonian numbers of graphs are described; in some cases, the authors provide proofs of these results to illustrate the beauty and complexity of this area of research. Two new concepts of traceable numbers of graphs and traceable numbers of vertices of a graph which were inspired by and closely related to Hamiltonian numbers are introduced. Results are illustrated on these two concepts and the relationship between traceable concepts and...

  16. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  17. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  18. Helping 'light green' consumers walk the talk. Results of a behavioural intervention survey in the Swiss electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvine, Dorian [University of Montpellier 1, LASER-CREDEN, UFR d' Economie, Montpellier (France); Wuestenhagen, Rolf [University of St. Gallen (Switzerland). IWOe-HSG

    2011-01-15

    While many consumer surveys show very positive attitudes towards renewable energy, the share of consumers actually purchasing green electricity is still in the single-digit percent range in most countries. What can be done to help consumers with positive attitudes towards green electricity to 'walk the talk', i.e. to behave consistently with their preferences? We developed a psychological model based on the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to design a large-scale behavioural intervention survey with 1163 Swiss electricity consumers. Our results show that by providing information targeted at the key factors influencing the intention to purchase green electricity, namely attitudes towards purchase, social norms and perceived behavioural control, a significant increase in green electricity market share can be achieved. Our results show that price is not the only barrier to purchasing green electricity, and that information to increase the perceived benefit of buying green electricity as well as targeted communication to overcome inertia among retail electricity consumers are equally important factors. (author)

  19. Pedestrian speeds on stairs: an initial step for a simulation model

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiyama, T.; Tyler, N.

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict a pedestrian’s walking speed on stairs from his/her characteristics of and those of the stairs, the relationship between the walking speed of a pedestrian on stairs and his/her characteristics, and the relationship between the pedestrians’ walking speeds on stairs and the stair-gradients were investigated. It is suggested that Leg Extensor Power shows a strong correlation to walking speeds of elderly people on stairs, the stair-gradient has a linear relationshi...

  20. The Walk Poem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Ron

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the long history of writing poems about a walk, noting many titles. Notes four basic types of walk poems and includes one by American poet Bill Zavatksy, called "Class Walk With Notebooks After Storm." Offers numerous brief ideas for both the writing and the form of walk poems. (SR)

  1. Walking, places and wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Dick; Smajic, Ifeta

    2015-01-01

    While there is a substantial body of research on the health implications of walking, the physical, emotional and social outcomes of walking have received limited attention. This paper explores the wellbeing effects of walking and how the walking environment fosters or hinders such wellbeing effects.

  2. Walking, places and wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Dick; Smajic, Ifeta

    2015-01-01

    While there is a substantial body of research on the health implications of walking, the physical, emotional and social outcomes of walking have received limited attention. This paper explores the wellbeing effects of walking and how the walking environment fosters or hinders such wellbeing effects.

  3. Community walking training program improves walking function and social participation in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MinKyu; Cho, KiHun; Lee, WanHee

    2014-01-01

    Stroke patients live with balance and walking dysfunction. Walking is the most important factor for independent community activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a community walking training program (CWTP) within the real environment on walking function and social participation in chronic stroke patients. Twenty-two stroke patients (13 male, 50.45 years old, post stroke duration 231.64 days) were randomly assigned to either the CWTP group or the control group. All subjects participated in the same standard rehabilitation program consisting of physical and occupational therapy for 60 min per day, five times a week, for four weeks. In addition, the CWTP group participated in CWTP for 30 min per day, five times a week, for four weeks. Walking function was assessed using the 10-m walk test (measurement for 10-meter walking speed), 6-min walk assessment (measurement of gait length for 6-minutes), and community gait assessment. Social participation was assessed using a social participation domain of stroke impact scale. In walking function, greater improvement was observed in the CWTP group compared with the control group (P participation improved more in the CWTP group compared with the control group (P participation in chronic stroke patients. Therefore, we suggest that CWTP within the real environment may be an effective method for improving walking function and social participation of chronic stroke patients when added to standard rehabilitation.

  4. Obesity does not increase external mechanical work per kilogram body mass during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Raymond C; McGowan, Craig P; Kram, Rodger

    2009-10-16

    Walking is the most common type of physical activity prescribed for the treatment of obesity. The net metabolic rate during level walking (W/kg) is approximately 10% greater in obese vs. normal weight adults. External mechanical work (W(ext)) is one of the primary determinants of the metabolic cost of walking, but the effects of obesity on W(ext) have not been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to compare W(ext) between obese and normal weight adults across a range of walking speeds. We hypothesized that W(ext) (J/step) would be greater in obese adults but W(ext) normalized to body mass would be similar in obese and normal weight adults. We collected right leg three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF) while twenty adults (10 obese, BMI=35.6 kg/m(2) and 10 normal weight, BMI=22.1 kg/m(2)) walked on a level, dual-belt force measuring treadmill at six speeds (0.50-1.75 m/s). We used the individual limb method (ILM) to calculate external work done on the center of mass. Absolute W(ext) (J/step) was greater in obese vs. normal weight adults at each walking speed, but relative W(ext) (J/step/kg) was similar between the groups. Step frequencies were not different. These results suggest that W(ext) is not responsible for the greater metabolic cost of walking (W/kg) in moderately obese adults.

  5. Estimation of quasi-stiffness of the human knee in the stance phase of walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shamaei

    Full Text Available Biomechanical data characterizing the quasi-stiffness of lower-limb joints during human locomotion is limited. Understanding joint stiffness is critical for evaluating gait function and designing devices such as prostheses and orthoses intended to emulate biological properties of human legs. The knee joint moment-angle relationship is approximately linear in the flexion and extension stages of stance, exhibiting nearly constant stiffnesses, known as the quasi-stiffnesses of each stage. Using a generalized inverse dynamics analysis approach, we identify the key independent variables needed to predict knee quasi-stiffness during walking, including gait speed, knee excursion, and subject height and weight. Then, based on the identified key variables, we used experimental walking data for 136 conditions (speeds of 0.75-2.63 m/s across 14 subjects to obtain best fit linear regressions for a set of general models, which were further simplified for the optimal gait speed. We found R(2 > 86% for the most general models of knee quasi-stiffnesses for the flexion and extension stages of stance. With only subject height and weight, we could predict knee quasi-stiffness for preferred walking speed with average error of 9% with only one outlier. These results provide a useful framework and foundation for selecting subject-specific stiffness for prosthetic and exoskeletal devices designed to emulate biological knee function during walking.

  6. Symmetricity of Distribution for One-Dimensional Hadamard Walk

    CERN Document Server

    Konno, N; Soshi, T; Konno, Norio; Namiki, Takao; Soshi, Takahiro

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we study a one-dimensional quantum random walk with the Hadamard transformation which is often called the Hadamard walk. We construct the Hadamard walk using a transition matrix on probability amplitude and give some results on symmetricity of probability distributions for the Hadamard walk.

  7. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  8. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  9. Walking is not like reaching: evidence from periodic mechanical perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooeun Ahn

    Full Text Available The control architecture underlying human reaching has been established, at least in broad outline. However, despite extensive research, the control architecture underlying human locomotion remains unclear. Some studies show evidence of high-level control focused on lower-limb trajectories; others suggest that nonlinear oscillators such as lower-level rhythmic central pattern generators (CPGs play a significant role. To resolve this ambiguity, we reasoned that if a nonlinear oscillator contributes to locomotor control, human walking should exhibit dynamic entrainment to periodic mechanical perturbation; entrainment is a distinctive behavior of nonlinear oscillators. Here we present the first behavioral evidence that nonlinear neuro-mechanical oscillators contribute to the production of human walking, albeit weakly. As unimpaired human subjects walked at constant speed, we applied periodic torque pulses to the ankle at periods different from their preferred cadence. The gait period of 18 out of 19 subjects entrained to this mechanical perturbation, converging to match that of the perturbation. Significantly, entrainment occurred only if the perturbation period was close to subjects' preferred walking cadence: it exhibited a narrow basin of entrainment. Further, regardless of the phase within the walking cycle at which perturbation was initiated, subjects' gait synchronized or phase-locked with the mechanical perturbation at a phase of gait where it assisted propulsion. These results were affected neither by auditory feedback nor by a distractor task. However, the convergence to phase-locking was slow. These characteristics indicate that nonlinear neuro-mechanical oscillators make at most a modest contribution to human walking. Our results suggest that human locomotor control is not organized as in reaching to meet a predominantly kinematic specification, but is hierarchically organized with a semi-autonomous peripheral oscillator operating under

  10. System overview and walking dynamics of a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of “passive dynamic walking robot” refers to the robot that can walk down a shallow slope stably without any actuation and control which shows a limit cycle during walking. By adding actuation at some joints, the passive dynamic walking robot can walk stably on level ground and exhibit more versatile gaits than fully passive robot, namely, the “limit cycle walker.” In this article, we present the mechanical structures and control system design for a passive dynamic walking robot with series elastic actuators at hip joint and ankle joints. We built a walking model that consisted of an upper body, knee joints, and flat feet and derived its walking dynamics that involve double stance phases in a walking cycle based on virtual power principle. The instant just before impact was chosen as the start of one step to reduce the number of independent state variables. A numerical simulation was implemented by using MATLAB, in which the proposed passive dynamic walking model could walk stably down a shallow slope, which proves that the derived walking dynamics are correct. A physical passive robot prototype was built finally, and the experiment results show that by only simple control scheme the passive dynamic robot could walk stably on level ground.

  11. Reduction and technical simplification of testing protocol for walking based on repeatability analyses: An Interreg IVa pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Sarabon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define the most appropriate gait measurement protocols to be used in our future studies in the Mobility in Ageing project. A group of young healthy volunteers took part in the study. Each subject carried out a 10-metre walking test at five different speeds (preferred, very slow, very fast, slow, and fast. Each walking speed was repeated three times, making a total of 15 trials which were carried out in a random order. Each trial was simultaneously analysed by three observers using three different technical approaches: a stop watch, photo cells and electronic kinematic dress. In analysing the repeatability of the trials, the results showed that of the five self-selected walking speeds, three of them (preferred, very fast, and very slow had a significantly higher repeatability of the average walking velocity, step length and cadence than the other two speeds. Additionally, the data showed that one of the three technical methods for gait assessment has better metric characteristics than the other two. In conclusion, based on repeatability, technical and organizational simplification, this study helped us to successfully define a simple and reliable walking test to be used in the main study of the project.

  12. Speed adaptation in a powered transtibial prosthesis controlled with a neuromuscular model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jared; Krishnaswamy, Pavitra; Eilenberg, Michael F.; Endo, Ken; Barnhart, Chris; Herr, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Control schemes for powered ankle–foot prostheses would benefit greatly from a means to make them inherently adaptive to different walking speeds. Towards this goal, one may attempt to emulate the intact human ankle, as it is capable of seamless adaptation. Human locomotion is governed by the interplay among legged dynamics, morphology and neural control including spinal reflexes. It has been suggested that reflexes contribute to the changes in ankle joint dynamics that correspond to walking at different speeds. Here, we use a data-driven muscle–tendon model that produces estimates of the activation, force, length and velocity of the major muscles spanning the ankle to derive local feedback loops that may be critical in the control of those muscles during walking. This purely reflexive approach ignores sources of non-reflexive neural drive and does not necessarily reflect the biological control scheme, yet can still closely reproduce the muscle dynamics estimated from biological data. The resulting neuromuscular model was applied to control a powered ankle–foot prosthesis and tested by an amputee walking at three speeds. The controller produced speed-adaptive behaviour; net ankle work increased with walking speed, highlighting the benefits of applying neuromuscular principles in the control of adaptive prosthetic limbs. PMID:21502131

  13. Effect of Forest Walking on Autonomic Nervous System Activity in Middle-Aged Hypertensive Individuals: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chorong Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing attention on the therapeutic effects of the forest environment. However, evidence-based research that clarifies the physiological effects of the forest environment on hypertensive individuals is lacking. This study provides scientific evidence suggesting that a brief forest walk affects autonomic nervous system activity in middle-aged hypertensive individuals. Twenty participants (58.0 ± 10.6 years were instructed to walk predetermined courses in forest and urban environments (as control. Course length (17-min walk, walking speed, and energy expenditure were equal between the forest and urban environments to clarify the effects of each environment. Heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate were used to quantify physiological responses. The modified semantic differential method and Profile of Mood States were used to determine psychological responses. The natural logarithm of the high-frequency component of HRV was significantly higher and heart rate was significantly lower when participants walked in the forest than when they walked in the urban environment. The questionnaire results indicated that, compared with the urban environment, walking in the forest increased “comfortable”, “relaxed”, “natural” and “vigorous” feelings and decreased “tension-anxiety,” “depression,” “anxiety-hostility,” “fatigue” and “confusion”. A brief walk in the forest elicited physiological and psychological relaxation effects on middle-aged hypertensive individuals.

  14. First results about recovery of walking function in patients with intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness from the General Weakness Syndrome Therapy (GymNAST) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Mückel, Simone; Oehmichen, Frank; Pohl, Marcus

    2015-12-23

    To describe the time course of recovery of walking function and other activities of daily living in patients with intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired muscle weakness. This is a cohort study. We included critically ill patients with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Post-acute ICU and rehabilitation units in Germany. We measured walking function, muscle strength, activities in daily living, motor and cognitive function. We recruited 150 patients (30% female) who fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. The primary outcome recovery of walking function was achieved after a median of 28.5 days (IQR=45) after rehabilitation onset and after a median of 81.5 days (IQR=64) after onset of illness. Our final multivariate model for recovery of walking function included two clinical variables from baseline: the Functional Status Score ICU (adjusted HR=1.07 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.12) and the ability to reach forward in cm (adjusted HR=1.02 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.04). All secondary outcomes but not pain improved significantly in the first 8 weeks after study onset. We found good recovery of walking function for most patients and described the recovery of walking function of people with ICU-acquired muscle weakness. Sächsische Landesärztekammer EK-BR-32/13-1; DRKS00007181, German Register of Clinical Trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Walking in postpoliomyelitis syndrome: The relationships between time-scored tests, walking in daily life and perceived mobility problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.L.D. Horemans (Herwin); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); A. Beelen (Anita); H.J. Stam (Henk); F. Nollet (Frans)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare walking test results with walking in daily life, and to investigate the relationships between walking tests, walking activity in daily life, and perceived mobility problems in patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome. Subjects: Twenty-four ambulant patients with po

  16. Comparison of walking overground and in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN in individuals with and without transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gates Deanna H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to increased interest in treadmill gait training, recent research has focused on the similarities and differences between treadmill and overground walking. Most of these studies have tested healthy, young subjects rather than impaired populations that might benefit from such training. These studies also do not include optic flow, which may change how the individuals integrate sensory information when walking on a treadmill. This study compared overground walking to treadmill walking in a computer assisted virtual reality environment (CAREN in individuals with and without transtibial amputations (TTA. Methods Seven individuals with traumatic TTA and 27 unimpaired controls participated. Subjects walked overground and on a treadmill in a CAREN at a normalized speed. The CAREN applied optic flow at the same speed that the subject walked. Temporal-spatial parameters, full body kinematics, and kinematic variability were collected during all trials. Results Both subject groups decreased step time and control subjects decreased step length when walking in the CAREN. Differences in lower extremity kinematics were small (○ and did not exceed the minimal detectable change values for these measures. Control subjects exhibited decreased transverse and frontal plane range of motion of the pelvis and trunk when walking in the CAREN, while patients with TTA did not. Both groups exhibited increased step width variability during treadmill walking in the CAREN, but only minor changes in kinematic variability. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that treadmill training in a virtual environment should be similar enough to overground that changes should carry over. Caution should be made when comparing step width variability and step time results from studies utilizing a treadmill to those overground.

