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Sample records for waardenburg syndrome type

  1. Waardenburg syndrome type 2: an orthodontic perspective.

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    Şuhani, Raluca Diana; Şuhani, Mihai Flaviu; Muntean, Alexandrina; Mesaroş, Michaela Florica; Badea, Mîndra Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare form of neurocristopathy. It is a disorder in the development of neural crest cells, caused by an altered cellular migration during the embryonic phase. That alteration causes an association of different abnormalities such as pigmentary disturbances of the hair, iris, skin, stria vascularis of the cochlea, dystopia canthorum and sensorineural hearing loss. We report a case of a 14-year-old Romanian male, with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome (mother) and Usher syndrome (father - congenitally sensorineural hearing loss and retinal degeneration). The case particularities are: the correlation between malocclusion and Waardenburg syndrome due to hypoplastic alae nasi and also factors that produced hearing loss, which could be Waardenburg syndrome, Usher syndrome or the presence of the connexin 26 (W24X) gene mutation.

  2. [Atypical manifestations in familial type 1 Waardenburg syndrome].

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    Sans, B; Calvas, P; Bazex, J

    1998-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an uncommon genetic disorder. Four clinical types are recognized. Three responsible genes have been identified (PAX 3: for type I syndrome, MITF and EDN3 for types II and IV respectively). We report the case of a patient with Waardenburg type I morphotype who had atypical neurological manifestations. Decisive elements for diagnosis were the presence of Waardenburg syndrome in the family and, in affected kin, a mutation causing a shift in PAX 3 gene reading. This case confirms the variability of Waardenburg signs within one family. The association of unusual neurological manifestations in the proband suggested that Vogt Koyanagi Harada disease may have been associated and may show some relationship with familial Waardenburg syndrome.

  3. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  4. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

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    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  5. Waardenburg syndrome

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    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  6. [Cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

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    Wan, Liangcai; Guo, Menghe; Chen, Shuaijun; Liu, Shuangriu; Chen, Hao; Gong, Jian

    2010-05-01

    To describe the multi-channel cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome including surgeries, pre and postoperative hearing assessments as well as outcomes of speech recognition. Multi-channel cochlear implantation surgeries have been performed in 12 cases with Waardenburg syndrome type II in our department from 2000 to 2008. All the patients received multi-channel cochlear implantation through transmastoid facial recess approach. The postoperative outcomes of 12 cases were compared with 12 cases with no inner ear malformation as a control group. The electrodes were totally inserted into the cochlear successfully, there was no facial paralysis and cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred after operation. The hearing threshold in this series were similar to that of the normal cochlear implantation. After more than half a year of speech rehabilitation, the abilities of speech discrimination and spoken language of all the patients were improved compared with that of preoperation. Multi-channel cochlear implantation could be performed in the cases with Waardenburg syndrome, preoperative hearing and images assessments should be done.

  7. Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in an african patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Otman S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A thirty six year-old African man, born in the Southern part of Libya, presented with congenital deafness and white forelock, variable-sized hypopigmented, depigmented patches and hyperpigmented islands within the areas of hypomelanosis affecting the upper parts of the trunk, both arms and forearms. The nasal root was hypertrophied, but there was a lack of lateral displacement of medial canthi. We report this case of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS 2. As no treatment is available for patients with WS 2, prompt diagnosis and referral to a hearing specialist are crucial for the normal development of patients affected with this condition.

  8. Germinal mosaicism of PAX3 mutation caused Waardenburg syndrome type I.

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    Chen, Kaitian; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zong, Ling; Jiang, Hongyan

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome mutations are most often recurrent or de novo. The rate of familial recurrence is low and families with several affected children are extremely rare. In this study, we aimed to clarify the underlying hereditary cause of Waardenburg syndrome type I in two siblings in a Chinese family, with a mother affected by prelingual mild hearing loss and a father who was negative for clinical symptoms of Waardenburg syndrome and had a normal hearing threshold. Complete characteristic features of the family members were recorded and genetic sequencing and parent-child relationship analyses were performed. The two probands were found to share double mutations in the PAX3/GJB2 genes that caused concurrent hearing loss in Waardenburg syndrome type I. Their mother carried the GJB2 c.109G > A homozygous mutation; however, neither the novel PAX3 c.592delG mutation, nor the Waardenburg syndrome phenotype, was observed in either parent. These previously unreported digenic mutations in PAX3/GJB2 resulted in deafness associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in this family. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing germinal mosaicism in Waardenburg syndrome. This concept is important because it complicates genetic counseling of this family regarding the risk of recurrence of the mutations in subsequent pregnancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  10. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome

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    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail. PMID:24351514

  11. Anisometropic amblyopia in a case of type 2 Waardenburg syndrome.

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    Akal, Ali; Göncü, Tugba; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Yılmaz, Ömer Faruk

    2013-12-18

    This study presents a case of an 8-year-old boy with iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia who was diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2. An ophthalmic examination revealed iris heterochromia and anisometropic amblyopia in our patient. In the systemic examination, a white forelock and vitiligo on the arms and body were observed and neurosensory hearing loss was revealed, for which the patient used hearing aids. Identification and typing of patients with WS is crucial to address neurosensory hearing loss, glaucoma and fundus changes. While it might be challenging to communicate with a patient with speech and hearing problems, visual acuity should be examined carefully and probable amblyopia should be identified. Anterior segment changes and signs of glaucoma should also be evaluated in detail.

  12. Case report: waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumayas, Grace Lea; Capó-Aponte, José E

    2015-03-01

    A case of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 is described and relevant literature is reviewed to raise awareness about this rare syndrome, including the classification of each subtype and the differentiating clinical manifestations. A 44-year-old African-American female presented for a routine evaluation with hearing loss, dystopia canthorum (W index = 2.74), and almost complete gray hair. In addition, she presented with heterochromia irides, different fundus pigmentation between eyes. The patient did not have any upper limbs defect, cranial skeletal abnormalities, or intestinal disorders. Facial abnormalities and a white forelock are prominent features difficult to overlook during a routine ophthalmological examination. A careful medical history in patients with suspected Waardenburg syndrome is important to accurately classify this rare condition and to identify potential systemic implications associated to each subtype. The associated systemic complications can be addressed and managed through referral to the appropriate subspecialties. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Waardenburg syndrome: clinical differentiation between types I and II.

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    Pardono, Eliete; van Bever, Yolande; van den Ende, Jenneke; Havrenne, Poti C; Iughetti, Paula; Maestrelli, Sylvia R P; Costa F, Orozimbo; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Frota-Pessoa, Oswaldo; Otto, Paulo A

    2003-03-15

    Here we present the results of a study performed on 59 patients affected by Waardenburg syndrome (WS), 30 with the I variant, 21 having the type II, and 8 of them being isolated cases without telecanthus. These patients belong to 37 families; the main contributions and conclusions are based on the detailed study of 25 of these families, examined using standard procedures. All patients were examined as to the presence of eight cardinal signs important for the diagnosis of the condition; from each patient, from many of his/her normal relatives, and from a control sample of 300 normal individuals stratified by age and sex, 23 different craniofacial measurements were obtained. We also estimated, using our own data as well those collected from the literature, the frequencies of the cardinal signs, based on a total sample of 461 affected individuals with WSI and 121 with WSII. In order to originate discriminant functions to separate individuals affected by one of the two variants, both metric (from craniofacial measurements) as well as categoric data (based on the frequencies of the cardinal signs or symptoms) were used. Discriminant analysis based on the frequency of the eight cardinal signs can improve the separation of WSI patients without telecanthus from those presenting the variant II. We present also a Table with the conditional probabilities favoring the diagnosis of WSI for suspect subjects without telecanthus and any combination of the other seven signs/symptoms. The discriminant function based on the four ocular measurements (inner and outer intercanthal, interpupillary, and inferior lacrymal distances), on the other side, perfectly classifies patients affected by one of the variants of WS, the same taking place when the average values of the W index of all affected individuals per family are used. The discriminant function based solely in the individual W index values of patients correctly classifies 93% of WSII subjects, but only 60% of the patients with the

  14. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

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    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rami, Mohamed; Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Afifi, My Abderrahmane; Youssef, Bouabdallah

    2013-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS) is a neurocristopathy and is characterized by Hirschsprung's disease (HD), deafness, and depigmentation of hairs, skin, and iris. Is a very rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression. This report describes a 4-day-old male newborn with Waardenburg's syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the colon and terminal ileum, and review the relevant literature for draws attention to the causal relationship between these two entities.

  15. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

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    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Images PMID:8423616

  16. Waardenburg syndrome and myelomeningocele in a family.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatkupt, S; Chatkupt, S; Johnson, W G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and myelomeningocele in which more than one subject was affected with both disorders. The possible association is discussed. Prenatal screening for myelomeningocele is suggested for a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

  17. Waardenburg syndrome type 3 (Klein-Waardenburg syndrome) segregating with a heterozygous deletion in the paired box domain of PAX3: a simple variant or a true syndrome?

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    Tekin, M; Bodurtha, J N; Nance, W E; Pandya, A

    2001-10-01

    Klein-Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg syndrome type 3 (WS-III; MIM 148820) is characterized by the presence of musculoskeletal abnormalities in association with clinical features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS-I). Since the description of the first patient in 1947 (D. Klein, Arch Klaus Stift Vererb Forsch 1947: 22: 336-342), a few cases have been reported. Only occasional families have demonstrated autosomal-dominant inheritance of WS-III. In a previous report, a missense mutation in the paired domain of the PAX3 gene has been described in a family with dominant segregation of WS-III. In this report, we present a second family (mother and son) with typical clinical findings of WS-III segregating with a heterozygous 13-bp deletion in the paired domain of the PAX3 gene. Although homozygosity or compound heterozygosity has also been documented in patients with severe limb involvement, a consistent genotype-phenotype correlation for limb abnormalities associated with heterozygous PAX3 mutations has not previously been apparent. Heterozygous mutations could either reflect a unique dominant-negative effect or possibly the contribution of other unlinked genetic modifiers in determining the phenotype.

  18. Because You Asked about Waardenburg Syndrome.

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    National Inst. on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet uses a question-and-answer format to provide information about Waardenburg syndrome, an inherited disorder often characterized by varying degrees of hearing loss and changes in skin and hair pigmentation. The pamphlet covers: causes of Waardenburg syndrome. characteristics, types, research being done, ways to help in research…

  19. [Clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

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    Yang, Shu-zhi; Yuan, Hui-jun; Bai, Lin-na; Cao, Ju-yang; Xu, Ye; Shen, Wei-dong; Ji, Fei; Yang, Wei-yan

    2005-10-12

    To investigate detailed clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome type 2. Members of this pedigree were interviewed to identify personal or family medical histories of hearing loss, the use of aminoglycosides, and other clinical abnormalities by filling questionnaire. The audiological and other clinical evaluations of the proband and other members of this family were conducted, including pure-tone audiometry, immittance and auditory brain-stem response and ophthalmological, dermatologic, hair, temporal bone CT examinations. This family is categorized as Waardenburg syndrome type 2 according to its clinical features. It's an autosomal dominant disorder with incomplete penetrance. The clinical features varied greatly among family members and characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia irides, freckle on the face and premature gray hair. Hearing loss can be unilateral or bilateral, congenital or late onset in this family. This Chinese family has some unique clinical features comparing with the international diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome. This study may provide some evidences to amend the diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome in Chinese population.

  20. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

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    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A de novo SOX10 mutation causing severe type 4 Waardenburg syndrome without Hirschsprung disease.

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    Sznajer, Yves; Coldéa, Cristina; Meire, Françoise; Delpierre, Isabelle; Sekhara, Tayeb; Touraine, Renaud L

    2008-04-15

    Type 4 Waardenburg syndrome represents a well define entity caused by neural crest derivatives anomalies (melanocytes, intrinsic ganglion cells, central, autonomous and peripheral nervous systems) leading, with variable expressivity, to pigmentary anomalies, deafness, mental retardation, peripheral neuropathy, and Hirschsprung disease. Autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is prevalent when Sox10 gene mutation is identified. We report the natural history of a child who presented with synophrys, vivid blue eye, deafness, bilateral complete semicircular canals agenesis with mental retardation, subtle signs for peripheral neuropathy and lack of Hirschsprung disease. SOX10 gene sequencing identified "de novo" splice site mutation (c.698-2A > C). The present phenotype and the genotype findings underline the wide spectrum of SOX10 gene implication in unusual type 4 Waardenburg syndrome patient. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

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    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism. PMID:27081571

  3. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism.

  4. A novel PAX3 mutation in a Japanese boy with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Yu; Doi, Rieko; Adachi, Kaori; Nanba, Eiji; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by hair hypopigmentation, abnormal iris pigmentation, and congenital hearing loss. WS1 is caused by mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). We identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.1107 C>G, p.Ser369Arg) in a Japanese WS1 patient showing abnormal right iris pigmentation, right-sided congenital hearing loss, synophrys, incomplete left cleft lip, and cryptorchidism.

  5. Mutations in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene cause Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) as well as Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I).

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, C F; Milunsky, A; Lipsky, N; Sheffer, R; Clarren, S K; Baldwin, C T

    1993-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS-I) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disturbances, and other developmental defects. Klein-Waardenburg syndrome (WS-III) is a disorder with many of the same characteristics as WS-I and includes musculoskeletal abnormalities. We have recently reported the identification and characterization of one of the first gene defects, in the human PAX3 gene, which causes WS-I. PAX3 is a DNA-binding ...

  6. [Visual diagnosis: Waardenburg syndrome].

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    Hager, T; Walter, H-S; Seitz, B; Käsmann-Kellner, B

    2010-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by a sensorineural hearing loss and pigment anomalies of the iris, skin and hair due to mutations in PAX3. WS can be subdivided into four groups according to major and minor clinical signs. We report the case of a 2 1/2-year-old coloured patient who presented in our department of paediatric ophthalmology for a syndrome search. The patient presented with hearing loss, brilliant blue iris colour and dystopia canthorum. The patient was slightly hypermetropic. Visual acuity was within normal limits according to the Cardiff acuity test. The ocular fundus examination revealed no abnormalities. According to the major and minor criteria defined by the Waardenburg consortium our patient showed the major criteria of WS1, i.e. hearing loss, hypopigmentation of the pigment epithelium of the iris and dystopic canthi. Diagnosis of WS is usually based on the clinical presentation. An additional molecular genetic analysis is possible.

  7. Waardenburg syndrome presenting with constipation since birth.

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    Gupta, R; Sharma, S B; Mathur, P; Agrawal, L D

    2014-12-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is Waardenburg syndrome associated with Hirschsprung's disease. A 10-day-old full-term male neonate of Waardenburg syndrome presented with constipation since birth along with features of small bowel obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy revealed distended proximal jejunal and ileal loops along with microcolon; an ileostomy was performed. Postoperatively patient developed sepsis and died. Histopathology confirmed total colonic aganglionosis. Suspect familial Shah-Waardenburg syndrome in a neonate of Waardenburg syndrome presenting with constipation since birth or intestinal obstruction.

  8. A PAX3 polymorphism (T315K) in a family exhibiting Waardenburg Syndrome type 2.

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    Wang, C; Kim, E; Attaie, A; Smith, T N; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1998-02-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder phenotypically characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances. Presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1 and results from defects in the PAX3 gene, whereas normally located medial canthi is characteristic of type 2 WS (WS2) and is associated with defects in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MIFT) gene. Here a neutral polymorphism is reported in the PAX3 gene (T315K) in a family with WS2. Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited

  9. Waardenburg syndrome type 4: report of two new cases caused by SOX10 mutations in Spain.

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    Fernández, Raquel M; Núñez-Ramos, Raquel; Enguix-Riego, M Valle; Román-Rodríguez, Francisco José; Galán-Gómez, Enrique; Blesa-Sánchez, Emilio; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Núñez-Núñez, Ramón; Borrego, Salud

    2014-02-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a neurocristopathy characterized by the association of deafness, depigmentation and Hirschsprung disease. Three disease-causing genes have been identified so far for WS4: EDNRB, EDN3, and SOX10. SOX10 mutations, found in 45-55% of WS4 patients, are inherited in autosomal dominant way. In addition, mutations in SOX10 are also responsible for an extended syndrome involving peripheral and central neurological phenotypes, referred to as PCWH (peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leucodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, Hirschsprung disease). Such mutations are mostly private, and a high intra- and inter-familial variability exists. In this report, we present a patient with WS4 and a second with PCWH due to SOX10 mutations supporting again the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of these syndromes. Interestingly, the WS4 family carries an insertion of 19 nucleotides in exon 5 of SOX10, which results in distinct phenotypes along three different generations: hypopigmentation in the maternal grandmother, hearing loss in the mother, and WS4 in the proband. Since mosaicism cannot explain the three different related-WS features observed in this family, we propose as the most plausible explanation the existence of additional molecular events, acting in an additive or multiplicative fashion, in genes or regulatory regions unidentified so far. On the other hand, the PCWH case was due to a de novo deletion in exon 5 of the gene. Efforts should be devoted to unravel the mechanisms underlying the intrafamilial phenotypic variability observed in the families affected, and to identify new genes responsible for the still unsolved WS4 cases. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hayrullah Alp; Esma Alp

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Auditory-pigmentary syndromes are a group of diseases that effect the skin, hair, eyes and the cochlea. Waardenburg syndrome is one of the members of these autosomal dominantly inherited diseases. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by white forelock, congenital sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmented skin and anomalies of the intraocular tissues. How ever all these diagnostic features may not be seen in all patient. In addition, there are four subtypes of the syndrome in ea...

  11. Alu-mediated deletion of SOX10 regulatory elements in Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurand, Nadége; Fouquet, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Lecerf, Laure; Loundon, Natalie; Goossens, Michel; Duriez, Benedicte; Labrune, Philippe; Pingault, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a rare neural crest disorder defined by the combination of Waardenburg syndrome (sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects) and Hirschsprung disease (intestinal aganglionosis). Three genes are known to be involved in this syndrome, that is, EDN3 (endothelin-3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), and SOX10. However, 15-35% of WS4 remains unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes could be involved and/or that mutations within known genes may have escaped previous screenings. Here, we searched for deletions within recently identified SOX10 regulatory sequences and describe the first characterization of a WS4 patient presenting with a large deletion encompassing three of these enhancers. Analysis of the breakpoint region suggests a complex rearrangement involving three Alu sequences that could be mediated by a FosTes/MMBIR replication mechanism. Taken together with recent reports, our results demonstrate that the disruption of highly conserved non-coding elements located within or at a long distance from the coding sequences of key genes can result in several neurocristopathies. This opens up new routes to the molecular dissection of neural crest disorders.

  12. Clinical and genetic investigation of families with type II Waardenburg syndrome.

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    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhou, Jianda; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type II in three families, in order to provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Relevant clinical examinations were conducted on the probands of the three pedigrees. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of paired box 3 (PAX3), microphthalmia‑associated transcription factor (MITF), sex‑determining region Y‑box 10 (SOX10) and snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. The heterozygous mutation, c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 1; however, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (MITF, SNAI2, SOX10 or PAX3) was detected in pedigrees 2 and 3. The heterozygous mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene is therefore considered the disease‑causing mutation in pedigree 1. However, there are novel disease‑causing genes in Waardenburg syndrome type II, which require further research.

  13. A novel mutation in PAX3 associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I in a Chinese family.

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    Xiao, Yun; Luo, Jianfen; Zhang, Fengguo; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Mingming; Ma, Yalin; Xu, Lei; Bai, Xiaohui; Wang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The novel compound heterozygous mutation in PAX3 was the key genetic reason for WS1 in this family, which was useful to the molecular diagnosis of WS1. Screening the pathogenic mutations in a four generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 4-year-old boy according to the Waardenburg syndrome Consortium criteria. The detailed family history revealed four affected members in the family. Routine clinical, audiological examination, and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on four affected and 10 healthy members in this family. The genetic analysis was conducted, including the targeted next-generation sequencing of 127 known deafness genes combined with Sanger sequencing, TA clone and bioinformatic analysis. A novel compound heterozygous mutation c.[169_170insC;172_174delAAG] (p.His57ProfsX55) was identified in PAX3, which was co-segregated with WS1 in the Chinese family. This mutation was absent in the unaffected family members and 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of Pax3 protein further confirmed that the novel compound heterozygous mutation was pathogenic.

  14. Three cases of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in a Korean family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Joong Hyuk; Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lee, Ki Hwang; Lew, Ho Min; Chang, Yoon-Hee

    2004-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances of the skin, hair, and iris, and other developmental defects such as lateral displacement of both medial canthi and lacrimal puncta called dystopia canthorum. While mutations of the PAX3 (paired box) gene have been identified in about 99% of WS type 1 cases, WS type 2 is a heterogeneous group, with about 15% of cases caused by mutations in microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF). We have experienced three cases of typical WS type 2 in a Korean family, for whom full ocular examination and genetic studies were performed. The genetic studies revealed no mutation in either PAX3 or MITF genes. The genetic basis, as yet unknown for most cases of WS type 2, might be found with further investigation.

  15. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    OpenAIRE

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one.

  16. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one. Images PMID:3712396

  17. Electrodiagnostic findings in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aiesha; Simmons, Zachary

    2009-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is associated with a variety of clinical features, which may include polyneuropathy. We describe a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 2 and provide detailed electrodiagnostic findings, thus complementing the biopsy data and brief descriptions of nerve conduction studies found in the literature.

  18. Cochlear implants in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Robert D; Zdanski, Carlton; Roush, Patricia; Brown, Carolyn; Teagle, Holly; Pillsbury, Harold C; Buchman, Craig

    2006-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal-dominant syndrome characterized by dystopia canthorum, hyperplasia of the eyebrows, heterochromia irides, a white forelock, and sensorineural hearing loss in 20% to 55% of patients. This patient population accounts for approximately 2% of congenitally deaf children. The purpose of this retrospective case review was to describe the outcomes for those children with Waardenburg syndrome who have undergone cochlear implantation. Pediatric cochlear implant recipients with documented evidence of Waardenburg syndrome underwent retrospective case review. All patients received their cochlear implants at the study institution followed by outpatient auditory habilitation. Charts were reviewed for etiology and duration of deafness, age at time of cochlear implantation, perioperative complications, duration of use, and performance outcomes. Results of standard tests batteries for speech perception and production administered as a part of the patients' auditory habilitation were reviewed. Seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome and cochlear implants were identified. The average age at implantation was 37 months (range, 18-64 months) and the average duration of use was 69 months (range, 12-143 months). All of these patients are active users of their devices and perform very well after implantation. There were no major complications in this small group of patients. Children with congenital sensorineural hearing loss without other comorbidities (e.g., developmental delay, inner ear malformations) perform well when they receive cochlear implantation and auditory habilitation. Patients with Waardenburg syndrome can be expected to have above-average performance after cochlear implantation.

