WorldWideScience

Sample records for wafer level packaging

  1. Wafer level packaging of MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-01-01

    Wafer level packaging plays many important roles for MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems), including cost, yield and reliability. MEMS structures on silicon chips are encapsulated between bonded wafers or by surface micromachining, and electrical interconnections are made from the cavity. Bonding at the interface, such as glass–Si anodic bonding and metal-to-metal bonding, requires electrical interconnection through the lid vias in many cases. On the other hand, lateral electrical interconnections on the surface of the chip are used for bonding with intermediate melting materials, such as low melting point glass and solder. The cavity formed by surface micromachining is made using sacrificial etching, and the openings needed for the sacrificial etching are plugged using deposition sealing methods. Vacuum packaging methods and the structures for electrical feedthrough for the interconnection are discussed in this review. (topical review)

  2. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  3. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Hilton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  4. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S

    2016-10-31

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors-"low cost" for ubiquitous presence, and "smart" for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  5. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S.

    2016-01-01

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging...

  6. Wafer-level packaged RF-MEMS switches fabricated in a CMOS fab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilmans, H.A.C.; Ziad, H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Di Monaco, O.; Jourdain, A.; De Raedt, W.; Rottenberg, X.; De Backer, E.; Decoussernaeker, A.; Baert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on wafer-level packaged RF-MEMS switches fabricated in a commercial CMOS fab. Switch fabrication is based on a metal surface micromachining process. A novel wafer-level packaging scheme is developed, whereby the switches are housed in on-chip sealed cavities using benzocyclobutene (BCB) as

  7. Novel SU-8 based vacuum wafer-level packaging for MEMS devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murillo, Gonzalo; Davis, Zachary James; Keller, Stephan Urs

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a simple and low-cost SU-8 based wafer-level vacuum packaging method which is CMOS and MEMS compatible. Different approaches have been investigated by taking advantage of the properties of SU-8, such as chemical resistance, optical transparence, mechanical reliability and versa......This work presents a simple and low-cost SU-8 based wafer-level vacuum packaging method which is CMOS and MEMS compatible. Different approaches have been investigated by taking advantage of the properties of SU-8, such as chemical resistance, optical transparence, mechanical reliability...

  8. Wafer-Level Packaging Method for RF MEMS Applications Using Pre-Patterned BCB Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuhao Gong; Yulong Zhang; Xin Guo; Zewen Liu

    2018-01-01

    A radio-frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF MEMS) wafer-level packaging (WLP) method using pre-patterned benzo-cyclo-butene (BCB) polymers with a high-resistivity silicon cap is proposed to achieve high bonding quality and excellent RF performance. In this process, the BCB polymer was pre-defined to form the sealing ring and bonding layer by the spin-coating and patterning of photosensitive BCB before the cavity formation. During anisotropic wet etching of the silicon wafer to gener...

  9. Wafer-level packaging with compression-controlled seal ring bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farino, Anthony J

    2013-11-05

    A device may be provided in a sealed package by aligning a seal ring provided on a first surface of a first semiconductor wafer in opposing relationship with a seal ring that is provided on a second surface of a second semiconductor wafer and surrounds a portion of the second wafer that contains the device. Forcible movement of the first and second wafer surfaces toward one another compresses the first and second seal rings against one another. A physical barrier against the movement, other than the first and second seal rings, is provided between the first and second wafer surfaces.

  10. Wafer-level chip-scale packaging analog and power semiconductor applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Shichun

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a state-of-art and in-depth overview in analog and power WLCSP design, material characterization, reliability, and modeling. Recent advances in analog and power electronic WLCSP packaging are presented based on the development of analog technology and power device integration. The book covers in detail how advances in semiconductor content, analog and power advanced WLCSP design, assembly, materials, and reliability have co-enabled significant advances in fan-in and fan-out with redistributed layer (RDL) of analog and power device capability during recent years. Along with new analog and power WLCSP development, the role of modeling is a key to assure successful package design. An overview of the analog and power WLCSP modeling and typical thermal, electrical, and stress modeling methodologies is also provided. This book also: ·         Covers the development of wafer-level power discrete packaging with regular wafer-level design concepts and directly bumping technology ·    �...

  11. Plasma Etching of Tapered Features in Silicon for MEMS and Wafer Level Packaging Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, H-D; Hiess, Andre; Seidemann, Volker; Studzinski, Daniel; Lange, Martin; Leib, Juergen; Shariff, Dzafir; Ashraf, Huma; Steel, Mike; Atabo, Lilian; Reast, Jon

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a brief report of plasma etching as applied to pattern transfer in silicon. It will focus more on concept overview and strategies for etching of tapered features of interest for MEMS and Wafer Level Packaging (WLP). The basis of plasma etching, the dry etching technique, is explained and plasma configurations are described elsewhere. An important feature of plasma etching is the possibility to achieve etch anisotropy. The plasma etch process is extremely sensitive to many variables such as mask material, mask openings and more important the plasma parameters

  12. Wafer-Level Packaging Method for RF MEMS Applications Using Pre-Patterned BCB Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuhao Gong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A radio-frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF MEMS wafer-level packaging (WLP method using pre-patterned benzo-cyclo-butene (BCB polymers with a high-resistivity silicon cap is proposed to achieve high bonding quality and excellent RF performance. In this process, the BCB polymer was pre-defined to form the sealing ring and bonding layer by the spin-coating and patterning of photosensitive BCB before the cavity formation. During anisotropic wet etching of the silicon wafer to generate the housing cavity, the BCB sealing ring was protected by a sputtered Cr/Au (chromium/gold layer. The average measured thickness of the BCB layer was 5.9 μm. In contrast to the conventional methods of spin-coating BCB after fabricating cavities, the pre-patterned BCB method presented BCB bonding layers with better quality on severe topography surfaces in terms of increased uniformity of thickness and better surface flatness. The observation of the bonded layer showed that no void or gap formed on the protruding coplanar waveguide (CPW lines. A shear strength test was experimentally implemented as a function of the BCB widths in the range of 100–400 μm. The average shear strength of the packaged device was higher than 21.58 MPa. A RF MEMS switch was successfully packaged using this process with a negligible impact on the microwave characteristics and a significant improvement in the lifetime from below 10 million to over 1 billion. The measured insertion loss of the packaged RF MEMS switch was 0.779 dB and the insertion loss deterioration caused by the package structure was less than 0.2 dB at 30 GHz.

  13. Output blue light evaluation for phosphor based smart white LED wafer level packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahdouz, Zahra; Rostamian, Ali; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Ma, Teng; van Zeijl, Henk; Zhang, Kouchi

    2016-02-22

    This study presents a blue light detector for evaluating the output light of phosphor based white LED package. It is composed of a silicon stripe-shaped photodiode designed and implemented in a 2 μm BiCMOS process which can be used for wafer level integration of different passive and active devices all in just 5 lithography steps. The final device shows a high selectivity to blue light. The maximum responsivity at 480 nm is matched with the target blue LED illumination. The designed structure have better responsivity compared to simple photodiode structure due to reducing the effect of dead layer formation close to the surface because of implantation. It has also a two-fold increase in the responsivity and quantum efficiency compared to previously similar published sensors.

  14. Wafer-level vacuum packaged resonant micro-scanning mirrors for compact laser projection displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ulrich; Oldsen, Marten; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim; Janes, Joachim; Heller, Martin; Weiss, Manfred; Fakas, Georgios; Ratzmann, Lars; Marchetti, Eleonora; D'Ascoli, Francesco; Melani, Massimiliano; Bacciarelli, Luca; Volpi, Emilio; Battini, Francesco; Mostardini, Luca; Sechi, Francesco; De Marinis, Marco; Wagner, Bernd

    2008-02-01

    Scanning laser projection using resonant actuated MEMS scanning mirrors is expected to overcome the current limitation of small display size of mobile devices like cell phones, digital cameras and PDAs. Recent progress in the development of compact modulated RGB laser sources enables to set up very small laser projection systems that become attractive not only for consumer products but also for automotive applications like head-up and dash-board displays. Within the last years continuous progress was made in increasing MEMS scanner performance. However, only little is reported on how mass-produceability of these devices and stable functionality even under harsh environmental conditions can be guaranteed. Automotive application requires stable MEMS scanner operation over a wide temperature range from -40° to +85°Celsius. Therefore, hermetic packaging of electrostatically actuated MEMS scanning mirrors becomes essential to protect the sensitive device against particle contamination and condensing moisture. This paper reports on design, fabrication and test of a resonant actuated two-dimensional micro scanning mirror that is hermetically sealed on wafer level. With resonant frequencies of 30kHz and 1kHz, an achievable Theta-D-product of 13mm.deg and low dynamic deformation <20nm RMS it targets Lissajous projection with SVGA-resolution. Inevitable reflexes at the vacuum package surface can be seperated from the projection field by permanent inclination of the micromirror.

  15. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free electrochemical etching approach by selectively patterning an Au film on highly topographic surfaces. The fabricated resonant pressure microsensor with dual resonators was characterized in a systematic manner, producing a quality factor higher than 10,000 (~6 months, a sensitivity of about 166 Hz/kPa and a reduced nonlinear error of 0.033% F.S. Based on the differential output, the sensitivity was increased to two times and the temperature-caused frequency drift was decreased to 25%.

  16. Utilizing an Adaptive Grey Model for Short-Term Time Series Forecasting: A Case Study of Wafer-Level Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Jung Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The wafer-level packaging process is an important technology used in semiconductor manufacturing, and how to effectively control this manufacturing system is thus an important issue for packaging firms. One way to aid in this process is to use a forecasting tool. However, the number of observations collected in the early stages of this process is usually too few to use with traditional forecasting techniques, and thus inaccurate results are obtained. One potential solution to this problem is the use of grey system theory, with its feature of small dataset modeling. This study thus uses the AGM(1,1 grey model to solve the problem of forecasting in the pilot run stage of the packaging process. The experimental results show that the grey approach is an appropriate and effective forecasting tool for use with small datasets and that it can be applied to improve the wafer-level packaging process.

  17. Wafer-level micro-optics: trends in manufacturing, testing, packaging, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Gong, Li; Rieck, Juergen; Zheng, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology (KET) for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the last decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks (supercomputer, ROADM), bringing high-speed internet to our homes (FTTH). Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flashlight shaping elements, the secondary camera, and ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. We report on the state of the art in wafer-based manufacturing, testing, packaging and present examples and applications for micro-optical components and systems.

  18. Through-glass copper via using the glass reflow and seedless electroplating processes for wafer-level RF MEMS packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju-Yong; Lee, Sung-Woo; Lee, Seung-Ki; Park, Jae-Hyoung

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of void-free copper-filled through-glass-vias (TGVs), and their application to the wafer-level radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) packaging scheme. By using the glass reflow process with a patterned silicon mold, a vertical TGV with smooth sidewall and fine pitch could be achieved. Bottom-up void-free filling of the TGV is successfully demonstrated through the seedless copper electroplating process. In addition, the proposed process allows wafer-level packaging with glass cap encapsulation using the anodic bonding process, since the reflowed glass interposer is only formed in the device area surrounded with silicon substrate. A simple coplanar waveguide (CPW) line was employed as the packaged device to evaluate the electrical characteristics and thermo-mechanical reliability of the proposed packaging structure. The fabricated packaging structure showed a low insertion loss of 0.116 dB and a high return loss of 35.537 dB at 20 GHz, which were measured through the whole electrical path, including the CPW line, TGVs and contact pads. An insertion loss lower than 0.1 dB and a return loss higher than 30 dB could be achieved at frequencies of up to 15 GHz, and the resistance of the single copper via was measured to be 36 mΩ. Furthermore, the thermo-mechanical reliability of the proposed packaging structure was also verified through thermal shock and pressure cooker test. (paper)

  19. Self-adaptive phosphor coating technology for wafer-level scale chip packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Linsong; Rao Haibo; Wang Wei; Wan Xianlong; Liao Junyuan; Wang Xuemei; Zhou Da; Lei Qiaolin

    2013-01-01

    A new self-adaptive phosphor coating technology has been successfully developed, which adopted a slurry method combined with a self-exposure process. A phosphor suspension in the water-soluble photoresist was applied and exposed to LED blue light itself and developed to form a conformal phosphor coating with self-adaptability to the angular distribution of intensity of blue light and better-performing spatial color uniformity. The self-adaptive phosphor coating technology had been successfully adopted in the wafer surface to realize a wafer-level scale phosphor conformal coating. The first-stage experiments show satisfying results and give an adequate demonstration of the flexibility of self-adaptive coating technology on application of WLSCP. (semiconductor devices)

  20. Sputtered Encapsulation as Wafer Level Packaging for Isolatable MEMS Devices: A Technique Demonstrated on a Capacitive Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrul Azlan Hamzah

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses sputtered silicon encapsulation as a wafer level packaging approach for isolatable MEMS devices. Devices such as accelerometers, RF switches, inductors, and filters that do not require interaction with the surroundings to function, could thus be fully encapsulated at the wafer level after fabrication. A MEMSTech 50g capacitive accelerometer was used to demonstrate a sputtered encapsulation technique. Encapsulation with a very uniform surface profile was achieved using spin-on glass (SOG as a sacrificial layer, SU-8 as base layer, RF sputtered silicon as main structural layer, eutectic gold-silicon as seal layer, and liquid crystal polymer (LCP as outer encapsulant layer. SEM inspection and capacitance test indicated that the movable elements were released after encapsulation. Nanoindentation test confirmed that the encapsulated device is sufficiently robust to withstand a transfer molding process. Thus, an encapsulation technique that is robust, CMOS compatible, and economical has been successfully developed for packaging isolatable MEMS devices at the wafer level.

  1. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  2. Wafer-level hermetic vacuum packaging by bonding with a copper-tin thin film sealing ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Teruhisa; Funabashi, Hirofumi; Takagi, Hideki; Omura, Yoshiteru; Hata, Yoshiyuki

    2018-04-01

    A wafer-level hermetic vacuum packaging technology intended for use with MEMS devices was developed based on a copper-tin (CuSn) thin film sealing ring. To allow hermetic packaging, the shear strength of the CuSn thin film bond was improved by optimizing the pretreatment conditions. As a result, an average shear strength of 72.3 MPa was obtained and a cavity that had been hermetically sealed using wafer-level packaging (WLP) maintained its vacuum for 1.84 years. The total pressures in the cavities and the partial pressures of residual gases were directly determined with an ultra-low outgassing residual gas analyzer (RGA) system. Hermeticity was evaluated based on helium leak rates, which were calculated from helium pressures determined with the RGA system. The resulting data showed that a vacuum cavity following 1.84 years storage had a total pressure of 83.1 Pa, contained argon as the main residual gas and exhibited a helium leak rate as low as 1.67  ×  10-17 Pa · m3 s-1, corresponding to an air leak rate of 6.19  ×  10-18 Pa · m3 s-1. The RGA data demonstrate that WLP using a CuSn thin film sealing ring permits ultra-high hermeticity in conjunction with long-term vacuum packaging that is applicable to MEMS devices.

  3. Very large scale heterogeneous integration (VLSHI) and wafer-level vacuum packaging for infrared bolometer focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Samel, Björn; Ericsson, Per; Hoivik, Nils; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Kittilsland, Gjermund; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Imaging in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm is an extremely useful tool for non-contact measurement and imaging of temperature in many industrial, automotive and security applications. However, the cost of the infrared (IR) imaging components has to be significantly reduced to make IR imaging a viable technology for many cost-sensitive applications. This paper demonstrates new and improved fabrication and packaging technologies for next-generation IR imaging detectors based on uncooled IR bolometer focal plane arrays. The proposed technologies include very large scale heterogeneous integration for combining high-performance, SiGe quantum-well bolometers with electronic integrated read-out circuits and CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packing. The fabrication and characterization of bolometers with a pitch of 25 μm × 25 μm that are arranged on read-out-wafers in arrays with 320 × 240 pixels are presented. The bolometers contain a multi-layer quantum well SiGe thermistor with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -3.0%/K. The proposed CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packaging technology uses Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. The presented technologies are suitable for implementation in cost-efficient fabless business models with the potential to bring about the cost reduction needed to enable low-cost IR imaging products for industrial, security and automotive applications.

  4. High Performance Microaccelerometer with Wafer-level Hermetic Packaged Sensing Element and Continuous-time BiCMOS Interface Circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Hyoungho; Park, Sangjun; Paik, Seung-Joon; Choi, Byoung-doo; Park, Yonghwa; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Sungwook; Lee, Sang Chul; Lee, Ahra; Yoo, Kwangho; Lim, Jaesang; Cho, Dong-il

    2006-01-01

    A microaccelerometer with highly reliable, wafer-level packaged MEMS sensing element and fully differential, continuous time, low noise, BiCMOS interface circuit is fabricated. The MEMS sensing element is fabricated on a (111)-oriented SOI wafer by using the SBM (Sacrificial/Bulk Micromachining) process. To protect the silicon structure of the sensing element and enhance the reliability, a wafer level hermetic packaging process is performed by using a silicon-glass anodic bonding process. The interface circuit is fabricated using 0.8 μm BiCMOS process. The capacitance change of the MEMS sensing element is amplified by the continuous-time, fully-differential transconductance input amplifier. A chopper-stabilization architecture is adopted to reduce low-frequency noise including 1/f noise. The fabricated microaccelerometer has the total noise equivalent acceleration of 0.89 μg/√Hz, the bias instability of 490 μg, the input range of ±10 g, and the output nonlinearity of ±0.5 %FSO

  5. Wafer level hermetic packaging based on Cu-Sn isothermal solidification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yuhan; Luo Le

    2009-01-01

    A novel wafer level bonding method based on Cu-Sn isothermal solidification technology is established. A multi-layer sealing ring and the bonding processing are designed, and the amount of solder and the bonding parameters are optimized based on both theoretical and experimental results. Verification shows that oxidation of the solder layer, voids and the scalloped-edge appearance of the Cu 6 Sn 5 phase are successfully avoided. An average shear strength of 19.5 MPa and an excellent leak rate of around 1.9 x 10 -9 atm cc/s are possible, meeting the demands of MIL-STD-883E. (semiconductor technology)

  6. Hybrid Wafer-Level Packaging for RF-MEMS and Optoelectronic Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, J.

    2013-01-01

    The current trend in electronic packaging research is to integrate more functions into one package, reduce electrical path parasitic, and increase the heat conduction in order to make the final packaged system smaller, more reliable, more functional and more complete, while keeping the packaging

  7. Effects of wafer-level packaging on millimetre-wave antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Abutarboush, Hattan; Tawfik, Hani H.; Soliman, Ezzeldin A.; Sallam, Mai O.; Shamim, Atif; Sedky, Sherif M.

    2011-01-01

    methods of packaging millimetre-wave (60 GHz) MEMS antennas. The paper first introduces the custom needs for optimum operation of the MEMS antenna and then examines the current available enabling technologies for packaging. The sensitivity of the antenna

  8. Effects of wafer-level packaging on millimetre-wave antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Abutarboush, Hattan

    2011-11-01

    A cost-effective antenna package suitable for mass production mm-wave applications is investigated. Different packaging material that can be possibly used in mm-wave antennas are presented and compared. Moreover, this study investigates different methods of packaging millimetre-wave (60 GHz) MEMS antennas. The paper first introduces the custom needs for optimum operation of the MEMS antenna and then examines the current available enabling technologies for packaging. The sensitivity of the antenna\\'s reflection coefficient, gain and radiation efficiency to the packaging environment is investigated through EM simulations. © 2011 IEEE.

  9. A wafer-level 3D packaging structure with Benzocyclobutene as a dielectric for multichip module fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Fei; Ding Xiaoyun; Xu Gaowei; Luo Le

    2009-01-01

    A new wafer-level 3D packaging structure with Benzocyclobutene (BCB) as interlayer dielectrics (ILDs) for multichip module fabrication is proposed for application in the Ku-band wave. The packaging structure consists of two layers of BCB films and three layers of metallized films, in which the monolithic microwave IC (MMIC), thin film resistors, striplines and microstrip lines are integrated. Wet etched cavities fabricated on the silicon substrate are used for mounting active and passive components. BCB layers cover the components and serve as ILDs for interconnections. Gold bumps are used as electric interconnections between different layers, which eliminates the need to prepare vias by costly dry etching and deposition processes. In order to get high-quality BCB films for the subsequent chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and multilayer metallization processes, the BCB curing profile is optimized and the roughness of the BCB film after the CMP process is kept lower than 10 nm. The thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the packaging structure are investigated. The thermal resistance can be controlled below 2 0 C/W. The average shear strength of the gold bumps on the BCB surface is around 70 N/mm 2 . The performances of MMIC and interconnection structure at high frequencies are optimized and tested. The S-parameters curves of the packaged MMIC shift slightly showing perfect transmission character. The insertion loss change after the packaging process is less than 1 dB range at the operating frequency and the return loss is less than -8 dB from 10 to 15 GHz.

  10. Robust Wafer-Level Thin-Film Encapsulation (Packaging) of Microstructures (MEMS) using Low Stress PECVD Silicon Carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Pham, H.T.M.; Sarro, P.M.; French, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new low-cost, CMOS-compatible and robust wafer-level encapsulation technique developed using a stress-optimised PECVD SiC as the capping and sealing material, imparting harsh environment capability. This technique has been applied for the fabrication and encapsulation of a wide

  11. Eutectic-based wafer-level-packaging technique for piezoresistive MEMS accelerometers and bond characterization using molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, T.; Kazama, A.; Okada, R.; Iwasaki, T.; Isono, Y.

    2018-03-01

    We developed a eutectic-based wafer-level-packaging (WLP) technique for piezoresistive micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers on the basis of molecular dynamics analyses and shear tests of WLP accelerometers. The bonding conditions were experimentally and analytically determined to realize a high shear strength without solder material atoms diffusing to adhesion layers. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometry done after the shear tests clarified the eutectic reaction of the solder materials used in this research. Energy relaxation calculations in MD showed that the diffusion of solder material atoms into the adhesive layer was promoted at a higher temperature. Tensile creep MD simulations also suggested that the local potential energy in a solder material model determined the fracture points of the model. These numerical results were supported by the shear tests and EDX analyses for WLP accelerometers. Consequently, a bonding load of 9.8 kN and temperature of 300 °C were found to be rational conditions because the shear strength was sufficient to endure the polishing process after the WLP process and there was little diffusion of solder material atoms to the adhesion layer. Also, eutectic-bonding-based WLP was effective for controlling the attenuation of the accelerometers by determining the thickness of electroplated solder materials that played the role of a cavity between the accelerometers and lids. If the gap distance between the two was less than 6.2 µm, the signal gains for x- and z-axis acceleration were less than 20 dB even at the resonance frequency due to air-damping.

  12. Wafer level 3-D ICs process technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Chuan Seng; Reif, L Rafael

    2009-01-01

    This book focuses on foundry-based process technology that enables the fabrication of 3-D ICs. The core of the book discusses the technology platform for pre-packaging wafer lever 3-D ICs. However, this book does not include a detailed discussion of 3-D ICs design and 3-D packaging. This is an edited book based on chapters contributed by various experts in the field of wafer-level 3-D ICs process technology. They are from academia, research labs and industry.

  13. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Okabe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna. In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT, the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  14. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-12-16

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  15. Wafer-level packaging technology for RF applications based on a rigid low-loss spacer substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyakov, A.

    2006-01-01

    As mobile portable devices such as cellular system/phones, smart handheld devices and laptop computers acquire wireless connectivity there is a growing demand for greater levels of RF integration. The holy grail of integration is to have a whole set of different components integrated into one chip.

  16. Cost-Efficient Wafer-Level Capping for MEMS and Imaging Sensors by Adhesive Wafer Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. Bleiker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Device encapsulation and packaging often constitutes a substantial part of the fabrication cost of micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS transducers and imaging sensor devices. In this paper, we propose a simple and cost-effective wafer-level capping method that utilizes a limited number of highly standardized process steps as well as low-cost materials. The proposed capping process is based on low-temperature adhesive wafer bonding, which ensures full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS compatibility. All necessary fabrication steps for the wafer bonding, such as cavity formation and deposition of the adhesive, are performed on the capping substrate. The polymer adhesive is deposited by spray-coating on the capping wafer containing the cavities. Thus, no lithographic patterning of the polymer adhesive is needed, and material waste is minimized. Furthermore, this process does not require any additional fabrication steps on the device wafer, which lowers the process complexity and fabrication costs. We demonstrate the proposed capping method by packaging two different MEMS devices. The two MEMS devices include a vibration sensor and an acceleration switch, which employ two different electrical interconnection schemes. The experimental results show wafer-level capping with excellent bond quality due to the re-flow behavior of the polymer adhesive. No impediment to the functionality of the MEMS devices was observed, which indicates that the encapsulation does not introduce significant tensile nor compressive stresses. Thus, we present a highly versatile, robust, and cost-efficient capping method for components such as MEMS and imaging sensors.

  17. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 μm AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 μm pixel size and 160x120, 52 μm pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  18. Wafer-Level Membrane-Transfer Process for Fabricating MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A process for transferring an entire wafer-level micromachined silicon structure for mating with and bonding to another such structure has been devised. This process is intended especially for use in wafer-level integration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) that have been fabricated on dissimilar substrates. Unlike in some older membrane-transfer processes, there is no use of wax or epoxy during transfer. In this process, the substrate of a wafer-level structure to be transferred serves as a carrier, and is etched away once the transfer has been completed. Another important feature of this process is that two electrodes constitutes an electrostatic actuator array. An SOI wafer and a silicon wafer (see Figure 1) are used as the carrier and electrode wafers, respectively. After oxidation, both wafers are patterned and etched to define a corrugation profile and electrode array, respectively. The polysilicon layer is deposited on the SOI wafer. The carrier wafer is bonded to the electrode wafer by using evaporated indium bumps. The piston pressure of 4 kPa is applied at 156 C in a vacuum chamber to provide hermetic sealing. The substrate of the SOI wafer is etched in a 25 weight percent TMAH bath at 80 C. The exposed buried oxide is then removed by using 49 percent HF droplets after an oxygen plasma ashing. The SOI top silicon layer is etched away by using an SF6 plasma to define the corrugation profile, followed by the HF droplet etching of the remaining oxide. The SF6 plasma with a shadow mask selectively etches the polysilicon membrane, if the transferred membrane structure needs to be patterned. Electrostatic actuators with various electrode gaps have been fabricated by this transfer technique. The gap between the transferred membrane and electrode substrate is very uniform ( 0.1 m across a wafer diameter of 100 mm, provided by optimizing the bonding control). Figure 2 depicts the finished product.

  19. Polymer-based 2D/3D wafer level heterogeneous integration for SSL module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.; Wei, J.; Ye, H.; Koh, S.; Harianto, S.; Nieuwenhof, M.A. van den; Zhang, G.Q.

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a heterogeneous integration of solid state lighting (SSL) module, including light source (LED) and driver/control components. Such integration has been realized by the polymer-based reconfigured wafer level package technologies and such structure has been prototyped and

  20. Fabrication of High Aspect Ratio Through-Wafer Vias in CMOS Wafers for 3-D Packaging Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Frank Engel; Frech, J.; Heschel, M.

    2003-01-01

    A process for fabrication of through-wafer vias in CMOS wafers is presented. The process presented offers simple and well controlled fabrication of through-wafer vias using DRIE formation of wafer through-holes, low temperature deposition of through-hole insulation, doubled sided sputtering of Cr...

  1. Functional Testing and Characterisation of ISFETs on Wafer Level by Means of a Micro-droplet Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Schöning

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A wafer-level functionality testing and characterisation system for ISFETs (ion-sensitive field-effect transistor is realised by means of integration of a specifically designedcapillary electrochemical micro-droplet cell into a commercial wafer prober-station. Thedeveloped system allows the identification and selection of “good” ISFETs at the earlieststage and to avoid expensive bonding, encapsulation and packaging processes for non-functioning ISFETs and thus, to decrease costs, which are wasted for bad dies. Thedeveloped system is also feasible for wafer-level characterisation of ISFETs in terms ofsensitivity, hysteresis and response time. Additionally, the system might be also utilised forwafer-level testing of further electrochemical sensors.

  2. Wafer-level manufacturing technology of glass microlenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, U.; Hoeftmann, T.; Wieland, R.; Hansch, W.

    2014-08-01

    In high-tech products, there is an increasing demand to integrate glass lenses into complex micro systems. Especially in the lighting industry LEDs and laser diodes used for automotive applications require encapsulated micro lenses. To enable low-cost production, manufacturing of micro lenses on wafer level base using a replication technology is a key technology. This requires accurate forming of thousands of lenses with a diameter of 1-2 mm on a 200 mm wafer compliant with mass production. The article will discuss the technical aspects of a lens manufacturing replication process and the challenges, which need to be solved: choice of an appropriate master for replication, thermally robust interlayer coating, choice of replica glass, bonding and separation procedure. A promising approach for the master substrate material is based on a lens structured high-quality glass wafer with high melting point covered by a coating layer of amorphous silicon or germanium. This layer serves as an interlayer for the glass bonding process. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes allow a deposition of layer coatings with different hydrogen and doping content influencing their chemical and physical behavior. A time reduced molding process using a float glass enables the formation of high quality lenses while preserving the recyclability of the mother substrate. The challenge is the separation of the replica from the master mold. An overview of chemical methods based on optimized etching of coating layer through small channels will be given and the impact of glass etching on surface roughness is discussed.

  3. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Iacopi, Francesca; Wood, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices. (paper)

  4. Wafer-level testing and test during burn-in for integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bahukudumbi, Sudarshan

    2010-01-01

    Wafer-level testing refers to a critical process of subjecting integrated circuits and semiconductor devices to electrical testing while they are still in wafer form. Burn-in is a temperature/bias reliability stress test used in detecting and screening out potential early life device failures. This hands-on resource provides a comprehensive analysis of these methods, showing how wafer-level testing during burn-in (WLTBI) helps lower product cost in semiconductor manufacturing.Engineers learn how to implement the testing of integrated circuits at the wafer-level under various resource constrain

  5. A wafer-level multi-chip module process with thick photosensitive benzocyclobutene as the dielectric for microwave application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Jiajie; Sun, Xiaowei; Luo, Le

    2011-01-01

    A wafer-level microwave multi-chip module (MMCM) packaging process is presented. Thick photosensitive-benzocyclobutene (photo-BCB) polymer (about 25 µm/layer) is used as the dielectric for its simplified process and the capability of obtaining desirable electrical, chemical and mechanical properties at high frequencies. The MMCM packaging structure contains a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) chip embedded in a lossy-silicon wafer, a microwave band-pass filter (BPF) and two layers of BCB/Au interconnection. Key processes of fabrication are described in detail. The non-uniformity of BCB film and the sidewall angle of the via-holes for inter-layer connection are tested. Via-chains prepared by metal/BCB multilayer structures are tested through the Kelvin test structure to investigate the resistances of inter-layer connection. The average value is measured to be 73.5 mΩ. The electrical characteristic of this structure is obtained by a microwave transmission performance test from 15 to 30 GHz. The measurement results show good consistency between the bare MMIC die and the packaged die in the test frequency band. The gain of the MMIC chip after packaging is better than 18 dB within the designed operating frequency range (from 23 to 25 GHz). When the packaged MMIC chip is connected to a BPF, the maximum gain is still measured to reach 11.95 dB at 23.8 GHz

  6. Design for Reliability of Wafer Level MEMS packaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The world has seen an unrivaled spread of semiconductor technology into virtually any part of society. The main enablers of this semiconductor rush are the decreasing feature size and the constantly decreasing costs of semiconductors. The decreasing costs of semiconductors in general are caused by

  7. Propagation of resist heating mask error to wafer level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, S. V.; Karklin, Linard

    2006-10-01

    As technology is approaching 45 nm and below the IC industry is experiencing a severe product yield hit due to rapidly shrinking process windows and unavoidable manufacturing process variations. Current EDA tools are unable by their nature to deliver optimized and process-centered designs that call for 'post design' localized layout optimization DFM tools. To evaluate the impact of different manufacturing process variations on final product it is important to trace and evaluate all errors through design to manufacturing flow. Photo mask is one of the critical parts of this flow, and special attention should be paid to photo mask manufacturing process and especially to mask tight CD control. Electron beam lithography (EBL) is a major technique which is used for fabrication of high-end photo masks. During the writing process, resist heating is one of the sources for mask CD variations. Electron energy is released in the mask body mainly as heat, leading to significant temperature fluctuations in local areas. The temperature fluctuations cause changes in resist sensitivity, which in turn leads to CD variations. These CD variations depend on mask writing speed, order of exposure, pattern density and its distribution. Recent measurements revealed up to 45 nm CD variation on the mask when using ZEP resist. The resist heating problem with CAR resists is significantly smaller compared to other types of resists. This is partially due to higher resist sensitivity and the lower exposure dose required. However, there is no data yet showing CD errors on the wafer induced by CAR resist heating on the mask. This effect can be amplified by high MEEF values and should be carefully evaluated at 45nm and below technology nodes where tight CD control is required. In this paper, we simulated CD variation on the mask due to resist heating; then a mask pattern with the heating error was transferred onto the wafer. So, a CD error on the wafer was evaluated subject to only one term of the

  8. Wafer-level hermetic thermo-compression bonding using electroplated gold sealing frame planarized by fly-cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farisi, Muhammad Salman Al; Hirano, Hideki; Frömel, Jörg; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel wafer-level hermetic packaging technology for heterogeneous device integration is presented. Hermetic sealing is achieved by low-temperature thermo-compression bonding using electroplated Au micro-sealing frame planarized by single-point diamond fly-cutting. The proposed technology has significant advantages compared to other established processes in terms of integration of micro-structured wafer, vacuum encapsulation and electrical interconnection, which can be achieved at the same time. Furthermore, the technology is also achievable for a bonding frame width as narrow as 30 μm, giving it an advantage from a geometry perspective, and bonding temperatures as low as 300 °C, making it advantageous for temperature-sensitive devices. Outgassing in vacuum sealed cavities is studied and a cavity pressure below 500 Pa is achieved by introducing annealing steps prior to bonding. The pressure of the sealed cavity is measured by zero-balance method utilizing diaphragm-structured bonding test devices. The leak rate into the packages is determined by long-term sealed cavity pressure measurement for 1500 h to be less than 2.0× {{10}-14} Pa m3s-1. In addition, the bonding shear strength is also evaluated to be higher than 100 MPa.

  9. Methods for characterization of wafer-level encapsulation applied on silicon to LTCC anodic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M F; Ghavanini, F A; Enoksson, P; Haasl, S; Löfgren, L; Persson, K; Rusu, C; Schjølberg-Henriksen, K

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents initial results on generic characterization methods for wafer-level encapsulation. The methods, developed specifically to evaluate anodic bonding of low-temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) to Si, are generally applicable to wafer-level encapsulation. Different microelectromechanical system (MEMS) structures positioned over the whole wafer provide local information about the bond quality. The structures include (i) resonating cantilevers as pressure sensors for bond hermeticity, (ii) resonating bridges as stress sensors for measuring the stress induced by the bonding and (iii) frames/mesas for pull tests. These MEMS structures have been designed, fabricated and characterized indicating that local information can easily be obtained. Buried electrodes to enable localized bonding have been implemented and their effectiveness is indicated from first results of the novel Si to LTCC anodic bonding.

  10. Radiation Level Changes at RAM Package Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opperman, Erich [Washington Savannah River Company; Hawk, Mark B [ORNL; Kapoor, Ashok [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Packaging and Transportation; Natali, Ronald [R. B. Natali Consulting, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will explore design considerations required to meet the regulations that limit radiation level variations at external surfaces of radioactive material (RAM) packages. The radiation level requirements at package surfaces (e.g. TS-R-1 paragraphs 531 and 646) invoke not only maximum radiation levels, but also strict limits on the allowable increase in the radiation level during transport. This paper will explore the regulatory requirements by quantifying the amount of near surface movement and/or payload shifting that results in a 20% increase in the radiation level at the package surface. Typical IP-2, IP-3, Type A and Type B packaging and source geometries will be illustrated. Variations in surface radiation levels are typically the result of changes in the geometry of the surface due to an impact, puncture or crush event, or shifting and settling of radioactive contents.

  11. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuite, K.; Winberg, M.R.; McIsaac, C.V. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy through the National Low-Level Waste Management Program and WMG Inc. have entered into a joint development effort to design, build, and demonstrate the Packaged Low-Level Waste Verification System. Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste disposal site operators have no method to independently verify the radionuclide content of packaged low-level waste that arrives at disposal sites for disposition. At this time, the disposal site relies on the low-level waste generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to ensure that low-level waste received meets the site`s waste acceptance criteria. The subject invention provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of low-level waste shipping records to ensure that the site`s waste acceptance criteria are being met. The objective of the prototype system is to demonstrate a mobile system capable of independently verifying the content of packaged low-level waste.

  12. Wafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/Micro- and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Morber, Jenny Ruth

    2009-05-25

    A study was conducted to fabricate wafer-level patterned and aligned polymer nanowire (PNW), micro- and nanotube arrays (PNT), which were created by exposing the polymer material to plasma etching. The approach for producing wafer-level aligned PNWs involved a one-step inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching process. The polymer nanowire array was fabricated in an ICP reactive ion milling chamber with a pressure of 10mTorr. Argon (Ar), O 2, and CF4 gases were released into the chamber as etchants at flow rates of 15 sccm, 10 sccm, and 40 sccm. Inert gasses, such as Ar-form positive ions were incorporated to serve as a physical component to assist in the material degradation process. One power source (400 W) was used to generate dense plasma from the input gases, while another power source applied a voltage of approximately 600V to accelerate the plasma toward the substrate.

  13. CMOS-MEMS Test-Key for Extracting Wafer-Level Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Zen Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops the technologies of mechanical characterization of CMOS-MEMS devices, and presents a robust algorithm for extracting mechanical properties, such as Young’s modulus, and mean stress, through the external electrical circuit behavior of the micro test-key. An approximate analytical solution for the pull-in voltage of bridge-type test-key subjected to electrostatic load and initial stress is derived based on Euler’s beam model and the minimum energy method. Then one can use the aforesaid closed form solution of the pull-in voltage to extract the Young’s modulus and mean stress of the test structures. The test cases include the test-key fabricated by a TSMC 0.18 μm standard CMOS process, and the experimental results refer to Osterberg’s work on the pull-in voltage of single crystal silicone microbridges. The extracted material properties calculated by the present algorithm are valid. Besides, this paper also analyzes the robustness of this algorithm regarding the dimension effects of test-keys. This mechanical properties extracting method is expected to be applicable to the wafer-level testing in micro-device manufacture and compatible with the wafer-level testing in IC industry since the test process is non-destructive.

  14. Low-temperature wafer-level gold thermocompression bonding: modeling of flatness deviations and associated process optimization for high yield and tough bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Tsau, Christine H.; Spearing, S. Mark

    2005-01-01

    Wafer-level, thermocompression bonding is a promising technique for MEMS packaging. The quality of the bond is critically dependent on the interaction between flatness deviations, the gold film properties and the process parameters and tooling used to achieve the bonds. The effect of flatness deviations on the resulting bond is investigated in the current work. The strain energy release rate associated with the elastic deformation required to overcome wafer bow is calculated. A contact yield criterion is used to examine the pressure and temperature conditions required to flatten surface roughness asperities in order to achieve bonding over the full apparent area. The results are compared to experimental data of bond yield and toughness obtained from four-point bend delamination testing and microscopic observations of the fractured surfaces. Conclusions from the modeling and experiments indicate that wafer bow has negligible effect on determining the variability of bond quality and that the well-bonded area is increased with increasing bonding pressure. The enhanced understanding of the underlying deformation mechanisms allows for a better controlled trade-off between the bonding pressure and temperature.

  15. All-in-One Wafer-Level Solution for MMIC Automatic Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an all-in-one wafer-level solution for MMIC (monolithic microwave integrated circuit automatic testing. The OSL (open short load two tier de-embedding, the calibration verification model, the accurate PAE (power added efficiency testing, and the optimized vector cold source NF (noise figure measurement techniques are integrated in this solution to improve the measurement accuracy. A dual-core topology formed by an IPC (industrial personal computer and a VNA (vector network analyzer, and an automatic test software based on a three-level driver architecture, are applied to enhance the test efficiency. The benefit from this solution is that all the data of a MMIC can be achieved in only one contact, which shows state-of-the-art accuracy and efficiency.

  16. Molded, wafer level optics for long wave infra-red applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, John

    2016-05-01

    For many years, the Thermal Imaging market has been driven by the high volume consumer market. The first signs of this came with the launch of night vision systems for cars, first by Cadillac and Honda and then, more successfully by BMW, Daimler and Audi. For the first time, simple thermal imaging systems were being manufactured at the rate of more than 10,000 units a year. This step change in volumes enabled a step change in system costs, with thermal imaging moving into the consumer's price range. Today we see that the consumer awareness and the consumer market continues to increase with the launch of a number of consumer focused smart phone add-ons. This has brought a further step change in system costs, with the possibility to turn your mobile phone into a thermal imager for under $250. As the detector technology has matured, the pixel pitches have dropped from 50μm in 2002 to 12 μm or even 10μm in today's detectors. This dramatic shrinkage in size has had an equally dramatic effect on the optics required to produce the image on the detector. A moderate field of view that would have required a focal length of 40mm in 2002 now requires a focal length of 8mm. For wide field of view applications and small detector formats, focal lengths in the range 1mm to 5mm are becoming common. For lenses, the quantity manufactured, quality and costs will require a new approach to high volume Infra-Red (IR) manufacturing to meet customer expectations. This, taken with the SwaP-C requirements and the emerging requirement for very small lenses driven by the new detectors, suggests that wafer scale optics are part of the solution. Umicore can now present initial results from an intensive research and development program to mold and coat wafer level optics, using its chalcogenide glass, GASIR®.

  17. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  18. Full Wafer Redistribution and Wafer Embedding as Key Technologies for a Multi-Scale Neuromorphic Hardware Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Zoschke, Kai; Güttler, Maurice; Böttcher, Lars; Grübl, Andreas; Husmann, Dan; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz; Ehrmann, Oswin

    2018-01-01

    Together with the Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics(KIP) the Fraunhofer IZM has developed a full wafer redistribution and embedding technology as base for a large-scale neuromorphic hardware system. The paper will give an overview of the neuromorphic computing platform at the KIP and the associated hardware requirements which drove the described technological developments. In the first phase of the project standard redistribution technologies from wafer level packaging were adapted to enable a ...

  19. Low-level waste packaging--a managerial perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, G.P.; Hebbard, L.B. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This paper emphasizes managerial responsibility for assuring that facility waste is properly packaged. Specifically, existing packaging regulations are summarized, several actual violations are reviewed and, lastly, some recommendations are made to assist managerial personnel in fulfilling their responsibility to ensure that low-level waste is packaged safely and properly before shipment to the disposal site

  20. Investigation of Surface Pre-Treatment Methods for Wafer-Level Cu-Cu Thermo-Compression Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Tanaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To increase the yield of the wafer-level Cu-Cu thermo-compression bonding method, certain surface pre-treatment methods for Cu are studied which can be exposed to the atmosphere before bonding. To inhibit re-oxidation under atmospheric conditions, the reduced pure Cu surface is treated by H2/Ar plasma, NH3 plasma and thiol solution, respectively, and is covered by Cu hydride, Cu nitride and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM accordingly. A pair of the treated wafers is then bonded by the thermo-compression bonding method, and evaluated by the tensile test. Results show that the bond strengths of the wafers treated by NH3 plasma and SAM are not sufficient due to the remaining surface protection layers such as Cu nitride and SAMs resulting from the pre-treatment. In contrast, the H2/Ar plasma–treated wafer showed the same strength as the one with formic acid vapor treatment, even when exposed to the atmosphere for 30 min. In the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS measurement of the H2/Ar plasma–treated Cu sample, the total number of the detected H2 was 3.1 times more than the citric acid–treated one. Results of the TDS measurement indicate that the modified Cu surface is terminated by chemisorbed hydrogen atoms, which leads to high bonding strength.

  1. Electrical Interconnections Through CMOS Wafers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Frank Engel

    2003-01-01

    Chips with integrated vias are currently the ultimate miniaturizing solution for 3D packaging of microsystems. Previously the application of vias has almost exclusively been demonstrated within MEMS technology, and only a few of these via technologies have been CMOS compatible. This thesis...... describes the development of vias through a silicon wafer containing Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry. Two via technologies have been developed and fabricated in blank silicon wafers; one based on KOH etching of wafer through-holes and one based on DRIE of wafer through......-holes. The most promising of these technologies --- the DRIE based process --- has been implemented in CMOS wafers containing hearing aid amplifiers. The main challenges in the development of a CMOS compatible via process depend on the chosen process for etching of wafer through-holes. In the case of KOH etching...

  2. Analysis and modeling of wafer-level process variability in 28 nm FD-SOI using split C-V measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Krishna; Poiroux, Thierry; Scheer, Patrick; Juge, André; Gouget, Gilles; Ghibaudo, Gérard

    2018-07-01

    This work details the analysis of wafer level global process variability in 28 nm FD-SOI using split C-V measurements. The proposed approach initially evaluates the native on wafer process variability using efficient extraction methods on split C-V measurements. The on-wafer threshold voltage (VT) variability is first studied and modeled using a simple analytical model. Then, a statistical model based on the Leti-UTSOI compact model is proposed to describe the total C-V variability in different bias conditions. This statistical model is finally used to study the contribution of each process parameter to the total C-V variability.

  3. Analysis and wafer-level design of a high-order silicon vibration isolator for resonating MEMS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Won; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil; Perkins, Noel C

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis and preliminary design, fabrication, and measurement for mechanical vibration-isolation platforms especially designed for resonating MEMS devices including gyroscopes. Important parameters for designing isolation platforms are specified and the first platform (in designs with cascaded multiple platforms) is crucial for improving vibration-isolation performance and minimizing side-effects on integrated gyroscopes. This isolation platform, made from a thick silicon wafer substrate for an environment-resistant MEMS package, incorporates the functionalities of a previous design including vacuum packaging and thermal resistance with no additional resources. This platform consists of platform mass, isolation beams, vertical feedthroughs, and bonding pads. Two isolation platform designs follow from two isolation beam designs: lateral clamped–clamped beams and vertical torsion beams. The beams function simultaneously as mechanical springs and electrical interconnects. The vibration-isolation platform can yield a multi-dimensional, high-order mechanical low pass filter. The isolation platform possesses eight interconnects within a 12.2 × 12.2 mm 2 footprint. The contact resistance ranges from 4–11 Ω depending on the beam design. Vibration measurements using a laser-Doppler vibrometer demonstrate that the lateral vibration-isolation platform suppresses external vibration having frequencies exceeding 2.1 kHz.

  4. An electret-based energy harvesting device with a wafer-level fabrication process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Wang, Fei; Hansen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a MEMS energy harvesting device which is able to generate power from two perpendicular ambient vibration directions. A CYTOP polymer is used both as the electret material for electrostatic transduction and as a bonding interface for low-temperature wafer bonding. The device...... is also discussed. With a final chip size of about 1 cm2, a power output of 32.5 nW is successfully harvested with an external load of 17 MΩ, when a harmonic vibration source with an RMS acceleration amplitude of 0.03 g (∼0.3 m s−2) and a resonant frequency of 179 Hz is applied. These results can...

  5. Non-Destructive Damping Measurement for Wafer-Level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    small geometries and inertial forces are often negligible, so the behavior of fluids is based primarily on the viscous effects.3 Experimental...system modeling. In isolated environments filled with a working fluid that dissipates energy, damping between parallel and sliding plates that are... damper in a second-order differential equation. Fig. 1 Example of the data taken by the data acquisition device The impact table will produce high

  6. Substrate Crosstalk Suppression Using Wafer-Level Packaging : Metalized Through-Substrate Trench Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaga, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The demand for miniaturization technology has been increasing over the last decades. Consumer electronics end-users often, if not always, go for more functionality and practicality. This is translated into systems that are more complex and yet smaller in size such as smart cellular phones and

  7. Heterogeneous Electronics – Wafer Level Integration, Packaging, and Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility integrates active electronics with microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices at the miniature system scale. It obviates current size-, weight-, and power...

  8. Digital Platform for Wafer-Level MEMS Testing and Characterization Using Electrical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Brito

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The uniqueness of microelectromechanical system (MEMS devices, with their multiphysics characteristics, presents some limitations to the borrowed test methods from traditional integrated circuits (IC manufacturing. Although some improvements have been performed, this specific area still lags behind when compared to the design and manufacturing competencies developed over the last decades by the IC industry. A complete digital solution for fast testing and characterization of inertial sensors with built-in actuation mechanisms is presented in this paper, with a fast, full-wafer test as a leading ambition. The full electrical approach and flexibility of modern hardware design technologies allow a fast adaptation for other physical domains with minimum effort. The digital system encloses a processor and the tailored signal acquisition, processing, control, and actuation hardware control modules, capable of the structure position and response analysis when subjected to controlled actuation signals in real time. The hardware performance, together with the simplicity of the sequential programming on a processor, results in a flexible and powerful tool to evaluate the newest and fastest control algorithms. The system enables measurement of resonant frequency (Fr, quality factor (Q, and pull-in voltage (Vpi within 1.5 s with repeatability better than 5 ppt (parts per thousand. A full-wafer with 420 devices under test (DUTs has been evaluated detecting the faulty devices and providing important design specification feedback to the designers.