  17. Theoretical analysis of the state of balance in bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmani, Flavio; Park, Edward J

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis based on classic mechanical principles of balance of forces in bipedal walking. Theories on the state of balance have been proposed in the area of humanoid robotics and although the laws of classical mechanics are equivalent to both humans and humanoid robots, the resulting motion obtained with these theories is unnatural when compared to normal human gait. Humanoid robots are commonly controlled using the zero moment point (ZMP) with the condition that the ZMP cannot exit the foot-support area. This condition is derived from a physical model in which the biped must always walk under dynamically balanced conditions, making the centre of pressure (CoP) and the ZMP always coincident. On the contrary, humans follow a different strategy characterized by a 'controlled fall' at the end of the swing phase. In this paper, we present a thorough theoretical analysis of the state of balance and show that the ZMP can exit the support area, and its location is representative of the imbalance state characterized by the separation between the ZMP and the CoP. Since humans exhibit this behavior, we also present proof-of-concept results of a single subject walking on an instrumented treadmill at different speeds (from slow 0.7 m/s to fast 2.0 m/s walking with increments of 0.1 m/s) with the motion recorded using an optical motion tracking system. In order to evaluate the experimental results of this model, the coefficient of determination (R2) is used to correlate the measured ground reaction forces and the resultant of inertial and gravitational forces (anteroposterior R² = 0.93, mediolateral R² = 0.89, and vertical R² = 0.86) indicating that there is a high correlation between the measurements. The results suggest that the subject exhibits a complete dynamically balanced gait during slow speeds while experiencing a controlled fall (end of swing phase) with faster speeds. This is quantified with the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD

  18. Study of human walking patterns based on the parameter optimization of a passive dynamic walking robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xizhe; Liu, Xinyu; Zhu, Yanhe; Zhao, Jie

    2016-04-29

    The study of human walking patterns mainly focuses on how control affects walking because control schemes are considered to be dominant in human walking. This study proposes that not only fine control schemes but also optimized body segment parameters are responsible for humans' low-energy walking. A passive dynamic walker provides the possibility of analyzing the effect of parameters on walking efficiency because of its ability to walk without any control. Thus, a passive dynamic walking model with a relatively human-like structure was built, and a parameter optimization process based on the gait sensitivity norm was implemented to determine the optimal mechanical parameters by numerical simulation. The results were close to human body parameters, thus indicating that humans can walk under a passive pattern based on their body segment parameters. A quasi-passive walking prototype was built on the basis of the optimization results. Experiments showed that a passive robot with optimized parameters could walk on level ground with only a simple hip actuation. This result implies that humans can walk under a passive pattern based on their body segment parameters with only simple control strategy implying that humans can opt to walk instinctively under a passive pattern.

  19. Stable bipedal walking with a swing-leg protraction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhounsule, Pranav A; Zamani, Ali

    2017-01-25

    In bipedal locomotion, swing-leg protraction and retraction refer to the forward and backward motion, respectively, of the swing-leg before touchdown. Past studies have shown that swing-leg retraction strategy can lead to stable walking. We show that swing-leg protraction can also lead to stable walking. We use a simple 2D model of passive dynamic walking but with the addition of an actuator between the legs. We use the actuator to do full correction of the disturbance in a single step (a one-step dead-beat control). Specifically, for a given limit cycle we perturb the velocity at mid-stance. Then, we determine the foot placement strategy that allows the walker to return to the limit cycle in a single step. For a given limit cycle, we find that there is swing-leg protraction at shallow slopes and swing-leg retraction at steep slopes. As the limit cycle speed increases, the swing-leg protraction region increases. On close examination, we observe that the choice of swing-leg strategy is based on two opposing effects that determine the time from mid-stance to touchdown: the walker speed at mid-stance and the adjustment in the step length for one-step dead-beat control. When the walker speed dominates, the swing-leg retracts but when the step length dominates, the swing-leg protracts. This result suggests that swing-leg strategy for stable walking depends on the model parameters, the terrain, and the stability measure used for control. This novel finding has a clear implication in the development of controllers for robots, exoskeletons, and prosthetics and to understand stability in human gaits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Walking Robot Locomotion System Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova D.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is a brief analysis on the application and perspective of using the walking robots in different areas in practice. The most common characteristics of walking four legs robots are presented here. The specific features of the applied actuators in walking mechanisms are also shown in the article. The experience of Institute of Mechanics - BAS is illustrated in creation of Spiroid and Helicon1 gears and their assembly in actuation of studied robots. Loading on joints reductors of robot legs is modelled, when the geometrical and the walking parameters of the studied robot are preliminary defined. The obtained results are purposed for designing the control of the loading of reductor type Helicon in the legs of the robot, when it is experimentally tested.

  1. Localization of reinforced random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyze how reinforced random walks can eventually localize, i.e. only visit finitely many sites. After introducing vertex and edge self-interacting walks on a discrete graph in a general setting, and stating the main results and conjectures so far on the topic, we present martingale techniques that provide an alternative proof of the a.s. localization of vertex-reinforced random walks (VRRWs) on the integers on finitely many sites and, with positive probability, on five consecutive sites, initially proved by Pemantle and Volkov (1999). Next we introduce the continuous time-lines representation (sometimes called Rubin construction) and its martingale counterpart, and explain how it has been used to prove localization of some reinforced walks on one attracting edge. Then we show how a modified version of this construction enables one to propose a new short proof of the a.s. localization of VRRWs on five sites on Z.

  2. The immediate effects of robot-assistance on energy consumption and cardiorespiratory load during walking compared to walking without robot-assistance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefeber, Nina; Swinnen, Eva; Kerckhofs, Eric

    2017-10-01

    The integration of sufficient cardiovascular stress into robot-assisted gait (RAG) training could combine the benefits of both RAG and aerobic training. The aim was to summarize literature data on the immediate effects of RAG compared to walking without robot-assistance on metabolic-, cardiorespiratory- and fatigue-related parameters. PubMed and Web of Science were searched for eligible articles till February 2016. Means, SDs and significance values were extracted. Effect sizes were calculated. Fourteen studies were included, concerning 155 participants (85 healthy subjects, 39 stroke and 31 spinal cord injury patients), 9 robots (2 end-effectors, 1 treadmill-based and 6 wearable exoskeletons), and 7 outcome parameters (mostly oxygen consumption and heart rate). Overall, metabolic and cardiorespiratory parameters were lower during RAG compared to walking without robot-assistance (moderate to large effect sizes). In healthy subjects, when no body-weight support (BWS) was provided, RAG with an end-effector device was more energy demanding than walking overground (p > .05, large effect sizes). Generally, results suggest that RAG is less energy-consuming and cardiorespiratory stressful than walking without robot-assistance, but results depend on factors such as robot type, walking speed, BWS and effort. Additional research is needed to draw firm conclusions. Implications for Rehabilitation Awareness of the energy consumption and cardiorespiratory load of robot-assisted gait (RAG) training is important in the rehabilitation of (neurological) patients with impaired cardiorespiratory fitness and patients who are at risk of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, the integration of sufficient cardiometabolic stress in RAG training could combine the effects of both RAG and aerobic training. Energy consumption and cardiorespiratory load during walking with robot-assistance seems to depend on factors such as robot type, walking speed, body-weight support or amount of

  3. Wind plant capacity credit variations: A comparison of results using multiyear actual and simulated wind-speed data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter-annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

  4. Muscles Activity in the elderly with Balance Impairments in walking under Dual tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Azadian

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Each step during gait requires different attention demands that will affect muscles activity. The study of changes in the timing and intensity of the muscles activity in walking with dual task has received less attention from researchers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in electromyography patterns of gait with cognitive dual tasks in balance impaired elderly. Methods: Thirty older adults were recruited for this study. People were selected through berg balance test. Subjects walked 12-meters in two conditions, normal walking and walking with a cognitive dual task. Spatial-temporal kinematic parameters were recorded through the motion analysis and muscles activities were recorded through electromyography system. The data obtained was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA at a significant level of p< 0.05.  Results: The results showed that walking under dual tasks would decrease gait speed and increase stride time and stance time. Also muscle activity in Tibialis anterior and Vastus lateralis in stance-phase would decrease significantly in dual tasks as compared with single task (p< 0.05, but timing of muscle activity would not change in dual task conditions.  Conclusions: Based on the results, it can be argued that walking under a dual task can change spatial-temporal parameters and muscle activity in gait pattern in the elderly with balance impairment. One explanation could be that the decreased control of the central nervous system on muscle activity in stance phase due to the performing of a dual task.

  5. Correlates of time spent walking and cycling to and from work: baseline results from the commuting and health in Cambridge study

    OpenAIRE

    Panter, J; Griffin, S.; Jones, A; MacKett, R; Ogilvie, D

    2011-01-01

    Environmental perceptions and psychological measures appear to be associated with walking and cycling behaviour; however, their influence is still unclear. We assessed these associations using baseline data from a quasi-experimental cohort study of the effects of major transport infrastructural developments in Cambridge, UK.

  6. Differences in muscle activity and temporal step parameters between Lokomat guided walking and treadmill walking in post-stroke hemiparetic patients and healthy walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Anne M; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; den Otter, Rob

    2017-04-20

    The Lokomat is a robotic exoskeleton that can be used to train gait function in hemiparetic stroke. To purposefully employ the Lokomat for training, it is important to understand (1) how Lokomat guided walking affects muscle activity following stroke and how these effects differ between patients and healthy walkers, (2) how abnormalities in the muscle activity of patients are modulated through Lokomat guided gait, and (3) how temporal step characteristics of patients were modulated during Lokomat guided walking. Ten hemiparetic stroke patients (>3 months post-stroke) and ten healthy age-matched controls walked on the treadmill and in the Lokomat (guidance force 50%, no bodyweight support) at matched speeds (0.56 m/s). Electromyography was used to record the activity of Gluteus Medius, Biceps Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Medial Gastrocnemius and Tibialis Anterior, bilaterally in patients and of the dominant leg in healthy walkers. Pressure sensors placed in the footwear were used to determine relative durations of the first double support and the single support phases. Overall, Lokomat guided walking was associated with a general lowering of muscle activity compared to treadmill walking, in patients as well as healthy walkers. The nature of these effects differed between groups for specific muscles, in that reductions in patients were larger if muscles were overly active during treadmill walking (unaffected Biceps Femoris and Gluteus Medius, affected Biceps Femoris and Vastus Lateralis), and smaller if activity was already abnormally low (affected Medial Gastrocnemius). Also, Lokomat guided walking was associated with a decrease in asymmetry in the relative duration of the single support phase. In stroke patients, Lokomat guided walking results in a general reduction of muscle activity, that affects epochs of overactivity and epochs of reduced activity in a similar fashion. These findings should be taken into account when considering the clinical potential of the

  7. Foot pressure distribution during walking in young and old adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipsitz Lewis A

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of foot pressure distribution (FPD is clinically useful for evaluation of foot and gait pathologies. The effects of healthy aging on FPD during walking are not well known. This study evaluated FPD during normal walking in healthy young and elderly subjects. Methods We studied 9 young (30 ± 5.2 years, and 6 elderly subjects (68.7 ± 4.8 years. FPD was measured during normal walking speed using shoe insoles with 99 capacitive sensors. Measured parameters included gait phase characteristics, mean and maximum pressure and force, and relative load. Time-series measurements of each variable for all sensors were grouped into 9 anatomical masks. Results Elderly subjects had lower normalized maximum pressure for the medial and lateral calcaneal masks, and for all medial masks combined. In the medial calcaneus mask, the elderly group also had a lower absolute maximum and lower mean and normalized mean pressures and forces, compared to young subjects. Elderly subjects had lower maximum force and normalized maximum force and lower mean force and normalized mean forces in the medial masks as well. Conclusion FPD differences between the young and elderly groups were confined to the calcaneus and hallux regions and to the medial side of the foot. In elderly subjects, weight bearing on the lateral side of the foot during heel touch and toe-off phases may affect stability during walking.

  8. Properties of long quantum walks in one and two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Xue, Peng

    2015-12-01

    The quantum walk (QW) is the term given to a family of algorithms governing the evolution of a discrete quantum system and as such has a founding role in the study of quantum computation. We contribute to the investigation of QW phenomena by performing a detailed numerical study of discrete-time quantum walks. In one dimension (1D), we compute the structure of the probability distribution, which is not a smooth curve but shows oscillatory features on all length scales. By analyzing walks up to N = 1,000,000 steps, we discuss the scaling characteristics and limiting forms of the QW in both real and Fourier space. In 2D, with a view to ready experimental realization, we consider two types of QW, one based on a four-faced coin and the other on sequential flipping of a single two-faced coin. Both QWs may be generated using two two-faced coins, which in the first case are completely unentangled and in the second are maximally entangled. We draw on our 1D results to characterize the properties of both walks, demonstrating maximal speed-up and emerging semi-classical behavior in the maximally entangled QW.

  9. [Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sanpablo, Alberto Isaac; Hernández-Arenas, Claudia; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Quiñones-Uriostegui, Ivett; Alessi Montero, Aldo; Núñez-Carrera, Lidia; Boll-Woehrlen, Marie Catherine; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Familiarization to treadmill walking in unimpaired Parkinson's disease (PD) patients is assessed, across multiple treadmill walking sessions. Thirteen PD subjects were enrolled into the study (Eight were in a moderate stage of the disease, and 5 in an advanced stage). PD subjects attended a progressive program consisting of 12 sessions of 20 min. Walking speed, cadence, step length and coefficient of variation were assessed. ANOVA test were used to evaluate progression of disease and time influence over familiarization. PD Subjects baseline characteristics did not differ significantly between both groups and typical dependencies over progression of disease and velocity were found for cadence, step length and coefficient of variation. However, we showed that some PD subjects may require longer familiarization times and that familiarization is an adaptation process which involves parameters as velocity, cadence and gait stability. A better definition of familiarization to treadmill is needed since some parameters such as step length does not change significantly while others such as cadence, coefficient of variation and intraclass correlation coefficient does. Therefore familiarization to treadmill walking should remain on measures of velocity, cadence, reliability and variability. However, a bigger sample size is needed in order to improve the results of the present study.