  19. [Clinical and genetic investigation of families with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H S; Liao, X B; Liu, Y L; He, C F; Zhang, H; Jiang, L; Feng, Y; Mei, L Y

    2016-12-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical chacteration and molecular pathology of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 in seven families, and provide genetic diagnosis and hereditary counseling for family members. Method: Clinical data of seven families with WS2(14 patients)were collected. Peripheral blood samples of the probands and related family members were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. The coding sequences of microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), sex-determining region Y-box 10(SOX10), snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2) and endothelin receptor type B(EDNRB)were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Then the raw data was analyzed. Result: The most common manifestations of WS2 are sensorineural hearing loss(10/14,71.4%), freckle(7/14, 50.0%),heterochromia iridis(6/14, 42.9%) and premature greying(5/14,35.7%). All the deafness phenotype is congenital, bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss. Freckles phenotype is different from cutaneous pigment abnormalities of WS in Westerners. The heterozygous mutation, c.328C>T in exon 3 of the MITF gene was detected in the proband and all patients of pedigree 2. However, no pathological mutation of the relevant genes (SOX10,SNAI2 and EDNRB) was detected in other pedigrees. Conclusion: There are obvious variations in clinical features of WS, while freckles may be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances. The MITF gene mutation, R110X,is therefore considered the disease causing mutation in pedigree WS02.However, there are novel disease causing genes or copy number variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2, which require further research. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Clinical Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery.

  20. Novel PAX3 mutations causing Waardenburg syndrome type 1 in Tunisian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Mediha; Nouira, Malek; Maazoul, Faouzi; Kraoua, Lilia; Meddeb, Rim; Ouertani, Ines; Chelly, Imen; Benoit, Valérie; Besbes, Ghazi; Mrad, Ridha

    2017-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disease characterized by a clinical and genetic variability. WS is classified into four types depending on the presence or absence of additional symptoms: WS1, WS2, WS3 and WS4. Type 1 and 3 are mostly caused by PAX3 mutations, while type 2 and type 4 are genetically heterogeneous. The aims of this study are to confirm the diagnostic of WS1 by the sequencing of PAX3 gene and to evaluate the genotype phenotype correlation. A clinical classification was established for 14 patients WS, as proposed by the Waardenburg Consortium, and noted a predominance of type 1 and type 2 with 6 patients WS1, 7 patients WS2 and 1 patient WS3. A significant inter and intra-familial clinical heterogeneity was also observed. A sequencing of PAX3 gene in the 6 patients WS1 confirmed the diagnosis in 4 of them by revealing three novel mutations that modify two functional domains of the protein: the c.942delC; the c.933_936dupTTAC and the c.164delTCCGCCACA. These three variations are most likely responsible for the phenotype, however their pathogenic effects need to be confirmed by functional studies. The MLPA analysis of the 2 patients who were sequence negative for PAX3 gene revealed, in one of them, a heterozygous deletion of exons 5 to 9 confirming the WS1 diagnosis. Both clinical and molecular approaches led to the conclusion that there is a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation in WS1, an element that must be taken into account in genetic counseling. The absence of PAX3 mutation in one patient WS1 highlights the fact that the clinical classification is sometimes insufficient to distinguish WS1 from other types WS hence the interest of sequencing the other WS genes in this patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Clinical classification and genetic mutation study of two pedigrees with type II Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yang, Fuwei; Zheng, Hexin; Zhu, Ganghua; Hu, Peng; Wu, Weijing

    2015-12-01

    To explore the molecular etiology of two pedigrees affected with type II Waardenburg syndrome (WS2) and to provide genetic diagnosis and counseling. Blood samples were collected from the proband and his family members. Following extraction of genomic DNA, the coding sequences of PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were amplified with PCR and subjected to DNA sequencing to detect potential mutations. A heterozygous deletional mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene has been identified in all patients from the first family, while no mutation was found in the other WS2 related genes including PAX3, MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2. The heterozygous deletion mutation c.649_651delAGA in exon 7 of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in the first family. It is expected that other genes may also underlie WS2.

  2. Cytogenetic mapping of a novel locus for type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selicorni, Angelo; Guerneri, Silvana; Ratti, Antonia; Pizzuti, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    An Italian family in which Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) segregates together with a der(8) chromosome from a (4p;8p) balanced translocation was studied. Cytogenetic analysis by painting and subtelomeric probe hybridization positioned the chromosome 8 breakpoint at p22-pter. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with yeast artificial chromosomes from a contig spanning the 8p21-pter region refined the breakpoint in an interval of less than 170 kb between markers WI-3823 and D8S1819. The only cloned gene for WS2 is that for microphtalmia (MITF) on chromosome 3p. In this family, MITF mutations were excluded by sequencing the whole coding region. The 8p23 region may represent a third locus for WS2 (WS2C).

  3. Worldwide distribution of Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chetan S; Isaacson, Glenn

    2003-09-01

    To clarify the multiracial occurrence of Waardenburg syndrome, we present a case series and literature review. A computerized review of the English-language literature was conducted to assess the distribution of reported occurrences of Waardenburg syndrome in populations around the world. We detail the clinical features of 2 family cohorts: one of Western European origin and the other from South Asia. A computerized literature review found sporadic cases of the syndrome in many ethnic groups, including Japanese, Taiwanese, and Middle Eastern families. The highest reported incidence is among Kenyan Africans. Waardenburg syndrome accounts for between 2% and 5% of cases of congenital deafness. It was first described in Northern European cohorts and is widely identified in fair-skinned populations. We hope to raise awareness of the worldwide distribution of this important cause of hearing loss.

  4. Homozygous EDNRB mutation in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Noriko; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Kaneko, Hiroki; Kosaki, Rika; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2018-04-01

    To examine and expand the genetic spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Clinical features related to Waardenburg syndrome (WS) were examined in a five-year old patient. Mutation analysis of genes related to WS was performed in the proband and her parents. Molecular modeling of EDNRB and the p.R319W mutant was conducted to predict the pathogenicity of the mutation. The proband showed sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, and dystopia canthorum, fulfilling the clinical criteria of WS1. Genetic analyses revealed that the proband had no mutation in PAX3 which has been known as the cause of WS1, but had a homozygous missense mutation (p.R319W) in endothelin receptor type B (EDNRB) gene. The asymptomatic parents had the mutation in a heterozygote state. This mutation has been previously reported in a heterozygous state in a patient with Hirschsprung's disease unaccompanied by WS, but the patient and her parents did not show any symptoms in gastrointestinal tract. Molecular modeling of EDNRB with the p.R319W mutation demonstrated reduction of the positively charged surface area in this region, which might reduce binding ability of EDNRB to G protein and lead to abnormal signal transduction underlying the WS phenotype. Our findings suggested that autosomal recessive mutation in EDNRB may underlie a part of WS1 with the current diagnostic criteria, and supported that Hirschsprung's disease is a multifactorial genetic disease which requires additional factors. Further molecular analysis is necessary to elucidate the gene interaction and to reappraise the current WS classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Tietz/Waardenburg type 2A syndrome associated with posterior microphthalmos in two unrelated patients with novel MITF gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-González, Vianney; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Guzmán-Sánchez, Martín; Giordano-Herrera, Verónica; Guadarrama-Vallejo, Dalia; Ruíz-Quintero, Narlly; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Tietz syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type 2A are allelic conditions caused by MITF mutations. Tietz syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by congenital deafness and generalized skin, hair, and eye hypopigmentation, while Waardenburg syndrome type 2A typically includes variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss and patches of de-pigmented skin, hair, and irides. In this paper, we report two unrelated families with MITF mutations. The first family showed an autosomal dominant pattern and variable expressivity. The second patient was isolated. MITF gene analysis in the first family demonstrated a c.648A>C heterozygous mutation in exon 8 c.648A>C; p. (R216S), while in the isolated patient, an apparently de novo heterozygous c.1183_1184insG truncating mutation was demonstrated in exon 10. All patients except one had bilateral reduced ocular anteroposterior axial length and a high hyperopic refractive error corresponding to posterior microphthalmos, features that have not been described as part of the disease. Our results suggest that posterior microphthalmos might be part of the clinical characteristics of Tietz/Waardenburg syndrome type 2A and expand both the clinical and molecular spectrum of the disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Waardenburg syndrome: A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sudip

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development with distinct cutaneous manifestations. Based on the clinical presentations, four subtypes of the disease are recognized. A careful clinical evaluation is required to differentiate various types of WS and other associated auditory-pigmentary syndromes. We describe a case series of WS to highlight the wide spectrum of manifestations of the syndrome including a rare association.

  7. A homozygous mutation in the endothelin-3 gene associated with a combined Waardenburg type 2 and Hirschsprung phenotype (Shah-Waardenburg syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, R M; Osinga, J; Tan-Sindhunata, G; Wu, Y; Kamsteeg, E J; Stulp, R P; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C; Majoor-Krakauer, D; Angrist, M; Chakravarti, A; Meijers, C; Buys, C H

    1996-04-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) or colonic aganglionosis is a congenital disorder characterized by an absence of intramural ganglia along variable lengths of the colon resulting in intestinal obstruction. The incidence of HSCR is 1 in 5,000 live births. Mutations in the RET gene, which codes for a receptor tyrosine kinase, and in EDNRB which codes for the endothelin-B receptor, have been shown to be associated with HSCR in humans. The lethal-spotted mouse which has pigment abnormalities, but also colonic aganglionosis, carries a mutation in the gene coding for endothelin 3 (Edn3), the ligand for the receptor protein encoded by EDNRB. Here, we describe a mutation of the human gene for endothelin 3 (EDN3), homozygously present in a patient with a combined Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) and HSCR phenotype (Shah-Waardenburg syndrome). The mutation, Cys159Phe, in exon 3 in the ET-3 like domain of EDN3, presumably affects the proteolytic processing of the preproendothelin to the mature peptide EDN3. The patient's parents were first cousins. A previous child in this family had been diagnosed with a similar combination of HSCR, depigmentation and deafness. Depigmentation and deafness were present in other relatives. Moreover, we present a further indication for the involvement of EDNRB in HSCR by reporting a novel mutation detected in one of 40 unselected HSCR patients.

  8. Genetic analysis of a Chinese family with members affected with Usher syndrome type II and Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueling; Lin, Xiao-Jiang; Tang, Xiangrong; Chai, Yong-Chuan; Yu, De-Hong; Chen, Dong-Ye; Wu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of a family presenting with multiple symptoms overlapping Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4). Targeted next-generation sequencing including the exon and flanking intron sequences of 79 deafness genes was performed on the proband. Co-segregation of the disease phenotype and the detected variants were confirmed in all family members by PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The affected members of this family had two different recessive disorders, USH2 and WS4. By targeted next-generation sequencing, we identified that USH2 was caused by a novel missense mutation, p.V4907D in GPR98; whereas WS4 due to p.V185M in EDNRB. This is the first report of homozygous p.V185M mutation in EDNRB in patient with WS4. This study reported a Chinese family with multiple independent and overlapping phenotypes. In condition, molecular level analysis was efficient to identify the causative variant p.V4907D in GPR98 and p.V185M in EDNRB, also was helpful to confirm the clinical diagnosis of USH2 and WS4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  10. EDNRB mutations cause Waardenburg syndrome type II in the heterozygous state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Sarah; Bondurand, Nadege; Faubert, Emmanuelle; Poisson, Sylvain; Lecerf, Laure; Nitschke, Patrick; Deggouj, Naima; Loundon, Natalie; Jonard, Laurence; David, Albert; Sznajer, Yves; Blanchet, Patricia; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique

    2017-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. The clinical definition of four WS types is based on additional features due to defects in structures mostly arising from the neural crest, with type I and type II being the most frequent. While type I is tightly associated to PAX3 mutations, WS type II (WS2) remains partly enigmatic with mutations in known genes (MITF, SOX10) accounting for only 30% of the cases. We performed exome sequencing in a WS2 index case and identified a heterozygous missense variation in EDNRB. Interestingly, homozygous (and very rare heterozygous) EDNRB mutations are already described in type IV WS (i.e., in association with Hirschsprung disease [HD]) and heterozygous mutations in isolated HD. Screening of a WS2 cohort led to the identification of an overall of six heterozygous EDNRB variations. Clinical phenotypes, pedigrees and molecular segregation investigations unraveled a dominant mode of inheritance with incomplete penetrance. In parallel, cellular and functional studies showed that each of the mutations impairs the subcellular localization of the receptor or induces a defective downstream signaling pathway. Based on our results, we now estimate EDNRB mutations to be responsible for 5%-6% of WS2. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Phenotypic and genetic analysis of a patient presented with Tietz/Waardenburg type II a syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanhuan; Tang, Lifang; Zhang, Jingmin; Hu, Qin; Chen, Yingwei; Xiao, Bing

    2015-08-01

    To determine the genetic cause for a patient featuring decreased pigmentation of the skin and iris, hearing loss and multiple congenital anomalies. Routine chromosomal banding was performed to analyze the karyotype of the patient and his parents. Single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP array) was employed to identify cryptic chromosome aberrations, and quantitative real-time PCR was used to confirm the results. Karyotype analysis has revealed no obvious anomaly for the patient and his parents. SNP array analysis of the patient has demonstrated a 3.9 Mb deletion encompassing 3p13p14.1, which caused loss of entire MITF gene. The deletion was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical features of the patient have included severe bilateral hearing loss, decreased pigmentation of the skin and iris and multiple congenital anomalies. The patient, carrying a 3p13p14.1 deletion, has features of Tietz syndrome/Waardenburg syndrome type IIa. This case may provide additional data for the study of genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease.

  12. Hearing dysfunction in heterozygous Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ mice, a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 2 and Tietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Christina; Zhang, Deming; Beyer, Lisa A; Halsey, Karin E; Fukui, Hideto; Raphael, Yehoash; Dolan, David F; Hornyak, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The human deafness-pigmentation syndromes, Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 2a, and Tietz syndrome are characterized by profound deafness but only partial cutaneous pigmentary abnormalities. Both syndromes are caused by mutations in MITF. To illuminate differences between cutaneous and otic melanocytes in these syndromes, their development and survival in heterozygous Microphthalmia-White (Mitf(Mi-wh) /+) mice were studied and hearing function of these mice characterized. Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ mice have a profound hearing deficit, characterized by elevated auditory brainstem response thresholds, reduced distortion product otoacoustic emissions, absent endocochlear potential, loss of outer hair cells, and stria vascularis abnormalities. Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ embryos have fewer melanoblasts during embryonic development than their wild-type littermates. Although cochlear melanocytes are present at birth, they disappear from the Mitf(Mi-wh) /+ cochlea between P1 and P7. These findings may provide insight into the mechanism of melanocyte and hearing loss in human deafness-pigmentation syndromes such as WS and Tietz syndrome and illustrate differences between otic and follicular melanocytes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Waardenburg syndrome: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivlal M Rawlani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome is a rare disorder of neural crest cell development. It is genetically inherited. Varying in prevalence from 1:42000 to 1:50,000, it compromises approximately 2-5% of congenital deaf children. The syndrome is not expressed in its complete form, in about 20% cases, which adds for its heterogenisity . Even among people affected in the same family,the features do vary. Unilateral heterochromia that manifests as lighter pigmentation of one iris is associated with Waardenburg syndrome and Parry-Romberg syndrome and less commonly with Hirschsprung disease. A case of ten yrs. old boy with a typical facial profile and hearing loss is reported.

  14. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Screening of MITF and SOX10 regulatory regions in Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Baral

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects. Four subtypes are clinically defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. WS type 2 (WS2 can result from mutations within the MITF or SOX10 genes; however, 70% of WS2 cases remain unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes might be involved and/or that mutations within the known genes escaped previous screenings. The recent identification of a deletion encompassing three of the SOX10 regulatory elements in a patient presenting with another WS subtype, WS4, defined by its association with Hirschsprung disease, led us to search for deletions and point mutations within the MITF and SOX10 regulatory elements in 28 yet unexplained WS2 cases. Two nucleotide variations were identified: one in close proximity to the MITF distal enhancer (MDE and one within the U1 SOX10 enhancer. Functional analyses argued against a pathogenic effect of these variations, suggesting that mutations within regulatory elements of WS genes are not a major cause of this neurocristopathy.

  16. Screening of MITF and SOX10 Regulatory Regions in Waardenburg Syndrome Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Viviane; Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Goossens, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects. Four subtypes are clinically defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. WS type 2 (WS2) can result from mutations within the MITF or SOX10 genes; however, 70% of WS2 cases remain unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes might be involved and/or that mutations within the known genes escaped previous screenings. The recent identification of a deletion encompassing three of the SOX10 regulatory elements in a patient presenting with another WS subtype, WS4, defined by its association with Hirschsprung disease, led us to search for deletions and point mutations within the MITF and SOX10 regulatory elements in 28 yet unexplained WS2 cases. Two nucleotide variations were identified: one in close proximity to the MITF distal enhancer (MDE) and one within the U1 SOX10 enhancer. Functional analyses argued against a pathogenic effect of these variations, suggesting that mutations within regulatory elements of WS genes are not a major cause of this neurocristopathy. PMID:22848661

  17. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuzhi; Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Weiyan; Zhou, Chengyong; Yang, Shiming; Yuan, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0%) and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0%) were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0%) had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14), which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  18. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhi Yang

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2 cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0% and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0% were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0% had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14, which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  19. Waardenburg syndrome type I: Dental phenotypes and genetic analysis of an extended family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sólia-Nasser, L; de Aquino, S-N; Paranaíba, L-M R; Gomes, A; Dos-Santos-Neto, P; Coletta, R-D; Cardoso, A-F; Frota, A-C; Martelli-Júnior, H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of inheritance and the clinical features in a large family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), detailing the dental abnormalities and screening for PAX3 mutations. To characterize the pattern of inheritance and clinical features, 29 family members were evaluated by dermatologic, ophthalmologic, otorhinolaryngologic and orofacial examination. Molecular analysis of the PAX3 gene was performed. The pedigree of the family,including the last four generations, was constructed and revealed non-consanguineous marriages. Out of 29 descendants, 16 family members showed features of WS1, with 9 members showing two major criteria indicative of WS1. Five patients showed white forelock and iris hypopigmentation, and four showed dystopia canthorum and iris hypopigmentation. Two patients had hearing loss. Dental abnormalities were identified in three family members, including dental agenesis, conical teeth and taurodontism. Sequencing analysis failed to identify mutations in the PAX3 gene. These results confirm that WS1 was transmitted in this family in an autosomal dominant pattern with variable expressivity and high penetrance. The presence of dental manifestations, especially tooth agenesis and conical teeth which resulted in considerable aesthetic impact on affected individuals was a major clinical feature. This article reveals the presence of well-defined dental changes associated with WS1 and tries to establish a possible association between these two entities showing a new spectrum of WS1.

  20. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  1. Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Chinese Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuzhi; Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Weiyan; Zhou, Chengyong; Yang, Shiming; Yuan, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0%) and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0%) were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0%) had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14), which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients. PMID:24194866

  2. Apparent digenic inheritance of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) and autosomal recessive ocular albinism (AROA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, R; Spritz, R A; Ho, L; Pierpont, J; Guo, W; Friedman, T B; Asher, J H

    1997-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for >2% of the congenitally deaf population. It is characterized by deafness in association with pigmentary anomalies and various defects of neural crest-derived tissues. At least four types are recognized (WS1, WS2, WS3 and WS4) on the basis of clinical and genetic criteria. Two previously described families seemed to delineate a new subtype characterized by WS2 in conjunction with ocular albinism (OA). Since mutations in the MITF gene are responsible for some instances of WS2, we screened for mutations in one of the WS2-OA families and discovered a 1 bp deletion in exon 8 of MITF. OA previously has been associated with compound heterozygosity for a mutant TYR allele and the TYR(R402Q) allele, a functionally significant polymorphism that is associated with moderately reduced tyrosinase catalytic activity. In this family, all of the individuals with the OA phenotype are either homozygous or heterozygous for TYR(R402Q), and heterozyous for the 1 bp deletion in MITF This suggests that the WS2-OA phenotype may result from digenic interaction between a gene for a transcription factor (MITF) and a gene that it regulates (TYR).

  3. Genetic analysis of PAX3 for diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Tatsuo; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Morita, Noriko; Masuda, Sawako

    2013-04-01

    PAX3 genetic analysis increased the diagnostic accuracy for Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1). Analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of PAX3 helped verify the pathogenicity of a missense mutation, and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of PAX3 increased the sensitivity of genetic diagnosis in patients with WS1. Clinical diagnosis of WS1 is often difficult in individual patients with isolated, mild, or non-specific symptoms. The objective of the present study was to facilitate the accurate diagnosis of WS1 through genetic analysis of PAX3 and to expand the spectrum of known PAX3 mutations. In two Japanese families with WS1, we conducted a clinical evaluation of symptoms and genetic analysis, which involved direct sequencing, MLPA analysis, quantitative PCR of PAX3, and analysis of the predicted 3D structure of PAX3. The normal-hearing control group comprised 92 subjects who had normal hearing according to pure tone audiometry. In one family, direct sequencing of PAX3 identified a heterozygous mutation, p.I59F. Analysis of PAX3 3D structures indicated that this mutation distorted the DNA-binding site of PAX3. In the other family, MLPA analysis and subsequent quantitative PCR detected a large, heterozygous deletion spanning 1759-2554 kb that eliminated 12-18 genes including a whole PAX3 gene.

  4. Screening of MITF and SOX10 regulatory regions in Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Viviane; Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Goossens, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects. Four subtypes are clinically defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. WS type 2 (WS2) can result from mutations within the MITF or SOX10 genes; however, 70% of WS2 cases remain unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes might be involved and/or that mutations within the known genes escaped previous screenings. The recent identification of a deletion encompassing three of the SOX10 regulatory elements in a patient presenting with another WS subtype, WS4, defined by its association with Hirschsprung disease, led us to search for deletions and point mutations within the MITF and SOX10 regulatory elements in 28 yet unexplained WS2 cases. Two nucleotide variations were identified: one in close proximity to the MITF distal enhancer (MDE) and one within the U1 SOX10 enhancer. Functional analyses argued against a pathogenic effect of these variations, suggesting that mutations within regulatory elements of WS genes are not a major cause of this neurocristopathy.

  5. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  6. Functional analysis of Waardenburg syndrome-associated PAX3 and SOX10 mutations: report of a dominant-negative SOX10 mutation in Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Luo, Hunjin; An, Jing; Sun, Lin; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Jiang, Lu; Jiang, Wen; Xia, Kun; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2012-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. PAX3 and SOX10 are two transcription factors that can activate the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a critical transcription factor for melanocyte development. Mutations of PAX3 are associated with WS1 and WS3, while mutations of SOX10 cause WS2 and WS4. Recently, we identified some novel WS-associated mutations in PAX3 and SOX10 in a cohort of Chinese WS patients. Here, we further identified an E248fsX30 SOX10 mutation in a family of WS2. We analyzed the subcellular distribution, expression and in vitro activity of two PAX3 mutations (p.H80D, p.H186fsX5) and four SOX10 mutations (p.E248fsX30, p.G37fsX58, p.G38fsX69 and p.R43X). Except H80D PAX3, which retained partial activity, the other mutants were unable to activate MITF promoter. The H80D PAX3 and E248fsX30 SOX10 were localized in the nucleus as wild type (WT) proteins, whereas the other mutant proteins were distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein retained the DNA-binding activity and showed dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. However, E248fsX30 SOX10 protein seems to decay faster than the WT one, which may underlie the mild WS2 phenotype caused by this mutation.