  9. Packaging and transport of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.J.S.; Streatfield, R.E.

    1987-02-01

    The paper presents an overview of Nirex proposals for the packaging and transport of low and intermediate-level radioactive waste, as well as the regulatory requirements which must be met in such operations. (author)

  10. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2017-01-01

    This second edition continues to be the most comprehensive review on the developments in advanced electronic packaging technologies, with a focus on materials and processing. Recognized experts in the field contribute to 22 updated and new chapters that provide comprehensive coverage on various 3D package architectures, novel bonding and joining techniques, wire bonding, wafer thinning techniques, organic substrates, and novel approaches to make electrical interconnects between integrated circuit and substrates. Various chapters also address advances in several key packaging materials, including: Lead-free solders Flip chip underfills Epoxy molding compounds Conductive adhesives Die attach adhesives/films Thermal interface materials (TIMS) Materials for fabricating embedded passives including capacitors, inductors, and resistors Materials and processing aspects on wafer-level chip scale package (CSP) and MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) Contributors also review new and emerging technologies such as Light ...

  11. Design and development of wafer-level near-infrared micro-camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, John W.; Rouse, Caitlin; Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Dhar, Nibir K.; Lewis, Jay S.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Puri, Yash R.; Sood, Ashok K.

    2015-08-01

    SiGe offers a low-cost alternative to conventional infrared sensor material systems such as InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe for developing near-infrared (NIR) photodetector devices that do not require cooling and can offer high bandwidths and responsivities. As a result of the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficients between germanium and silicon, tensile strain incorporated into Ge epitaxial layers deposited on Si utilizing specialized growth processes can extend the operational range of detection to 1600 nm and longer wavelengths. We have fabricated SiGe based PIN detector devices on 300 mm diameter Si wafers in order to take advantage of high throughput, large-area complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This device fabrication process involves low temperature epitaxial deposition of Ge to form a thin p+ seed/buffer layer, followed by higher temperature deposition of a thicker Ge intrinsic layer. An n+-Ge layer formed by ion implantation of phosphorus, passivating oxide cap, and then top copper contacts complete the PIN photodetector design. Various techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have been employed to characterize the material and structural properties of the epitaxial growth and fabricated detector devices. In addition, electrical characterization was performed to compare the I-V dark current vs. photocurrent response as well as the time and wavelength varying photoresponse properties of the fabricated devices, results of which are likewise presented.

  12. Low level radwaste packaging: why not cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Over the past several years many words have been expended in a quest to define a variety of competing radioactive waste immobilization technologies. With the more recent recognition of the technical pitfalls of urea-formaldehyde (UF) a liquid chemical binder considered as optimum less than two years ago, utilities, architect-engineers and systems vendors find themselves in a technology void, awaiting the inevitable breakthrough which will identify the perfect immobilization agent. The culmination of these pressures has brought about the introduction of new immobilization technologies including: one which offers both volume reduction and immobilization in yet another new binder agent; the costly development of highly sophisticated volume reduction systems, the highly-concentrated products from which may pose as-yet unknown immobilization problems; and, the marketing of several new more expensive liquid chemical binders which are reputed to have eliminated the kinds of problems associated with urea-formaldehyde. This paper addresses these issues by coming full circle and arriving back at the initial approach employed for low level radwaste immobilization, the use of cement. Based on an evaluation of the three principal competing immobilization approaches, liquid chemical, bitumen and cement, the merits and drawbacks of each is examined. As will be described, an objective assessment of these competing technologies has resulted in a somewhat surprising conclusion that, while none of the approaches is without disadvantages, cement can be shown to offer the most reliable, versatile long-term solution to today's needs

  13. Software refactoring at the package level using clustering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing, modifying or adapting the software to new requirements increases the internal software complexity. Software with high level of internal complexity is difficult to maintain. Software refactoring reduces software complexity and hence decreases the maintenance effort. However, software refactoring becomes quite challenging task as the software evolves. The authors use clustering as a pattern recognition technique to assist in software refactoring activities at the package level. The approach presents a computer aided support for identifying ill-structured packages and provides suggestions for software designer to balance between intra-package cohesion and inter-package coupling. A comparative study is conducted applying three different clustering techniques on different software systems. In addition, the application of refactoring at the package level using an adaptive k-nearest neighbour (A-KNN) algorithm is introduced. The authors compared A-KNN technique with the other clustering techniques (viz. single linkage algorithm, complete linkage algorithm and weighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages). The new technique shows competitive performance with lower computational complexity. © 2011 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  14. Demonstration tests for low level radioactive waste packaging safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, I.; Shimura, S.; Miki, T.; Tamamura, T.; Kunitomi, K.

    1993-01-01

    The transport packaging for low level radioactive waste (so-called the LLW packaging) has been developed to be utilized for transportation of LLW in 200 liter-drums from Japanese nuclear power stations to the LLW Disposal Center at Rokkashomura in Aomori Prefecture. Transportation is expected to start from December in 1992. We will explain the brief history of the development, technical features and specifications as well as two kinds of safety demonstration tests, namely one is '1.2 meter free drop test' and the other is 'ISO container standard test'. (J.P.N.)

  15. Off-line wafer level reliability control: unique measurement method to monitor the lifetime indicator of gate oxide validated within bipolar/CMOS/DMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnard, Xavier; Bonnaud, Olivier

    2000-08-01

    We have recently published a paper on a new rapid method for the determination of the lifetime of the gate oxide involved in a Bipolar/CMOS/DMOS technology (BCD). Because this previous method was based on a current measurement with gate voltage as a parameter needing several stress voltages, it was applied only by lot sampling. Thus, we tried to find an indicator in order to monitor the gate oxide lifetime during the wafer level parametric test and involving only one measurement of the device on each wafer test cell. Using the Weibull law and Crook model, combined with our recent model, we have developed a new test method needing only one electrical measurement of MOS capacitor to monitor the quality of the gate oxide. Based also on a current measurement, the parameter is the lifetime indicator of the gate oxide. From the analysis of several wafers, we gave evidence of the possibility to detect a low performance wafer, which corresponds to the infantile failure on the Weibull plot. In order to insert this new method in the BCD parametric program, a parametric flowchart was established. This type of measurement is an important challenges, because the actual measurements, breakdown charge, Qbd, and breakdown electric field, Ebd, at parametric level and Ebd and interface states density, Dit during the process cannot guarantee the gate oxide lifetime all along fabrication process. This indicator measurement is the only one, which predicts the lifetime decrease.

  16. A novel patterning control strategy based on real-time fingerprint recognition and adaptive wafer level scanner optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekli, Hakki Ergun; Nije, Jelle; Ypma, Alexander; Bastani, Vahid; Sonntag, Dag; Niesing, Henk; Zhang, Linmiao; Ullah, Zakir; Subramony, Venky; Somasundaram, Ravin; Susanto, William; Matsunobu, Masazumi; Johnson, Jeff; Tabery, Cyrus; Lin, Chenxi; Zou, Yi

    2018-03-01

    In addition to lithography process and equipment induced variations, processes like etching, annealing, film deposition and planarization exhibit variations, each having their own intrinsic characteristics and leaving an effect, a `fingerprint', on the wafers. With ever tighter requirements for CD and overlay, controlling these process induced variations is both increasingly important and increasingly challenging in advanced integrated circuit (IC) manufacturing. For example, the on-product overlay (OPO) requirement for future nodes is approaching process induced variance to become extremely small. Process variance control is seen as an bottleneck to further shrink which drives the need for more sophisticated process control strategies. In this context we developed a novel `computational process control strategy' which provides the capability of proactive control of each individual wafer with aim to maximize the yield, without introducing a significant impact on metrology requirements, cycle time or productivity. The complexity of the wafer process is approached by characterizing the full wafer stack building a fingerprint library containing key patterning performance parameters like Overlay, Focus, etc. Historical wafer metrology is decomposed into dominant fingerprints using Principal Component Analysis. By associating observed fingerprints with their origin e.g. process steps, tools and variables, we can give an inline assessment of the strength and origin of the fingerprints on every wafer. Once the fingerprint library is established, a wafer specific fingerprint correction recipes can be determined based on its processing history. Data science techniques are used in real-time to ensure that the library is adaptive. To realize this concept, ASML TWINSCAN scanners play a vital role with their on-board full wafer detection and exposure correction capabilities. High density metrology data is created by the scanner for each wafer and on every layer during the

  17. Wafer-level integration of NiTi shape memory alloy on silicon using Au–Si eutectic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradin, Henrik; Bushra, Sobia; Braun, Stefan; Stemme, Göran; Van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the wafer level integration of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) sheets with silicon substrates through Au–Si eutectic bonding. Different bond parameters, such as Au layer thicknesses and substrate surface treatments were evaluated. The amount of gold in the bond interface is the most important parameter to achieve a high bond yield; the amount can be determined by the barrier layers between the Au and Si or by the amount of Au deposition. Deposition of a gold layer of more than 1 μm thickness before bonding gives the most promising results. Through patterning of the SMA sheet and by limiting bonding to small areas, stresses created by the thermal mismatch between Si and NiTi are reduced. With a gold layer of 1 μm thickness and bond areas between 200 × 200 and 800 × 800 μm 2 a high bond strength and a yield above 90% is demonstrated. (paper)

  18. Material size effects on crack growth along patterned wafer-level Cu–Cu bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    together. Crack growth along the bond interface is here studied numerically using finite element analyses. The experiments have shown that plasticity in the Cu films makes a major contribution to the macroscopic interface toughness. To account for the size dependence of the plastic flow a strain gradient...... plasticity model is applied here for the metal. A cohesive zone model is applied to represent the crack growth along the bond between the two Cu films. This cohesive zone model incorporates the effect of higher order stresses in the continuum, such that the higher order tractions on the crack faces decay...... the toughness peak and the subsequent plateau level are highly sensitive to the value of the characteristic material length. A small material length, relative to the thickness of the Cu film, gives high toughness whereas a length comparable to the film thickness gives much reduced crack growth resistance...

  19. Low-Level Radioactive Waste siting simulation information package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Department of Energy's National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program has developed a simulation exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The siting simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, can involve 14-70 participants (or more), and requires approximately eight hours to complete. The exercise is available for use by states, regional compacts, or other organizations for use as part of the planning process for low-level waste disposal facilities. This information package describes the development, content, and use of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation. Information is provided on how to organize a workshop for conducting the simulation. 1 ref., 1 fig

  20. Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is duty of the seller to pack the goods in a manner which assures their safe arrival and enables their handling in transit and at the place of destination. The problem of packing is relevant in two main respects. First of all the buyer is in certain circumstances entitled to refuse acceptance of the goods if they are not properly packed. Second, the package is relevant to calculation of price and freight based on weight. In the case of export trade, the package should conform to the legislation in the country of destination. The impact of package on environment is regulated by environment protection regulation of Republic if Serbia.

  1. A 45° saw-dicing process applied to a glass substrate for wafer-level optical splitter fabrication for optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, M. J.; Costa, C. G.; Silva, M. F.; Gonçalves, S. B.; Peixoto, A. C.; Ribeiro, A. Fernando; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.; Correia, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on the development of a technology for the wafer-level fabrication of an optical Michelson interferometer, which is an essential component in a micro opto-electromechanical system (MOEMS) for a miniaturized optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The MOEMS consists on a titanium dioxide/silicon dioxide dielectric beam splitter and chromium/gold micro-mirrors. These optical components are deposited on 45° tilted surfaces to allow the horizontal/vertical separation of the incident beam in the final micro-integrated system. The fabrication process consists of 45° saw dicing of a glass substrate and the subsequent deposition of dielectric multilayers and metal layers. The 45° saw dicing is fully characterized in this paper, which also includes an analysis of the roughness. The optimum process results in surfaces with a roughness of 19.76 nm (rms). The actual saw dicing process for a high-quality final surface results as a compromise between the dicing blade’s grit size (#1200) and the cutting speed (0.3 mm s-1). The proposed wafer-level fabrication allows rapid and low-cost processing, high compactness and the possibility of wafer-level alignment/assembly with other optical micro components for OCT integrated imaging.

  2. Hanford high-level waste melter system evaluation data packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, M.L.; Shafer, P.J.; Lamar, D.A.; Merrill, R.A.; Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.

    1996-03-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System is selecting a reference melter system for the Hanford High-Level Waste vitrification plant. A melter evaluation was conducted in FY 1994 to narrow down the long list of potential melter technologies to a few for testing. A formal evaluation was performed by a Melter Selection Working Group (MSWG), which met in June and August 1994. At the June meeting, MSWG evaluated 15 technologies and selected six for more thorough evaluation at the Aug. meeting. All 6 were variations of joule-heated or induction-heated melters. Between the June and August meetings, Hanford site staff and consultants compiled data packages for each of the six melter technologies as well as variants of the baseline technologies. Information was solicited from melter candidate vendors to supplement existing information. This document contains the data packages compiled to provide background information to MSWG in support of the evaluation of the six technologies. (A separate evaluation was performed by Fluor Daniel, Inc. to identify balance of plant impacts if a given melter system was selected.)

  3. Containers for packaging of solid and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive wastes are generated at all stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and also from the medical, industrial and research applications of radiation. These wastes can potentially present risks to health and the environment if they are not managed adequately. Their effective management will require the wastes to be safely stored, transported and ultimately disposed of. The waste container, which may be defined as any vessel, drum or box, made from metals, concrete, polymers or composite materials, in which the waste form is placed for interim storage, for transport and/or for final disposal, is an integral part of the whole package for the management of low and intermediate level wastes. It has key roles to play in several stages of the waste management process, starting from the storage of raw wastes and ending with the disposal of conditioned wastes. This report provides an overview of the various roles that a container may play and the factors that are important in each of these roles. This report has two main objectives. The first is to review the main requirements for the design of waste containers. The second is to provide advice on the design, fabrication and handling of different types of containers used in the management of low and intermediate level radioactive solid wastes. Recommendations for design and testing are given, based on the extensive experience available worldwide in waste management. This report is not intended to have any regulatory status or objectives. 56 refs, 16 figs, 10 tabs

  4. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  5. The packaging of intermediate and low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Solid radioactive wastes will generally require some kind of packaging to prepare them for a period of storage followed probably by a land burial. In this Paper the specification of the package is discussed in relation to the properties which will facilitate those two phases of the management of the waste. It is concluded that, by adopting the philosophy of redundant barriers for the disposal phase, a suitable package can be specified for any particular waste product even before the repository site has been selected. Low water flow and an appropriate depth to reduce the risk of accidental re-exposure are the technical site parameters for which particular values will have to be assured at that stage. (author)

  6. High-κ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material in low temperature wafer-level bonding for 3D integration application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J., E-mail: fanji@hust.edu.cn; Tu, L. C. [MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Physical Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tan, C. S. [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-03-15

    This work systematically investigated a high-κ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} material for low temperature wafer-level bonding for potential applications in 3D microsystems. A clean Si wafer with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness of 50 nm was applied as our experimental approach. Bonding was initiated in a clean room ambient after surface activation, followed by annealing under inert ambient conditions at 300 °C for 3 h. The investigation consisted of three parts: a mechanical support study using the four-point bending method, hermeticity measurements using the helium bomb test, and thermal conductivity analysis for potential heterogeneous bonding. Compared with samples bonded using a conventional oxide bonding material (SiO{sub 2}), a higher interfacial adhesion energy (∼11.93 J/m{sup 2}) and a lower helium leak rate (∼6.84 × 10{sup −10} atm.cm{sup 3}/sec) were detected for samples bonded using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. More importantly, due to the excellent thermal conductivity performance of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this technology can be used in heterogeneous direct bonding, which has potential applications for enhancing the performance of Si photonic integrated devices.

  7. Implementation of a monolithic capacitive accelerometer in a wafer-level 0.18 µm CMOS MEMS process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Sheng-Hsiang; Lu, Michael S-C; Wu, Po-Chang; Teng, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Hann-Huei; Juang, Ying-Zong

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) accelerometer implemented in a 0.18 µm multi-project wafer (MPW) CMOS MEMS process. In addition to the standard CMOS process, an additional aluminum layer and a thick photoresist masking layer are employed to achieve etching and microstructural release. The structural thickness of the accelerometer is up to 9 µm and the minimum structural spacing is 2.3 µm. The out-of-plane deflection resulted from the vertical stress gradient over the whole device is controlled to be under 0.2 µm. The chip area containing the micromechanical structure and switched-capacitor sensing circuit is 1.18 × 0.9 mm 2 , and the total power consumption is only 0.7 mW. Within the sensing range of ±6 G, the measured nonlinearity is 1.07% and the cross-axis sensitivities with respect to the in-plane and out-of-plane are 0.5% and 5.8%, respectively. The average sensitivity of five tested accelerometers is 191.4 mV G −1 with a standard deviation of 2.5 mV G −1 . The measured output noise floor is 354 µG Hz −1/2 , corresponding to a 100 Hz 1 G sinusoidal acceleration. The measured output offset voltage is about 100 mV at 27 °C, and the zero-G temperature coefficient of the accelerometer output is 0.94 mV °C −1 below 85 °C. (paper)

  8. Alternatives for packaging and transport of greater-than-class C low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.

    1990-06-01

    Viable methods for packaging greater-than-class C (GTCC) low-level wastes and for transporting those wastes from the waste generator sites or from an eastern interim storage site to the Yucca Mountain repository site have been identified and evaluated. Estimated costs for packaging and transporting the population of GTCC wastes expected to be accumulated through the year 2040 have been developed for three waste volume scenarios, for two preferred packaging methods for activated metals from reactor operations and from reactor decommissioning, and for two packaging density assumptions for the activated metals from reactor decommissioning. 7 refs. 7 tabs

  9. Thermal analysis of Yucca Mountain commercial high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenhofen, M.K.; Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-10-01

    The thermal performance of commercial high-level waste packages was evaluated on a preliminary basis for the candidate Yucca Mountain repository site. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate for waste package component temperatures as a function of isolation time in tuff. Several recommendations are made concerning the additional information and modeling needed to evaluate the thermal performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system

  10. Software refactoring at the package level using clustering techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalid, A.; Alshayeb, M.; Mahmoud, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing, modifying or adapting the software to new requirements increases the internal software complexity. Software with high level of internal complexity is difficult to maintain. Software refactoring reduces software complexity and hence

  11. Study of the impact behaviour of packages containing intermediate level radioactive waste coming from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.; Lund, J.S.; Meredith, P.; Walker, P.; Wells, D.A.; Jowett, J.; Kinsella, K.

    1989-01-01

    The following describes primarily an experimental study into the benefits, for impact resistance, to be gained by incorporating a welded lid into the design of the cement filled drum type of intermediate level waste package. Tests on packages which were not provided with a lid showed that matrix material began to be expelled from drop heights of about 16m. This damage threshold was similar for packages composed of both high and low strength matrix. Above the damage threshold, however, the rate of increase of expelled mass with drop height was greater for the packages filled with a low strength matrix. Similar tests were conducted with specimens to which a lid had been attached by welding. Even from the greatest drop height available at the test facility (28m) only one package showed a significant amount of drum tearing but even then little matrix was lost. The benefits of incorporating a welded lid into package design were thus clearly established. Simple calculations were performed to predict the local deformations and deceleration/time histories of the packages. By optimisation of the impact resistive stress used in the computer model, final knockback areas were predicted to an accuracy of 30%. The average deceleration predicted for four of the six tests for which deceleration histories were available were also within 30% of measured values

  12. The packaging and transport of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.; Price, M.S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Up to the present time, the majority of the radioactive waste which has been transported in the United Kingdom has been low level waste for disposal in the trenches of the shallow burial site operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc at Drigg and also the packaged waste destined for sea disposal in the annual operation. However, the main bulk of the low and intermediate level wastes which have been generated over the last quarter century remain in store at the various nuclear sites where it originated. Before significant packaging and transport of intermediate level wastes takes place it is desirable to examine the sources and types of wastes, the immobilisation and packaging processes and plants, the transport, and the problems of handling of packages at future land repositories. Optimisation of the packaging and transport must take account of both the upstream and downstream con=straints as well as the implications of complying with both the IAEA Transport Regulations and radiological protection guidelines. Packages for sea disposal must in addition comply with the requirements of the London Dumping Convention and the NEA guidelines. (author)

  13. Improvement of level-1 PSA computer code package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Park, C. K.; Kim, K. Y.; Han, S. H.; Jung, W. D.; Chang, S. C.; Yang, J. E.; Sung, T. Y.; Kang, D. I.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, S. H.; Hwang, M. J.; Choi, S. Y.

    1997-07-01

    This year the fifth (final) year of the phase-I of the Government-sponsored Mid- and Long-term Nuclear Power Technology Development Project. The scope of this subproject titled on `The improvement of level-1 PSA Computer Codes` is divided into two main activities : (1) improvement of level-1 PSA methodology, (2) development of applications methodology of PSA techniques to operations and maintenance of nuclear power plant. Level-1 PSA code KIRAP is converted to PC-Windows environment. For the improvement of efficiency in performing PSA, the fast cutset generation algorithm and an analytical technique for handling logical loop in fault tree modeling are developed. Using about 30 foreign generic data sources, generic component reliability database (GDB) are developed considering dependency among source data. A computer program which handles dependency among data sources are also developed based on three stage bayesian updating technique. Common cause failure (CCF) analysis methods are reviewed and CCF database are established. Impact vectors can be estimated from this CCF database. A computer code, called MPRIDP, which handles CCF database are also developed. A CCF analysis reflecting plant-specific defensive strategy against CCF event is also performed. A risk monitor computer program, called Risk Monster, are being developed for the application to the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. The PSA application technique is applied to review the feasibility study of on-line maintenance and to the prioritization of in-service test (IST) of motor-operated valves (MOV). Finally, the root cause analysis (RCA) and reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) technologies are adopted and applied to the improvement of reliability of emergency diesel generators (EDG) of nuclear power plant. To help RCA and RCM analyses, two software programs are developed, which are EPIS and RAM Pro. (author). 129 refs., 20 tabs., 60 figs.

  14. Improvement of level-1 PSA computer code package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Park, C. K.; Kim, K. Y.; Han, S. H.; Jung, W. D.; Chang, S. C.; Yang, J. E.; Sung, T. Y.; Kang, D. I.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. H.; Kim, S. H.; Hwang, M. J.; Choi, S. Y.

    1997-07-01

    This year the fifth (final) year of the phase-I of the Government-sponsored Mid- and Long-term Nuclear Power Technology Development Project. The scope of this subproject titled on 'The improvement of level-1 PSA Computer Codes' is divided into two main activities : 1) improvement of level-1 PSA methodology, 2) development of applications methodology of PSA techniques to operations and maintenance of nuclear power plant. Level-1 PSA code KIRAP is converted to PC-Windows environment. For the improvement of efficiency in performing PSA, the fast cutset generation algorithm and an analytical technique for handling logical loop in fault tree modeling are developed. Using about 30 foreign generic data sources, generic component reliability database (GDB) are developed considering dependency among source data. A computer program which handles dependency among data sources are also developed based on three stage bayesian updating technique. Common cause failure (CCF) analysis methods are reviewed and CCF database are established. Impact vectors can be estimated from this CCF database. A computer code, called MPRIDP, which handles CCF database are also developed. A CCF analysis reflecting plant-specific defensive strategy against CCF event is also performed. A risk monitor computer program, called Risk Monster, are being developed for the application to the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. The PSA application technique is applied to review the feasibility study of on-line maintenance and to the prioritization of in-service test (IST) of motor-operated valves (MOV). Finally, the root cause analysis (RCA) and reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) technologies are adopted and applied to the improvement of reliability of emergency diesel generators (EDG) of nuclear power plant. To help RCA and RCM analyses, two software programs are developed, which are EPIS and RAM Pro. (author). 129 refs., 20 tabs., 60 figs

  15. Self-aligned 0-level sealing of MEMS devices by a two layer thin film reflow process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, C.R.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gunn, R.; Witvrouw, A.

    2003-01-01

    Many micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) require a vacuum or controlled atmosphere encapsulation in order to ensure either a good performance or an acceptable lifetime of operation. Two approaches for wafer-scale zero-level packaging exist. The most popular approach is based on wafer bonding.

  16. Hanford low-level waste process chemistry testing data package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Tracey, E.M.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) among the State of Washington Department of Ecology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the cleanup of the Hanford Site was renegotiated. The revised agreement specifies vitrification as the encapsulation technology for low level waste (LLW). A demonstration, testing, and evaluation program underway at Westinghouse Hanford Company to identify the best overall melter-system technology available for vitrification of Hanford Site LLW to meet the TPA milestones. Phase I is a open-quotes proof of principleclose quotes test to demonstrate that a melter system can process a simulated highly alkaline, high nitrate/nitrite content aqueous LLW feed into a glass product of consistent quality. Seven melter vendors were selected for the Phase I evaluation: joule-heated melters from GTS Duratek, Incorporated (GDI); Envitco, Incorporated (EVI); Penberthy Electomelt, Incorporated (PEI); and Vectra Technologies, Incorporated (VTI); a gas-fired cyclone burner from Babcock ampersand Wilcox (BCW); a plasma torch-fired, cupola furnace from Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC); and an electric arc furnace with top-entering vertical carbon electrodes from the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM)

  17. Containment barrier metals for high-level waste packages in a Tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O`Neal, W.C.

    1983-10-12

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package project is part of the US Department of Energy`s Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program. The NNWSI project is working towards the development of multibarriered packages for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in tuff in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The final engineered barrier system design may be composed of a waste form, canister, overpack, borehole liner, packing, and the near field host rock, or some combination thereof. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) role is to design, model, and test the waste package subsystem for the tuff repository. At the present stage of development of the nuclear waste management program at LLNL, the detailed requirements for the waste package design are not yet firmly established. In spite of these uncertainties as to the detailed package requirements, we have begun the conceptual design stage. By conceptual design, we mean design based on our best assessment of present and future regulatory requirements. We anticipate that changes will occur as the detailed requirements for waste package design are finalized. 17 references, 4 figures, 10 tables.

  18. Containment barrier metals for high-level waste packages in a Tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, E.W.; McCright, R.D.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package project is part of the US Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) Program. The NNWSI project is working towards the development of multibarriered packages for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in tuff in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The final engineered barrier system design may be composed of a waste form, canister, overpack, borehole liner, packing, and the near field host rock, or some combination thereof. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) role is to design, model, and test the waste package subsystem for the tuff repository. At the present stage of development of the nuclear waste management program at LLNL, the detailed requirements for the waste package design are not yet firmly established. In spite of these uncertainties as to the detailed package requirements, we have begun the conceptual design stage. By conceptual design, we mean design based on our best assessment of present and future regulatory requirements. We anticipate that changes will occur as the detailed requirements for waste package design are finalized. 17 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  19. A Feasibility Study of Lead Free Solders for Level 1 Packaging Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Hald, John; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2009-01-01

    An attempt has been made to determine the lead free ternary combinations that satisfied the solidification requirement for a solder used in level 1 packaging applications, using the CALPHAD approach. The segregation profiles of the promising candidates were analyzed after scrutinizing the equilib......An attempt has been made to determine the lead free ternary combinations that satisfied the solidification requirement for a solder used in level 1 packaging applications, using the CALPHAD approach. The segregation profiles of the promising candidates were analyzed after scrutinizing...

  20. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  1. Reliability of industrial packaging for microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reus, Roger De; Christensen, Carsten; Weichel, Steen

    1998-01-01

    . Protective coatings of amorphous silicon carbide and tantalum oxide are suitable candidates with etch rates below 0.1 Angstrom/h in aqueous solutions with pH II at temperatures up to 140 degrees C. Si-Ta-N films exhibit etch rates around 1 Angstrom/h. Parylene C coatings did not etch but peeled off after......Packaging concepts for silicon-based micromachined sensors exposed to harsh environments are explored. By exposing the sensors directly to the media and applying protection at the wafer level the packaging and assembly will be simplified as compared to conventional methods of fabrication...

  2. Bacterial quality and safety of packaged fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousiainen, L-L; Joutsen, S; Lunden, J; Hänninen, M-L; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, M

    2016-09-02

    Consumption of packaged fresh leafy vegetables, which are convenient ready-to-eat products, has increased during the last decade. The number of foodborne outbreaks associated with these products has concurrently increased. In our study, (1) label information, (2) O2/CO2 composition, (3) bacterial quality and (4) safety of 100 fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level were studied in Finland during 2013. Bacterial quality was studied using aerobic bacteria (AB) and coliform bacteria (CB) counts, and searching for the presence of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Yersinia. The safety was studied by the presence of Salmonella, ail-positive Yersinia, stx-positive E. coli (STEC) and Listeria monocytogenes using PCR and culturing. Important label information was unavailable on several packages originating from different companies. The packaging date was missing on all packages and the date of durability on 83% of the packages. Storage temperature was declared on 62% of the packages and 73% of the packages contained information about prewashing. The batch/lot number was missing on 29% of the packages. Very low oxygen (O2) (vegetable samples varying between 6.2 and 10.6 and 4.2-8.3logcfu/g, respectively. In most of the samples, the AB and CB counts exceeded 10(8) and 10(6)cfu/g, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the AB and CB counts. E. coli was isolated from 15% of the samples and Yersinia from 33%. L. monocytogenes was isolated from two samples and ail-positive Y. enterocolitica in one. Using PCR, STEC was detected in seven samples, and Salmonella and ail-positive Y. enterocolitica in two samples each. The AB and CB mean values of products originating from different companies varied widely. High AB and CB counts and pathogenic bacteria were detected in ready-to-eat products not needing washing before use. Our study shows that the bacterial quality and safety of packaged fresh leafy vegetables is poor and label information on the packages is

  3. Effectiveness of E-Content Package on Teaching IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry at Undergraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendiran, G.; Vakkil, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to discover the effectiveness of an e-content package when teaching IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry at the undergraduate level. The study consisted of a Pre-test-Post-test Non Equivalent Groups Design, and the sample of 71 (n = 71) students were drawn from two colleges. The overall study was divided into two groups, an…

  4. Handbook of wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Peter; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2011-01-01

    Written by an author and editor team from microsystems companies and industry-near research organizations, this handbook and reference presents dependable, first-hand information on bonding technologies.In the first part, researchers from companies and institutions around the world discuss the most reliable and reproducible technologies for the production of bonded wafers. The second part is devoted to current and emerging applications, including microresonators, biosensors and precise measuring devices.

  5. Transportation packagings for high-level wastes and unprocessed transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, E.L.; Romesberg, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Packagings used for nuclear waste transport are varied in size, shape, and weight because they must accommodate a wide variety of waste forms and types. However, this paper will discuss the common characteristics among the packagings in order to provide a broad understanding of packaging designs. The paper then discusses, in some detail, a design that has been under development recently at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for handling unprocessed, contact-handled transuranic (CHTRU) wastes as well as a cask design for defense high-level wastes (HLW). As presently conceived, the design of the transuranic package transporter (TRUPACT) calls for inner and outer boxes that are separated by a rigid polyurethane foam. The inner box has a steel frame with stainless steel surfaces; the outer box is similarly constructed except that carbon steel is used for the outside surfaces. The access to each box is through hinged doors that are sealed after loading. To meet another waste management need, a cask is being developed to transport defense HLW. The cask, which is at the preliminary design stage, is being developed by General Atomic under the direction of the TTC. The cask design relies heavily on state-of-the-art spent-fuel cask designs though it can be much simpler due to the characteristics of the HLW. A primary purpose of this paper is to show that CHTRU waste and defense HLW currently are and will be transported in packagings designed to meet the hazards of transportation that are present in general commerce

  6. Microelectronic packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, M; Schultze, J Walter

    2004-01-01

    Microelectronic Packaging analyzes the massive impact of electrochemical technologies on various levels of microelectronic packaging. Traditionally, interconnections within a chip were considered outside the realm of packaging technologies, but this book emphasizes the importance of chip wiring as a key aspect of microelectronic packaging, and focuses on electrochemical processing as an enabler of advanced chip metallization.Divided into five parts, the book begins by outlining the basics of electrochemical processing, defining the microelectronic packaging hierarchy, and emphasizing the impac

  7. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Qualitative Models, Version 1, Release 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouiya, Claudine; Keating, Sarah M; Berenguier, Duncan; Naldi, Aurélien; Thieffry, Denis; van Iersel, Martijn P; Le Novère, Nicolas; Helikar, Tomáš

    2015-09-04

    Quantitative methods for modelling biological networks require an in-depth knowledge of the biochemical reactions and their stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. In many practical cases, this knowledge is missing. This has led to the development of several qualitative modelling methods using information such as, for example, gene expression data coming from functional genomic experiments. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding qualitative models, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The SBML Qualitative Models package for SBML Level 3 adds features so that qualitative models can be directly and explicitly encoded. The approach taken in this package is essentially based on the definition of regulatory or influence graphs. The SBML Qualitative Models package defines the structure and syntax necessary to describe qualitative models that associate discrete levels of activities with entity pools and the transitions between states that describe the processes involved. This is particularly suited to logical models (Boolean or multi-valued) and some classes of Petri net models can be encoded with the approach.

  8. Quality assurance requirements and methods for high level waste package acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This document should serve as guidance for assigning the necessary items to control the conditioning process in such a way that waste packages are produced in compliance with the waste acceptance requirements. It is also provided to promote the exchange of information on quality assurance requirements and on the application of quality assurance methods associated with the production of high level waste packages, to ensure that these waste packages comply with the requirements for transportation, interim storage and waste disposal in deep geological formations. The document is intended to assist both the operators of conditioning facilities and repositories as well as national authorities and regulatory bodies, involved in the licensing of the conditioning of high level radioactive wastes or in the development of deep underground disposal systems. The document recommends the quality assurance requirements and methods which are necessary to generate data for these parameters identified in IAEA-TECDOC-560 on qualitative acceptance criteria, and indicates where and when the control methods can be applied, e.g. in the operation or commissioning of a process or in the development of a waste package design. Emphasis is on the control of the process and little reliance is placed on non-destructive or destructive testing. Qualitative criteria, relevant to disposal of high level waste, are repository dependent and are not addressed here. 37 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Application of geometry correction factors for low-level waste package dose measurements. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, M.C.; Parish, B.

    1995-01-01

    Plans are to determine the Cs-137 content of low-level waste packages generated in High-Level Waste by measuring the radiation level at a specified distance from the package with a hand-held radiation instrument. The measurement taken at this specified distance, either 3 or 5 feet, is called the far-field measurement. This report documents a method for adjusting the gamma exposure rate (mR/hr) reading used in dose-to-curie determinations when the far-field measurement equals the background reading. This adjustment is necessary to reduce the conservatism resulting from using a minimum detection limit exposure rate for the dose-to-curie determination for the far-field measurement position. To accomplish this adjustment, the near-field (5 cm) measurement is multiplied by a geometry correction factor to obtain an estimate of the far field exposure rate (which is below instrument sensitivity). This estimate of the far field exposure rate is used to estimate the Cs-137 curie content of the package. This report establishes the geometry correction factors for the dose-to-curie determination when the far-field gamma exposure measurement equals the background reading. This report also provides a means of demonstrating compliance to 1S Manual requirements for exposure rate readings at different locations from waste packages while specifying only two measurement positions. This demonstration of compliance is necessary to minimize the number of locations exposure rate measurements that are required, i.e., ALARA

  10. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Layout, Version 1 Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauges, Ralph; Rost, Ursula; Sahle, Sven; Wengler, Katja; Bergmann, Frank Thomas

    2015-09-04

    Many software tools provide facilities for depicting reaction network diagrams in a visual form. Two aspects of such a visual diagram can be distinguished: the layout (i.e.: the positioning and connections) of the elements in the diagram, and the graphical form of the elements (for example, the glyphs used for symbols, the properties of the lines connecting them, and so on). For software tools that also read and write models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language) format, a common need is to store the network diagram together with the SBML representation of the model. This in turn raises the question of how to encode the layout and the rendering of these diagrams. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding diagrams, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The Layout package for SBML Level 3 adds the necessary features to SBML so that diagram layouts can be encoded in SBML files, and a companion package called SBML Rendering specifies how the graphical rendering of elements can be encoded. The SBML Layout package is based on the principle that reaction network diagrams should be described as representations of entities such as species and reactions (with direct links to the underlying SBML elements), and not as arbitrary drawings or graphs; for this reason, existing languages for the description of vector drawings (such as SVG) or general graphs (such as GraphML) cannot be used.

  11. Evaluation of low and intermediate level radioactive solidified waste forms and packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    Evaluation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste forms and packages with respect to compliance with quality and safety requirements for transport, interim storage and disposal has become a very important part of the radioactive waste management strategy in many countries. The evaluation of waste forms and packages provides precise basic data for regulatory bodies to establish safety requirements, and implement quality control and quality assurance procedures for radioactive waste management programmes. The requirements depend very much upon the disposal option selected, treatment technology used, waste form characteristics, package quality and other factors. The regulatory requirements can also influence the methodology of waste form/package evaluation together with selection and analysis of data for quality control and safety assurance. A coordinated research programme started at the end of 1985 and brought together 12 participants from 11 countries. The results of the programme and each particular project were discussed at three Research Coordination Meetings held in Cairo, Egypt, in May, 1986; in Beijing, China, in April, 1998; and at Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, in November, 1989. This document summarises the salient features and results achieved during the four year investigation and a recommendation for future work in this area. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Technical considerations for evaluating substantially complete containment of high-level waste within the waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaktala, H.K.; Interrante, C.G.

    1990-12-01

    This report deals with technical information that is considered essential for demonstrating the ability of the high-level radioactive waste package to provide ''substantially complete containment'' of its contents (vitrified waste form or spent light-water reactor fuel) for a period of 300 to 1000 years in a geological repository environment. The discussion is centered around technical considerations of the repository environment, materials and fabrication processes for the waste package components, various degradation modes of the materials of construction of the waste packages, and inspection and monitoring of the waste package during the preclosure and retrievability period, which could begin up to 50 years after initiation of waste emplacement. The emphasis in this report is on metallic materials. However, brief references have been made to other materials such as ceramics, graphite, bonded ceramic-metal systems, and other types of composites. The content of this report was presented to an external peer review panel of nine members at a workshop held at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, April 2--4, 1990. The recommendations of the peer review panel have been incorporated in this report. There are two companion reports; the second report in the series provides state-of-the-art techniques for uncertainty evaluations. 97 refs., 1 fig

  13. Radioactivity evaluation method for pre-packed concrete packages of low-level dry active wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Toshiaki; Funahashi, Tetsuo; Watabe, Kiyomi; Ozawa, Yukitoshi; Kashiwagi, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    Low-level dry active wastes of nuclear power plants are grouted with cement mortal in a container and planned to disposed into the shallow land disposal site. The characteristics of radionuclides contained in dry active wastes are same as homogeneous solidified wastes. In the previous report, we reported the applicability of the radioactivity evaluation methods established for homogeneous solidified wastes to pre-packed concrete packages. This report outlines the developed radioactivity evaluation methods for pre-packed concrete packages based upon recent data. Since the characteristics of dry active wastes depend upon the plant system in which dry active wastes originate and the types of contamination, sampling of wastes and activity measurement were executed to derive scaling factors. The radioactivity measurement methods were also verified. The applicability of non-destructive methods to measure radioactivity concentration of pre-packed concrete packages was examined by computer simulation. It is concluded that those methods are accurate enough to measure actual waste packages. (author)

  14. Technical considerations for evaluating substantially complete containment of high-level waste within the waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manaktala, H.K. (Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (USA). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses); Interrante, C.G. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA). Div. of High-Level Waste Management)

    1990-12-01

    This report deals with technical information that is considered essential for demonstrating the ability of the high-level radioactive waste package to provide substantially complete containment'' of its contents (vitrified waste form or spent light-water reactor fuel) for a period of 300 to 1000 years in a geological repository environment. The discussion is centered around technical considerations of the repository environment, materials and fabrication processes for the waste package components, various degradation modes of the materials of construction of the waste packages, and inspection and monitoring of the waste package during the preclosure and retrievability period, which could begin up to 50 years after initiation of waste emplacement. The emphasis in this report is on metallic materials. However, brief references have been made to other materials such as ceramics, graphite, bonded ceramic-metal systems, and other types of composites. The content of this report was presented to an external peer review panel of nine members at a workshop held at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA), Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, April 2--4, 1990. The recommendations of the peer review panel have been incorporated in this report. There are two companion reports; the second report in the series provides state-of-the-art techniques for uncertainty evaluations. 97 refs., 1 fig.

  15. First-time demonstration of measuring concrete prestress levels with metal packaged fibre optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeeman, I.; Fusiek, G.; Perry, M.; Johnston, M.; Saafi, M.; Niewczas, P.; Walsh, M.; Khan, S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present the first large-scale demonstration of metal packaged fibre Bragg grating sensors developed to monitor prestress levels in prestressed concrete. To validate the technology, strain and temperature sensors were mounted on steel prestressing strands in concrete beams and stressed up to 60% of the ultimate tensile strength of the strand. We discuss the methods and calibration procedures used to fabricate and attach the temperature and strain sensors. The use of induction brazing for packaging the fibre Bragg gratings and welding the sensors to prestressing strands eliminates the use of epoxy, making the technique suitable for high-stress monitoring in an irradiated, harsh industrial environment. Initial results based on the first week of data after stressing the beams show the strain sensors are able to monitor prestress levels in ambient conditions.

  16. Evaluation on the structural soundness of the transport package for low-level radioactive waste for subsurface disposal against aircraft impact by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    The structural analysis of aircraft crush on the transport package for low-level radioactive waste was performed using the impact force which was already used for the evaluation of the high-level waste transport package by LSDYNA code. The transport package was deformed, and stresses due to the crush exceeded elastic range. However, plastic strains yieled in the package were far than the elongation of the materials and the body of the package did not contact the disposal packages due to the deformation of the package. Therefore, it was confirmed that the package keeps its integrity against aircraft crush. (author)

  17. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.

    2001-01-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  18. Waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basham, S.J. Jr.; Carr, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In the United States of America the selected method for disposal of radioactive waste is mined repositories located in suitable geohydrological settings. Currently four types of host rocks are under consideration: tuff, basalt, crystalline rock and salt. Development of waste package designs for incorporation in mined salt repositories is discussed. The three pertinent high-level waste forms are: spent fuel, as disassembled and close-packed fuel pins in a mild steel canister; commercial high-level waste (CHLW), as borosilicate glass in stainless-steel canisters; defence high-level waste (DHLW), as borosilicate glass in stainless-steel canisters. The canisters are production and handling items only. They have no planned long-term isolation function. Each waste form requires a different approach in package design. However, the general geometry and the materials of the three designs are identical. The selected waste package design is an overpack of low carbon steel with a welded closure. This container surrounds the waste forms. Studies to better define brine quantity and composition, radiation effects on the salt and brines, long-term corrosion behaviour of the low carbon steel, and the leaching behaviour of the spent fuel and borosilicate glass waste forms are continuing. (author)

  19. Waste package performance criteria for deepsea disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1988-07-01

    Sea disposal of low-level radioactive waste began in the United States in 1946, and was placed under the licensing authority of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The practice stopped completely in 1970. Most of the waste disposed of at sea was packaged in second- hand or reconditioned 55-gallon drums filled with cement so that the average package density was sufficiently greater than that of sea water to ensure sinking. It was assumed that all the contents would eventually be released since the packages were not designed or required to remain intact for sustained periods of time after descent to the ocean bottom. Recently, there has been renewed interest in ocean disposal, both in this country and abroad, as a waste management alternative to land burial. The Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (PL 92-532) gives EPA the regulatory responsibility for ocean dumping of all materials, including radioactive waste. This act prohibits the ocean disposal of high-level radioactive waste and requires EPA to control the ocean disposal of all other radioactive waste through the issuance of permits. In implementing its permit authorities, EPA issued on initial set of regulations and criteria in 1973 to control the disposal of material into the ocean waters. It was in these regulations that EPA initially introduced the general requirement of isolation and containment of radioactive waste as the basic operating philosophy. 37 refs

  20. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML Level 3 Package: Layout, Version 1 Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauges Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many software tools provide facilities for depicting reaction network diagrams in a visual form. Two aspects of such a visual diagram can be distinguished: the layout (i.e.: the positioning and connections of the elements in the diagram, and the graphical form of the elements (for example, the glyphs used for symbols, the properties of the lines connecting them, and so on. For software tools that also read and write models in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language format, a common need is to store the network diagram together with the SBML representation of the model. This in turn raises the question of how to encode the layout and the rendering of these diagrams. The SBML Level 3 Version 1 Core specification does not provide a mechanism for explicitly encoding diagrams, but it does provide a mechanism for SBML packages to extend the Core specification and add additional syntactical constructs. The Layout package for SBML Level 3 adds the necessary features to SBML so that diagram layouts can be encoded in SBML files, and a companion package called SBML Rendering specifies how the graphical rendering of elements can be encoded.

  1. BayesTwin: An R Package for Bayesian Inference of Item-Level Twin Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Schwabe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BayesTwin is an open-source R package that serves as a pipeline to the MCMC program JAGS to perform Bayesian inference on genetically-informative hierarchical twin data. Simultaneously to the biometric model, an item response theory (IRT measurement model is estimated, allowing analysis of the raw phenotypic (item-level data. The integration of such a measurement model is important since earlier research has shown that an analysis based on an aggregated measure (e.g., a sum-score based analysis can lead to an underestimation of heritability and the spurious finding of genotype-environment interactions. The package includes all common biometric and IRT models as well as functions that help plot relevant information or determine whether the analysis was performed well. Funding statement: Partly funded by the PROO grant 411-12-623 from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO.

  2. Wafer-level MOCVD growth of AlGaN/GaN-on-Si HEMT structures with ultra-high room temperature 2DEG mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigate the influence of growth temperature, impurity concentration, and metal contact structure on the uniformity and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG properties of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT structure grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD on 4-inch Si substrate. High uniformity of 2DEG mobility (standard deviation down to 0.72% across the radius of the 4-inch wafer has been achieved, and 2DEG mobility up to 1740.3 cm2/V⋅s at room temperature has been realized at low C and O impurity concentrations due to reduced ionized impurity scattering. The 2DEG mobility is further enhanced to 2161.4 cm2/V⋅s which is comparable to the highest value reported to date when the contact structure is switched from a square to a cross pattern due to reduced piezoelectric scattering at lower residual strain. This work provides constructive insights and promising results to the field of wafer-scale fabrication of AlGaN/GaN HEMT on Si.

  3. Low-temperature, low-loss zero level packaging techniques for RF applications by using a photopatternable dry film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J; Seok, S; Rolland, N; Rolland, P-A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a low-temperature zero-level packaging technique using a dry film type of PerMX polymer for RF devices. Silicon cap packaging with PerMX sealing ring and PerMX cap packaging through multilayer lamination have been implemented. All of the fabrication process has been performed at temperature less than 150 °C. The influence of each packaging cap on the packaged coplanar waveguide was first investigated using the HFSS electromagnetic simulation. The RF measurement results showed that both packaging caps did not have significant influence on the performance of transmission lines. The insertion loss changes before and after packaging were almost negligible up to 30 GHz, and the return losses were better than 20 dB. Also, the deformation of PerMX structures concerning the packaging processes has been studied. For silicon capping, the volumetric compression of PerMX sealing ring by the bonding process has been observed. For PerMX cap packaging, the deflection of the polymer cap has been investigated as a function of sealing ring width for the different cap size. Measured results had good agreement with the ANSYS simulated ones. (paper)

  4. Regulatory authority of the Rocky Mountain states for low-level radioactive waste packaging and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, M.; Tate, P.

    1983-07-01

    The newly-formed Rocky Mountain Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an interstate agreement for the management of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Eligible members of the compact are Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. Each state must ratify the compact within its legislature for the compact to become effective in that state and to make that state a full-fledged member of the compact. By so adopting the compact, each state agrees to the terms and conditions specified therein. Among those terms and conditions are provisions requiring each member state to adopt and enforce procedures requiring low-level waste shipments originating within its borders and destined for a regional facility to conform to packaging and transportation requirements and regulations. These procedures are to include periodic inspections of packaging and shipping practices, periodic inspections of waste containers while in the custody of carriers and appropriate enforcement actions for violations. To carry out this responsibility, each state must have an adequate statutory and regulatory inspection and enforcement authority to ensure the safe transportation of low-level radioactive waste. Three states in the compact region, Arizona, Utah and Wyoming, have incorporated the Department of Transportation regulations in their entirety, and have no published rules and regulations of their own. The other states in the compact, Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico all have separate rules and regulations that incorporate the DOT regulations. A brief description of the regulatory requirements of each state is presented

  5. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ''unpackaged'' volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste

  6. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayal, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  7. Wafer bonding applications and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gösele, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade direct wafer bonding has developed into a mature materials integration technology. This book presents state-of-the-art reviews of the most important applications of wafer bonding written by experts from industry and academia. The topics include bonding-based fabrication methods of silicon-on-insulator, photonic crystals, VCSELs, SiGe-based FETs, MEMS together with hybrid integration and laser lift-off. The non-specialist will learn about the basics of wafer bonding and its various application areas, while the researcher in the field will find up-to-date information about this fast-moving area, including relevant patent information.