  10. Law of large numbers for a class of random walks in dynamic random environments

    CERN Document Server

    Avena, L; Redig, F

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider a class of one-dimensional interacting particle systems in equilibrium, constituting a dynamic random environment, together with a nearest-neighbor random walk that on occupied/vacant sites has a local drift to the right/left. We adapt a regeneration-time argument originally developed by Comets and Zeitouni for static random environments to prove that, under a space-time mixing property for the dynamic random environment called cone-mixing, the random walk has an a.s. constant global speed. In addition, we show that if the dynamic random environment is exponentially mixing in space-time and the local drifts are small, then the global speed can be written as a power series in the size of the local drifts. From the first term in this series the sign of the global speed can be read off. The results can be easily extended to higher dimensions.

  11. Lower limb joint forces during walking on the level and slopes at different inclinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Nathalie; Schwameder, Hermann

    2016-03-01

    Sloped walking is associated with an increase of lower extremity joint loading compared to level walking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse lower limb joint compression forces as well as tibiofemoral joint shear forces during sloped walking at different inclinations. Eighteen healthy male participants (age: 27.0 ± 4.7 years, height: 1.80 ± 0.05 m, mass: 74.5 ± 8.2 kg) were asked to walk at a pre-set speed of 1.1m/s on a ramp (6 m × 1.5 m) at the slopes of -18°, -12°, -6°, 0°, 6°, 12° and 18°. Kinematic data were captured with a twelve-camera motion capture system (Vicon). Kinetic data were recorded with two force plates (AMTI) imbedded into a ramp. A musculoskeletal model (AnyBody) was used to compute lower limb joint forces. Results showed that downhill walking led to significantly increased hip, tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joint compression forces (pjoint compression forces (pjoint compression forces with increasing inclination (pligament could not be supported in the current study, since anterior tibiofemoral joint shear forces did not increase with the gradient. Due to diverse tibiofemoral joint shear force patterns in the literature, results should be treated with caution in general. Finally, lower limb joint force analyses provided more insight in the structure loading conditions during sloped walking than joint moment analyses.

  12. The effect of foot progression angle on knee joint compression force during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblauch, Henrik; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Henriksen, Marius

    2013-06-01

    It is unclear how rotations of the lower limb affect the knee joint compression forces during walking. Increases in the frontal plane knee moment have been reported when walking with internally rotated feet and a decrease when walking with externally rotated feet. The aim of this study was to investigate the knee joint compressive forces during walking with internal, external and normal foot rotation and to determine if the frontal plane knee joint moment is an adequate surrogate for the compression forces in the medial and lateral knee joint compartments under such gait modifications. Ten healthy males walked at a fixed speed of 4.5 km/h under three conditions: Normal walking, internally rotated and externally rotated. All gait trials were recorded by six infrared cameras. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. The results revealed that the medial knee joint compartment compression force increased during external foot rotation and the lateral knee joint compartment compression force increased during internal foot rotation. The increases in joint loads may be a result of increased knee flexion angles. Further, these data suggest that the frontal plane knee joint moment is not a valid surrogate measure for knee joint compression forces but rather indicates the medial- to-lateral load distribution.

  13. Numerical analysis of a pedestrian to car collision: Effect of variations in walk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špička J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the modelling of car to pedestrian crash scenario. Virtual hybrid human body model VIRTHUMAN as well as a simplified model of car chassis is modelled under Virtual Performance Solution software. The main idea of the work is the investigation and sensitivity analysis of various initial conditions of the pedestrian during frontal car crash scenario, such as position of the extremities due to different step phases or turning of the pedestrian around his own axis. The experimental data of human gait measurement are used so that one human step is divided into 9 phases to capture the effect of walk when the pedestrian crosses a road. Consequently, the influence of different initial conditions on the kinematics, dynamics of the collision together with injury prediction of pedestrian is discussed. Moreover, the effect of walk is taken into account within translational velocities of the full human body and rotational velocities of the extremities. The trend of the injury prediction for varying initial conditions is monitored. The configurations with zero and non-zero initial velocities are compared with each other, in order to study the effect of walking speed of the pedestrian. Note that only the average walking speed is considered. On the basis of the achieved results, the importance or redundancy of modelling the walking motion and the consideration of different step phases in the car-pedestrian accident can be examined.

  14. Dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in persons with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; Geurts, A C H; Weerdesteyn, V

    2015-09-01

    Patients with FSHD suffer from progressive skeletal muscle weakness, which is associated with an elevated fall risk. To obtain insight into fall mechanisms in this patient group, we aimed to assess dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in patients at different disease stages. Ten patients with at least some lower extremity weakness were included, of whom six were classified as moderately affected and four as mildly affected. Ten healthy controls were also included. Level walking at comfortable speed was assessed, as well as crossing a 10 cm high wooden obstacle. We assessed forward and lateral dynamic stability, as well as spatiotemporal and kinematics variables. During level walking, the moderately affected group demonstrated a lower walking speed, which was accompanied by longer step times and smaller step lengths, yet dynamic stability was unaffected. When crossing the obstacle, however, the moderately affected patients demonstrated reduced forward stability margins during the trailing step, which was accompanied by an increased toe clearance and greater trunk and hip flexion. This suggests that during level walking, the patients effectively utilized compensatory strategies for maintaining dynamic stability, but that the moderately affected group lacked the capacity to fully compensate for the greater stability demands imposed by obstacle crossing, rendering them unable to maintain optimal stability levels. The present results highlight the difficulties that FSHD patients experience in performing this common activity of daily living and may help explain their propensity to fall in the forward direction.

  15. Law of large numbers for non-elliptic random walks in dynamic random environments

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den; Sidoravicius, Vladas

    2011-01-01

    We prove a law of large numbers for a class of $\\Z^d$-valued random walks in dynamic random environments, including \\emph{non-elliptic} examples. We assume that the random environment has a mixing property called \\emph{conditional cone-mixing} and that the random walk tends to stay inside space-time cones. The proof is based on a generalization of the regeneration scheme developed by Comets and Zeitouni for static random environments, which was adapted by Avena, den Hollander and Redig to dynamic random environments. We exhibit some one-dimensional examples to which our result applies. In some cases, the sign of the speed can be determined.

  16. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  17. Steady and transient coordination structures of walking and running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, C. J. C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Huys, R.; Beek, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    We studied multisegmental coordination and stride characteristics in nine participants while walking and running on a treadmill. The study's main aim was to evaluate the coordination patterns of walking and running and their variance as a function of locomotion speed, with a specific focus on gait t

  18. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  19. Influence of the swing ankle angle on walking stability for a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xizhe Zang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To achieve high walking stability for a passive dynamic walking robot is not easy. In this article, we aim to investigate whether the walking performance for a passive dynamic walking robot can be improved by just simply changing the swing ankle angle before impact. To validate this idea, a passive bipedal walking model with two straight legs, two flat feet, a hip joint, and two ankle joints was built in this study. The walking dynamics that contains double stance phase was derived. By numerical simulation of the walking in MATLAB, we found that the walking performance can be adjusted effectively by only simply changing the swing ankle angle before impact. A bigger swing ankle angle in a reasonable range will lead to a higher walking stability and a lower initial walking speed of the next step. A bigger swing ankle angle before impact leads to a bigger amount of energy lost during impact for the quasi-passive dynamic walking robot which will influence the walking stability of the next step.

  20. On alternating quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseva, Jenia; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2017-03-01

    We study an inhomogeneous quantum walk on a line that evolves according to alternating coins, each a rotation matrix. For the quantum walk with the coin alternating between clockwise and counterclockwise rotations by the same angle, we derive a closed form solution for the propagation of probabilities, and provide its asymptotic approximation via the method of stationary phase. Finally, we observe that for a x03c0;/4 angle, this alternating rotation walk will replicate the renown Hadamard walk.

  1. Validation of satellite SAR offshore wind speed maps to in-situ data, microscale and mesoscale model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, C.B.; Astrup, Poul; Barthelmie, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    planning of offshore wind farms. The report describes the validation analysis in detail for three sites in Denmark, Italy and Egypt. The site in Norway is analyzed by the Nansen Environmental and Remote SensingCentre (NERSC). Wind speed maps and wind direction maps from Earth Observation data recorded...... band in which the SAR wind speed observations have a strong negative bias. The bathymetry of Horns Rev combined with tidal currents give rise to bias in the SAR wind speed maps near areas of shallow, complex bottom topography in some cases. Atotal of 16 cases were analyzed for Horns Rev. For Maddalena...

  2. The work of walking: a calorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, P; Saris, W H; Schoffelen, P F; Van Ingen Schenau, G J; Ten Hoor, F

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were designed to test the traditional assumption that during level walking all of the energy from oxidation of fuel appears as heat and no work is done. Work is force expressed through distance, or energy transferred from a man to the environment, but not as heat. While wearing a suit calorimeter in a respiration chamber, five women and five men walked for 70 to 90 min on a level treadmill at 2.5, 4.6, and 6.7 km.h-1 and pedalled a cycle ergometer for 70 to 90 min against 53 and 92 W loads. They also walked with a weighted backpack and against a horizontal load. During cycling, energy from fuel matched heat loss plus the power measured by the ergometer. During walking, however, energy from fuel exceeded that which appeared as heat, meaning that work was done. The power increased with walking speed; values were 14, 29, and 63 W, which represented 11, 12, and 13% of the incremental cost of fuel above the resting level. Vertical and horizontal loads increased the fuel cost and heat loss of walking but did not alter the power output. This work energy did not re-appear as thermal energy during 18 h of recovery. The most likely explanation of the work done is in the inter-action between the foot and the ground, such as compressing the heel of the shoe and bending the sole. We conclude that work is done in level walking.

  3. Oral amino acids in elderly subjects: effect on myocardial function and walking capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Roldano; Piccolotto, Roberto; Negut, Christian; Tiengo, Antonio; Avogaro, Angelo

    2005-01-01

    With advancing age the risk of developing serious nutritional deficiencies increases, and disturbances to the actions of insulin and insulin-like growth factor, coupled with reduced protein/amino acid (AA) intake, impair protein synthesis in muscles. To assess the effects of administering oral AAs on walking capacity and perceived walking impairment, isometric muscular strength, and myocardial function at rest and during isometric exercise. One hundred elderly subjects (aged >65 years) with reduced physical activity were randomized to receive an oral AA mixture (12 g/day) or placebo for 3 months. At baseline and after 3 months of therapy we assessed physical capacity with the 6-min walk test, and perceived physical impairment with the walking impairment questionnaire (WIQ); we assessed maximal isometric muscular strength of the right hand with a handgrip dynamometer, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) using quantitative two-dimensional echocardiography at rest and during acute overload. Three months of AA treatment resulted in significant increases in 6-min walk distance (268.8 +/- 34.9 vs. 212 +/- 40 m, p speed: 72.2 +/- 14.4 vs. 52.8 +/- 12%, p stairs: 98.2 +/- 24 vs. 72.4 +/- 22%, p walking capacity. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Accelerometry-enabled measurement of walking performance with a robotic exoskeleton: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonini, Luca; Shawen, Nicholas; Scanlan, Kathleen; Rymer, William Z; Kording, Konrad P; Jayaraman, Arun

    2016-03-31

    Clinical scores for evaluating walking skills with lower limb exoskeletons are often based on a single variable, such as distance walked or speed, even in cases where a host of features are measured. We investigated how to combine multiple features such that the resulting score has high discriminatory power, in particular with few patients. A new score is introduced that allows quantifying the walking ability of patients with spinal cord injury when using a powered exoskeleton. Four spinal cord injury patients were trained to walk over ground with the ReWalk™ exoskeleton. Body accelerations during use of the device were recorded by a wearable accelerometer and 4 features to evaluate walking skills were computed. The new score is the Gaussian naïve Bayes surprise, which evaluates patients relative to the features' distribution measured in 7 expert users of the ReWalk™. We compared our score based on all the features with a standard outcome measure, which is based on number of steps only. All 4 patients improved over the course of training, as their scores trended towards the expert users' scores. The combined score (Gaussian naïve surprise) was considerably more discriminative than the one using only walked distance (steps). At the end of training, 3 out of 4 patients were significantly different from the experts, according to the combined score (p exoskeleton. Testing this approach with other features and more subjects remains as future work.

  5. Effect of carbon-composite knee-ankle-foot orthoses on walking efficiency and gait in former polio patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Merel-Anne; Beelen, Anita; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Harlaar, Jaap; Nollet, Frans

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the effects of total-contact fitted carbon-composite knee-ankle-foot orthoses (KAFOs) on energy cost of walking in patients with former polio who normally wear a conventional leather/metal KAFO or plastic/metal KAFO. A prospective uncontrolled study with a multiple baseline and follow-up design. Follow-up measurements continued until 26 weeks after intervention. Twenty adults with polio residuals (mean age 55 years). Each participant received a new carbon-composite KAFO, fitted according to a total-contact principle, which resulted in a rigid, lightweight and well-fitting KAFO. Energy cost of walking, walking speed, biomechanics of gait, physical functioning and patient satisfaction. The energy cost decreased significantly, by 8%, compared with the original KAFO. Furthermore, the incremention energy cost during walking with the carbon-composite KAFO was reduced by 18% towards normative values. An improvement in knee flexion, forward excursion of the centre of pressure, peak ankle moment, and timing of peak ankle power were significantly associated with the decrease in energy cost. Walking speed and physical functioning remained unchanged. In patients with former polio, carbon-composite KAFOs are superior to conventional leather/metal and plastic/metal KAFOs with respect to improving walking efficiency and gait, and are therefore important in reducing overuse and maintaining functional abilities in polio survivors.

  6. Walk-Startup of a Two-Legged Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babković, Kalman; Nagy, László; Krklješ, Damir; Borovac, Branislav

    There is a growing interest towards humanoid robots. One of their most important characteristic is the two-legged motion - walk. Starting and stopping of humanoid robots introduce substantial delays. In this paper, the goal is to explore the possibility of using a short unbalanced state of the biped robot to quickly gain speed and achieve the steady state velocity during a period shorter than half of the single support phase. The proposed method is verified by simulation. Maintainig a steady state, balanced gait is not considered in this paper.