  7. Nonsense mutations in the PAX3 gene cause Waardenburg syndrome type I in two Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Zhi; Cao, Ju-Yang; Zhang, Rui-Ning; Liu, Li-Xian; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Li, Mei; Han, Dong-Yi; Yuan, Hui-Jun; Yang, Wei-Yan

    2007-01-05

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmental abnormalities of the eye, hair and skin, and dystopia canthorum. The gene mainly responsible for WS1 is PAX3 which is involved in melanocytic development and survival. Mutations of PAX3 have been reported in familiar or sporadic patients with WS1 in several populations of the world except Chinese. In order to explore the genetic background of Chinese WS1 patients, a mutation screening of PAX3 gene was carried out in four WS1 pedigrees. A questionnaire survey and comprehensive clinical examination were conducted in four Chinese pedigrees of WS1. Genomic DNA from each patient and their family members was extracted and exons of PAX3 were amplified by PCR. PCR fragments were ethanol-purified and sequenced in both directions on an ABI_Prism 3100 DNA sequencer with the BigDye Terminator Cycle Sequencing Ready Reaction Kit. The sequences were obtained and aligned to the wild type sequence of PAX3 with the GeneTool program. Two nonsense PAX3 mutations have been found in the study population. One is heterozygous for a novel nonsense mutation S209X. The other is heterozygous for a previously reported mutation in European population R223X. Both mutations create stop codons leading to truncation of the PAX3 protein. This is the first demonstration of PAX3 mutations in Chinese WS1 patients and one of the few examples of an identical mutation of PAX3 occurred in different populations.

  8. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY-box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice-site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in-frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling. PMID:29115496

  9. PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Li, Shiqiang; Xiao, Xueshan; Wang, Panfeng; Guo, Xiangming

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To detect paired box gene 3 (PAX3) mutations and associated phenotypes in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Methods Five unrelated families with suspected WS1 were selected from our Genomic DNA Repository for Hereditary Eye Diseases. The coding and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplicons were then analyzed by cycle sequencing. Variations detected were further evaluated in available family members as well as one hundred controls with heteroduplex-single strand conformational polymorphism (heteroduplex-SSCP) analysis and/or clone sequencing. Results Three novel and two known mutations in PAX3 were detected in five patients, respectively: c.567_586+17del (p.Asp189_Gln505delinsGluGlyGlyAlaLeuAlaGly), c.456_459dupTTCC (p.Ile154PhefsX162), c.795_800delCTGGTT (p.Trp266_Phe267del), c.799T>A (p.Phe267Ile), and c.667C>T (p.Arg223X). Two novel mutations proved to be de novo as their parents did not carry the mutations. All five patients with PAX3 mutations had dystopia canthorum and different iris color and fundi between their two eyes. However, none had white forelock, skin hypopigmentation, and deafness. Conclusions Our findings expand the frequency and spectrum of PAX3 mutations and ethnic-related phenotypes in Chinese patients with WS1. De novo mutations in PAX3 have not been reported before. PMID:20664692

  10. PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Li, Shiqiang; Xiao, Xueshan; Wang, Panfeng; Guo, Xiangming; Zhang, Qingjiong

    2010-06-22

    To detect paired box gene 3 (PAX3) mutations and associated phenotypes in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). Five unrelated families with suspected WS1 were selected from our Genomic DNA Repository for Hereditary Eye Diseases. The coding and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the amplicons were then analyzed by cycle sequencing. Variations detected were further evaluated in available family members as well as one hundred controls with heteroduplex-single strand conformational polymorphism (heteroduplex-SSCP) analysis and/or clone sequencing. Three novel and two known mutations in PAX3 were detected in five patients, respectively: c.567_586+17del (p.Asp189_Gln505delinsGluGlyGlyAlaLeuAlaGly), c.456_459dupTTCC (p.Ile154PhefsX162), c.795_800delCTGGTT (p.Trp266_Phe267del), c.799T>A (p.Phe267Ile), and c.667C>T (p.Arg223X). Two novel mutations proved to be de novo as their parents did not carry the mutations. All five patients with PAX3 mutations had dystopia canthorum and different iris color and fundi between their two eyes. However, none had white forelock, skin hypopigmentation, and deafness. Our findings expand the frequency and spectrum of PAX3 mutations and ethnic-related phenotypes in Chinese patients with WS1. De novo mutations in PAX3 have not been reported before.

  11. Deletions at the SOX10 gene locus cause Waardenburg syndrome types 2 and 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondurand, Nadege; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Stanchina, Laure; Collot, Nathalie; Baral, Viviane; Marlin, Sandrine; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Giurgea, Irina; Skopinski, Laurent; Reardon, William; Toutain, Annick; Sarda, Pierre; Echaieb, Anis; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marilyn; Touraine, Renaud; Amiel, Jeanne; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique

    2007-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that exhibits varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair and skin. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four subtypes, WS1-WS4. Absence of additional features characterizes WS2. The association of facial dysmorphic features defines WS1 and WS3, whereas the association with Hirschsprung disease (aganglionic megacolon) characterizes WS4, also called "Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease." Mutations within the genes MITF and SNAI2 have been identified in WS2, whereas mutations of EDN3, EDNRB, and SOX10 have been observed in patients with WS4. However, not all cases are explained at the molecular level, which raises the possibility that other genes are involved or that some mutations within the known genes are not detected by commonly used genotyping methods. We used a combination of semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex polymerase chain reaction and fluorescent in situ hybridization to search for SOX10 heterozygous deletions. We describe the first characterization of SOX10 deletions in patients presenting with WS4. We also found SOX10 deletions in WS2 cases, making SOX10 a new gene of WS2. Interestingly, neurological phenotypes reminiscent of that observed in WS4 (PCWH syndrome [peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, WS, and Hirschsprung disease]) were observed in some WS2-affected patients with SOX10 deletions. This study further characterizes the molecular complexity and the close relationship that links the different subtypes of WS.

  12. A family with unusual Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to PAX 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierpont, J W; St Jacques, D; Seaver, L H; Erickson, R P

    1995-03-01

    An unusual family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WSI), cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease is not linked to the PAX 3 gene since there is an obligate crossover which has occurred between PAX 3 DNA markers and the disorder in this family. This family may also have anticipation of the WSI traits as the proband's grandmother is nonpenetrant, his mother has dystopia canthorum, and severe cleft lip (palate), while the proband has dystopia canthorum, severe cleft lip (palate), and Hirschsprung disease. Thus, a locus other than PAX 3 is implicated in this Waardenburg-like syndrome with Hirschsprung disease and cleft lip (palate).

  13. A de novo deletion mutation in SOX10 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Shen, Na; Peng, Jing; Wang, Chunyu; Liu, Haiyi; Lu, Yanjun

    2017-01-27

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) or Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with a prevalence of <1/1,000,000 and characterized by the association of congenital sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, and intestinal aganglionosis. There are three types of WS4 (WS4A-C) caused by mutations in endothelin receptor type B, endothelin 3, and SRY-box 10 (SOX10), respectively. This study investigated a genetic mutation in a Chinese family with one WS4 patient in order to improve genetic counselling. Genomic DNA was extracted, and mutation analysis of the three WS4 related genes was performed using Sanger sequencing. We detected a de novo heterozygous deletion mutation [c.1333delT (p.Ser445Glnfs*57)] in SOX10 in the patient; however, this mutation was absent in the unaffected parents and 40 ethnicity matched healthy controls. Subsequent phylogenetic analysis and three-dimensional modelling of the SOX10 protein confirmed that the c.1333delT heterozygous mutation was pathogenic, indicating that this mutation might constitute a candidate disease-causing mutation.

  14. A novel missense mutation of the paired box 3 gene in a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Filiz; Ozturk, A Taylan; Adibelli, Hamit; Unal, Nurettin; Tukun, Ajlan

    2013-01-01

    Screening of mutations in the paired box 3 (PAX3) gene in three generations of a Turkish family with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1). WS1 was diagnosed in a 13-month-old girl according to the WS Consortium criteria. Detailed family history of the proband revealed eight affected members in three generations. Routine clinical and audiological examination and ophthalmologic evaluation were performed on eight affected and five healthy members of the study family. Dystopia canthorum was detected in all affected patients; however, a brilliant blue iris was present in five patients who also had mild retinal hypopigmentation. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral blood of affected and unaffected individuals in the family as well as 50 unrelated healthy volunteers. All coding exons and adjacent intronic regions of PAX3 were sequenced directly. A novel missense heterozygous c.788T>G mutation was identified in eight patients. This nucleotide alteration was not found in unaffected members of the study family or in the 50 unrelated control subjects. The mutation causes V263G amino-acid substitution in the homeodomain of the PAX3 protein, which represents the 45(th) residue of helix 3. We identified a novel missense c.788T>G mutation in PAX3 in a family with Waardenburg syndrome with intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity.

  15. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of Chinese Han deaf patients with type I and type II Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianhua; Li, Xiaohua; Shi, Jun; Pang, Xiuhong; Hu, Yechen; Wang, Xiaowen; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2016-10-19

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities is genetically heterogeneous and phenotypically variable. This study investigated the molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of WS in 36 Chinese Han deaf probands and 16 additional family members that were clinically diagnosed with WS type I (WS1, n = 8) and type II (WS2, n = 42). Mutation screening of six WS-associated genes detected PAX3 mutations in 6 (86%) of the 7 WS1 probands. Among the 29 WS2 probands, 13 (45%) and 10 (34%) were identified with SOX10 and MITF mutations, respectively. Nineteen of the 26 detected mutations were novel. In WS2 probands whose parental DNA samples were available, de novo mutations were frequently seen for SOX10 mutations (7/8) but not for MITF mutations (0/5, P = 0.005). Excessive freckle, a common feature of WS2 in Chinese Hans, was frequent in WS2 probands with MITF mutations (7/10) but not in those with SOX10 mutations (0/13, P = 4.9 × 10 -4 ). Our results showed that mutations in SOX10 and MITF are two major causes for deafness associated with WS2. These two subtypes of WS2 can be distinguished by the high de novo rate of the SOX10 mutations and the excessive freckle phenotype exclusively associated with the MITF mutations.

  17. Identification of a de novo mutation of SOX10 in a Chinese patient with Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fenghe; Zhao, Min; Fan, Lynn; Zhang, Hongyan; Shi, Yang; Han, Rui; Qu, Chunyan

    2016-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation abnormalities. Four subtypes have been classified. The present study aimed to analyze the clinical feature and investigate the genetic cause for a Chinese case of Waardenburg type IV (WS4). The patient and his family members were subjected to mutation detection in the candidate gene SOX10 by Sanger sequencing. The patient has the clinical features of WS4, including sensorineural hearing loss, bright blue irides, premature graying of the hair and Hirschsprung disease. A novel heterozygous frameshift mutation, c.752_753ins7 (p.Gly252Alafs*31) in the exon 5 of SOX10 was detected in the patient, but not found in the unaffected family members and 100 normal controls. This mutation results in a premature stop codon 31 amino acid downstream. The novel mutation c.752_753ins7 (p.Gly252Alafs*31) arose de novo and was considered as the cause of WS4 in the proband. This study further characterized the molecular complexity of WS4 and provided a clinical case for genotype-phenotype correlation studies of different phenotypes caused by SOX10 mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Creation of miniature pig model of human Waardenburg syndrome type 2A by ENU mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Tang; Guo, Weiwei; Yao, Jing; Cao, Chunwei; Luo, Ailing; Qi, Meng; Wang, Xianlong; Wang, Xiao; Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Hongyong; Wang, Dayu; Shang, Haitao; Hong, Qianlong; Zhang, Rui; Jia, Qitao; Zheng, Qiantao; Qin, Guosong; Li, Yongshun; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Weiwu; Chen, Zheng-Yi; Wang, Hongmei; Zhou, Qi; Meng, Anming; Wei, Hong; Yang, Shiming; Zhao, Jianguo

    2017-11-01

    Human Waardenburg syndrome 2A (WS2A) is a dominant hearing loss (HL) syndrome caused by mutations in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene. In mouse models with MITF mutations, WS2A is transmitted in a recessive pattern, which limits the study of hearing loss (HL) pathology. In the current study, we performed ENU (ethylnitrosourea) mutagenesis that resulted in substituting a conserved lysine with a serine (p. L247S) in the DNA-binding domain of the MITF gene to generate a novel miniature pig model of WS2A. The heterozygous mutant pig (MITF +/L247S ) exhibits a dominant form of profound HL and hypopigmentation in skin, hair, and iris, accompanied by degeneration of stria vascularis (SV), fused hair cells, and the absence of endocochlear potential, which indicate the pathology of human WS2A. Besides hypopigmentation and bilateral HL, the homozygous mutant pig (MITF L247S/L247S ) and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated MITF bi-allelic knockout pigs both exhibited anophthalmia. Three WS2 patients carrying MITF mutations adjacent to the corresponding region were also identified. The pig models resemble the clinical symptom and molecular pathology of human WS2A patients perfectly, which will provide new clues for better understanding the etiology and development of novel treatment strategies for human HL.

  19. Wnt signaling pathway involvement in genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2 with MITF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ping; Liu, Ya-Lan; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Feng, Yong; Zhang, Hua

    2018-05-01

    Mutation in the gene encoding microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) lead to Waardenburg syndrome 2 (WS2), an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome with auditory-pigmentary abnormalities, which is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Haploinsufficiency may be the underlying mechanism for WS2. However, the mechanisms explaining the genotypic and phenotypic variations in WS2 caused by MITF mutations are unclear. A previous study revealed that MITF interacts with LEF-1, an important factor in the Wnt signaling pathway, to regulate its own transcription through LEF-1-binding sites on the MITF promoter. In this study, four different WS2-associated MITF mutations (p.R217I, p.R217G, p.R255X, p.R217del) that are associated with highly variable clinical features were chosen. According to the results, LEF-1 can activate the expression of MITF on its own, but MITF proteins inhibited the activation. This inhibition weakens when the dosage of MITF is reduced. Except for p.R217I, p.R255X, p.R217G, and p.R217del lose the ability to activate TYR completely and do not inhibit the LEF-1-mediated activation of the MITF-M promoter, and the haploinsufficiency created by mutant MITF can be overcome; correspondingly, the mutants' associated phenotypes are less severe than that of p.R217I. The dominant negative of p.R217del made it have a second-most severe phenotype. This study's data imply that MITF has a negative feedback loop of regulation to stabilize MITF gene dosage that involves the Wnt signaling pathway and that the interaction of MITF mutants with this pathway drives the genotypic and phenotypic differences observed in Waardenburg syndrome type 2 associated with MITF mutations.

  20. Identification and functional analysis of a novel mutation in the PAX3 gene associated with Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijie; Li, Jiada; Tang, Fen; Sun, Jie; Wang, Xueping; Jiang, Lu; Mei, Lingyun; Chen, Hongsheng; Liu, Yalan; Cai, Xinzhang; Feng, Yong; He, Chufeng

    2018-02-05

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder of neural crest cells (NCC) characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and abnormal iris pigmentation. WS1 is due to loss-of-function mutations in paired box gene 3 (PAX3). Here, we identified a novel PAX3 mutation (c.808C>G, p.R270G) in a three-generation Chinese family with WS1, and then analyzed its in vitro activities. The R270G PAX3 retained nuclear distribution and normal DNA-binding ability; however, it failed to activate MITF promoter, suggesting that haploinsufficiency may be the underlying mechanism for the mild WS1 phenotype of the study family. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel mutations in the SOX10 gene in the first two Chinese cases of type IV Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu; Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Wen; Hu, Zhengmao; Mei, Lingyun; Xue, Jingjie; He, Chufeng; Liu, Yalan; Xia, Kun; Feng, Yong

    2011-05-20

    We analyzed the clinical features and family-related gene mutations for the first two Chinese cases of type IV Waardenburg syndrome (WS4). Two families were analyzed in this study. The analysis included a medical history, clinical analysis, a hearing test and a physical examination. In addition, the EDNRB, EDN3 and SOX10 genes were sequenced in order to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for the WS4 observed in these patients. The two WS4 cases presented with high phenotypic variability. Two novel heterozygous mutations (c.254G>A and c.698-2A>T) in the SOX10 gene were detected. The mutations identified in the patients were not found in unaffected family members or in 200 unrelated control subjects. This is the first report of WS4 in Chinese patients. In addition, two novel mutations in SOX10 gene have been identified. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months). Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome.

  3. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Koyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months. Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome.

  4. Waardenburg syndrome in the Turkish deaf population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silan, F; Zafer, C; Onder, I

    2006-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited disorder that accounts for more than 2% cases of congenital deafness. The aim of this study is to determine the WS incidence among deaf pupils. Dysmorphological examination was performed on 720 children who were attending 7 special schools in Turkey and who had hearing disabilities. All subjects in the study were examined for WS diagnostic criteria. We detected 49 patients (6.8%) with WS among the 720 children examined. Six patients had WS type 1 (12.2%) and 43 had type 2 (87.8%). We observed 2 to 5 major diagnostic criteria for WS. Out of all the subjects in the study, only two patients have deaf first degree relatives. All subjects had been previously examined by physicians for deafness but none of them had been then diagnosed to have Waardenburg Syndrome. Instead, they were all misdiagnosed as to have nonsyndromic deafness. Awareness of WS diagnostic criteria by the physicans will provide accurate diagnosis for many deaf pupils and their first degree relatives who are able-to-hear WS patients and whose children are at risk for deafness.

  5. A zebrafish model for Waardenburg syndrome type IV reveals diverse roles for Sox10 in the otic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Kirsten; Abbas, Leila; Spencer, Joanne; Brannon, Claire; Mowbray, Catriona; Nikaido, Masataka; Kelsh, Robert N; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2009-01-01

    In humans, mutations in the SOX10 gene are a cause of the auditory-pigmentary disorder Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4) and related variants. SOX10 encodes an Sry-related HMG box protein essential for the development of the neural crest; deafness in WS4 and other Waardenburg syndromes is usually attributed to loss of neural-crest-derived melanocytes in the stria vascularis of the cochlea. However, SOX10 is strongly expressed in the developing otic vesicle and so direct roles for SOX10 in the otic epithelium might also be important. Here, we examine the otic phenotype of zebrafish sox10 mutants, a model for WS4. As a cochlea is not present in the fish ear, the severe otic phenotype in these mutants cannot be attributed to effects on this tissue. In zebrafish sox10 mutants, we see abnormalities in all otic placodal derivatives. Gene expression studies indicate deregulated expression of several otic genes, including fgf8, in sox10 mutants. Using a combination of mutant and morphant data, we show that the three sox genes belonging to group E (sox9a, sox9b and sox10) provide a link between otic induction pathways and subsequent otic patterning: they act redundantly to maintain sox10 expression throughout otic tissue and to restrict fgf8 expression to anterior macula regions. Single-cell labelling experiments indicate a small and transient neural crest contribution to the zebrafish ear during normal development, but this is unlikely to account for the strong defects seen in the sox10 mutant. We discuss the implication that the deafness in WS4 patients with SOX10 mutations might reflect a haploinsufficiency for SOX10 in the otic epithelium, resulting in patterning and functional abnormalities in the inner ear.

  6. Evidence suggesting digenic inheritance of Waardenburg syndrome type II with ocular albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Pei-Wen; Spector, Elaine; McGregor, Tracy L

    2009-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a series of auditory-pigmentary disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. In most patients, WS2 results from mutations in the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that activates transcription of tyrosinase and other melanocyte proteins. The clinical presentation of WS is highly variable, and we believe that Tietz syndrome and WS2 with ocular albinism (OA) are likely two variations of WS2 due to the presence of modifiers. One family with a molecular diagnosis of WS2 co-segregating with OA has previously been reported. A digenic mutation mechanism including both a MITF mutation and the TYR(R402Q) hypomorphic allele was proposed to be the cause of OA in this family. Here, we present a second WS2 family with OA and provide evidence suggesting the TYR(R402Q) allele does not cause OA in this family. We hypothesize the presence of a novel OCA3 mutation together with the MITF del p.R217 mutation account for the OA phenotype in this family. Since MITF is a transcription factor for pigmentation genes, a mutation in MITF plus a heterozygous mutation in OCA3 together provide an adverse effect crossing a quantitative threshold; therefore, WS2 with OA occurs. We have hypothesized previously that the clinical spectrum and mutation mechanism of OCA depend on the pigmentation threshold of an affected individual. This unique family has provided further evidence supporting this hypothesis. We suggest that by studying OCA patients alongside WS patients with various pigmentation profiles we can facilitate further understanding of the pigmentation pathway.

  7. Molecular and clinical characterization of Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian cohort with two novel PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayeb; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a disease of abnormal neural-crest derived melanocyte development characterized by hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances in hair, eyes and skin. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4, where WS1 is recognized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, with PAX3 being the only known gene involved. This study aimed at investigating PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics of WS1 in a group of Iranian patients. A total of 12 WS1 patients from four unrelated Iranian families were enrolled. Waardenburg consortium guidelines were used for WS1 diagnosis. A detailed family history was traced and a thorough clinical examination was performed for all participants. Furthermore, WS1 patients underwent screening for PAX3 mutations using PCR-sequencing. Dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys were observed in all patients. Early graying, hair discoloration, hypoplastic blue eyes (characteristic brilliant blue iris) and hearing loss were the most common features observed, while heterochromia iridis was the least frequently observed sign among the studied Iranian WS1 patients. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed four mutations including c.667C>T, c.784C>T, c.951delT and c.451+3A>C. Two of the four mutations reported here (c.951delT and c.451+3A>C) are being reported for the first time in this study. Our data provide insight into genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of WS1 in an Iranian series of patients. Our results expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations and may have implications for the genetic counseling of WS in Iran. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Waardenburg syndrome in four Mexican patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Caso, Sandra I; Ortiz Nieva, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a hereditary auditory-pigmentary syndrome. The major features include pigmentary disturbances and congenital deafness. Clinical findings are extremely variable, not only at the authors' institution but also in the literature. The authors describe four patients who presented with various clinical features and different genetic pedigree penetration.

  9. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling in a case of spina bifida in a family with Waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujat, Annegret; Veith, Veit-Peter; Faber, Renaldo; Froster, Ursula G

    2007-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS I) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder with an incidence of 1:45,000 in Europe. Mutations within the PAX3 gene are responsible for the clinical phenotype ranging from mild facial features to severe malformations detectable in prenatal diagnosis. Here, we report a four-generation family with several affected members showing various symptoms of WS I. We diagnosed the syndrome first in a pregnant young woman; she was referred because of a spina bifida in prenatal diagnosis. We performed clinical genetic investigations and molecular genetic analysis in all available family members. The phenotype displays a wide intra-familial clinical variability of pigmentary disturbances, facial anomalies and developmental defects. Molecular studies identified a novel splice site mutation within the PAX3 gene in intron 5 in all affected family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives. This case demonstrates the prenatal diagnosis of spina bifida in a fetus which leads to the initial diagnosis of WS I. Further studies could identify a private splice site mutation within the PAX3 gene responsible for the phenotype in this family.