  8. Long-term corrosion behaviour of low-/medium-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendras, M.; Bach, F.W.; Behrens, S.; Birr, Ch.; Hassel, Th.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Storage of low- and medium-level radioactive waste requires safe packages. This means that all materials used for the manufacturing of such packages have to show a sufficient resistance especially against corrosive attacks. Since these packages are generally made from carbon steel an additional coating for corrosion protection - mainly solvent-based polymers - is necessary. However, it is not enough to consider the selection and combination of the materials. Regarding the construction and manufacturing of corrosion-resistant drums for low- and medium-level radioactive waste there also has to be paid closer attention to the joining technologies such as welding. For lifetime prediction of low-/medium-level waste packages reliable experimental data concerning the long-term corrosion behaviour of each material as well as of the components is needed. Therefore sheet metals from carbon steel were galvanized or coated with different solvent-based and water-based corrosion protection materials (epoxy as well as silicone resins). After damaging the anti-corrosion coating of some of these sheets with predefined scratches sets of these samples were stored at higher temperatures in climatic chamber, in simulated waste or aged according to standard DIN EN ISO 9227. All corrosion damages were analyzed by means of metallography (light microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy of micro-sections). The quantitative influence of the corrosive attacks on the mechanical properties of the materials was examined by mechanical testing according to DIN EN 10002. Besides reduction of tensile strength drastic reduction of percentage of elongation after fracture (from 30 % to 10 %) was found. Further experiments were carried out using components or scaled-down drums joined by means of innovative welding techniques such as Cold Arc or Force Arc. The relevant welding parameters (e.g. welding current, proper volume of shielding gas or wire feed) were

  9. The Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) Level 3 Package: Flux Balance Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Brett G; Bergmann, Frank T

    2015-09-04

    Constraint-based modeling is a well established modelling methodology used to analyze and study biological networks on both a medium and genome scale. Due to their large size, genome scale models are typically analysed using constraint-based optimization techniques. One widely used method is Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) which, for example, requires a modelling description to include: the definition of a stoichiometric matrix, an objective function and bounds on the values that fluxes can obtain at steady state. The Flux Balance Constraints (FBC) Package extends SBML Level 3 and provides a standardized format for the encoding, exchange and annotation of constraint-based models. It includes support for modelling concepts such as objective functions, flux bounds and model component annotation that facilitates reaction balancing. The FBC package establishes a base level for the unambiguous exchange of genome-scale, constraint-based models, that can be built upon by the community to meet future needs (e. g. by extending it to cover dynamic FBC models).

  10. Laser wafering for silicon solar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-01-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W p (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs (∼20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions (∼50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 (micro)m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  11. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  12. MEMS packaging: state of the art and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossche, Andre; Cotofana, Carmen V. B.; Mollinger, Jeff R.

    1998-07-01

    Now that the technology for Integrated sensor and MEMS devices has become sufficiently mature to allow mass production, it is expected that the prices of bare chips will drop dramatically. This means that the package prices will become a limiting factor in market penetration, unless low cost packaging solutions become available. This paper will discuss the developments in packaging technology. Both single-chip and multi-chip packaging solutions will be addressed. It first starts with a discussion on the different requirements that have to be met; both from a device point of view (open access paths to the environment, vacuum cavities, etc.) and from the application point of view (e.g. environmental hostility). Subsequently current technologies are judged on their applicability for MEMS and sensor packaging and a forecast is given for future trends. It is expected that the large majority of sensing devices will be applied in relative friendly environments for which plastic packages would suffice. Therefore, on the short term an important role is foreseen for recently developed plastic packaging techniques such as precision molding and precision dispensing. Just like in standard electronic packaging, complete wafer level packaging methods for sensing devices still have a long way to go before they can compete with the highly optimized and automated plastic packaging processes.

  13. CVTresh: R Package for Level-Dependent Cross-Validation Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoh Kim

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The core of the wavelet approach to nonparametric regression is thresholding of wavelet coefficients. This paper reviews a cross-validation method for the selection of the thresholding value in wavelet shrinkage of Oh, Kim, and Lee (2006, and introduces the R package CVThresh implementing details of the calculations for the procedures. This procedure is implemented by coupling a conventional cross-validation with a fast imputation method, so that it overcomes a limitation of data length, a power of 2. It can be easily applied to the classical leave-one-out cross-validation and K-fold cross-validation. Since the procedure is computationally fast, a level-dependent cross-validation can be developed for wavelet shrinkage of data with various sparseness according to levels.

  14. CVTresh: R Package for Level-Dependent Cross-Validation Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoh Kim

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The core of the wavelet approach to nonparametric regression is thresholding of wavelet coefficients. This paper reviews a cross-validation method for the selection of the thresholding value in wavelet shrinkage of Oh, Kim, and Lee (2006, and introduces the R package CVThresh implementing details of the calculations for the procedures.This procedure is implemented by coupling a conventional cross-validation with a fast imputation method, so that it overcomes a limitation of data length, a power of 2. It can be easily applied to the classical leave-one-out cross-validation and K-fold cross-validation. Since the procedure is computationally fast, a level-dependent cross-validation can be developed for wavelet shrinkage of data with various sparseness according to levels.

  15. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  16. Status of standardization efforts for packaging and transportation of spent fuel and high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, P.E.; Dawson, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper provides a current review of the status of efforts to develop standards and guidelines related to the packaging and transportation of spent fuel and high-level waste. An overview of each of the organizations and agencies developing standards and guidelines is discussed and includes the efforts of the N14 Division of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), NUPACK Committee of Section III of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy. This comparative overview identifies the scope and areas of application of each standard and guideline. In addition, the current or proposed standards and guidelines are considered collectively with commentary on areas of apparent or potential complimentary fit, overlap and incompatability. Finally, the paper reviews initiatives now being taken within the N14 division of ANSI to identify where new standards development activities are required

  17. Development of a package program for estimating ground level concentrations of radioactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilkamhang, W.

    1986-01-01

    A package program for estimating ground level concentration of radioactive gas from elevate release was develop for use on IBM P C microcomputer. The main program, GAMMA PLUME NT10, is based on the well known VALLEY MODEL which is a Fortran computer code intended for mainframe computers. Other two options were added, namely, calculation of radioactive gas ground level concentration in Ci/m 3 and dose equivalent rate in mren/hr. In addition, a menu program and editor program were developed to render the program easier to use since the option could be readily selected and the input data could be easily modified as required through the keyboard. The accuracy and reliability of the program is almost identical to the mainframe. Ground level concentration of radioactive radon gas due to ore program processing in the nuclear chemistry laboratory of the Department of Nuclear Technology was estimated. In processing radioactive ore at a rate of 2 kg/day, about 35 p Ci/s of radioactive gas was released from a 14 m stack. When meteorological data of Don Muang (average for 5 years 1978-1982) were used maximum ground level concentration and the dose equivalent rate were found to be 0.00094 p Ci/m 3 and 5.0 x 10 -10 mrem/hr respectively. The processing time required for the above problem was about 7 minutes for any case of source on IBM P C which was acceptable for a computer of this class

  18. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Improvement of level 1 PSA computer code package-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Kyoo; Kim, Tae Woon; Kim, Kil Yoo; Han, Sang Hoon; Jung, Won Dae; Jang, Seung Chul; Yang, Joon Un; Choi, Yung; Sung, Tae Yong; Son, Yung Suk; Park, Won Suk; Jung, Kwang Sub; Kang Dae Il; Park, Jin Heui; Hwang, Mi Jung; Hah, Jae Joo

    1995-07-01

    This year is the third year of the Government-sponsored mid- and long-term nuclear power technology development project. The scope of this sub project titled on 'The improvement of level-1 PSA computer codes' is divided into three main activities : (1) Methodology development on the underdeveloped fields such as risk assessment technology for plant shutdown and low power situations, (2) Computer code package development for level-1 PSA, (3) Applications of new technologies to reactor safety assessment. At first, in this area of shutdown risk assessment technology development, plant outage experiences of domestic plants are reviewed and plant operating states (POS) are decided. A sample core damage frequency is estimated for over draining event in RCS low water inventory i.e. mid-loop operation. Human reliability analysis and thermal hydraulic support analysis are identified to be needed to reduce uncertainty. Two design improvement alternatives are evaluated using PSA technique for mid-loop operation situation: one is use of containment spray system as backup of shutdown cooling system and the other is installation of two independent level indication system. Procedure change is identified more preferable option to hardware modification in the core damage frequency point of view. Next, level-1 PSA code KIRAP is converted to PC-windows environment. For the improvement of efficiency in performing PSA, the fast cutest generation algorithm and an analytical technique for handling logical loop in fault tree modeling are developed. 48 figs, 15 tabs, 59 refs. (Author)

  19. Research on the improvement of nuclear safety -Improvement of level 1 PSA computer code package-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Kyoo; Kim, Tae Woon; Kim, Kil Yoo; Han, Sang Hoon; Jung, Won Dae; Jang, Seung Chul; Yang, Joon Un; Choi, Yung; Sung, Tae Yong; Son, Yung Suk; Park, Won Suk; Jung, Kwang Sub; Kang Dae Il; Park, Jin Heui; Hwang, Mi Jung; Hah, Jae Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This year is the third year of the Government-sponsored mid- and long-term nuclear power technology development project. The scope of this sub project titled on `The improvement of level-1 PSA computer codes` is divided into three main activities : (1) Methodology development on the underdeveloped fields such as risk assessment technology for plant shutdown and low power situations, (2) Computer code package development for level-1 PSA, (3) Applications of new technologies to reactor safety assessment. At first, in this area of shutdown risk assessment technology development, plant outage experiences of domestic plants are reviewed and plant operating states (POS) are decided. A sample core damage frequency is estimated for over draining event in RCS low water inventory i.e. mid-loop operation. Human reliability analysis and thermal hydraulic support analysis are identified to be needed to reduce uncertainty. Two design improvement alternatives are evaluated using PSA technique for mid-loop operation situation: one is use of containment spray system as backup of shutdown cooling system and the other is installation of two independent level indication system. Procedure change is identified more preferable option to hardware modification in the core damage frequency point of view. Next, level-1 PSA code KIRAP is converted to PC-windows environment. For the improvement of efficiency in performing PSA, the fast cutest generation algorithm and an analytical technique for handling logical loop in fault tree modeling are developed. 48 figs, 15 tabs, 59 refs. (Author).

  20. Methodologies for assessing long-term performance of high-level radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, K.; Boesch, L.; Crane, B.; Johnson, R.; Moler, R.; Smith, S.; Zaremba, L.

    1986-01-01

    Several methods the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can use to independently assess Department of Energy (DOE) waste package performance were identified by The Aerospace Corporation. The report includes an overview of the necessary attributes of performance assessment, followed by discussions of DOE methods, probabilistic methods capable of predicting waste package lifetime and radionuclide releases, process modeling of waste package barriers, sufficiency of the necessary input data, and the applicability of probability density functions. It is recommended that the initial NRC performance assessment (for the basalt conceptual waste package design) should apply modular simulation, using available process models and data, to demonstrate this assessment method

  1. Improvement of Level-1 PSA computer code package -A study for nuclear safety improvement-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Tae Woon; Ha, Jae Joo; Han, Sang Hoon; Cho, Yeong Kyun; Jeong, Won Dae; Jang, Seung Cheol; Choi, Young; Seong, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Hwang, Mi Jeong; Choi, Seon Yeong; An, Kwang Il

    1994-07-01

    This year is the second year of the Government-sponsored Mid- and Long-Term Nuclear Power Technology Development Project. The scope of this subproject titled on 'The Improvement of Level-1 PSA Computer Codes' is divided into three main activities : (1) Methodology development on the under-developed fields such as risk assessment technology for plant shutdown and external events, (2) Computer code package development for Level-1 PSA, (3) Applications of new technologies to reactor safety assessment. At first, in the area of PSA methodology development, foreign PSA reports on shutdown and external events have been reviewed and various PSA methodologies have been compared. Level-1 PSA code KIRAP and CCF analysis code COCOA are converted from KOS to Windows. Human reliability database has been also established in this year. In the area of new technology applications, fuzzy set theory and entropy theory are used to estimate component life and to develop a new measure of uncertainty importance. Finally, in the field of application study of PSA technique to reactor regulation, a strategic study to develop a dynamic risk management tool PEPSI and the determination of inspection and test priority of motor operated valves based on risk importance worths have been studied. (Author)

  2. Effect of alpha and gamma radiation on the near-field chemistry and geochemistry of high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.

    1985-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can potentially alter geochemical and chemical processes in a geologic system. These effects can either enhance or reduce the performance of the waste package in a deep geologic repository. Current indications are that, in a repository located in basalt, ionizing radiation significantly affects geochemical/chemical processes but does not appear to significantly affect factors important to the long-term performance of the repository. The experimental results presented in this paper were obtained as part of an ongoing effort by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to determine the effect of ionizing radiation on chemical and geochemical processes in the environment of the waste package. Gamma radiolysis experiments were done by subjecting samples of synthetic basalt groundwater in the presence of various waste package components (basalt/packing/low-carbon steel) to high levels of gamma radiation from a 60 Co source. Post-irradiation analysis was done on the gas, liquid, and solid components of the basalt system. The results obtained are important in evaluating waste package performance during the containment period. The effect of alpha radiation on the basalt groundwater system in the presence of waste package components is important in evaluating waste package performance during the isolation period. The experimental work in this area is in a very preliminary stage. Results from two experiments are reported. 9 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Waste Package and Material Testing for the Proposed Yucca Mountain High Level Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doering, Thomas; Pasupathi, V.

    2002-01-01

    Over the repository lifetime, the waste package containment barriers will perform various functions that will change with time. During the operational period, the barriers will function as vessels for handling, emplacement, and waste retrieval (if necessary). During the years following repository closure, the containment barriers will be relied upon to provide substantially complete containment, through 10,000 years and beyond. Following the substantially complete containment phase, the barriers and the waste package internal structures help minimize release of radionuclides by aqueous- and gaseous-phase transport. These requirements have lead to a defense-in-depth design philosophy. A multi-barrier design will result in a lower breach rate distributed over a longer period of time, thereby ensuring the regulatory requirements are met. The design of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) has evolved. The initial waste package design was a thin walled package, 3/8 inch of stainless steel 304, that had very limited capacity, (3 PWR and 4 BWR assemblies) and performance characteristics, 300 to 1,000 years. This design required over 35,000 waste packages compared to today's design of just over 10,000 waste packages. The waste package designs are now based on a defense-in-depth/multi-barrier philosophy and have a capacity similar to the standard storage and rail transported spent nuclear fuel casks. Concurrent with the development of the design of the waste packages, a comprehensive waste package materials testing program has been undertaken to support the selection of containment barrier materials and to develop predictive models for the long-term behavior of these materials under expected repository conditions. The testing program includes both long-term and short-term tests and the results from these tests combination with the data published in the open literature are being used to develop models for predicting performance of the waste packages

  4. Bondability of processed glass wafers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandraud, G.; Gui, C.; Lambeck, Paul; Pigeon, F.; Parriaux, O.; Gorecki, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of direct bonding at room temperature has been attributed to the short range inter-molecular and inter-atomic attraction forces, such as Van der Waals forces. Consequently, the wafer surface smoothness becomes one of the most critical parameters in this process. High surface roughness

  5. Wafer of Intel Pentium 4 Prescott Chips

    CERN Multimedia

    Silicon wafer with hundreds of Penryn cores (microprocessor). There are around four times as many Prescott chips can be made per wafer than with the previous generation of Northwood-core Pentium 4 processors. It is faster and cheaper.

  6. International Collaboration in Packaging Education: Hands-on System-on-Package (SOP) Graduate Level Courses at Indian Institute of Science and Georgia Tech PRC

    OpenAIRE

    Varadarajan, Mahesh; Bhattacharya, Swapan; Doraiswami, Ravi; Rao, Ananda G; Rao, NJ; May, Gary; Conrad, Leyla; Tummala, Rao

    2005-01-01

    System-on-Package (SOP) continues to revolutionize the realization of convergent systems in microelectronics packaging. The SOP concept which began at the Packaging Research Center (PRC) at Georgia Tech has benefited its international collaborative partners in education including the Indian Institute of Science (IISc). The academic program for electronics packaging currently in the Centre for Electronics Design and Technology (CEDT) at IISc is aimed at educating a new breed of globally-compet...

  7. Packaging of MEMS/MOEMS and nanodevices: reliability, testing, and characterization aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Tolga; Ngo, Ha-Duong; Wittler, Olaf; Bouhlal, Bouchaib; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2011-02-01

    The last decade witnessed an explosive growth in research and development efforts devoted to MEMS devices and packaging. The successfully developed MEMS devices are, for example inkjet, pressure sensors, silicon microphones, accelerometers, gyroscopes, MOEMS, micro fuel cells and emerging MEMS. For the next decade, MEMS/MOEMS and nanodevice based products will penetrate into IT, telecommunications, automotive, defense, life sciences, medical and implantable applications. Forecasts say the MEMS market to be $14 billion by 2012. The packaging cost of MEMS/MOEMS products in general is about 70 percent. Unlike today's electronics IC packaging, their packaging are custom-built and difficult due to the moving structural elements. In order for the moving elements of a MEMS device to move effectively in a well-controlled atmosphere, hermetic sealing of the MEMS device in a cap is necessary. For some MEMS devices, such as resonators and gyroscopes, vacuum packaging is required. Usually, the cap is processed at the wafer level, and thus MEMS packaging is truly a wafer level packaging. In terms of MEMS/MOEMS and nanodevice packaging, there are still many critical issues need to be addressed due to the increasing integration density supported by 3D heterogeneous integration of multi-physic components/layers consisting of photonics, electronics, rf, plasmonics, and wireless. The infrastructure of MEMS/MOEMS and nanodevices and their packaging is not well established yet. Generic packaging platform technologies are not available. Some of critical issues have been studied intensively in the last years. In this paper we will discuss about processes, reliability, testing and characterization of MEMS/MOEMS and nanodevice packaging.

  8. Long-Term Waste Package Degradation Studies at the Yucca Mountain Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mon, K. G.; Bullard, B. E.; Longsine, D. E.; Mehta, S.; Lee, J. H.; Monib, A. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Site Recommendation (SR) process for the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underway. Fulfillment of the requirements for substantially complete containment of the radioactive waste emplaced in the potential repository and subsequent slow release of radionuclides from the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) into the geosphere will rely on a robust waste container design, among other EBS components. Part of the SR process involves sensitivity studies aimed at elucidating which model parameters contribute most to the drip shield and waste package degradation characteristics. The model parameters identified included (a) general corrosion rate model parameters (temperature-dependence and uncertainty treatment), and (b) stress corrosion cracking (SCC) model parameters (uncertainty treatment of stress and stress intensity factor profiles in the Alloy 22 waste package outer barrier closure weld regions, the SCC initiation stress threshold, and the fraction of manufacturing flaws oriented favorably for through-wall penetration by SCC). These model parameters were reevaluated and new distributions were generated. Also, early waste package failures due to improper heat treatment were added to the waste package degradation model. The results of these investigations indicate that the waste package failure profiles are governed by the manufacturing flaw orientation model parameters and models used

  9. Study of Si wafer surfaces irradiated by gas cluster ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isogai, H.; Toyoda, E.; Senda, T.; Izunome, K.; Kashima, K.; Toyoda, N.; Yamada, I.

    2007-01-01

    The surface structures of Si (1 0 0) wafers subjected to gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) irradiation have been analyzed by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). GCIB irradiation is a promising technique for both precise surface etching and planarization of Si wafers. However, it is very important to understand the crystalline structure of Si wafers after GCIB irradiation. An Ar-GCIB used for the physically sputtering of Si atoms and a SF 6 -GCIB used for the chemical etching of the Si surface are also analyzed. The GCIB irradiation increases the surface roughness of the wafers, and amorphous Si layers are formed on the wafer surface. However, when the Si wafers are annealed in hydrogen at a high temperature after the GCIB irradiation, the surface roughness decreases to the same level as that before the irradiation. Moreover, the amorphous Si layers disappear completely

  10. Temperature Dependent Electrical Properties of PZT Wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, T.; Sen, S.; Seal, A.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical and electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) wafers were investigated and compared with PZT bulk. PZT wafers were prepared by tape casting technique. The transition temperature of both the PZT forms remained the same. The transition from an asymmetric to a symmetric shape was observed for PZT wafers at higher temperature. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33) values obtained were 560 pc/N and 234 pc/N, and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p) values were 0.68 and 0.49 for bulk and wafer, respectively. The reduction in polarization after fatigue was only ~3% in case of PZT bulk and ~7% for PZT wafer.

  11. Vacuum-packaged piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters: damping contributions and autonomy for a wireless sensor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfrink, R; Renaud, M; Kamel, T M; De Nooijer, C; Jambunathan, M; Goedbloed, M; Hohlfeld, D; Matova, S; Pop, V; Caballero, L; Van Schaijk, R

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of thin-film MEMS vibration energy harvesters based on aluminum nitride as piezoelectric material. A record output power of 85 µW is measured. The parasitic-damping and the energy-harvesting performances of unpackaged and packaged devices are investigated. Vacuum and atmospheric pressure levels are considered for the packaged devices. When dealing with packaged devices, it is found that vacuum packaging is essential for maximizing the output power. Therefore, a wafer-scale vacuum package process is developed. The energy harvesters are used to power a small prototype (1 cm 3 volume) of a wireless autonomous sensor system. The average power consumption of the whole system is less than 10 µW, and it is continuously provided by the vibration energy harvester

  12. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhaus, Dirk-Holger; Münzer, Adolf

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future e...

  13. Nuclear-waste-package program for high-level isolation in Nevada tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the waste package program is to insure that a package is designed suitable for a repository in tuff that meets performance requirements of the NRC. In brief, the current (draft) regulation requires that the radionuclides be contained in the engineered system for 1000 years, and that, thereafter, no more than one part in 10 5 of the nuclides per year leave the boundary of the system. Studies completed as of this writing are thermal modeling of waste packages in a tuff repository and analysis of sodium bentonite as a potential backfill material. Both studies will be presented. Thermal calculations coupled with analysis of the geochemical literature on bentonite indicate that extensive chemical and physical alteration of bentonite would result at the high power densities proposed (ca. 2 kW/package and an area density of 25 W/m 2 ), in part due to compacted bentonite's relatively low thermal conductivity when dehydrated (approx. 0.6 +- 0.2 W/m 0 C). Because our groundwater contains K + , an upper hydrothermal temperature limit appears to be 120 to 150 0 C. At much lower power densities (less than 1 kW per package and an areal density of 12 W/m 2 ), bentonite may be suitable

  14. Fabrication of CVD graphene-based devices via laser ablation for wafer-scale characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, David; Buron, Jonas Christian Due; Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf

    2015-01-01

    Selective laser ablation of a wafer-scale graphene film is shown to provide flexible, high speed (1 wafer/hour) device fabrication while avoiding the degradation of electrical properties associated with traditional lithographic methods. Picosecond laser pulses with single pulse peak fluences of 140......-effect mobility, doping level, on–off ratio, and conductance minimum before and after laser ablation fabrication....

  15. Effects of packaging, mineral oil coating, and storage time on biogenic amine levels and internal quality of eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, T C; Assis, D C S; Menezes, L D M; Oliveira, D D; Lima, A L; Souza, M R; Heneine, L G D; Cançado, S V

    2014-12-01

    This study was carried out with the aim of evaluating the effects of mineral oil application on eggshells and the use of plastic packages with lids on the physical-chemical and microbiological quality and biogenic amine contents of eggs stored under refrigeration for up to 125 d. A total of 1,920 eggs from 46-wk-old Hyline W36 laying hens were randomly distributed into 4 groups soon after classification: (i) 480 eggs were stored in pulp carton tray packages; (ii) 480 eggs were stored in plastic packages with lids; (iii) 480 eggs were stored in carton packages after the application of mineral oil; and (iv) 480 eggs were stored in plastic packages with lids after the application of mineral oil. The internal quality was measured by Haugh units, by the counts of mesophilic and psychrotrophic microorganisms, by the most probable number of total and thermal-tolerant coliforms, by the counts of molds and yeasts, by the analysis of Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus spp., and by the levels of biogenic amines in the egg yolk and albumen. The application of mineral oil to the eggshell resulted in higher Haugh unit values throughout storage, and the use of plastic packages altered the internal quality. The application of mineral oil and the use of packaging had no effects on the microbiological and biogenic amine results. Microbiological analyses showed the absence of Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, thermal-tolerant coliforms, and fungi. However, the highest counts of mesophilic (1.1 × 10(7) cfu/g) and psychrotrophic (6.7 × 10(7) cfu/g) microorganisms were recorded. The highest values of biogenic amines detected and quantified were putrescine (2.38 mg/kg) and cadaverine (7.27 mg/kg) in the egg yolk and putrescine (1.95 mg/kg), cadaverine (2.83 mg/kg), and phenylethylamine (2.57 mg/kg) in the albumen. Despite these results, the biogenic amine levels recorded were considered low and would not be harmful to consumer health. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  16. Determination of critical levels of residual oxygen to minimize discoloration of sliced packaged Norwegian salami under light display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørheim, Oddvin; Måge, Ingrid; Larsen, Hanne

    2017-07-01

    Discoloration of sliced packaged salami is contributing to rejection of the product, food waste and economical loss. A combination of residual O 2 in the headspace of packages and light is causing photooxidation and deterioration of colour. The aim of this study was to establish maximum tolerable concentrations of residual O 2 in packages of salami slices with 100% N 2 under light display at 4 and 20°C. Salami sausages had variable inherent O 2 consumption rate. Storage of salami in 1% O 2 in darkness did not induce discoloration. The upper limits for O 2 for avoiding discoloration under light were variable in the range 0.1-1.0%, depending on temperature and type of salami. Display at 20°C increased the rate of O 2 depletion compared to 4°C. To minimize discoloration, sliced and packaged salami should be stored in darkness at approximately 20°C until the level of residual O 2 is reduced below a critical limit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optoelectronic interconnects for 3D wafer stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, David; Carson, John C.; Lome, Louis S.

    1996-01-01

    Wafer and chip stacking are envisioned as means of providing increased processing power within the small confines of a three-dimensional structure. Optoelectronic devices can play an important role in these dense 3-D processing electronic packages in two ways. In pure electronic processing, optoelectronics can provide a method for increasing the number of input/output communication channels within the layers of the 3-D chip stack. Non-free space communication links allow the density of highly parallel input/output ports to increase dramatically over typical edge bus connections. In hybrid processors, where electronics and optics play a role in defining the computational algorithm, free space communication links are typically utilized for, among other reasons, the increased network link complexity which can be achieved. Free space optical interconnections provide bandwidths and interconnection complexity unobtainable in pure electrical interconnections. Stacked 3-D architectures can provide the electronics real estate and structure to deal with the increased bandwidth and global information provided by free space optical communications. This paper will provide definitions and examples of 3-D stacked architectures in optoelectronics processors. The benefits and issues of these technologies will be discussed.

  18. Board Level Proton Testing Book of Knowledge for NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertin, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    This book of knowledge (BoK) provides a critical review of the benefits and difficulties associated with using proton irradiation as a means of exploring the radiation hardness of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) systems. This work was developed for the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Board Level Testing for the COTS task. The fundamental findings of this BoK are the following. The board-level test method can reduce the worst case estimate for a board's single-event effect (SEE) sensitivity compared to the case of no test data, but only by a factor of ten. The estimated worst case rate of failure for untested boards is about 0.1 SEE/board-day. By employing the use of protons with energies near or above 200 MeV, this rate can be safely reduced to 0.01 SEE/board-day, with only those SEEs with deep charge collection mechanisms rising this high. For general SEEs, such as static random-access memory (SRAM) upsets, single-event transients (SETs), single-event gate ruptures (SEGRs), and similar cases where the relevant charge collection depth is less than 10 µm, the worst case rate for SEE is below 0.001 SEE/board-day. Note that these bounds assume that no SEEs are observed during testing. When SEEs are observed during testing, the board-level test method can establish a reliable event rate in some orbits, though all established rates will be at or above 0.001 SEE/board-day. The board-level test approach we explore has picked up support as a radiation hardness assurance technique over the last twenty years. The approach originally was used to provide a very limited verification of the suitability of low cost assemblies to be used in the very benign environment of the International Space Station (ISS), in limited reliability applications. Recently the method has been gaining popularity as a way to establish a minimum level of SEE performance of systems that require somewhat higher reliability performance than previous applications. This sort of application of

  19. Physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Modern manufacturing processes of complex integrated semiconductor devices are based on wafer-level manufacturing of components which are subsequently interconnected. When compared with classical monolithic bi-dimensional integrated circuits (2D ICs), the new approach of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs) exhibits significant benefits in terms of signal propagation delay and power consumption due to the reduced metal interconnection length and allows high integration levels with reduced form factor. Metal thermo-compression bonding is a process suitable for 3D interconnects applications at wafer level, which facilitates the electrical and mechanical connection of two wafers even processed in different technologies, such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Due to its high electrical conductivity, copper is a very attractive material for electrical interconnects. For Cu-Cu wafer bonding the process requires typically bonding for around 1 h at 400°C and high contact pressure applied during bonding. Temperature reduction below such values is required in order to solve issues regarding (i) throughput in the wafer bonder, (ii) wafer-to-wafer misalignment after bonding and (iii) to minimise thermo-mechanical stresses or device degradation. The aim of this work was to study the physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu bonding and based on this study to further optimise the bonding process for low temperatures. The critical sample parameters (roughness, oxide, crystallinity) were identified using selected analytical techniques and correlated with the characteristics of the bonded Cu-Cu interfaces. Based on the results of this study the impact of several materials and process specifications on the bonding result were theoretically defined and experimentally proven. These fundamental findings subsequently facilitated low temperature (LT) metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding and even room temperature direct

  20. Wafer scale oblique angle plasma etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckel, David Bruce; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.; Finnegan, Patrick Sean

    2017-05-23

    Wafer scale oblique angle etching of a semiconductor substrate is performed in a conventional plasma etch chamber by using a fixture that supports a multiple number of separate Faraday cages. Each cage is formed to include an angled grid surface and is positioned such that it will be positioned over a separate one of the die locations on the wafer surface when the fixture is placed over the wafer. The presence of the Faraday cages influences the local electric field surrounding each wafer die, re-shaping the local field to be disposed in alignment with the angled grid surface. The re-shaped plasma causes the reactive ions to follow a linear trajectory through the plasma sheath and angled grid surface, ultimately impinging the wafer surface at an angle. The selected geometry of the Faraday cage angled grid surface thus determines the angle at with the reactive ions will impinge the wafer.

  1. Survey of waste package designs for disposal of high-level waste/spent fuel in selected foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Lakey, L.T.; Silviera, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of the waste package strategies for seven western countries with active nuclear power programs that are pursuing disposal of spent nuclear fuel or high-level wastes in deep geologic rock formations. Information, current as of January 1989, is given on the leading waste package concepts for Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. All but two of the countries surveyed (France and the UK) have developed design concepts for their repositories, but none of the countries has developed its final waste repository or package concept. Waste package concepts are under study in all the countries surveyed, except the UK. Most of the countries have not yet developed a reference concept and are considering several concepts. Most of the information presented in this report is for the current reference or leading concepts. All canisters for the wastes are cylindrical, and are made of metal (stainless steel, mild steel, titanium, or copper). The canister concepts have relatively thin walls, except those for spent fuel in Sweden and Germany. Diagrams are presented for the reference or leading concepts for canisters for the countries surveyed. The expected lifetimes of the conceptual canisters in their respective disposal environment are typically 500 to 1,000 years, with Sweden's copper canister expected to last as long as one million years. Overpack containers that would contain the canisters are being considered in some of the countries. All of the countries surveyed, except one (Germany) are currently planning to utilize a buffer material (typically bentonite) surrounding the disposal package in the repository. Most of the countries surveyed plan to limit the maximum temperature in the buffer material to about 100 degree C. 52 refs., 9 figs

  2. Shelf-life of almond pastry cookies with different types of packaging and levels of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, F V; De Luca, S; Piscopo, A; Santisi, V; Poiana, M

    2010-06-01

    Almond pastries are typical cookies of the south of Italy. Introduction of new packaging for this kind of cookies requires shelf-life assessments. This study, related to different types of packaging under various storage conditions of time and temperature, identifies critical parameters, as color and texture, to track during storage studies and to extend the shelf-life. The cookies were packed in three different ways and stored at two different temperatures. The pastries were separately stored: (1) in polyvinylchloride film; (2) in aluminum foil (ALL); (3) with modified atmosphere (MAP) in plastic vessels sealed into a polyamide/ polyethylene film; and (4) in vessels without any polymeric film. The storage temperatures were 20 and 30 °C. Evolution of texture, water activity, dry matter and color was assessed. Texture was evaluated by a texture analyzer with a puncturing test. Indices for hardening were the area under the curve (N × mm) up to 10 mm of distance, and the maximum force (N) corresponding to the crust fracture. The best results were obtained with ALL packaging and MAP condition, and above all, in all the trials a temperature of 30 °C reduced the crust hardness.

  3. A mechanistic model for leaching from low-level radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a waste leaching model to predict radionuclide releases from porous wastes in corrodible outer containers in unsaturated conditions and/or conditions of intermittent water flow is summarized in this paper. Three major processes have been conceptualized as necessarily participating in waste leaching: infiltration of water to the waste package; interaction of this water with the waste; and exit of radionuclide-laden water from the waste package. Through the exit point, the main features of the whole leaching process ware held in common. The departure occurs in two main ways: 1) the method of entrance of the radionuclides to leachant (i.e. part of the waste-water interaction phase outlined earlier); and 2) the mode of exit from waste form/waste package (i.e., the exit of radionuclide-laden water phase). The first branching point, which occurs in relation to 1), leads to either readily soluble species directly entering leachant on contact, or to other processes - mainly expected to be diffusion, dissolution or ion exchange, or some combination thereof

  4. High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At the High Speed On-Wafer Characterization Laboratory, researchers characterize and model devices operating at terahertz (THz) and millimeter-wave frequencies. The...

  5. A multi-level, multi-jurisdictional strategy: Transnational tobacco companies' attempts to obstruct tobacco packaging restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Benjamin; Holden, Chris; Mackinder, Sophie

    2018-03-09

    Despite the extensive literature on the tobacco industry, there has been little attempt to study how transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) coordinate their political activities globally, or to theorise TTC strategies within the context of global governance structures and policy processes. This article draws on three concepts from political science - policy transfer, multi-level governance and venue shifting - to analyse TTCs' integrated, global strategies to oppose augmented packaging requirements across multiple jurisdictions. Following Uruguay's introduction of extended labelling requirements, Australia became the first country in the world to require tobacco products to be sold in standardised ('plain') packaging in 2012. Governments in the European Union, including in the United Kingdom and Ireland, adopted similar laws, with other member states due to follow. TTCs vehemently opposed these measures and developed coordinated, global strategies to oppose their implementation, exploiting the complexity of contemporary global governance arrangements. These included a series of legal challenges in various jurisdictions, alongside political lobbying and public relations campaigns. This article draws on analysis of public documents and 32 semi-structured interviews with key policy actors. It finds that TTCs developed coordinated and highly integrated strategies to oppose packaging restrictions across multiple jurisdictions and levels of governance.

  6. Severe Accident Research Network (SARNET). Level 2 PSA work package: comparison of partners methods for uncertainties assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumont, B.; Haesendonck, M.; Vidal, S.; Eyink, J.; Loeffler, H.; Radu, G.; Kopustinskas, V.; Ming, A.; Guntay, S.; Gustavsson, V.; Ivanov, I.; Dienstbier, J.; Bareith, A.; Hollo, E.; Lajtha, G.

    2007-01-01

    The PSA2 work package (PSA2 WP) is a part of the Joined Programme Activity of the European Severe Accident Network (SARNET) related to level 2 PSA methodologies. The general objectives of this work package is to provide a comparison of the different methodologies used or under development for level 2 PSA application by the partners involved in the work package and to promote their harmonization. The PSA2 WP is organized into three main topics: methodologies in general, methodologies for uncertainties assessment, and dynamic reliability methods. The different tasks initially defined for these three topics are shortly described and the partners involved identified. Attention is then paid on the methodologies used so far by the different partners to assess the uncertainties in their level 2 PSA. A review of partners approaches to assess - as far as possible - the different sources of possible uncertainties is done for the different following topics: - uncertainties propagated from the level 1 PSA, - uncertainties (in sense of approximation) due to the binning of the level 1 sequences in Plant Damage, - uncertainties related to the structure of the Accident Progression Event Tree, - uncertainties related to the probabilities of stochastic events (system failure or recovery, human actions, some physical phenomena such as ignition of hydrogen combustion or triggering of steam explosion), - uncertainties elated to the modelling of the different physical phenomena, - uncertainties related to the cut-off frequency used in the probabilistic quantification of the Accident Progression Event Tree; - uncertainties related to the binning of level 2 sequences in Release Categories (variables not considered, values of eventual continuous variables). First conclusions of the comparison are given in terms of improvement needs and then of perspectives of the work for the following period of work. (authors)

  7. Modified atmosphere packaging for prevention of mold spoilage of bakery products with different pH and water activity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynot, M E; Marín, S; Sanchis, V; Ramos, A J

    2003-10-01

    A sponge cake analog was used to study the influence of pH, water activity (aw), and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on the growth of seven fungal species commonly causing bakery product spoilage (Eurotium amstelodami, Eurotium herbariorum, Eurotium repens, Eurotium rubrum, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, and Penicillium corylophilum). A full factorial design was used. Water activity, CO2, and their interaction were the main factors significantly affecting fungal growth. Water activity at levels of 0.80 to 0.90 had a significant influence on fungal growth and determined the concentration of CO2 needed to prevent cake analog spoilage. At an aw level of 0.85, lag phases increased twofold when the level of CO2 in the headspace increased from 0 to 70%. In general, no fungal growth was observed for up to 28 days of incubation at 25 degrees C when samples were packaged with 100% CO2, regardless of the aw level. Partial least squares projection to latent structures regression was used to build a polynomial model to predict sponge cake shelf life on the basis of the lag phases of all seven species tested. The model developed explained quite well (R2 = 79%) the growth of almost all species, which responded similarly to changes in tested factors. The results of this study emphasize the importance of combining several hurdles, such as modified atmosphere packaging, aw, and pH, that have synergistic or additive effects on the inhibition of mold growth.

  8. Improving matrix-vector product performance and multi-level preconditioning for the parallel PCG package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLay, R.T.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we consider parallel solution of sparse linear systems arising from discretized PDE`s. As part of our continuing work on our parallel PCG Solver package, we have made improvements in two areas. The first is improving the performance of the matrix-vector product. Here on regular finite-difference grids, we are able to use the cache memory more efficiently for smaller domains or where there are multiple degrees of freedom. The second problem of interest in the present work is the construction of preconditioners in the context of the parallel PCG solver we are developing. Here the problem is partitioned over a set of processors subdomains and the matrix-vector product for PCG is carried out in parallel for overlapping grid subblocks. For problems of scaled speedup, the actual rate of convergence of the unpreconditioned system deteriorates as the mesh is refined. Multigrid and subdomain strategies provide a logical approach to resolving the problem. We consider the parallel trade-offs between communication and computation and provide a complexity analysis of a representative algorithm. Some preliminary calculations using the parallel package and comparisons with other preconditioners are provided together with parallel performance results.

  9. Annotated bibliography for the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurm, K.J.; Miller, N.E.

    1982-11-01

    This bibliography identifies documents that are pertinent to the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The bibliography is divided into fourteen subject categories so that anyone wishing to review the subject of leaching, for example, can turn to the leaching section and review the abstracts of reports which are concerned primarily with leaching. Abstracts are also cross referenced according to secondary subject matter so that one can get a complete list of abstracts for any of the fourteen subject categories. All documents which by their title alone appear to deal with the design of waste packages for the geologic disposal of spent fuel or high-level waste were obtained and reviewed. Only those documents which truly appear to be of interest to a waste package designer were abstracted. The documents not abstracted are listed in a separate section. There was no beginning date for consideration of a document for review. About 1100 documents were reviewed and about 450 documents were abstracted

  10. Role of waste packages in the safety of a high level waste repository in a deep geological formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretheau, F.; Lewi, J.

    1990-06-01

    The safety of a radioactive waste disposal facility lays on the three following barriers placed between the radioactive materials and the biosphere: the waste package; the engineered barriers; the geological barrier. The function assigned to each of these barriers in the performance assessment is an option taken by the organization responsible for waste disposal management (ANDRA in France), which must show that: expected performances of each barrier (confinement ability, life-time, etc.) are at least equal to those required to fulfill the assigned function; radiation protection requirements are met in all situations considered as credible, whether they be the normal situation or random event situations. The French waste management strategy is based upon two types of disposal depending on the nature and activity of waste packages: - surface disposal intended for low and medium level wastes having half-lives of about 30 years or less and alpha activity less than 3.7 MBq/kg (0.1 Ci/t), for individual packages and less than 0.37 MBq/kg (0.01 Ci/t) in the average. Deep geological disposal intended for TRU and high level wastes. The conditions of acceptance of packages in a surface disposal site are subject to the two fundamental safety rules no. I.2 and III.2.e. The present paper is only dealing with deep geological disposal. For deep geological repositories, three stages are involved: stage preceding definitive disposal (intermediate storage, transportation, handling, setting up in the disposal cavities); stage subsequent to definitive sealing of the disposal cavities but prior to the end of operation of the repository; stage subsequent to closure of the repository. The role of the geological barrier has been determined as the essential part of long term radioactivity confinement, by a working group, set up by the French safety authorities. Essential technical criteria relating to the choice of a site so defined by this group, are the following: very low permeability

  11. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  12. Design and fabrication of a foldable 3D silicon based package for solid state lighting applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovskij, R; Liu, P; Van Zeijl, H W; Mimoun, B; Zhang, G Q

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of solid state lighting (SSL) luminaires as well as reduction of packaging and assembly costs are of prime interest for the SSL lighting industry. A novel silicon based LED package for lighting applications is presented in this paper. The proposed design consists of 5 rigid Si tiles connected by flexible polyimide hinges with embedded interconnects (ICs). Electrical, optical and thermal characteristics were taken into consideration during design. The fabrication process involved polyimide (PI) application and patterning, aluminium interconnect integration in the flexible hinge, LED reflector cavity formation and metalization followed by through wafer DRIE etching for chip formation and release. A method to connect chip front to backside without TSVs was also integrated into the process. Post-fabrication wafer level assembly included LED mounting and wirebond, phosphor-based colour conversion and silicone encapsulation. The package formation was finalized by vacuum assisted wrapping around an assembly structure to form a 3D geometry, which is beneficial for omnidirectional lighting. Bending tests were performed on the flexible ICs and optical performance at different temperatures was evaluated. It is suggested that 3D packages can be expanded to platforms for miniaturized luminaire applications by combining monolithic silicon integration and system-in-package (SiP) technologies. (paper)

  13. Comprehensive Die Shear Test of Silicon Packages Bonded by Thermocompression of Al Layers with Thin Sn Capping or Insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Satoh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermocompression bonding for wafer-level hermetic packaging was demonstrated at the lowest temperature of 370 to 390 °C ever reported using Al films with thin Sn capping or insertions as bonding layer. For shrinking the chip size of MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems, a smaller size of wafer-level packaging and MEMS–ASIC (application specific integrated circuit integration are of great importance. Metal-based bonding under the temperature of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor backend process is a key technology, and Al is one of the best candidates for bonding metal in terms of CMOS compatibility. In this study, after the thermocompression bonding of two substrates, the shear fracture strength of dies was measured by a bonding tester, and the shear-fractured surfaces were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope, EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and a surface profiler to clarify where the shear fracture took place. We confirmed two kinds of fracture mode. One mode is Si bulk fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 41.6 to 209 MPa, proportionally depending on the area of Si fracture. The other mode is bonding interface fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 32.8 to 97.4 MPa. Regardless of the fracture modes, the minimum die shear strength is practical for wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  14. Operating cost estimate low-level radioactive waste volume reduction and packaging options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.C.; Collins, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    The projected operating cost data examine the differences in compaction and incineration for DAW. Two commonly achieved densities for compaction are presented, while a third case approaching the theoretical density of the cloth and paper materials shows the interesting possibilities of improved compaction. Incineration at two benchmarks for the chlorinated plastic component of typical DAW illustrates the impact waste stream make-up has on economics. Evaporator concentrates are considered as a liquid at four concentrations (6%, 12%, 25% and 50%) and after all water has been removed for the cement and polymer cases. Five separate processing schemes are presented for bead resins. These range from dewatering and packaging in high integrity containers to incineration with solidification

  15. Surface etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon wafer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Muzhi

    With more than 200 GW of accumulated installations in 2015, photovoltaics (PV) has become an important green energy harvesting method. The PV market is dominated by solar cells made from crystalline silicon wafers. The engineering of the wafer surfaces is critical to the solar cell cost reduction and performance enhancement. Therefore, this thesis focuses on the development of surface etching technologies for monocrystalline silicon wafer solar cells. It aims to develop a more efficient alkaline texturing method and more effective surface cleaning processes. Firstly, a rapid, isopropanol alcohol free texturing method is successfully demonstrated to shorten the process time and reduce the consumption of chemicals. This method utilizes the special chemical properties of triethylamine, which can form Si-N bonds with wafer surface atoms. Secondly, a room-temperature anisotropic emitter etch-back process is developed to improve the n+ emitter passivation. Using this method, 19.0% efficient screen-printed aluminium back surface field solar cells are developed that show an efficiency gain of 0.15% (absolute) compared with conventionally made solar cells. Finally, state-of-the-art silicon surface passivation results are achieved using hydrogen plasma etching as a dry alternative to the classical hydrofluoric acid wet-chemical process. The effective native oxide removal and the hydrogenation of the silicon surface are shown to be the reasons for the excellent level of surface passivation achieved with this novel method.

  16. Effect of oxygen level on the oxidative stability of two different retail pork products stored using modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Ann Tørngren, Mari; Christensen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and the oxidative stability of pork steaks and of pork mince were investigated during 2, 5 and 7 days of refrigerated storage using oxygen (O2) levels of 0%, 20%, 50% and 80% in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP). Steaks stored during 7 days were not affected by an increase i......%) O2 MAP. The results show that fresh pork products are affected differently by the MAP O2 concentration and strongly indicate that optimisation of MAP based on the retail product type would be of considerable benefit to their oxidative stability....

  17. Trace analysis for 300 MM wafers and processes with TXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutsch, A.; Erdmann, V.; Zielonka, G.; Pfitzner, L.; Ryssel, H.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient fabrication of semiconductor devices is combined with an increasing size of silicon wafers. The contamination level of processes, media, and equipment has to decrease continuously. A new test laboratory for 300 mm was installed in view of the above mentioned aspects. Aside of numerous processing tools this platform consist electrical test methods, particle detection, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) preparation, and TXRF. The equipment is installed in a cleanroom. It is common to perform process or equipment control, development, evaluation and qualification with monitor wafers. The evaluation and the qualification of 300 mm equipment require direct TXRF on 300 mm wafers. A new TXRF setup was installed due to the wafer size of 300 mm. The 300 mm TXRF is equipped with tungsten and molybdenum anode. This combination allows a sensitive detection of elements with fluorescence energy below 10 keV for tungsten excitation. The molybdenum excitation enables the detection of a wide variety of elements. The detection sensitivity for the tungsten anode excited samples is ten times higher than for molybdenum anode measured samples. The system is calibrated with 1 ng Ni. This calibration shows a stability within 5 % when monitored to control system stability. Decreasing the amount of Ni linear results in a linear decrease of the measured Ni signal. This result is verified for a range of elements by multielement samples. New designs demand new processes and materials, e.g. ferroelectric layers and copper. The trace analysis of many of these materials is supported by the higher excitation energy of the molybdenum anode. Reclaim and recycling of 300 mm wafers demand for an accurate contamination control of the processes to avoid cross contamination. Polishing or etching result in modified surfaces. TXRF as a non-destructive test method allows the simultaneously detection of a variety of elements on differing surfaces in view of contamination control and process

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood

  19. Waste package performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes work undertaken to assess the life-expectancy and post-failure nuclide release behavior of high-level and waste packages in a geologic repository. The work involved integrating models of individual phenomena (such as heat transfer, corrosion, package deformation, and nuclide transport) and using existing data to make estimates of post-emplacement behavior of waste packages. A package performance assessment code was developed to predict time to package failure in a flooded repository and subsequent transport of nuclides out of the leaking package. The model has been used to evaluate preliminary package designs. The results indicate, that within the limitation of model assumptions and data base, packages lasting a few hundreds of years could be developed. Very long lived packages may be possible but more comprehensive data are needed to confirm this

  20. Considerations on the activity concentration determination method for low-level waste packages and nuclide data comparison between different countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, M.; Mueller, W.

    2000-01-01

    In low-level waste disposal, acceptable activity concentration limits are regulated for individual nuclides and groups of nuclides according to the conditions of each disposal site. Such regulated limits principally concern total alpha and beta /gamma activity as well as nuclides such as C-14, Ni-63, and Pu-238 which are long-lived and difficult to measure (hereinafter referred to as difficult-to-measure nuclides). Before waste packages are transported to the disposal site, the activities or activity concentrations of the regulated nuclides and groups of nuclides in the waste packages must be assessed and declared. A generally applicable theoretical method to determine these activities is lacking at present. Therefore, to meet this requirement, for NPP waste each country independently samples actual waste and carries out radiochemical analyses on these samples. The activity concentrations of difficult-to-measure nuclides are then determined by statistical correlation of the measured data between difficult-to-measure nuclides and Co-60 and Cs-137 which are measurable from outside the waste packages (hereinafter referred to as key nuclides). This method is called 'Scaling Factor Method'. It is widely adopted as a method for determining the activity concentrations of the limited nuclides in low-level waste packages from NPP, and it is also approved by responsible authorities in the respective country. In the past, each country independently determined scaling factors based on measurements on samples from the local NPPs. In the first part of this study, the possibility of an international scaling factor assessment using a database integrating data from different countries was studied by comparing radiochemical analysis data between Germany, Japan, and the United States. These countries have accumulated a large number of those nuclide data required to determine scaling factors. Statistical values such as correlation coefficients change with an accumulation of data. In

  1. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. Marr

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation

  2. Self-aligned 0-level sealing of MEMS devices by a two layer thin film reflow process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, C.R.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gunn, R.; Witvrouw, A.

    2004-01-01

    Many micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) require a vacuum or controlled atmosphere encapsulation in order to ensure either a good performance or an acceptable lifetime of operation. Two approaches for waferscale zero-level packaging exist. The most popular approach is based on wafer bonding.