  7. Random Walk Method for Potential Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    A local Random Walk Method (RWM) for potential problems governed by Lapalace's and Paragon's equations is developed for two- and three-dimensional problems. The RWM is implemented and demonstrated in a multiprocessor parallel environment on a Beowulf cluster of computers. A speed gain of 16 is achieved as the number of processors is increased from 1 to 23.

  8. Full revivals in 2D quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanak, M; Jex, I [Department of Physics, FJFI CVUT v Praze, Brehova 7, 115 19 Praha 1-Stare Mesto (Czech Republic); Kollar, B; Kiss, T, E-mail: martin.stefanak@fjfi.cvut.c [Department of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege M. u. 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-09-01

    Recurrence of a random walk is described by the Polya number. For quantum walks, recurrence is understood as the return of the walker to the origin, rather than the full revival of its quantum state. Localization for two-dimensional quantum walks is known to exist in the sense of non-vanishing probability distribution in the asymptotic limit. We show, on the example of the 2D Grover walk, that one can exploit the effect of localization to construct stationary solutions. Moreover, we find full revivals of a quantum state with a period of two steps. We prove that there cannot be longer cycles for a four-state quantum walk. Stationary states and revivals result from interference, which has no counterpart in classical random walks.

  9. Two- and 6-minute walk tests assess walking capability equally in neuromuscular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Kahr; Knak, Kirsten Lykke; Witting, Nanna;

    2016-01-01

    to participate on 2 test days, each consisting of 1 2MWT and 1 6MWT separated by a minimum 30-minute period of rest. The order of the walk tests was randomly assigned via sealed envelopes. A group of 38 healthy controls completed 1 6MWT. RESULTS: The mean walking distance for the 2MWT was 142.8 meters......OBJECTIVE: This methodologic study investigates if the 2-minute walk test (2MWT) can be a valid alternative to the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to describe walking capability in patients with neuromuscular diseases. METHODS: Patients (n = 115) with different neuromuscular diseases were invited...... and for the 6MWT 405.3 meters. The distance walked in the 2MWT was highly correlated to the distance walked in the 6MWT (r = 0.99, p minute in the 6MWT, both among patients and healthy controls, which was not evident in the 2MWT...

  10. How does wearable robotic exoskeleton affect overground walking performance measured with the 10-m and six-minute walk tests after a basic locomotor training in healthy individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Dany H; Cunha, Jérémie Da; Boyer-Delestre, Mael; Bosquet, Laurent; Duclos, Cyril

    2017-08-26

    It is still unknown to what extent overground walking with a WRE is equivalent to natural overground walking without a WRE. Hence, the interpretability of the 10-m (10MWT) and six-minute (6MWT) walk tests during overground walking with a WRE against reference values collected during natural overground walking without a WRE is challenging. This study aimed to 1) compare walking performance across three different overground walking conditions: natural walking without a WRE, walking with a WRE providing minimal assistance (active walking), and walking with a WRE proving complete assistance (passive walking) and 2) assess the association and the agreement between the 10MWT and the 6MWT during passive and active walking with a WRE. Seventeen healthy individuals who underwent basic locomotor training with a WRE performed the 10MWT (preferred and maximal speeds) and the 6MWT under the three conditions. For the 10MWT, the speed progressively and significantly decreased from natural walking without a WRE (preferred: 1.40±0.18m/s; maximal: 2.16±0.19m/s), to active walking with a WRE (preferred: 0.48±0.10m/s; maximal: 0.61±0.14m/s), and to passive walking with a WRE (preferred: 0.38±0.09m/s; maximal: 0.42±0.10m/s). For the 6MWT, total distances decreased from walking without a WRE (609±53.9m), to active walking with a WRE (196.6±42.6m), and to passive walking with a WRE (144.3±33.3m). The 10MWT and 6MWT provide distinct information and can't be used interchangeably to document speed only during active walking with the WRE. Speed and distance drastically decrease during active and, even more so, passive walking with the WRE in comparison to walking without a WRE. Selection of walking tests should depend on the level of assistance provided by the WRE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerobic treadmill plus Bobath walking training improves walking in subacute stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, H-J; Mach, H; Werner, C; Hesse, S

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of aerobic treadmill plus Bobath walking training in subacute stroke survivors compared with Bobath walking training alone. Randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation unit. Fifty patients, first-time supratentorial stroke, stroke interval less than six weeks, Barthel Index (0-100) from 50 to 80, able to walk a minimum distance of 12 m with either intermittent help or stand-by while walking, cardiovascular stable, minimum 50 W in the bicycle ergometry, randomly allocated to two groups, A and B. Group A 30 min of treadmill training, harness secured and minimally supported according to patients' needs, and 30 min of physiotherapy, every workday for six weeks, speed and inclination of the treadmill were adjusted to achieve a heart rate of HR: (Hrmax-HRrest)*0.6+HRrest; in group B 60 min of daily physiotherapy for six weeks. Primary outcome variables were the absolute improvement of walking velocity (m/s) and capacity (m), secondary were gross motor function including walking ability (score out of 13) and walking quality (score out of 41), blindly assessed before and after the intervention, and at follow-up three months later. Patients tolerated the aerobic training well with no side-effects, significantly greater improvement of walking velocity and capacity both at study end (p =0.001 versus p =0.002) and at follow-up (p Bobath walking training in moderately affected stroke patients was better than Bobath walking training alone with respect to the improvement of walking velocity and capacity. The treatment approach is recommended in patients meeting the inclusion criteria. A multicentre trial should follow to strengthen the evidence.

  12. Cardiovascular Responses Associated with Daily Walking in Subacute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K. Prajapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of regaining independent ambulation after stroke, the amount of daily walking completed during in-patient rehabilitation is low. The purpose of this study is to determine if (1 walking-related heart rate responses reached the minimum intensity necessary for therapeutic aerobic exercise (40%–60% heart rate reserve or (2 heart rate responses during bouts of walking revealed excessive workload that may limit walking (>80% heart rate reserve. Eight individuals with subacute stroke attending in-patient rehabilitation were recruited. Participants wore heart rate monitors and accelerometers during a typical rehabilitation day. Walking-related changes in heart rate and walking bout duration were determined. Patients did not meet the minimum cumulative requirements of walking intensity (>40% heart rate reserve and duration (>10 minutes continuously necessary for cardiorespiratory benefit. Only one patient exceeded 80% heart rate reserve. The absence of significant increases in heart rate associated with walking reveals that patients chose to walk at speeds well below a level that has meaningful cardiorespiratory health benefits. Additionally, cardiorespiratory workload is unlikely to limit participation in walking. Measurement of heart rate and walking during in-patient rehabilitation may be a useful approach to encourage patients to increase the overall physical activity and to help facilitate recovery.

  13. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  14. Relation Between Aerobic Capacity and Walking Ability in Older Adults With a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Faber, Willemijn X.; de Haan, Arnold; Houdijk, Han

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the relative aerobic load, walking speed, and walking economy of older adults with a lower-limb prosthesis, and to predict the effect of an increased aerobic capacity on their walking ability. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Human motion laboratory at a rehabilitation cent

  15. Relation Between Aerobic Capacity and Walking Ability in Older Adults With a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Faber, Willemijn X.; de Haan, Arnold; Houdijk, Han

    Objectives: To determine the relative aerobic load, walking speed, and walking economy of older adults with a lower-limb prosthesis, and to predict the effect of an increased aerobic capacity on their walking ability. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Human motion laboratory at a rehabilitation

  16. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  17. Does perceptual-motor calibration generalize across two different forms of locomotion? Investigations of walking and wheelchairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Kunz

    Full Text Available The relationship between biomechanical action and perception of self-motion during walking is typically consistent and well-learned but also adaptable. This perceptual-motor coupling can be recalibrated by creating a mismatch between the visual information for self-motion and walking speed. Perceptual-motor recalibration of locomotion has been demonstrated through effects on subsequent walking without vision, showing that learned perceptual-motor coupling influences a dynamic representation of one's spatial position during walking. Our present studies test whether recalibration of wheelchair locomotion, a novel form of locomotion for typically walking individuals, similarly influences subsequent wheelchair locomotion. Furthermore, we test whether adaptation to the pairing of visual information for self-motion during one form of locomotion transfers to a different locomotion modality. We find strong effects of perceptual-motor recalibration for matched locomotion modalities--walking/walking and wheeling/wheeling. Transfer across incongruent locomotion modalities showed weak recalibration effects. The results have implications both for theories of perceptual-motor calibration mechanisms and their effects on spatial orientation, as well as for practical applications in training and rehabilitation.

  18. 烧结机磁力密封中的磁场与台车移动速度的耦合研究%Research on Coupling of Magnetic Field of Magnetic Sealand Walking Speed of Trolley in Sintering Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凌燕; 于旭光; 杨九霄; 王俊帅

    2014-01-01

    To solve the problem of air leakage between the sintering machine trolley and the air box , the coupling law of magnetic field of magnetic seal on sintering machine and trolley ’ s speed is studied .A set of sim-ulated device is applied , which includes moving part , fixed part, and a variable gap between them .The magnet-ic field source is set in the fixed part .Three kinds of magnetic media are put in the gap and their motion states are observed.The results show that when the moving part moves with a linear velocity of 0.79~2.12 meter per second , the magnetic media is divided into two layers , which are the moving layer and the fixed layer .The lay-ered interface are associated with many factors such as the strength of the magnetic field in the gap , the moving speed of the moving part , the size of the gap and the characteristics of the magnetic medium .It reveals the cou-pling law of the magnetic medium ’ s magnetic properties and speed which is marked by the “thickness of moving layer ” in the magnetic medium having function relationship with the above four factors .%为了解决烧结机台车与风箱之间的漏风问题,研究了烧结机磁力密封中的磁场与台车移动速度的耦合规律。在模拟装置上,设置了移动副和含磁场源的固定副,在可变的二者间隙中分别放入3种磁介质并观察其运动状态。结果表明:移动副以0.79~2.12 m/min的线速度移动时,磁介质分为移动层和固定层两层;分层面与间隙中的磁场强度、移动副移动速度、间隙大小以及磁介质的特性等因素有关。揭示了以“移动层厚度”为标志,与以上四因素具有函数关系的磁介质中“磁”与“速度”的耦合规律。

  19. The mechanics of walking in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagna, G A; Franzetti, P; Fuchimoto, T

    1983-10-01

    The work done at each step, during level walking at a constant average speed, to lift the centre of mass of the body, to accelerate it forward, and to increase the sum of both gravitational potential and kinetic energies, has been measured at various speeds on children of 2-12 years of age, with the same technique used previously for adults (Cavagna, 1975; Cavagna, Thys & Zamboni, 1976). The pendulum-like transfer between potential and kinetic energies (Cavagna et al. 1976) reaches a maximum at the speed at which the weight-specific work to move the centre of mass a given distance is at a minimum ('optimal' speed). This speed is about 2 X 8 km/hr at 2 years of age and increases progressively with age up to 5 km/hr at 12 years of age and in adults. The speed freely chosen during steady walking at the different ages is similar to this 'optimal' speed. At the 'optimal' speed, the time of single contact (time of swing) is in good agreement with that predicted, for the same stature, by a ballistic walking model assuming a minimum of muscular work (Mochon & McMahon, 1980). Above the 'optimal' speed, the recovery of mechanical energy through the potential-kinetic energy transfer decreases. This decrease is greater the younger the subject. A reduction of this recovery implies a greater amount of work to be supplied by muscles: at 4 X 5 km/hr the weight-specific muscular power necessary to move the centre of mass is 2 X 3 times greater in a 2-year-old child than in an adult.

  20. Speed, accuracy, and confidence in Google, Ovid, PubMed, and UpToDate: results of a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Robert H; Poiro, Nathan C; Scalzo, David C; Nemergut, Edward C

    2010-08-01

    The explosion of biomedical information has led to an 'information paradox'-the volume of biomedical information available has made it increasingly difficult to find relevant information when needed. It is thus increasingly critical for physicians to acquire a working knowledge of biomedical informatics. To evaluate four search tools commonly used to answer clinical questions, in terms of accuracy, speed, and user confidence. From December 2008 to June 2009, medical students, resident physicians, and attending physicians at the authors' institution were asked to answer a set of four anaesthesia and/or critical care based clinical questions, within 5 min, using Google, Ovid, PubMed, or UpToDate (only one search tool per question). At the end of each search, participants rated their results on a four point confidence scale. One to 3 weeks after answering the initial four questions, users were randomised to one of the four search tools, and asked to answer eight questions, four of which were repeated. The primary outcome was defined as a correct answer with the highest level of confidence. Google was the most popular search tool. Users of Google and UpToDate were more likely than users of PubMed to answer questions correctly. Subjects had the most confidence in UpToDate. Searches with Google and UpToDate were faster than searches with PubMed or Ovid. Non-Medline based search tools are not inferior to Medline based search tools for purposes of answering evidence based anaesthesia and critical care questions.

  1. Myoelectric walking mode classification for transtibial amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jason D; Beazer, Mahyo Seyedali; Hahn, Michael E

    2013-10-01

    Myoelectric control algorithms have the potential to detect an amputee's motion intent and allow the prosthetic to adapt to changes in walking mode. The development of a myoelectric walking mode classifier for transtibial amputees is outlined. Myoelectric signals from four muscles (tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), vastus lateralis, and biceps femoris) were recorded for five nonamputee subjects and five transtibial amputees over a variety of walking modes: level ground at three speeds, ramp ascent/descent, and stair ascent/descent. These signals were decomposed into relevant features (mean absolute value, variance, wavelength, number of slope sign changes, number of zero crossings) over three subwindows from the gait cycle and used to test the ability of classification algorithms for transtibial amputees using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. Detection of all seven walking modes had an accuracy of 97.9% for the amputee group and 94.7% for the nonamputee group. Misclassifications occurred most frequently between different walking speeds due to the similar nature of the gait pattern. Stair ascent/descent had the best classification accuracy with 99.8% for the amputee group and 100.0% for the nonamputee group. Stability of the developed classifier was explored using an electrode shift disturbance for each muscle. Shifting the electrode placement of the MG had the most pronounced effect on the classification accuracy for both samples. No increase in classification accuracy was observed when using SVM compared to LDA for the current dataset.