  11. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel mutation of the MITF gene in a family with Waardenburg syndrome type 2: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfang; Li, Xiaozhou; Ju, Duan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiuling; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with varying degrees of sensorineural hearing loss, and accumulation of pigmentation in hair, skin and iris. There are four types of WS (WS1-4) with differing characteristics. Mutations in six genes [paired box gene 3 ( PAX3 ), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor ( MITF ), endothelin 3 ( END3 ), endothelin receptor type B ( EDNRB ), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 10 ( SOX10 ) and snail homolog 2 ( SNAI2 )] have been identified to be associated with the various types. This case report describes the investigation of genetic mutations in three patients with WS2 from a single family. Genomic DNA was extracted, and the six WS-related genes were sequenced using next-generation sequencing technology. In addition to mutations in PAX3, EDNRB and SOX10, a novel heterozygous MITF mutation, p.Δ315Arg (c.944_946delGAA) on exon 8 was identified. This is predicted to be a candidate disease-causing mutation that may affect the structure and function of the enzyme.

  13. Skip segment Hirschsprung disease and Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica R. Gross

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Skip segment Hirschsprung disease describes a segment of ganglionated bowel between two segments of aganglionated bowel. It is a rare phenomenon that is difficult to diagnose. We describe a recent case of skip segment Hirschsprung disease in a neonate with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome and the genetic profile that was identified.

  14. Skip segment Hirschsprung disease and Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Erica R.; Geddes, Gabrielle C.; McCarrier, Julie A.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Arca, Marjorie J.

    2015-01-01

    Skip segment Hirschsprung disease describes a segment of ganglionated bowel between two segments of aganglionated bowel. It is a rare phenomenon that is difficult to diagnose. We describe a recent case of skip segment Hirschsprung disease in a neonate with a family history of Waardenburg syndrome and the genetic profile that was identified.

  15. Identification and functional analysis of a novel mutation in the SOX10 gene associated with Waardenburg syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Han; Chen, Hong-Sheng; Li, Hai-Bo; Zhang, Hua; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Wang, Xing-Wei; Men, Mei-Chao; Jiang, Lu; Liao, Xin-Bin; Wu, Hong; Feng, Yong

    2014-03-15

    Waardenburg syndrome type IV (WS4) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by auditory-pigmentary abnormalities and Hirschsprung disease. Mutations of the EDNRB gene, EDN3 gene, or SOX10 gene are responsible for WS4. In the present study, we reported a case of a Chinese patient with clinical features of WS4. In addition, the three genes mentioned above were sequenced in order to identify whether mutations are responsible for the case. We revealed a novel nonsense mutation, c.1063C>T (p.Q355*), in the last coding exon of SOX10. The same mutation was not found in three unaffected family members or 100 unrelated controls. Then, the function and mechanism of the mutation were investigated in vitro. We found both wild-type (WT) and mutant SOX10 p.Q355* were detected at the expected size and their expression levels are equivalent. The mutant protein also localized in the nucleus and retained the DNA-binding activity as WT counterpart; however, it lost its transactivation capability on the MITF promoter and acted as a dominant-negative repressor impairing function of the WT SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Point mutation in the MITF gene causing Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, A K; Attaie, A; Randolph, F T; Deshmukh, D; Wang, C; Mhatre, A; Wilcox, E

    1998-12-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant neural crest cell disorder phenotypically characterized by hearing impairment and disturbance of pigmentation. A presence of dystopia canthorum is indicative of WS type 1, caused by loss of function mutation in the PAX3 gene. In contrast, type 2 WS (WS2) is characterized by normally placed medial canthi and is genetically heterogeneous; mutations in MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor) associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report on a three-generation Indian family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. This mutation, initially reported in a Northern European family, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking the HLH-Zip or Zip structure necessary for normal interaction with its target DNA motif. Comparison of the phenotype between the two families demonstrates a significant difference in pigmentary disturbance of the eye. This family, with the first documented case of two unrelated WS2 families harboring identical mutations, provides additional evidence for the importance of genetic background on the clinical phenotype.

  17. Functional analysis of a nonstop mutation in MITF gene identified in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Hao, Ziqi; Luo, Hunjin; He, Chufeng; Mei, Lingyun; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Xueping; Niu, Zhijie; Chen, Hongsheng; Li, Jia-Da; Feng, Yong

    2017-07-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurogenic disorder with the combination of various degrees of sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities affecting the skin, hair and eye. The four subtypes of WS were defined on the basis of the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutation of human microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene gives rise to WS2. Here, we identified a novel WS-associated mutation at the stop codon of MITF (p.X420Y) in a Chinese WS2 patient. This mutation resulted in an extension of extra 33 amino-acid residues in MITF. The mutant MITF appeared in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, whereas the wild-type MITF was localized in the nucleus exclusively. The mutation led to a reduction in the transcriptional activities, whereas the DNA-binding activity was not altered. We show that the foremost mechanism was haploinsufficiency for the mild phenotypes of WS2 induced in X420Y MITF.

  18. Ser298 of MITF, a mutation site in Waardenburg syndrome type 2, is a phosphorylation site with functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, K; Takemoto, C; Kobayashi, I; Watanabe, A; Nobukuni, Y; Fisher, D E; Tachibana, M

    2000-01-01

    MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) is a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) factor which regulates expression of tyrosinase and other melanocytic genes via a CATGTG promoter sequence, and is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Mutations of MITF in mice or humans with Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) often severely disrupt the bHLHZip domain, suggesting the importance of this structure. Here, we show that Ser298, which locates downstream of the bHLHZip and was previously found to be mutated in individuals with WS2, plays an important role in MITF function. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) was found to phosphorylate Ser298 in vitro, thereby enhancing the binding of MITF to the tyrosinase promoter. The same serine was found to be phosphorylated in vivo, and expression of dominant-negative GSK3beta selectively suppressed the ability of MITF to transactivate the tyrosinase promoter. Moreover, mutation of Ser298, as found in a WS2 family, disabled phos-phorylation of MITF by GSK3beta and impaired MITF function. These findings suggest that the Ser298 is important for MITF function and is phosphorylated probably by GSK3beta.

  19. Congenital stapes malformation: Rare conductive hearing loss in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Eliason, Michael; Conley, George S

    2016-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a known autosomal dominant cause of congenital hearing loss. It is characterized by a distinctive phenotypic appearance and often involves sensorineural hearing loss. Temporal bone abnormalities and inner ear dysmorphisms have been described in association with the disease. However, middle ear abnormalities as causes of conductive hearing loss are not typically seen in Waardenburg syndrome. We discuss a case of an 8-year-old female who meets diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome type 3 and who presented with a bilateral conductive hearing loss associated with congenital stapes fixation. We discuss management strategy in this previously unreported phenotype. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. A splice-site mutation affecting the paired box of PAX3 in a three generation family with Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaie, A; Kim, E; Wilcox, E R; Lalwani, A K

    1997-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary disturbances and other developmental defects, is the most frequent form of congenital deafness in humans. Mutations in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, is associated with WS types I and III. Here we report the identification of a novel acceptor splice site mutation (86-2 A-->G) in the paired domain of the human PAX3 gene causing WS type I in a three generation family.

  1. Spectrum of novel mutations found in Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 2: implications for molecular genetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhardt, Gabriele; Zirn, Birgit; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Suckfüll, Markus; Buske, Annegret; Bohring, Axel; Kubisch, Christian; Vogt, Stefanie; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Greally, Marie; Bartsch, Oliver; Steinberger, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Till date, mutations in the genes PAX3 and MITF have been described in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is clinically characterised by congenital hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. Our study intended to determine the frequency of mutations and deletions in these genes, to assess the clinical phenotype in detail and to identify rational priorities for molecular genetic diagnostics procedures. Design Prospective analysis. Patients 19 Caucasian patients with typical features of WS underwent stepwise investigation of PAX3 and MITF. When point mutations and small insertions/deletions were excluded by direct sequencing, copy number analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect larger deletions and duplications. Clinical data and photographs were collected to facilitate genotype–phenotype analyses. Setting All analyses were performed in a large German laboratory specialised in genetic diagnostics. Results 15 novel and 4 previously published heterozygous mutations in PAX3 and MITF were identified. Of these, six were large deletions or duplications that were only detectable by copy number analysis. All patients with PAX3 mutations had typical phenotype of WS with dystopia canthorum (WS1), whereas patients with MITF gene mutations presented without dystopia canthorum (WS2). In addition, one patient with bilateral hearing loss and blue eyes with iris stroma dysplasia had a de novo missense mutation (p.Arg217Ile) in MITF. MITF 3-bp deletions at amino acid position 217 have previously been described in patients with Tietz syndrome (TS), a clinical entity with hearing loss and generalised hypopigmentation. Conclusions On the basis of these findings, we conclude that sequencing and copy number analysis of both PAX3 and MITF have to be recommended in the routine molecular diagnostic setting for patients, WS1 and WS2. Furthermore, our genotype–phenotype analyses indicate that WS2 and TS correspond to a clinical spectrum

  2. Spectrum of novel mutations found in Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 2: implications for molecular genetic diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhardt, Gabriele; Zirn, Birgit; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Suckfüll, Markus; Buske, Annegret; Bohring, Axel; Kubisch, Christian; Vogt, Stefanie; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Greally, Marie; Bartsch, Oliver; Steinberger, Daniela

    2013-03-18

    Till date, mutations in the genes PAX3 and MITF have been described in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is clinically characterised by congenital hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. Our study intended to determine the frequency of mutations and deletions in these genes, to assess the clinical phenotype in detail and to identify rational priorities for molecular genetic diagnostics procedures. Prospective analysis. 19 Caucasian patients with typical features of WS underwent stepwise investigation of PAX3 and MITF. When point mutations and small insertions/deletions were excluded by direct sequencing, copy number analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect larger deletions and duplications. Clinical data and photographs were collected to facilitate genotype-phenotype analyses. All analyses were performed in a large German laboratory specialised in genetic diagnostics. 15 novel and 4 previously published heterozygous mutations in PAX3 and MITF were identified. Of these, six were large deletions or duplications that were only detectable by copy number analysis. All patients with PAX3 mutations had typical phenotype of WS with dystopia canthorum (WS1), whereas patients with MITF gene mutations presented without dystopia canthorum (WS2). In addition, one patient with bilateral hearing loss and blue eyes with iris stroma dysplasia had a de novo missense mutation (p.Arg217Ile) in MITF. MITF 3-bp deletions at amino acid position 217 have previously been described in patients with Tietz syndrome (TS), a clinical entity with hearing loss and generalised hypopigmentation. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that sequencing and copy number analysis of both PAX3 and MITF have to be recommended in the routine molecular diagnostic setting for patients, WS1 and WS2. Furthermore, our genotype-phenotype analyses indicate that WS2 and TS correspond to a clinical spectrum that is influenced by MITF mutation type and position.

  3. Waardenburg syndrome--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Yuvika; Jain, Parul; Goyal, Gaurav; Singh, Malvika; Mishra, Chittranjan

    2013-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by varying degree of deafness associated with pigmentary anomaly and defects of neural crest cell derived structures. Four subtypes (I-IV) with variable penetrance and gene expression of different clinical features have been described. We report a patient showing constellation of complete heterochromia, dystopia canthorum, white forelock, and synophrys. Other affected family relatives with heterochromia have been depicted in pedigree. Copyright © 2012 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for Waardenburg syndrome type I and II in Chinese families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Qin, Litao; Li, Tao; Liu, Hongjian; Ma, Lingcao; Li, Wan; Wu, Dong; Wang, Hongdan; Guo, Qiannan; Guo, Liangjie; Liao, Shixiu

    2018-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an auditory‑pigmentary disorder with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular pathology and provide a method of prenatal diagnosis of WS in Chinese families. A total of 11 patients with WS from five unrelated Chinese families were enrolled. A thorough clinical examination was performed on all participants. Furthermore, patients with WS underwent screening for mutations in the following genes: Paired box 3 (PAX3), melanogenesis associated transcription factor (MITF), SRY‑box 10, snail family transcriptional repressor 2 and endothelin receptor type B using polymerase chain reaction sequencing. Array‑based comparative genomic hybridization was used for specific patients whose sequence results were normal. Following identification of the genotype of the probands and their parents, prenatal genetic diagnosis was performed for family 01 and 05. According to the diagnostic criteria for WS, five cases were diagnosed as WS1, while the other six cases were WS2. Genetic analysis revealed three mutations, including a nonsense mutation PAX3 c.583C>T in family 01, a splice‑site mutation MITF c.909G>A in family 03 and an in‑frame deletion MITF c.649_651delGAA in family 05. To the best of the authors' knowledge the mutations (c.583C>T in PAX3 and c.909G>A in MITF) were reported for the first time in Chinese people. Mutations in the gene of interest were not identified in family 02 and 04. The prenatal genetic testing of the two fetuses was carried out and demonstrated that the two babies were normal. The results of the present study expanded the range of known genetic mutations in China. Identification of genetic mutations in these families provided an efficient way to understand the causes of WS and improved genetic counseling.

  5. [Analysis of SOX10 gene mutation in a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Yan, Yousheng; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xuan; Hao, Shen

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To detect potential mutation of SOX10 gene in a pedigree affected with Warrdenburg syndrome type II. METHODS Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of the proband and his family members. Exons and flanking sequences of MITF, PAX3, SOX10, SNAI2, END3 and ENDRB genes were analyzed by chip capturing and high throughput sequencing. Suspected mutations were verified with Sanger sequencing. RESULTS A c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of the SOX10 gene was detected in the proband, for which both parents showed a wild-type genotype. CONCLUSION The c.127C>T (p.R43X) mutation of SOX10 gene probably underlies the ocular symptoms and hearing loss of the proband.

  6. Allelic Mutations of KITLG, Encoding KIT Ligand, Cause Asymmetric and Unilateral Hearing Loss and Waardenburg Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazo Seco, Celia; Serrão de Castro, Luciana; van Nierop, Josephine W; Morín, Matías; Jhangiani, Shalini; Verver, Eva J J; Schraders, Margit; Maiwald, Nadine; Wesdorp, Mieke; Venselaar, Hanka; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Oostrik, Jaap; Schoots, Jeroen; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lelieveld, Stefan H; Huygen, Patrick L M; Insenser, María; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Pennings, Ronald J E; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Arias-Vásquez, Alejandro; de Ligt, Joep; Yntema, Helger G; Jansen, Joop H; Muzny, Donna M; Huls, Gerwin; van Rossum, Michelle M; Lupski, James R; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel Angel; Kunst, Henricus P M; Kremer, Hannie

    2015-11-05

    Linkage analysis combined with whole-exome sequencing in a large family with congenital and stable non-syndromic unilateral and asymmetric hearing loss (NS-UHL/AHL) revealed a heterozygous truncating mutation, c.286_303delinsT (p.Ser96Ter), in KITLG. This mutation co-segregated with NS-UHL/AHL as a dominant trait with reduced penetrance. By screening a panel of probands with NS-UHL/AHL, we found an additional mutation, c.200_202del (p.His67_Cys68delinsArg). In vitro studies revealed that the p.His67_Cys68delinsArg transmembrane isoform of KITLG is not detectable at the cell membrane, supporting pathogenicity. KITLG encodes a ligand for the KIT receptor. Also, KITLG-KIT signaling and MITF are suggested to mutually interact in melanocyte development. Because mutations in MITF are causative of Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2), we screened KITLG in suspected WS2-affected probands. A heterozygous missense mutation, c.310C>G (p.Leu104Val), that segregated with WS2 was identified in a small family. In vitro studies revealed that the p.Leu104Val transmembrane isoform of KITLG is located at the cell membrane, as is wild-type KITLG. However, in culture media of transfected cells, the p.Leu104Val soluble isoform of KITLG was reduced, and no soluble p.His67_Cys68delinsArg and p.Ser96Ter KITLG could be detected. These data suggest that mutations in KITLG associated with NS-UHL/AHL have a loss-of-function effect. We speculate that the mechanism of the mutation underlying WS2 and leading to membrane incorporation and reduced secretion of KITLG occurs via a dominant-negative or gain-of-function effect. Our study unveils different phenotypes associated with KITLG, previously associated with pigmentation abnormalities, and will thereby improve the genetic counseling given to individuals with KITLG variants. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Mutation screening of MITF gene in patients with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Yang, Shu-Zhi; Liu, Jun; Han, Bing; Wang, Guo-Jian; Zhang, Xin; Kang, Dong-Yang; Dai, Pu; Young, Wie-Yen; Yuan, Hui-Jun

    2008-04-01

    Warrgenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) is the most common autosomal dominantly-inherited syndrome with hearing loss. MITF (microphthalmia associated transcription factor)is a basic-helix-loop-helix-luecine zipper (bHLHZip) factor which regulates expression of tyrosinase, and is involved in melanocyte differentiation. Mutations in MITF associated with WS2 have been identified in some but not all affected families. Here, we report a three-generation Chinese family with a point mutation in the MITF gene causing WS2. The proband exhibits congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis and facial freckles. One of family members manifests sensorineural deafness, and the other patients show premature greying or/and freckles. This mutation, heterozygous deletion c.639delA, creates a stop codon in exon 7 and is predicted to result in a truncated protein lacking normal interaction with its target DNA motif. This mutation is a novel mutation and the third case identified in exon 7 of MITF in WS2. Though there is only one base pair distance between this novel mutation and the other two documented cases and similar amino acids change, significant difference is seen in clinical phenotype, which suggests genetic background may play an important role.

  8. Cochlear implant rehabilitation outcomes in Waardenburg syndrome children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Andrade, Susana Margarida; Monteiro, Ana Rita Tomé; Martins, Jorge Humberto Ferreira; Alves, Marisa Costa; Santos Silva, Luis Filipe; Quadros, Jorge Manuel Cardoso; Ribeiro, Carlos Alberto Reis

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of children with documented Waardenburg syndrome implanted in the ENT Department of Centro Hospitalar de Coimbra, concerning postoperative speech perception and production, in comparison to the rest of non-syndromic implanted children. A retrospective chart review was performed for children congenitally deaf who had undergone cochlear implantation with multichannel implants, diagnosed as having Waardenburg syndrome, between 1992 and 2011. Postoperative performance outcomes were assessed and confronted with results obtained by children with non-syndromic congenital deafness also implanted in our department. Open-set auditory perception skills were evaluated by using European Portuguese speech discrimination tests (vowels test, monosyllabic word test, number word test and words in sentence test). Meaningful auditory integration scales (MAIS) and categories of auditory performance (CAP) were also measured. Speech production was further assessed and included results on meaningful use of speech Scale (MUSS) and speech intelligibility rating (SIR). To date, 6 implanted children were clinically identified as having WS type I, and one met the diagnosis of type II. All WS children received multichannel cochlear implants, with a mean age at implantation of 30.6±9.7months (ranging from 19 to 42months). Postoperative outcomes in WS children were similar to other nonsyndromic children. In addition, in number word and vowels discrimination test WS group showed slightly better performances, as well as in MUSS and MAIS assessment. Our study has shown that cochlear implantation should be considered a rehabilitative option for Waardenburg syndrome children with profound deafness, enabling the development and improvement of speech perception and production abilities in this group of patients, reinforcing their candidacy for this audio-oral rehabilitation method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Waardenburg Syndrome Type 4 Gene, SOX10, Is a Novel Tumor-associated Antigen Identified in a Patient with a Dramatic Response to Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Hung T.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have identified, for the first time, the presence of de novo cellular immune reactivity against the transcription factor SOX10, using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes obtained from a patient who experienced a dramatic clinical response to immunotherapy. SOX10 acts as a critical transactivator of tyrosinase-related protein-2 during melanoblast development and a potent transactivator of micropthalmia-associated transcription factor, which is considered to be a master gene that controls the development and postnatal survival of melanocytes. Mutations in SOX10 result in Waardenburg syndrome type 4. The overlapping epitopes AWISKPPGV and SAWISKPPGV, designated SOX10: 332–340 and SOX10: 331–340, respectively, were recognized by tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte clone M37 in an HLA-A2-restricted fashion. PMID:12036907

  10. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o'clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with Waardenburg syndrome and diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Waardenburg syndrome with familial unilateral renal agenesis: a new syndrome variant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Katie M; Smith, Alisha J; Dansby, Linda M; Diskin, Charles J

    2015-06-01

    A 64-year-old man with Waardenburg syndrome presented with anuria and was subsequently discovered by renal ultrasound to have unilateral renal agenesis. The patient is one of three generations with incidental finding of renal agenesis also marked by the presence of Waardenburg syndrome. To our knowledge, there has been no mention elsewhere in the scientific literature of a variant of Waardenburg syndrome with associated renal agenesis. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  12. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashima T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Kashima, Hideo Akiyama, Shoji KishiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma 371-8511, JapanAbstract: A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o’clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibited hypochromic iris. Hypopigmentation of the fundus was seen in the superior part of her right eye. This eye also had a huge neovascularization on the optic disc that was 7 discs in diameter. Conversely, her left fundi showed hypopigmentation of the fundus in the entire region of the left eye, and dot hemorrhages were observed all over the left fundi, although no neovascularization could be seen microscopically. Fluorescein angiography showed a huge neovascularization in the right eye and a tiny neovascularization in the left eye. Gene analysis revealed the presence of the PAX3 gene homeobox domain mutation, which led to her being diagnosed as Waardenburg syndrome type 1. Magnetic resonance angiography showed there was no obstructive region at either of the internal carotid arteries and ophthalmic arteries. The severity of the diabetic retinopathy appeared to be correlated with the degree of hypopigmentation in the posterior fundus. We speculate that hypopigmentation of the fundus in Waardenburg syndrome may be responsible for the reduction in retinal metabolism, which led to a reduction in oxygen consumption and prevented further aggravation of the diabetic retinopathy. Only laser treatments using short wavelengths was effective in this case. While the extinction coefficient for hemoglobin when using green light is higher than when using yellow light, the differences between these wavelengths tend to disappear when oxygenated hemoglobin is present. To the best of

  13. [Waardenburg syndrome--ophthalmic findings and criteria for diagnosis: case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Luciano Sólia; Paranaíba, Lívia Maris Ribeiro; Frota, Ana Cláudia; Gomes, Andreia; Versiani, Gisele; Martelli Júnior, Hercílio

    2012-10-01

    To describe the clinical and imaginological features of two families with Waardenburg syndrome: type I and II, with emphasis on ophthalmic manifestations, as well as the pattern of genetic inheritance. We conducted a clinical study involving two families affected by Waardenburg syndrome, and through the pedigree, determined the present pattern of genetic inheritance. Analyses were performed including the measurement of visual acuity, the presence of dystopia cantorum (telecanthus), evaluation of iris color and retinal mapping, as well as dermatological and otological examinations. The pedigree of the family affected by the Waardenburg syndrome type I showed an autosomal dominant mode of transmission. The syndrome was present at 85.71% of patients. The dystopia cantorum was the most frequent feature, followed by the white streak on the skin of the forehead, hypopigmentation of the iris and retina and deafness. The Waardenburg syndrome family type II had 33.33% of family members affected by the syndrome. No member had dystopia cantorum and hypopigmentation of the iris. Three patients had sensorineural hearing loss (12.5%), associated with white forelock and achromatic spots confluent by the body. This study shows the importance of the ophthalmologist in aiding the diagnosis of this rare genetic condition, since it includes ocular disorders such as telecanthus, hypopigmentation of the iris and retina. The cantorum dystopia is the main diagnostic criterion to differentiate type I and II syndrome and should be done by a trained ophthalmologist. The families are in medical monitoring, receiving genetic guidelines and care related to eye protection.