  3. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Holger Neuhaus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future efficiency potential of this technology. In research and development, more various advanced solar cell concepts have demonstrated higher efficiencies. The question which arises is “why are new solar cell concepts not transferred into industrial production more frequently?”. We look into the requirements a new solar cell technology has to fulfill to have an advantage over the current approach. Finally, we give an overview of high-efficiency concepts which have already been transferred into industrial production.

  4. Single wafer rapid thermal multiprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraswat, K.C.; Moslehi, M.M.; Grossman, D.D.; Wood, S.; Wright, P.; Booth, L.

    1989-01-01

    Future success in microelectronics will demand rapid innovation, rapid product introduction and ability to react to a change in technological and business climate quickly. These technological advances in integrated electronics will require development of flexible manufacturing technology for VLSI systems. However, the current approach of establishing factories for mass manufacturing of chips at a cost of more than 200 million dollars is detrimental to flexible manufacturing. The authors propose concepts of a micro factory which may be characterized by more economical small scale production, higher flexibility to accommodate many products on several processes, and faster turnaround and learning. In-situ multiprocessing equipment where several process steps can be done in sequence may be a key ingredient in this approach. For this environment to be flexible, the equipment must have ability to change processing environment, requiring extensive in-situ measurements and real time control. This paper describes the development of a novel single wafer rapid thermal multiprocessing (RTM) reactor for next generation flexible VLSI manufacturing. This reactor will combine lamp heating, remote microwave plasma and photo processing in a single cold-wall chamber, with applications for multilayer in-situ growth and deposition of dielectrics, semiconductors and metals

  5. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available

  6. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John [Mechanical Engineering Department, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London, SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom and Nestec York Ltd., Nestlé Product Technology Centre, Haxby Road, PO Box 204, York YO91 1XY (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-22

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  7. Prediction of radionuclide invention for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste by considering concentration limit of waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Min Seong; Jeong, Noh Gyeon; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency(KORAD), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The result of a preliminary safety assessment that was completed by applying the radionuclide inventory calculated on the basis of available data from radioactive waste generation agencies suggested that many difficulties are to be expected with regard to disposal safety and operation. Based on the results of the preliminary safety assessment of the entire disposal system, in this paper, a unit package exceeding the safety goal is selected that occupies a large proportion of radionuclides in intermediate-level radioactive waste. We introduce restrictions on the amount of radioactivity in a way that excludes the high surface dose rate of the package. The radioactivity limit for disposal will be used as the baseline data for establishing the acceptance criteria and the disposal criteria for each disposal facility to meet the safety standards. It is necessary to draw up a comprehensive safety development plan for the Gyeongju waste disposal facility that will contribute to the construction of a Safety Case for the safety optimization of radioactive waste disposal facilities.

  8. Wafer Cakes of Improved Amino Acid Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksolana Boidunyk

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study of the amino acid composition of newly developed wafer cakes with adipose fillings combined with natural additives. The appropriateness of the using non-traditional raw materials (powder of willow herb, poppy oilcake, carob, as well as skimmed milk powder in order to increase the biological value of wafer cakes and improve their amino acid composition is proven.

  9. Silicon wafers for integrated circuit process

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy , B.

    1986-01-01

    Silicon as a substrate material will continue to dominate the market of integrated circuits for many years. We first review how crystal pulling procedures impact the quality of silicon. We then investigate how thermal treatments affect the behaviour of oxygen and carbon, and how, as a result, the quality of silicon wafers evolves. Gettering techniques are then presented. We conclude by detailing the requirements that wafers must satisfy at the incoming inspection.

  10. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    Fromme, P.; Pizzolato, M.; Robyr, J-L; Masserey, B.

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness a...

  11. BSATOM - package of programs for calculating the energy levels and wave functions of helium-like systems taking into account isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrashkevich, A.G.; Abrashkevich, D.G.; Vinitskij, S.I.; Puzynin, I.V.

    1989-01-01

    Description of package BCATOM for calculating the energy levels and wave functions of helium-like systems in the hyperspherical adiabatic approach taking into account the isotopic effects is given. The corresponding Sturm-Liouville problems are approximated by the difference method and the high order accuracy finite element method. The obtained generalized algebraic eigenvalue problems are solved by subspace iteration method. Possibilities of the package are demonstrated by calculating the ground state characteristics of a negative hydrogen ion. 33 refs.; 1 fig

  12. On the design and implementation of a wafer yield editor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pineda de Gyvez, J.; Jess, J.A.G.

    1989-01-01

    An interactive environment is presented for the analysis of yield information required on modern integrated circuit manufacturing lines. The system estimates wafer yields and wafer-yield variations, quantifies regional yield variations within wafers, identifies clusters in wafers and/or in lots, and

  13. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  14. Modeling the wafer temperature profile in a multiwafer LPCVD furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badgwell, T.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Trachtenberg, I.; Edgar, T.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to predict wafer temperatures within a hot-wall multiwafer low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) reactor. The model predicts both axial (wafer-to-wafer) and radial (across-wafer) temperature profiles. Model predictions compare favorably with in situ wafer temperature measurements described in an earlier paper. Measured axial and radial temperature nonuniformities are explained in terms of radiative heat-transfer effects. A simulation study demonstrates how changes in the outer tube temperature profile and reactor geometry affect wafer temperatures. Reactor design changes which could improve the wafer temperature profile are discussed.

  15. Residual stress in silicon wafer using IR polariscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhijia; Wang, Pin; Asundi, Anand

    2008-09-01

    The infrared phase shift polariscope (IR-PSP) is a full-field optical technique for stress analysis in Silicon wafers. Phase shift polariscope is preferred to a conventional polariscope, as it can provide quantitative information of the normal stress difference and the shear stress in the specimen. The method is based on the principles of photoelasticity, in which stresses induces temporary birefringence in materials which can be quantitatively analyzed using a phase shift polariscope. Compared to other stress analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction or laser scanning, infrared photoelastic stress analysis provides full-field information with high resolution and in near real time. As the semiconductor fabrication is advancing, larger wafers, thinner films and more compact packages are being manufactured. This results in a growing demand of process control. Residual stress exist in silicon during semiconductor fabrication and these stresses may make cell processing difficult or even cause the failure of the silicon. Reducing these stresses would improve manufacturability and reliability. Therefore stress analysis is essential to trace the root cause of the stresses. The polariscope images are processed using MATLAB and four-step phase shifting method to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding the residual stress of the sample. The system is calibrated using four-point bend specimen and then the residual stress distribution in a MEMS sample is shown.

  16. Using depleted uranium to shield vitrified high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Gildea, P.D.; Bernard, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    The underlying report for this paper evaluates options for using depleted uranium as shielding materials for transport systems for disposal of vitrified high-level waste (VHLW). In addition, economic analyses are presented to compare costs associated with these options to costs, associated with existing and proposed storage, transport, and diposal capabilities. A more detailed evaluation is provided elsewhere. (Yoshimura et al. 1995.)

  17. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  18. Peptide and protein loading into porous silicon wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestidge, C.A.; Barnes, T.J.; Mierczynska-Vasilev, A.; Kempson, I.; Peddie, F. [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes (Australia); Barnett, C. [Medica Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK WR14 3SZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    The influence of peptide/protein size and hydrophobicity on the physical and chemical aspects of loading within porous silicon (pSi) wafer samples has been determined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). Both Gramicidin A (a small hydrophobic peptide) and Papain (a larger hydrophilic protein) were observed (ToF-SIMS) to penetrate across the entire pSi layer, even at low loading levels. AFM surface imaging of pSi wafers during peptide/protein loading showed that surface roughness increased with Papain loading, but decreased with Gramicidin A loading. For Papain, the loading methodology was also found to influence loading efficiency. These differences indicate more pronounced surface adsorption of Papain. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Method to determine the radioactivity of radioactive waste packages. Basic procedure of the method used to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants: 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    This document describes the procedures adopted in order to determine the radioactivity of low-level radioactive waste packages generated at nuclear power plants in Japan. The standards applied have been approved by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan after deliberations by the Subcommittee on the Radioactivity Verification Method for Waste Packages, the Nuclear Cycle Technical Committee, and the Standards Committee. The method for determining the radioactivity of the low-level radioactive waste packages was based on procedures approved by the Nuclear Safety Commission in 1992. The scaling factor method and other methods of determining radioactivity were then developed on the basis of various investigations conducted, drawing on extensive accumulated knowledge. Moreover, the international standards applied as common guidelines for the scaling factor method were developed by Technical Committee ISO/TC 85, Nuclear Energy, Subcommittee SC 5, Nuclear Fuel Technology. Since the application of accumulated knowledge to future radioactive waste disposal is considered to be rational and justified, such body of knowledge has been documented in a standardized form. The background to this standardization effort, the reasoning behind the determination method as applied to the measurement of radioactivity, as well as other related information, are given in the Annexes hereto. This document includes the following Annexes. Annex 1: (reference) Recorded items related to the determination of the scaling factor. Annex 2 (reference): Principles applied to the determining the radioactivity of waste packages. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the data available for estimating release rates from commercial low-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.; Cowgill, M.G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, an overview of our findings concerning the distribution of activity within low-level radioactive wastes will be presented. This will begin in a general fashion and consider the distribution of the total activity by each of the following: waste class, waste stream, wasteform, and waste container. A radionuclide specific breakdown by waste class and wasteform follows. The findings are reviewed in terms of performance assessment modeling needs. Finally, we present our conclusions

  1. The influence of silicon wafer thickness on characteristics of multijunction solar cells with vertical p—n-junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnilenko A. B.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A multijunction silicon solar cell with vertical p–n junctions consisted of four serial n+–p–p+-structures was simulated using Silvaco TCAD software package. The dependence of solar cell characteristics on the silicon wafer thickness is investigated for a wide range of values.

  2. X-ray analytics for 450-mm wafer; Roentgenanalytik fuer 450-mm-Wafer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2014-09-15

    The introduction of the 450-mm technology in the wafer fabrication and the further reduction of critical dimensions requires improved X-ray analysis methods. Therefor the PTB has concipated a metrology chamber for the characterization of 450-mm wafers, the crucial element of which is a multi-axis patent-pending manipulator.

  3. Modeling for speciation of radionuclides in waste packages with high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyand, Torben; Bracke, Guido; Seher, Holger

    2016-10-01

    Based on a literature search on radioactive waste inventories adequate thermodynamic data for model inventories were derived for geochemical model calculations using PHREEQC in order to determine the solid phase composition of high-level radioactive wastes in different containers. The calculations were performed for different model inventories (PWR-MOX, PWR-UO2, BWR-MOX, BMR-UO2) assuming intact containers under reduction conditions. The effect of a defect in the container on the solid phase composition was considered in variation calculations assuming air contact induced oxidation.

  4. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELsourougy, M R; Zaki, A A; Aly, H F [Atomic energy authority, hot laboratory center, Cairo, (Egypt); Khalil, M Y [Nuclear engineering department, Alexandria university. Alexandria, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELsourougy, M.R.; Zaki, A.A.; Aly, H.F.; Khalil, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Calculation of keff for plutonium in high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, P.R.; Culbreth, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    The proposed national high-level nuclear waste repository will be designed to store approximately 70,000 tons of commercial spent fuel, but other forms of waste will also be considered for ultimate storage at this site. Plutonium in the form of PuO 2 may be added to borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal in the repository. The maximum amount of this fissile that may be added to a glass ''log'' will be limited by its ability to sustain a chain reaction. In this study, the removal of neutron absorbers from a glass log and the subsequent possibility of water infiltration were studied to find corresponding neutron multiplication factors. Weight fractions of 1%, 2%, and 3% PuO 2 were analyzed in the study. The results show the maximum amount of plutonium fissile that may be safely added to a glass log under conditions that lead to leaching of the principal neutron absorbers from the glass

  7. Development of a working set of waste package performance criteria for deepsea disposal of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Columbo, P.; Fuhrmann, M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr; Sailor, V.L.

    1982-11-01

    The United States ocean dumping regulations developed pursuant to PL92-532, the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, as amended, provide for a general policy of isolation and containment of low-level radioactive waste after disposal into the ocean. In order to determine whether any particular waste packaging system is adequate to meet this general requirement, it is necessary to establish a set of performance criteria against which to evaluate a particular packaging system. These performance criteria must present requirements for the behavior of the waste in combination with its immobilization agent and outer container in a deepsea environment. This report presents a working set of waste package performance criteria, and includes a glossary of terms, characteristics of low-level radioactive waste, radioisotopes of importance in low-level radioactive waste, and a summary of domestic and international regulations which control the ocean disposal of these wastes

  8. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavone, G; Murray, J; Smith, S; Walton, A J; Desmulliez, M P Y; Mount, A R

    2016-01-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements. (paper)

  9. Packaging fluency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocanu, Ana; Chrysochou, Polymeros; Bogomolova, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Research on packaging stresses the need for packaging design to read easily, presuming fast and accurate processing of product-related information. In this paper we define this property of packaging as “packaging fluency”. Based on the existing marketing and cognitive psychology literature on pac...

  10. Standard semiconductor packaging for high-reliability low-cost MEMS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, Kieran P.

    2005-01-01

    Microelectronic packaging technology has evolved over the years in response to the needs of IC technology. The fundamental purpose of the package is to provide protection for the silicon chip and to provide electrical connection to the circuit board. Major change has been witnessed in packaging and today wafer level packaging technology has further revolutionized the industry. MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology has created new challenges for packaging that do not exist in standard ICs. However, the fundamental objective of MEMS packaging is the same as traditional ICs, the low cost and reliable presentation of the MEMS chip to the next level interconnect. Inertial MEMS is one of the best examples of the successful commercialization of MEMS technology. The adoption of MEMS accelerometers for automotive airbag applications has created a high volume market that demands the highest reliability at low cost. The suppliers to these markets have responded by exploiting standard semiconductor packaging infrastructures. However, there are special packaging needs for MEMS that cannot be ignored. New applications for inertial MEMS devices are emerging in the consumer space that adds the imperative of small size to the need for reliability and low cost. These trends are not unique to MEMS accelerometers. For any MEMS technology to be successful the packaging must provide the basic reliability and interconnection functions, adding the least possible cost to the product. This paper will discuss the evolution of MEMS packaging in the accelerometer industry and identify the main issues that needed to be addressed to enable the successful commercialization of the technology in the automotive and consumer markets.

  11. Making Porous Luminescent Regions In Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Jones, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    Regions damaged by ion implantation stain-etched. Porous regions within single-crystal silicon wafers fabricated by straightforward stain-etching process. Regions exhibit visible photoluminescence at room temperature and might constitute basis of novel class of optoelectronic devices. Stain-etching process has advantages over recently investigated anodic-etching process. Process works on both n-doped and p-doped silicon wafers. Related development reported in article, "Porous Si(x)Ge(1-x) Layers Within Single Crystals of Si," (NPO-18836).

  12. Microemulsion-Based Mucoadhesive Buccal Wafers: Wafer Formation, In Vitro Release, and Ex Vivo Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Minh Nguyet; Van Vo, Toi; Tran, Van-Thanh; Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh

    2017-10-01

    Microemulsion has the potentials to enhance dissolution as well as facilitate absorption and permeation of poorly water-soluble drugs through biological membranes. However, its application to govern a controlled release buccal delivery for local treatment has not been discovered. The aim of this study is to develop microemulsion-based mucoadhesive wafers for buccal delivery based on an incorporation of the microemulsion with mucoadhesive agents and mannitol. Ratio of oil to surfactant to water in the microemulsion significantly impacted quality of the wafers. Furthermore, the combination of carbopol and mannitol played a key role in forming the desired buccal wafers. The addition of an extra 50% of water to the formulation was suitable for wafer formation by freeze-drying, which affected the appearance and distribution of carbopol in the wafers. The amount of carbopol was critical for the enhancement of mucoadhesive properties and the sustained drug release patterns. Release study presented a significant improvement of the drug release profile following sustained release for 6 h. Ex vivo mucoadhesive studies provided decisive evidence to the increased retention time of wafers along with the increased carbopol content. The success of this study indicates an encouraging strategy to formulate a controlled drug delivery system by incorporating microemulsions into mucoadhesive wafers.

  13. Nonuniformities of electrical resistivity in undoped 6H-SiC wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q.; Polyakov, A.Y.; Skowronski, M.; Sanchez, E.K.; Loboda, M.J.; Fanton, M.A.; Bogart, T.; Gamble, R.D.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical elemental analysis, temperature-dependent Hall measurements, deep-level transient spectroscopy, and contactless resistivity mapping were performed on undoped semi-insulating (SI) and lightly nitrogen-doped conducting 6H-SiC crystals grown by physical vapor transport (PVT). Resistivity maps of commercial semi-insulating SiC wafers revealed resistivity variations across the wafers between one and two orders of magnitude. Two major types of variations were identified. First is the U-shape distribution with low resistivity in the center and high in the periphery of the wafer. The second type had an inverted U-shape distribution. Secondary-ion-mass spectrometry measurements of the distribution of nitrogen concentration along the growth axis and across the wafers sliced from different locations of lightly nitrogen-doped 6H-SiC boules were conducted. The measured nitrogen concentration gradually decreased along the growth direction and from the center to the periphery of the wafers. This change gives rise to the U-like distribution of resistivity in wafers of undoped SI-SiC. The concentrations of deep electron traps exhibited similar dependence. Compensation of nitrogen donors by these traps can result in the inverted U-like distribution of resistivity. Possible reasons for the observed nonuniformities include formation of a (0001) facet in PVT growth coupled with orientation-dependent nitrogen incorporation, systematic changes of the gas phase composition, and increase of the deposition temperature during boule growth

  14. Evaluation of a cyanoacrylate dressing to manage peristomal skin alterations under ostomy skin barrier wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Catherine T; Saucier, Darlene; Trevellini, Chenel; Smith, Juliet

    2011-01-01

    Peristomal skin alterations under ostomy barrier wafers are a commonly reported problem. While a number of interventions to manage this issue have been reported, the use of a topically applied cyanoacrylate has received little attention. This case series describes the use of a topical cyanoacrylate for the management of peristomal skin alterations in persons living with an ostomy. Using a convenience sample, the topical cyanoacrylate dressing was applied to 11 patients with peristomal skin disruption under ostomy wafers in acute care and outpatient settings. The causes of barrier function interruption were also addressed to enhance outcomes. Patients were assessed for wound discomfort using a Likert Scale, time to healing, and number of appliance changes. Patient satisfaction was also examined. Average reported discomfort levels were 9.5 out of 10 at the initial peristomal irritation assessment visit decreased to 3.5 at the first wafer change and were absent by the second wafer change. Wafers had increasing wear time between changes in both settings with acute care patients responding faster. Epidermal resurfacing occurred within 10.2 days in outpatients and within 7 days in acute care patients. Because of the skin sealant action of this dressing, immediate adherence of the wafer was reported at all pouch changes.

  15. High throughput batch wafer handler for 100 to 200 mm wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathmell, R.D.; Raatz, J.E.; Becker, B.L.; Kitchen, R.L.; Luck, T.R.; Decker, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new batch processing end station for ion implantation has been developed for wafers of 100 to 200 mm diameter. It usilizes a spinning disk with clampless wafer support. All wafer transport is done with backside handling and is carried out in vacuum. This end station incorporates a new dose control scheme which is able to monitor the incident particle current independently of the charge state of the ions. This technique prevents errors which may be caused by charge exchange between the beam and residual gas. The design and features of this system will be reviewed and the performance to date will be presented. (orig.)

  16. In situ corrosion studies on selected high level waste packaging materials under simulated disposal conditions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1988-01-01

    In order to qualify corrosion resistant materials for high level waste (HLW) packagings acting as a long-term barrier in a rock salt repository, the corrosion behavior of preselected materials is being investigated in laboratory-scale and in-situ experiments. This work reports about in-situ corrosion experiments on unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd, Hastelloy C4, and iron-base alloys, as nodular cast iron, Ni-Resist D4 and Si-cast iron, under simulated disposal conditions. The results of the investigations can be summarized as follows: (1) all materials investigated exhibited high resistance to corrosion under the conditions prevailing in the Brine Migration Test; (2) all materials and above all the materials with passivating oxide layers such as Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 which may corrode selectively already in the presence of minor amounts of brine had been resistant with respect to any type of local corrosion attack; the gamma-radiation of 3 · 10 2 Gy/h did not exert an influence on the corrosion behavior of the materials

  17. Some physical impacts of the marine environment on packages of low-level radioactive waste for sea disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, G.J.; Smith, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the effects of descent to the sea bed on representative UK sea disposal packages are discussed. Estimates are given of terminal velocities, and comparative drop heights in free air are presented to show that the effects of impact with the sea bed are minimal. The effect of pressure changes is likely to be most severe on those packages which contain significant void space. The adequacy of vent tubes for pressure equilisation is considered; for the most frequently used packages, conservative estimates are presented for the numbers of 25 mm internal diameter vent tubes which are demonstrably adequate. Where substantially less equalisation is provided with packages containing significant void space, prior testing is advisable. (author)

  18. Effect of weight and frontal area of external telemetry packages on the kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of small-bodied sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, I A; Suski, C D; Mandelman, J W; Brooks, E J

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to observe the effects of submerged weight and frontal cross-sectional area of external telemetry packages on the kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of small-bodied juvenile sharks, using lemon sharks Negaprion brevirostris (60-80 cm total length, L T ) as a model species. Juveniles were observed free-swimming in a mesocosm untagged and with small and large external accelerometer packages that increased frontal cross-sectional area of the animals and their submerged weight. Despite adhering to widely used standards for tag mass, the presence of an external telemetry package altered swimming kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of juvenile N. brevirostris relative to untagged individuals, suggesting that tag mass is not a suitable standalone metric of device suitability. Changes in swimming performance could not be detected from tail-beat frequency, which suggests that tail-beat frequency is an unsuitable standalone metric of swimming performance for small N. brevirostris. Lastly, sharks experienced treatment-specific changes in activity level and swimming kinematics from morning to afternoon observation. Therefore, the presence of external telemetry packages altered the kinematics, activity levels and swimming performance of small young-of-the-year N. brevirostris and these data may therefore be relevant to other similar-sized juveniles of other shark species. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Controllable laser thermal cleavage of sapphire wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiayu; Hu, Hong; Zhuang, Changhui; Ma, Guodong; Han, Junlong; Lei, Yulin

    2018-03-01

    Laser processing of substrates for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offers advantages over other processing techniques and is therefore an active research area in both industrial and academic sectors. The processing of sapphire wafers is problematic because sapphire is a hard and brittle material. Semiconductor laser scribing processing suffers certain disadvantages that have yet to be overcome, thereby necessitating further investigation. In this work, a platform for controllable laser thermal cleavage was constructed. A sapphire LED wafer was modeled using the finite element method to simulate the thermal and stress distributions under different conditions. A guide groove cut by laser ablation before the cleavage process was observed to guide the crack extension and avoid deviation. The surface and cross section of sapphire wafers processed using controllable laser thermal cleavage were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy, and their morphology was compared to that of wafers processed using stealth dicing. The differences in luminous efficiency between substrates prepared using these two processing methods are explained.

  20. Optimal Wafer Cutting in Shuttle Layout Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nisted, Lasse; Pisinger, David; Altman, Avri

    2011-01-01

    . The shuttle layout problem is frequently solved in two phases: first, a floorplan of the shuttle is generated. Then, a cutting plan is found which minimizes the overall number of wafers needed to satisfy the demand of each die type. Since some die types require special production technologies, only compatible...

  1. Silicon waveguides produced by wafer bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mette; Jensen, Flemming; Bunk, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    X-ray waveguides are successfully produced employing standard silicon technology of UV photolithography and wafer bonding. Contrary to theoretical expectations for similar systems even 100 mu m broad guides of less than 80 nm height do not collapse and can be used as one dimensional waveguides...

  2. Low-cost silicon wafer dicing using a craft cutter

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2014-05-20

    This paper reports a low-cost silicon wafer dicing technique using a commercial craft cutter. The 4-inch silicon wafers were scribed using a crafter cutter with a mounted diamond blade. The pre-programmed automated process can reach a minimum die feature of 3 mm by 3 mm. We performed this scribing process on the top polished surface of a silicon wafer; we also created a scribing method for the back-unpolished surface in order to protect the structures on the wafer during scribing. Compared with other wafer dicing methods, our proposed dicing technique is extremely low cost (lower than $1,000), and suitable for silicon wafer dicing in microelectromechanical or microfluidic fields, which usually have a relatively large die dimension. The proposed dicing technique is also usable for dicing multiple project wafers, a process where dies of different dimensions are diced on the same wafer.

  3. Shielding properties of protective thin film coatings and blended concrete compositions for high level waste storage packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco, Michael A.; Winfrey, Leigh; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Measured linear attenuation coefficients are the same for bare and coated steels. • Gamma mean free path is much larger than coating thickness; buildup is negligible. • ‘Concrete-6’ reduces exposure rate outside spent fuel cask significantly over ordinary concrete. - Abstract: Various thin film coatings have been proposed to protect stainless steel high level waste (HLW) containers from premature failure due to localized corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and mechanical wear. These coatings include TiN, ZrO 2 , MoS 2 , TiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 , to be deposited either in multiple layers or as a thicker, single-layer composite. Linear attenuation coefficients of these materials have been simulated using MicroShield and measured experimentally for various photon energies. Additionally, spent fuel casks with overpacks made of two different types of concrete were simulated to compare exposure rate at the cask surface. In the energy range that is significant for high level waste storage all coating materials possess very similar attenuation behavior. A specialty concrete, containing magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and lead oxide (PbO), reduces the exposure rate at the outer surface of the overpack by several orders of magnitude. The higher-Z elements not present in ordinary concrete greatly increase attenuation of intermediate-energy gammas (0.4–1.0 MeV). The thin film coatings do not affect the shielding capabilities of the HLW packaging, as their total proposed thickness is nearly three orders of magnitude less than the mean free path (MFP) of the primary photons of interest.

  4. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of glass commercial high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable to the reference glass composition described in PNL-3838 and carbon steel canister described in ONWI-438. They provide preliminary numerical values for the commercial high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses and regulatory requirements become available. 13 references, 1 figure

  5. Repository environmental parameters and models/methodologies relevant to assessing the performance of high-level waste packages in basalt, tuff, and salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claiborne, H.C.; Croff, A.G.; Griess, J.C.; Smith, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    This document provides specifications for models/methodologies that could be employed in determining postclosure repository environmental parameters relevant to the performance of high-level waste packages for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) at Richland, Washington, the tuff at Yucca Mountain by the Nevada Test Site, and the bedded salt in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Guidance is provided on the identify of the relevant repository environmental parameters; the models/methodologies employed to determine the parameters, and the input data base for the models/methodologies. Supporting studies included are an analysis of potential waste package failure modes leading to identification of the relevant repository environmental parameters, an evaluation of the credible range of the repository environmental parameters, and a summary of the review of existing models/methodologies currently employed in determining repository environmental parameters relevant to waste package performance. 327 refs., 26 figs., 19 tabs.

  6. Repository environmental parameters and models/methodologies relevant to assessing the performance of high-level waste packages in basalt, tuff, and salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claiborne, H.C.; Croff, A.G.; Griess, J.C.; Smith, F.J.

    1987-09-01

    This document provides specifications for models/methodologies that could be employed in determining postclosure repository environmental parameters relevant to the performance of high-level waste packages for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) at Richland, Washington, the tuff at Yucca Mountain by the Nevada Test Site, and the bedded salt in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Guidance is provided on the identify of the relevant repository environmental parameters; the models/methodologies employed to determine the parameters, and the input data base for the models/methodologies. Supporting studies included are an analysis of potential waste package failure modes leading to identification of the relevant repository environmental parameters, an evaluation of the credible range of the repository environmental parameters, and a summary of the review of existing models/methodologies currently employed in determining repository environmental parameters relevant to waste package performance. 327 refs., 26 figs., 19 tabs

  7. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  8. Noncontact sheet resistance measurement technique for wafer inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Rommel, J. Martin; Litovsky, Roman; Becla, Peter; Lojek, Bohumil; Bryson, Frank; Blake, Julian

    1995-12-01

    A new technique, MICROTHERM, has been developed for noncontact sheet resistance measurements of semiconductor wafers. It is based on the application of microwave energy to the wafer, and simultaneous detection of the infrared radiation resulting from ohmic heating. The pattern of the emitted radiation corresponds to the sheet resistance distribution across the wafer. This method is nondestructive, noncontact, and allows for measurements of very small areas (several square microns) of the wafer.

  9. Long term behaviour of low and intermediate level waste packages under repository conditions. Results of a co-ordinated research project 1997-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The development and application of approaches and technologies that provide long term safety is an essential issue in the disposal of radioactive waste. For low and intermediate level radioactive waste, engineered barriers play an important role in the overall safety and performance of near surface repositories. Thus, developing a strong technical basis for understanding the behaviour and performance of engineered barriers is an important consideration in the development and establishment of near surface repositories for radioactive waste. In 1993, a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Performance of Engineered Barrier Materials in Near Surface Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste was initiated by the IAEA with the twin goals of addressing some of the gaps in the database on radionuclide isolation and long term performance of a wide variety of materials and components that constitute the engineered barriers system (IAEA-TECDOC-1255 (2001)). However, during the course of the CRP, it was realized that that the scope of the CRP did not include studies of the behaviour of waste packages over time. Given that a waste package represents an important component of the overall near surface disposal system and the fact that many Member States have active R and D programmes related to waste package testing and evaluation, a new CRP was launched, in 1997, on Long Term Behaviour of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages Under Repository Conditions. The CRP was intended to promote research activities on the subject area in Member States, share information on the topic among the participating countries, and contribute to advancing technologies for near surface disposal of radioactive waste. Thus, this CRP complements the afore mentioned CRP on studies of engineered barriers. With the active participation and valuable contributions from twenty scientists and engineers from Argentina, Canada, Czech Republic, Egypt, Finland, India, Republic of Korea, Norway, Romania

  10. Modeling of direct wafer bonding: Effect of wafer bow and etch patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. T.; Spearing, S. M.

    2002-12-01

    Direct wafer bonding is an important technology for the manufacture of silicon-on-insulator substrates and microelectromechanical systems. As devices become more complex and require the bonding of multiple patterned wafers, there is a need to understand the mechanics of the bonding process. A general bonding criterion based on the competition between the strain energy accumulated in the wafers and the surface energy that is dissipated as the bond front advances is developed. The bonding criterion is used to examine the case of bonding bowed wafers. An analytical expression for the strain energy accumulation rate, which is the quantity that controls bonding, and the final curvature of a bonded stack is developed. It is demonstrated that the thickness of the wafers plays a large role and bonding success is independent of wafer diameter. The analytical results are verified through a finite element model and a general method for implementing the bonding criterion numerically is presented. The bonding criterion developed permits the effect of etched features to be assessed. Shallow etched patterns are shown to make bonding more difficult, while it is demonstrated that deep etched features can facilitate bonding. Model results and their process design implications are discussed in detail.

  11. Water saving in IC wafer washing process; IC wafer senjo deno sessui taisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, H. [Mitsubishi Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Araki, M.; Nakazawa, T.

    1997-11-30

    This paper reports features of a wafer washing technology, a new IC wafer washing process, its pure water saving effect, and a `QC washing` which has pure water saving effect in the wafer washing. Wafer washing processes generally include the SC1 process (using ammonia + hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution) purposed for removing contamination due to ultrafine particles, the SC2 process (using hydrochloric acid + hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution) purposed for removing contamination due to heavy metals, the piranha washing process (using hot sulfuric acid + hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution) purposed for removing contamination due to organic matters, and the DHF (using dilute hydrofluoric acid) purposed for removing natural oxide films. Natural oxide films are now remained as surface protection films, by which surface contamination has been reduced remarkably. A high-temperature washing chemical circulating and filtering technology developed in Japan has brought about a reform in wafer washing processes having been used previously. Spin washing is used as a water saving measure, in which washing chemicals or pure water are sprayed onto one each of wafers which is spin-rotated, allowing washing and rinsing to be made with small amount of washing chemicals and pure water. The QC washing is a method to replace tank interior with pure was as quick as possible in order to increase the rinsing effect. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  12. MEMS packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu , Tai-Ran

    2004-01-01

    MEMS Packaging discusses the prevalent practices and enabling techniques in assembly, packaging and testing of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The entire spectrum of assembly, packaging and testing of MEMS and microsystems, from essential enabling technologies to applications in key industries of life sciences, telecommunications and aerospace engineering is covered. Other topics included are bonding and sealing of microcomponents, process flow of MEMS and microsystems packaging, automated microassembly, and testing and design for testing.The Institution of Engineering and Technology is

  13. P/N InP solar cells on Ge wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Vernon, Stanley; Burke, Edward A.

    1994-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) P-on-N one-sun solar cells were epitaxially grown using a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process on germanium (Ge) wafers. The motivation for this work is to replace expensive InP wafers, which are fragile and must be thick and therefore heavy, with less expensive Ge wafers, which are stronger, allowing use of thinner, lighter weight wafers. An intermediate InxGs1-xP grading layer starting as In(0.49)Ga(0.51) at the GaAs-coated Ge wafer surface and ending as InP at the top of the grading layer (backside of the InP cell) was used to attempt to bend some of the threading dislocations generated by lattice-mismatch between the Ge wafer and InP cell so they would be harmlessly confined in this grading layer. The best InP/Ge cell was independently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-sun 25 C AMO efficiently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-circuit photocurrent 22.6 mA/sq cm. We believe this is the first published report of an InP cell grown on a Ge wafer. Why get excited over a 9 percent InP/Ge cell? If we look at the cell weight and efficiency, a 9 percent InP cell on an 8 mil Ge wafer has about the same cell power density, 118 W/kg (BOL), as the best InP cell ever made, a 19 percent InP cell on an 18 mil InP wafer, because of the lighter Ge wafer weight. As cell panel materials become lighter, the cell weight becomes more important, and the advantage of lightweight cells to the panel power density becomes more important. In addition, although InP/Ge cells have a low beginning-of-life (BOL) efficiency due to dislocation defects, the InP/Ge cells are very radiation hard (end-of-life power similar to beginning-of-life). We have irradiated an InP/Ge cell with alpha particles to an equivalent fluence of 1.6 x 10(exp 16) 1 MeV electrons/sq cm and the efficiency is still 83 percent of its BOL value. At this fluence level, the power output of these InP/Ge cells matches the GaAs/Ge cell data tabulated in the JPL handbook. Data are presented

  14. 320 x 240 uncooled IRFPA with pixel wise thin film vacuum packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, J.-J.; Dumont, G.; Rabaud, W.; Becker, S.; Carle, L.; Goudon, V.; Vialle, C.; Hamelin, A.; Arnaud, A.

    2012-10-01

    Silicon based vacuum packaging is a key enabling technology for achieving affordable uncooled Infrared Focal Plane Arrays (IRFPA) as required by the promising mass market for very low cost IR applications, such as automotive driving assistance, energy loss monitoring in buildings, motion sensors… Among the various approaches studied worldwide, the CEA, LETI is developing a unique technology where each bolometer pixel is sealed under vacuum at the wafer level, using an IR transparent thin film deposition. This technology referred to as PLP (Pixel Level Packaging), leads to an array of hermetic micro-caps each containing a single microbolometer. Since the successful demonstration that the PLP technology, when applied on a single microbolometer pixel, can provide the required vacuum noise and NETD distributions, the paper also puts emphasis on additional key features such as thermal time constant, image quality, and ageing properties.

  15. Expected very-near-field thermal environments for advanced spent-fuel and defense high-level waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickertsen, L.D.; Misplon, M.A.; Claiborne, H.C.

    1982-03-01

    The very-near-field thermal environments expected in a nuclear waste repository in a salt formation have been evaluated for the Westinghouse Form I advanced waste package concepts. The repository descriptions used to supplement the waste package designs in these analyses are realistic and take into account design constraints to assure conservatism. As a result, areal loadings are well below the acceptable values established for salt repositories. Predicted temperatures are generally well below any temperature limits which have been discussed for waste packages in a salt formation. These low temperatures result from the conservative repository designs. Investigations are also made of the sensitivity of these temperatures to areal loading, canister separation, and other design features

  16. Size of silicon strip sensor from 6 inch wafer (right) compared to that from a 4 inch wafer (left).

    CERN Multimedia

    Honma, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Silicon strip sensors made from 6 inch wafers will allow for much larger surface area coverage at a reduced cost per unit surface area. A prototype sensor of size 8cm x 11cm made by Hamamatsu from a 6 inch wafer is shown next to a traditional 6cm x 6cm sensor from a 4 inch wafer.

  17. Wafer-scale integrated micro-supercapacitors on an ultrathin and highly flexible biomedical platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Jimin; Meng, Chuizhou; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2015-02-01

    We present wafer-scale integrated micro-supercapacitors on an ultrathin and highly flexible parylene platform, as progress toward sustainably powering biomedical microsystems suitable for implantable and wearable applications. All-solid-state, low-profile (supercapacitors are formed on an ultrathin (~20 μm) freestanding parylene film by a wafer-scale parylene packaging process in combination with a polyaniline (PANI) nanowire growth technique assisted by surface plasma treatment. These micro-supercapacitors are highly flexible and shown to be resilient toward flexural stress. Further, direct integration of micro-supercapacitors into a radio frequency (RF) rectifying circuit is achieved on a single parylene platform, yielding a complete RF energy harvesting microsystem. The system discharging rate is shown to improve by ~17 times in the presence of the integrated micro-supercapacitors. This result suggests that the integrated micro-supercapacitor technology described herein is a promising strategy for sustainably powering biomedical microsystems dedicated to implantable and wearable applications.

  18. Mechanics of wafer bonding: Effect of clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. T.; Thouless, M. D.; Spearing, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanics-based model is developed to examine the effects of clamping during wafer bonding processes. The model provides closed-form expressions that relate the initial geometry and elastic properties of the wafers to the final shape of the bonded pair and the strain energy release rate at the interface for two different clamping configurations. The results demonstrate that the curvature of bonded pairs may be controlled through the use of specific clamping arrangements during the bonding process. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the strain energy release rate depends on the clamping configuration and that using applied loads usually leads to an undesirable increase in the strain energy release rate. The results are discussed in detail and implications for process development and bonding tool design are highlighted.

  19. Wafer integrated micro-scale concentrating photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tian; Li, Duanhui; Li, Lan; Jared, Bradley; Keeler, Gordon; Miller, Bill; Sweatt, William; Paap, Scott; Saavedra, Michael; Das, Ujjwal; Hegedus, Steve; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Hu, Juejun

    2017-09-01

    Recent development of a novel micro-scale PV/CPV technology is presented. The Wafer Integrated Micro-scale PV approach (WPV) seamlessly integrates multijunction micro-cells with a multi-functional silicon platform that provides optical micro-concentration, hybrid photovoltaic, and mechanical micro-assembly. The wafer-embedded micro-concentrating elements is shown to considerably improve the concentration-acceptance-angle product, potentially leading to dramatically reduced module materials and fabrication costs, sufficient angular tolerance for low-cost trackers, and an ultra-compact optical architecture, which makes the WPV module compatible with commercial flat panel infrastructures. The PV/CPV hybrid architecture further allows the collection of both direct and diffuse sunlight, thus extending the geographic and market domains for cost-effective PV system deployment. The WPV approach can potentially benefits from both the high performance of multijunction cells and the low cost of flat plate Si PV systems.

  20. Carbon dioxide capture using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Trachtenberg, Michael S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Datta, Saurav

    2015-09-08

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium. A pH suitable for exchange of CO.sub.2 is electrochemically maintained within the basic and acidic ion exchange wafers by applying an electric potential across the cathode and anode.

  1. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  2. Wafer-shape metrics based foundry lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungtae; Liang, Frida; Mileham, Jeffrey; Tsai, Damon; Bouche, Eric; Lee, Sean; Huang, Albert; Hua, C. F.; Wei, Ming Sheng

    2017-03-01

    As device shrink, there are many difficulties with process integration and device yield. Lithography process control is expected to be a major challenge due to tighter overlay and focus control requirement. The understanding and control of stresses accumulated during device fabrication has becoming more critical at advanced technology nodes. Within-wafer stress variations cause local wafer distortions which in turn present challenges for managing overlay and depth of focus during lithography. A novel technique for measuring distortion is Coherent Gradient Sensing (CGS) interferometry, which is capable of generating a high-density distortion data set of the full wafer within a time frame suitable for a high volume manufacturing (HVM) environment. In this paper, we describe the adoption of CGS (Coherent Gradient Sensing) interferometry into high volume foundry manufacturing to overcome these challenges. Leveraging this high density 3D metrology, we characterized its In-plane distortion as well as its topography capabilities applied to the full flow of an advanced foundry manufacturing. Case studies are presented that summarize the use of CGS data to reveal correlations between in-plane distortion and overlay variation as well as between topography and device yield.

  3. Lamb wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul; Pizzolato, Marco; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Masserey, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. Guided ultrasonic waves offer the potential to efficiently detect micro-cracks in the thin wafers. Previous studies of ultrasonic wave propagation in silicon focused on effects of material anisotropy on bulk ultrasonic waves, but the dependence of the wave propagation characteristics on the material anisotropy is not well understood for Lamb waves. The phase slowness and beam skewing of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes A 0 and S 0 were investigated. Experimental measurements using contact wedge transducer excitation and laser measurement were conducted. Good agreement was found between the theoretically calculated angular dependency of the phase slowness and measurements for different propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation. Significant wave skew and beam widening was observed experimentally due to the anisotropy, especially for the S 0 mode. Explicit finite element simulations were conducted to visualize and quantify the guided wave beam skew. Good agreement was found for the A 0 mode, but a systematic discrepancy was observed for the S 0 mode. These effects need to be considered for the non-destructive testing of wafers using guided waves.

  4. Evidence of Processing Non-Idealities in 4H-SiC Integrated Circuits Fabricated with Two Levels of Metal Interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, David J.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Liangyu, Chen; Evans, Laura J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Chang, Carl W.; Beheim, Glenn M.

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication and prolonged 500 C electrical testing of 4H-SiC junction field effect transistor (JFET) integrated circuits (ICs) with two levels of metal interconnect is reported in another submission to this conference proceedings. While some circuits functioned more than 1000 hours at 500 C, the majority of packaged ICs from this wafer electrically failed after less than 200 hours of operation in the same test conditions. This work examines the root physical degradation and failure mechanisms believed responsible for observed large discrepancies in 500 C operating time. Evidence is presented for four distinct issues that significantly impacted 500 C IC operational yield and lifetime for this wafer.

  5. Qualification of multi-crystalline silicon wafers by optical imaging for industrial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Van der Borg, N.J.C.M.; Manshanden, P.; De Bruijne, M.; Bende, E.E. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    We have developed a method to qualify multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers that are being used in a production process. An optical image of an etched wafer is made. This etching can be a standard industrial acid etching for mc-Si wafers as is commonly used for saw damage removal and simultaneous iso-texturing. Digital image processing is then applied to identify the number of dislocations and their distribution over the wafer. This information is used as input for a cell performance prediction model, where the performance is characterized by the open circuit voltage (Voc) or the efficiency. The model can include various levels of sophistication, i.e. from using an average density of dislocations to the full spatial resolution of the dislocations in a 2D simulation that includes also the metallization pattern on the cell. The predicted performance is then evaluated against pre-selected criteria. The possibility to apply this optical qualification method in an initial stage in the production enables early rejection of the wafers, further tailoring of the cell production process or identification of instabilities in the production process.

  6. Palladium-based on-wafer electroluminescence studies of GaN-based LED structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcianu, C.O.; Thrush, E.J.; Humphreys, C.J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Plumb, R.G. [Centre for Photonic Systems, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FD (United Kingdom); Boyd, A.R.; Rockenfeller, O.; Schmitz, D.; Heuken, M. [AIXTRON AG, Kackertstr. 15-17, 52072 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Electroluminescence (EL) testing of Light Emitting Diode (LED) structures is usually done at the chip level. Assessing the optical and electrical properties of LED structures at the wafer scale prior to their processing would improve the cost effectiveness of producing LED-lamps. A non-destructive method for studying the luminescence properties of the structure at the wafer-scale is photoluminescence (PL). However, the relationship between the on-wafer PL data and the final device EL can be less than straightforward (Y. H Aliyu et al., Meas. Sci. Technol. 8, 437 (1997)) as the two techniques employ different carrier injection mechanisms. This paper provides an overview of some different techniques in which palladium is used as a contact in order to obtain on-wafer electroluminescence information which could be used to screen wafers prior to processing into final devices. Quick mapping of the electrical and optical characteristics was performed using either palladium needle electrodes directly, or using the latter in conjunction with evaporated palladium contacts to inject both electrons and holes into the active region via the p-type capping layer of the structure. For comparison, indium was also used to make contact to the n-layer so that electrons could be directly injected into that layer. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Data package for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration Program environmental impact statement: Volume 1, Sections 1--7 and Appendices A--D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelle, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    This data package is required to support an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to be written to evaluate the effects of future disposal of low-level waste at four sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation. Current waste disposal facilities are exceeding their capacities and increasingly stringent disposal requirements dictate the need for the sites and new waste disposal technologies. The Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration Program has developed a strategy for low-level waste disposal built around a dose based approach. This approach emphasizes contamination pathways, including surface and groundwater and ALARA conditions for workers. This strategy dictates the types of data needed for this data package. The data package provides information on geology, soils, groundwater, surface water, and ecological characterization of the Oak Ridge Reservation in order to evaluate alternative technologies and alternative sites. The results of the investigations and data collections indicate that different technologies will probably have to be used at different sites. This conclusion, however, depends on the findings of the Environmental Impact Statement. 14 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Packaging microservices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montesi, Fabrizio; Thrane, Dan Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    We describe a first proposal for a new packaging system for microservices based on the Jolie programming language, called the Jolie Package Manager (JPM). Its main features revolve around service interfaces, which make the functionalities that a service provides and depends on explicit. For the f......We describe a first proposal for a new packaging system for microservices based on the Jolie programming language, called the Jolie Package Manager (JPM). Its main features revolve around service interfaces, which make the functionalities that a service provides and depends on explicit...

  9. Study of the semiconductor properties by irradiation, 8. Study of trapping center by. gamma. -ray on Si wafer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Koji; Shioya, Hitoshi; Nagamatsu, Yasuhiko; Ogura, Shoji [Miyazaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1983-08-01

    In order to know the effects of ..gamma..-ray irradiation on n-type Si-wafers, the author did ..gamma..-ray irradiation experiments on n-type Si-wafers. They then observed the trapping center by using DLTS and ICTS equipments. The trapping center level, which is produced by ..gamma..-ray, is about 0.49 eV. In addition, the authors discuss the recombination rate.

  10. Characterization of silicon-on-insulator wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Hoon

    The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) is attracting more interest as it is being used for an advanced complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and a base substrate for novel devices to overcome present obstacles in bulk Si scaling. Furthermore, SOI fabrication technology has improved greatly in recent years and industries produce high quality wafers with high yield. This dissertation investigated SOI material properties with simple, yet accurate methods. The electrical properties of as-grown wafers such as electron and hole mobilities, buried oxide (BOX) charges, interface trap densities, and carrier lifetimes were mainly studied. For this, various electrical measurement techniques were utilized such as pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (PseudoMOSFET) static current-voltage (I-V) and transient drain current (I-t), Hall effect, and MOS capacitance-voltage/capacitance-time (C-V/C-t). The electrical characterization, however, mainly depends on the pseudo-MOSFET method, which takes advantage of the intrinsic SOI structure. From the static current-voltage and pulsed measurement, carrier mobilities, lifetimes and interface trap densities were extracted. During the course of this study, a pseudo-MOSFET drain current hysteresis regarding different gate voltage sweeping directions was discovered and the cause was revealed through systematic experiments and simulations. In addition to characterization of normal SOI, strain relaxation of strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) was also measured. As sSOI takes advantage of wafer bonding in its fabrication process, the tenacity of bonding between the sSOI and the BOX layer was investigated by means of thermal treatment and high dose energetic gamma-ray irradiation. It was found that the strain did not relax with processes more severe than standard CMOS processes, such as anneals at temperature as high as 1350 degree Celsius.

  11. Wafer-Scale Integration of Systolic Arrays,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    hus wtha rbaiith hig robabili, e aubrbe orutysta mostck b(e)adstotoefwsi the cenofther cnnel thati are connted to (g.The kery ato the alevel of t...problems considered heretofore in this paper also have an interpretation in a purely graph theoretic model. Suppose we are given a two-dimensional...graphs," Magyar 7Td. Akad. Math . Kut. Int. Kozl, Vol. 5, 1960, pp. 17-61. [6] D. Fussell and P. Varman, "Fault-tolerant wafer-scale architectures for

  12. Wafer-scale pixelated detector system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Farah; Deptuch, Grzegorz; Zimmerman, Tom

    2017-10-17

    A large area, gapless, detection system comprises at least one sensor; an interposer operably connected to the at least one sensor; and at least one application specific integrated circuit operably connected to the sensor via the interposer wherein the detection system provides high dynamic range while maintaining small pixel area and low power dissipation. Thereby the invention provides methods and systems for a wafer-scale gapless and seamless detector systems with small pixels, which have both high dynamic range and low power dissipation.