  2. Treadmill training improves overground walking economy in Parkinson's disease: a randomized, controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel Angel; Sanchez, Jose Andres; Bello, Olalla; Lopez-Alonso, Virginia; Márquez, Gonzalo; Morenilla, Luis; Castro, Xabier; Giraldez, Manolo; Santos-García, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Gait disturbances are one of the principal and most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, walking economy is impaired in PD patients and could contribute to excess fatigue in this population. An important number of studies have shown that treadmill training can improve kinematic parameters in PD patients. However, the effects of treadmill and overground walking on the walking economy remain unknown. The goal of this study was to explore the walking economy changes in response to a treadmill and an overground training program, as well as the differences in the walking economy during treadmill and overground walking. Twenty-two mild PD patients were randomly assigned to a treadmill or overground training group. The training program consisted of 5 weeks (3 sessions/week). We evaluated the energy expenditure of overground walking, before and after each of the training programs. The energy expenditure of treadmill walking (before the program) was also evaluated. The treadmill, but not the overground training program, lead to an improvement in the walking economy (the rate of oxygen consumed per distance during overground walking at a preferred speed) in PD patients. In addition, walking on a treadmill required more energy expenditure compared with overground walking at the same speed. This study provides evidence that in mild PD patients, treadmill training is more beneficial compared with that of walking overground, leading to a greater improvement in the walking economy. This finding is of clinical importance for the therapeutic administration of exercise in PD.

  3. Continuity and anomalous fluctuations in random walks in dynamic random environments: numerics, phase diagrams and conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Avena, L

    2012-01-01

    We perform simulations for one dimensional continuous-time random walks in two dynamic random environments with fast (independent spin-flips) and slow (simple symmetric exclusion) decay of space-time correlations, respectively. We focus on the asymptotic speeds and the scaling limits of such random walks. We observe different behaviors depending on the dynamics of the underlying random environment and the ratio between the jump rate of the random walk and the one of the environment. We compare our data with well known results for static random environment. We observe that the non-diffusive regime known so far only for the static case can occur in the dynamic setup too. Such anomalous fluctuations emerge in a new phase diagram. Further we discuss possible consequences for general static and dynamic random environments.

  4. Human Walking Pattern Recognition Based on KPCA and SVM with Ground Reflex Pressure Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqin Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Algorithms based on the ground reflex pressure (GRF signal obtained from a pair of sensing shoes for human walking pattern recognition were investigated. The dimensionality reduction algorithms based on principal component analysis (PCA and kernel principal component analysis (KPCA for walking pattern data compression were studied in order to obtain higher recognition speed. Classifiers based on support vector machine (SVM, SVM-PCA, and SVM-KPCA were designed, and the classification performances of these three kinds of algorithms were compared using data collected from a person who was wearing the sensing shoes. Experimental results showed that the algorithm fusing SVM and KPCA had better recognition performance than the other two methods. Experimental outcomes also confirmed that the sensing shoes developed in this paper can be employed for automatically recognizing human walking pattern in unlimited environments which demonstrated the potential application in the control of exoskeleton robots.

  5. A pilot clinical trial on a Variable Automated Speed and Sensing Treadmill (VASST for hemiparetic gait rehabilitation in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eChua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Impairments in walking speed and quantity are common mobility-related problems after stroke. Treadmill training is a useful and accepted method to improve endurance and gait speed. Standard treadmills currently lack variable training speed and automated safe speed progression, thus risking backward displacement and falls. A Variable Automated Speed and Sensing Treadmill (VASST was thus developed and tested on chronic stroke subjects in a supervised exercise programme. Materials and MethodsAn open label study with assessor blinding was conducted in 10 community-dwelling chronic hemiplegics who could ambulate at least 0.1m/s for >150 meters with contact guard or supervision. Interventions included physiotherapist-supervised training on VASST for 60 minutes 3 times per week for 4 weeks (total 12 hours. Outcome measures of gait speed, quantity, balance and adverse events were assessed at 0, 2, 4 and 8 weeks.Results Altogether 10 subjects (8 males, mean age 55.5 years, 2.1 years poststroke completed VASST training. Mean 10-meter walk test speed was 0.69m/s (SD 0.29 and mean 6-minute walk test distance was 178.3m (84.0. After 4 weeks of training, 70% had significant positive gains in gait speed (0.06 m/s SD 0.08m/s, P =0.037; and 90% improved in walking distance. (54.3m, SD 30.9m, P = 0.005. Both gains maintained at week 8. (0.12 m/s SD 0.1, P = 0.01; 56.0m, SD 31.8, P = 0.005. There were no adverse events.Discussion and conclusion This preliminary study demonstrates the initial feasibility and short-term efficacy of VASST for walking speed and distance for chronic stroke with hemiplegia.

  6. Levy Walks Suboptimal under Predation Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato S Abe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A key challenge in movement ecology is to understand how animals move in nature. Previous studies have predicted that animals should perform a special class of random walks, called Lévy walk, to obtain more targets. However, some empirical studies did not support this hypothesis, and the relationship between search strategy and ecological factors is still unclear. We focused on ecological factors, such as predation risk, and analyzed whether Lévy walk may not be favored. It was remarkable that the ecological factors often altered an optimal search strategy from Lévy walk to Brownian walk, depending on the speed of the predator's movement, density of predators, etc. This occurred because higher target encounter rates simultaneously led searchers to higher predation risks. Our findings indicate that animals may not perform Lévy walks often, and we suggest that it is crucial to consider the ecological context for evaluating the search strategy performed by animals in the field.

  7. Random-walk enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  8. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  9. Random-walk enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  10. Speed estimation from a tri-axial accelerometer using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yoonseon; Shin, Seungchul; Kim, Seunghwan; Lee, Doheon; Lee, Kwang H

    2007-01-01

    We propose a speed estimation method with human body accelerations measured on the chest by a tri-axial accelerometer. To estimate the speed we segmented the acceleration signal into strides measuring stride time, and applied two neural networks into the patterns parameterized from each stride calculating stride length. The first neural network determines whether the subject walks or runs, and the second neural network with different node interactions according to the subject's status estimates stride length. Walking or running speed is calculated with the estimated stride length divided by the measured stride time. The neural networks were trained by patterns obtained from 15 subjects and then validated by 2 untrained subjects' patterns. The result shows good agreement between actual and estimated speeds presenting the linear correlation coefficient r=0.9874. We also applied the method to the real field and track data.

  11. Meaningful improvement in gait speed in hip fracture recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Dawn E; Hicks, Gregory E; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William; Miller, Ram; Craik, Rebecca L; Mangione, Kathleen K; Orwig, Denise; Hochberg, Marc; Resnick, Barbara; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-09-01

    To estimate meaningful improvements in gait speed observed during recovery from hip fracture and to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of gait speed changes in detecting change in self-reported mobility. Secondary longitudinal data analysis from two randomized controlled trials Twelve hospitals in the Baltimore, Maryland, area. Two hundred seventeen women admitted with hip fracture. Usual gait speed and self-reported mobility (ability to walk 1 block and climb 1 flight of stairs) measured 2 and 12 months after fracture. Effect size-based estimates of meaningful differences were 0.03 for small differences and 0.09 for substantial differences. Depending on the anchor (stairs vs walking) and method (mean difference vs regression), anchor-based estimates ranged from 0.10 to 0.17 m/s for small meaningful improvements and 0.17 to 0.26 m/s for substantial meaningful improvement. Optimal gait speed cutpoints yielded low sensitivity (0.39-0.62) and specificity (0.57-0.76) for improvements in self-reported mobility. Results from this sample of women recovering from hip fracture provide only limited support for the 0.10-m/s cut point for substantial meaningful change previously identified in community-dwelling older adults experiencing declines in walking abilities. Anchor-based estimates and cut points derived from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggest that greater improvements in gait speed may be required for substantial perceived mobility improvement in female hip fracture patients. Furthermore, gait speed change performed poorly in discriminating change in self-reported mobility. Estimates of meaningful change in gait speed may differ based on the direction of change (improvement vs decline) or between patient populations. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Extended Evolutionary Fast Learn-to-Walk Approach for Four-Legged Robots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muh.Anshar; Mary-Anne Williams

    2007-01-01

    Robot locomotion is an active research area. In this paper we focus on the locomotion of quadruped robots. An effective walking gait of quadruped robots is mainly concerned with two key aspects, namely speed and stability. The large search space of potential parameter settings for leg joints means that hand tuning is not feasible in general. As a result walking parameters are typically determined using machine learning techniques. A major shortcoming of using machine learning techniques is the significant wear and tear of robots since many parameter combinations need to be evaluated before an optimal solution is found.This paper proposes a direct walking gait learning approach, which is specifically designed to reduce wear and tear of robot motors, joints and other hardware. In essence we provide an effective learning mechanism that leads to a solution in a faster convergence time than previous algorithms. The results demonstrate that the new learning algorithm obtains a faster convergence to the best solutions in a short run. This approach is significant in obtaining faster walking gaits which will be useful for a wide range of applications where speed and stability are important. Future work will extend our methods so that the faster convergence algorithm can be applied to a two legged humanoid and lead to less wear and tear whilst still developing a fast and stable gait.

  13. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Joh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes such as walking, bicycling and transit in auto-oriented cities such as Los Angeles. Although many past studies have analyzed changes in walking travel across the U.S., there is little clarity on the drivers of change. We address this gap by conducting a longitudinal analysis of walking travel in the greater Los Angeles area from 2001 to 2009. We use travel diary and household data from regional and national surveys to analyze changes in walking trip shares and rates across our study area. Results show that walking has significantly increased across most of Los Angeles, and that increases in walking trips generally correspond with increases in population, employment, and transit service densities. Estimates from fixed-effects regression analysis generally suggest a positive association between population density and walking, and that higher increases in transit stop density are correlated with increased walking trips to and from transit stops. These findings illustrate how regional planning efforts to pursue a coordinated land use-transit planning strategy can help promote walking in auto-oriented or vehicle adopting cities.

  14. Gait-specific metabolic costs and preferred speeds in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), with implications for the scaling of locomotor costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Matthew C

    2012-11-01

    Metabolic costs of resting and locomotion have been used to gain novel insights into the behavioral ecology and evolution of a wide range of primates; however, most previous studies have not considered gait-specific effects. Here, metabolic costs of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) walking, cantering and galloping are used to test for gait-specific effects and a potential correspondence between costs and preferred speeds. Metabolic costs, including the net cost of locomotion (COL) and net cost of transport (COT), change as a curvilinear function of walking speed and (at least provisionally) as a linear function of cantering and galloping speeds. The baseline quantity used to calculate net costs had a significant effect on the magnitude of speed-specific estimates of COL and COT, especially for walking. This is because non-locomotor metabolism constitutes a substantial fraction (41-61%, on average) of gross metabolic rate at slow speeds. The slope-based estimate of the COT was 5.26 J kg(-1) m(-1) for all gaits and speeds, while the gait-specific estimates differed between walking (0.5 m s(-1) : 6.69 J kg(-1) m(-1) ) and cantering/galloping (2.0 m s(-1) : 5.61 J kg(-1) m(-1) ). During laboratory-based overground locomotion, ring-tailed lemurs preferred to walk at ~0.5 m s(-1) and canter/gallop at ~2.0 m s(-1) , with the preferred walking speed corresponding well to the COT minima. Compared with birds and other mammals, ring-tailed lemurs are relatively economical in walking, cantering, and galloping. These results support the view that energetic optima are an important movement criterion for locomotion in ring-tailed lemurs, and other terrestrial animals. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Walks on Weighted Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU An-Cai; XU Xin-Jian; WU Zhi-Xi; WANG Ying-Hai

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of random walks on weighted networks. Assuming that the edge weight and the node strength are used as local information by a random walker. Two kinds of walks, weight-dependent walk and strength-dependent walk, are studied. Exact expressions for stationary distribution and average return time are derived and confirmed by computer simulations. The distribution of average return time and the mean-square that a weight-dependent walker can arrive at a new territory more easily than a strength-dependent one.

  16. Virtually Abelian quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo; Erba, Marco; Perinotti, Paolo; Tosini, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    We study discrete-time quantum walks on Cayley graphs of non-Abelian groups, focusing on the easiest case of virtually Abelian groups. We present a technique to reduce the quantum walk to an equivalent one on an Abelian group with coin system having larger dimension. This method allows one to extend the notion of wave-vector to the virtually Abelian case and study analytically the walk dynamics. We apply the technique in the case of two quantum walks on virtually Abelian groups with planar Cayley graphs, finding the exact solution in terms of dispersion relation.

  17. WALKING CAPACITY AND FALLS-EFFICACY CORRELATES WITH PARTICIPATION RESTRICTION IN INDIVIDUALS WITH CHRONIC STROKE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Nayak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobility impairments seen after Stroke impact walking speed, endurance and balance. Almost all the individuals with Stroke have fear of fall. The physical impairments in balance and gait along with individual’s perception about his/her own abilities to maintain balance might have an impact on level of activity and participation in the community. The association of these variables with recovery of Stroke has been well studied. However, it is currently unknown which of these variables are most associated with activity and participation in the community. This study aimed to identify the correlation of walking capacity and perception of fall with activity & participation. Methods: 30 Subjects were assessed for - walking capacity (6 minute walk test & Self-efficacy for falls (Modified Falls Efficacy scale. Level of Activity Limitation (AL & Participation Restriction (PR was graded on validated ICF Measure of Participation and Activities. (IMPACT-S Results: Data was analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient & regression model. Walking distance and Falls-efficacy is significantly correlated (r=-0.751 and -0.683, respectively with Participation restriction. Walking distance correlated with Activity Limitation (r=-0.714 significantly. Falls efficacy has a correlation coefficient of -0.642 with Activity Limitation. When put into Regression models, Walking Capacity & Gait Velocity was found to be independently associated with AL &PR. Conclusion: There is significant relationship between falls self-efficacy, walking capacity and Post-stroke activity & participation. Participation can be impacted by factors such as self-motivation and confidence about one's balance abilities. This is reflected by the correlation between falls efficacy and participation. Physical parameters such as the distance walked can contribute to participating in the community, and can predict variation in AL-PR

  18. EXERTION DURING UPHILL, LEVEL AND DOWNHILL WALKING WITH AND WITHOUT HIKING POLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Perrey

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of poles when walking on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE, physiological and kinematics parameters, and upon the mean ratio between locomotor and respiratory rhythms. Twelve healthy male and female volunteers, aged 22 to 49 years old, completed on a motorized treadmill in a counterbalanced randomized order 12 walking trials for 10 min at an individually preferred walking speed, with three grades (horizontal level, uphill or downhill with a slope of 15%, with and without hiking poles and a load carriage of 15% of body mass. During all testing sessions, heart rate (HR, oxygen consumption (VO2, ventilation (VE, tidal volume (VT, breathing frequency (Bf, and stride frequency were recorded continuously during the last 5-min of each trial. At the end of each trial, subjects were asked to give RPE. Energy cost (EC and VE increased significantly with the grade (-15% < 0% < +15% and with the carrying load. VT was significantly less important with hiking poles, while Bf was significantly more elevated. VO2 and EC increased (p < 0.05 with the use of the hiking poles only during the downhill trials. No significant effect of poles was observed on HR, RPE, and preferred walking speed. The average ratio between the locomotor and respiratory frequencies was significantly influenced by the three experimental factors tested. There was a significant relationship between average ratio of leg movement per breath and EC of walking among all conditions (r = 0.83, n = 12. These results suggest that the use of the hiking poles had a significant influence on the respiratory and energetic responses only during downhill walking

  19. Relativistically speaking: Let's walk or run through the rain?

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, Armando V D B

    2010-01-01

    We analyse under a simple approach the problem one must decide the best strategy to minimize the contact with rain when moving between two points through the rain. The available strategies: walk (low speed boost $<<$ $c$) or run (relativistic speed boost $\\approx$ $c$).