  14. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome: a case highlighting the importance of a holistic approach to assessing a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Amogh; Prathyusha, Lanka; Patil, Muganagowda

    2017-12-22

    We present the case of a 45-day-old child with the chief complaint of failure to pass stools for 10 days. After initial investigation, the patient was found to have Hirschsprung's disease. However, with further examination and analysis, the extremely rare diagnosis of type 4 Waardenburg syndrome was made (also known as Shah-Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg-Hirschsprung's disease). © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Upregulation of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair in murine neural crest cells results in a complex phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Karl-F; Nguyen, Chloé M A; Cardinal, Tatiana; Charrier, Baptiste; Silversides, David W; Pilon, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a neurocristopathy characterized by a combination of skin and hair depigmentation, and inner ear defects. In the type 4 form, these defects show comorbidity with Hirschsprung disease, a disorder marked by an absence of neural ganglia in the distal colon, triggering functional intestinal obstruction. Here, we report that the Spot mouse line - obtained through an insertional mutagenesis screen for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC) development - is a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 4. We found that the Spot insertional mutation causes overexpression of an overlapping gene pair composed of the transcription-factor-encoding Nr2f1 and the antisense long non-coding RNA A830082K12Rik in NCCs through a mechanism involving relief of repression of these genes. Consistent with the previously described role of Nr2f1 in promoting gliogenesis in the central nervous system, we further found that NCC-derived progenitors of the enteric nervous system fail to fully colonize Spot embryonic guts owing to their premature differentiation in glial cells. Taken together, our data thus identify silencer elements of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair as new candidate loci for Waardenburg syndrome type 4. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Upregulation of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair in murine neural crest cells results in a complex phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg syndrome type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-F. Bergeron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a neurocristopathy characterized by a combination of skin and hair depigmentation, and inner ear defects. In the type 4 form, these defects show comorbidity with Hirschsprung disease, a disorder marked by an absence of neural ganglia in the distal colon, triggering functional intestinal obstruction. Here, we report that the Spot mouse line – obtained through an insertional mutagenesis screen for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC development – is a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 4. We found that the Spot insertional mutation causes overexpression of an overlapping gene pair composed of the transcription-factor-encoding Nr2f1 and the antisense long non-coding RNA A830082K12Rik in NCCs through a mechanism involving relief of repression of these genes. Consistent with the previously described role of Nr2f1 in promoting gliogenesis in the central nervous system, we further found that NCC-derived progenitors of the enteric nervous system fail to fully colonize Spot embryonic guts owing to their premature differentiation in glial cells. Taken together, our data thus identify silencer elements of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair as new candidate loci for Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

  17. Hearing loss in Waardenburg syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Feng, Y; Acke, F R; Coucke, P; Vleminckx, K; Dhooge, I J

    2015-06-22

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by hearing loss (HL) and pigment disturbances of hair, skin and iris. Classifications exist based on phenotype and genotype. The auditory phenotype is inconsistently reported among the different Waardenburg types and causal genes, urging the need for an up-to-date literature overview on this particular topic. We performed a systematic review in search for articles describing auditory features in WS patients along with the associated genotype. Prevalences of HL were calculated and correlated with the different types and genes of WS. Seventy-three articles were included, describing 417 individual patients. HL was found in 71.0% and was predominantly bilateral and sensorineural. Prevalence of HL among the different clinical types significantly differed (WS1: 52.3%, WS2: 91.6%, WS3: 57.1%, WS4: 83.5%). Mutations in SOX10 (96.5%), MITF (89.6%) and SNAI2 (100%) are more frequently associated with hearing impairment than other mutations. Of interest, the distinct disease-causing genes are able to better predict the auditory phenotype compared with different clinical types of WS. Consequently, it is important to confirm the clinical diagnosis of WS with molecular analysis in order to optimally inform patients about the risk of HL. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A novel mutation in the MITF may be digenic with GJB2 mutations in a large Chinese family of Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xukun; Zhang, Tianyu; Wang, Zhengmin; Jiang, Yi; Chen, Yan; Wang, Hongyan; Ma, Duan; Wang, Lei; Li, Huawei

    2011-12-20

    Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) is associated with syndromic deafness. A subset of WS2, WS2A, accounting for approximately 15% of patients, is attributed to mutations in the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene. We examined the genetic basis of WS2 in a large Chinese family. All 9 exons of the MITF gene, the single coding exon (exon 2) of the most common hereditary deafness gene GJB2 and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) 12S rRNA were sequenced. A novel heterozygous mutation c.[742_743delAAinsT;746_747delCA] in exon 8 of the MITF gene co-segregates with WS2 in the family. The MITF mutation results in a premature termination codon and a truncated MITF protein with only 247 of the 419 wild type amino acids. The deaf proband had this MITF gene heterozygous mutation as well as a c.[109G>A]+[235delC] compound heterozygous pathogenic mutation in the GJB2 gene. No pathogenic mutation was found in mtDNA 12S rRNA in this family. Thus, a novel compound heterozygous mutation, c.[742_743delAAinsT;746_747delCA] in MITF exon 8 was the key genetic reason for WS2 in this family, and a digenic effect of MITF and GJB2 genes may contribute to deafness of the proband. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Review and update of mutations causing Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, Véronique; Ente, Dorothée; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Goossens, Michel; Marlin, Sandrine; Bondurand, Nadège

    2010-04-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by the association of pigmentation abnormalities, including depigmented patches of the skin and hair, vivid blue eyes or heterochromia irides, and sensorineural hearing loss. However, other features such as dystopia canthorum, musculoskeletal abnormalities of the limbs, Hirschsprung disease, or neurological defects are found in subsets of patients and used for the clinical classification of WS. Six genes are involved in this syndrome: PAX3 (encoding the paired box 3 transcription factor), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDN3 (endothelin 3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), SOX10 (encoding the Sry bOX10 transcription factor), and SNAI2 (snail homolog 2), with different frequencies. In this review we provide an update on all WS genes and set up mutation databases, summarize molecular and functional data available for each of them, and discuss the applications in diagnostics and genetic counseling. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. CHOROIDAL MELANOMA IN A PATIENT WITH WAARDENBURG SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itty, Sujit; Richter, Elizabeth R; McCannel, Tara A

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of choroidal malignant melanoma in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome and bilateral choroidal pigmentary abnormalities. Clinical examination and multimodal imaging of the case. A 45-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic flat choroidal pigmentation abnormalities in both eyes. A choroidal lesion was identified in the inferotemporal periphery of the left eye arising from an area of hyperpigmentation; ultrasonography findings were consistent with a choroidal melanoma. The patient endorsed a personal and family history of premature graying of hair and was identified to have dystopia canthorum consistent with the diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome. The authors present the first reported case of concurrent Waardenburg syndrome and choroidal malignant melanoma. This cooccurrence may suggest that the relative hyperpigmented regions in affected fundi may be abnormal and should be monitored closely for the development of choroidal melanoma.

  1. Waardenburg's Syndrome in a Nigerian Family | Onabolu | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both girls presented with white forelock, heterochromia irides and sensorineural deafness. WS is inherited as an ... Deafness, which is the most disabling feature of this syndrome should be identified early to prepare the child for proper education. KEY WORDS: Waardenburg's Syndrome, genetic mutation, deafness. [Nig.

  2. Anophthalmia-Waardenburg syndrome: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyugül, Z; Seven, M; Hacihanefioğlu, S; Kartal, A; Suyugül, N; Cenani, A

    1996-04-24

    We report on 2 Turkish families with children who had bilateral anophthalmia, upper and lower limb abnormalities, mental retardation and consanguineous parents. We have evaluated the 2 cases in the first family and the only case in the second as anophthalmia-Waardenburg syndrome. This is an extremely rare autosomal recessive syndrome.

  3. [Waardenburg syndrome. A heterogenic disorder with variable penetrance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, F; Bereketoglu, M; Turan, O; Hribar, K; Maassen, M M; Günhan, O; Zenner, H-P; Pfister, M

    2004-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by pigmentary anomalies of the skin, hairs, eyes and various defects of other neural crest derived tissues. It accounts for over 2% of congenital hearing impairment. At least four types are recognized on the basis of clinical and genetic criteria. Based on a screening of congenitally hearing impaired children, 12 families with WS type II were detected. Of special interest was the phenotype of these families, in particular the reduced penetrance of hearing impairment within the families. In all cases a high variability of the disease phenotype was detected and the penetrance of the clinical traits varied accordingly. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the clinical phenotype even in a single family. Based on these studies, we plan to identify the pathogenetic cause of the disease in order to perform a detailed genotype/phenotype analysis.

  4. Waardenburg syndrome with extended aganglionosis: report of 3 new cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Irfan; Turk, Erdal; Ortac, Ragip; Kandirici, Aliye

    2009-06-01

    The Waardenburg-Shah syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with varied penetration where Hirschsprung's disease and the Waardenburg syndrome are seen together. Although the length of the involved intestinal segment varies in this syndrome, most patients had total colonic aganglionosis with or without small bowel involvement. We present in this study 2 siblings and one first-degree relative for a total of 3 male patients with Waardenburg syndrome and total colonic aganglionosis with or without small bowel involvement, together with their clinical characteristics and treatment methods. The patients who presented with intestinal obstruction findings within the first 48 hours after birth were operated on with 2 patients under elective conditions and 1 as an emergency. The ganglionic segment lengths were 6, 8, and 20 cm, respectively. Aganglionic enterostomy was performed, and the Ziegler operation was used for these patients. The enterostomies started to function on the third postoperative week, and they started to gain weight. However, all died because of sepsis on the 5th to 12th month. Waardenburg-Shah syndrome patients have a higher incidence of total colonic aganglionosis with or without small bowel involvement. The Ziegler operation may be used in patients with inadequate ganglionic bowel length to gain some time for the child to grow and to decrease total parenteral nutrition complications.

  5. Identification of a novel mutation in the paired domain of PAX3 in an Iranian family with waardenburg syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirova, V N; Rezaie, T M; Khoshsorour, M M; Sarfarazi, M

    2000-03-01

    Waardenburg syndrome Type I (WS1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that has previously been associated with mutations in the PAX3 gene on the 2q35 region. In this study, we used an Iranian WS1 family with seven affected individuals in three generations. The phenotypic characteristics of the family include sensorineural deafness, dystopia canthorum, hypopigmented skin patches of the upper limbs, congenital white forelock, confluent white eyebrows, nonpigmented iris, poliosis, and hypopigmentation of the retina. Herein, we report a previously unidentified single-base substitution in exon II (C-->T at position 218) that results in a change of serine to leucine (S73L) in this family. This change was not observed in 100 chromosomes of healthy unrelated individuals. This mutation is within the PAX3 paired domain region, a structure that is highly conserved and implicated in DNA binding. This is the first identification of a PAX3 mutation for this phenotype in the Iranian population. This also provides additional confirmation for the involvement of this gene in the etiology of WS1.

  6. Spectrum of temporal bone abnormalities in patients with Waardenburg syndrome and SOX10 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Baumann, C; Noël-Pétroff, N; Sekkal, A; Couloigner, V; Devriendt, K; Wilson, M; Marlin, S; Sebag, G; Pingault, V

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome, characterized by deafness and pigmentation abnormalities, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, consisting of 4 distinct subtypes and involving several genes. SOX10 mutations have been found both in types 2 and 4 Waardenburg syndrome and neurologic variants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both the full spectrum and relative frequencies of inner ear malformations in these patients. Fifteen patients with Waardenburg syndrome and different SOX10 mutations were studied retrospectively. Imaging was performed between February 2000 and March 2010 for cochlear implant work-up, diagnosis of hearing loss, and/or evaluation of neurologic impairment. Eleven patients had both CT and MR imaging examinations, 3 had MR imaging only, and 1 had CT only. Temporal bone abnormalities were bilateral. The most frequent pattern associated agenesis or hypoplasia of ≥1 semicircular canal, an enlarged vestibule, and a cochlea with a reduced size and occasionally an abnormal shape, but with normal partition in the 13/15 cases that could be analyzed. Three patients lacked a cochlear nerve, bilaterally in 2 patients. In addition, associated abnormalities were found when adequate MR imaging sequences were available: agenesis of the olfactory bulbs (7/8), hypoplastic or absent lacrimal glands (11/14), hypoplastic parotid glands (12/14), and white matter signal anomalies (7/13). In the appropriate clinical context, bilateral agenesis or hypoplasia of the semicircular canals or both, associated with an enlarged vestibule and a cochlear deformity, strongly suggests a diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome linked to a SOX10 mutation.

  7. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Case Study of Two Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Karan; Arora, Archana

    2015-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with an incidence of 1 in 40,000 that manifests with sensorineural deafness, pigmentation defects of the skin, hair and iris and various defects of neural crest-derived tissues. This genetically heterogeneous disease accounts for >2 % of the congenitally deaf population. Mutations in the EDN3, EDNRB, MITF, PAX3, SNAI2, and SOX10 genes can cause Waardenburg syndrome. We here report a case of 12 year old female who presented with chief complaint of decreased hearing in both ears and had clinical features consistent with Waardenburg syndrome. She had a distinct white forelock of hair in the midline along with striking bilateral blue iris. Also a white depigmented patch was present on the right forearm. Both eyes had bright red fundal reflex with choroidal depigmentation. Her younger brother, the second case in this study, had similar blue eyes, white forelock of hair, depigmented skin patch and choroidal depigmentation but with normal hearing. Their father had a history of premature graying of hair. All the primary care physicians coming across a child with blue eyes and white forelock of hair should get the child's hearing tested at the first instance, if not already tested. An early diagnosis and improvement of hearing impairment with timely intervention are the most important for psychological and intellectual development of children with Waardenburg syndrome.

  8. Tetraphocomelia with the Waardenburg syndrome and multiple malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hue-Tsi; Wainwright, Helen; Beighton, Peter

    2009-04-01

    A male infant delivered spontaneously at the 29th week of pregnancy had gross tetraphocomelia and features of the Waardenburg syndrome. There were no relevant factors in the pregnancy nor family history. It is possible that microdeletions or contiguous gene defects are involved in the pathogenesis of these malformations.

  9. Anaesthesia Management in a Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kevser; Ergil, Julide; Öztürk, İbrahim

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that may cause hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, neurocristopathy and partial albinism. Incidence is estimated as 2%-3% among the cases of congenital deafness and 1/42,000 of the general population. Children with Waardenburg syndrome usually require anaesthesia for the cochlear implant operation in early age. The features of the syndrome that may bear importance for anaesthetic management are laryngomalacia, multiple muscle contractures, limited neck movements, cyanotic cardiopathy and electrolyte imbalance. Patients with Waardenburg syndrome stand for difficult airway. We aimed to report anaesthetic management of a child with Waardenburg syndrome who underwent surgery for cochlear implantation.

  10. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss. Aim: To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations. Method: This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July 2012 were included in the study. Intraoperative neural response telemetry, hearing evaluation, speech perception, and speech production data before and after surgery were assessed. Results: During this period, 806 patients received a cochlear implant and 10 of these (1.2% were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome. Eight of the children received a Nucleus 24® implant and 1 child and 1 adult received a DigiSonic SP implant. The mean age at implantation was 44 months among the children. The average duration of use of a cochlear implant at the time of the study was 43 months. Intraoperative neural responses were present in all cases. Patients who could use the speech processor effectively had a pure tone average of 31 dB in free-field conditions. In addition, the MUSS and MAIS questionnaires revealed improvements in speech perception and production. Four patients did not have a good outcome, which might have been associated with ineffective use of the speech processor. Conclusion: Despite the heterogeneity of the group, patients with Waardenburg syndrome who received cochlear implants were found to have hearing thresholds that allowed access to speech sounds. However, patients who received early intervention and rehabilitation showed better evolution of auditory perception.

  11. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos; Samuel, Paola Angélica; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schimdt; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-07-01

     The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss.  To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations.  This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July 2012 were included in the study. Intraoperative neural response telemetry, hearing evaluation, speech perception, and speech production data before and after surgery were assessed.  During this period, 806 patients received a cochlear implant and 10 of these (1.2%) were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome. Eight of the children received a Nucleus 24(®) implant and 1 child and 1 adult received a DigiSonic SP implant. The mean age at implantation was 44 months among the children. The average duration of use of a cochlear implant at the time of the study was 43 months. Intraoperative neural responses were present in all cases. Patients who could use the speech processor effectively had a pure tone average of 31 dB in free-field conditions. In addition, the MUSS and MAIS questionnaires revealed improvements in speech perception and production. Four patients did not have a good outcome, which might have been associated with ineffective use of the speech processor.  Despite the heterogeneity of the group, patients with Waardenburg syndrome who received cochlear implants were found to have hearing thresholds that allowed access to speech sounds. However, patients who received early intervention and rehabilitation showed better evolution of auditory perception.

  12. [A case report on Waardenburg syndrome with cleft lip].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traoré, H; Traoré, D; Ouane, O; Simpara, B; Ongoiba, N

    2011-01-01

    The syndrome of Waardenburg is a congenital plurimal formatif unit rare described and individualized for the first time by Waardenburg in 1951. It associates in its form most typical dystopie canthale intern, a widening of the base of the nose, disorders of the pigmentation. We wanted brought back this case because of its scarcity. It was about a 18 month old infant without particular antecedents, which was drawn up to us for correction of congenital malformation. The interrogation did not make it possible to find signs functional notable. With the examination it had a general good state. t presented a bilateral iridal hypochromy, a dystopie canthale, a canitie, a bilateral labial slit. The diagnosis of presumption was the Syndrome of Waardenburg because of the description of at least 2 major signs: dystopie canthale and disorders of the pigmentation. The complementary examinations carried out were those of the preoperative assessment which returned normal. The biological diagnosis which rests on the search for change of gene was not made for reasons of technical order and financier. The surgery is centered on the treatment of the labial slit. A chéiloplastie according to Millard was carried out. The continuations were simple. The Syndrome of Waardenburg is a rare, hereditary entity. A neurosensory deafness, musculo-skeletal anomalies, thus qu' a disease of Hirschsprung will have to be systematically required. The surgery of the slit or the télécanthus allows an social integration of the subjects reached.

  13. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations : A case report and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoid (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations

  14. Locus heterogeneity for Waardenburg syndrome is predictive of clinical subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, L A; Arnos, K S; Asher, J H; Baldwin, C T; Diehl, S R; Friedman, T B; Greenberg, J; Grundfast, K M; Hoth, C; Lalwani, A K

    1994-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited and clinically variable syndrome of deafness, pigmentary changes, and distinctive facial features. Clinically, WS type I (WS1) is differentiated from WS type II (WS2) by the high frequency of dystopia canthorum in the family. In some families, WS is caused by mutations in the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q. We have typed microsatellite markers within and flanking PAX3 in 41 WS1 kindreds and 26 WS2 kindreds in order to estimate the proportion of families with probable mutations in PAX3 and to study the relationship between phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. Evaluation of heterogeneity in location scores obtained by multilocus analysis indicated that WS is linked to PAX3 in 60% of all WS families and in 100% of WS1 families. None of the WS2 families were linked. In those families in which equivocal lod scores (between -2 and +1) were found, PAX3 mutations have been identified in 5 of the 15 WS1 families but in none of the 4 WS2 families. Although preliminary studies do not suggest any association between the phenotype and the molecular pathology in 20 families with known PAX3 mutations and in four patients with chromosomal abnormalities in the vicinity of PAX3, the presence of dystopia in multiple family members is a reliable indicator for identifying families likely to have a defect in PAX3.

  15. Novel mutations of PAX3, MITF, and SOX10 genes in Chinese patients with type I or type II Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Jiang, Lu; Xie, Zhiguo; Mei, Lingyun; He, Chufeng; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Feng, Yong

    2010-06-18

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, pigment disturbances, and sensorineural deafness. There are four WS subtypes. WS1 is mostly caused by PAX3 mutations, while MITF, SNAI2, and SOX10 mutations are associated with WS2. More than 100 different disease-causing mutations have been reported in many ethnic groups, but the data from Chinese patients with WS remains poor. Herein we report 18 patients from 15 Chinese WS families, in which five cases were diagnosed as WS1 and the remaining as WS2. Clinical evaluation revealed intense phenotypic variability in Chinese WS patients. Heterochromia iridis and sensorineural hearing loss were the most frequent features (100% and 88.9%, respectively) of the two subtypes. Many brown freckles on normal skin could be a special subtype of cutaneous pigment disturbances in Chinese WS patients. PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, and SOX10 genes mutations were screened for in all the patients. A total of nine mutations in 11 families were identified and seven of them were novel. The SOX10 mutations in WS2 were first discovered in the Chinese population, with an estimated frequency similar to that of MITF mutations, implying SOX10 is an important pathogenic gene in Chinese WS2 cases and should be considered for first-step analysis in WS2, as well as MITF. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Multimodal Ultrawide-Field Imaging Features in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Netan; Rao, Rajesh C

    2015-06-01

    A 45-year-old woman was referred for bilateral irregular fundus pigmentation. Dilated fundus examination revealed irregular hypopigmentation posterior to the equator in both eyes, confirmed by fundus autofluorescence. A thickened choroid was seen on enhanced-depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI SD-OCT). Systemic evaluation revealed sensorineural deafness, telecanthus, and a white forelock. Further investigation revealed a first-degree relative with Waardenburg syndrome. Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by a group of features including telecanthus, a broad nasal root, synophrys of the eyebrows, piedbaldism, heterochromia irides, and deafness. Choroidal hypopigmentation is a unique feature that can be visualized with ultrawide-field fundus autofluorescence. The choroid may also be thickened and its thickness measured with EDI SD-OCT. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Waardenburg Syndrome: A Report of Two Familial Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Safal Khanal, BOptom; Pragati Gautam, MD; Nabin Paudel, BOptom

    2013-01-01

    Background: Waardenburg syndrome is a rare autosomally-inherited developmental disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness in association with pigmentary anomalies comprising various ocular features including dystopia canthorum, iris heterochromia, eyebrow flare, and fundus alterations. It is a congenital non-progressive genetic disorder that has been found to result in hearing loss, reduced vision, reduced self esteem, problems related to appearance, and decreased intellectual functioni...

  18. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. F...

  19. Anesthetic management of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambi, Uday S.; Adarsh, E. S.; Hatti, Ramesh; Samalad, Vijaymahantesh

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah–Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases. PMID:22754447

  20. Anesthetic management of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome: Experience of two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday S Ambi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development. Literature regarding the anesthetic management of these cases is limited. We present 2 cases of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and discuss them in the context of review of previously published cases.