  13. Wafer-scale fabrication of uniform Si nanowire arrays using the Si wafer with UV/Ozone pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Fan; Li, Meicheng; Huang, Rui; Yu, Yue; Gu, Tiansheng; Chen, Zhao; Fan, Huiyang; Jiang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The electroless etching technique combined with the process of UV/Ozone pretreatment is presented for wafer-scale fabrication of the silicon nanowire (SiNW) arrays. The high-level uniformity of the SiNW arrays is estimated by the value below 0.2 of the relative standard deviation of the reflection spectra on the 4-in. wafer. Influence of the UV/Ozone pretreatment on the formation of SiNW arrays is investigated. It is seen that a very thin SiO 2 produced by the UV/Ozone pretreatment improves the uniform nucleation of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the Si surface because of the effective surface passivation. Meanwhile, the SiO 2 located among the adjacent Ag NPs can obstruct the assimilation growth of Ag NPs, facilitating the deposition of the uniform and dense Ag NPs catalysts, which induces the formation of the SiNW arrays with good uniformity and high filling ratio. Furthermore, the remarkable antireflective and hydrophobic properties are observed for the SiNW arrays which display great potential in self-cleaning antireflection applications

  14. Growth of misfit dislocation-free p/p+ thick epitaxial silicon wafers on Ge-B-codoped substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Huihua; Yang Deren; Ma Xiangyang; Tian Daxi; Li Liben; Que Duanlin

    2006-01-01

    The growth of p/p + silicon epitaxial silicon wafers (epi-wafers) without misfit dislocations has been successfully achieved by using heavily boron-doped Czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers codoped with desirable level of germanium as the substrates. The lattice compensation by codoping of germanium and boron into the silicon matrix to reduce the lattice mismatch between the substrate (heavily boron-doped) and epi-layer (lightly boron-doped) is the basic idea underlying in the present achievement. In principle, the codoping of germanium and boron in the CZ silicon can be tailored to achieve misfit dislocation-free epi-layer with required thickness. It is reasonably expected that the presented solution to elimination of misfit dislocations in the p/p + silicon wafers can be applied in the volume production

  15. Candida parapsilosis meningitis associated with Gliadel (BCNU) wafer implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Deirdre

    2012-02-01

    A 58-year old male presented with meningitis associated with subgaleal and subdural collections 6 weeks following a temporal craniotomy for resection of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and Gliadel wafer implantation. Candida parapsilosis was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Gliadel wafers removed during surgical debridement. He was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Candida parapsilosis meningitis secondary to Gliadel wafer placement.

  16. Candida parapsilosis meningitis associated with Gliadel (BCNU) wafer implants.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'brien, Deirdre

    2010-12-15

    A 58-year old male presented with meningitis associated with subgaleal and subdural collections 6 weeks following a temporal craniotomy for resection of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme and Gliadel wafer implantation. Candida parapsilosis was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Gliadel wafers removed during surgical debridement. He was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Candida parapsilosis meningitis secondary to Gliadel wafer placement.

  17. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzolato, M.; Masserey, B.; Robyr, J. L.; Fromme, P.

    2017-01-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full...

  18. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    With the semiconductor industry racing toward a historic transition, nano chips with less than 45 nm features demand I/Os in excess of 20,000 that support computing speed in terabits per second, with multi-core processors aggregately providing highest bandwidth at lowest power. On the other hand, emerging mixed signal systems are driving the need for 3D packaging with embedded active components and ultra-short interconnections. Decreasing I/O pitch together with low cost, high electrical performance and high reliability are the key technological challenges identified by the 2005 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). Being able to provide several fold increase in the chip-to-package vertical interconnect density is essential for garnering the true benefits of nanotechnology that will utilize nano-scale devices. Electrical interconnections are multi-functional materials that must also be able to withstand complex, sustained and cyclic thermo-mechanical loads. In addition, the materials must be environmentally-friendly, corrosion resistant, thermally stable over a long time, and resistant to electro-migration. A major challenge is also to develop economic processes that can be integrated into back end of the wafer foundry, i.e. with wafer level packaging. Device-to-system board interconnections are typically accomplished today with either wire bonding or solders. Both of these are incremental and run into either electrical or mechanical barriers as they are extended to higher density of interconnections. Downscaling traditional solder bump interconnect will not satisfy the thermo-mechanical reliability requirements at very fine pitches of the order of 30 microns and less. Alternate interconnection approaches such as compliant interconnects typically require lengthy connections and are therefore limited in terms of electrical properties, although expected to meet the mechanical requirements. A novel chip-package interconnection technology is

  19. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Allinson, N M

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  20. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, A C; Zheng, Y; Speller, R D; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Wells, K

    2014-07-07

    Recently CMOS active pixels sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous silicon and selenium flat panel imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However, despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non-uniformity of stitched sensors can arise from a number of factors related to the manufacturing process, including variation of amplification, variation between readout components, wafer defects and process variations across the wafer due to manufacturing processes. This paper reports on an investigation into the spatial non-uniformity and regional variations of a wafer scale stitched CMOS APS. For the first time a per-pixel analysis of the electro-optical performance of a wafer CMOS APS is presented, to address inhomogeneity issues arising from the stitching techniques used to manufacture wafer scale sensors. A complete model of the signal generation in the pixel array has been provided and proved capable of accounting for noise and gain variations across the pixel array. This novel analysis leads to readout noise and conversion gain being evaluated at pixel level, stitching block level and in regions of interest, resulting in a coefficient of variation ⩽1.9%. The uniformity of the image quality performance has been further investigated in a typical x-ray application, i.e. mammography, showing a uniformity in terms of CNR among the highest when compared with mammography detectors commonly used in clinical practice. Finally, in order to compare the detection capability of this novel APS with the technology currently used (i.e. FPIs), theoretical evaluation of the detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at zero-frequency has been performed, resulting in a higher DQE for this

  1. Challenges in the Packaging of MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malshe, A.P.; Singh, S.B.; Eaton, W.P.; O' Neal, C.; Brown, W.D.; Miller, W.M.

    1999-03-26

    The packaging of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is a field of great importance to anyone using or manufacturing sensors, consumer products, or military applications. Currently much work has been done in the design and fabrication of MEMS devices but insufficient research and few publications have been completed on the packaging of these devices. This is despite the fact that packaging is a very large percentage of the total cost of MEMS devices. The main difference between IC packaging and MEMS packaging is that MEMS packaging is almost always application specific and greatly affected by its environment and packaging techniques such as die handling, die attach processes, and lid sealing. Many of these aspects are directly related to the materials used in the packaging processes. MEMS devices that are functional in wafer form can be rendered inoperable after packaging. MEMS dies must be handled only from the chip sides so features on the top surface are not damaged. This eliminates most current die pick-and-place fixtures. Die attach materials are key to MEMS packaging. Using hard die attach solders can create high stresses in the MEMS devices, which can affect their operation greatly. Low-stress epoxies can be high-outgassing, which can also affect device performance. Also, a low modulus die attach can allow the die to move during ultrasonic wirebonding resulting to low wirebond strength. Another source of residual stress is the lid sealing process. Most MEMS based sensors and devices require a hermetically sealed package. This can be done by parallel seam welding the package lid, but at the cost of further induced stress on the die. Another issue of MEMS packaging is the media compatibility of the packaged device. MEMS unlike ICS often interface with their environment, which could be high pressure or corrosive. The main conclusion we can draw about MEMS packaging is that the package affects the performance and reliability of the MEMS devices. There is a

  2. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Short, K.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Sol-gel bonds have been produced between smooth, clean silicon substrates by spin-coating solutions containing partially hydrolysed silicon alkoxides. The two coated substrates were assembled and the resulting sandwich fired at temperatures ranging from 60 to 600 deg. C. The sol-gel coatings were characterised using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy, while the corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were characterised using both microindentation and tensile testing. Bonding of silicon wafers has been successfully achieved at temperatures as low as 60 deg. C. At 300 deg. C, the interfacial fracture energy was 1.55 J/m 2 . At 600 deg. C, sol-gel bonding provided superior interfacial fracture energy over classical hydrophilic bonding (3.4 J/m 2 vs. 1.5 J/m 2 ). The increase in the interfacial fracture energy is related to the increase in film density due to the sintering of the sol-gel interface with increasing temperature. The superior interfacial fracture energy obtained by sol-gel bonding at low temperature is due to the formation of an interfacial layer, which chemically bonds the two sol-gel coatings on each wafer. Application of a tensile stress on the resulting bond leads to fracture of the samples at the silicon/sol-gel interface

  3. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.S. Domski

    2003-07-21

    The work associated with the development of this model report was performed in accordance with the requirements established in ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA'' (BSC 2002a). The in-package chemistry model and in-package chemistry model abstraction are developed to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a failed waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry. The purpose of this work is to provide the abstraction model to the Performance Assessment Project and the Waste Form Department for development of geochemical models of the waste package interior. The scope of this model report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model and in-package chemistry model abstraction. The in-package chemistry model will consider chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and codisposed high-level waste glass (HLWG) and N Reactor spent fuel (CDNR). The in-package chemistry model includes two sub-models, the first a water vapor condensation (WVC) model, where water enters a waste package as vapor and forms a film on the waste package components with subsequent film reactions with the waste package materials and waste form--this is a no-flow model, the reacted fluids do not exit the waste package via advection. The second sub-model of the in-package chemistry model is the seepage dripping model (SDM), where water, water that may have seeped into the repository from the surrounding rock, enters a failed waste package and reacts with the waste package components and waste form, and then exits the waste package with no accumulation of reacted water in the waste package. Both of the submodels of the in-package chemistry model are film models in contrast to past in-package chemistry models where all of the waste package pore space was filled with water. The

  4. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P.S. Domski

    2003-01-01

    The work associated with the development of this model report was performed in accordance with the requirements established in ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA'' (BSC 2002a). The in-package chemistry model and in-package chemistry model abstraction are developed to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a failed waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry. The purpose of this work is to provide the abstraction model to the Performance Assessment Project and the Waste Form Department for development of geochemical models of the waste package interior. The scope of this model report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model and in-package chemistry model abstraction. The in-package chemistry model will consider chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and codisposed high-level waste glass (HLWG) and N Reactor spent fuel (CDNR). The in-package chemistry model includes two sub-models, the first a water vapor condensation (WVC) model, where water enters a waste package as vapor and forms a film on the waste package components with subsequent film reactions with the waste package materials and waste form--this is a no-flow model, the reacted fluids do not exit the waste package via advection. The second sub-model of the in-package chemistry model is the seepage dripping model (SDM), where water, water that may have seeped into the repository from the surrounding rock, enters a failed waste package and reacts with the waste package components and waste form, and then exits the waste package with no accumulation of reacted water in the waste package. Both of the submodels of the in-package chemistry model are film models in contrast to past in-package chemistry models where all of the waste package pore space was filled with water. The current in-package

  5. Wafer edge overlay control solution for N7 and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Richard; Calado, Victor; van Dijk, Leon; Hermans, Jan; Kumar, Kaushik; Yamashita, Fumiko

    2018-03-01

    Historically, the on-product overlay performance close to the wafer edge is lagging with respect to the inner part of the wafer. The reason for this is that wafer processing is less controlled close to the wafer edge as opposed to the rest of the wafer. It is generally accepted that Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of stressed layers that cause wafer warp, wafer table contamination, Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP), and Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) may deteriorate the overlay performance and/or registration close to the wafer edge. For the N7 technology node and beyond, it is anticipated that the tight on-product overlay specification is required across the full wafer which includes the edge region. In this work, we highlight one contributor that may negatively impact the on-product overlay performance, namely the etch step. The focus will be mainly on the wafer edge region but the remaining part of the wafer is considered as well. Three use-cases are examined: multiple Litho-Etch steps (LEn), contact hole layer etch, and the copper dual damascene etch. We characterize the etch contribution by considering the overlay measurement after resist development inspect (ADI) and after etch inspect (AEI). We show that the Yieldstar diffraction based overlay (μDBO) measurements can be utilized to characterize the etch contribution to the overlay budget. The effects of target asymmetry as well as overlay shifts are considered and compared with SEM measurements. Based on the results above, we propose a control solution aiming to reduce or even eliminate the delta between ADI and AEI. By doing so, target/mark to device offsets due to etch might be avoided.

  6. The influence of threatening visual warnings on tobacco packaging: Measuring the impact of threat level, image size, and type of pack through psychophysiological and self-report methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droulers, Olivier; Gallopel-Morvan, Karine; Lacoste-Badie, Sophie; Lajante, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness, in terms of emotional and behavioral reactions, of moderately vs. highly TVWs (Threatening Visual Warnings) displayed on tobacco packs. Given the key role that emotional reactions play in explaining the effect of TVWs on behaviors, psychophysiological and self-report methods were used-for the first time in this context-to measure the emotions provoked by TVWs. The second aim of this research was to determine whether increasing the size of warnings, and their display on plain packaging (compared with branded packaging) would improve their effectiveness. A within-subjects experiment was conducted. Three variables were manipulated: health warning threat level (high vs. moderate), image size (40% vs. 75%) and pack type (plain vs. branded). A convenience sample of 48 French daily smokers participated. They were exposed to eight different packs of cigarettes in a research lab at the University of Rennes. Smokers' emotions and behavioral intentions were recorded through self-reports. Emotions were also evaluated using psychophysiological measurements: electrodermal activity and facial electromyography. The results revealed that TVWs with a high threat level are the most effective in increasing negative emotions (fear, disgust, valence, arousal) and behavioral intentions conducive to public health (desire to quit, etc.). They also highlight the appeal of increasing the size of the warnings and displaying them on plain packs, because this influences emotions, which is the first step toward behavioral change. Increasing the threat level of TVWs from moderate to high seems beneficial for public health. Our results also confirm the relevance of recent governmental decisions to adopt plain packaging and larger TVWs (in the UK, France, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Hungary, etc.).

  7. Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species in retail pre-packaged mixed vegetable salads in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, C L; Taylor, F C; Sagoo, S K; Gillespie, I A; Grant, K; McLauchlin, J

    2007-01-01

    As part of the European Commission (EC) co-ordinated programme for 2005, a study of pre-packaged ready-to-eat (RTE) mixed salads containing meat or seafood ingredients from retail premises was undertaken in the UK to determine the frequency and level of Listeria monocytogenes in these products. Almost all (99.8%; 2682/2686) samples were of satisfactory/acceptable microbiological quality. Two (0.1%) samples exceeded EC legal food safety criteria due to the presence of L. monocytogenes in excess of 100 cfu g(-1) (1.7 x 10(2), 9.9 x 10(2)cfu g(-1)) while another two (0.1%) were unsatisfactory due to L. welshimeri levels over 100 cfu g(-1) (1.2 x 10(3), 6.0 x 10(3) cfu g(-1)). Overall contamination of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes found in samples of mixed salads in the UK was 10.8% and 4.8%, respectively. Almost twice as many salad samples with meat ingredients were contaminated with Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes (14.7% and 6.0%, respectively) compared to samples with seafood ingredients (7.4% and 3.8%, respectively). Pre-packaged mixed salads were contaminated with Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes more frequently when: collected from sandwich shops; not packaged on the premises; stored or displayed above 8 degrees C. This study demonstrates that the control of L. monocytogenes in food manufacturing and at retail sale is essential in order to minimize the potential for this bacterium to be present in mixed salads at the point of consumption at levels hazardous to health.

  8. The influence of threatening visual warnings on tobacco packaging: Measuring the impact of threat level, image size, and type of pack through psychophysiological and self-report methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droulers, Olivier; Lacoste-Badie, Sophie; Lajante, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness, in terms of emotional and behavioral reactions, of moderately vs. highly TVWs (Threatening Visual Warnings) displayed on tobacco packs. Given the key role that emotional reactions play in explaining the effect of TVWs on behaviors, psychophysiological and self-report methods were used–for the first time in this context–to measure the emotions provoked by TVWs. The second aim of this research was to determine whether increasing the size of warnings, and their display on plain packaging (compared with branded packaging) would improve their effectiveness. A within-subjects experiment was conducted. Three variables were manipulated: health warning threat level (high vs. moderate), image size (40% vs. 75%) and pack type (plain vs. branded). A convenience sample of 48 French daily smokers participated. They were exposed to eight different packs of cigarettes in a research lab at the University of Rennes. Smokers’ emotions and behavioral intentions were recorded through self-reports. Emotions were also evaluated using psychophysiological measurements: electrodermal activity and facial electromyography. The results revealed that TVWs with a high threat level are the most effective in increasing negative emotions (fear, disgust, valence, arousal) and behavioral intentions conducive to public health (desire to quit, etc.). They also highlight the appeal of increasing the size of the warnings and displaying them on plain packs, because this influences emotions, which is the first step toward behavioral change. Increasing the threat level of TVWs from moderate to high seems beneficial for public health. Our results also confirm the relevance of recent governmental decisions to adopt plain packaging and larger TVWs (in the UK, France, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Hungary, etc.). PMID:28910317

  9. The influence of threatening visual warnings on tobacco packaging: Measuring the impact of threat level, image size, and type of pack through psychophysiological and self-report methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Droulers

    Full Text Available The first aim of this research was to assess the effectiveness, in terms of emotional and behavioral reactions, of moderately vs. highly TVWs (Threatening Visual Warnings displayed on tobacco packs. Given the key role that emotional reactions play in explaining the effect of TVWs on behaviors, psychophysiological and self-report methods were used-for the first time in this context-to measure the emotions provoked by TVWs. The second aim of this research was to determine whether increasing the size of warnings, and their display on plain packaging (compared with branded packaging would improve their effectiveness. A within-subjects experiment was conducted. Three variables were manipulated: health warning threat level (high vs. moderate, image size (40% vs. 75% and pack type (plain vs. branded. A convenience sample of 48 French daily smokers participated. They were exposed to eight different packs of cigarettes in a research lab at the University of Rennes. Smokers' emotions and behavioral intentions were recorded through self-reports. Emotions were also evaluated using psychophysiological measurements: electrodermal activity and facial electromyography. The results revealed that TVWs with a high threat level are the most effective in increasing negative emotions (fear, disgust, valence, arousal and behavioral intentions conducive to public health (desire to quit, etc.. They also highlight the appeal of increasing the size of the warnings and displaying them on plain packs, because this influences emotions, which is the first step toward behavioral change. Increasing the threat level of TVWs from moderate to high seems beneficial for public health. Our results also confirm the relevance of recent governmental decisions to adopt plain packaging and larger TVWs (in the UK, France, Ireland, Canada, New Zealand, Hungary, etc..

  10. Corrosion testing of selected packaging materials for disposal of high-level waste glass in rock salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.; Fiehn, B.; Halm, G.

    1990-05-01

    In previous corrosion studies performed in salt brines, unalloyed steels, Ti 99.8-Pd and Hastelloy C4 have proved to be the most promising materials for long-term resistant packagings to be used in heat-generating waste (vitrified HLW, spent fuel) disposal in rock-salt formations. To characterise the corrosion behaviour of these materials in more detail, further in-depth laboratory-scale and in-situ corrosion studies have been performed in the present study. Besides the above-mentioned materials, also some in-situ investigations of the iron-base materials Ni-Resist D2 and D4, cast iron and Si-cast iron have been carried out in order to complete the results available to date. (orig.) [de

  11. Kerfless epitaxial silicon wafers with 7 ms carrier lifetimes and a wide lift-off process window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, Catherin; Hensen, Jan; David, Lasse; Kajari-Schröder, Sarah; Brendel, Rolf

    2018-04-01

    Silicon wafers contribute significantly to the photovoltaic module cost. Kerfless silicon wafers that grow epitaxially on porous silicon (PSI) and are subsequently detached from the growth substrate are a promising lower cost drop-in replacement for standard Czochralski (Cz) wafers. However, a wide technological processing window appears to be a challenge for this process. This holds in particularly for the etching current density of the separation layer that leads to lift-off failures if it is too large or too low. Here we present kerfless PSI wafers of high electronic quality that we fabricate on weakly reorganized porous Si with etch current densities varying in a wide process window from 110 to 150 mA/cm2. We are able to detach all 17 out of 17 epitaxial wafers. All wafers exhibit charge carrier lifetimes in the range of 1.9 to 4.3 ms at an injection level of 1015 cm-3 without additional high-temperature treatment. We find even higher lifetimes in the range of 4.6 to 7.0 ms after applying phosphorous gettering. These results indicate that a weak reorganization of the porous layer can be beneficial for a large lift-off process window while still allowing for high carrier lifetimes.

  12. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gdowski, G.E. [KMI, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices.

  13. Selection of candidate container materials for the conceptual waste package design for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Halsey, W.G.; McCright, R.D.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Gdowski, G.E.

    1993-02-01

    Preliminary selection criteria have been developed, peer-reviewed, and applied to a field of 41 candidate materials to choose three alloys for further consideration during the advanced conceptual design phase of waste package development for a potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These three alloys are titanium grade 12, Alloy C-4, and Alloy 825. These selections are specific to the particular conceptual design outlined in the Site Characterization Plan. Other design concepts that may be considered in the advanced conceptual design phase may favor other materials choices

  14. Si-to-Si wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1997-01-01

    Anodic bonding of Si to Si four inch wafers using evaporated glass was performed in air at temperatures ranging from 300°C to 450°C. Although annealing of Si/glass structures around 340°C for 15 minutes eliminates stress, the bonded wafer pairs exhibit compressive stress. Pull testing revealed...

  15. Direct Electroplating on Highly Doped Patterned Silicon Wafers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas Llona, Laura Dolores; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    Nickel thin films have been electrodeposited directly on highly doped silicon wafers after removal of the native oxide layer. These substrates conduct sufficiently well to allow deposition using a periferical electrical contact on the wafer. Films 2 μm thick were deposited using a nickel sulfamate

  16. Low-cost silicon wafer dicing using a craft cutter

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang; Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Li, Huawei; Foulds, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    feature of 3 mm by 3 mm. We performed this scribing process on the top polished surface of a silicon wafer; we also created a scribing method for the back-unpolished surface in order to protect the structures on the wafer during scribing. Compared

  17. Semiconductor industry wafer fab exhaust management

    CERN Document Server

    Sherer, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Given the myriad exhaust compounds and the corresponding problems that they can pose in an exhaust management system, the proper choice of such systems is a complex task. Presenting the fundamentals, technical details, and general solutions to real-world problems, Semiconductor Industry: Wafer Fab Exhaust Management offers practical guidance on selecting an appropriate system for a given application. Using examples that provide a clear understanding of the concepts discussed, Sherer covers facility layout, support facilities operations, and semiconductor process equipment, followed by exhaust types and challenges. He reviews exhaust point-of-use devices and exhaust line requirements needed between process equipment and the centralized exhaust system. The book includes information on wet scrubbers for a centralized acid exhaust system and a centralized ammonia exhaust system and on centralized equipment to control volatile organic compounds. It concludes with a chapter devoted to emergency releases and a separ...

  18. Voltage-assisted polymer wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsanik, J S; Bernstein, J J

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wafer bonding is a widely used process for fabrication of microfluidic devices. However, best practices for polymer bonds do not achieve sufficient bond strength for many applications. By applying a voltage to a polymer bond in a process called voltage-assisted bonding, bond strength is shown to improve dramatically for two polymers (Cytop™ and poly(methyl methacrylate)). Several experiments were performed to provide a starting point for further exploration of this technique. An optimal voltage range is experimentally observed with a reduction in bonding strength at higher voltages. Additionally, voltage-assisted bonding is shown to reduce void diameter due to bond defects. An electrostatic force model is proposed to explain the improved bond characteristics. This process can be used to improve bond strength for most polymers. (paper)

  19. Chemical polishing of epitoxial silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Shohei

    1978-01-01

    SSD telescopes are used for the determination of the kind and energy of charged particles produced by nuclear reactions, and are the equipments combining ΔE counters and E counters. The ΔE counter is a thin SSD which is required to be thin and homogeneous enough to get the high resolution of measurement. The SSDs for ΔE counters have so far been obtained by polishing silicon plates mechanically and chemically or by applying electrolytic polishing method on epitaxial silicon wafers, but it was very hard to obtain them. The creative etching equipment and technique developed this time make it possible to obtain thin SSDs for ΔE counters. The outline of the etching equipment and its technique are described in the report. The etching technique applied for the silicon films for ΔE counters with thickness of about 10 μm was able to be experimentally established in this study. (Kobatake, H.)

  20. Thermoelectric properties of boron and boron phosphide CVD wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumashiro, Y.; Yokoyama, T.; Sato, A.; Ando, Y. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Electrical and thermal conductivities and thermoelectric power of p-type boron and n-type boron phosphide wafers with amorphous and polycrystalline structures were measured up to high temperatures. The electrical conductivity of amorphous boron wafers is compatible to that of polycrystals at high temperatures and obeys Mott`s T{sup -{1/4}} rule. The thermoelectric power of polycrystalline boron decreases with increasing temperature, while that of amorphous boron is almost constant in a wide temperature range. The weak temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of BP polycrystalline wafers reflects phonon scattering by grain boundaries. Thermal conductivity of an amorphous boron wafer is almost constant in a wide temperature range, showing a characteristic of a glass. The figure of merit of polycrystalline BP wafers is 10{sup -7}/K at high temperatures while that of amorphous boron is 10{sup -5}/K.

  1. Reticle variation influence on manufacturing line and wafer device performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistler, John L.; Spurlock, Kyle

    1994-01-01

    Cost effective manufacturing of devices at 0.5, 0.35 and 0.25μm geometries will be highly dependent on a companys' ability to obtain an economic return on investment. The high capital investment in equipment and facilities, not to mention the related chemical and wafer costs, for producing 200mm silicon wafers requires aspects of wafer processing to be tightly controlled. Reduction in errors and enhanced yield management requires early correction or avoidance of reticle problems. It is becoming increasingly important to recognize and track all pertinent factors impacting both the technical and financial viability of a wafer manufacturing fabrication area. Reticle related effects on wafer manufacturing can be costly and affect the total quality perceived by the device customer.

  2. Fluorine-enhanced low-temperature wafer bonding of native-oxide covered Si wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Q.-Y.; Gan, Q.; Fountain, G.; Enquist, P.; Scholz, R.; Gösele, U.

    2004-10-01

    The bonding energy of bonded native-oxide-covered silicon wafers treated in the HNO3/H2O/HF or the HNO3/HF solution prior to room-temperature contact is significantly higher than bonded standard RCA1 cleaned wafer pairs after low-temperature annealing. The bonding energy reaches over 2000mJ/m2 after annealing at 100 °C. The very slight etching and fluorine in the chemically grown oxide are believed to be the main contributors to the enhanced bonding energy. Transmission-electron-microscopic images have shown that the chemically formed native oxide at bonding interface is embedded with many flake-like cavities. The cavities can absorb the by-products of the interfacial reactions that result in covalent bond formation at low temperatures allowing the strong bond to be retained.

  3. NWTS program criteria for mined geologic disposal of nuclear waste: functional requirements and performance criteria for waste packages for solidified high-level waste and spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has primary federal responsibility for the development and implementation of safe and environmentally acceptable nuclear waste disposal methods. Currently, the principal emphasis in the program is on emplacement of nuclear wastes in mined geologic repositories well beneath the earth's surface. A brief description of the mined geologic disposal system is provided. The National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program was established under DOE's predecessor, the Energy Research and Development Administration, to provide facilities for the mined geologic disposal of radioactive wastes. The NWTS program includes both the development and the implementation of the technology necessary for designing, constructing, licensing, and operating repositories. The program does not include the management of processing radioactive wastes or of transporting the wastes to repositories. The NWTS-33 series, of which this document is a part, provides guidance for the NWTS program in the development and implementation of licensed mined geologic disposal systems for solidified high-level and transuranic (TRU) wastes. This document presents the functional requirements and performance criteria for waste packages for solidified high-level waste and spent fuel. A separate document to be developed, NWTS-33(4b), will present the requirements and criteria for waste packages for TRU wastes. The hierarchy and application of these requirements and criteria are discussed in Section 2.2

  4. High voltage photo switch package module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James S; Sanders, David M; Hawkins, Steven A; Sampayan, Stephen E

    2014-02-18

    A photo-conductive switch package module having a photo-conductive substrate or wafer with opposing electrode-interface surfaces, and at least one light-input surface. First metallic layers are formed on the electrode-interface surfaces, and one or more optical waveguides having input and output ends are bonded to the substrate so that the output end of each waveguide is bonded to a corresponding one of the light-input surfaces of the photo-conductive substrate. This forms a waveguide-substrate interface for coupling light into the photo-conductive wafer. A dielectric material such as epoxy is then used to encapsulate the photo-conductive substrate and optical waveguide so that only the metallic layers and the input end of the optical waveguide are exposed. Second metallic layers are then formed on the first metallic layers so that the waveguide-substrate interface is positioned under the second metallic layers.

  5. Die singulation method and package formed thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C [Tucson, AZ; Shul, Randy J [Albuquerque, NM; Clews, Peggy J [Tijeras, NM; Baker, Michael S [Albuquerque, NM; De Boer, Maarten P [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-08-07

    A method is disclosed for singulating die from a substrate having a sacrificial layer and one or more device layers, with a retainer being formed in the device layer(s) and anchored to the substrate. Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE) etching of a trench through the substrate from the bottom side defines a shape for each die. A handle wafer is then attached to the bottom side of the substrate, and the sacrificial layer is etched to singulate the die and to form a frame from the retainer and the substrate. The frame and handle wafer, which retain the singulated die in place, can be attached together with a clamp or a clip and to form a package for the singulated die. One or more stops can be formed from the device layer(s) to limit a sliding motion of the singulated die.

  6. RASPLAV package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The RASPLAV package for investigation of post-accident mass transport and heat transfer processes is presented. The package performs three dimensional thermal conduction calculations in space nonuniform and temperature dependent conductivities and variable heat sources, taking into account phase transformations. The processes of free-moving bulk material, mixing of melting fuel due to advection and dissolution, and also evaporation/adsorption are modelled. Two-dimensional hydrodynamics with self-consistent heat transfer are also performed. The paper briefly traces the ways the solution procedures are carried out in the program package and outlines the major results of the simulation of reactor vessel melting after a core meltdown. The theoretical analysis and the calculations in this case were carried out in order to define the possibility of localization of the zone reminders. The interactions between the reminders and the concrete are simulated and evaluation of the interaction parameters is carried out. 4 refs. (R.Ts)

  7. Influence of Wafer Edge Geometry on Removal Rate Profile in Chemical Mechanical Polishing: Wafer Edge Roll-Off and Notch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Akira; Fukuda, Tetsuo; Fukunaga, Akira; Tsujimura, Manabu

    2012-05-01

    In the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, uniform polishing up to near the wafer edge is essential to reduce edge exclusion and improve yield. In this study, we examine the influences of inherent wafer edge geometries, i.e., wafer edge roll-off and notch, on the CMP removal rate profile. We clarify the areas in which the removal rate profile is affected by the wafer edge roll-off and the notch, as well as the intensity of their effects on the removal rate profile. In addition, we propose the use of a small notch to reduce the influence of the wafer notch and present the results of an examination by finite element method (FEM) analysis.

  8. The challenges encountered in the integration of an early test wafer surface scanning inspection system into a 450mm manufacturing line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey; McGarvey, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The introduction of early test wafer (ETW) 450mm Surface Scanning Inspection Systems (SSIS) into Si manufacturing has brought with it numerous technical, commercial, and logistical challenges on the path to rapid recipe development and subsequent qualification of other 450mm wafer processing equipment. This paper will explore the feasibility of eliminating the Polystyrene Latex Sphere deposition process step and the subsequent creation of SSIS recipes based upon the theoretical optical properties of both the SSIS and the process film stack(s). The process of Polystyrene Latex Sphere deposition for SSIS recipe generation and development is generally accepted on the previous technology nodes for 150/200/300mm wafers. PSL is deposited with a commercially available deposition system onto a non-patterned bare Si or non-patterned filmed Si wafer. After deposition of multiple PSL spots, located in different positions on a wafer, the wafer is inspected on a SSIS and a response curve is generated. The response curve is based on the the light scattering intensity of the NIST certified PSL that was deposited on the wafer. As the initial 450mm Si wafer manufacturing began, there were no inspection systems with sub-90nm sensitivities available for defect and haze level verification. The introduction of a 450mm sub-30nm inspection system into the manufacturing line generated instant challenges. Whereas the 450mm wafers were relatively defect free at 90nm, at 40nm the wafers contained several hundred thousand defects. When PSL was deposited onto wafers with these kinds of defect levels, PSL with signals less than the sub-90nm defects were difficult to extract. As the defectivity level of the wafers from the Si suppliers rapidly improves the challenges of SSIS recipe creation with high defectivity decreases while at the same time the cost of PSL deposition increases. The current cost per wafer is fifteen thousand dollars for a 450mm PSL deposition service. When viewed from the

  9. Interconnect mechanisms in microelectronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Maria Penafrancia C.

    alloy showed differences in adhesion strength and IMC formation. Bond strength by wire pull testing showed the 95Ag alloy with higher values while shear bond testing showed the 88Ag higher bond strength. Use of Cu pillars in flip chips and eutectic bonding in wafer level chip scale packages are direct consequences of diminishing interconnect dimension as a result of the drive for miniaturization. The combination of Cu-Sn interdiffusion, Kirkendall mechanism and heterogeneous vacancy precipitation are the main causes of IMC and void formation in Cu pillar - Sn solder - Cu lead frame sandwich structure. However, adding a Ni barrier agent showed less porous IMC layer as well as void formation as a result of the modified Cu and Sn movement well as the void formation. Direct die to die bonding using Al-Ge eutectic bonds is necessary when 3D integration is needed to reduce the footprint of a package. Hermeticity and adhesion strength are a function of the Al/Ge thickness ratio, bonding pressure, temperature and time. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) allowed imaging of interfacial microstructures, porosity, grain morphology while Scanning Transmission Electron microscope (STEM) provided diffusion profile and confirmed interdiffusion. Ion polishing technique provided information on porosity and when imaged using backscattered mode, grain structure confirmed mechanical deformation of the bonds. Measurements of the interfacial bond strength are made by wire pull tests and ball shear tests based on existing industry standard tests. However, for the Al-Ge eutectic bonds, no standard strength is available so a test is developed using the stud pull test method using the Dage 4000 Plus to yield consistent results. Adhesion strengths of 30-40 MPa are found for eutectic bonded packages however, as low as 20MPa was measured in low temperature bonded areas.

  10. Assessment of microelectronics packaging for high temperature, high reliability applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe, F.

    1997-04-01

    This report details characterization and development activities in electronic packaging for high temperature applications. This project was conducted through a Department of Energy sponsored Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors. Even though the target application of this collaborative effort is an automotive electronic throttle control system which would be located in the engine compartment, results of this work are directly applicable to Sandia`s national security mission. The component count associated with the throttle control dictates the use of high density packaging not offered by conventional surface mount. An enabling packaging technology was selected and thermal models defined which characterized the thermal and mechanical response of the throttle control module. These models were used to optimize thick film multichip module design, characterize the thermal signatures of the electronic components inside the module, and to determine the temperature field and resulting thermal stresses under conditions that may be encountered during the operational life of the throttle control module. Because the need to use unpackaged devices limits the level of testing that can be performed either at the wafer level or as individual dice, an approach to assure a high level of reliability of the unpackaged components was formulated. Component assembly and interconnect technologies were also evaluated and characterized for high temperature applications. Electrical, mechanical and chemical characterizations of enabling die and component attach technologies were performed. Additionally, studies were conducted to assess the performance and reliability of gold and aluminum wire bonding to thick film conductor inks. Kinetic models were developed and validated to estimate wire bond reliability.

  11. Alternative Packaging for Back-Illuminated Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2009-01-01

    An alternative scheme has been conceived for packaging of silicon-based back-illuminated, back-side-thinned complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled-device image-detector integrated circuits, including an associated fabrication process. This scheme and process are complementary to those described in "Making a Back-Illuminated Imager With Back-Side Connections" (NPO-42839), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 38. To avoid misunderstanding, it should be noted that in the terminology of imaging integrated circuits, "front side" or "back side" does not necessarily refer to the side that, during operation, faces toward or away from a source of light or other object to be imaged. Instead, "front side" signifies that side of a semiconductor substrate upon which the pixel pattern and the associated semiconductor devices and metal conductor lines are initially formed during fabrication, and "back side" signifies the opposite side. If the imager is of the type called "back-illuminated," then the back side is the one that faces an object to be imaged. Initially, a back-illuminated, back-side-thinned image-detector is fabricated with its back side bonded to a silicon handle wafer. At a subsequent stage of fabrication, the front side is bonded to a glass wafer (for mechanical support) and the silicon handle wafer is etched away to expose the back side. The frontside integrated circuitry includes metal input/output contact pads, which are rendered inaccessible by the bonding of the front side to the glass wafer. Hence, one of the main problems is to make the input/output contact pads accessible from the back side, which is ultimately to be the side accessible to the external world. The present combination of an alternative packaging scheme and associated fabrication process constitute a solution of the problem.

  12. Dislocation behavior of surface-oxygen-concentration controlled Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asazu, Hirotada; Takeuchi, Shotaro; Sannai, Hiroya; Sudo, Haruo; Araki, Koji; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Izunome, Koji; Sakai, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated dislocation behavior in the surface area of surface-oxygen-concentration controlled Si wafers treated by a high temperature rapid thermal oxidation (HT-RTO). The HT-RTO process allows us to precisely control the interstitial oxygen concentration ([O i ]) in the surface area of the Si wafers. Sizes of rosette patterns, generated by nano-indentation and subsequent thermal annealing at 900 °C for 1 h, were measured for the Si wafers with various [O i ]. It was found that the rosette size decreases in proportion to the − 0.25 power of [O i ] in the surface area of the Si wafers, which were higher than [O i ] of 1 × 10 17 atoms/cm 3 . On the other hand, [O i ] of lower than 1 × 10 17 atoms/cm 3 did not affect the rosette size very much. These experimental results demonstrate the ability of the HT-RTO process to suppress the dislocation movements in the surface area of the Si wafer. - Highlights: • Surface-oxygen-concentration controlled Si wafers have been made. • The oxygen concentration was controlled by high temperature rapid thermal oxidation. • Dislocation behavior in the surface area of the Si wafers has been investigated. • Rosette size decreased with increasing of interstitial oxygen atoms. • The interstitial oxygen atoms have a pinning effect of dislocations at the surface

  13. Multifunctional medicated lyophilised wafer dressing for effective chronic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Harshavardhan V; Boateng, Joshua S; Ayensu, Isaac; Tetteh, John

    2014-06-01

    Wafers combining weight ratios of Polyox with carrageenan (75/25) or sodium alginate (50/50) containing streptomycin and diclofenac were prepared to improve chronic wound healing. Gels were freeze-dried using a lyophilisation cycle incorporating an annealing step. Wafers were characterised for morphology, mechanical and in vitro functional (swelling, adhesion, drug release in the presence of simulated wound fluid) characteristics. Both blank (BLK) and drug-loaded (DL) wafers were soft, flexible, elegant in appearance and non-brittle in nature. Annealing helped to improve porous nature of wafers but was affected by the addition of drugs. Mechanical characterisation demonstrated that the wafers were strong enough to withstand normal stresses but also flexible to prevent damage to newly formed skin tissue. Differences in swelling, adhesion and drug release characteristics could be attributed to differences in pore size and sodium sulphate formed because of the salt forms of the two drugs. BLK wafers showed relatively higher swelling and adhesion than DL wafers with the latter showing controlled release of streptomycin and diclofenac. The optimised dressing has the potential to reduce bacterial infection and can also help to reduce swelling and pain associated with injury due to the anti-inflammatory action of diclofenac and help to achieve more rapid wound healing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Advanced organics for electronic substrates and packages

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Andrew E

    1992-01-01

    Advanced Organics for Electronic Substrates and Packages provides information on packaging, which is one of the most technologically intensive activities in the electronics industry. The electronics packaging community has realized that while semiconductor devices continue to be improved upon for performance, cost, and reliability, it is the interconnection or packaging of these devices that will limit the performance of the systems. Technology must develop packaging for transistor chips, with high levels of performance and integration providing cooling, power, and interconnection, and yet pre

  15. The uses of Man-Made diamond in wafering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    The continuing, rapid growth of the semiconductor industry requires the involvement of several specialized industries in the development of special products geared toward the unique requirements of this new industry. A specialized manufactured diamond to meet various material removal needs was discussed. The area of silicon wafer slicing has presented yet anothr challenge and it is met most effectively. The history, operation, and performance of Man-Made diamond and particularly as applied to silicon wafer slicing is discussed. Product development is underway to come up with a diamond specifically for sawing silicon wafers on an electroplated blade.

  16. The development of MEMS device packaging technology using proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyeon, J. W.; Kong, Y. J.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, H. S.; No, S. J.

    2006-05-01

    Wafer-bonding techniques are key issues for the commercialization of MEMS(MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices. The anodic bonding method and the wafer direct-bonding method are well-known major techniques for wafer bonding. Due to the anodic bonding method includes high voltage processes above 1.5 kV, the MEMS devices can be damaged during the bonding process or malfunctioned while long-term operation. On the other hand, since the wafer direct-bonding method includes a high temperature processes above 1000 .deg. C, temperature-sensitive materials and integrated circuits will be damaged or degraded during the bonding processes. Therefore, high-temperature bonding processes are not applicable for fabricating or packaging devices where temperature-sensitive materials exist. During the past few years, much effort has been undertaken to find a reliable bonding process that can be conducted at a low temperature. Unfortunately, these new bonding processes depend highly on the bonding material, surface treatment and surface flatness. In this research, a new packaging method using proton beam irradiation is proposed. While the energy loss caused in an irradiated material by X-rays or electron beams decreases with the surface distance, the energy loss caused by proton beams has a maximum value at the Bragg peak. Thus, the localized energy produced at the Bragg peak of the proton beams can be used to bond pyrex glass on a silicon wafer, so the MEMS damage is expected to be minimized. The localized heating caused by as well as the penetration depth, or the proton beam has been investigated. The energy absorbed in a stack of pyrex glass/silicon wafers due to proton-beam irradiation was numerically calculated for various proton energies by using the SRIM program. The energy loss was shown to be sufficiently localized at the interface between the pyrex glass and the silicon wafer. Proton beam irradiation was performed in the common environment of room temperature and

  17. Sol-gel bonding of silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbe, C.J.; Cassidy, D.J.; Triani, G.; Latella, B.A.; Mitchell, D.R.G.; Finnie, K.S.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.; Collins, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Low temperature bonding of silicon wafers was achieved using sol-gel technology. The initial sol-gel chemistry of the coating solution was found to influence the mechanical properties of the resulting bonds. More precisely, the influence of parameters such as the alkoxide concentration, water-to-alkoxide molar ratio, pH, and solution aging on the final bond morphologies and interfacial fracture energy was studied. The thickness and density of the sol-gel coating were characterised using ellipsometry. The corresponding bonded specimens were investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy to monitor their chemical composition, infrared imaging to control bond integrity, and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy to study their microstructure. Their interfacial fracture energy was measured using microindentation. An optimum water-to-alkoxide molar ratio of 10 and hydrolysis water at pH = 2 were found. Such conditions led to relatively dense films (> 90%), resulting in bonds with a fracture energy of 3.5 J/m 2 , significantly higher than those obtained using classical hydrophilic bonding (typically 1.5-2.5 J/m 2 ). Ageing of the coating solution was found to decrease the bond strength

  18. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.; Cruse, J.M.

    1991-02-01

    To provide uniform packaging of hazardous materials on an international level, the United Nations has developed packaging recommendations that have been implemented worldwide. The United Nations packaging recommendations are performance oriented, allowing for a wide variety of package materials and systems. As a result of this international standard, efforts in the United States are being directed toward use of performance-oriented packaging and elimination of specification (designed) packaging. This presentation will focus on trends, design evaluation, and performance testing of radioactive material packaging. The impacts of US Department of Transportation Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A on specification and low-specific activity radioactive material packaging requirements are briefly discussed. The US Department of Energy's program for evaluating radioactive material packings per US Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A requirements, is used as the basis for discussing low-activity packaging performance test requirements. High-activity package testing requirements are presented with examples of testing performed at the Hanford Site that is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  19. development and evaluation of lyophilized thiolated-chitosan wafers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    THIOLATED-CHITOSAN WAFERS FOR BUCCAL DELIVERY. OF PROTEIN ... of the thiolated polymer incorporating per polymer weight, 10 % each of glycerol as plasticizer, D-mannitol as ..... delivery systems: in vitro stability, in vivo fate, and ...

  20. Cohesive zone model for direct silicon wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubair, D. V.; Spearing, S. M.

    2007-05-01

    Direct silicon wafer bonding and decohesion are simulated using a spectral scheme in conjunction with a rate-dependent cohesive model. The cohesive model is derived assuming the presence of a thin continuum liquid layer at the interface. Cohesive tractions due to the presence of a liquid meniscus always tend to reduce the separation distance between the wafers, thereby opposing debonding, while assisting the bonding process. In the absence of the rate-dependence effects the energy needed to bond a pair of wafers is equal to that needed to separate them. When rate-dependence is considered in the cohesive law, the experimentally observed asymmetry in the energetics can be explained. The derived cohesive model has the potential to form a bridge between experiments and a multiscale-modelling approach to understand the mechanics of wafer bonding.

  1. Electronic properties of interfaces produced by silicon wafer hydrophilic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2011-07-15

    The thesis presents the results of the investigations of electronic properties and defect states of dislocation networks (DNs) in silicon produced by wafers direct bonding technique. A new insight into the understanding of their very attractive properties was succeeded due to the usage of a new, recently developed silicon wafer direct bonding technique, allowing to create regular dislocation networks with predefined dislocation types and densities. Samples for the investigations were prepared by hydrophilic bonding of p-type Si (100) wafers with same small misorientation tilt angle ({proportional_to}0.5 ), but with four different twist misorientation angles Atw (being of < , 3 , 6 and 30 , respectively), thus giving rise to the different DN microstructure on every particular sample. The main experimental approach of this work was the measurements of current and capacitance of Schottky diodes prepared on the samples which contained the dislocation network at a depth that allowed one to realize all capabilities of different methods of space charge region spectroscopy (such as CV/IV, DLTS, ITS, etc.). The key tasks for the investigations were specified as the exploration of the DN-related gap states, their variations with gradually increasing twist angle Atw, investigation of the electrical field impact on the carrier emission from the dislocation-related states, as well as the establishing of the correlation between the electrical (DLTS), optical (photoluminescence PL) and structural (TEM) properties of DNs. The most important conclusions drawn from the experimental investigations and theoretical calculations can be formulated as follows: - DLTS measurements have revealed a great difference in the electronic structure of small-angle (SA) and large-angle (LA) bonded interfaces: dominating shallow level and a set of 6-7 deep levels were found in SA-samples with Atw of 1 and 3 , whereas the prevalent deep levels - in LA-samples with Atw of 6 and 30 . The critical twist

  2. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  3. Guided ultrasonic wave beam skew in silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2018-04-01

    In the photovoltaic industry, monocrystalline silicon wafers are employed for solar cells with high conversion efficiency. Micro-cracks induced by the cutting process in the thin wafers can lead to brittle wafer fracture. Guided ultrasonic waves would offer an efficient methodology for the in-process non-destructive testing of wafers to assess micro-crack density. The material anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the guided wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Selective guided ultrasonic wave excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with custom-made wedges for the A0 and S0 Lamb wave modes and a transducer holder to achieve controlled contact pressure and orientation. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a non-contact laser interferometer. The phase slowness (velocity) of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes was measured experimentally for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation and found to match theoretical predictions. Significant wave beam skew was observed experimentally, especially for the S0 mode, and investigated from 3D finite element simulations. Good agreement was found with the theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer. The important contribution of guided wave beam skewing effects for the non-destructive testing of silicon wafers was demonstrated.

  4. Waste package characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Wannijn, J.P

    1998-09-01

    Radioactive wastes originating from the hot labs of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN contain a wide variety of radiotoxic substances. The accurate characterisation of the short- and long-term radiotoxic components is extremely difficult but required in view of geological disposal. This paper describes the methodology which was developed and adopted to characterise the high- and medium-level waste packages at the SCK-CEN hot laboratories. The proposed method is based on the estimation of the fuel inventory evacuated in a particular waste package; a calculation of the relative fission product contribution on the fuel fabrication and irradiation footing; a comparison of the calculated, as expected, dose rate and the real measured dose rate of the waste package. To cope with the daily practice an appropriate fuel inventory estimation route, a user friendly computer programme for fission product and corresponding dose rate calculation, and a simple dose rate measurement method have been developed and implemented.

  5. Waste package characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Wannijn, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    Radioactive wastes originating from the hot labs of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN contain a wide variety of radiotoxic substances. The accurate characterisation of the short- and long-term radiotoxic components is extremely difficult but required in view of geological disposal. This paper describes the methodology which was developed and adopted to characterise the high- and medium-level waste packages at the SCK-CEN hot laboratories. The proposed method is based on the estimation of the fuel inventory evacuated in a particular waste package; a calculation of the relative fission product contribution on the fuel fabrication and irradiation footing; a comparison of the calculated, as expected, dose rate and the real measured dose rate of the waste package. To cope with the daily practice an appropriate fuel inventory estimation route, a user friendly computer programme for fission product and corresponding dose rate calculation, and a simple dose rate measurement method have been developed and implemented

  6. Waste package reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Sastre, C.

    1983-01-01

    Proof of future performance of a complex system such as a high-level nuclear waste package over a period of hundreds to thousands of years cannot be had in the ordinary sense of the word. The general method of probabilistic reliability analysis could provide an acceptable framework to identify, organize, and convey the information necessary to satisfy the criterion of reasonable assurance of waste package performance according to the regulatory requirements set forth in 10 CFR 60. General principles which may be used to evaluate the qualitative and quantitative reliability of a waste package design are indicated and illustrated with a sample calculation of a repository concept in basalt. 8 references, 1 table

  7. Lively package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaremko, G.

    1997-01-01

    Progress on the Lloydminster Heavy Oil Interpretive Centre, sponsored by the Lloydminster Oilfield Technical Society and expected to open in late 1998, was discussed. Some $150,000 of the $750,000 budget is already in the bank, and another $150,000 is in the pipeline. The Centre will be added to an existing and well-established visitor's site. It is reported to contain a lively and imaginatively-designed exhibit package, and promises to become a combination of educational tool and tourist attraction for the town of Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, in the heart of heavy oil country

  8. Reflective Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  9. Non-axisymmetric flexural vibrations of free-edge circular silicon wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitriev, A.V., E-mail: dmitriev@hbar.phys.msu.ru; Gritsenko, D.S.; Mitrofanov, V.P., E-mail: mitr@hbar.phys.msu.ru

    2014-02-07

    Non-axisymmetric flexural vibrations of circular silicon (111) wafers are investigated. The modes with azimuthal index 2⩽k⩽30 are electrostatically excited and monitored by a capacitive sensor. The splitting of the mode frequencies associated with imperfection of the wafer is observed. The measured loss factors for the modes with 6≲k≲26 are close to those calculated according to the thermoelastic damping theory, while clamping losses likely dominate for k≲6, and surface losses at the level of inverse Q-factor Q{sup −1}≈4×10{sup −6} prevail for the modes with large k. The modes demonstrate nonlinear behavior of mainly geometrical origin at large amplitudes.