  20. Comparison of Random Waypoint & Random Walk Mobility Model under DSR, AODV & DSDV MANET Routing Protocols

    CERN Document Server

    Aslam, Muhammad Zaheer

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Adhoc Network is a kind of wireless ad hoc network where nodes are connected wirelessly and the network is self configuring. MANET may work in a standalone manner or may be a part of another network. In this paper we have compared Random Walk Mobility Model and Random Waypoint Mobility Model over two reactive routing protocols Dynamic Source Routing (DSR) and Adhoc On-Demand Distance Vector Routing (AODV) protocol and one Proactive routing protocol Distance Sequenced Distance Vector Routing (DSDV) Our analysis showed that DSR, AODV & DSDV under Random Walk and Random Way Point Mobility models have similar results for similar inputs however as the pause time increases so does the difference in performance rises. They show that their motion, direction, angle of direction, speed is same under both mobility models. We have made their analysis on packet delivery ratio, throughput and routing overhead. We have tested them with different criteria like different number of nodes, speed and different maximum...

  1. Effect of gait speed on gait rhythmicity in Parkinson's disease: variability of stride time and swing time respond differently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peretz Chava

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to maintain a steady gait rhythm is impaired in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. This aspect of locomotor dyscontrol, which likely reflects impaired automaticity in PD, can be quantified by measuring the stride-to-stride variability of gait timing. Previous work has shown an increase in both the variability of the stride time and swing time in PD, but the origins of these changes are not fully understood. Patients with PD also generally walk with a reduced gait speed, a potential confounder of the observed changes in variability. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between walking speed and gait variability. Methods Stride time variability and swing time variability were measured in 36 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage 2–2.5 and 30 healthy controls who walked on a treadmill at four different speeds: 1 Comfortable walking speed (CWS, 2 80% of CWS 3 90% of CWS, and 4 110% of CWS. In addition, we studied the effects of walking slowly on level ground, both with and without a walker. Results Consistent with previous findings, increased variability of stride time and swing time was observed in the patients with PD in CWS, compared to controls. In both groups, there was a small but significant association between treadmill gait speed and stride time variability such that higher speeds were associated with lower (better values of stride time variability (p = 0.0002. In contrast, swing time variability did not change in response to changes in gait speed. Similar results were observed with walking on level ground. Conclusion The present results demonstrate that swing time variability is independent of gait speed, at least over the range studied, and therefore, that it may be used as a speed-independent marker of rhythmicity and gait steadiness. Since walking speed did not affect stride time variability and swing time variability in the same way, it appears that these two aspects of

  2. Walk modularity and community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mehrle, David; Harkin, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Modularity maximization has been one of the most widely used approaches in the last decade for discovering community structure in networks of practical interest in biology, computing, social science, statistical mechanics, and more. Modularity is a quality function that measures the difference between the number of edges found within clusters minus the number of edges one would statistically expect to find based on random chance. We present a natural generalization of modularity based on the difference between the actual and expected number of walks within clusters, which we call walk-modularity. Walk-modularity can be expressed in matrix form, and community detection can be performed by finding leading eigenvectors of the walk-modularity matrix. We demonstrate community detection on both synthetic and real-world networks and find that walk-modularity maximization returns significantly improved results compared to traditional modularity maximization.

  3. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  4. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2011-03-15

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 min of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-min training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed.

  5. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 minutes of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-minute training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  6. An online gait generator for quadruped walking using motor primitives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlin Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents implementation of an online gait generator on a quadruped robot. Firstly, the design of a quadruped robot is presented. The robot contains four leg modules each of which is constructed by a 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF five-bar parallel linkage mechanism. Together with other two rotational DOF, the leg module is able to perform 4-DOF movement. The parallel mechanism of the robot allows all the servos attached on the body frame, so that the leg mass is decreased and motor load can be balanced. Secondly, an online gait generator based on dynamic movement primitives for the walking control is presented. Dynamic movement primitives provide an approach to generate periodic trajectories and they can be modulated in real time, which makes the online adjustment of walking gaits possible. This gait controller is tested by the quadruped robot in regulating walking speed, switching between forward\\backward movements and steering. The controller is easy to apply, expand and is quite effective on phase coordination and online trajectory modulation. Results of simulated experiments are presented.

  7. Probability of walking in children with cerebral palsy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckung, E.; Hagberg, G.; Uldall, P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to describe walking ability in children with cerebral palsy from the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe common database through 21 years and to examine the association between walking ability and predicting factors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Anonymous data...... on 10042 children with cerebral palsy born between 1976 and 1996 were gathered from 14 European centers; 9012 patients were eligible for the analyses. RESULTS: Unaided walking as the primary way of walking at 5 years of age was reported for 54%, walking with assistive devices was reported for 16......%, and no walking ability was reported for 30%. The proportion of children who were unable to walk was rather stable over time in all of the centers, with a mean proportion of 28%. Walking ability related significantly to cerebral palsy types, that is, spastic unilateral, spastic bilateral, dyskinetic, and ataxic...

  8. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Svendsen, Morten B; Nørreslet, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...... joint abductor moment. Several EMG parameters increased significantly when walking on high-heels. The results indicate a large increase in bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint directly caused by the increased knee joint extensor moment during high-heeled walking, which may explain the observed higher...

  9. Running for exercise mitigates age-related deterioration of walking economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Justus D; Beck, Owen N; Roby, Jaclyn M; Turney, Aria L; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Impaired walking performance is a key predictor of morbidity among older adults. A distinctive characteristic of impaired walking performance among older adults is a greater metabolic cost (worse economy) compared to young adults. However, older adults who consistently run have been shown to retain a similar running economy as young runners. Unfortunately, those running studies did not measure the metabolic cost of walking. Thus, it is unclear if running exercise can prevent the deterioration of walking economy. To determine if and how regular walking vs. running exercise affects the economy of locomotion in older adults. 15 older adults (69 ± 3 years) who walk ≥ 30 min, 3x/week for exercise, "walkers" and 15 older adults (69 ± 5 years) who run ≥ 30 min, 3x/week, "runners" walked on a force-instrumented treadmill at three speeds (0.75, 1.25, and 1.75 m/s). We determined walking economy using expired gas analysis and walking mechanics via ground reaction forces during the last 2 minutes of each 5 minute trial. We compared walking economy between the two groups and to non-aerobically trained young and older adults from a prior study. Older runners had a 7-10% better walking economy than older walkers over the range of speeds tested (p = .016) and had walking economy similar to young sedentary adults over a similar range of speeds (p =  .237). We found no substantial biomechanical differences between older walkers and runners. In contrast to older runners, older walkers had similar walking economy as older sedentary adults (p =  .461) and ∼ 26% worse walking economy than young adults (peconomy whereas walking for exercise appears to have minimal effect on the age-related deterioration in walking economy.

  10. Effect of uphill and downhill walking on walking performance in geriatric patients using a wheeled walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Ulrich; Schwenk, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Weyrich, Michael; Schlicht, Wolfgang; Becker, Clemens

    2017-08-01

    Wheeled walkers are recommended to improve walking performance in older persons and to encourage and assist participation in daily life. Nevertheless, using a wheeled walker can cause serious problems in the natural environment. This study aimed to compare uphill and downhill walking with walking level in geriatric patients using a wheeled walker. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of using a wheeled walker with respect to dual tasking when walking level. A total of 20 geriatric patients (median age 84.5 years) walked 10 m at their habitual pace along a level surface, uphill and downhill, with and without a standard wheeled walker. Gait speed, stride length and cadence were assessed by wearable sensors and the walk ratio was calculated. When using a wheeled walker while walking level the walk ratio improved (0.58 m/[steps/min] versus 0.57 m/[steps/min], p = 0.023) but gait speed decreased (1.07 m/s versus 1.12 m/s, p = 0.020) when compared to not using a wheeled walker. With respect to the walk ratio, uphill and downhill walking with a wheeled walker decreased walking performance when compared to level walking (0.54 m/[steps/min] versus 0.58 m/[steps/min], p = 0.023 and 0.55 m/[steps/min] versus 0.58 m/[steps/min], p = 0.001, respectively). At the same time, gait speed decreased (0.079 m/s versus 1.07 m/s, p < 0.0001) or was unaffected. The use of a wheeled walker improved the quality of level walking but the performance of uphill and downhill walking was worse compared to walking level when using a wheeled walker.

  11. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael T; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-21

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  12. Denoising and artefact reduction in dynamic flat detector CT perfusion imaging using high speed acquisition: first experimental and clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael T.; Aichert, André; Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kowarschik, Markus; Maier, Andreas K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2014-08-01

    Flat detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) is a novel technique using C-arm angiography systems for interventional dynamic tissue perfusion measurement with high potential benefits for catheter-guided treatment of stroke. However, FD-CTP is challenging since C-arms rotate slower than conventional CT systems. Furthermore, noise and artefacts affect the measurement of contrast agent flow in tissue. Recent robotic C-arms are able to use high speed protocols (HSP), which allow sampling of the contrast agent flow with improved temporal resolution. However, low angular sampling of projection images leads to streak artefacts, which are translated to the perfusion maps. We recently introduced the FDK-JBF denoising technique based on Feldkamp (FDK) reconstruction followed by joint bilateral filtering (JBF). As this edge-preserving noise reduction preserves streak artefacts, an empirical streak reduction (SR) technique is presented in this work. The SR method exploits spatial and temporal information in the form of total variation and time-curve analysis to detect and remove streaks. The novel approach is evaluated in a numerical brain phantom and a patient study. An improved noise and artefact reduction compared to existing post-processing methods and faster computation speed compared to an algebraic reconstruction method are achieved.

  13. Hatha Yoga Practice Improves Attention and Processing Speed in Older Adults: Results from an 8-Week Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothe, Neha P; Kramer, Arthur F; McAuley, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is well documented across various aspects of cognitive function, including attention and processing speed, and lifestyle behaviors such as physical activity play an important role in preventing cognitive decline and maintaining or even improving cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week Hatha yoga intervention on attention and processing speed among older adults. Participants (n = 118; mean age, 62 ± 5.59) were randomly assigned to an 8-week Hatha yoga group or a stretching control group and completed cognitive assessments-Attention Network Task, Trail Making Test parts A and B, and Pattern Comparison Test-at baseline and after the 8-week intervention. Analyses of covariance revealed significantly faster reaction times for the yoga group on the Attention Network Task's neutral, congruent, and incongruent conditions (p ≤ 0.04). The yoga intervention also improved participants' visuospatial and perceptual processing on the Trail Making Test part B (p = 0.002) and pattern comparison (p yoga practice that includes postures, breathing, and meditative exercises lead to improved attentional and information processing abilities. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely speculative, more systematic trials are needed to explore the extent of cognitive benefits and their neurobiological mechanisms.

  14. Random walk search in unstructured P2P

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhaoqing; You Jinyuan; Rao Ruonan; Li Minglu

    2006-01-01

    Unstructured P2P has power-law link distribution, and the random walk in power-law networks is analyzed. The analysis results show that the probability that a random walker walks through the high degree nodes is high in the power-law network, and the information on the high degree nodes can be easily found through random walk. Random walk spread and random walk search method (RWSS) is proposed based on the analysis result. Simulation results show that RWSS achieves high success rates at low cost and is robust to high degree node failure.

  15. Torsion and antero-posterior bending in the in vivo human tibia loading regimes during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Fei; Sanno, Maximilian; Ganse, Bergita; Koy, Timmo; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Müller, Lars Peter; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Bending, in addition to compression, is recognized to be a common loading pattern in long bones in animals. However, due to the technical difficulty of measuring bone deformation in humans, our current understanding of bone loading patterns in humans is very limited. In the present study, we hypothesized that bending and torsion are important loading regimes in the human tibia. In vivo tibia segment deformation in humans was assessed during walking and running utilizing a novel optical approach. Results suggest that the proximal tibia primarily bends to the posterior (bending angle: 0.15°-1.30°) and medial aspect (bending angle: 0.38°-0.90°) and that it twists externally (torsion angle: 0.67°-1.66°) in relation to the distal tibia during the stance phase of overground walking at a speed between 2.5 and 6.1 km/h. Peak posterior bending and peak torsion occurred during the first and second half of stance phase, respectively. The peak-to-peak antero-posterior (AP) bending angles increased linearly with vertical ground reaction force and speed. Similarly, peak-to-peak torsion angles increased with the vertical free moment in four of the five test subjects and with the speed in three of the test subjects. There was no correlation between peak-to-peak medio-lateral (ML) bending angles and ground reaction force or speed. On the treadmill, peak-to-peak AP bending angles increased with walking and running speed, but peak-to-peak torsion angles and peak-to-peak ML bending angles remained constant during walking. Peak-to-peak AP bending angle during treadmill running was speed-dependent and larger than that observed during walking. In contrast, peak-to-peak tibia torsion angle was smaller during treadmill running than during walking. To conclude, bending and torsion of substantial magnitude were observed in the human tibia during walking and running. A systematic distribution of peak amplitude was found during the first and second parts of the stance phase.

  16. A Passive Dynamic Walking Model Based on Knee-Bend Behaviour: Stability and Adaptability for Walking Down Steep Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model based on knee-bend behaviour, which is inspired by the way human beings walk. The length and mass parameters of human beings are used in the walking model. The knee-bend mechanism of the stance leg is designed in the phase between knee-strike and heel- strike. q* which is the angular difference of the stance leg between the two events, knee-strike and knee-bend, is adjusted in order to find a stable walking motion. The results show that the stable periodic walking motion on a slope of r <0.4 can be found by adjusting q*. Furthermore, with a particular q* in the range of 0.12walk down more steps before falling down on an arbitrary slope. The walking motion is more stable and adaptable than the conventional walking motion, especially for steep slopes.

  17. A Passive Dynamic Walking Model Based on Knee-Bend Behaviour: Stability and Adaptability for Walking down Steep Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a passive dynamic walking model based on knee-bend behaviour, which is inspired by the way human beings walk. The length and mass parameters of human beings are used in the walking model. The knee-bend mechanism of the stance leg is designed in the phase between knee-strike and heel-strike. q* which is the angular difference of the stance leg between the two events, knee-strike and knee-bend, is adjusted in order to find a stable walking motion. The results show that the stable periodic walking motion on a slope of r <0.4 can be found by adjusting q*. Furthermore, with a particular q* in the range of 0.12walk down more steps before falling down on an arbitrary slope. The walking motion is more stable and adaptable than the conventional walking motion, especially for steep slopes.