  1. Chronic constipation recognized as a sign of a SOX10 mutation in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Yukiko; Namba, Kazunori; Nakano, Atsuko; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2014-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by hearing loss, pigmentation abnormalities, dysmorphologic features, and neurological phenotypes. Waardenburg syndrome consists of four distinct subtypes, and SOX10 mutations have been identified in type II and type IV. Type IV differs from type II owing to the presence of Hirschsprung disease. We identified a de novo nonsense mutation in SOX10 (p.G39X) in a female pediatric patient with Waardenburg syndrome with heterochromia iridis, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, inner ear malformations, and overall hypopigmentation of the hair without dystopia canthorum. This patient has experienced chronic constipation since she was a neonate, but anorectal manometry showed a normal anorectal reflex. Chronic constipation in this patient was likely to be a consequence of a mild intestinal disorder owing to the SOX10 mutation, and this patient was considered to have a clinical phenotype intermediate between type II and type IV of the syndrome. Chronic constipation may be recognized as indicative of a SOX10 mutation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neural tube defects in Waardenburg syndrome: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph; Miriyala, Kalpana

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment abnormalities, and is caused by variants in the PAX3 homeodomain. PAX3 variants have been associated with severe neural tube defects in mice and humans, but the frequency and clinical manifestations of this symptom remain largely unexplored in humans. Consequently, the role of PAX3 in human neural tube formation remains a study of interest, for clinical as well as research purposes. Though the association between spina bifida and WS1 is now well-documented, no study has attempted to characterize the range of spina bifida phenotypes seen in WS. Spina bifida encompasses several diagnoses with a wide scope of clinical severity, ranging from spina bifida occulta to myelomeningocele. We present a patient with Waardenburg syndrome type 1 caused by a novel missense variant in PAX3, presenting with myelomeningocele, Arnold-Chiari malformation, and hydrocephalus at birth. Additionally, we review 32 total cases of neural tube defects associated with WS. Including this report, there have been 15 published cases of myelomeningocele, 10 cases of unspecified spina bifida, 3 cases of sacral dimples, 0 cases of meningocele, and 4 cases of miscellaneous other neural tube defects. Though the true frequency of each phenotype cannot be determined from this collection of cases, these results demonstrate that Waardenburg syndrome type 1 carries a notable risk of severe neural tube defects, which has implications in prenatal and genetic counseling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A 725 kb deletion at 22q13.1 chromosomal region including SOX10 gene in a boy with a neurologic variant of Waardenburg syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomou, Elisavet; Manolakos, Emmanouil; Petersen, Michael; Thomaidis, Loretta; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Orru, Sandro; Papoulidis, Ioannis

    2012-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare (1/40,000) autosomal dominant disorder resulting from melanocyte defects, with varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four clinical subtypes (WS1-S4). Six genes have been identified to be associated with the different subtypes of WS, among which SOX10, which is localized within the region 22q13.1. Lately it has been suggested that whole SOX10 gene deletions can be encountered when testing for WS. In this study we report a case of a 13-year-old boy with a unique de novo 725 kb deletion within the 22q13.1 chromosomal region, including the SOX10 gene and presenting clinical features of a neurologic variant of WS2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Allelic mutations of KITLG, encoding KIT ligand, cause asymmetric and unilateral hearing loss and Waardenburg syndrome type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zazo Seco, C. (Celia); Serrão De Castro, L. (Luciana); J.W.I. van Nierop; Morín, M. (Matías); S.N. Jhangiani (Shalini N.); E.J.J. Verver (Eva J. J.); M. Schraders (Margit); Maiwald, N. (Nadine); Wesdorp, M. (Mieke); H. Venselaar (Hanka); L. Spruijt (Liesbeth); Oostrik, J. (Jaap); J. Schoots (Jeroen); J. van Reeuwijk (Jeroen); Lelieveld, S.H. (Stefan H.); P.L.M. Huygen (Patrick); Insenser, M. (María); R.J. Admiraal (Ronald); R.J.E. Pennings (Ronald J.E.); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); J. de Ligt (Joep); H.G. Yntema; Jansen, J.H. (Joop H.); D. Muzny (Donna); G. Huls (Gerwin); M.M. van Rossum (Michelle); J.R. Lupski (James R.); Moreno-Pelayo, M.A. (Miguel Angel); H.P.M. Kunst (Henricus P.M.); H. Kremer (Hannie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractLinkage analysis combined with whole-exome sequencing in a large family with congenital and stable non-syndromic unilateral and asymmetric hearing loss (NS-UHL/AHL) revealed a heterozygous truncating mutation, c.286-303delinsT (p.Ser96Ter), in KITLG. This mutation co-segregated with

  5. Allelic Mutations of KITLG, Encoding KIT Ligand, Cause Asymmetric and Unilateral Hearing Loss and Waardenburg Syndrome Type 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zazo Seco, C.; Castro, L.S. de; Nierop, J.W. van; Morin, M.; Jhangiani, S.; Verver, E.J.; Schraders, M.; Maiwald, N.; Wesdorp, F.M.; Venselaar, H.; Spruijt, L.; Oostrik, J.; Schoots, J.; Reeuwijk, J. van; Lelieveld, S.H.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Insenser, M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Arias Vasquez, A.; Ligt, J. de; Yntema, H.G.; Jansen, J.H.; Muzny, D.M.; Huls, G.A.; Rossum, M.M. van; Lupski, J.R.; Moreno-Pelayo, M.A.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Kremer, H.

    2015-01-01

    Linkage analysis combined with whole-exome sequencing in a large family with congenital and stable non-syndromic unilateral and asymmetric hearing loss (NS-UHL/AHL) revealed a heterozygous truncating mutation, c.286_303delinsT (p.Ser96Ter), in KITLG. This mutation co-segregated with NS-UHL/AHL as a

  6. Familial co-segregation of Coffin-Lowry syndrome inherited from the mother and autosomal dominant Waardenburg type IV syndrome due to deletion of EDNRB inherited from the father.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupe, Jacob; Sampath, Srirangan; Lacassie, Yves

    2014-10-01

    We report an African-American family that was identified after the proposita was referred for diagnostic evaluation at 4½ months with a history of Hirschsprung and dysmorphic features typical of Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Family evaluation revealed that the father had heterochromidia irides and hypertelorism supporting the clinical diagnosis of WS; however, examination of the mother revealed characteristic facial and digital features of Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS). Molecular testing of the mother identified a novel 2 bp deletion (c.865_866delCA) in codon 289 of RPS6KA3 leading to a frame-shift and premature termination of translation 5 codons downstream (NM_004586.2:p.Gln289ValfsX5). This deletion also was identified in the proposita and her three sisters with a clinical suspicion of CLS, all of whom as carriers for this X-linked disorder had very subtle manifestations. The molecular confirmation of WS type 4 (Shah-Waardenburg; WS4) was not as straightforward. To evaluate WS types 1-4, multiple sequential molecular tests were requested, including Sanger sequencing of all exons, and deletion/duplication analysis using MLPA for PAX3, MITF, SOX10, EDN3 and EDNRB. Although sequencing did not identify any disease causing variants, MLPA identified a heterozygous deletion of the entire EDNRB in the father. This deletion was also found in the proposita and the oldest child. Since the heterozygous deletion was the only change identified in EDNRB, this family represents one of the few cases of an autosomal dominant inheritance of WS4 involving the endothelin pathway. Altogether, clinical evaluation of the family revealed one child to be positive for WS4 and two positive for CLS, while two children were positive for both diseases simultaneously (including the proposita) while another pair test negative for either disease. This kinship is an example of the coincidence of two conditions co-segregating in one family, with variable phenotypes requiring molecular testing to

  7. Anaesthesia Management in a Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Peker, Kevser; Ergil, Julide; Öztürk, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that may cause hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, neurocristopathy and partial albinism. Incidence is estimated as 2%–3% among the cases of congenital deafness and 1/42,000 of the general population. Children with Waardenburg syndrome usually require anaesthesia for the cochlear implant operation in early age. The features of the syndrome that may bear importance for anaesthetic management are laryngomalacia, multiple muscle contr...

  8. Waardenburg syndrome: Novel mutations in a large Brazilian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocángel, Magnolia Astrid Pretell; Melo, Uirá Souto; Alves, Leandro Ucela; Pardono, Eliete; Lourenço, Naila Cristina Vilaça; Marcolino, Humberto Vicente Cezar; Otto, Paulo Alberto; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2018-06-01

    This paper deals with the molecular investigation of Waardenburg syndrome (WS) in a sample of 49 clinically diagnosed probands (most from southeastern Brazil), 24 of them having the type 1 (WS1) variant (10 familial and 14 isolated cases) and 25 being affected by the type 2 (WS2) variant (five familial and 20 isolated cases). Sequential Sanger sequencing of all coding exons of PAX3, MITF, EDN3, EDNRB, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes, followed by CNV detection by MLPA of PAX3, MITF and SOX10 genes in selected cases revealed many novel pathogenic variants. Molecular screening, performed in all patients, revealed 19 causative variants (19/49 = 38.8%), six of them being large whole-exon deletions detected by MLPA, seven (four missense and three nonsense substitutions) resulting from single nucleotide substitutions (SNV), and six representing small indels. A pair of dizygotic affected female twins presented the c.430delC variant in SOX10, but the mutation, imputed to gonadal mosaicism, was not found in their unaffected parents. At least 10 novel causative mutations, described in this paper, were found in this Brazilian sample. Copy-number-variation detected by MLPA identified the causative mutation in 12.2% of our cases, corresponding to 31.6% of all causative mutations. In the majority of cases, the deletions were sporadic, since they were not present in the parents of isolated cases. Our results, as a whole, reinforce the fact that the screening of copy-number-variants by MLPA is a powerful tool to identify the molecular cause in WS patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of a Novel De Novo Heterozygous Deletion in the SOX10 Gene in Waardenburg Syndrome Type II Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haonan; Jin, Peng; Hao, Qian; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Xia; Wang, Ping

    2017-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associated with pigmentation abnormalities and sensorineural hearing loss. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of WSII in a patient and evaluated the reliability of the targeted next-generation exome sequencing method for the genetic diagnosis of WS. Clinical evaluations were conducted on the patient and targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to identify the candidate genes responsible for WSII. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were performed to confirm the targeted NGS results. Targeted NGS detected the entire deletion of the coding sequence (CDS) of the SOX10 gene in the WSII patient. MLPA results indicated that all exons of the SOX10 heterozygous deletion were detected; no aberrant copy number in the PAX3 and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) genes was found. Real-time qPCR results identified the mutation as a de novo heterozygous deletion. This is the first report of using a targeted NGS method for WS candidate gene sequencing; its accuracy was verified by using the MLPA and qPCR methods. Our research provides a valuable method for the genetic diagnosis of WS.

  10. [Mutation analysis of seven patients with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ziqi; Zhou, Yongan; Li, Pengli; Zhang, Quanbin; Li, Jiao; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Xiangshao; Feng, Yong

    2016-06-01

    To perform genetic analysis for 7 patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Potential mutation of MITF, PAX3, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Functions of non-synonymous polymorphisms were predicted with PolyPhen2 software. Seven mutations, including c.649-651delAGA (p.R217del), c.72delG (p.G24fs), c.185T>C (p.M62T), c.118C>T (p.Q40X), c.422T>C (p.L141P), c.640C>T (p.R214X) and c.28G>T(p.G43V), were detected in the patients. Among these, four mutations of the PAX3 gene (c.72delG, c.185T>C, c.118C>T and c.128G>T) and one SOX10 gene mutation (c.422T>C) were not reported previously. Three non-synonymous SNPs (c.185T>C, c.128G>T and c.422T>C) were predicted as harmful. Genetic mutations have been detected in all patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

  11. Waardenburg Syndrome: description of two novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, one of which incompletely penetrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete Pardono

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two different novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, detected in two families with cases of Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI. The missense mutation detected in one family involved a single substitution in exon 2 (c.142 G > T and was present both in the affected individual and in his clinically normal father. The mutation found in the second family consisted of a deletion of 13 bases, c.764-776del(TTACCCTGACATT, in exon 5.

  12. Partial Oculocutaneous Albinism: Two Siblings with Features of both Hermansky Pudlak and Waardenburg's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Mazhar; Niazi, Muhammad Khizar; Khan, Muhammad Saim; Nadeem, Yasser

    2015-04-01

    Albinism is an inherited abnormality of melanin synthesis with incidence of one per 20,000 births. Its clinical manifestations are related to the reduction or absence of pigmentation in the visual system and/or the skin and teguments. The clinical spectrum of Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA) has four types ranging from OCA 1 - 4, of which OCA 1, A-1 is the most severe form. Partial cutaneous albinism which is a subtype of OCA is associated with systemic immunodeficiency disorders like Chediak Higashi (CHS), Griscelli (GS) and Hermansky-Pudlak (HPS) syndromes. A7 years boy was labeled initially as a case of Hermansky Pudlak syndrome at the age of 01 year. He as well as his 4 years old younger brother when examined in detail along with audiological investigations were diagnosed as a rare presentation of both Hermansky Pudlak and Waardenburg's syndrome.

  13. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  14. Double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3 result in Waardenburg syndrome with increased penetrance in pigmentary defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T; Li, X; Huang, Q; Li, L; Chai, Y; Sun, L; Wang, X; Zhu, Y; Wang, Z; Huang, Z; Li, Y; Wu, H

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary defects of the hair, skin, and iris. Heterozygous mutations of MITF and its transactivator gene PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) and type I (WS1), respectively. Most patients with MITF or PAX3 mutations, however, show variable penetrance of WS-associated phenotypes even within families segregating the same mutation, possibly mediated by genetic background or specific modifiers. In this study, we reported a rare Waardenburg syndrome simplex family in which a pair of WS parents gave birth to a child with double heterozygous mutations of MITF and PAX3. Compared to his parents who carried a single mutation in either MITF or PAX3, this child showed increased penetrance of pigmentary defects including white forelock, white eyebrows and eyelashes, and patchy facial depigmentation. This observation suggested that the expression level of MITF is closely correlated to the penetrance of WS, and variants in transcription regulator genes of MITF may modify the relevant clinical phenotypes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. A de novo 2q35-q36.1 deletion incorporating IHH in a Chinese boy (47,XYY) with syndactyly, type III Waardenburg syndrome, and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Ren, G F; Zhang, H Z; Yi, C Y; Peng, Z J

    2016-12-02

    Reports of terminal and interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 2 are rare in the literature. Here, we present a case report concerning a Chinese boy with a 47,XYY karyotype and a de novo deletion comprising approximately 5 Mb between 2q35 and q36.1, along with syndactyly, type III Waardenburg syndrome, and congenital heart disease. High-resolution chromosome analysis to detect copy number variations was carried out using an Affymetrix microarray platform, and the genes affected by the patient's deletion, including IHH, were determined. However, no copy number changes were observed in his healthy parents. The present case exhibited novel syndactyly features, broadening the spectrum of clinical findings observed in individuals with 2q interstitial deletions. Our data, together with previous observations, suggest that IHH haploinsufficiency is the principal pathogenic factor in the syndactyly phenotype in this study, and that different types of variations at the IHH locus may cause divergent disease phenotypes. This is the first report of the involvement of IHH haploinsufficiency in syndactyly phenotype.

  16. Functional analysis of a SOX10 gene mutation associated with Waardenburg syndrome II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ping; Hao, Zi-Qi; Liu, Ya-Lan; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Feng, Yong

    2017-11-04

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant inherited non-syndromic type of hereditary hearing loss characterized by varying combinations of sensorineural hearing loss and abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and inner ear. WS is classified into four subtypes (WS1-WS4) based on additional symptoms. WS2 is characterized by the absence of additional symptoms. Recently, we identified a SOX10 missense mutation c.422T > C (p.L141P) associated with WS2. We performed functional assays and found the mutant loses DNA-binding capacity, shows aberrant cytoplasmic and nuclear localization, and fails to interact with PAX3. Therefore, the mutant cannot transactivate the MITF promoter effectively, inhibiting melanin synthesis and leading to WS2. Our study confirmed haploinsufficiency as the underlying pathogenesis for WS2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Paediatric Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nierop, Josephine W I; Snabel, Rebecca R; Langereis, Margreet; Pennings, Ronald J E; Admiraal, Ronald J C; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Kunst, Henricus P M

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the benefit of cochlear implantation in young deaf children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) compared to a reference group of young deaf children without additional disabilities. A retrospective study was conducted on children with WS who underwent cochlear implantation at the age of 2 years or younger. The post-operative results for speech perception (phonetically balanced standard Dutch consonant-vocal-consonant word lists) and language comprehension (the Reynell Developmental Language Scales, RDLS), expressed as a language quotient (LQ), were compared between the WS group and the reference group by using multiple linear regression analysis. A total of 14 children were diagnosed with WS, and 6 of them had additional disabilities. The WS children were implanted at a mean age of 1.6 years and the 48 children of the reference group at a mean age of 1.3 years. The WS children had a mean phoneme score of 80% and a mean LQ of 0.74 at 3 years post-implantation, and these results were comparable to those of the reference group. Only the factor additional disabilities had a significant negative influence on auditory perception and language comprehension. Children with WS performed similarly to the reference group in the present study, and these outcomes are in line with the previous literature. Although good counselling about additional disabilities concomitant to the syndrome is relevant, cochlear implantation is a good rehabilitation method for children with WS. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Cochlear implantation in Waardenburg syndrome: The Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Ramesh Chandra; Sikka, Kapil; Chaturvedy, Gaurav; Singh, Chirom Amit; Venkat Karthikeyan, C; Kumar, Rakesh; Agarwal, Shivani

    2010-10-01

    Children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) exhibiting normal inner ear anatomy, like those included in our cohort, derive significant benefit from cochlear implantation and results are comparable to those reported for the general population of implanted children. The patient population of WS accounts for approximately 2% of congenitally deaf children. The purpose of this retrospective case review was to describe the outcomes for those children with WS who have undergone cochlear implantation. On retrospective chart review, there were four cases with WS who underwent cochlear implantation. These cases were assessed for age at implantation, clinical and radiological features, operative and perioperative course, and performance outcomes. Auditory perception and speech production ability were evaluated using categories of auditory performance (CAP), meaningful auditory integration scales (MAIS), and speech intelligibility rating (SIR) during the follow-up period. In this group of children with WS, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months, the CAP score ranged from 3 to 5, MAIS from 25 to 30, and SIR was 3. These scores are comparable with those of other cochlear implantees.

  19. Outcomes and special considerations of cochlear implantation in waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorinis, Georgios; Lenarz, Thomas; Giourgas, Alexandros; Durisin, Martin; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was a state-of-the-art analysis of cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome (WS). Twenty-five patients with WS treated with cochlear implants in our department from 1990 to 2010. The 25 patients with WS underwent 35 cochlear implantations. Hearing outcome was evaluated using HSM sentence test in 65 dB in quiet, Freiburg Monosyllabic Test, and categories of auditory performance for children and compared with that of a control group. Anatomic abnormalities of the inner ear were examined using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the temporal bones. The mean follow-up time was 8.3 years (range, 0.3-18.3 yr). The majority achieved favorable postimplantation performance with mean HSM scores of 75.3% (range, 22.6%-99%) and Freiburg Monosyllabic Test scores of 67.8% (range, 14%-95%). However, in 4 cases, the results were less satisfactory. The comparison with the control group did not reveal any statistical significance (p = 0.56). In 6 patients (24%), behavioral disorders caused temporary difficulties during the rehabilitation procedure. Except of isolated large vestibule in 1 patient, the radiological assessment of the 50 temporal bones did not reveal any temporal bone abnormalities. Most patients with WS performed well with cochlear implants. However, WS is related to behavioral disorders that may cause temporary rehabilitation difficulties. Finally, temporal bone malformations that could affect cochlear implantation are notcharacteristic of WS.

  20. A spontaneous and novel Pax3 mutant mouse that models Waardenburg syndrome and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Miura, Ikuo; Ohba, Hisako; Shimamoto, Chie; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2017-04-05

    Genes responsible for reduced pigmentation phenotypes in rodents are associated with human developmental defects, such as Waardenburg syndrome, where patients display congenital deafness along with various abnormalities mostly related to neural crest development deficiency. In this study, we identified a spontaneous mutant mouse line Rwa, which displays variable white spots on mouse bellies and white digits and tail, on a C57BL/6N genetic background. Curly tail and spina bifida were also observed, although at a lower penetrance. These phenotypes were dominantly inherited by offspring. We searched for the genetic mechanism of the observed phenotypes. We harnessed a rapid mouse gene mapping system newly developed in our laboratories to identify a responsible gene. We detected a region within chromosome 1 as a probable locus for the causal mutation. Dense mapping using interval markers narrowed the locus down to a 670-kbp region, containing four genes including Pax3, a gene known to be implicated in the types I and III Waardenburg syndrome. Extensive mutation screening of Pax3 detected an 841-bp deletion, spanning the promoter region and intron 1 of the gene. The defective allele of Pax3, named Pax3 Rwa , lacked the first coding exon and co-segregated perfectly with the phenotypes, confirming its causal nature. The genetic background of Rwa mice is almost identical to that of inbred C57BL/6N. These results highlight Pax3 Rwa mice as a beneficial tool for analyzing biological processes involving Pax3, in particular the development and migration of neural crest cells and melanocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Waardenburg syndrome: iris and choroidal hypopigmentation: findings on anterior and posterior segment imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Carol L; Nickerson, Stephanie J; Al-Dahmash, Saad; Shields, Jerry A

    2013-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome typically manifests with congenital iris pigmentary abnormalities, but careful inspection can reveal additional posterior uveal pigmentary abnormalities. To demonstrate iris and choroidal hypopigmentation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Retrospective review of 7 patients referred for evaluation of presumed ocular melanocytosis. To describe the clinical and imaging features of the anterior and posterior uvea. In all patients, the diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome was established. The nonocular features included white forelock in 4 of 7 (57%), tubular nose in 5 of 6 (83%), and small nasal alae in 5 of 6 (83%) patients. In 2 patients, a hearing deficit was documented on audiology testing. Family history of Waardenburg syndrome was elicited in 5 of 7 (71%) patients. Ocular features (7 patients) included telecanthus in 5 (71%), synophrys in 2 (29%), iris hypopigmentation in 5 (71%), and choroidal hypopigmentation in 5 (71%) patients. No patient had muscle contractures or Hirschsprung disease. Visual acuity was 20/20 to 20/50 in all patients. Iris hypopigmentation in 8 eyes was sector in 6 (75%) and diffuse (complete) in 2 (25%). Choroidal hypopigmentation in 9 eyes (100%) showed a sector pattern in 6 (67%) and a diffuse pattern in 3 (33%). Anterior segment optical coherence tomography revealed the hypopigmented iris to be thinner and with shallower crypts than the normal iris. Posterior segment optical coherence tomography showed a normal retina in all patients, but the subfoveal choroid in the hypopigmented region was slightly thinner (mean, 197 μm) compared with the opposite normal choroid (243 μm). Fundus autofluorescence demonstrated mild hyperautofluorescence (scleral unmasking) in hypopigmented choroid and no lipofuscin abnormality. Waardenburg syndrome manifests hypopigmentation of the iris and choroid with imaging features showing a slight reduction in the thickness of the affected tissue.

  2. Síndrome de Waardenburg: achados audiológicos em 2 irmãos Waardenburg's syndrome: audiological findings in 2 brothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique F. Martins

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Waardenburg foi inicialmente descrita em 1951 por P.J. Waardenburg, como uma condição autossômica dominante que apresenta penetrância e expressividade variáveis de seus caracteres. Os sinais clínicos mais frequentes são: deslocamento lateral dos cantos internos dos olhos (telecanto, hiperplasia da porção medial dos supercílios (sinofris, base nasal proeminente e alargada, alterações na pigmentação da íris e da pele, surdez congênita, mecha branca frontal ou encanecimento precoce. Este estudo foi realizado em dois irmãos de uma família, que apresentavam características clínicas da síndrome de Waardenburg, entre elas a deficiência auditiva. Os pacientes foram submetidos à uma avaliação otorrinolaringológica, audiológica e genética.Waardenburg's Syndrome, first described in 1951 by P.J. Waardenburg, is an autossomal dominant condition with variable penetrance and expressivity of its features. The clinical signs are lateral displacement of the inner canthi of the eyes, confluent eyebrows, broad and prominent nasal root, pigmentation changes of the irises and skin, sensorineural deafness, white forelock or early graying of the hair. This study was based on two brothers who presented a typical clinical picture of Waardenburg's Syndrome, including hearing loss. Otolaryngological, audiological and genetical evaluations were conducted.