  10. BURYIT/ANALYZ: a computer package for assessment of radiological risk of low-level radioactive waste land disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.E.; Cox, N.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    This report is a user's manual for a partially completed code for risk assessment of a low-level waste shallow-land burial site, to be used in the licensing of burial sites. This code is intended as a tool to be used for considering nuclide transport mechanisms, including atmospheric, groundwater, erosion, and infiltration to an underlying aquifer. It also calculates doses to individuals and the population through direct exposure, inhalation, and ingestion. The methodology of the risk assessment is based primarily on the response surface method of uncertainty analysis. The parameters of a model for predicting dose commitment due to a release are treated as statistical variables in order to compute statistical distributions for various dose commitment contributions. The likelihood of a release is also accounted for by statistically evaluating the arithmetic product of the dose commitment distributions with the probability of release occurrence. An example is given using the atmospheric transport pathway as modeled by a code called BURYIT. The framework for using other release pathways is described in this manual. Information on parameter uncertainties, reference site characteristics, and probabilities of release events is included

  11. Evaluation of the post-emplacement environment of high level radioactive waste packages at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassley, W.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluation of the post-emplacement environment around high-level radioactive waste containers is required by federal regulations. The information derived from this evaluation will be used to determine the service performance of the waste containers, the chemical and hydrological conditions that may influence radionuclide release and transport if containers are breached, and retrievability of the waste containers prior to closure of the repository. Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and field experiments and tests are used to provide data necessary for this evaluation. Results obtained to date demonstrate that the post-emplacement environment in the welded tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada maintains relatively benign chemical features (i.e., near neutral pH, low concentrations of dissolved species) for most scenarios. The hydrological environment appears to be one of low flow volume and rates for the expected condition of an unsaturated medium. Emplacement borehole stability will be a function of fracture density and orientation, which may be influenced by microcrack development. Field studies and numerical simulations are in progress that will extend the results of laboratory studies to long time periods. The extent to which chemical, hydrological and mechanical processes can be adequately coupled through numerical simulations remains a matter of concern

  12. Naval Waste Package Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.M. Lewis

    2004-01-01

    A design methodology for the waste packages and ancillary components, viz., the emplacement pallets and drip shields, has been developed to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the Yucca Mountain Project. This methodology is described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' Mecham 2004 [DIRS 166168]. To demonstrate the practicability of this design methodology, four waste package design configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology. These four design configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor (PWR) Absorber Plate waste package, the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package, the 5-defense high-level waste (DHLW)/United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Co-disposal Short waste package, and the Naval Canistered SNF Long waste package. Also included in this demonstration is the emplacement pallet and continuous drip shield. The purpose of this report is to document how that design methodology has been applied to the waste package design configurations intended to accommodate naval canistered SNF. This demonstrates that the design methodology can be applied successfully to this waste package design configuration and support the License Application for construction of the repository

  13. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Thomas

    2005-07-14

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

  14. IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H 2 O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package

  15. Treatment, conditioning and packaging for final disposal of low and intermediate level waste from Cernavoda: a techno-economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanarayan, S.; Husain, A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Fellingham, L.; Nesbitt, V. [Nuvia Ltd., Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Toro, L. [Mate-fin, Bucharest (Romania); Simionov, V.; Dumitrescu, D. [Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Cernavoda (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    National Nuclearelectrica Society (SNN) owns and operates two CANDU-6 plants at Cernavoda in Romania. Two additional units are expected to be built on the site in the future. Low and intermediate level short-lived radioactive wastes from Cernavoda are planned to be disposed off in a near-surface repository to be built at Saligny. The principal waste streams are IX resins, filters, compactable wastes, non-compactables, organic liquids and oil-solid mixtures. Their volumetric generation rates per reactor unit are estimated to be: IX resins (6 m{sup 3}/y), filters (2 m{sup 3}/y), compactables (23 m{sup 3}/y) and non-compactables (15 m{sup 3}/y). A techno-economic assessment of the available options for a facility to treat and condition Cernavoda's wastes for disposal was carried out in 2009 based on projected waste volumes from all four units. A large number of processes were first screened to identify viable options. They were further considered to develop overall processing options for each waste stream. These were then consolidated to obtain options for the entire plant by minimizing the number of unit operations required to process the various waste streams. A total of 9 plant options were developed for which detailed costing was undertaken. Based on a techno-economic assessment, two top ranking plant options were identified. Several scenarios were considered for implementing these options. Amongst them, a contractor run operation of a facility located on the Cernavoda site was considered to be more cost effective than operating the facility using SNN personnel. (author)

  16. Packaging LLW and ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.; Owen, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Low level waste (LLW) accounts for 70-80% by volume of all radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry. It has low specific activity, negligible actinide content and requires little, if any, shielding to protect workers. Volume reduction for LLW of high volume but low density may be achieved by incineration and compaction as appropriate, before packaging for disposal by near surface burial. Intermediate level waste (ILW) is treated and packed to convert it into a stable form to minimize any release of activity and make handling easier. The matrix chosen for immobilization, usually cement, polymers or bitumen, depends on the nature of the waste and the acceptance criteria of the disposal facility. The special case of LLW and ILW which will arise from reactor decommissioning is discussed. Packaging methods adopted by individual countries are reviewed. The range of costs involved for packaging ILW is indicated. There is no international consensus on the performance required from packaged waste to ensure its suitability both for interim storage and final disposal. (UK)

  17. A user's guide to the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated software package:a low-level radioactive waste disposal performance assessment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Arnold, Bill Walter; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), a U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory, has over 30 years experience in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal and at the time of this publication is providing assistance internationally in a number of areas relevant to the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems. In countries with small radioactive waste programs, international technology transfer program efforts are often hampered by small budgets, schedule constraints, and a lack of experienced personnel. In an effort to surmount these difficulties, Sandia has developed a system that utilizes a combination of commercially available software codes and existing legacy codes for probabilistic safety assessment modeling that facilitates the technology transfer and maximizes limited available funding. Numerous codes developed and endorsed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and codes developed and maintained by United States Department of Energy are generally available to foreign countries after addressing import/export control and copyright requirements. From a programmatic view, it is easier to utilize existing codes than to develop new codes. From an economic perspective, it is not possible for most countries with small radioactive waste disposal programs to maintain complex software, which meets the rigors of both domestic regulatory requirements and international peer review. Therefore, revitalization of deterministic legacy codes, as well as an adaptation of contemporary deterministic codes, provides a credible and solid computational platform for constructing probabilistic safety assessment models. This document is a reference users guide for the GoldSim/BLT-MS integrated modeling software package developed as part of a cooperative technology transfer project between Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) in Taiwan for the preliminary assessment of several candidate low-level

  18. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    printability of defects at wafer level and automates the process of defect dispositioning from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. It first eliminates false defects due to registration, focus errors, image capture errors and random noise caused during inspection. For the remaining real defects, actual mask-like contours are generated using the Calibre® ILT solution [1][2], which is enhanced to predict the actual mask contours from high resolution defect images. It enables accurate prediction of defect contours, which is not possible from images captured using inspection machine because some information is already lost due to optical effects. Calibre's simulation engine is used to generate images at wafer level using scanner optical conditions and mask-like contours as input. The tool then analyses simulated images and predicts defect printability. It automatically calculates maximum CD variation and decides which defects are severe to affect patterns on wafer. In this paper, we assess the printability of defects for the mask of advanced technology nodes. In particular, we will compare the recovered mask contours with contours extracted from SEM image of the mask and compare simulation results with AIMSTM for a variety of defects and patterns. The results of printability assessment and the accuracy of comparison are presented in this paper. We also suggest how this method can be extended to predict printability of defects identified on EUV photomasks.

  19. Preparation and characterisation of immobilised humic acid on silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Gy.; Guczi, J.; Telegdi, J.; Pashalidis, I.; Szymczak, W.; Buckau, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The chemistry of the interactions of radionuclides with humic acid needs to be understood in details so that humate-mediated migration of radionuclides through the environment can be predicted. To achieve such a data in microscopic scale, several detective techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), chemical force microscopy (CFM), nuclear microprobe analysis (NMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) can be used to measure intermolecular forces and to visualize the surface morphology. The main aim of this work was to provide humic material with specific properties in order to study with different spectroscopic techniques, the complexation behaviour of surface bound humic acid in microscopic scale. Namely, humic acid has been immobilised on silicon wafers in order to mimic surface bound humic substances in natural aquatic systems. In this communication, we present a simple protocol to immobilize humic acid on silicon wafer surface. A tri-functional silane reagent 3-amino-propyl-tri-methoxy-silane (APTES) was used to modify the surface of silicon wafers and appeared to be able to strongly attached soluble humic acid through their carboxylic groups to solid support. Characterisation of the surfaces, after any preparation steps, was done by ATR-FTIR, AFM and TOF-SIMS. These methods have proved that the humic acid forms a relatively homogeneous layer on the wafers. Immobilisation of humic acid on silicon wafer was further proved by binding isotherm of Am/Nd. (authors)

  20. Single-mode glass waveguide technology for optical interchip communication on board level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusberg, Lars; Neitz, Marcel; Schröder, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The large bandwidth demand in long-distance telecom networks lead to single-mode fiber interconnects as result of low dispersion, low loss and dense wavelength multiplexing possibilities. In contrast, multi-mode interconnects are suitable for much shorter lengths up to 300 meters and are promising for optical links between racks and on board level. Active optical cables based on multi-mode fiber links are at the market and research in multi-mode waveguide integration on board level is still going on. Compared to multi-mode, a single-mode waveguide has much more integration potential because of core diameters of around 20% of a multi-mode waveguide by a much larger bandwidth. But light coupling in single-mode waveguides is much more challenging because of lower coupling tolerances. Together with the silicon photonics technology, a single-mode waveguide technology on board-level will be the straight forward development goal for chip-to-chip optical interconnects integration. Such a hybrid packaging platform providing 3D optical single-mode links bridges the gap between novel photonic integrated circuits and the glass fiber based long-distance telecom networks. Following we introduce our 3D photonic packaging approach based on thin glass substrates with planar integrated optical single-mode waveguides for fiber-to-chip and chip-to-chip interconnects. This novel packaging approach merges micro-system packaging and glass integrated optics. It consists of a thin glass substrate with planar integrated singlemode waveguide circuits, optical mirrors and lenses providing an integration platform for photonic IC assembly and optical fiber interconnect. Thin glass is commercially available in panel and wafer formats and characterizes excellent optical and high-frequency properties. That makes it perfect for microsystem packaging. The paper presents recent results in single-mode waveguide technology on wafer level and waveguide characterization. Furthermore the integration in a

  1. MASA SIMPAN BUAH MANGGIS (Garcinia mangostana L. PADA BERBAGAI TINGKAT KEMATANGAN, SUHU DAN JENID KEMASAN [Shelf life of Manggis Fruit (Garcinia mangostana L. at Various Fruit Maturity Levels, Temperature, and Types of Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasbi1

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the effect of manggis fruit maturity levels, temperature, and types of packaging on the shelf fife of manggis fruit (Garcinia mangostana L, The experimental design used was Factorial Completely Randomized Design with three factors consisting of manggis fruit maturity levels (tinged with purple and brown, packaging types (flexible and stretch film, and storage temperature (l50C and 250C using two replication for each treatment. The result showed that maturity level had significant effect on weight toss, color but had no significant effect on hardness, total sugar and total acid of manggis fruit during storage. The suitable packaging type to maintain the quality of manggis fruit with maturity level of tinged purple was the flexible type, which result n a shelf life of 33 days. Packaging suitable for manggis fruit with maturity level of brown was the stretch type, which had the shelf life of 39 days. Storage temperature to maintain quality was l50C.

  2. Development of parametric material, energy, and emission inventories for wafer fabrication in the semiconductor industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cynthia F; Kenig, George A; Allen, David T; Laurent, Jean-Philippe; Dyer, David E

    2003-12-01

    Currently available data suggest that most of the energy and material consumption related to the production of an integrated circuit is due to the wafer fabrication process. The complexity of wafer manufacturing, requiring hundreds of steps that vary from product to product and from facility to facility and which change every few years, has discouraged the development of material, energy, and emission inventory modules for the purpose of insertion into life cycle assessments. To address this difficulty, a flexible, process-based system for estimating material requirements, energy requirements, and emissions in wafer fabrication has been developed. The method accounts for mass and energy use atthe unit operation level. Parametric unit operation modules have been developed that can be used to predict changes in inventory as the result of changes in product design, equipment selection, or process flow. A case study of the application of the modules is given for energy consumption, but a similar methodology can be used for materials, individually or aggregated.

  3. An attempt to specify thermal history in CZ silicon wafers and possibilities for its modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissinger, G.; Sattler, A.; Mueller, T.; Ammon, W. von

    2007-01-01

    The term thermal history of silicon wafers represents the whole variety of process parameters of crystal growth. The aim of this contribution is an attempt to specify thermal history by one parameter that is directly correlated to the bulk microdefect density. The parameter that reflects thermal history and correlates it with nucleation of oxide precipitates is the concentration of VO 2 complexes. The VO 2 concentration in silicon wafers is too low to be measured by FTIR but it can be obtained from the loss of interstitial oxygen during a standardized thermal treatment. Based on this, the vacancy concentration frozen during crystal cooling in the ingot can be calculated. RTA treatments above 1150 deg. C create a well defined level of the VO 2 concentration in silicon wafers. This means that a well controlled modification of the thermal history is possible. We also investigated the kinetics of reduction of the as-grown excess VO 2 concentration during RTA treatments at 950 deg. C and 1050 deg. C and the effectiveness of this attempt to totally delete the thermal history

  4. Modular packaging concept for MEMS and MOEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenchly, Vanessa; Reinert, Wolfgang; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim

    2017-11-01

    Wherever technical systems detect objects in their environment or interact with people, optical devices may play an important role. Light can be relatively easily produced and spatially and temporally modulated. Laser can project sharp images over long distances or cut materials in short distances. Depending on the wavelength an invisible scanning in near infrared for gesture recognition is possible as well as a projection of brilliant colour images. For several years, the Fraunhofer ISIT develops Opto-Packaging processes based on the viscous reshaping of glass wafers: First, hermetically sealed laser micro-mirror scanners WLP with inclined windows deflect in the central light reflex of the window out of the image area. Second, housing with lateral light exit permits hermetic sealing of edge-emitting lasers for highest reliability and durability. Such systems are currently experiencing an extremely high interest of the industry in all segments, from consumer to automotive through to materials processing. Our modular Opto-Packaging platform enables fast product developments. Housing for opto mechanical MEMS devices are equipped with inclined windows to minimize distortion, stray light and reflection losses. The hot viscous glass forming technology is also applied to functionalized substrate wafers which possess areas with high heat dissipation in addition to thermally insulating areas. Electrical contacts may be realized with metal filled vias or TGV (Through Glass Vias). The modular system reduces the development times for new, miniaturized optical systems so that manufacturers can focus on the essentials in their development, namely their product functionalities.

  5. Field Level Computer Exploitation Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    to take advantage of the data retrieved from the computer. Major Barge explained that if a tool could be designed that nearly anyone could use...the study of network forensics. This has become a necessity because of the constantly growing eCommerce industry and the stiff competition between...Security. One big advantage that Insert has is the fact that it is quite small compared to most bootable CDs. At only 60 megabytes it can be burned

  6. WASTE-PRA: a computer package for probabilistic risk assessment of shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, N.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1985-12-01

    This report is a user's manual for a package of computer programs and data files to be used for probabilistic risk assessment of shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste. The nuclide transport pathways modeled are an unsaturated groundwater column, an aquifer, and the atmosphere. An individual or the population receives a dose commitment through shine, inhalation, ingestion, direct exposure, and/or a puncture wound. The methodology of risk assessment is based on the response surface method of uncertainty analysis. The parameters of the model for predicting dose commitment due to a release are treated as statistical variables, in order to compute statistical distributions for various contributions to the dose commitment. The likelihood of a release is similarly treated as a statistical variable. Uncertainty distributions are obtained both for the dose commitment and for the corresponding risk. Plots and printouts are produced to aid in comparing the importance of various release scenarios and in assessing the total risk of a set of scenarios. The entire methodology is illustrated by an example. Information is included on parameter uncertainties, reference site characteristics, and probabilities of release events

  7. Characterizing SOI Wafers By Use Of AOTF-PHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Li, Guann-Pyng; Zang, Deyu

    1995-01-01

    Developmental nondestructive method of characterizing layers of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer involves combination of polarimetric hyperspectral imaging by use of acousto-optical tunable filters (AOTF-PHI) and computational resources for extracting pertinent data on SOI wafers from polarimetric hyperspectral images. Offers high spectral resolution and both ease and rapidity of optical-wavelength tuning. Further efforts to implement all of processing of polarimetric spectral image data in special-purpose hardware for sake of procesing speed. Enables characterization of SOI wafers in real time for online monitoring and adjustment of production. Also accelerates application of AOTF-PHI to other applications in which need for high-resolution spectral imaging, both with and without polarimetry.

  8. Nonlinear resonance ultrasonic vibrations in Czochralski-silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapenko, S.; Tarasov, I.

    2000-04-01

    A resonance effect of generation of subharmonic acoustic vibrations is observed in as-grown, oxidized, and epitaxial silicon wafers. Ultrasonic vibrations were generated into a standard 200 mm Czochralski-silicon (Cz-Si) wafer using a circular ultrasound transducer with major frequency of the radial vibrations at about 26 kHz. By tuning frequency (f) of the transducer within a resonance curve, we observed a generation of intense f/2 subharmonic acoustic mode assigned as a "whistle." The whistle mode has a threshold amplitude behavior and narrow frequency band. The whistle is attributed to a nonlinear acoustic vibration of a silicon plate. It is demonstrated that characteristics of the whistle mode are sensitive to internal stress and can be used for quality control and in-line diagnostics of oxidized and epitaxial Cz-Si wafers.

  9. Wafer-scale fabrication of polymer distributed feedback lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    The authors demonstrate wafer-scale, parallel process fabrication of distributed feedback (DFB) polymer dye lasers by two different nanoimprint techniques: By thermal nanoimprint lithography (TNIL) in polymethyl methacrylate and by combined nanoimprint and photolithography (CNP) in SU-8. In both...... techniques, a thin film of polymer, doped with rhodamine-6G laser dye, is spin coated onto a Borofloat glass buffer substrate and shaped into a planar waveguide slab with first order DFB surface corrugations forming the laser resonator. When optically pumped at 532 nm, lasing is obtained in the wavelength...... range between 576 and 607 nm, determined by the grating period. The results, where 13 laser devices are defined across a 10 cm diameter wafer substrate, demonstrate the feasibility of NIL and CNP for parallel wafer-scale fabrication of advanced nanostructured active optical polymer components...

  10. Uniformity across 200 mm silicon wafers printed by nanoimprint lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourgon, C; Perret, C; Tallal, J; Lazzarino, F; Landis, S; Joubert, O; Pelzer, R

    2005-01-01

    Uniformity of the printing process is one of the key parameters of nanoimprint lithography. This technique has to be extended to large size wafers to be useful for several industrial applications, and the uniformity of micro and nanostructures has to be guaranteed on large surfaces. This paper presents results of printing on 200 mm diameter wafers. The residual thickness uniformity after printing is demonstrated at the wafer scale in large patterns (100 μm), in smaller lines of 250 nm and in sub-100 nm features. We show that a mould deformation occurs during the printing process, and that this deformation is needed to guarantee printing uniformity. However, the mould deformation is also responsible for the potential degradation of the patterns

  11. Level 4 Milestone (M4): M41UF033201 - Review of Radiolysis of Brines on the Surface of a Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-12

    This milestone report (M41UF033201) documents a literature review of relevant publications for gamma radiolysis occurring within a droplet of water on the outside of a waste package in a repository environment within the “

  12. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  13. Package materials, waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The schedules for waste package development for the various host rocks were presented. The waste form subtask activities were reviewed, with the papers focusing on high-level waste, transuranic waste, and spent fuel. The following ten papers were presented: (1) Waste Package Development Approach; (2) Borosilicate Glass as a Matrix for Savannah River Plant Waste; (3) Development of Alternative High-Level Waste Forms; (4) Overview of the Transuranic Waste Management Program; (5) Assessment of the Impacts of Spent Fuel Disassembly - Alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System; (6) Reactions of Spent Fuel and Reprocessing Waste Forms with Water in the Presence of Basalt; (7) Spent Fuel Stabilizer Screening Studies; (8) Chemical Interactions of Shale Rock, Prototype Waste Forms, and Prototype Canister Metals in a Simulated Wet Repository Environment; (9) Impact of Fission Gas and Volatiles on Spent Fuel During Geologic Disposal; and (10) Spent Fuel Assembly Decay Heat Measurement and Analysis

  14. CDIAC catalog of numeric data packages and computer model packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, T.A.; Stoss, F.W.

    1993-05-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center acquires, quality-assures, and distributes to the scientific community numeric data packages (NDPs) and computer model packages (CMPs) dealing with topics related to atmospheric trace-gas concentrations and global climate change. These packages include data on historic and present atmospheric CO 2 and CH 4 concentrations, historic and present oceanic CO 2 concentrations, historic weather and climate around the world, sea-level rise, storm occurrences, volcanic dust in the atmosphere, sources of atmospheric CO 2 , plants' response to elevated CO 2 levels, sunspot occurrences, and many other indicators of, contributors to, or components of climate change. This catalog describes the packages presently offered by CDIAC, reviews the processes used by CDIAC to assure the quality of the data contained in these packages, notes the media on which each package is available, describes the documentation that accompanies each package, and provides ordering information. Numeric data are available in the printed NDPs and CMPs, in CD-ROM format, and from an anonymous FTP area via Internet. All CDIAC information products are available at no cost

  15. Wafer scale integration of catalyst dots into nonplanar microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerde, Kjetil; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Gammelgaard, Lauge

    2007-01-01

    In order to successfully integrate bottom-up fabricated nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes or silicon, germanium, or III-V nanowires into microelectromechanical systems on a wafer scale, reliable ways of integrating catalyst dots are needed. Here, four methods for integrating sub-100-nm...... diameter nickel catalyst dots on a wafer scale are presented and compared. Three of the methods are based on a p-Si layer utilized as an in situ mask, an encapsulating layer, and a sacrificial window mask, respectively. All methods enable precise positioning of nickel catalyst dots at the end...

  16. Computational Modeling in Plasma Processing for 300 mm Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Migration toward 300 mm wafer size has been initiated recently due to process economics and to meet future demands for integrated circuits. A major issue facing the semiconductor community at this juncture is development of suitable processing equipment, for example, plasma processing reactors that can accomodate 300 mm wafers. In this Invited Talk, scaling of reactors will be discussed with the aid of computational fluid dynamics results. We have undertaken reactor simulations using CFD with reactor geometry, pressure, and precursor flow rates as parameters in a systematic investigation. These simulations provide guidelines for scaling up in reactor design.

  17. The 1 000-year prediction. A state-of-the-art review on the research activity for the structural integrity of geological disposal packages of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune

    1996-01-01

    The geological disposal package for high-level nuclear waste to be buried deep underground must be assured of structural integrity for ultra-long services of 1 000 years or even longer. The greatest and essentially the sole adversary to those packages in such a service is corrosion by ground water. Therefore, quantitative assessment of the corrosion form, the corrosion rate, and the corrosion lifetime is indispensable. This paper reviews the research activities to clarify what has been known, and discusses the future items to be studied. The largest detriment to the integrity of the package is not the uniform corrosion but the localized corrosion. The critical potential concept can quantify the safety usage domain for the material concerned. (author)

  18. Science packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Primary science teachers in Scotland have a new updating method at their disposal with the launch of a package of CDi (Compact Discs Interactive) materials developed by the BBC and the Scottish Office. These were a response to the claim that many primary teachers felt they had been inadequately trained in science and lacked the confidence to teach it properly. Consequently they felt the need for more in-service training to equip them with the personal understanding required. The pack contains five disks and a printed user's guide divided up as follows: disk 1 Investigations; disk 2 Developing understanding; disks 3,4,5 Primary Science staff development videos. It was produced by the Scottish Interactive Technology Centre (Moray House Institute) and is available from BBC Education at £149.99 including VAT. Free Internet distribution of science education materials has also begun as part of the Global Schoolhouse (GSH) scheme. The US National Science Teachers' Association (NSTA) and Microsoft Corporation are making available field-tested comprehensive curriculum material including 'Micro-units' on more than 80 topics in biology, chemistry, earth and space science and physics. The latter are the work of the Scope, Sequence and Coordination of High School Science project, which can be found at http://www.gsh.org/NSTA_SSandC/. More information on NSTA can be obtained from its Web site at http://www.nsta.org.

  19. The impact of packaging on product competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Masoumi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this paper is to detect important factors, which are influencing competitive advantage. The proposed model of this paper uses sampling technique to measure characteristics of society. There are eight independent variables for the proposed study of this paper including packaging endurance, easy distribution, customer promotion through packaging, packaging structure, packaging as silent advertiser, diversity of packaging, clean and healthy packaging and innovation in packaging. The proposed study uses structural equation modeling to either accept or reject all hypotheses associated with the proposed study of this paper. The population of this study includes all managers and experts who are involved in packaging products. We used simple sampling technique and chooses 300 from a population of 450 people who are considered as the population of this survey. Cronbach alpha was determined as 0.732, which is above the minimum acceptable level. The results confirm that all mentioned factors influence competitiveness, effectively.

  20. Friction mechanisms of silicon wafer and silicon wafer coated with diamond-like carbon film and two monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R. Arvind; Yoon, Eui Sung; Han, Hung Gu; Kong, Ho Sung

    2006-01-01

    The friction behaviour of Si-wafer, Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) and two Self-Assembled Monolayers(SAMs) namely DiMethylDiChlorosilane (DMDC) and DiPhenyl-DiChlorosilane (DPDC) coated on Si-wafer was studied under loading conditions in milli-Newton (mN) range. Experiments were performed using a ball-on-flat type reciprocating micro-tribo tester. Glass balls with various radii 0.25 mm, 0.5 mm and 1 mm were used. The applied normal load was in the range of 1.5 mN to 4.8 mN. Results showed that the friction increased with the applied normal load in the case of all the test materials. It was also observed that friction was affected by the ball size. Friction increased with the increase in the ball size in the case of Si-wafer. The SAMs also showed a similar trend, but had lower values of friction than those of Si-wafer. Interestingly, for DLC it was observed that friction decreased with the increase in the ball size. This distinct difference in the behavior of friction in DLC was attributed to the difference in the operating mechanism. It was observed that Si-wafer and DLC exhibited wear, whereas wear was absent in the SAMs. Observations showed that solid-solid adhesion was dominant in Si-wafer, while plowing in DLC. The wear in these two materials significantly influenced their friction. In the case of SAMs their friction behaviour was largely influenced by the nature of their molecular chains

  1. Influence of Si wafer thinning processes on (sub)surface defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Fumihiro, E-mail: fumihiro.inoue@imec.be [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Jourdain, Anne; Peng, Lan; Phommahaxay, Alain; De Vos, Joeri; Rebibis, Kenneth June; Miller, Andy; Sleeckx, Erik; Beyne, Eric [Imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Uedono, Akira [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Mono-vacancy free Si-thinning can be accomplished by combining several thinning techniques. • The grinding damage needs to be removed prior to dry etching, otherwise vacancies remain in the Si at a depth around 0.5 to 2 μm after Si wafer thickness below 5 μm. • The surface of grinding + CMP + dry etching is equivalent mono vacancy level as that of grinding + CMP. - Abstract: Wafer-to-wafer three-dimensional (3D) integration with minimal Si thickness can produce interacting multiple devices with significantly scaled vertical interconnections. Realizing such a thin 3D structure, however, depends critically on the surface and subsurface of the remaining backside Si after the thinning processes. The Si (sub)surface after mechanical grinding has already been characterized fruitfully for a range of few dozen of μm. Here, we expand the characterization of Si (sub)surface to 5 μm thickness after thinning process on dielectric bonded wafers. The subsurface defects and damage layer were investigated after grinding, chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), wet etching and plasma dry etching. The (sub)surface defects were characterized using transmission microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and positron annihilation spectroscopy. Although grinding provides the fastest removal rate of Si, the surface roughness was not compatible with subsequent processing. Furthermore, mechanical damage such as dislocations and amorphous Si cannot be reduced regardless of Si thickness and thin wafer handling systems. The CMP after grinding showed excellent performance to remove this grinding damage, even though the removal amount is 1 μm. For the case of Si thinning towards 5 μm using grinding and CMP, the (sub)surface is atomic scale of roughness without vacancy. For the case of grinding + dry etch, vacancy defects were detected in subsurface around 0.5–2 μm. The finished surface after wet etch remains in the nm scale in the strain region. By inserting a CMP step in

  2. 11.72-sq cm Active-Area Wafer Interconnected PiN Diode Pulsed at 64 kA Dissipates 382 J and Exhibits an Action of 1.7 MA(sup 2)-s

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    calculated action exceeded 1.7 MA2 -s. Preliminary efforts on high voltage diode interconnection have produced quarter wafer interconnected PiN...was packaged in a “hockey-puck” configuration and pulsed to 64 kA, dissipating 382 J with a calculated action exceeding 1.7 MA2 -s. II. FULL...epitaxial layers are utilized. 11.72-cm2 Active-area Wafer Interconnected PiN Diode pulsed at 64 kA dissipates 382 J and exhibits an action of 1.7 MA2 -s

  3. DynAMITe: a wafer scale sensor for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M; Wells, K; Anaxagoras, T; Fant, A; Allinson, N M; Konstantinidis, A; Speller, R D; Osmond, J P F; Evans, P M

    2011-01-01

    In many biomedical imaging applications Flat Panel Imagers (FPIs) are currently the most common option. However, FPIs possess several key drawbacks such as large pixels, high noise, low frame rates, and excessive image artefacts. Recently Active Pixel Sensors (APS) have gained popularity overcoming such issues and are now scalable up to wafer size by appropriate reticule stitching. Detectors for biomedical imaging applications require high spatial resolution, low noise and high dynamic range. These figures of merit are related to pixel size and as the pixel size is fixed at the time of the design, spatial resolution, noise and dynamic range cannot be further optimized. The authors report on a new rad-hard monolithic APS, named DynAMITe (Dynamic range Adjustable for Medical Imaging Technology), developed by the UK MI-3 Plus consortium. This large area detector (12.8 cm × 12.8 cm) is based on the use of two different diode geometries within the same pixel array with different size pixels (50 μm and 100 μm). Hence the resulting device can possess two inherently different resolutions each with different noise and saturation performance. The small and the large pixel cameras can be reset at different voltages, resulting in different depletion widths. The larger depletion width for the small pixels allows the initial generated photo-charge to be promptly collected, which ensures an intrinsically lower noise and higher spatial resolution. After these pixels reach near saturation, the larger pixels start collecting so offering a higher dynamic range whereas the higher noise floor is not important as at higher signal levels performance is governed by the Poisson noise of the incident radiation beam. The overall architecture and detailed characterization of DynAMITe will be presented in this paper.

  4. Scatterometry on pelliclized masks: an option for wafer fabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Emily; Benson, Craig; Higuchi, Masaru; Okumoto, Yasuhiro; Kwon, Michael; Yedur, Sanjay; Li, Shifang; Lee, Sangbong; Tabet, Milad

    2007-03-01

    Optical scatterometry-based metrology is now widely used in wafer fabs for lithography, etch, and CMP applications. This acceptance of a new metrology method occurred despite the abundance of wellestablished CD-SEM and AFM methods. It was driven by the desire to make measurements faster and with a lower cost of ownership. Over the last year, scatterometry has also been introduced in advanced mask shops for mask measurements. Binary and phase shift masks have been successfully measured at all desired points during photomask production before the pellicle is mounted. There is a significant benefit to measuring masks with the pellicle in place. From the wafer fab's perspective, through-pellicle metrology would verify mask effects on the same features that are characterized on wafer. On-site mask verification would enable quality control and trouble-shooting without returning the mask to a mask house. Another potential application is monitoring changes to mask films once the mask has been delivered to the fab (haze, oxide growth, etc.). Similar opportunities apply to the mask metrologist receiving line returns from a wafer fab. The ability to make line-return measurements without risking defect introduction is clearly attractive. This paper will evaluate the feasibility of collecting scatterometry data on pelliclized masks. We explore the effects of several different pellicle types on scatterometry measurements made with broadband light in the range of 320-780 nm. The complexity introduced by the pellicles' optical behavior will be studied.

  5. Fusion bonding of Si wafers investigated by x ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Grey, Francois; Rasmussen, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The interface structure of bonded Si(001) wafers with twist angle 6.5 degrees is studied as a function of annealing temperature. An ordered structure is observed in x-ray diffraction by monitoring a satellite reflection due to the periodic modulation near the interface, which results from...

  6. Prediction of thermo-mechanical reliability of wafer backend processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonda, V.; Toonder, den J.M.J.; Beijer, J.G.J.; Zhang, G.Q.; van Driel, W.D.; Hoofman, R.J.O.M.; Ernst, L.J.

    2004-01-01

    More than 65% of IC failures are related to thermal and mechanical problems. For wafer backend processes, thermo-mechanical failure is one of the major bottlenecks. The ongoing technological trends like miniaturization, introduction of new materials, and function/product integration will increase

  7. Prediction of thermo-mechanical integrity of wafer backend processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonda, V.; Toonder, den J.M.J.; Beijer, J.G.J.; Zhang, G.Q.; Hoofman, R.J.O.M.; Ernst, L.J.; Ernst, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    More than 65% of IC failures are related to thermal and mechanical problems. For wafer backend processes, thermo-mechanical failure is one of the major bottlenecks. The ongoing technological trends like miniaturization, introduction of new materials, and function/product integration will increase

  8. Sacrificial wafer bonding for planarization after very deep etching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiering, V.L.; Spiering, Vincent L.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    A new technique is presented that provides planarization after a very deep etching step in silicon. This offers the possibility for as well resist spinning and layer patterning as realization of bridges or cantilevers across deep holes or grooves. The sacrificial wafer bonding technique contains a

  9. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full three-dimensional Finite Element simulations of the guided wave propagation were conducted to visualize and quantify these effects for a line source. The phase velocity (slowness) and skew angle of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes (first anti-symmetric mode A0 and first symmetric mode S0) for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation were measured experimentally. Selective mode excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with a custom-made wedge and holder to achieve a controlled contact pressure. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement was found with the simulation results and theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer.

  10. Photolithography and Micro-Fabrication/ Packaging Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photolithography and Micro-Fabrication/Packaging laboratories provide research level semiconductor processing equipment and facilities that do not require a full...

  11. Corrosion behaviour of selected high-level waste packaging materials under gamma irradiation and in-situ disposal conditions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1988-07-01

    Corrosion studies performed until now on a number of materials have shown that unalloyed steels, Hastelloy C4 and Ti 99.8-Pd are the most promising materials for a long-term resistant packaging to be used in high-level waste (HLW) canister disposal in rock salt formations. To characterize their corrosion behaviour in more detail, additional studies have been performed. The influence has been examined which is exerted by the gamma dose rate (1 Gy/h to 100 Gy/h) on the corrosion of three preselected steels and Hastelloy C4 at 90 0 C in a salt brine (Q-brine) rich in MgCl 2 , i.e., conditions relevant to accident scenarios in a repository. In addition, in-situ corrosion experiments have been carried out in the Asse salt mine at elevated temperatures (120 0 C to 210 0 C) in the absence and in the presence of a gamma radiation field of 3 x 10 2 Gy/h, within the framework of the German/US Brine Migration Test. Under the test conditions the gamma radiation did not exert a significant influence on the corrosion of the steels investigated, whereas Hastelloy C4, exposed to dose rates of 10 Gy/h and 100 Gy/h, underwent pitting and crevice corrosion (20 μm/a at the maximum).The low amounts of migrated salt brine (140 ml after 900 days) in the in-situ- experiment did not produce noticeable corrosion of the materials. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Radioactive material packaging performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, T.

    1992-06-01

    In an effort to provide uniform packaging of hazardous material on an international level, recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods have been developed by the United Nations. These recommendations are performance oriented and contrast with a large number of packaging specifications in the US Department of Transportation's hazard materials regulations. This dual system presents problems when international shipments enter the US Department of Transportation's system. Faced with the question of continuing a dual system or aligning with the international system, the Research and Special Programs Administration of the US Department of Transportation responded with Docket HM-181. This began the transition toward the international transportation system. Following close behind is Docket HM-169A, which addressed low specific activity radioactive material packaging. This paper will discuss the differences between performance-oriented and specification packaging, the transition toward performance-oriented packaging by the US Department of Transportation, and performance-oriented testing of radioactive material packaging by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Dockets HM-181 and HM-169A will be discussed along with Type A (low activity) and Type B (high activity) radioactive material packaging evaluations

  13. Fabrication of Ge-on-insulator wafers by Smart-CutTM with thermal management for undamaged donor Ge wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munho; Cho, Sang June; Jayeshbhai Dave, Yash; Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Seo, Jung-Hun; Yoon, Jung U.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2018-01-01

    Newly engineered substrates consisting of semiconductor-on-insulator are gaining much attention as starting materials for the subsequent transfer of semiconductor nanomembranes via selective etching of the insulating layer. Germanium-on-insulator (GeOI) substrates are critically important because of the versatile applications of Ge nanomembranes (Ge NMs) toward electronic and optoelectronic devices. Among various fabrication techniques, the Smart-CutTM technique is more attractive than other methods because a high temperature annealing process can be avoided. Another advantage of Smart-CutTM is the reusability of the donor Ge wafer. However, it is very difficult to realize an undamaged Ge wafer because there exists a large mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion among the layers. Although an undamaged donor Ge wafer is a prerequisite for its reuse, research related to this issue has not yet been reported. Here we report the fabrication of 4-inch GeOI substrates using the direct wafer bonding and Smart-CutTM process with a low thermal budget. In addition, a thermo-mechanical simulation of GeOI was performed by COMSOL to analyze induced thermal stress in each layer of GeOI. Crack-free donor Ge wafers were obtained by annealing at 250 °C for 10 h. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated similarly favorable crystalline quality of the Ge layer in GeOI compared to that of bulk Ge. In addition, Ge p-n diodes using transferred Ge NM indicate a clear rectifying behavior with an on and off current ratio of 500 at ±1 V. This demonstration offers great promise for high performance transferrable Ge NM-based device applications.

  14. Evolution of repository and waste package designs for Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, Rob P.; Voegele, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the evolution of the engineered barrier design for the proposed Yucca Mountain disposal system. Initially, the underground facility used a fairly standard panel and drift layout excavated mostly by drilling and blasting. By 1993, the layout of the underground facility was changed to accommodate construction by a tunnel boring machine. Placement of the repository in unsaturated zone permitted an extended period without backfilling; placement of the waste package in an open drift permitted use of much larger, and thus hotter packages. Hence in 1994, the underground facility design switched from floor emplacement of waste in small, single walled stainless steel or nickel alloy containers to in-drift emplacement of waste in large, double-walled containers. By 2000, the outer layer was a high nickel alloy for corrosion resistance and the inner layer was stainless steel for structural strength. Use of large packages facilitated receipt and disposal of high volumes of spent nuclear fuel. In addition, in-drift package placement saved excavation costs. Options considered for in-drift emplacement included different heat loads and use of backfill. To avoid dripping on the package during the thermal period and the possibility of localized corrosion, titanium drip shields were added for the disposal drifts by 2000. In addition, a handling canister, sealed at the reactor to eliminate further handling of bare fuel assemblies, was evaluated and eventually adopted in 2006. Finally, staged development of the underground layout was adopted to more readily adjust to changes in waste forms and Congressional funding. - Highlights: • Progression of events associated with repository design to accommodate tunnel boring machine and in-drift waste package emplacement are discussed. • Change in container design from small, single-layered stainless steel vessel to large, two-layered nickel alloy vessel is discussed. • The addition of drip shield to limit the

  15. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Thomas

    2004-11-09

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste

  16. In-Package Chemistry Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste package has been

  17. Curvature evolution of 200 mm diameter GaN-on-insulator wafer fabricated through metalorganic chemical vapor deposition and bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Lee, Kwang Hong; Kadir, Abdul; Wang, Yue; Lee, Kenneth E.; Tan, Chuan Seng; Chua, Soo Jin; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    2018-05-01

    Crack-free 200 mm diameter N-polar GaN-on-insulator (GaN-OI) wafers are demonstrated by the transfer of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown Ga-polar GaN layers from Si(111) wafers onto SiO2/Si(100) wafers. The wafer curvature of the GaN-OI wafers after the removal of the original Si(111) substrate is correlated with the wafer curvature of the starting GaN-on-Si wafers and the voids on the GaN-on-Si surface that evolve into cracks on the GaN-OI wafers. In crack-free GaN-OI wafers, the wafer curvature during the removal of the AlN nucleation layer, AlGaN strain-compensation buffer layers and GaN layers is correlated with the residual stress distribution within individual layers in the GaN-OI wafer.

  18. ASIC Wafer Test System for the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker Front-End Chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghinolfi, F.; Bialas, W.; Busek, N.; Ciocio, A.; Cosgrove, D.; Fadeyev, V.; Flacco, C.; Gilchriese, M.; Grillo, A.A.; Haber, C.; Kaplon, J.; Lacasta, C.; Murray, W.; Niggli, H.; Pritchard, T.; Rosenbaum, F.; Spieler, H.; Stezelberger, T.; Vu, C.; Wilder, M.; Yaver, H.; Zetti, F.

    2002-01-01

    An ASIC wafer test system has been developed to provide comprehensive production screening of the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker front-end chip (ABCD3T). The ABCD3T[1] features a 128-channel analog front-end, a digital pipeline, and communication circuitry, clocked at 40 MHz, which is the bunch crossing frequency at the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The tester measures values and tolerance ranges of all critical IC parameters, including DC parameters, electronic noise, time resolution, clock levels and clock timing. The tester is controlled by an FPGA (ORCA3T) programmed to issue the input commands to the IC and to interpret the output data. This allows the high-speed wafer-level IC testing necessary to meet the production schedule. To characterize signal amplitudes and phase margins, the tester utilizes pin-driver, delay, and DAC chips, which control the amplitudes and delays of signals sent to the IC under test. Output signals from the IC under test go through window comparator chips to measure their levels. A probe card has been designed specifically to reduce pick-up noise that can affect the measurements. The system can operate at frequencies up to 100 MHz to study the speed limits of the digital circuitry before and after radiation damage. Testing requirements and design solutions are presented

  19. Denuded zone in Czochralski silicon wafer with high carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiahe; Yang Deren; Ma Xiangyang; Que Duanlin

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability of the denuded zone (DZ) created by high-low-high-temperature annealing in high carbon content (H[C]) and low carbon content (L[C]) Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) has been investigated in a subsequent ramping and isothermal 1050 deg. C annealing. The tiny oxygen precipitates which might occur in the DZ were checked. It was found in the L[C] Cz-Si that the DZ shrank and the density of bulk micro-defects (BMDs) reduced with the increase of time spent at 1050 deg. C. Also, the DZs above 15 μm of thickness present in the H[C] Cz-Si wafers continuously and the density and total volume of BMDs first decreased then increased and finally decreased again during the treatments. Moreover, tiny oxygen precipitates were hardly generated inside the DZs, indicating that H[C] Cz-Si wafers could support the fabrication of integrated circuits

  20. Denuded zone in Czochralski silicon wafer with high carbon content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahe; Yang, Deren; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2006-12-01

    The thermal stability of the denuded zone (DZ) created by high-low-high-temperature annealing in high carbon content (H[C]) and low carbon content (L[C]) Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) has been investigated in a subsequent ramping and isothermal 1050 °C annealing. The tiny oxygen precipitates which might occur in the DZ were checked. It was found in the L[C] Cz-Si that the DZ shrank and the density of bulk micro-defects (BMDs) reduced with the increase of time spent at 1050 °C. Also, the DZs above 15 µm of thickness present in the H[C] Cz-Si wafers continuously and the density and total volume of BMDs first decreased then increased and finally decreased again during the treatments. Moreover, tiny oxygen precipitates were hardly generated inside the DZs, indicating that H[C] Cz-Si wafers could support the fabrication of integrated circuits.

  1. Contacting graphene in a 200 mm wafer silicon technology environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Marco; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Kitzmann, Julia; Fraschke, Mirko; Wolansky, Dirk; Schulze, Sebastian; Lupina, Grzegorz; Mai, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    Two different approaches for contacting graphene in a 200 mm wafer silicon technology environment were tested. The key is the opportunity to create a thin SiN passivation layer on top of the graphene protecting it from the damage by plasma processes. The first approach uses pure Ni contacts with a thickness of 200 nm. For the second attempt, Ni is used as the contact metal which substitutes the Ti compared to a standard contact hole filling process. Accordingly, the contact hole filling of this "stacked via" approach is Ni/TiN/W. We demonstrate that the second "stacked Via" is beneficial and shows contact resistances of a wafer scale process with values below 200 Ohm μm.

  2. Silicon-to-silicon wafer bonding using evaporated glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Lindahl, M.

    1998-01-01

    Anodic bending of silicon to silicon 4-in. wafers using an electron-beam evaporated glass (Schott 8329) was performed successfully in air at temperatures ranging from 200 degrees C to 450 degrees C. The composition of the deposited glass is enriched in sodium as compared to the target material....... The roughness of the as-deposited films was below 5 nm and was found to be unchanged by annealing at 500 degrees C for 1 h in air. No change in the macroscopic edge profiles of the glass film was found as a function of annealing; however, small extrusions appear when annealing above 450 degrees C. Annealing...... of silicon/glass structures in air around 340 degrees C for 15 min leads to stress-free structures. Bonded wafer pairs, however, show no reduction in stress and always exhibit compressive stress. The bond yield is larger than 95% for bonding temperatures around 350 degrees C and is above 80% for bonding...

  3. JOINT RIGIDITY ASSESSMENT WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFERS AND ACOUSTIC WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Angela C.; Maji, Arup K.

    2010-01-01

    There has been an interest in the development of rapid deployment satellites. In a modular satellite design, different panels of specific functions can be pre-manufactured. The satellite can then be assembled and tested just prior to deployment. Traditional vibration testing is time-consuming and expensive. An alternative test method to evaluate the connection between two plates will be proposed. The method investigated and described employs piezoelectric wafers to induce and sense lamb waves in two aluminum plates, which were joined by steel brackets to form an 'L-Style' joint. Lamb wave behavior and piezoelectric material properties will be discussed; the experimental setup and results will be presented. A set of 4 piezoelectric ceramic wafers were used alternately as source and sensor. The energy transmitted was shown to correlate with a mechanical assessment of the joint, demonstrating that this method of testing is a feasible and reliable way to inspect the rigidity of joints.

  4. Simplified nonplanar wafer bonding for heterogeneous device integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Jon; Bowers, John E.; Riley, Anton

    2004-07-01

    We demonstrate a simplified nonplanar wafer bonding technique for heterogeneous device integration. The improved technique can be used to laterally integrate dissimilar semiconductor device structures on a lattice-mismatched substrate. Using the technique, two different InP-based vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser active regions have been integrated onto GaAs without compromising the quality of the photoluminescence. Experimental and numerical simulation results are presented.

  5. Cost of Czochralski wafers as a function of diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, M. H.; Radics, C.; Kachare, A.

    1980-02-01

    The impact of diameter in the range of 10 to 15 cm on the cost of wafers sliced from Czochralski ingots was analyzed. Increasing silicon waste and decreasing ingot cost with increasing ingot size were estimated along with projected costs. Results indicate a small but continuous decrease in sheet cost with increasing ingot size in this size range. Sheet costs including silicon are projected to be $50 to $60/sq m (1980 $) depending upon technique used.

  6. Low hemorrhage-related mortality in trauma patients in a Level I trauma center employing transfusion packages and early thromboelastography-directed hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Sørensen, Anne Marie Møller; Larsen, Claus F

    2013-01-01

    (ISS), transfusion therapy, and mortality were registered. Hemostatic resuscitation was based on a massive transfusion protocol encompassing transfusion packages and thromboelastography (TEG)-guided therapy. RESULTS: A total of 182 patients were included (75% males, median age 43 years, ISS of 17, 92....... Nonsurvivors had lower clot strength by kaolin-activated TEG and TEG functional fibrinogen and lower kaolin-tissue factor-activated TEG α-angle and lysis after 30 minutes compared to survivors. None of the TEG variables were independent predictors of massive transfusion or mortality. CONCLUSION: Three......-fourths of the patients transfused with plasma or PLTs within 24 hours received these in the first 2 hours. Hemorrhage caused 14% of the deaths. We introduced transfusion packages and early TEG-directed hemostatic resuscitation at our hospital 10 years ago and this may have contributed to reducing hemorrhagic trauma...