  18. The Crossing Speed of Elderly Pedestrians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Trpković

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The population of elderly people is rapidly growing and in terms of safety, senior pedestrians represent one of the most vulnerable group. The pedestrian crossing speed is a significant input parameter in traffic engineering, which can have effect on pedestrians’ safety, especially of older population. The objective of this study was to determine the value of the crossing speed of elderly pedestrians (65+ for different types of urban crossings. The research was conducted at ten intersections in the city of Belgrade, Serbia, using the method of direct observation and a questionnaire for collecting data. The data were analysed in the statistical software package IBM SPSS Statistics. The results showed that elderly pedestrians walk slower and the crossing type significantly influenced the speed of older population. The order of crossing types in relation to the measured speed is ranked as follows, from the lowest to the highest speed value: unsignalized, signalized, signalized with pedestrian countdown display, signalized with pedestrian island and pedestrian countdown display and finally signalized crossing with pedestrian island. According to the questionnaire results, the elderly recognize the importance of implementing pedestrian counters. This indicates the necessity to provide safe street crossing for the elderly using the corresponding engineering measures.

  19. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  20. Fractional Brownian motions via random walk in the complex plane and via fractional derivative. Comparison and further results on their Fokker-Planck equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumarie, Guy E-mail: jumarie.guy@uqam.ca

    2004-11-01

    There are presently two different models of fractional Brownian motions available in the literature: the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative of white noise on the one hand, and the complex-valued Brownian motion of order n defined by using a random walk in the complex plane, on the other hand. The paper provides a comparison between these two approaches, and in addition, takes this opportunity to contribute some complements. These two models are more or less equivalent on the theoretical standpoint for fractional order between 0 and 1/2, but their practical significances are quite different. Otherwise, for order larger than 1/2, the fractional derivative model has no counterpart in the complex plane. These differences are illustrated by an example drawn from mathematical finance. Taylor expansion of fractional order provides the expression of fractional difference in terms of finite difference, and this allows us to improve the derivation of Fokker-Planck equation and Kramers-Moyal expansion, and to get more insight in their relation with stochastic differential equations of fractional order. In the case of multi-fractal systems, the Fokker-Planck equation can be solved by using path integrals, and the fractional dynamic equations of the state moments of the stochastic system can be easily obtained. By combining fractional derivative and complex white noise of order n, one obtains a family of complex-valued fractional Brownian motions which exhibits long-range dependence. The conclusion outlines suggestions for further research, mainly regarding Lorentz transformation of fractional noises.

  1. External mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of overground and treadmill walking in adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eZollinger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Motor impairments affect functional abilities and gait in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP. Improving their walking is an essential objective of treatment, and the use of a treadmill for gait analysis and training could offer several advantages in adolescents with CP. However, there is a controversy regarding the similarity between treadmill and overground walking both for gait analysis and training in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of these two types of gait modalities at standard and preferred walking speeds in adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP and typically developing (TD adolescents matched on age, height and body mass. Methods. Spatiotemporal parameters, external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of walking were computed using two inertial sensors equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and compared in 10 UCP (14.2 ± 1.7 yr and 10 TD (14.1 ± 1.9 yr adolescents during treadmill and overground walking at standard and preferred speeds. Results. The treadmill induced almost identical mechanical changes to overground walking in TD adolescents and those with UCP, with the exception of potential and kinetic vertical and lateral mechanical works, which are both significantly increased in the overground-treadmill transition only in UCP (P<0.05. Conclusions. Adolescents with UCP have a reduced adaptive capacity in absorbing and decelerating the speed created by a treadmill (i.e., dynamic stability compared to TD adolescents. This may have an important implication in rehabilitation programs that assess and train gait by using a treadmill in adolescents with UCP.

  2. External Mechanical Work and Pendular Energy Transduction of Overground and Treadmill Walking in Adolescents with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Marie; Degache, Francis; Currat, Gabriel; Pochon, Ludmila; Peyrot, Nicolas; Newman, Christopher J.; Malatesta, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Motor impairments affect functional abilities and gait in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). Improving their walking is an essential objective of treatment, and the use of a treadmill for gait analysis and training could offer several advantages in adolescents with CP. However, there is a controversy regarding the similarity between treadmill and overground walking both for gait analysis and training in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of these two types of gait modalities at standard and preferred walking speeds in adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy (UCP) and typically developing (TD) adolescents matched on age, height and body mass. Methods: Spatiotemporal parameters, external mechanical work and pendular energy transduction of walking were computed using two inertial sensors equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and compared in 10 UCP (14.2 ± 1.7 year) and 10 TD (14.1 ± 1.9 year) adolescents during treadmill and overground walking at standard and preferred speeds. Results: The treadmill induced almost identical mechanical changes to overground walking in TD adolescents and those with UCP, with the exception of potential and kinetic vertical and lateral mechanical works, which are both significantly increased in the overground-treadmill transition only in UCP (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Adolescents with UCP have a reduced adaptive capacity in absorbing and decelerating the speed created by a treadmill (i.e., dynamic stability) compared to TD adolescents. This may have an important implication in rehabilitation programs that assess and train gait by using a treadmill in adolescents with UCP. PMID:27148062

  3. Study of surface integrity AISI 4140 as result of hard, dry and high speed machining using CBN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, B.; Sembiring, R. W.; Manurung, N.

    2017-09-01

    The concept of hard, dry and high speed machining can be combined, to produce high productivity, with lower production costs in manufacturing industry. Hard lathe process can be a solution to reduce production time. In lathe hard alloy steels reported problems relating to the integrity of such surface roughness, residual stress, the white layer and the surface integrity. AISI 4140 material is used for high reliable hydraulic system components. This material includes in cold work tool steel. Consideration election is because this material is able to be hardened up to 55 HRC. In this research, the experimental design using CCD model fit with three factors, each factor is composed of two levels, and six central point, experiments were conducted with 1 replications. The experimental design research using CCD model fit.

  4. Vection in depth during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, April; Palmisano, Stephen; Apthorp, Deborah; Allison, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    Vection has typically been induced in stationary observers (ie conditions providing visual-only information about self-motion). Two recent studies have examined vection during active treadmill walking--one reported that treadmill walking in the same direction as the visually simulated self-motion impaired vection (Onimaru et al, 2010 Journal of Vision 10(7):860), the other reported that it enhanced vection (Seno et al, 2011 Perception 40 747-750; Seno et al, 2011 Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics 73 1467-1476). Our study expands on these earlier investigations of vection during observer active movement. In experiment 1 we presented radially expanding optic flow and compared the vection produced in stationary observers with that produced during walking forward on a treadmill at a 'matched' speed. Experiment 2 compared the vection induced by forward treadmill walking while viewing expanding or contracting optic flow with that induced by viewing playbacks of these same displays while stationary. In both experiments subjects' tracked head movements were either incorporated into the self-motion displays (as simulated viewpoint jitter) or simply ignored. We found that treadmill walking always reduced vection (compared with stationary viewing conditions) and that simulated viewpoint jitter always increased vection (compared with constant velocity displays). These findings suggest that while consistent visual-vestibular information about self-acceleration increases vection, biomechanical self-motion information reduces this experience (irrespective of whether it is consistent or not with the visual input).

  5. Cross-Slope and Level Walking Strategies During Swing in Individuals With Lower Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Coralie; Loiret, Isabelle; Langlois, Karine; Bonnet, Xavier; Lavaste, François; Fodé, Pascale; Pillet, Hélène

    2017-06-01

    To quantitatively analyze prosthetic limb swing phase gait strategies used to adapt to cross slopes compared with flat surfaces. Cross-sectional study. Gait laboratory. A volunteer sample (N=49) of individuals with transfemoral amputation (n=17), individuals with transtibial amputation (n=15), and able-bodied individuals (n=17). Participants walked on flat and 6° (10%) inclined cross-slope surfaces at a self-selected walking speed. Gait speed, step width, sagittal plane kinematics (ankle, knee, hip) on the prosthetic side during swing (uphill limb) and on the contralateral side during stance (downhill limb), frontal plane pelvic kinematics on the prosthetic side during swing, contralateral side ankle power during stance, and timing of gait events. All groups reduced gait speed and downhill limb knee flexion during the stance phase. Able-bodied participants adjusted their uphill limb ankle flexion during the swing phase. Participants with lower limb amputation used additional adjustments during the swing phase of the prosthetic limb when positioned uphill on cross slopes. Transtibial amputee participants mainly adapted with increased flexion of the residual hip and knee joints. Transfemoral amputee participants primarily compensated using increased pelvic hiking and vaulting gait strategies. The swing phase of the uphill limb during cross-slope walking results in compensatory mechanisms that should be addressed during rehabilitation to gain confidence and reduce avoidance when encountering cross slopes in daily life. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of lower body pressure support on the walking patterns of healthy children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Max J; Deffeyes, Joan E; Arpin, David J; Karst, Gregory M; Stuberg, Wayne A

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of a lower body positive pressure support system on the joint kinematics and activity of the lower extremity antigravity musculature of adults and children during walking. Adults (age = 25 ± 4 years) and children (age = 13 ± 2 years) walked at a preferred speed and a speed that was based on the Froude number, while 0-80% of their body weight was supported. Electrogoniometers were used to monitor knee and ankle joint kinematics. Surface electromyography was used to quantify the magnitude of the vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscle activity. There were three key findings: (1) The lower extremity joint angles and activity of the lower extremity antigravity muscles of children did not differ from those of adults. (2) The magnitude of the changes in the lower extremity joint motion and antigravity muscle activity was dependent upon an interaction between body weight support and walking speed. (3) Lower body positive pressure support resulted in reduced activation of the antigravity musculature, and reduced range of motion of the knee and ankle joints.

  7. Quantum walks: a comprehensive review

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E

    2012-01-01

    Quantum walks, the quantum mechanical counterpart of classical random walks, is an advanced tool for building quantum algorithms that has been recently shown to constitute a universal model of quantum computation. Quantum walks is now a solid field of research of quantum computation full of exciting open problems for physicists, computer scientists, mathematicians and engineers. In this paper we review theoretical advances on the foundations of both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks, together with the role that randomness plays in quantum walks, the connections between the mathematical models of coined discrete quantum walks and continuous quantum walks, the quantumness of quantum walks, a summary of papers published on discrete quantum walks and entanglement as well as a succinct review of experimental proposals and realizations of discrete-time quantum walks. Furthermore, we have reviewed several algorithms based on both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks as well as a most important resul...

  8. Results of an Advanced Fan Stage Operating Over a Wide Range of Speed and Bypass Ratio. Part 2; Comparison of CFD and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, Mark L.; Suder, Kenneth L.; Kulkarni, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    NASA and GE teamed to design and build a 57 percent engine scaled fan stage for a Mach 4 variable cycle turbofan/ramjet engine for access to space with multipoint operations. This fan stage was tested in NASA's transonic compressor facility. The objectives of this test were to assess the aerodynamic and aero mechanic performance and operability characteristics of the fan stage over the entire range of engine operation including: 1) sea level static take-off; 2) transition over large swings in fan bypass ratio; 3) transition from turbofan to ramjet; and 4) fan wind-milling operation at high Mach flight conditions. This paper will focus on an assessment of APNASA, a multistage turbomachinery analysis code developed by NASA, to predict the fan stage performance and operability over a wide range of speeds (37 to 100 percent) and bypass ratios.

  9. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider ...... set of experiential or ‘felt’ qualities of living with mobile technologies. Moving from reflections on the value of walking with people, the paper outlines some affordances of a smartphone application built to capture place experiences through walking....

  10. SORTING CAPABILITIES OF CASTINGS FROM NODULAR AND GRAY IRON BY THE STRUCTURE BY THE RESULT OF THE MEASUREMENT OF THE MAGNETIC PARAMETERS AND THE SPEED OF SOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Sandomirskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of the analysis of the influence of changes in the structure of the metal substrate and form of graphite inclusions in cast iron on the magnetic coercive sensitive parameter and the speed of sound are given. The efficiency of shared use of the results of magnetic and ultrasonic measurements to control the shape of inclusions in ductile iron and pearlite content in its metal matrix is shown.

  11. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  12. Predictors of Gait Speeds and the Relationship of Gait Speeds to Falls in Men and Women with Parkinson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Nemanich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait difficulties and falls are commonly reported in people with Parkinson disease (PD. Reduction in gait speed is a major characteristic of Parkinsonian gait, yet little is known about its underlying determinants, its ability to reflect an internal reservation about walking, or its relationship to falls. To study these issues, we selected age, disease severity, and nonmotor factors (i.e., depression, quality of life, balance confidence, and exercise beliefs and attitudes to predict self-selected (SELF, fast-as-possible (FAST, and the difference (DIFF between these walking speeds in 78 individuals with PD. We also examined gender differences in gait speeds and evaluated how gait speeds were related to a retrospective fall report. Age, disease severity, and balance confidence were strong predictors of SELF, FAST, and, to a lesser extent, DIFF. All three parameters were strongly associated with falling. DIFF was significantly greater in men compared to women and was significantly associated with male but not female fallers. The results supported the clinical utility of using a suite of gait speed parameters to provide insight into the gait difficulties and differentiating between fallers in people with PD.

  13. Electron Temperatures and Flow Speeds of the Low Solar Corona: MACS Results from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 in Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davila, Joseph M.; SaintCyr, O.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Hassler, Donald M.; Gashut, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya to measure both the electron temperature and its flow speed simultaneously at multiple locations in the low solar corona by measuring the visible K-coronal spectrum. Coronal model spectra incorporating the effects of electron temperature and its flow speed were matched with the measured K-coronal spectra to interpret the observations. Results show electron temperatures of (1.10 +/- 0.05) MK, (0.70 +/- 0.08) MK, and (0.98 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and (0.93 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar west. The corresponding outflow speeds obtained from the spectral fit are (103 +/- 92) km/s, (0 + 10) km/s, (0+10) km/s, and (0+10) km/s. Since the observations were taken only at 1.1 Solar Radius and 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center, these speeds, consistent with zero outflow, are in agreement with expectations and provide additional confirmation that the spectral fitting method is working. The electron temperature at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center is larger at the north (polar region) than the east and west (equatorial region).