  3. Molecular Study of Three Lebanese and Syrian Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome and Report of Novel Mutations in the EDNRB and MITF Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N.M.; Ente, D.; Chouery, E.; Jalkh, N.; Mehawej, C.; Khoueir, Z.; Pingault, V.; Mégarbané, A.

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized primarily by depigmentation of the skin and hair, heterochromia of the irides, sensorineural deafness, and sometimes by dystopia canthorum, and Hirschsprung disease. WS presents a large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Four different types have been individualized and linked to 5 different genes. We report 2 cases of WS type II and 1 case of WS type IV from Lebanon and Syria. The genetic studies revealed 2 novel mutations in the MITF gene of the WS type II cases and 1 novel homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene of the WS type IV case. This is the first molecular study of patients from the Arab world. Additional cases will enable a more detailed description of the clinical spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome in this region. PMID:21373256

  4. Molecular Study of Three Lebanese and Syrian Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome and Report of Novel Mutations in the EDNRB and MITF Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N M; Ente, D; Chouery, E; Jalkh, N; Mehawej, C; Khoueir, Z; Pingault, V; Mégarbané, A

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized primarily by depigmentation of the skin and hair, heterochromia of the irides, sensorineural deafness, and sometimes by dystopia canthorum, and Hirschsprung disease. WS presents a large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Four different types have been individualized and linked to 5 different genes. We report 2 cases of WS type II and 1 case of WS type IV from Lebanon and Syria. The genetic studies revealed 2 novel mutations in the MITF gene of the WS type II cases and 1 novel homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene of the WS type IV case. This is the first molecular study of patients from the Arab world. Additional cases will enable a more detailed description of the clinical spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome in this region.

  5. Clinical manifestations of Waardenburg syndrome in a male adolescent in Mali, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H

    2015-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder of which there are four distinct types. These four types are differentiated by the physical defects which they produce. Presented here is the case of a 13-year-old boy with WS Type I who was observed and physically assessed in Mali, West Africa in 1969. His physical findings included a bright blue coloring to the irises of the eyes, profound sensorineural deafness, mutism, dystopia canthorum (lateral displacement of the inner canthi of the eyes), broad nasal root, bushy eyebrows, and scaphoid deformities of the supraorbital portions of the frontal bone. Because family members were not available for interviews or physical examinations, it was not possible to determine if this patient was suffering from a congenital form of the disorder or from a spontaneous mutation. Given the patient's then location in a remote rural area of Mali where electricity was absent, it was not possible to perform additional diagnostic tests. The patient described here is the first with WS in Mali, West Africa to have been medically observed and evaluated and later documented in the medical literature. A second case of the syndrome in Mali was described in the medical literature in 2011 in an 18-month-old infant who did not have sensorineural hearing loss, but who did have a bilateral cleft lip. An historical overview of WS is presented along with details concerning the characteristics of the four types of the disorder.

  6. Sensorineural deafness, distinctive facial features, and abnormal cranial bones: a new variant of Waardenburg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H

    2008-07-15

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair, and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Screening program for Waardenburg syndrome in Colombia: clinical definition and phenotypic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Marta L; Gelvez, Nancy; Rodriguez, Marcela; Florez, Silvia; Varon, Clara; Medina, David; Bernal, Jaime E

    2008-04-15

    A screening program to detect Waardenburg syndrome (WS) conducted between 2002 and 2005, among 1,763 deaf individuals throughout Columbia identified 95 affected individuals belonging to 95 families, giving a frequency of 5.38% of WS among the institutionalized deaf population. We confirmed the clinical diagnosis of WS in the 95 propositi and, through the family evaluation, we also identified 45 non-institutionalized affected relatives. Audiologic, ophthalmologic, and genetic studies were performed to confirm the diagnosis. Following the classification of the WS consortium, based on the Waardenburg Index (WI), to define the type of WS. We classified 62.1% of the propositi as WS2 and 37.9% as WS1. We present here the results of the study of clinical manifestations, analyzing the presence, severity, and symmetry of clinical findings among this affected population. Overall, among the 95 propositi, in addition to sensorineural deafness in all, the most frequent features were broad nasal root (58.9%), a first degree relative affected (37.9%), heterochromia irides (36.8%), skin hypopigmentation (31.6%), white forelock (28.0%), intense blue iris (27.4%), synophrys (12.6%), premature graying (10.5%), ptosis of the eyelids (9.5%), and hypoplasia alae nasi (1.1%). The majority of individuals had normal psychomotor development (87%), while the remaining 13% had developmental delay. Among the latter, 9.4% corresponded to WS2 and 3.6% to WS1. Our data confirm an interesting inter- and intrafamilial variability in the phenotypic manifestations as well as extremely variable expression. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  9. Waardenburg syndrome: A rare genetic disorder, a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudesh; Rao, Kiran

    2012-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder. Patients have heterochromia or eyes with iris of different color, increased inter-canthal distance, distopia canthorum, pigmentation anomalies, and varying degree of deafness. It usually follows autosomal dominant pattern. In this report, two cases have been discussed but no familial history of WS has been found. Counseling of the patient is necessary and cases of irreversible deafness have been treated.

  10. Waardenburg Syndrome in an 8 Year Old African Child: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    V. Odogu; I. O. Chukwuka; N. Chinawa

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Waardenburg syndrome is a very rare condition, inherited autosomally with genetic heterogeneity and characterized by deafness, hair discoloration, iris discoloration and eyelid changes. Case Report: We report a case of an 8 year old female child with a history of a striking difference between the eyes since birth. Ocular examination revealed slightly widened medial canthal distances and hypertelorism. There was a lateral displacement of the right inner canthi [Dystopia Canthorum]. T...

  11. A novel mutation in the endothelin B receptor gene in a moroccan family with shah-waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubaj, Yassamine; Pingault, Véronique; Elalaoui, Siham C; Ratbi, Ilham; Azouz, Mohamed; Zerhouni, Hicham; Ettayebi, Fouad; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2015-02-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy disorder combining sensorineural deafness and pigmentary abnormalities. The presence of additional signs defines the 4 subtypes. WS type IV, also called Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS), is characterized by the association with congenital aganglionic megacolon (Hirschsprung disease). To date, 3 causative genes have been related to this congenital disorder. Mutations in the EDNRB and EDN3 genes are responsible for the autosomal recessive form of SWS, whereas SOX10 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. We report here the case of a 3-month-old Morrocan girl with WS type IV, born to consanguineous parents. The patient had 3 cousins who died in infancy with the same symptoms. Molecular analysis by Sanger sequencing revealed the presence of a novel homozygous missense mutation c.1133A>G (p.Asn378Ser) in the EDNRB gene. The proband's parents as well as the parents of the deceased cousins are heterozygous carriers of this likely pathogenic mutation. This molecular diagnosis allows us to provide genetic counseling to the family and eventually propose prenatal diagnosis to prevent recurrence of the disease in subsequent pregnancies.

  12. A case report of reversible generalized seizures in a patient with Waardenburg syndrome associated with a novel nonsense mutation in the penultimate exon of SOX10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Noriomi; Mutai, Hideki; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Terashima, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2018-05-23

    Waardenburg syndrome type 1 (WS1) can be distinguished from Waardenburg syndrome type 2 (WS2) by the presence of dystopia canthorum. About 96% of WS1 are due to PAX3 mutations, and SOX10 mutations have been reported in 15% of WS2. This report describes a patient with WS1 who harbored a novel SOX10 nonsense mutation (c.652G > T, p.G218*) in exon 3 which is the penultimate exon. The patient had mild prodromal neurological symptoms that were followed by severe attacks of generalized seizures associated with delayed myelination of the brain. The immature myelination recovered later and the neurological symptoms could be improved. This is the first truncating mutation in exon 3 of SOX10 that is associated with neurological symptoms in Waardenburg syndrome. Previous studies reported that the neurological symptoms that associate with WS are congenital and irreversible. These findings suggest that the reversible neurological phenotype may be associated with the nonsense mutation in exon 3 of SOX10. When patients of WS show mild prodromal neurological symptoms, the clinician should be aware of the possibility that severe attacks of generalized seizures may follow, which may be associated with the truncating mutation in exon 3 of SOX10.

  13. Clinical variability of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome in patients with proximal 13q deletion syndrome including the endothelin-B receptor locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Collin, Anna; Arapoğlu, Müjde; Suyugül, Nezir

    2009-10-01

    Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (Waardenburg syndrome type IV-WS4) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that combines clinical features of pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, hair and irides, sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB) gene on 13q22 have been found to cause this syndrome. Mutations in both alleles cause the full phenotype, while heterozygous mutations cause isolated HSCR or HSCR with minor pigmentary anomalies and/or sensorineural deafness. We investigated the status of the EDNRB gene, by FISH analysis, in three patients with de novo proximal 13q deletions detected at cytogenetic analysis and examined the clinical variability of WS4 among these patients. Chromosome 13q was screened with locus specific FISH probes and breakpoints were determined at 13q22.1q31.3 in Patients 1 and 3, and at 13q21.1q31.3 in Patient 2. An EDNRB specific FISH probe was deleted in all three patients. All patients had common facial features seen in proximal 13q deletion syndrome and mild mental retardation. However, findings related to WS4 were variable; Patient 1 had hypopigmentation of the irides and HSCR, Patient 2 had prominent bicolored irides and mild bilateral hearing loss, and Patient 3 had only mild unilateral hearing loss. These data contribute new insights into the pathogenesis of WS4.

  14. Síndrome de Waardenburg. Variabilidad en una familia en Sandino, Pinar del Río, Cuba Waardenburg syndrome: variability in a Sandino family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Waardenburg es una enfermedad infrecuente, autosómica y dominante que cursa con cierto grado de discapacidad cuando aparece la hipoacusia neurosensorial, sin embargo, se ha detectado en Sandino, Pinar del Río, Cuba, una familia con 26 individuos vivos portadores del síndrome. Se describe por primera vez el estudio general de la familia desde el primer portador, y se demuestra la variabilidad individual en los portadores.Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is a non-frequent autosomal dominant disease, showing a certain degree of disability when neurosensitive hypoacusia appears; however, in Sandino, Pinar de Río, Cuba a family, from whom 26 alive relatives show WS. The general study of this family from the first ill relative, and the individual variability is showed.

  15. Waardenburg Syndrome: An Unusual Indication of Cochlear Implantation Experienced in 11 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Feda; Çatlı, Tolgahan; Atsal, Görkem; Tokat, Taşkın; Olgun, Levent

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the surgical findings of children with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) and investigate speech development after cochlear implantation in this unique group of patients. A retrospective chart review of the patients diagnosed with WS and implanted between 1998 and 2015 was performed. Categories of auditory performance (CAP) test were used to assess the auditory skills of these patients. CAP is a nonlinear hierarchical scale used to rate a child's developing auditory abilities. Preoperative test results and intraoperative surgical findings of these patients have been presented. In total, 1835 cases were implanted a tour institution, and 1210 of these were children. Among these implantees, 11 were diagnosed with WS (0.59% of all implantees). Four of the 11 patients showed incomplete partition type 2bony labyrinth abnormality (Mondini deformity) and all patients showed intraoperative gusher during cochleostomy, which was subsided through routine interventions. No other complications occurred during surgery, and all patients showed satisfactory CAP results in the late postoperative period. Our experiences with cochlear implantation in patients with WS showed that the procedure is safe and effective in this group of patients. Surgeons should be aware of possible labyrinth malformations and intraoperative problems such as gusher in these patients. In long term, auditory performances may exhibit satisfactory results with optimal postoperative educational and supportive measures.

  16. Inner ear anatomy in Waardenburg syndrome: radiological assessment and comparison with normative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorinis, Georgios; Goetz, Friedrich; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Luytenski, Stefan; Giesemann, Anja M

    2014-08-01

    As patients with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) represent potential candidates for cochlear implantation, their inner ear anatomy is of high significance. There is an ongoing debate whether WS is related to any inner ear dysplasias. Our objective was to evaluate radiologically the inner ear anatomy in patients with WS and identify any temporal bone malformations. A retrospective case review was carried out in a tertiary, referral center. The high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans of the temporal bone from 20 patients (40 ears) with WS who were managed for deafness in a tertiary referral center from 1995 to 2012 were retrospectively examined. Measurements of 15 different inner ear dimensions, involving the cochlea, the vestibule, the semicircular canals and the internal auditory meatus, as well as measurements of the vestibular aqueduct, were performed independently by two neuroradiologists. Finally, we compared the results from the WS group with a control group consisting of 50 normal hearing subjects (100 ears) and with previously reported normative values. Inner ear malformations were not found in any of the patients with WS. All measured inner ear dimensions were within the normative values compiled by our study group as well as by others. Inner ear malformations are not characteristic for all types of WS; however, certain rare subtypes might be related to inner ear deformities. Normative cochleovestibular dimensions that can help in assessing the temporal bone anatomy are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Whole-exome sequencing analysis of Waardenburg syndrome in a Chinese family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhong; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhuoyu; Wu, Changxin; Fu, Jie; Xiao, Han

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited, genetically heterogeneous auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by non-progressive sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. By whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified a nonsense mutation (c.598C>T) in PAX3 gene, predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This is the first report of genetically diagnosed case of WS PAX3 c.598C>T nonsense mutation in Chinese ethnic origin by WES and in silico functional prediction methods. PMID:28690861

  18. Whole-exome sequencing analysis of Waardenburg syndrome in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dezhong; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhuoyu; Wu, Changxin; Fu, Jie; Xiao, Han

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited, genetically heterogeneous auditory-pigmentary syndrome characterized by non-progressive sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. By whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified a nonsense mutation (c.598C>T) in PAX3 gene, predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This is the first report of genetically diagnosed case of WS PAX3 c.598C>T nonsense mutation in Chinese ethnic origin by WES and in silico functional prediction methods.

  19. Loss of the BMP antagonist, SMOC-1, causes Ophthalmo-acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia) syndrome in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rainger, J.; Beusekom, E. van; Ramsay, J.K.; McKie, L.; Al-Gazali, L.; Pallotta, R.; Saponari, A.; Branney, P.; Fisher, M.; Morrison, H.; Bicknell, L.; Gautier, P.; Perry, P.; Sokhi, K.; Sexton, D.; Bardakjian, T.M.; Schneider, A.S.; Elcioglu, N.; Ozkinay, F.; Koenig, R.; Megarbane, A.; Semerci, C.N.; Khan, A.; Zafar, S.; Hennekam, R.; Sousa, S.B.; Ramos, L.; Garavelli, L.; Furga, A.S.; Wischmeijer, A.; Jackson, I.J.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Brunner, H.G.; Wieczorek, D.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; FitzPatrick, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS), also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2

  20. Loss of the BMP Antagonist, SMOC-1, Causes Ophthalmo-Acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia) Syndrome in Humans and Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rainger, J.; van Beusekom, E.; Ramsay, J.K.; McKie, L.; Al-Gazali, L.; Pallotta, R.; Saponari, A.; Branney, P.; Fisher, M.; Morrison, H.; Bicknell, L.; Gautier, P.; Perry, P.; Sokhi, K.; Sexton, D.; Bardakjian, T.M.; Schneider, A.S.; Elcioglu, N.; Ozkinay, F.; Koenig, R.; Megarbane, A.; Semerci, C.N.; Khan, A.; Zafar, S.; Hennekam, R.; Sousa, S.B.; Ramos, L.; Garavelli, L.; Furga, A.S.; Wischmeijer, A.; Jackson, I.J.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G.; Brunner, H.G.; Wieczorek, D; van Bokhoven, H.; Fitzpatrick, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS), also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2

  1. Síndrome de Waardenburg: clasificación clínica de una familia Waardenburg's syndrome: clinical classification of a family

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    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El síndrome de Waardenburg (SW es una entidad infrecuente, hereditaria, que cursa con cierto grado de discapacidad cuando aparece la hipoacusia neurosensorial y su cuadro clínico no está completamente definido. Objetivo: Describir las características clínicas de una familia afectada con el síndrome y las variantes encontradas. Material y Método: Estudio de casos, observacional, transversal y descriptivo. Se confeccionó una base de datos automatizada. Las variables utilizadas fueron los signos clínicos, incluyendo la clasificación de la hipoacusia. Se utilizaron medidas de frecuencia: absolutas y relativas porcentuales, y se empleó la prueba de X² al 95 % de certeza. Resultados: De los signos clásicos el 100 % mostró distopia cantorum, el resto apareció con variabilidad. Se observaron signos no descritos anteriormente, entre los cuales destacó el dorso nasal recto (65,4 %. Se detectó hallux valgus en 4 de los individuos, lo que permitió clasificar a los individuos en 19 del tipo I, y los 7 restantes en la subvariante 1 del tipo III. Conclusiones: Las alteraciones óseas encontradas en individuos con SW permiten clasificarlos como portadores de la subvariante III-1, no descrita previamente.Background: Waardenburg Syndrome (SW is a rare inherited disorder characterized by varying degrees of disability, when sensorineural hearing loss appear and its clinical chart is not definitely complete. Objective: to describe the clinical characteristics of a family suffering from this entity and the variables found. Material and Method: observational, cross-sectional and descriptive case studies. An automated database was created, using the variables of clinical signs, including the classification of hypoacusis. Measures of frequency were employed: absolute and relative percentages as well as X² test with 95% of confidence. Results: out of the classical signs 100% showed dystopia canthorum, the rest appeared with variability

  2. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome and PCWH associated with SOX10 mutations: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Johanna B G M; Sival, Deborah A; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Vos, Yvonne J; Meiners, Linda C; Brouwer, Oebele F; van Essen, Anthonie J

    2006-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome is a rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression, characterised by aganglionosis of the rectosigmoïd (Hirschsprung disease), and abnormal melanocyte migration, resulting in pigmentary abnormalities and sensorineural deafness (Waardenburg syndrome). Mutations in the EDN, EDNRB and SOX10 genes can be found in patients with this syndrome. SOX10 mutations are specifically associated with a more severe phenotype called PCWH: peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease. Neuronal expression of SOX10 occurs in neural crest cells during early embryonic development and in glial cells of the peripheral and central nervous systems during late embryonic development and in adults. We present a 4-year-old girl with the PCWH phenotype associated with a de novo nonsense mutation (S384X) in SOX10. Main clinical features were mental retardation, peripheral neuropathy, deafness, Hirschsprung disease, distal arthrogryposis, white hairlock, and growth retardation. She presented with hypotonia, developmental delay, reduced peripheral nerve conduction velocities, and radiologically assessed central hypomyelination. Subsequently, the formation of abnormal myelin within the central and peripheral nervous system was functionally and radiologically assessed. Children presenting with features of Waardenburg syndrome and neurological dysfunction should be tested for mutations in the SOX10 gene to enable diagnosis and counselling.

  3. Síndrome de Waardenburg: aspectos oftalmológicos e critérios de diagnóstico: relatos de casos Waardenburg syndrome: ophthalmic findings and criteria for diagnosis: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Sólia Nasser

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever as características clínicas e imaginológicas de duas famílias com a síndrome de Waardenburg, sendo uma do tipo I e outra do tipo II, enfatizando as manifestações oftalmológicas, bem como o padrão de herança genética. MÉTODO: Realizou-se um estudo clínico envolvendo as duas famílias afetadas pela síndrome de Waardenburg, sendo, através dos heredogramas, determinado o padrão de herança genética presente. Também foram realizadas análises oftalmológicas abordando a medida da acuidade visual, a presença de distopia cantorum (telecanto, a avaliação da coloração da íris e o mapeamento de retina, além de exames otológicos e dermatológicos. RESULTADOS: O heredograma da família afetada pela síndrome de Waardenburg tipo I revelou um modo autossômico dominante de transmissão. A condição estava presente em 85,71% dos pacientes. A distopia cantorum foi a alteração mais frequente, seguida pela mecha branca na pele da fronte, hipopigmentação da íris e da retina e surdez neurossensorial. A família com síndrome de Waardenburg tipo II apresentou 33,33% dos familiares com a alteração. Nenhum membro apresentou distopia cantorum e hipopigmentação de íris. Três pacientes apresentaram surdez neurossensorial (12,5%, associada ao topete branco e manchas acrômicas confluentes pelo corpo. CONCLUSÃO: O presente estudo mostra a importância do oftalmologista no auxílio do diagnóstico desta rara condição genética, uma vez que inclui alterações oftalmológicas como telecanto, hipopigmentação da íris e retina. A distopia cantorum é o principal critério diagnóstico para diferenciar o tipo I do II e deve ser feita por oftalmologista treinado. As famílias encontram-se em acompanhamento multiprofissional, tendo recebido orientações genéticas e os cuidados referentes à proteção ocular.PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and imaginological features of two families with Waardenburg syndrome: type

  4. Genetic analysis of an Indian family with members affected with Waardenburg syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Saketh; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B; Sinha, Sanjib; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Rani, S Vasantha; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan; Kumar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects of the eye, skin, and hair. It is caused by mutations in one of the following genes: PAX3 (paired box 3), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), EDN3 (endothelin 3), SNAI2 (snail homolog 2, Drosophila) and SOX10 (SRY-box containing gene 10). Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of WS and DMD in an Indian family with two patients: one affected with WS and DMD, and another one affected with only WS. Blood samples were collected from individuals for genomic DNA isolation. To determine the linkage of this family to the eight known WS loci, microsatellite markers were selected from the candidate regions and used to genotype the family. Exon-specific intronic primers for EDN3 were used to amplify and sequence DNA samples from affected individuals to detect mutations. A mutation in DMD was identified by multiplex PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification method using exon-specific probes. Pedigree analysis suggested segregation of WS as an autosomal recessive trait in the family. Haplotype analysis suggested linkage of the family to the WS4B (EDN3) locus. DNA sequencing identified a novel missense mutation p.T98M in EDN3. A deletion mutation was identified in DMD. This study reports a novel missense mutation in EDN3 and a deletion mutation in DMD in the same Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the mutation spectrum of EDN3.