  7. Physical mechanisms of copper-copper wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.; Hingerl, K.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the physical mechanisms driving Cu-Cu wafer bonding allowed for reducing the bonding temperatures below 200 °C. Metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding results obtained at such low temperatures are very encouraging and suggest that the process is possible even at room temperature if some boundary conditions are fulfilled. Sputtered (PVD) and electroplated Cu thin layers were investigated, and the analysis of both metallization techniques demonstrated the importance of decreasing Cu surface roughness. For an equal surface roughness, the bonding temperature of PVD Cu wafers could be even further reduced due to the favorable microstructure. Their smaller grain size enhances the length of the grain boundaries (observed on the surface prior bonding), acting as efficient mass transfer channels across the interface, and hence the grains are able to grow over the initial bonding interface. Due to the higher concentration of random high-angle grain boundaries, this effect is intensified. The model presented is explaining the microstructural changes based on atomic migration, taking into account that the reduction of the grain boundary area is the major driving force to reduce the Gibbs free energy, and predicts the subsequent microstructure evolution (grain growth) during thermal annealing

  8. Packaging for Food Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilwell, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Most of the key areas of concern in packaging the three principle food forms for the space station were covered. It can be generally concluded that there are no significant voids in packaging materials availability or in current packaging technology. However, it must also be concluded that the process by which packaging decisions are made for the space station feeding program will be very synergistic. Packaging selection will depend heavily on the preparation mechanics, the preferred presentation and the achievable disposal systems. It will be important that packaging be considered as an integral part of each decision as these systems are developed.

  9. A study of UO2 wafer fuel for very high-power research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, T.C.; Jankus, V.Z.; Rest, J.; Billone, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program is aimed at reducing fuel enrichment to 2 caramel fuel is one of the most promising new types of reduced-enrichment fuel for use in research reactors with very high power density. Parametric studies have been carried out to determine the maximum specific power attainable without significant fission-gas release for UO 2 wafers ranging from 0.75 to 1.50 mm in thickness. The results indicate that (1) all the fuel designs considered in this study are predicted not to fail under full power operation up to a burnup, of 1.9x10 21 fis/cm 3 ; (2) for all fuel designs, failure is predicted at approximately the same fuel centerline temperature for a given burnup; (3) the thinner the wafer, the wider the margin for fuel specific power between normal operation and increased-power operation leading to fuel failure; (4) increasing the coolant pressure in the reactor core could improve fuel performance by maintaining the fuel at a higher power level without failure for a given burnup; and (5) for a given power level, fuel failure will occur earlier at a higher cladding surface temperature and/or under power-cycling conditions. (author)

  10. High sensitivity detection and characterization of the chemical state of trace element contamination on silicon wafers

    CERN Document Server

    Pianetta, Piero A; Baur, K; Brennan, S; Homma, T; Kubo, N

    2003-01-01

    Increasing the speed and complexity of semiconductor integrated circuits requires advanced processes that put extreme constraints on the level of metal contamination allowed on the surfaces of silicon wafers. Such contamination degrades the performance of the ultrathin SiO sub 2 gate dielectrics that form the heart of the individual transistors. Ultimately, reliability and yield are reduced to levels that must be improved before new processes can be put into production. It should be noted that much of this metal contamination occurs during the wet chemical etching and rinsing steps required for the manufacture of integrated circuits and industry is actively developing new processes that have already brought the metal contamination to levels beyond the measurement capabilities of conventional analytical techniques. The measurement of these extremely low contamination levels has required the use of synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) where sensitivities 100 times better than conv...

  11. Synchrotron radiation induced TXRF of low Z elements on Si wafer surfaces at SSRL-comparison of excitation geometries and condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Pepponi, G.; Pianetta, P.; Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of low Z elements, like Na and Al at ultra trace levels on Si wafer surfaces is demanded by semiconductor industry. SR-TXRF is a promising method to fulfill the task, if a special energy dispersive detector with an ultra thin window is used. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal suited excitation source for TXRF of low Z elements due to its intensive, natural collimated and linear polarized radiation with wide spectral range down to low energies even below 1 keV. TXRF offers some advantages for wafer surface analysis like nondestructive investigation and mapping capability. Experiments have been performed at SSRL beamline 3-4, a bending magnet beamline using white (<3 keV) and monochromatic radiation, as well as on beamline 3-3, using a crystal monochromator as well as a multilayer monochromator. A comparison of excitation detection geometries was performed, using a sidelooking detector with vertical positioned wafer as well as a downlooking detector with a horizontally arranged wafer. The advantages and disadvantages of the various geometries and excitation conditions are presented and the results compared. Detection limits are in the 100 fg range for Na, determined with droplet samples on Si wafer surfaces. (author)

  12. Mechanical Properties of Photovoltaic Silicon in Relation to Wafer Breakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Prashant Kumar

    This thesis focuses on the fundamental understanding of stress-modified crack-propagation in photovoltaic (PV) silicon in relation to the critical issue of PV silicon "wafer breakage". The interactions between a propagating crack and impurities/defects/residual stresses have been evaluated for consequential fracture path in a thin PV Si wafer. To investigate the mechanism of brittle fracture in silicon, the phase transformations induced by elastic energy released at a propagating crack-tip have been evaluated by locally stressing the diamond cubic Si lattice using a rigid Berkovich nanoindenter tip (radius ≈50 nm). Unique pressure induced phase transformations and hardness variations have been then related to the distribution of precipitates (O, Cu, Fe etc.), and the local stresses in the wafer. This research demonstrates for the first time the "ductile-like fracture" in almost circular crack path that significantly deviates from its energetically favorable crystallographic [110](111) system. These large diameter (≈ 200 mm) Si wafers were sliced to less than 180 microm thickness from a Czochralski (CZ) ingot that was grown at faster than normal growth rates. The vacancy (vSi) driven precipitation of oxygen at enhanced thermal gradients in the wafer core develops large localized stresses (upto 100 MPa) which we evaluated using Raman spectral analysis. Additional micro-FTIR mapping and microscopic etch pit measurements in the wafer core have related the observed crack path deviations to the presence of concentric ring-like distributions of oxygen precipitates (OPs). To replicate these "real-world" breakage scenarios and provide better insight on crack-propagation, several new and innovative tools/devices/methods have been developed in this study. An accurate quantitative profiling of local stress, phase changes and load-carrying ability of Si lattice has been performed in the vicinity of the controlled micro-cracks created using micro-indentations to represent

  13. Packaging Review Guide for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSabatino, A; Biswas, D; DeMicco, M; Fisher, L E; Hafner, R; Haslam, J; Mok, G; Patel, C; Russell, E

    2007-04-12

    This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE Order 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his or her review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. This PRG is generally organized at the section level in a format similar to that recommended in Regulatory Guide 7.9 (RG 7.9). One notable exception is the addition of Section 9 (Quality Assurance), which is not included as a separate chapter in RG 7.9. Within each section, this PRG addresses the technical and regulatory bases for the review, the manner in which the review is accomplished, and findings that are generally applicable for a package that meets the approval standards. This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for DOE review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE O 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. The primary objectives of this PRG are to: (1) Summarize the regulatory requirements for package approval; (2) Describe the technical review procedures by which DOE determines that these requirements have been satisfied; (3) Establish and maintain the quality and uniformity of reviews; (4) Define the base from which to evaluate proposed changes in scope

  14. Reference waste package environment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassley, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    One of three candidate repository sites for high-level radioactive waste packages is located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in rhyolitic tuff 700 to 1400 ft above the static water table. Calculations indicate that the package environment will experience a maximum temperature of ∼230 0 C at 9 years after emplacement. For the next 300 years the rock within 1 m of the waste packages will remain dehydrated. Preliminary results suggest that the waste package radiation field will have very little effect on the mechanical properties of the rock. Radiolysis products will have a negligible effect on the rock even after rehydration. Unfractured specimens of repository rock show no change in hydrologic characteristics during repeated dehydration-rehydration cycles. Fractured samples with initially high permeabilities show a striking permeability decrease during dehydration-rehydration cycling, which may be due to fracture healing via deposition of silica. Rock-water interaction studies demonstrate low and benign levels of anions and most cations. The development of sorptive secondary phases such as zeolites and clays suggests that anticipated rock-water interaction may produce beneficial changes in the package environment

  15. Merganser Download Package

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data download package contains an Esri 10.0 MXD, file geodatabase and copy of this FGDC metadata record. The data in this package are used in support of the...

  16. Creative Thinking Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clive

    1972-01-01

    A look at the latest package from a British managment training organization, which explains and demonstrates creative thinking techniques, including brainstorming. The package, designed for groups of twelve or more, consists of tapes, visuals, and associated exercises. (Editor/JB)

  17. Magnetron target designs to improve wafer edge trench filling in ionized metal physical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junqing; Yoon, Jae-Hong; Shin, Keesam; Park, Bong-Gyu; Yang Lin

    2006-01-01

    Severe asymmetry of the metal deposits on the trench sidewalls occurs near the wafer edge during low pressure ionized metal physical vapor deposition of Cu seed layer for microprocessor interconnects. To investigate this process and mitigate the asymmetry, an analytical view factor model based on the analogy between metal sputtering and diffuse thermal radiation was constructed. The model was validated based on the agreement between the model predictions and the reported experimental values for the asymmetric metal deposition at trench sidewalls near the wafer edge for a 200 mm wafer. This model could predict the thickness of the metal deposits across the wafer, the symmetry of the deposits on the trench sidewalls at any wafer location, and the angular distributions of the metal fluxes arriving at any wafer location. The model predictions for the 300 mm wafer indicate that as the target-to-wafer distance is shortened, the deposit thickness increases and the asymmetry decreases, however the overall uniformity decreases. Up to reasonable limits, increasing the target size and the sputtering intensity for the outer target portion significantly improves the uniformity across the wafer and the symmetry on the trench sidewalls near the wafer edge

  18. Packaging Printing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislav Bolanča; Igor Majnarić; Kristijan Golubović

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. T...

  19. Genome packaging in viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Siyang; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy structures became available. Here we discu...

  20. Packaged integrated opto-fluidic solution for harmful fluid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenet, T.; Bucci, D.; Geoffray, F.; Canto, F.; Couston, L.; Jardinier, E.; Broquin, J.-E.

    2016-02-01

    Advances in nuclear fuel reprocessing have led to a surging need for novel chemical analysis tools. In this paper, we present a packaged lab-on-chip approach with co-integration of optical and micro-fluidic functions on a glass substrate as a solution. A chip was built and packaged to obtain light/fluid interaction in order for the entire device to make spectral measurements using the photo spectroscopy absorption principle. The interaction between the analyte solution and light takes place at the boundary between a waveguide and a fluid micro-channel thanks to the evanescent part of the waveguide's guided mode that propagates into the fluid. The waveguide was obtained via ion exchange on a glass wafer. The input and the output of the waveguides were pigtailed with standard single mode optical fibers. The micro-scale fluid channel was elaborated with a lithography procedure and hydrofluoric acid wet etching resulting in a 150+/-8 μm deep channel. The channel was designed with fluidic accesses, in order for the chip to be compatible with commercial fluidic interfaces/chip mounts. This allows for analyte fluid in external capillaries to be pumped into the device through micro-pipes, hence resulting in a fully packaged chip. In order to produce this co-integrated structure, two substrates were bonded. A study of direct glass wafer-to-wafer molecular bonding was carried-out to improve detector sturdiness and durability and put forward a bonding protocol with a bonding surface energy of γ>2.0 J.m-2. Detector viability was shown by obtaining optical mode measurements and detecting traces of 1.2 M neodymium (Nd) solute in 12+/-1 μL of 0.01 M and pH 2 nitric acid (HNO3) solvent by obtaining an absorption peak specific to neodymium at 795 nm.

  1. Trends in Food Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Dana B.

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses developments in food packaging, processing, and preservation techniques in terms of packaging materials, technologies, consumer benefits, and current and potential food product applications. Covers implications due to consumer life-style changes, cost-effectiveness of packaging materials, and the ecological impact of…

  2. Impact of SiO2 on Al–Al thermocompression wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Nishant; Finstad, Terje G; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Poppe, Erik U; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2015-01-01

    Al–Al thermocompression bonding suitable for wafer level sealing of MEMS devices has been investigated. This paper presents a comparison of thermocompression bonding of Al films deposited on Si with and without a thermal oxide (SiO 2 film). Laminates of diameter 150 mm containing device sealing frames of width 200 µm were realized. The wafers were bonded by applying a bond force of 36 or 60 kN at bonding temperatures ranging from 300–550 °C for bonding times of 15, 30 or 60 min. The effects of these process variations on the quality of the bonded laminates have been studied. The bond quality was estimated by measurements of dicing yield, tensile strength, amount of cohesive fracture in Si and interfacial characterization. The mean bond strength of the tested structures ranged from 18–61 MPa. The laminates with an SiO 2 film had higher dicing yield and bond strength than the laminates without SiO 2 for a 400 °C bonding temperature. The bond strength increased with increasing bonding temperature and bond force. The laminates bonded for 30 and 60 min at 400 °C and 60 kN had similar bond strength and amount of cohesive fracture in the bulk silicon, while the laminates bonded for 15 min had significantly lower bond strength and amount of cohesive fracture in the bulk silicon. (paper)

  3. Signal processing techniques for damage detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and embedded ultrasonic structural radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-07-01

    Embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm is developed for using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. Signal processing techniques are used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages, and thereby to determine the location of the defects with the EUSR algorithm. In our research, the transient tone-burst wave propagation signals are generated and collected by the embedded PWAS. Then, with signal processing, the frequency contents of the signals and the time of flight of individual frequencies are determined. This paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm. Then we will describe the signal processing methods used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages. The signal processing methods being used include the wavelet denoising, the cross correlation, and Hilbert transform. Though hardware device can provide averaging function to eliminate the noise coming from the signal collection process, wavelet denoising is included to ensure better signal quality for the application in real severe environment. For better recognition of time of flight, cross correlation method is used. Hilbert transform is applied to the signals after cross correlation in order to extract the envelope of the signals. Signal processing and EUSR are both implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabView. We conclude with a description of our vision for applying EUSR signal analysis to structural health monitoring and embedded nondestructive evaluation. To this end, we envisage an automatic damage detection application utilizing embedded PWAS, EUSR, and advanced signal processing.

  4. Thermal analysis in the near field for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Establishment of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch on the 2nd progress report for the geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Wataru; Iwasa, Kengo

    1999-11-01

    For the underground facility of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), the space is needed to set the engineered barrier, and the set engineered barrier and rock-mass of near field are needed to satisfy some conditions or constraints for their performance. One of the conditions above mentioned is thermal condition arising from heat outputs of vitrified waste and initial temperature at the disposal depth. Hence, it is needed that the temperature of the engineered barrier and rock mass is less degree than the constraint temperature of each other. Therefore, the design of engineered barrier and underground facility is conducted so that the temperature of the engineered barrier and rock mass is less degree than the constraint temperature of each other. One of these design is establishment of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch. In this report, thermal analysis is conducted to establish the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch to satisfy the constraint temperature in the near field. Also, other conditions or constraints for establishment of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch are investigated. Then, design of the disposal tunnel spacing and waste package pitch, considering these conditions or constraints, is conducted. For the near field configuration using the results of the design above mentioned, the temperature with time dependency is studied by analysis, and then the temperature variation due to the gaps, that will occur within the engineered barrier and between the engineered barrier and rock mass in setting engineered barrier in the disposal tunnel or pit, is studied. At last, the disposal depth variation is studied to satisfy the temperature constraint in the near field. (author)

  5. Active Packaging Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Bastarrachea

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Active food packaging involves the packaging of foods with materials that provide an enhanced functionality, such as antimicrobial, antioxidant or biocatalytic functions. This can be achieved through the incorporation of active compounds into the matrix of the commonly used packaging materials, or by the application of coatings with the corresponding functionality through surface modification. The latter option offers the advantage of preserving the packaging materials’ bulk properties nearly intact. Herein, different coating technologies like embedding for controlled release, immobilization, layer-by-layer deposition, and photografting are explained and their potential application for active food packaging is explored and discussed.

  6. Science and technology of plasma activated direct wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberds, Brian Edward

    This dissertation studied the kinetics of silicon direct wafer bonding with emphasis on low temperature bonding mechanisms. The project goals were to understand the topological requirements for initial bonding, develop a tensile test to measure the bond strength as a function of time and temperature and, using the kinetic information obtained, develop lower temperature methods of bonding. A reproducible surface metrology metric for bonding was best described by power spectral density derived from atomic force microscopy measurements. From the tensile strength kinetics study it was found that low annealing temperatures could be used to obtain strong bonds, but at the expense of longer annealing times. Three models were developed to describe the kinetics. A diffusion controlled model and a reaction rate controlled model were developed for the higher temperature regimes (T > 600sp°C), and an electric field assisted oxidation model was proposed for the low temperature range. An in situ oxygen plasma treatment was used to further enhance the field-controlled mechanism which resulted in dramatic increases in the low temperature bonding kinetics. Multiple internal transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (MIT-FTIR) was used to monitor species evolution at the bonded interface and a capacitance-voltage (CV) study was undertaken to investigate charge distribution and surface states resulting from plasma activation. A short, less than a minute, plasma exposure prior to contacting the wafers was found to obtain very strong bonds for hydrophobic silicon wafers at very low temperatures (100sp°C). This novel bonding method may enable new technologies involving heterogeneous material systems or bonding partially fabricated devices to become realities.

  7. Multiproject wafers: not just for million-dollar mask sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Richard D.

    2003-06-01

    With the advent of Reticle Enhancement Technologies (RET) such as Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) and Phase Shift Masks (PSM) required to manufacture semiconductors in the sub-wavelength era, the cost of photomask tooling has skyrocketed. On the leading edge of technology, mask set prices often exceed $1 million. This shifts an enormous burden back to designers and Electronic Design Automation (EDA) software vendors to create perfect designs at a time when the number of transistors per chip is measured in the hundreds of millions, and gigachips are on the drawing boards. Moore's Law has driven technology to incredible feats. The prime beneficiaries of the technology - memory and microprocessor (MPU) manufacturers - can continue to fit the model because wafer volumes (and chip prices in the MPU case) render tooling costs relatively insignificant. However, Application-Specific IC (ASIC) manufacturers and most foundry clients average very small wafer per reticle ratios causing a dramatic and potentially insupportable rise in the cost of manufacturing. Multi-Project wafers (MPWs) are a way to share the cost of tooling and silicon by putting more than one chip on each reticle. Lacking any unexpected breakthroughs in simulation, verification, or mask technology to reduce the cost of prototyping, more efficient use of reticle space becomes a viable and increasingly attractive choice. It is worthwhile therefore, to discuss the economics of prototyping in the sub-wavelength era and the increasing advantages of the MPW, shared-silicon approach. However, putting together a collection of different-sized chips during tapeout can be challenging and time consuming. Design compatibility, reticle field optimization, and frame generation have traditionally been the biggest worries but, with the advent of dummy-fill for planarization and RET for resolution, another layer of complexity has been added. MPW automation software is quite advanced today, but the size of the task

  8. Tests of a silicon wafer based neutron collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cussen, L.D.; Vale, C.J.; Anderson, I.S.; Hoeghoj, P.

    2001-01-01

    A Soller slit neutron collimator has been prepared by stacking 160 μm thick single crystal silicon wafers coated on one surface with 4 μm of gadolinium metal. The collimator has an angular width of 20 min full width at half maximum and an effective length of 2.75 cm. The collimator has beam dimensions of 1 cm wide by 5.3 cm high. Tests at neutron wavelengths 7.5A and 1.8A showed a peak transmission of 88% within 2% of the optimum theoretical possibility. The background suppression in the wings is comparable with that of conventional neutron collimators

  9. Tests of a silicon wafer based neutron collimator

    CERN Document Server

    Cussen, L D; Anderson, I S; Hoeghoj, P

    2001-01-01

    A Soller slit neutron collimator has been prepared by stacking 160 mu m thick single crystal silicon wafers coated on one surface with 4 mu m of gadolinium metal. The collimator has an angular width of 20 min full width at half maximum and an effective length of 2.75 cm. The collimator has beam dimensions of 1 cm wide by 5.3 cm high. Tests at neutron wavelengths 7.5A and 1.8A showed a peak transmission of 88% within 2% of the optimum theoretical possibility. The background suppression in the wings is comparable with that of conventional neutron collimators.

  10. Underling modification in ion beam induced Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Chini, T.K.; Sanyal, M.K.; Grenzer, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface (amorphous-crystalline interface) structure of keV ion beam modified Si(001) wafers was studied for the first time using non-destructive technique and compared with that of the top one. Ion-beam modifications of the Si samples were done using state-of-art high-current ion implanter facility at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics by changing energy, dose and angle of incidence of the Ar + ion beam. To bring out the underlying modification depth-resolved x-ray grazing incidence diffraction has been carried out using synchrotron radiation facility, while the structure of the top surface was studied through atomic force microscopy

  11. Automotive SOI-BCD Technology Using Bonded Wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himi, H.; Fujino, S.

    2008-01-01

    The SOI-BCD device is excelling in high temperature operation and noise immunity because the integrated elements can be electrically separated by dielectric isolation. We have promptly paid attention to this feature and have concentrated to develop SOI-BCD devices seeking to match the automotive requirement. In this paper, the feature technologies specialized for automotive SOI-BCD devices, such as buried N + layer for impurity gettering and noise shielding, LDMOS with improved ESD robustness, crystal defect-less process, and wafer direct bonding through the amorphous layer for intelligent power IC are introduced.

  12. Addressable Inverter Matrix Tests Integrated-Circuit Wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressing elements indirectly through shift register reduces number of test probes. With aid of new technique, complex test structure on silicon wafer tested with relatively small number of test probes. Conserves silicon area by reduction of area devoted to pads. Allows thorough evaluation of test structure characteristics and of manufacturing process parameters. Test structure consists of shift register and matrix of inverter/transmission-gate cells connected to two-by-ten array of probe pads. Entire pattern contained in square area having only 1.6-millimeter sides. Shift register is conventional static CMOS device using inverters and transmission gates in master/slave D flip-flop configuration.

  13. Advancements in meat packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Kenneth W

    2017-10-01

    Packaging of meat provides the same or similar benefits for raw chilled and processed meats as other types of food packaging. Although air-permeable packaging is most prevalent for raw chilled red meat, vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging offer longer shelf life. The major advancements in meat packaging have been in the widely used plastic polymers while biobased materials and their integration into composite packaging are receiving much attention for functionality and sustainability. At this time, active and intelligent packaging are not widely used for antioxidant, antimicrobial, and other functions to stabilize and enhance meat properties although many options are being developed and investigated. The advances being made in nanotechnology will be incorporated into food packaging and presumably into meat packaging when appropriate and useful. Intelligent packaging using sensors for transmission of desired information and prompting of subsequent changes in packaging materials, environments or the products to maintain safety and quality are still in developmental stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Edible packaging materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjarasskul, Theeranun; Krochta, John M

    2010-01-01

    Research groups and the food and pharmaceutical industries recognize edible packaging as a useful alternative or addition to conventional packaging to reduce waste and to create novel applications for improving product stability, quality, safety, variety, and convenience for consumers. Recent studies have explored the ability of biopolymer-based food packaging materials to carry and control-release active compounds. As diverse edible packaging materials derived from various by-products or waste from food industry are being developed, the dry thermoplastic process is advancing rapidly as a feasible commercial edible packaging manufacturing process. The employment of nanocomposite concepts to edible packaging materials promises to improve barrier and mechanical properties and facilitate effective incorporation of bioactive ingredients and other designed functions. In addition to the need for a more fundamental understanding to enable design to desired specifications, edible packaging has to overcome challenges such as regulatory requirements, consumer acceptance, and scaling-up research concepts to commercial applications.

  15. Waste package materials selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Fish, R.L.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain in Southern Nevada to determine its suitability as a mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The B ampersand W Fuel Company (BWFC), as a part of the Management and Operating (M ampersand O) team in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), is responsible for designing and developing the waste package for this potential repository. As part of this effort, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is responsible for testing materials and developing models for the materials to be used in the waste package. This paper is aimed at presenting the selection process for materials needed in fabricating the different components of the waste package

  16. Determination of wafer center position during the transfer process by using the beam-breaking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Gen; Huang, Bo-Kai

    2014-01-01

    A wafer on a robot blade may slip due to inertia sliding during the acceleration or deceleration process. This study presents the implementation and experimental verification of a novel real-time wafer positioning system to be used during the transfer process. A system-integration computer program involving a human–machine interface (HMI) was also developed, exhibiting the following functions: (a) moving direction judgment; (b) notch-passing judgment; (c) indicating the sensor by which the notch passes; and (d) computing the wafer center in real time. The position of the wafer center is calculated based on the time-sequence of the beam-breaking signals from two optical sensors, and the geometric relations among the sensing points of the robot blade and wafer. When using eight-inch wafers, the experimental results indicated the capabilities of the proposed positioning system under various conditions, including distinct parameters regarding the moving direction, wafer displacement and notch-passing sensors. The accuracy and precision (repeatability) of the measurement in various conditions were calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the experimental results demonstrate that, after combining the novel wafer positioning system and HMI program, the proposed method can be used to compute the position of the wafer center in real time in various conditions. (paper)

  17. Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Microcontamination Analysis on Silicon Wafer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaura, Norikatsu

    1997-10-01

    As dimensions in state-of-the-art CMOS devices shrink to less than 0.1 pm, even low levels of impurities on wafer surfaces can cause device degradation. Conventionally, metal contamination on wafer surfaces is measured using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TXRF). However, commercially available TXRF systems do not have the necessary sensitivity for measuring the lower levels of contamination required to develop new CMOS technologies. In an attempt to improve the sensitivity of TXRF, this research investigates Synchrotron Radiation TXRF (SR TXRF). The advantages of SR TXRF over conventional TXRF are higher incident photon flux, energy tunability, and linear polarization. We made use of these advantages to develop an optimized SR TXRF system at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The results of measurements show that the Minimum Detection Limits (MDLs) of SR TXRF for 3-d transition metals are typically at a level-of 3x10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2}, which is better than conventional TXRF by about a factor of 20. However, to use our SR TXRF system for practical applications, it was necessary to modify a commercially available Si (Li) detector which generates parasitic fluorescence signals. With the modified detector, we could achieve true MDLs of 3x10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for 3-d transition metals. In addition, the analysis of Al on Si wafers is described. Al analysis is difficult because strong Si signals overlap the Al signals. In this work, the Si signals are greatly reduced by tuning the incident beam energy below the Si K edge. The results of our measurements show that the sensitivity for Al is limited by x-ray Raman scattering. Furthermore, we show the results of theoretical modeling of SR TXRF backgrounds consisting of the bremsstrahlung generated by photoelectrons, Compton scattering, and Raman scattering. To model these backgrounds, we extended conventional theoretical models by taking into account several aspects particular

  18. Hydrogen Incorporation during Aluminium Anodisation on Silicon Wafer Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Pei Hsuan Doris; Strutzberg, Hartmuth; Wenham, Stuart; Lennon, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen can act to reduce recombination at silicon surfaces for solar cell devices and consequently the ability of dielectric layers to provide a source of hydrogen for this purpose is of interest. However, due to the ubiquitous nature of hydrogen and its mobility, direct measurements of hydrogen incorporation in dielectric layers are challenging. In this paper, we report the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements to show that deuterium from an electrolyte can be incorporated in an anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) layer and be introduced into an underlying amorphous silicon layer during anodisation of aluminium on silicon wafers. After annealing at 400 °C, the concentration of deuterium in the AAO was reduced by a factor of two, as the deuterium was re-distributed to the interface between the amorphous silicon and AAO and to the amorphous silicon. The assumption that hydrogen, from an aqueous electrolyte, could be similarly incorporated in AAO, is supported by the observation that the hydrogen content in the underlying amorphous silicon was increased by a factor of ∼ 3 after anodisation. Evidence for hydrogen being introduced into crystalline silicon after aluminium anodisation was provided by electrochemical capacitance voltage measurements indicating boron electrical deactivation in the underlying crystalline silicon. If introduced hydrogen can electrically deactivate dopant atoms at the surface, then it is reasonable to assume that it could also deactivate recombination-active states at the crystalline silicon interface therefore enabling higher minority carrier lifetimes in the silicon wafer

  19. Improving scanner wafer alignment performance by target optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leray, Philippe; Jehoul, Christiane; Socha, Robert; Menchtchikov, Boris; Raghunathan, Sudhar; Kent, Eric; Schoonewelle, Hielke; Tinnemans, Patrick; Tuffy, Paul; Belen, Jun; Wise, Rich

    2016-03-01

    In the process nodes of 10nm and below, the patterning complexity along with the processing and materials required has resulted in a need to optimize alignment targets in order to achieve the required precision, accuracy and throughput performance. Recent industry publications on the metrology target optimization process have shown a move from the expensive and time consuming empirical methodologies, towards a faster computational approach. ASML's Design for Control (D4C) application, which is currently used to optimize YieldStar diffraction based overlay (DBO) metrology targets, has been extended to support the optimization of scanner wafer alignment targets. This allows the necessary process information and design methodology, used for DBO target designs, to be leveraged for the optimization of alignment targets. In this paper, we show how we applied this computational approach to wafer alignment target design. We verify the correlation between predictions and measurements for the key alignment performance metrics and finally show the potential alignment and overlay performance improvements that an optimized alignment target could achieve.

  20. Flexible packaging for PV modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2008-08-01

    Economic, flexible packages that provide needed level of protection to organic and some other PV cells over >25-years have not yet been developed. However, flexible packaging is essential in niche large-scale applications. Typical configuration used in flexible photovoltaic (PV) module packaging is transparent frontsheet/encapsulant/PV cells/flexible substrate. Besides flexibility of various components, the solder bonds should also be flexible and resistant to fatigue due to cyclic loading. Flexible front sheets should provide optical transparency, mechanical protection, scratch resistance, dielectric isolation, water resistance, UV stability and adhesion to encapsulant. Examples are Tefzel, Tedlar and Silicone. Dirt can get embedded in soft layers such as silicone and obscure light. Water vapor transmittance rate (WVTR) of polymer films used in the food packaging industry as moisture barriers are ~0.05 g/(m2.day) under ambient conditions. In comparison, light emitting diodes employ packaging components that have WVTR of ~10-6 g/(m2.day). WVTR of polymer sheets can be improved by coating them with dense inorganic/organic multilayers. Ethylene vinyl acetate, an amorphous copolymer used predominantly by the PV industry has very high O2 and H2O diffusivity. Quaternary carbon chains (such as acetate) in a polymer lead to cleavage and loss of adhesional strength at relatively low exposures. Reactivity of PV module components increases in presence of O2 and H2O. Adhesional strength degrades due to the breakdown of structure of polymer by reactive, free radicals formed by high-energy radiation. Free radical formation in polymers is reduced when the aromatic rings are attached at regular intervals. This paper will review flexible packaging for PV modules.

  1. Lithium niobate packaging challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.J.; Holmes, R.J.; Jander, R.B.; Schelling, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The use of lithium niobate integrated optic devices outside of the research laboratory is predicated on the development of a sound packaging method. The authors present a discussion of the many issues that face the development of a viable, robust packaging technology. The authors emphasize the interaction of lithium niobate's physical properties with available packaging materials and technologies. The broad range of properties (i.e. electro-optic, piezo-electric, pyro-electric, photorefractive...) that make lithium niobate an interesting material in many device applications also make it a packaging challenge. The package design, materials and packaging technologies must isolate the device from the environment so that lithium niobate's properties do not adversely affect the device performance

  2. Packaged die heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Richard; Ohme, Bruce Walker; Jensen, Ronald J.

    2011-06-21

    A heater for heating packaged die for burn-in and heat testing is described. The heater may be a ceramic-type heater with a metal filament. The heater may be incorporated into the integrated circuit package as an additional ceramic layer of the package, or may be an external heater placed in contact with the package to heat the die. Many different types of integrated circuit packages may be accommodated. The method provides increased energy efficiency for heating the die while reducing temperature stresses on testing equipment. The method allows the use of multiple heaters to heat die to different temperatures. Faulty die may be heated to weaken die attach material to facilitate removal of the die. The heater filament or a separate temperature thermistor located in the package may be used to accurately measure die temperature.

  3. Packaging for Sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Helen; Fitzpatrick, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    The packaging industry is under pressure from regulators, customers and other stakeholders to improve packaging’s sustainability by reducing its environmental and societal impacts. This is a considerable challenge because of the complex interactions between products and their packaging, and the many roles that packaging plays in the supply chain. Packaging for Sustainability is a concise and readable handbook for practitioners who are trying to implement sustainability strategies for packaging. Industry case studies are used throughout the book to illustrate possible applications and scenarios. Packaging for Sustainability draws on the expertise of researchers and industry practitioners to provide information on business benefits, environmental issues and priorities, environmental evaluation tools, design for environment, marketing strategies, and challenges for the future.

  4. Penggunaan Limbah Kopi Sebagai Bahan Penyusun Ransum Itik Peking dalam Bentuk Wafer Ransum Komplit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Daud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Effect of coffee waste as component of compiler ration peking duck in the form of wafer complete ration ABSTRACT. Coffee waste is a by-product of coffee processing that potential to be used as feed stuff for peking duck. The weakness of this coffee waste, among others, is perishable, voluminous (bulky and the availability was fluctuated so the processing technology is needed to make this vegetable waste to be durable, easy to stored and to be given to livestock. To solve this problem vegetable waste could be formed as wafer. This research was conducted to study effectiveness of coffee waste as component of compiler ration peking duck in the form of wafer complete ration This experiment was run in completely randomized design which consist of 4 feed treatment and 3 replications.  Ration used was consisted of  P0 = wafer complete ration 0% coffee waste (control, P1 = wafer complete ration 2,5% coffee waste, P2 = wafer complete ration 5% coffee waste, and P3 = Wafer complete ration 7,5% coffee waste. The Variables observed were: physical characteristic (aroma, color, and wafer density and palatability of wafer complete ration. Data collected was analyzed with ANOVA and Duncan Range Test would be used if the result was significantly different. The result showed that the density of wafer complete ration coffee waste was significantly (P< 0.05 differences between of treatment. Mean density wafer complete ration equal to: P0= 0,52±0,03, P1 =0,67±0,04, P2 =0,72±0,03, and P3 = 0,76±0.05 g/cm3. Wafer complete ration coffee waste palatability was significantly (P< 0.05 differences between of treatment. It is concluded that of wafer complete ration composition 5 and 7,5% coffee waste was significantly wafer palatability and gave a highest wafer density. The ration P0 was the most palatable compare to other treatments for the experimental peking duck.

  5. MARS software package status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhgirej, I.L.; Talanov, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    The MARS software package is intended for simulating the nuclear-electromagnetic cascades and the secondary neutrons and muons transport in the heterogeneous medium of arbitrary complexity in the magnetic fields presence. The inclusive approach to describing the particle production in the nuclear and electromagnetic interactions and by the unstable particles decay is realized in the package. The MARS software package was actively applied for solving various radiation physical problems [ru

  6. Correlation study of actual temperature profile and in-line metrology measurements for within-wafer uniformity improvement and wafer edge yield enhancement (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Vaid, Alok; Vinslava, Alina; Casselberry, Richard; Mishra, Shailendra; Dixit, Dhairya; Timoney, Padraig; Chu, Dinh; Porter, Candice; Song, Da; Ren, Zhou

    2018-03-01

    It is getting more important to monitor all aspects of influencing parameters in critical etch steps and utilize them as tuning knobs for within-wafer uniformity improvement and wafer edge yield enhancement. Meanwhile, we took a dive in pursuing "measuring what matters" and challenged ourselves for more aspects of signals acquired in actual process conditions. Among these factors which are considered subtle previously, we identified Temperature, especially electrostatic chuck (ESC) Temperature measurement in real etch process conditions have direct correlation to in-line measurements. In this work, we used SensArray technique (EtchTemp-SE wafer) to measure ESC temperature profile on a 300mm wafer with plasma turning on to reproduce actual temperature pattern on wafers in real production process conditions. In field applications, we observed substantial correlation between ESC temperature and in-line optical metrology measurements and since temperature is a process factor that can be tuning through set-temperature modulations, we have identified process knobs with known impact on physical profile variations. Furthermore, ESC temperature profile on a 300mm wafer is configured as multiple zones upon radius and SensArray measurements mechanism could catch such zonal distribution as well, which enables detailed temperature modulations targeting edge ring only where most of chips can be harvested and critical zone for yield enhancement. Last but not least, compared with control reference (ESC Temperature in static plasma-off status), we also get additional factors to investigate in chamber-to-chamber matching study and make process tool fleet match on the basis really matters in production. KLA-Tencor EtchTemp-SE wafer enables Plasma On wafer temperature monitoring of silicon etch process. This wafer is wireless and has 65 sensors with measurement range from 20 to 140°C. the wafer is designed to run in real production recipe plasma on condition with maximum RF power up

  7. User friendly packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Most consumers have experienced occasional problems with opening packaging. Tomato sauce from the tinned mackerel splattered all over the kitchen counter, the unrelenting pickle jar lid, and the package of sliced ham that cannot be opened without a knife or a pair of scissors. The research project...... “User-friendly Packaging” aims to create a platform for developing more user-friendly packaging. One intended outcome of the project is a guideline that industry can use in development efforts. The project also points the way for more extended collaboration between companies and design researchers. How...... can design research help industry in packaging innovation?...

  8. The ZOOM minimization package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischler, Mark S.; Sachs, D.

    2004-01-01

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete

  9. Plasma physics plotting package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyman, D.H.

    1981-02-01

    We describe a package of plotting routines that do up to six two- or three-dimensional plots on a frame with minimal loss of resolution. The package now runs on a PDP-10 with PLOT-10 TCS primitives and on a Control Data Corporation-7600 and a Cray-1 with TV80LIB primitives on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center network. The package is portable to other graphics systems because only the primitive plot calls are used from the underlying system's graphics package

  10. Active food packaging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Murat; Floros, John D

    2004-01-01

    Active packaging technologies offer new opportunities for the food industry, in the preservation of foods. Important active packaging systems currently known to date, including oxygen scavengers, carbon dioxide emitters/absorbers, moisture absorbers, ethylene absorbers, ethanol emitters, flavor releasing/absorbing systems, time-temperature indicators, and antimicrobial containing films, are reviewed. The principle of operation of each active system is briefly explained. Recent technological advances in active packaging are discussed, and food related applications are presented. The effects of active packaging systems on food quality and safety are cited.

  11. Package-friendly piezoresistive pressure sensors with on-chip integrated packaging-stress-suppressed suspension (PS3) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiachou; Li, Xinxin

    2013-01-01

    An on-chip integrated packaging-stress-suppressed suspension (PS 3 ) technology for a packaging-stress-free pressure sensor is proposed and developed. With a MIS (microholes interetch and sealing) micromachining process implemented only from the front-side of a single-side polished (1 1 1) silicon wafer, a compact cantilever-shaped PS 3 is on-chip integrated surrounding a piezoresistive pressure-sensing structure to provide a packaging-process/substrate-friendly method for low-cost but high-performance sensor applications. With the MIS process, the chip size of the PS 3 -enclosed pressure sensor is as small as 0.8 mm × 0.8 mm. Compared with a normal pressure sensor without PS 3 (but with an identical pressure-sensing structure), the proposed pressure sensor has the same sensitivity of 0.046 mV kPa −1 (3.3 V) −1 . However, without using the thermal compensation technique, a temperature coefficient of offset of only 0.016% °C −1 FS is noted for the sensor with PS 3 , which is about 15 times better than that for the sensor without PS 3 . Featuring effective isolation and elimination of the influence from packaging stress, the PS 3 technique is promising to be widely used for packaging-friendly mechanical sensors. (paper)

  12. Effect of Activebag® Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-11-30

    Nov 30, 2014 ... 1University of Nairobi, Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection P.O Box ... Conclusion: Packaging mangoes in Activebag® after harvest at ripe stage was effective in delaying most of the ... to modify the O2 and CO2 levels within the package ... and sugar consumption in packaged commodities.

  13. A Study of the Charge Trap Transistor (CTT) for Post-Fab Modification of Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2018-0030 A STUDY OF THE CHARGE TRAP TRANSISTOR (CTT) FOR POST- FAB MODIFICATION OF WAFERS Subramanian S. Iyer University of California...Final 13 June 2016 – 13 December 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A STUDY OF THE CHARGE TRAP TRANSISTOR (CTT) FOR POST- FAB MODIFICATION OF WAFERS 5a. CONTRACT

  14. Synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis; of polymer coated silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brehm, L.; Kregsamer, P.; Pianetta, P.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides an efficient method for analyzing trace metal contamination on silicon wafer surfaces. New polymeric materials used as interlayer dielectrics in microprocessors are applied to the surface of silicon wafers by a spin-coating process. Analysis of these polymer coated wafers present a new challenge for TXRF analysis. Polymer solutions are typically analyzed for bulk metal contamination prior to application on the wafer using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Questions have arisen about how to relate results of surface contamination analysis (TXRF) of a polymer coated wafer to bulk trace analysis (ICP-MS) of the polymer solutions. Experiments were done to explore this issue using synchrotron radiation (SR) TXRF. Polymer solutions were spiked with several different concentrations of metals. These solutions were applied to silicon wafers using the normal spin-coating process. The polymer coated wafers were then measured using the SR-TXRF instrument set-up at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Several methods of quantitation were evaluated. The best results were obtained by developing calibration curves (intensity versus ppb) using the spiked polymer coated wafers as standards. Conversion of SR-TXRF surface analysis results (atoms/cm 2 ) to a volume related concentration was also investigated. (author)

  15. Comparison of silicon strip tracker module size using large sensors from 6 inch wafers

    CERN Multimedia

    Honma, Alan

    1999-01-01

    Two large silicon strip sensor made from 6 inch wafers are placed next to each other to simulate the size of a CMS outer silicon tracker module. On the left is a prototype 2 sensor CMS inner endcap silicon tracker module made from 4 inch wafers.

  16. Bond strength tests between silicon wafers and duran tubes (fusion bonded fluidic interconnects)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazal, I.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, J.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2005-01-01

    The fusion bond strength of glass tubes with standard silicon wafers is presented. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and those coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are presented. Results obtained are discussed in terms of homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing

  17. A low feed-through 3D vacuum packaging technique with silicon vias for RF MEMS resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jicong; Yuan, Quan; Kan, Xiao; Yang, Jinling; Yang, Fuhua

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a wafer-level three-dimensional (3D) vacuum packaging technique for radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) resonators. A Sn-rich Au-Sn solder bonding is employed to provide a vacuum encapsulation as well as electrical conductions. Vertical silicon vias are micro-fabricated by glass reflow process. The optimized grounding, via pitch, and all-round shielding effectively reduce feed-through capacitance. Thus the signal-to-background ratios (SBRs) of the transmission signals increase from 17 dB to 20 dB, and the quality factor (Q) values of the packaged resonators go from around 8000 up to more than 9500. The measured average leak rate and shear strength are (2.55  ±  0.9)  ×  10-8 atm-cc s-1 and 42.53  ±  4.19 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, thermal cycling test between  -40 °C and 100 °C and high temperature storage test at 150 °C show that the resonant-frequency drifts are less than  ±7 ppm. In addition, the SBRs and the Q values have no obvious change after the tests. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed encapsulation technique is well suited for the applications of RF MEMS devices.

  18. Nanotechnology: An Untapped Resource for Food Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chetan; Dhiman, Romika; Rokana, Namita; Panwar, Harsh

    2017-01-01

    Food commodities are packaged and hygienically transported to protect and preserve them from any un-acceptable alteration in quality, before reaching the end-consumer. Food packaging continues to evolve along-with the innovations in material science and technology, as well as in light of consumer's demand. Presently, the modern consumers of competitive economies demands for food with natural quality, assured safety, minimal processing, extended shelf-life and ready-to-eat concept. Innovative packaging systems, not only ascertains transit preservation and effective distribution, but also facilitates communication at the consumer levels. The technological advances in the domain of food packaging in twenty-first century are mainly chaired by nanotechnology, the science of nano-materials. Nanotechnology manipulates and creates nanometer scale materials, of commercial and scientific relevance. Introduction of nanotechnology in food packaging sector has significantly addressed the food quality, safety and stability concerns. Besides, nanotechnology based packaging intimate's consumers about the real time quality of food product. Additionally, nanotechnology has been explored for controlled release of preservatives/antimicrobials, extending the product shelf life within the package. The promising reports for nanotechnology interventions in food packaging have established this as an independent priority research area. Nanoparticles based food packages offer improved barrier and mechanical properties, along with food preservation and have gained welcoming response from market and end users. In contrary, recent advances and up-liftment in this area have raised various ethical, environmental and safety concerns. Policies and regulation regarding nanoparticles incorporation in food packaging are being reviewed. This review presents the existing knowledge, recent advances, concerns and future applications of nanotechnology in food packaging sector.

  19. Locally-enhanced light scattering by a monocrystalline silicon wafer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the optical properties of light scattering by a monocrystalline silicon wafer, by using transparent material to replicate its surface structure and illuminating a fabricated sample with a laser source. The experimental results show that the scattering field contains four spots of concentrated intensity with high local energy, and these spots are distributed at the four vertices of a square with lines of intensity linking adjacent spots. After discussing simulations of and theory about the formation of this light scattering, we conclude that the scattering field is formed by the effects of both geometrical optics and physical optics. Moreover, we calculate the central angle of the spots in the light field, and the result indicates that the locally-enhanced intensity spots have a definite scattering angle. These results may possibly provide a method for improving energy efficiency within mono-Si based solar cells.

  20. Joint Research on Scatterometry and AFM Wafer Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodermann, Bernd; Buhr, Egbert; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Bär, Markus; Scholze, Frank; Krumrey, Michael; Wurm, Matthias; Klapetek, Petr; Hansen, Poul-Erik; Korpelainen, Virpi; van Veghel, Marijn; Yacoot, Andrew; Siitonen, Samuli; El Gawhary, Omar; Burger, Sven; Saastamoinen, Toni

    2011-11-01

    Supported by the European Commission and EURAMET, a consortium of 10 participants from national metrology institutes, universities and companies has started a joint research project with the aim of overcoming current challenges in optical scatterometry for traceable linewidth metrology. Both experimental and modelling methods will be enhanced and different methods will be compared with each other and with specially adapted atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurement systems in measurement comparisons. Additionally novel methods for sophisticated data analysis will be developed and investigated to reach significant reductions of the measurement uncertainties in critical dimension (CD) metrology. One final goal will be the realisation of a wafer based reference standard material for calibration of scatterometers.

  1. Coherent spin transport through a 350 micron thick silicon wafer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biqin; Monsma, Douwe J; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-10-26

    We use all-electrical methods to inject, transport, and detect spin-polarized electrons vertically through a 350-micron-thick undoped single-crystal silicon wafer. Spin precession measurements in a perpendicular magnetic field at different accelerating electric fields reveal high spin coherence with at least 13pi precession angles. The magnetic-field spacing of precession extrema are used to determine the injector-to-detector electron transit time. These transit time values are associated with output magnetocurrent changes (from in-plane spin-valve measurements), which are proportional to final spin polarization. Fitting the results to a simple exponential spin-decay model yields a conduction electron spin lifetime (T1) lower bound in silicon of over 500 ns at 60 K.

  2. Ambient plasma treatment of silicon wafers for surface passivation recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jia; Prinz, Markus; Markert, Thomas; Aberle, Armin G.; Mueller, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effect of an ambient plasma treatment powered by compressed dry air on the passivation quality of silicon wafers coated with intrinsic amorphous silicon sub-oxide is investigated. While long-time storage deteriorates the effective lifetime of all samples, a short ambient plasma treatment improves their passivation qualities. By studying the influence of the plasma treatment parameters on the passivation layers, an optimized process condition was identified which even boosted the passivation quality beyond its original value obtained immediately after deposition. On the other hand, the absence of stringent requirement on gas precursors, vacuum condition and longtime processing makes the ambient plasma treatment an excellent candidate to replace conventional thermal annealing in industrial heterojunction solar cell production.

  3. Thermal analysis of NNWSI conceptual waste package designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, W.; Hockman, J.N.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1984-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in the design and testing of high-level nuclear waste packages. Many of the aspects of waste package design and testing (e.g., corrosion and leaching) depend in part on the temperature history of the emplaced packages. This report discusses thermal modeling and analysis of various emplaced waste package conceptual designs including the models used, the assumptions and approximations made, and the results obtained. 16 references

  4. Comparison on mechanical properties of heavily phosphorus- and arsenic-doped Czochralski silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kang; Sun, Yuxin; Lu, Yunhao; Liang, Xingbo; Tian, Daxi; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren

    2018-04-01

    Heavily phosphorus (P)- and arsenic (As)-doped Czochralski silicon (CZ-Si) wafers generally act as the substrates for the epitaxial silicon wafers used to fabricate power and communication devices. The mechanical properties of such two kinds of n-type heavily doped CZ silicon wafers are vital to ensure the quality of epitaxial silicon wafers and the manufacturing yields of devices. In this work, the mechanical properties including the hardness, Young's modulus, indentation fracture toughness and the resistance to dislocation motion have been comparatively investigated for heavily P- and As-doped CZ-Si wafers. It is found that heavily P-doped CZ-Si possesses somewhat higher hardness, lower Young's modulus, larger indentation fracture toughness and stronger resistance to dislocation motion than heavily As-doped CZ-Si. The mechanisms underlying this finding have been tentatively elucidated by considering the differences in the doping effects of P and As in silicon.