  14. Electron Temperatures and Flow Speeds of the Low Solar Corona: MACS Results from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 in Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginald, Nelson L.; Davila, Joseph M.; SaintCyr, O.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika; Hassler, Donald M.; Gashut, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in conjunction with the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya to measure both the electron temperature and its flow speed simultaneously at multiple locations in the low solar corona by measuring the visible K-coronal spectrum. Coronal model spectra incorporating the effects of electron temperature and its flow speed were matched with the measured K-coronal spectra to interpret the observations. Results show electron temperatures of (1.10 +/- 0.05) MK, (0.70 +/- 0.08) MK, and (0.98 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and (0.93 +/- 0.12) MK, at 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center in the solar west. The corresponding outflow speeds obtained from the spectral fit are (103 +/- 92) km/s, (0 + 10) km/s, (0+10) km/s, and (0+10) km/s. Since the observations were taken only at 1.1 Solar Radius and 1.2 Solar Radius from Sun center, these speeds, consistent with zero outflow, are in agreement with expectations and provide additional confirmation that the spectral fitting method is working. The electron temperature at 1.1 Solar Radius from Sun center is larger at the north (polar region) than the east and west (equatorial region).

  15. Utilization of central nervous system resources for preparation and performance of complex walking tasks in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Clark

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionWalking in the home and community often involves performance of complex walking tasks. Understanding the control of such tasks is crucial to preserving independence and quality of life in older adults. However, very little research has been conducted in this area. Here we assess the extent to which two measures of central nervous system (CNS activity are responsive to the challenges posed by preparation and performance of complex walking tasks. Prefrontal cortical activity was measured by functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS and sympathetic nervous system arousal was measured by skin conductance level (SCL.Materials and MethodsSixteen older men and women (age 77.2 ± 5.6 years with mild mobility deficits participated in this study. Participants walked at their preferred speed without distractions along an unobstructed, well-lit course (control task and also walked on the same course under five separate challenging conditions: performing a cognitive verbal fluency task (verbal task, dim lighting (dim task, carrying a tray (carry task, negotiating obstacles (obstacles task and wearing a weighted vest (vest task. Mean prefrontal activation and SCL were calculated during the preparation and performance phases of each task. Gait spatiotemporal measurements were acquired by an instrumented gait mat.ResultsPrefrontal cortical activity and SCL were elevated during the preparation phase of complex walking tasks relative to the control task. During the performance phase, prefrontal activity remained elevated to a similar level as during task preparation. In contrast, SCL continued to increase beyond the level observed during task preparation. A larger increase in prefrontal activity was found to be linked to preserved quality of gait during complex walking tasks.DiscussionThese findings indicate that availability and utilization of CNS resources are important for optimizing performance of complex walking tasks in older adults.

  16. An experimental analysis of human straight walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental analysis of human straight walking has been presented. Experiments on human walking were carried out by using Cassino tracking system which is a passive cable-based measuring system. This system is adopted because it is capable of both pose and wrench measurements with fairly simple monitoring of operation. By using experimental results, trajectories of a human limb extremity and its posture have been analyzed; forces that are exerted against cables by the limb of a person under test have been measured by force sensors as well. Furthermore, by using experimental tests, modeling and characterization of the human straight walking gait have been proposed.

  17. Toe Walking in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may simply monitor your child's gait during regular office visits. If a physical problem is contributing to toe walking, treatment options may include: Physical therapy. Gentle stretching of the leg and foot muscles may improve ...

  18. The energy expenditure of non-weight bearing crutch walking on the level and ascending stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jonathan; Murphy, Alexandra; Murphy, David; Austin, Andy; Moran, Danielle; Cronin, Caitriona; Guinan, Emer; Hussey, Juliette

    2015-06-01

    Crutches are commonly prescribed to patients with lower limb dysfunction during rehabilitation to assist with mobility. The aim of this study was to determine the energy expenditure for non-weight bearing crutch walking on level ground and ascending stairs at a self selected speed in a healthy adult population. Thirty-one healthy male and female adults (mean±SD: age 21.6±1.2 years; height 170.8±10.8 cm; weight 70.8±11.4 kg) mobilised non-weight bearing with elbow crutches along a 30 m corridor and (with one crutch) up a flight of 13 stairs. Energy expenditure for each activity was measured by indirect calorimetry using the COSMED K4b(2) portable ergospirometry system. The established VO2 values were 16.4ml/kg/min for crutch walking on level ground and 17.85 ml/kg/min for stair climbing. Non-weight bearing crutch walking at a self selected speed on the level ground and up a flight of stairs resulted in a MET value of 4.57 and 5.06 respectively. The mean heart rate (HR) for crutch walking along the flat was 117.06±20.54 beats per minute (bpm), while the mean HR for ambulating upstairs with crutches was 113.91±19.32 bpm. The increased energy demands of non-weight bearing crutch walking should be considered by physical therapists when instructing patients on crutch use. Further investigation to determine the implications of these results in populations with chronic disease is warranted.

  19. On a directionally reinforced random walk

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arka; Roitershtein, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We consider a generalized version of a directionally reinforced random walk, which was originally introduced by Mauldin, Monticino, and von Weizs\\"{a}cker in \\cite{drw}. Our main result is a stable limit theorem for the position of the random walk in higher dimensions. This extends a result of Horv\\'{a}th and Shao \\cite{limits} that was previously obtained in dimension one only (however, in a more stringent functional form).

  20. A walking controller for a powered ankle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Amanda H; Mitchell, Jason E; Truex, Don; Lawson, Brian E; Ledoux, Elissa; Goldfarb, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a walking controller implemented on a powered ankle prosthesis prototype and assessed by a below-knee amputee subject on a treadmill at three speeds. The walking controller is a finite state machine which emulates a series of passive impedance functions at the joint in order to reproduce the behavior of a healthy joint. The assessments performed demonstrate the ability of the powered prosthesis prototype and walking controller to reproduce essential biomechanical aspects (i.e. joint angle, torque, and power profiles) of the healthy joint, especially relative to a passive prosthesis.

  1. Visual control of foot placement when walking over complex terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthis, Jonathan S; Fajen, Brett R

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of visual information in the control of walking over complex terrain with irregularly spaced obstacles. We developed an experimental paradigm to measure how far along the future path people need to see in order to maintain forward progress and avoid stepping on obstacles. Participants walked over an array of randomly distributed virtual obstacles that were projected onto the floor by an LCD projector while their movements were tracked by a full-body motion capture system. Walking behavior in a full-vision control condition was compared with behavior in a number of other visibility conditions in which obstacles did not appear until they fell within a window of visibility centered on the moving observer. Collisions with obstacles were more frequent and, for some participants, walking speed was slower when the visibility window constrained vision to less than two step lengths ahead. When window sizes were greater than two step lengths, the frequency of collisions and walking speed were weakly affected or unaffected. We conclude that visual information from at least two step lengths ahead is needed to guide foot placement when walking over complex terrain. When placed in the context of recent research on the biomechanics of walking, the findings suggest that two step lengths of visual information may be needed because it allows walkers to exploit the passive mechanical forces inherent to bipedal locomotion, thereby avoiding obstacles while maximizing energetic efficiency. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Design of wheel-type walking-assist device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Jung, Kyung Min; Lee, Sung Uk

    2006-03-15

    In this research, a outdoor wheel-type walking-assist device is developed to help an elder having a poor muscular strength at legs for walking, sitting and standing up easily at outdoors, and also for going and downing stairs. In conceptually designing, the environments of an elder's activity, the size of an elder's body and a necessary function of helping an elder are considered. This device has 4 wheels for stability. When an elder walks in incline plane with the proposed device, a rear-wing is rotated to keep the supporting device horizontal, regardless of an angle of inclination. A height-controlling device, which can control the height of the supporting device for adjusting an elder's height, is varied vertically to help an elder to sit and stand-up easily. Moreover, a outdoor wheel-type walking-assist device is conceptually designed and is made. In order to design it, the preview research is investigated firstly. On the basis of the proposed walking-assist device, the outdoor walking-assist device is designed and made. The outdoor wheel-type walking-assist device can go and down stairs automatically. This device go up and down the stair of having maximum 20cm height and an angle of 25 degrees with maximum 4 sec/stairs speed, and move at flatland with 60cm/sec speed.

  3. Foot trajectory approximation using the pendulum model of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Galen, Sujay; Conway, Bernard A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Generating a natural foot trajectory is an important objective in robotic systems for rehabilitation of walking. Human walking has pendular properties, so the pendulum model of walking has been used in bipedal robots which produce rhythmic gait patterns. Whether natural foot trajectories can be produced by the pendulum model needs to be addressed as a first step towards applying the pendulum concept in gait orthosis design. This study investigated circle approximation of the foot trajectories, with focus on the geometry of the pendulum model of walking. Three able-bodied subjects walked overground at various speeds, and foot trajectories relative to the hip were analysed. Four circle approximation approaches were developed, and best-fit circle algorithms were derived to fit the trajectories of the ankle, heel and toe. The study confirmed that the ankle and heel trajectories during stance and the toe trajectory in both the stance and the swing phases during walking at various speeds could be well modelled by a rigid pendulum. All the pendulum models were centred around the hip with pendular lengths approximately equal to the segment distances from the hip. This observation provides a new approach for using the pendulum model of walking in gait orthosis design.

  4. Predicting human walking gaits with a simple planar model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anne E; Schmiedeler, James P

    2014-04-11

    Models of human walking with moderate complexity have the potential to accurately capture both joint kinematics and whole body energetics, thereby offering more simultaneous information than very simple models and less computational cost than very complex models. This work examines four- and six-link planar biped models with knees and rigid circular feet. The two differ in that the six-link model includes ankle joints. Stable periodic walking gaits are generated for both models using a hybrid zero dynamics-based control approach. To establish a baseline of how well the models can approximate normal human walking, gaits were optimized to match experimental human walking data, ranging in speed from very slow to very fast. The six-link model well matched the experimental step length, speed, and mean absolute power, while the four-link model did not, indicating that ankle work is a critical element in human walking models of this type. Beyond simply matching human data, the six-link model can be used in an optimization framework to predict normal human walking using a torque-squared objective function. The model well predicted experimental step length, joint motions, and mean absolute power over the full range of speeds.

  5. Effectiveness of Motorcycle speed controlled by speed hump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornsiri Urapa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Speed humps are one of the traffic calming measures widely accepted to control vehicle speed in the local road. Humps standards from the western countries are designed mainly for the passenger car. This study, therefore, aims to reveal the effectiveness of speed hump to control the motorcycle speed. This study observes the free-flow speed of the riders at the total of 20 speed bumps and humps. They are 0.3-14.8 meter in width and 5-18 centimeter in height. The results reveal that the 85th percentile speeds reduce 15-65 percent when crossing the speed bumps and speed humps. Besides, this study develops the speed model to predict the motorcycle mean speed and 85th percentile speed. It is found that speed humps follow the ITE standard can control motorcycle crossing speeds to be 25-30 Kph which are suitable to travel on the local road.

  6. Walking and child pedestrian injury: a systematic review of built environment correlates of safe walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Linda; Buliung, Ron; Macarthur, Colin; To, Teresa; Howard, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    The child active transportation literature has focused on walking, with little attention to risk associated with increased traffic exposure. This paper reviews the literature related to built environment correlates of walking and pedestrian injury in children together, to broaden the current conceptualization of walkability to include injury prevention. Two independent searches were conducted focused on walking in children and child pedestrian injury within nine electronic databases until March, 2012. Studies were included which: 1) were quantitative 2) set in motorized countries 3) were either urban or suburban 4) investigated specific built environment risk factors 5) had outcomes of either walking in children and/or child pedestrian roadway collisions (ages 0-12). Built environment features were categorized according to those related to density, land use diversity or roadway design. Results were cross-tabulated to identify how built environment features associate with walking and injury. Fifty walking and 35 child pedestrian injury studies were identified. Only traffic calming and presence of playgrounds/recreation areas were consistently associated with more walking and less pedestrian injury. Several built environment features were associated with more walking, but with increased injury. Many features had inconsistent results or had not been investigated for either outcome. The findings emphasise the importance of incorporating safety into the conversation about creating more walkable cities.

  7. Assessment of exercise capacity in African patients with chronic heart failure using six minutes walk test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufus A Adedoyin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rufus A Adedoyin1, Samuel A Adeyanju2, Michael O Balogun3, Anthony O Akintomide3, Rasaaq A Adebayo3, Patience O Akinwusi4, Taofeek O Awotidebe11Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 2Department of Physical and Health Education, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 3Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 4Department of Medicine, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Osogbo, NigeriaBackground: The purpose of this study was to assess the functional capacity during a 6-minute corridor walk and a 6-minute bicycle ergometry exercise in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Method: Thirty five patients with stable CHF were recruited for the study. Each subject performed six minutes corridor walk and 6-minute bicycle ergometry testing. The 6-minute walk required the subjects to walk at a self selected speed on a 20 meter marked level ground for 6-minute. All the subjects also performed a 6-minute exercise on a stationary bicycle ergometer with initial resistance of 20 watts and increased by 10 watts after 3-minutes. The perceived rate of exertion was assessed using a modified Borg Scale after each exercise mode. The maximum oxygen consumption was derived using American College of Sport Medicine equations.Results: Result showed high positive correlation between distance walked in the 6-minute and the maximum volume of oxygen (VO2 max (r = 0.65, P < 0.01. The average distance walked was 327 m ± 12.03 m. The VO2 max estimated during bicycle ergometry was higher (13.7 ± 1.9 L than during the six minutes walk (8.9 ± 1.2 L.Conclusion: Six minutes walk could be useful to evaluate exercise tolerance in patients with chronic heart failure, while the bicycle ergometer could be more appropriate in the assessment of maximum functional capacity in these patients.Keywords: 6-minute walk, CHF, bicycle ergometer

  8. Speeding Up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU SHUJUN

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of the global financial crisis, China has amazed the world with the speed of its economic recovery. But what has been even more surprising is the speed of its railway evolution. The unveiling of the 1,069-km Wuhan-Guangzhou High-speed Railway on December 26, 2009 pushed China's high-speed rail sys-tem-the total mileage, the average speed and the technology-to rank first in the world almost overnight.

  9. Local dynamic stability of the trunk segments and lower extremity joints during backward walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu; Xiao, Fei; Gu, Dong-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Backward walking has become a popular training method in physical exercise and clinical rehabilitation. For the sake of safety, it is important to keep a stable gait during backward walking. However, the gait stability during backward walking was rarely studied. This study investigated the effects of walking direction on local dynamic stability of the trunk segments (neck, torso and pelvis) and lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint). The maximum Lyapunov exponents (λ(s)) of 17 young healthy male adults were calculated while they were walking under three conditions: backward walking with preferred walking speed (BW), forward walking (FW) with the same speed determined by BW, and forward walking with normal speed (FWN). We found that compared with FW, BW showed significa