  5. Development of thin film measurement program of wafer for spin etcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hak Suk; Kim, No Hyu; Kim, Young Chul; Cho, Jung Keun; Bae, Jung Yong

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a thickness measurement method of silicon-oxide and poly-silicon film deposited on 12 inch silicon wafer for spin etcher. Krypton lamp is used as a light source for generating a wide-band spectrum, which is guided and focused on the wafer surface through a optical fiber cable. Interference signal from the film is detected by optical sensor to determine the thickness of the film using spectrum analysis and several signal processing techniques including curve-fitting and filtering. Test wafers with two kinds of priori-known films, silicon-oxide(100nm) and poly-silicon(300nm), are measured under the condition that the wafer is spinning at 20Hz and DI water flowing on the wafer surface. From experiment results the algorithm presented in the paper is proved to be effective with accuracy of maximum 6.5% error.

  6. Development of thin film measurement program of wafer for spin etcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hak Suk; Kim, No Hyu; Kim, Young Chul [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jung Keun; Bae, Jung Yong [Korea DNS, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-11-15

    This paper proposes a thickness measurement method of silicon-oxide and poly-silicon film deposited on 12 inch silicon wafer for spin etcher. Krypton lamp is used as a light source for generating a wide-band spectrum, which is guided and focused on the wafer surface through a optical fiber cable. Interference signal from the film is detected by optical sensor to determine the thickness of the film using spectrum analysis and several signal processing techniques including curve-fitting and filtering. Test wafers with two kinds of priori-known films, silicon-oxide(100nm) and poly-silicon(300nm), are measured under the condition that the wafer is spinning at 20Hz and DI water flowing on the wafer surface. From experiment results the algorithm presented in the paper is proved to be effective with accuracy of maximum 6.5% error.

  7. Temperature Uniformity of Wafer on a Large-Sized Susceptor for a Nitride Vertical MOCVD Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhi-Ming; Jiang Hai-Ying; Han Yan-Bin; Li Jin-Ping; Yin Jian-Qin; Zhang Jin-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of coil location on wafer temperature is analyzed in a vertical MOCVD reactor by induction heating. It is observed that the temperature distribution in the wafer with the coils under the graphite susceptor is more uniform than that with the coils around the outside wall of the reactor. For the case of coils under the susceptor, we find that the thickness of the susceptor, the distance from the coils to the susceptor bottom and the coil turns significantly affect the temperature uniformity of the wafer. An optimization process is executed for a 3-inch susceptor with this kind of structure, resulting in a large improvement in the temperature uniformity. A further optimization demonstrates that the new susceptor structure is also suitable for either multiple wafers or large-sized wafers approaching 6 and 8 inches

  8. Crack detection and analyses using resonance ultrasonic vibrations in full-size crystalline silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, A.; Polupan, O.; Dallas, W.; Ostapenko, S.; Hess, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental approach for fast crack detection and length determination in full-size solar-grade crystalline silicon wafers using a resonance ultrasonic vibrations (RUV) technique is presented. The RUV method is based on excitation of the longitudinal ultrasonic vibrations in full-size wafers. Using an external piezoelectric transducer combined with a high sensitivity ultrasonic probe and computer controlled data acquisition system, real-time frequency response analysis can be accomplished. On a set of identical crystalline Si wafers with artificially introduced periphery cracks, it was demonstrated that the crack results in a frequency shift in a selected RUV peak to a lower frequency and increases the resonance peak bandwidth. Both characteristics were found to increase with the length of the crack. The frequency shift and bandwidth increase serve as reliable indicators of the crack appearance in silicon wafers and are suitable for mechanical quality control and fast wafer inspection

  9. Impurity engineering for germanium-doped Czochralski silicon wafer used for ultra large scale integrated circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiahe; Yang, Deren [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2009-07-01

    Internal gettering (IG) technology has been challenged by both the reduction of thermal budget during device fabrication and the enlargement of wafer diameter. Improving the properties of Czochralski (Cz) silicon wafers by intentional impurity doping, the so-called 'impurity engineering (IE)', is defined. Germanium has been found to be one of the important impurities for improving the internal gettering effect in Cz silicon wafer. In this paper, the investigations on IE involved with the conventional furnace anneal based denudation processing for germanium-doped Cz silicon wafer are reviewed. Meanwhile, the potential mechanisms of germanium effects for the IE of Cz silicon wafer are also interpreted based on the experimental facts. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Wafer size effect on material removal rate in copper CMP process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuh, Minjong; Jang, Soocheon; Park, Inho; Jeong, Haedo [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The semiconductor industry has employed the Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) to enable surface topography control. Copper has been used to build interconnects because of its low-resistivity and high-electromigration. In this study, the effect of wafer size on the Material removal rate (MRR) in copper CMP process was investigated. CMP experiments were conducted using copper blanket wafers with diameter of 100, 150, 200 and 300 mm, while temperature and friction force were measured by infrared and piezoelectric sen-sors. The MRR increases with an increase in wafer size under the same process conditions. The wafer size increased the sliding distance of pad, resulting in an increase in the process temperature. This increased the process temperature, accelerating the chemical etching rate and the dynamic etch rate. The sliding distance of the pad was proportional to the square of the wafer radius; it may be used to predict CMP results and design a CMP machine.

  11. A Novel Defect Inspection Method for Semiconductor Wafer Based on Magneto-Optic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.; Chen, L.; Li, W.; Zhang, G.; Wu, P.

    2013-03-01

    The defects of semiconductor wafer may be generated from the manufacturing processes. A novel defect inspection method of semiconductor wafer is presented in this paper. The method is based on magneto-optic imaging, which involves inducing eddy current into the wafer under test, and detecting the magnetic flux associated with eddy current distribution in the wafer by exploiting the Faraday rotation effect. The magneto-optic image being generated may contain some noises that degrade the overall image quality, therefore, in this paper, in order to remove the unwanted noise present in the magneto-optic image, the image enhancement approach using multi-scale wavelet is presented, and the image segmentation approach based on the integration of watershed algorithm and clustering strategy is given. The experimental results show that many types of defects in wafer such as hole and scratch etc. can be detected by the method proposed in this paper.

  12. CYPROS - Cybernetic Program Packages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Tyssø

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available CYPROS is an interactive program system consisting of a number of special purpose packages for simulation, identification, parameter estimation and control system design. The programming language is standard FORTRAN IV and the system is implemented on a medium size computer system (Nord-10. The system is interactive and program control is obtained by the use of numeric terminals. Output is rapidly examined by extensive use of video colour graphics. The subroutines included in the packages are designed and documented according to standardization rules given by the SCL (Scandinavian Control Library organization. This simplifies the exchange of subroutines throughout the SCL system. Also, this makes the packages attractive for implementation by industrial users. In the simulation package, different integration methods are available and it can be easily used for off-line, as well as real time, simulation problems. The identification package consists of programs for single-input/single-output and multivariablc problems. Both transfer function models and state space models can be handled. Optimal test signals can be designed. The control package consists of programs based on multivariable time domain and frequency domain methods for analysis and design. In addition, there is a package for matrix and time series manipulation. CYPROS has been applied successfully to industrial problems of various kinds, and parts of the system have already been implemented on different computers in industry. This paper will, in some detail, describe the use and the contents of the packages and some examples of application will be discussed.

  13. User friendly packaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geert Jensen, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    Most consumers have experienced occasional problems with opening packaging. Tomato sauce from the tinned mackerel splattered all over the kitchen counter, the unrelenting pickle jar lid, and the package of sliced ham that cannot be opened without a knife or a pair of scissors. The research project...

  14. NRF TRIGA packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, M.D.

    1995-11-01

    Training Reactor Isotopes, General Atomics (TRIGA reg-sign) Reactors are in use at four US Department of Energy (DOE) complex facilities and at least 23 university, commercial, or government facilities. The development of the Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA packaging system began in October 1993. The Hanford Site NRF is being shut down and requires an operationally user-friendly transportation and storage packaging system for removal of the TRIGA fuel elements. The NRF TRIGA packaging system is designed to remotely remove the fuel from the reactor and transport the fuel to interim storage (up to 50 years) on the Hanford Site. The packaging system consists of a cask and an overpack. The overpack is used only for transport and is not necessary for storage. Based upon the cask's small size and light weight, small TRIGA reactors will find it versatile for numerous refueling and fuel storage needs. The NRF TRIGA packaging design also provides the basis for developing a certifiable and economical packaging system for other TRIGA reactor facilities. The small size of the NRF TRIGA cask also accommodates placing the cask into a larger certified packaging for offsite transport. The Westinghouse Hanford Company NRF TRIGA packaging, as described herein can serve other DOE sites for their onsite use, and the design can be adapted to serve university reactor facilities, handling a variety of fuel payloads

  15. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weddle, D.C.; Novotny, R.; Cron, J.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''

  16. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  17. The BINSYN Program Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert P. Linnell

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The BINSYN program package, recently expanded to calculate synthetic spectra of cataclysmic variables, is being further extended to include synthetic photometry of ordinary binary stars in addition to binary stars with optically thick accretion disks. The package includes a capability for differentials correction optimization of eclipsing binary systems using synthetic photometry.

  18. The LCDROOT Analysis Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    The North American Linear Collider Detector group has developed simulation and analysis program packages. LCDROOT is one of the packages, and is based on ROOT and the C++ programing language to maximally benefit from object oriented programming techniques. LCDROOT is constantly improved and now has a new topological vertex finder, ZVTOP3. In this proceeding, the features of the LCDROOT simulation are briefly described

  19. Grooming. Learning Activity Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Pamela

    This learning activity package on grooming for health workers is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  20. Waste package performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lester, D.H.; Stula, R.T.; Kirstein, B.E.

    1982-01-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been applied to several package designs. The resulting preliminary assessments were intended for use in making decisions about package development programs. A computer model called BARIER estimates the package life and subsequent rate of release of selected nuclides. The model accounts for temperature, pressure (and resulting stresses), bulk and localized corrosion, and nuclide retardation by the backfill after water intrusion into the waste form. The assessment model assumes a post-closure, flooded, geologic repository. Calculations indicated that, within the bounds of model assumptions, packages could last for several hundred years. Intact backfills of appropriate design may be capable of nuclide release delay times on the order of 10 7 yr for uranium, plutonium, and americium. 8 references, 6 figures, 9 tables

  1. RH Packaging Operations Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-01-01

    This procedure provides operating instructions for the RH-TRU 72-B Road Cask, Waste Shipping Package. In this document, ''Packaging'' refers to the assembly of components necessary to ensure compliance with the packaging requirements (not loaded with a payload). ''Package'' refers to a Type B packaging that, with its radioactive contents, is designed to retain the integrity of its containment and shielding when subject to the normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident test conditions set forth in 10 CFR Part 71. Loading of the RH 72-B cask can be done two ways, on the RH cask trailer in the vertical position or by removing the cask from the trailer and loading it in a facility designed for remote-handling (RH). Before loading the 72-B cask, loading procedures and changes to the loading procedures for the 72-B cask must be sent to CBFO at sitedocuments at wipp.ws for approval

  2. Advanced flip chip packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Yi-Shao; Wong, CP

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Flip Chip Packaging presents past, present and future advances and trends in areas such as substrate technology, material development, and assembly processes. Flip chip packaging is now in widespread use in computing, communications, consumer and automotive electronics, and the demand for flip chip technology is continuing to grow in order to meet the need for products that offer better performance, are smaller, and are environmentally sustainable. This book also: Offers broad-ranging chapters with a focus on IC-package-system integration Provides viewpoints from leading industry executives and experts Details state-of-the-art achievements in process technologies and scientific research Presents a clear development history and touches on trends in the industry while also discussing up-to-date technology information Advanced Flip Chip Packaging is an ideal book for engineers, researchers, and graduate students interested in the field of flip chip packaging.

  3. Application of a layout/material handling design method to a furnace area in a 300 mm wafer fab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesen, P.M.C.; Renders, P.J.J.; Rooda, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    For many years, material handling within the semiconductor industry has become increasingly important. With the introduction of 300 mm wafer production, ergonomics and product safety become more critical. Therefore, the manufacturers of semiconductor wafer fabs are considering the automation of

  4. Probing photo-carrier collection efficiencies of individual silicon nanowire diodes on a wafer substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S W; Brönstrup, G; Shalev, G; Srivastava, S K; Bashouti, M Y; Döhler, G H; Christiansen, S H

    2014-07-21

    Vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) diodes are promising candidates for the integration into various opto-electronic device concepts for e.g. sensing or solar energy conversion. Individual SiNW p-n diodes have intensively been studied, but to date an assessment of their device performance once integrated on a silicon substrate has not been made. We show that using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a nano-manipulator and an optical fiber feed-through for tunable (wavelength, power using a tunable laser source) sample illumination, the dark and illuminated current-voltage (I-V) curve of individual SiNW diodes on the substrate wafer can be measured. Surprisingly, the I-V-curve of the serially coupled system composed of SiNW/wafers is accurately described by an equivalent circuit model of a single diode and diode parameters like series and shunting resistivity, diode ideality factor and photocurrent can be retrieved from a fit. We show that the photo-carrier collection efficiency (PCE) of the integrated diode illuminated with variable wavelength and intensity light directly gives insight into the quality of the device design at the nanoscale. We find that the PCE decreases for high light intensities and photocurrent densities, due to the fact that considerable amounts of photo-excited carriers generated within the substrate lead to a decrease in shunting resistivity of the SiNW diode and deteriorate its rectification. The PCE decreases systematically for smaller wavelengths of visible light, showing the possibility of monitoring the effectiveness of the SiNW device surface passivation using the shown measurement technique. The integrated device was pre-characterized using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), TCAD simulations and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements to validate the properties of the characterized material at the single SiNW diode level.

  5. Interim storage of radioactive waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report covers all the principal aspects of production and interim storage of radioactive waste packages. The latest design solutions of waste storage facilities and the operational experiences of developed countries are described and evaluated in order to assist developing Member States in decision making and design and construction of their own storage facilities. This report is applicable to any category of radioactive waste package prepared for interim storage, including conditioned spent fuel, high level waste and sealed radiation sources. This report addresses the following issues: safety principles and requirements for storage of waste packages; treatment and conditioning methods for the main categories of radioactive waste; examples of existing interim storage facilities for LILW, spent fuel and high level waste; operational experience of Member States in waste storage operations including control of storage conditions, surveillance of waste packages and observation of the behaviour of waste packages during storage; retrieval of waste packages from storage facilities; technical and administrative measures that will ensure optimal performance of waste packages subject to various periods of interim storage

  6. Packaging Printing Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  7. Consumer response to packaging design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, Nigel D.; Herpen, van Erica; Lans, van der Ivo A.; Ligthart, Tom N.; Trijp, van Hans C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Building on theories of cue utilization, this paper investigates whether and how packaging sustainability influences consumer perceptions, inferences and attitudes towards packaged products. A framework is tested in an empirical study among 249 students using soup products varying in packaging

  8. Innovative Approaches to Large Component Packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, A.; Hooper, M.; Posivak, E.; Sullivan, J.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal often times requires creative approaches in packaging design, especially for large components. Innovative design techniques are required to meet the needs for handling, transporting, and disposing of these large packages. Large components (i.e., Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) heads and even RPVs themselves) require special packaging for shielding and contamination control, as well as for transport and disposal. WMG Inc designed and used standard packaging for RPV heads without control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) attached for five RPV heads and has also more recently met an even bigger challenge and developed the innovative Intact Vessel Head Transport System (IVHTS) for RPV heads with CRDMs intact. This packaging system has been given a manufacturer's exemption by the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) for packaging RPV heads. The IVHTS packaging has now been successfully used at two commercial nuclear power plants. Another example of innovative packaging is the large component packaging that WMG designed, fabricated, and utilized at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). In 2002, West Valley's high-level waste vitrification process was shut down in preparation for D and D of the West Valley Vitrification Facility. Three of the major components of concern within the Vitrification Facility were the Melter, the Concentrate Feed Makeup Tank (CFMT), and the Melter Feed Holdup Tank (MFHT). The removal, packaging, and disposition of these three components presented significant radiological and handling challenges for the project. WMG designed, fabricated, and installed special packaging for the transport and disposal of each of these three components, which eliminated an otherwise time intensive and costly segmentation process that WVDP was considering. Finally, WMG has also designed and fabricated special packaging for both the Connecticut Yankee (CY) and San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) RPVs. This paper

  9. Packaging Concerns/Techniques for Large Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews packaging challenges and options for electronic parts. The presentation includes information about non-hermetic packages, space challenges for packaging and complex package variations.

  10. Hermeticity of electronic packages

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhouse, Hal; Romenesco, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This is a book about the integrity of sealed packages to resist foreign gases and liquids penetrating the seal or an opening (crack) in the packageùespecially critical to the reliability and longevity of electronics. The author explains how to predict the reliability and the longevity of the packages based on leak rate measurements and the assumptions of impurities. Non-specialists in particular will benefit from the author's long involvement in the technology. Hermeticity is a subject that demands practical experience, and solving one problem does not necessarily give one the background to so

  11. Hermeticity of electronic packages

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhouse, Hal

    2000-01-01

    This is a book about the integrity of sealed packages to resist foreign gases and liquids penetrating the seal or an opening (crack) in the package-especially critical to the reliability and longevity of electronics. The author explains how to predict the reliability and the longevity of the packages based on leak rate measurements and the assumptions of impurities. Non-specialists in particular will benefit from the author's long involvement in the technology. Hermeticity is a subject that demands practical experience, and solving one problem does not necessarily give one the background to so

  12. Effect of nanoscale surface roughness on the bonding energy of direct-bonded silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, N.; Spearing, S. M.

    2003-11-01

    Direct wafer bonding of silicon wafers is a promising technology for manufacturing three-dimensional complex microelectromechanical systems as well as silicon-on-insulator substrates. Previous work has reported that the bond quality declines with increasing surface roughness, however, this relationship has not been quantified. This article explicitly correlates the bond quality, which is quantified by the apparent bonding energy, and the surface morphology via the bearing ratio, which describes the area of surface lying above a given depth. The apparent bonding energy is considered to be proportional to the real area of contact. The effective area of contact is defined as the area sufficiently close to contribute to the attractive force between the two bonding wafers. Experiments were conducted with silicon wafers whose surfaces were roughened by a buffered oxide etch solution (BOE, HF:NH4F=1:7) and/or a potassium hydroxide solution. The surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. The wafers were direct bonded to polished "monitor" wafers following a standard RCA cleaning and the resulting bonding energy was measured by the crack-opening method. The experimental results revealed a clear correlation between the bonding energy and the bearing ratio. A bearing depth of ˜1.4 nm was found to be appropriate for the characterization of direct-bonded silicon at room temperature, which is consistent with the thickness of the water layer at the interface responsible for the hydrogen bonds that link the mating wafers.

  13. Edge printability: techniques used to evaluate and improve extreme wafer edge printability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bill; Demmert, Cort; Jekauc, Igor; Tiffany, Jason P.

    2004-05-01

    The economics of semiconductor manufacturing have forced process engineers to develop techniques to increase wafer yield. Improvements in process controls and uniformities in all areas of the fab have reduced film thickness variations at the very edge of the wafer surface. This improved uniformity has provided the opportunity to consider decreasing edge exclusions, and now the outermost extents of the wafer must be considered in the yield model and expectations. These changes have increased the requirements on lithography to improve wafer edge printability in areas that previously were not even coated. This has taxed all software and hardware components used in defining the optical focal plane at the wafer edge. We have explored techniques to determine the capabilities of extreme wafer edge printability and the components of the systems that influence this printability. We will present current capabilities and new detection techniques and the influence that the individual hardware and software components have on edge printability. We will show effects of focus sensor designs, wafer layout, utilization of dummy edge fields, the use of non-zero overlay targets and chemical/optical edge bead optimization.

  14. Towards ultra-thin plasmonic silicon wafer solar cells with minimized efficiency loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Stokes, Nicholas; Jia, Baohua; Fan, Shanhui; Gu, Min

    2014-05-13

    The cost-effectiveness of market-dominating silicon wafer solar cells plays a key role in determining the competiveness of solar energy with other exhaustible energy sources. Reducing the silicon wafer thickness at a minimized efficiency loss represents a mainstream trend in increasing the cost-effectiveness of wafer-based solar cells. In this paper we demonstrate that, using the advanced light trapping strategy with a properly designed nanoparticle architecture, the wafer thickness can be dramatically reduced to only around 1/10 of the current thickness (180 μm) without any solar cell efficiency loss at 18.2%. Nanoparticle integrated ultra-thin solar cells with only 3% of the current wafer thickness can potentially achieve 15.3% efficiency combining the absorption enhancement with the benefit of thinner wafer induced open circuit voltage increase. This represents a 97% material saving with only 15% relative efficiency loss. These results demonstrate the feasibility and prospect of achieving high-efficiency ultra-thin silicon wafer cells with plasmonic light trapping.

  15. Safety Analysis Report - Packages, 9965, 9968, 9972-9975 Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, P.

    2000-01-01

    This Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) documents the analysis and testing performed on four type B Packages: the 9972, 9973, 9974, and 9975 packages. Because all four packages have similar designs with very similar performance characteristics, all of them are presented in a single SARP. The performance evaluation presented in this SARP documents the compliance of the 9975 package with the regulatory safety requirements. Evaluations of the 9972, 9973, and 9974 packages support that of the 9975. To avoid confusion arising from the inclusion of four packages in a single document, the text segregates the data for each package in such a way that the reader interested in only one package can progress from Chapter 1 through Chapter 9. The directory at the beginning of each chapter identifies each section that should be read for a given package. Sections marked ''all'' are generic to all packages

  16. Completion of Level 4 Milestone M4AT-15OR2301039 for the Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements Work Package AT-15OR230103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-14

    This memorandum constitutes our September 2015 level 4 milestone for the project entitled “Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements” and satisfies the Milestone/Activity (Conclude HFIR field demonstration of JNT prototype). The progress summary describes the work performed to complete the subject milestone.

  17. Hydrogel-forming microneedles prepared from "super swelling" polymers combined with lyophilised wafers for transdermal drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Donnelly

    Full Text Available We describe, for the first time, hydrogel-forming microneedle arrays prepared from "super swelling" polymeric compositions. We produced a microneedle formulation with enhanced swelling capabilities from aqueous blends containing 20% w/w Gantrez S-97, 7.5% w/w PEG 10,000 and 3% w/w Na2CO3 and utilised a drug reservoir of a lyophilised wafer-like design. These microneedle-lyophilised wafer compositions were robust and effectively penetrated skin, swelling extensively, but being removed intact. In in vitro delivery experiments across excised neonatal porcine skin, approximately 44 mg of the model high dose small molecule drug ibuprofen sodium was delivered in 24 h, equating to 37% of the loading in the lyophilised reservoir. The super swelling microneedles delivered approximately 1.24 mg of the model protein ovalbumin over 24 h, equivalent to a delivery efficiency of approximately 49%. The integrated microneedle-lyophilised wafer delivery system produced a progressive increase in plasma concentrations of ibuprofen sodium in rats over 6 h, with a maximal concentration of approximately 179 µg/ml achieved in this time. The plasma concentration had fallen to 71±6.7 µg/ml by 24 h. Ovalbumin levels peaked in rat plasma after only 1 hour at 42.36±17.01 ng/ml. Ovalbumin plasma levels then remained almost constant up to 6 h, dropping somewhat at 24 h, when 23.61±4.84 ng/ml was detected. This work represents a significant advancement on conventional microneedle systems, which are presently only suitable for bolus delivery of very potent drugs and vaccines. Once fully developed, such technology may greatly expand the range of drugs that can be delivered transdermally, to the benefit of patients and industry. Accordingly, we are currently progressing towards clinical evaluations with a range of candidate molecules.

  18. Thermal stress during RTP processes and its possible effect on the light induced degradation in Cz-Si wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhlane, Yacine; Bouhafs, Djoudi; Khelifati, Nabil; Guenda, Abdelkader; Demagh, Nacer-Eddine; Demagh, Assia; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Mezghiche, Salah; Hetatache, Warda; Derkaoui, Fahima; Nasraoui, Chahinez; Nwadiaru, Ogechi Vivian

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the carrier lifetime variation of p-type boron-doped Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) wafers was investigated after a direct rapid thermal processing (RTP). Two wafers were passivated by silicon nitride (SiNx:H) layers, deposited by a PECVD system on both surfaces. Then the wafers were subjected to an RTP cycle at a peak temperature of 620 °C. The first wafer was protected (PW) from the direct radiative heating of the RTP furnace by placing the wafer between two as-cut Cz-Si shield wafers during the heat processing. The second wafer was not protected (NPW) and followed the same RTP cycle procedure. The carrier lifetime τ eff was measured using the QSSPC technique before and after illumination for 5 h duration at 0.5 suns. The immediate results of the measured lifetime (τ RTP ) after the RTP process have shown a regeneration in the lifetime of the two wafers with the PW wafer exhibiting an important enhancement in τ RTP as compared to the NPW wafer. The QSSPC measurements have indicated a good stable lifetime (τ d ) and a weak degradation effect was observed in the case of the PW wafer as compared to their initial lifetime value. Interferometry technique analyses have shown an enhancement in the surface roughness for the NPW wafer as compared to the protected one. Additionally, to improve the correlation between the RTP heat radiation stress and the carrier lifetime behavior, a simulation of the thermal stress and temperature profile using the finite element method on the wafers surface at RTP peak temperature of 620 °C was performed. The results confirm the reduction of the thermal stress with less heat losses for the PW wafer. Finally, the proposed method can lead to improving the lifetime of wafers by an RTP process at minimum energy costs.

  19. London 2012 packaging guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    These guidelines are intended to provide supplemental advice to suppliers and licensees regarding the provisions of the LOCOG Sustainable Sourcing Code that relate to packaging design and materials selection.

  20. Type B Drum packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, W.S.

    1995-11-01

    The Type B Drum package is a container in which a single drum containing Type B quantities of radioactive material will be packaged for shipment. The Type B Drum containers are being developed to fill a void in the packaging and transportation capabilities of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as no double containment packaging for single drums of Type B radioactive material is currently available. Several multiple-drum containers and shielded casks presently exist. However, the size and weight of these containers present multiple operational challenges for single-drum shipments. The Type B Drum containers will offer one unshielded version and, if needed, two shielded versions, and will provide for the option of either single or double containment. The primary users of the Type B Drum container will be any organization with a need to ship single drums of Type B radioactive material. Those users include laboratories, waste retrieval facilities, emergency response teams, and small facilities

  1. Food irradiation and packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcast, David

    1988-01-01

    This outline review was written for 'Food Manufacture'. It deals with the known effects of irradiation on current packaging materials (glass, cellulosics, organic polymers and metals), and their implications for the effective application of the process. (U.K.)

  2. FLEXIBLE FOOD PACKAGING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains equipment to fabricate and test prototype packages of many types and sizes (e.g., bags, pouches, trays, cartons, etc.). This equipment can...

  3. BCRA R Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    BCRA is an R package that projects absolute risk of invasive breast cancer according to NCI’s Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) algorithm for specified race/ethnic groups and age intervals.

  4. TXRF with synchrotron radiation. Analysis of Ni on Si-wafer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wobrauschek, P [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Kregsamer, P [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Ladisich, W [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Streli, C [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Vienna (Austria); Pahlke, S [Wacker Chemitronic GmbH, D-84479 Burghausen (Germany); Fabry, L [Wacker Chemitronic GmbH, D-84479 Burghausen (Germany); Garbe, S [Institut fuer Anorg. u. Angew. Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg, Martin-Luther King-Pl.6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Haller, M [Institut fuer Anorg. u. Angew. Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg, Martin-Luther King-Pl.6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Knoechel, A [Institut fuer Anorg. u. Angew. Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg, Martin-Luther King-Pl.6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Radtke, M [Institut fuer Anorg. u. Angew. Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg, Martin-Luther King-Pl.6, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-09-11

    SR-TXRF (Synchrotron Radiation excited Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Analysis) with monoenergetic radiation produced by a W/C multilayer monochromator has been applied to the analysis of Ni on a Si-wafer surface. An intentionally contaminated wafer with 100 pg has been used to determine the detection limits. 13 fg have been achieved for Ni at a beam current of 73 mA and extrapolated to 1000 s. This technique simulates the sample preparation technique of Vapour Phase Decomposition (VPD) on a wafer surface. (orig.).

  5. TXRF with synchrotron radiation. Analysis of Ni on Si-wafer surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobrauschek, P.; Kregsamer, P.; Ladisich, W.; Streli, C.; Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L.; Garbe, S.; Haller, M.; Knoechel, A.; Radtke, M.

    1995-01-01

    SR-TXRF (Synchrotron Radiation excited Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Analysis) with monoenergetic radiation produced by a W/C multilayer monochromator has been applied to the analysis of Ni on a Si-wafer surface. An intentionally contaminated wafer with 100 pg has been used to determine the detection limits. 13 fg have been achieved for Ni at a beam current of 73 mA and extrapolated to 1000 s. This technique simulates the sample preparation technique of Vapour Phase Decomposition (VPD) on a wafer surface. (orig.)

  6. A modified occlusal wafer for managing partially dentate orthognathic patients--a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Bhavin Kiritkumar; Esmail, Zaid; Sharma, Pratik

    2015-03-01

    A multidisciplinary approach is essential in orthognathic surgery to achieve stable and successful outcomes. The model surgery planning is an important aspect in achieving the desired aims. An occlusal wafer used at the time of surgery aids the surgeon during correct placement of the jaws. When dealing with partially dentate patients, the design of the occlusal wafer requires modification to appropriately position the jaw. Two cases with partially dentate jaws are presented in which the occlusal wafer has been modified to provide stability at the time of surgery.

  7. The ENSDF Java Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonzogni, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    A package of computer codes has been developed to process and display nuclear structure and decay data stored in the ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File) library. The codes were written in an object-oriented fashion using the java language. This allows for an easy implementation across multiple platforms as well as deployment on web pages. The structure of the different java classes that make up the package is discussed as well as several different implementations

  8. Energy and packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boustead, I; Hancock, G F

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on the energy and raw materials required in the production and use of containers used to package beer, cider, and carbonated soft drinks in the United Kingdom. Topics covered include: methodology of energy analysis, primary and secondary fuels, transport, packaging materials, including glass, aluminum, iron, steel, and tinplate, container production, including plastic bottles, distribution of empty containers, filling and packing, distribution, and disposal. (LEW)

  9. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the WIPP management and operating (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document provides the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs

  10. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT Shipping Package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the SARP and/or C of C shall govern. C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SAR P charges the WIPP Management and Operation (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 CFR 71.11. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. This document details the instructions to be followed to operate, maintain, and test the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packaging. The intent of these instructions is to standardize these operations. All users will follow these instructions or equivalent instructions that assure operations are safe and meet the requirements of the SARPs

  11. Comparative Packaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele H.; Oziomek, Thomas V.

    2009-01-01

    Future long duration manned space flights beyond low earth orbit will require the food system to remain safe, acceptable and nutritious. Development of high barrier food packaging will enable this requirement by preventing the ingress and egress of gases and moisture. New high barrier food packaging materials have been identified through a trade study. Practical application of this packaging material within a shelf life test will allow for better determination of whether this material will allow the food system to meet given requirements after the package has undergone processing. The reason to conduct shelf life testing, using a variety of packaging materials, stems from the need to preserve food used for mission durations of several years. Chemical reactions that take place during longer durations may decrease food quality to a point where crew physical or psychological well-being is compromised. This can result in a reduction or loss of mission success. The rate of chemical reactions, including oxidative rancidity and staling, can be controlled by limiting the reactants, reducing the amount of energy available to drive the reaction, and minimizing the amount of water available. Water not only acts as a media for microbial growth, but also as a reactant and means by which two reactants may come into contact with each other. The objective of this study is to evaluate three packaging materials for potential use in long duration space exploration missions.

  12. A metallic buried interconnect process for through-wafer interconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Herrault, Florian; Allen, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design, fabrication process and experimental results of electroplated metal interconnects buried at the bottom of deep silicon trenches with vertical sidewalls. A manual spray-coating process along with a unique trench-formation process has been developed for the electroplating of a metal interconnection structure at the bottom surface of the deep trenches. The silicon etch process combines the isotropic dry etch process and conventional Bosch process to fabricate a deep trench with angled top-side edges and vertical sidewalls. The resulting trench structure, in contrast to the trenches fabricated by wet anisotropic etching, enables spray-coated photoresist patterning with good sidewall and top-side edge coverage while maintaining the ability to form a high-density array of deep trenches without excessive widening of the trench opening. A photoresist spray-coating process was developed and optimized for the formation of electroplating mold at the bottom of 300 µm deep trenches having vertical sidewalls. A diluted positive tone photoresist with relatively high solid content and multiple coating with baking between coating steps has been experimentally proven to provide high quality sidewall and edge coverage. To validate the buried interconnect approach, a three-dimensional daisy chain structure having a buried interconnect as the bottom connector and traces on the wafer surface as the top conductor has been designed and fabricated

  13. Effects of γ-irradiation on caprolactam level from multilayer PA-6 films for food packaging: Development and validation of a gas chromatographic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Henrique Peres; Felix, Juliana Silva; Manzoli, Jose Eduardo; Padula, Marisa; Monteiro, Magali

    2008-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method to determine caprolactam in multilayer PA-6 films used for meat foodstuffs and cheese was developed and validated. A wide linear range (0.8-400 μg/ml), RSD≤4.1% and recovery higher than 90.0% were obtained for the chromatographic system, while precision and accuracy of the method showed RSD≤3.8%, recovery from 95.5-100.0% and LOQ of 32 μg/g. Irradiated (3, 7 and 12 kGy) and non-irradiated commercial films were analyzed. Most of them increased caprolactam levels with the increase of irradiation doses

  14. Modeling for speciation of radionuclides in waste packages with high-level radioactive wastes; Modellierung zur Speziation von Radionukliden in Abfallgebinden mit hoch radioaktiven Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyand, Torben; Bracke, Guido; Seher, Holger

    2016-10-15

    Based on a literature search on radioactive waste inventories adequate thermodynamic data for model inventories were derived for geochemical model calculations using PHREEQC in order to determine the solid phase composition of high-level radioactive wastes in different containers. The calculations were performed for different model inventories (PWR-MOX, PWR-UO2, BWR-MOX, BMR-UO2) assuming intact containers under reduction conditions. The effect of a defect in the container on the solid phase composition was considered in variation calculations assuming air contact induced oxidation.

  15. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on caprolactam level from multilayer PA-6 films for food packaging: Development and validation of a gas chromatographic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Henrique Peres; Felix, Juliana Silva [Department of Food and Nutrition, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sao Paulo State University, PO Box 502, 14801-902 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Manzoli, Jose Eduardo [Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Padula, Marisa [Packaging Technology Center/Food Technology Institute (CETEA/ITAL), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Monteiro, Magali [Department of Food and Nutrition, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sao Paulo State University, PO Box 502, 14801-902 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: monteiro@fcfar.unesp.br

    2008-07-15

    A gas chromatographic method to determine caprolactam in multilayer PA-6 films used for meat foodstuffs and cheese was developed and validated. A wide linear range (0.8-400 {mu}g/ml), RSD{<=}4.1% and recovery higher than 90.0% were obtained for the chromatographic system, while precision and accuracy of the method showed RSD{<=}3.8%, recovery from 95.5-100.0% and LOQ of 32 {mu}g/g. Irradiated (3, 7 and 12 kGy) and non-irradiated commercial films were analyzed. Most of them increased caprolactam levels with the increase of irradiation doses.

  16. 1366 Project Automate: Enabling Automation for <$0.10/W High-Efficiency Kerfless Wafers Manufactured in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies, Bedford, MA (United States)

    2017-05-10

    For photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing to thrive in the U.S., there must be an innovative core to the technology. Project Automate builds on 1366’s proprietary Direct Wafer® kerfless wafer technology and aims to unlock the cost and efficiency advantages of thin kerfless wafers. Direct Wafer is an innovative, U.S.-friendly (efficient, low-labor content) manufacturing process that addresses the main cost barrier limiting silicon PV cost-reductions – the 35-year-old grand challenge of manufacturing quality wafers (40% of the cost of modules) without the cost and waste of sawing. This simple, scalable process will allow 1366 to manufacture “drop-in” replacement wafers for the $10 billion silicon PV wafer market at 50% of the cost, 60% of the capital, and 30% of the electricity of conventional casting and sawing manufacturing processes. This SolarMat project developed the Direct Wafer processes’ unique capability to tailor the shape of wafers to simultaneously make thinner AND stronger wafers (with lower silicon usage) that enable high-efficiency cell architectures. By producing wafers with a unique target geometry including a thick border (which determines handling characteristics) and thin interior regions (which control light capture and electron transport and therefore determine efficiency), 1366 can simultaneously improve quality and lower cost (using less silicon).

  17. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the pplication.' They further state: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations

  18. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' They further state: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations

  19. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' It further states: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M and O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1.8, 'Deliberate Misconduct.' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, 'Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material,' certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, 'Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance,' regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these

  20. RH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this program guidance document is to provide the technical requirements for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of the RH-TRU 72-B Waste Shipping Package (also known as the 'RH-TRU 72-B cask') and directly related components. This document complies with the requirements as specified in the RH-TRU 72-B Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9212. If there is a conflict between this document and the SARP and/or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of C states: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' It further states: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP tasks the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Management and Operating (M and O) Contractor with assuring the packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8, 'Deliberate Misconduct.' Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, 'Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material,' certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21, 'Reporting of Defects and Noncompliance,' regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous

  1. Methodology For Reduction Of Sampling On The Visual Inspection Of Developed And Etched Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Jamie S.; Khorasani, Fred

    1989-07-01

    There is a lot of inspection in the manufacturing of semiconductor devices. Generally, the more important a manufacturing step, the higher is the level of inspection. In some cases 100% of the wafers are inspected after certain steps. Inspection is a non-value added and expensive activity. It requires an army of "inspectors," often times expensive equipment and becomes a "bottle neck" when the level of inspection is high. Although inspection helps identify quality problems, it hurts productivity. The new management, quality and productivity philosophies recommend against over inspection. [Point #3 in Dr. Deming's 14 Points for Management (1)] 100% inspection is quite unnecessary . Often the nature of a process allows us to reduce inspection drastically and still maintain a high level of confidence in quality. In section 2, we discuss such situations and show that some elementary probability theory allows us to determine sample sizes and measure the chances of catching a bad "lot" and accepting a good lot. In section 3, we provide an example and application of the theory, and make a few comments on money and time saved because of this work. Finally, in section 4, we draw some conclusions about the new quality and productivity philosophies and how applied statisticians and engineers should study every situation individually and avoid blindly using methods and tables given in books.

  2. Application of GA package in functional packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, D. A.; Noskova, E. E.; Kapulin, D. V.

    2018-05-01

    The approach to application program for the task of configuration of the elements of the commutation circuit for design of the radio-electronic equipment on the basis of the genetic algorithm is offered. The efficiency of the used approach for commutation circuits with different characteristics for computer-aided design on radio-electronic manufacturing is shown. The prototype of the computer-aided design subsystem on the basis of a package GA for R with a set of the general functions for optimization of multivariate models is programmed.

  3. Characterization and control of wafer charging effects during high-current ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current, M.I.; Lukaszek, W.; Dixon, W.; Vella, M.C.; Messick, C.; Shideler, J.; Reno, S.

    1994-02-01

    EEPROM-based sense and memory devices provide direct measures of the charge flow and potentials occurring on the surface of wafers during ion beam processing. Sensor design and applications for high current ion implantation are discussed

  4. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: ''each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' They further state: ''each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.'' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.

  5. Food Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The photos show a few of the food products packaged in Alure, a metallized plastic material developed and manufactured by St. Regis Paper Company's Flexible Packaging Division, Dallas, Texas. The material incorporates a metallized film originally developed for space applications. Among the suppliers of the film to St. Regis is King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Ma'ssachusetts. Initially used by NASA as a signal-bouncing reflective coating for the Echo 1 communications satellite, the film was developed by a company later absorbed by King-Seeley. The metallized film was also used as insulating material for components of a number of other spacecraft. St. Regis developed Alure to meet a multiple packaging material need: good eye appeal, product protection for long periods and the ability to be used successfully on a wide variety of food packaging equipment. When the cost of aluminum foil skyrocketed, packagers sought substitute metallized materials but experiments with a number of them uncovered problems; some were too expensive, some did not adequately protect the product, some were difficult for the machinery to handle. Alure offers a solution. St. Regis created Alure by sandwiching the metallized film between layers of plastics. The resulting laminated metallized material has the superior eye appeal of foil but is less expensive and more easily machined. Alure effectively blocks out light, moisture and oxygen and therefore gives the packaged food long shelf life. A major packaging firm conducted its own tests of the material and confirmed the advantages of machinability and shelf life, adding that it runs faster on machines than materials used in the past and it decreases product waste; the net effect is increased productivity.

  6. Generalized waste package containment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Apted, M.J.

    1985-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a performance assessment strategy to demonstrate compliance with standards and technical requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in geologic repositories. One aspect of this strategy is the development of a unified performance model of the entire geologic repository system. Details of a generalized waste package containment (WPC) model and its relationship with other components of an overall repository model are presented in this paper. The WPC model provides stochastically determined estimates of the distributions of times-to-failure of the barriers of a waste package by various corrosion mechanisms and degradation processes. The model consists of a series of modules which employ various combinations of stochastic (probabilistic) and mechanistic process models, and which are individually designed to reflect the current state of knowledge. The WPC model is designed not only to take account of various site-specific conditions and processes, but also to deal with a wide range of site, repository, and waste package configurations. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Solidified package-storage device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takakura, Masahide

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification products such as high level radioactive liquid wastes are contained in a solidification package. A containing tube for vertically containing the solidification packages in multi-stages is disposed such that it passes through a ceiling slab. A shielding plug for preventing leakage of radiation from the solidification packages is fitted to an upper opening thereof. A lid of the containing tube is fitted above the plug. The lid is a carbon steel plate having a thickness of 10cm or more. A heat insulation layer comprising glass wool or rock wool is formed on the lower surface of the ceiling slab. A radiation shielding layer comprising such as an iron plate is formed on the lower surface of the heat insulation layer. Then, deterioration of the ceiling slug by heat can be prevented by the heat insulation layer even if high temperature cooling air flown from the upper opening of a ventilation tube should reach the lower surface of the ceiling slab. (I.N.)

  8. Glass packages in interim storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO 2 . The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ''source term'' models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs

  9. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-01-01

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational

  10. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-07-12

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety

  11. Food packages for Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohey, M. F.; Sauer, R. L.; Westover, J. B.; Rockafeller, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews food packaging techniques used in space flight missions and describes the system developed for the Space Shuttle. Attention is directed to bite-size food cubes used in Gemini, Gemini rehydratable food packages, Apollo spoon-bowl rehydratable packages, thermostabilized flex pouch for Apollo, tear-top commercial food cans used in Skylab, polyethylene beverage containers, Skylab rehydratable food package, Space Shuttle food package configuration, duck-bill septum rehydration device, and a drinking/dispensing nozzle for Space Shuttle liquids. Constraints and testing of packaging is considered, a comparison of food package materials is presented, and typical Shuttle foods and beverages are listed.

  12. Fabrication of etched facets and vertical couplers in InP for packaging and on-wafer test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemos Alvares Dos Santos, Rui; D'Agostino, D.; Soares, F. M.; Haghighi, H. Rabbani; Williams, K. A.; Leijtens, X. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, the fabrication and the characterization of angled and straight etched facets in InP-based technology are reported. In addition, we report on etched facets combined with coupler mirrors for vertical outcoupling, realized with a wet-etching process.

  13. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, YuPo J [Naperville, IL; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  14. Silicon wafer wettability and aging behaviors: Impact on gold thin-film morphology

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoming; Zhong, Zhaowei; Diallo, Elhadj; Wang, Zhihong; Yue, Weisheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the wettability and aging behaviors of the silicon wafers that had been cleaned using a piranha (3:1 mixture of sulfuric acid (H2SO4, 96%) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O 2, 30%), 120 °C), SC1 (1:1:5 mixture of NH4OH, H 2O2 and H2O, at 80°C) or HF solution (6 parts of 40% NH4F and 1 part of 49% HF, at room temperature) solution, and treated with gaseous plasma. The silicon wafers cleaned using the piranha or SC1 solution were hydrophilic, and the water contact angles on the surfaces would increase along with aging time, until they reached the saturated points of around 70°. The contact angle increase rate of these wafers in a vacuum was much faster than that in the open air, because of loss of water, which was physically adsorbed on the wafer surfaces. The silicon wafers cleaned with the HF solution were hydrophobic. Their contact angle decreased in the atmosphere, while it increased in the vacuum up to 95°. Gold thin films deposited on the hydrophilic wafers were smoother than that deposited on the hydrophobic wafers, because the numerous oxygen groups formed on the hydrophilic surfaces would react with gold adatoms in the sputtering process to form a continuous thin film at the nucleation stage. The argon, nitrogen, oxygen gas plasma treatments could change the silicon wafer surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by creating a thin (around 2.5 nm) silicon dioxide film, which could be utilized to improve the roughness and adhesion of the gold thin film. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fabrication of high aspect ratio through-wafer copper interconnects by reverse pulse electroplating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Changdong; Zhang, Tong-Yi; Xu, Hui

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to fabricate high aspect ratio through-wafer copper interconnects by a simple reverse pulse electroplating technique. High aspect-ratio (∼18) through-wafer holes obtained by a two-step deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process exhibit a taper profile, which might automatically optimize the local current density distribution during the electroplating process, thereby achieving void-free high aspect-ratio copper vias

  16. Silicon wafer wettability and aging behaviors: Impact on gold thin-film morphology

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaoming

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports on the wettability and aging behaviors of the silicon wafers that had been cleaned using a piranha (3:1 mixture of sulfuric acid (H2SO4, 96%) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O 2, 30%), 120 °C), SC1 (1:1:5 mixture of NH4OH, H 2O2 and H2O, at 80°C) or HF solution (6 parts of 40% NH4F and 1 part of 49% HF, at room temperature) solution, and treated with gaseous plasma. The silicon wafers cleaned using the piranha or SC1 solution were hydrophilic, and the water contact angles on the surfaces would increase along with aging time, until they reached the saturated points of around 70°. The contact angle increase rate of these wafers in a vacuum was much faster than that in the open air, because of loss of water, which was physically adsorbed on the wafer surfaces. The silicon wafers cleaned with the HF solution were hydrophobic. Their contact angle decreased in the atmosphere, while it increased in the vacuum up to 95°. Gold thin films deposited on the hydrophilic wafers were smoother than that deposited on the hydrophobic wafers, because the numerous oxygen groups formed on the hydrophilic surfaces would react with gold adatoms in the sputtering process to form a continuous thin film at the nucleation stage. The argon, nitrogen, oxygen gas plasma treatments could change the silicon wafer surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic by creating a thin (around 2.5 nm) silicon dioxide film, which could be utilized to improve the roughness and adhesion of the gold thin film. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' They further state: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant| (WIPP) management and operating (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations(CFR) 71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations

  18. CH Packaging Program Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II), a HalfPACT shipping package, and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), HalfPACT SARP, and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificates of Compliance (C of C) 9218 and 9279, respectively. In the event of a conflict between this document and the SARP or C of C, the C of C shall govern. The C of Cs state: 'each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.' They further state: 'each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the Application.' Chapter 9.0 of the SARP charges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) management and operating (M and O) contractor with assuring packaging is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. Because the packaging is NRC-approved, users need to be familiar with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 71.8. Any time a user suspects or has indications that the conditions of approval in the C of C were not met, the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) shall be notified immediately. The CBFO will evaluate the issue and notify the NRC if required.In accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, certificate holders, packaging users, and contractors or subcontractors who use, design, fabricate, test, maintain, or modify the packaging shall post copies of (1) 10 CFR Part 21 regulations, (2) Section 206 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, and (3) NRC Form 3, Notice to Employees. These documents must be posted in a conspicuous location where the activities subject to these regulations

  19. Welding robot package; Arc yosetsu robot package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, S. [Yaskawa Electric Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the conventional high-speed welding robot, the welding current was controlled mainly for reducing the spatters during short circuits and for stabilizing the beads by the periodic short circuits. However, an increase of deposition amount in response to the speed is required for the high-speed welding. Large-current low-spatter welding current region control was added. Units were integrated into a package by which the arc length is kept in short without dispersion of arc length for welding without defects such as undercut and unequal beads. In automobile industry, use of aluminum parts is extended for the light weight. The welding is very difficult, and automation is not so progressing in spite of the poor environment. Buckling of welding wire is easy to occur, and supply of wire is obstructed by the deposition of chipped powders on the torch cable, which stay within the contact chip resulting in the deposition. Dislocation of locus is easy to occur at the corner of rectangular pipe during the welding. By improving these troubles, an aluminum MIG welding robot package has been developed. 13 figs.

  20. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a sublingual fentanyl wafer formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Stephen CB; Paech, Michael J; Sunderland, Bruce; Liu, Yandi

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to prepare a novel fentanyl wafer formulation by a freeze-drying method, and to evaluate its in vitro and in vivo release characteristics, including its bioavailability via the sublingual route. Methods The wafer formulation was prepared by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of fentanyl containing sodium carboxymethylcellulose and amylogum as matrix formers. Uniformity of weight, friability, and dissolution testing of the fentanyl wafer was achieved using standard methods, and the residual moisture content was measured. The fentanyl wafer was also examined using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The absolute bioavailability of the fentanyl wafer was evaluated in 11 opioid-naïve adult female patients using a randomized crossover design. Results In vitro release showed that almost 90% of the fentanyl dissolved in one minute. In vivo, the first detectable plasma fentanyl concentration was observed after 3.5 minutes and the peak plasma concentration between 61.5 and 67 minutes. The median absolute bioavailability was 53.0%. Conclusion These results indicate that this wafer has potential as an alternative sublingual fentanyl formulation. PMID:23596347