  5. Identification and functional analysis of SOX10 missense mutations in different subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoui, Asma; Watanabe, Yuli; Touraine, Renaud; Baral, Viviane; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Veronique; Bondurand, Nadege

    2011-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder characterized by pigmentation defects and sensorineural deafness, classified into four clinical subtypes, WS1-S4. Whereas the absence of additional features characterizes WS2, association with Hirschsprung disease defines WS4. WS is genetically heterogeneous, with six genes already identified, including SOX10. About 50 heterozygous SOX10 mutations have been described in patients presenting with WS2 or WS4, with or without myelination defects of the peripheral and central nervous system (PCWH, Peripheral demyelinating neuropathy-Central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy-Waardenburg syndrome-Hirschsprung disease, or PCW, PCWH without HD). The majority are truncating mutations that most often remove the main functional domains of the protein. Only three missense mutations have been thus far reported. In the present study, novel SOX10 missense mutations were found in 11 patients and were examined for effects on SOX10 characteristics and functions. The mutations were associated with various phenotypes, ranging from WS2 to PCWH. All tested mutations were found to be deleterious. Some mutants presented with partial cytoplasmic redistribution, some lost their DNA-binding and/or transactivation capabilities on various tissue-specific target genes. Intriguingly, several mutants were redistributed in nuclear foci. Whether this phenomenon is a cause or a consequence of mutation-associated pathogenicity remains to be determined, but this observation could help to identify new SOX10 modes of action. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Novel splice mutation in microthalmia-associated transcription factor in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Laura; Burke, Kelly; Leduc, Charles A; Guha, Saurav; Guo, Jiancheng; Chung, Wendy K

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is a syndromic form of hearing loss associated with mutations in six different genes. We identified a large family with WS that had previously undergone clinical testing, with no reported pathogenic mutation. Using linkage analysis, a region on 3p14.1 with an LOD score of 6.6 was identified. Microthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor, a gene known to cause WS, is located within this region of linkage. Sequencing of Microthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor demonstrated a c.1212 G>A synonymous variant that segregated with the WS in the family and was predicted to cause a novel splicing site that was confirmed with expression analysis of the mRNA. This case illustrates the need to computationally analyze novel synonymous sequence variants for possible effects on splicing to maximize the clinical sensitivity of sequence-based genetic testing.

  7. Correlation between Waardenburg syndrome phenotype and genotype in a population of individuals with identified PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, A L; Cupples, L A; Arnos, K S; Asher, J H; Baldwin, C T; Blanton, S; Carey, M L; da Silva, E O; Friedman, T B; Greenberg, J; Lalwani, A K; Milunsky, A; Nance, W E; Pandya, A; Ramesar, R S; Read, A P; Tassabejhi, M; Wilcox, E R; Farrer, L A

    1998-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities of the eye, hair, and skin, and dystopia canthorum. The phenotype is variable and affected individuals may exhibit only one or a combination of several of the associated features. To assess the relationship between phenotype and gene defect, clinical and genotype data on 48 families (271 WS individuals) collected by members of the Waardenburg Consortium were pooled. Forty-two unique mutations in the PAX3 gene, previously identified in these families, were grouped in five mutation categories: amino acid (AA) substitution in the paired domain, AA substitution in the homeodomain, deletion of the Ser-Thr-Pro-rich region, deletion of the homeodomain and the Ser-Thr-Pro-rich region, and deletion of the entire gene. These mutation classes are based on the structure of the PAX3 gene and were chosen to group mutations predicted to have similar defects in the gene product. Association between mutation class and the presence of hearing loss, eye pigment abnormality, skin hypopigmentation, or white forelock was evaluated using generalized estimating equations, which allowed for incorporation of a correlation structure that accounts for potential similarity among members of the same family. Odds for the presence of eye pigment abnormality, white forelock, and skin hypopigmentation were 2, 8, and 5 times greater, respectively, for individuals with deletions of the homeodomain and the Pro-Ser-Thr-rich region compared to individuals with an AA substitution in the homeodomain. Odds ratios that differ significantly from 1.0 for these traits may indicate that the gene products resulting from different classes of mutations act differently in the expression of WS. Although a suggestive association was detected for hearing loss with an odds ratio of 2.6 for AA substitution in the paired domain compared with AA substitution in the homeodomain, this odds

  8. Waardenburg syndrome: a rare cause of inherited neuropathy due to SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova-Mihaylova, Petya; Alexander, Michael D; Murphy, Raymond P J; Murphy, Sinéad M

    2017-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disorder comprising sensorineural deafness and pigmentation abnormalities. Four distinct subtypes are defined based on the presence or absence of additional symptoms. Mutations in six genes have been described in WS. SOX10 mutations are usually associated with a more severe phenotype of WS with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, and Hirschsprung disease. Here we report a 32-year-old man with a novel heterozygous missense variant in SOX10 gene, who presented with congenital deafness, Hirschsprung disease, iris heterochromia, foot deformity, and intermediate conduction velocity length-dependent sensorimotor neuropathy. This case highlights that the presence of other non-neuropathic features in a patient with presumed hereditary neuropathy should alert the clinician to possible atypical rare causes. © 2017 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  9. Waardenburg-Shah Syndrome: a rare case in an Indian child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattebahadur, Rajesh; Singhi, Shipra; Maharana, Prafulla Kumar

    2016-09-30

    A 7-year-old male child presented with a history of discolouration of right eye since birth. On examination visual acuity was 6/6 on Snellen's chart in both eyes; anterior segment was within normal limits except for the brilliant blue discolouration of the inferior quadrant and superior quadrant of right iris and left eye iris, respectively. Both eyes had a clear lens and fundus findings were within normal limits. A detailed history from parents revealed that the child had difficulty in hearing and slurring of speech. In addition, the child had repeated episodes of constipation with bilious vomiting during infancy for which a diagnosis of fungal sepsis with Hirschsprung's disease was made and the child had to undergo a mid-sigmoid loop colostomy for that. A diagnosis of Waardenburg--Shah Syndrome was made and the child was referred for hearing and speech rehabilitation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  11. 22q11.2q13 duplication including SOX10 causes sex-reversal and peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falah, Nadia; Posey, Jennifer E; Thorson, Willa; Benke, Paul; Tekin, Mustafa; Tarshish, Brocha; Lupski, James R; Harel, Tamar

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of genetic syndromes may be difficult when specific components of a disorder manifest at a later age. We present a follow up of a previous report [Seeherunvong et al., (2004); AJMGA 127: 149-151], of an individual with 22q duplication and sex-reversal syndrome. The subject's phenotype evolved to include peripheral and central demyelination, Waardenburg syndrome type IV, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH; MIM 609136). DNA microarray analysis defined the duplication at 22q11.2q13, including SOX10. Sequencing of the coding region of SOX10 did not reveal any mutations. Our data suggest that SOX10 duplication can cause disorders of sex development and PCWH, supporting the hypothesis that SOX10 toxic gain of function rather than dominant negative activity underlies PCWH. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome: response to authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aditi Gupta, Rajiv Raman, Tarun SharmaShri Bhagwan Mahavir Department of Vitreoretinal Services, Sankara Nethralaya, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, IndiaWe read with great interest the recent article by Kashima et al,1 in which the authors report a case of asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome. We want to highlight some concerns regarding this report. Previous reports have described many systemic and local factors associated with the development of asymmetric diabetic retinopathy.2,3 These include myopia ≥5 D, anisometropia >1 D, amblyopia, unilateral elevated intraocular pressure, complete posterior vitreous detachment, unilateral carotid artery stenosis, ocular ischemic syndrome, and chorioretinal scarring.2,3 In any suspected case of asymmetric diabetic retinopathy, it is prudent to rule out the abovementioned factors first. In the present case, although the authors clearly mention the absence of internal carotid and ophthalmic artery obstruction on magnetic resonance angiography, it would have been more informative if the authors had also provided the refractive error, intraocular pressure, and posterior vitreous detachment status of both the eyes.Likewise, it would have been useful to note the arm-retina time and retinal arteriovenous filling time in both the eyes on fundus fluorescein angiography, which is usually used to diagnose ocular ischemic syndrome by monitoring extension of the retinal circulation time, including time of blood circulation from the arm to the retina and the retinal arteriovenous filling time.4,5 The mere absence of internal carotid obstruction on magnetic resonance angiography cannot rule out the presence of ocular ischemic syndrome because, rarely, ocular ischemic syndrome can also occur secondary to other causes, such as arteritis.6,7 Comparing the arm-retina time and retinal arteriovenous filling time on fundus fluorescein angiography in both the eyes would be more helpful to rule out ocular

  13. Waardenburg's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharya A

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl presented with sensoryneural deafness and depigmented macular lesions in characteristic pattern since birth. She also had heterochromia of iris and lateral displacement of inner canthi which pointed towards this rare entity.

  14. Waardenburg's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharya A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old girl presented with sensoryneural deafness and depigmented macular lesions in characteristic pattern since birth. She also had heterochromia of iris and lateral displacement of inner canthi which pointed towards this rare entity.

  15. Mutations in the SPARC-related modular calcium-binding protein 1 gene, SMOC1, cause waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Hana; Boisset, Gaëlle; Favez, Tatiana; Youssef, Mohamed; Marzouk, Iman; Shakankiry, Nihal; Bayoumi, Nader; Descombes, Patrick; Agosti, Céline; Munier, Francis L; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2011-01-07

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome, also known as microphthalmia with limb anomalies, ophthalmoacromelic syndrome, and anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare autosomal-recessive developmental disorder that has been mapped to 10p11.23. Here we show that this disease is heterogeneous by reporting on a consanguineous family, not linked to the 10p11.23 locus, whose two affected children have a homozygous mutation in SMOC1. Knockdown experiments of the zebrafish smoc1 revealed that smoc1 is important in eye development and that it is expressed in many organs, including brain and somites.

  16. Loss of the BMP antagonist, SMOC-1, causes Ophthalmo-acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia) syndrome in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, Joe; van Beusekom, Ellen; Ramsay, Jacqueline K; McKie, Lisa; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Pallotta, Rosanna; Saponari, Anita; Branney, Peter; Fisher, Malcolm; Morrison, Harris; Bicknell, Louise; Gautier, Philippe; Perry, Paul; Sokhi, Kishan; Sexton, David; Bardakjian, Tanya M; Schneider, Adele S; Elcioglu, Nursel; Ozkinay, Ferda; Koenig, Rainer; Mégarbané, Andre; Semerci, C Nur; Khan, Ayesha; Zafar, Saemah; Hennekam, Raoul; Sousa, Sérgio B; Ramos, Lina; Garavelli, Livia; Furga, Andrea Superti; Wischmeijer, Anita; Jackson, Ian J; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Brunner, Han G; Wieczorek, Dagmar; van Bokhoven, Hans; Fitzpatrick, David R

    2011-07-01

    Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS), also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2 identified homozygous mutations in SMOC1 (SPARC-related modular calcium binding 1) in eight unrelated families. Four of these mutations are nonsense, two frame-shift, and two missense. The missense mutations are both in the second Thyroglobulin Type-1 (Tg1) domain of the protein. The orthologous gene in the mouse, Smoc1, shows site- and stage-specific expression during eye, limb, craniofacial, and somite development. We also report a targeted pre-conditional gene-trap mutation of Smoc1 (Smoc1(tm1a)) that reduces mRNA to ∼10% of wild-type levels. This gene-trap results in highly penetrant hindlimb post-axial oligosyndactyly in homozygous mutant animals (Smoc1(tm1a/tm1a)). Eye malformations, most commonly coloboma, and cleft palate occur in a significant proportion of Smoc1(tm1a/tm1a) embryos and pups. Thus partial loss of Smoc-1 results in a convincing phenocopy of the human disease. SMOC-1 is one of the two mammalian paralogs of Drosophila Pentagone, an inhibitor of decapentaplegic. The orthologous gene in Xenopus laevis, Smoc-1, also functions as a Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) antagonist in early embryogenesis. Loss of BMP antagonism during mammalian development provides a plausible explanation for both the limb and eye phenotype in humans and mice.

  17. Loss of the BMP antagonist, SMOC-1, causes Ophthalmo-acromelic (Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome in humans and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Rainger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome (OAS, also known as Waardenburg Anophthalmia syndrome, is defined by the combination of eye malformations, most commonly bilateral anophthalmia, with post-axial oligosyndactyly. Homozygosity mapping and subsequent targeted mutation analysis of a locus on 14q24.2 identified homozygous mutations in SMOC1 (SPARC-related modular calcium binding 1 in eight unrelated families. Four of these mutations are nonsense, two frame-shift, and two missense. The missense mutations are both in the second Thyroglobulin Type-1 (Tg1 domain of the protein. The orthologous gene in the mouse, Smoc1, shows site- and stage-specific expression during eye, limb, craniofacial, and somite development. We also report a targeted pre-conditional gene-trap mutation of Smoc1 (Smoc1(tm1a that reduces mRNA to ∼10% of wild-type levels. This gene-trap results in highly penetrant hindlimb post-axial oligosyndactyly in homozygous mutant animals (Smoc1(tm1a/tm1a. Eye malformations, most commonly coloboma, and cleft palate occur in a significant proportion of Smoc1(tm1a/tm1a embryos and pups. Thus partial loss of Smoc-1 results in a convincing phenocopy of the human disease. SMOC-1 is one of the two mammalian paralogs of Drosophila Pentagone, an inhibitor of decapentaplegic. The orthologous gene in Xenopus laevis, Smoc-1, also functions as a Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP antagonist in early embryogenesis. Loss of BMP antagonism during mammalian development provides a plausible explanation for both the limb and eye phenotype in humans and mice.

  18. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF – from Waardenburg syndrome genetics to melanoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Šamija

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF was first discovered as protein coded by gene whose mutations are associated with Waardenburg syndrome. Later, MITF was shown to be key transcription factor regulating melanogenesis. Further studies have shown that in addition to regulating melanogenesis MITF also plays central role in regulation of melanocyte development and survival. MITF gene is amplified in a proportion of melanomas and ectopic MITF expression can transform melanocytes so MITF can function as melanoma “lineage survival” oncogene. Different studies have further revealed MITF’s important but complex role in tumorigenesis and progression of melanoma. As expected from its important role in melanocytes and melanoma MITF is intricately regulated on all the levels from transcription to post-translational modifications. Although complex mechanisms of MITF functioning are still being revealed, MITF already has a valuable role in managing melanoma patients. Immunohistochemical analysis of MITF has shown both diagnostic and prognostic value in patients with melanoma. MITF is also a valuable specific marker for detection of circulating melanoma cells by reverse-transcription – polymerase chain reaction. MITF has recently been investigated as a potential target for melanoma therapy.

  19. Trauma due to Self-aggression in Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome associated with Congenital Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta, Sara Nader; Kawakami, Roberto Yoshio; Sgavioli, Claudia Almeida Prado Piccino; Correa, Ana Eliza; D'Árk de Oliveira El Kadre, Guaniara; Carvalho, Ricardo Sandri

    2016-08-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant genetic disorder presenting variable penetrance and expressivity, with an estimated prevalence of 1:42,000. Clinical characteristics of WS include lateral displacement of the internal eye canthus, hyperplasia of the medial portion of the eyebrows, prominent and broad nasal base, congenital deafness, pigmentation of the iris and skin, and white forelock. A 24-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with WS, was referred to the Special Needs Dental Clinic of Sacred Heart University, Bauru, Brazil. Parents reported that the patient was experiencing self-mutilation, particularly in the oral region. He presented multiple congenital anomalies, including anophthalmia, mental retardation, low-set ears, and leg deformities. Clinical oral examination revealed hypodontia, abnormalities in dental morphology, extensive dental caries, periodontal disease, and fistulae. Extensive scars on the tongue, lips, and hands caused by self-mutilation were also observed. In accordance with his family and neurologist, full-mouth extraction under general anesthesia was performed, especially considering his severe self-aggressive behavior and the necessity to be fed with soft-food diet due to his inability to chew. After the surgical procedure, a significant reduction in the patient's irritability and gain of weight were reported in the follow-ups of 30, 60, and 180 days.

  20. [SOX10 mutation is relevant to inner ear malformation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G Y; Hao, Q Q; Zhong, L L; Ren, W; Yan, Y; Liu, R Y; Li, J N; Guo, W W; Zhao, H; Yang, S M

    2016-11-07

    Objective: To determine the relevance between the SOX 10 mutation and Waardenburg syndrome (WS) accompanied with inner ear abnormality by analyzing the inner ear imaging results and molecular and genetic results of the WS patients with the SOX 10 mutation. Methods: This study included 36 WS in patients during 2001 and 2015 in the department of otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery, Chinese Peoples's Liberation Army General Hospital. The condition of the inner ear of each patient was assessed by analyzing HRCT scans of the temporal bone and MRI scans of the brain and internal auditory canal. Meanwhile, the possible pathogenic genes of WS, including SOX10, MITF , and PAX 3, were also screened. Patients were divided into two groups according to SOX 10 mutation.The Fisher accuracy test was used to determine statistical difference of inner ear deformation incidence between the two groups. Results: Among all 36 patients, 12 were found to have inner ear abnormality. Most abnormalities were posterior semicircular canal deformations, some accompanied with cochlear deformation and an enlarged vestibule. Among all patients, 9 patients were SOX 10 heterozygous mutation carriers, among which six showed bilateral inner ear abnormality. Fisher accuracy test results suggested a significant correlation between the SOX 10 mutation and inner ear abnormality in WS patients ( P =0.036). Conclusion: This study found that WS patients with the SOX 10 mutation are more likely to have deformed inner ears when compared to WS patients without the SOX 10 mutation.

  1. A novel mutation of PAX3 in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Shu, Anli; Qian, Xueqing; Gao, Jianjun; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Yonglan; Li, Xingwang; Li, Sheng; Feng, Guoyin; He, Lin

    2006-08-28

    The molecular characterization of 34 members of a Chinese family, with 22 members in four generations, affected with Waardenburg syndrome (WS1). A detailed family history and clinical data were collected. A genome-wide scan by two-point linkage analysis using more than 400 microsatellite markers in combination with haplotype analysis was performed. Mutation screening was carried out in the candidate gene by sequencing of amplified products. A maximum two-point lod score of 6.53 at theta = 0.00 was obtained with marker D2S2248. Haplotype analysis placed the WS1 locus to a 45.74 cM region between D2S117 and D2S206, in close proximity to the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q35. Mutation screening in PAX3 identified a 701T > C mutation which converted a highly conserved Leu to Pro. This nucleotide alteration was neither seen in unaffected members of the family nor found in 50 unrelated control subjects. The present study identified a novel 701T > C mutation in PAX3. The mutation observed in this family highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder.

  2. Novel mutations of endothelin-B receptor gene in Pakistani patients with Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Raheela; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Ahmad, Jamil; Awan, Ali Raza

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in EDNRB gene have been reported to cause Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (WS4) in humans. We investigated 17 patients with WS4 for identification of mutations in EDNRB gene using PCR and direct sequencing technique. Four genomic mutations were detected in four patients; a G to C transversion in codon 335 (S335C) in exon 5 and a transition of T to C in codon (S361L) in exon 5, a transition of A to G in codon 277 (L277L) in exon 4, a non coding transversion of T to A at -30 nucleotide position of exon 5. None of these mutations were found in controls. One of the patients harbored two novel mutations (S335C, S361L) in exon 5 and one in Intronic region (-30exon5 A>G). All of the mutations were homozygous and novel except the mutation observed in exon 4. In this study, we have identified 3 novel mutations in EDNRB gene associated with WS4 in Pakistani patients.

  3. EPHA4 haploinsufficiency is responsible for the short stature of a patient with 2q35-q36.2 deletion and Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Chen, Rongyu; Fan, Xin; Luo, Jingsi; Qian, Jiale; Wang, Jin; Xie, Bobo; Shen, Yiping; Chen, Shaoke

    2015-04-11

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1), an auditory-pigmentary genetic disorder, is caused by heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in PAX3. Abnormal physical signs such as dystopia canthorum, patchy hypopigmentation and sensorineural hearing loss are common, but short stature is not associated with WS1. We reported a 4-year and 6 month-old boy with a rare combination of WS1 and severe short stature (83.5 cm (-5.8SD)). His facial features include dystopia canthorum, mild synophrys, slightly up-slanted palpebral fissure, posteriorly rotated ears, alae nasi hypoplasia and micrognathia. No heterochromia was noticed. He had a normal intelligence quotient and hearing. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was 52.7 ng/ml, lower than the normal range (55 ~ 452 ng/ml) and the peak growth hormone level was 7.57 ng/ml at 90 minutes after taking moderate levodopa and pyridostigmine bromide. The patient exhibited a good response to human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy, showing a 9.2 cm/year growth rate and an improvement of 1 standard deviation (SD) of height after one year treatment. CMA test of patient's DNA revealed a 4.46 Mb de novo deletion at 2q35-q36.2 (hg19; chr2:221,234,146-225,697,363). PAX3 haploinsufficiency is known to cause Waardenburg syndrome. Examining overlapping deletions in patients led to the conclusion that EPHA4 is a novel short stature gene. The finding is supported by the splotch-retarded and epha4 knockout mouse models which both showed growth retardation. We believe this rare condition is caused by the haploinsufficiency of both PAX3 and EPH4 genes. We further reported a growth response to recombinant human growth hormone treatment in this patient.

  4. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form.

  5. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-08-14

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. SOX10 mutation causes Waardenburg syndrome associated with distinctive phenotypic features in an Iranian family: A clue for phenotype-directed genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Alimadadi, Hossein; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2017-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy characterized by hearing impairment and pigmentary disturbances in hair, eyes, and skin. WS is clinically heterogeneous and can be subdivided into four major types (WS1-WS4) where WS4 or Shah-Waardenburg is diagnosed when WS2 is accompanied by Hirschsprung disease (HD). Mutations of SOX10, EDN3/EDNRB have been identified in association with WS4. This study was aimed to determine the pathogenic variant in an Iranian pedigree affected with WS4. A two-generation pedigree with three affected members and considerable phenotypic heterogeneity was recruited. The proband was a 15-year-old boy, with severe to profound sensorineural hearing impairment, heterochromia iridis, hypoplastic blue eyes and Hirschprung disease. The other two also presented characteristics of WS2 and complained of chronic constipation with normal anorectal reflex. Sequencing of all exons and exon-intron boundaries of SOX10, EDN3/EDNRB revealed a heterozygous variant c.422T > C in exon 3 of SOX10 confirmed by a series of evidence to be pathogenic. It resulted in p.L141P at the protein level. Leucin 141 is located in Nuclear Export signal, HMG box of the protein. This study is the first report of a WS4 family in the Iranian population. The mutation is associated with distinctive phenotypic profile (association of anosmia and chronic constipation with SOX10 mutations) and could further improve diagnosis and counseling of WS in the Iranian population and can contribute to phenotype-directed genetic analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Waardenburg Sendromu

    OpenAIRE

    EYIBILEN, Ahmet; BULUT, Selçuk

    2004-01-01

    Waardenburg Sendromu (WS) işitsel-pigmenter sendromların heterojen bir grubu olup otozomal dominant geçişlidir. Etkilenen kişilerde sensörinöral işitme kaybı ve pigmentasyon bozukluklarıyla ortaya çıkar. Işitme azlıgı ve diger fenotipik özellikler yüksek oranda degişkenlik gösterir. Işitme kaybı çogunlukla hastanın yaşamını etkileyen tek bulgudur. Bu çalışmada ikisinde WS Tip I, birinde WS Tip II tanısı konan üç hasta nedeniyle Waardenburg sendromu güncel literatür ışıgında sunuldu. ©2004, Fı...

  8. A Novel Pathogenic Variant in the MITF Gene Segregating with a Unique Spectrum of Ocular Findings in an Extended Iranian Waardenburg Syndrome Kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad A; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Karbasi, Golaleh; Bahramian, Mohammad H; Salimpoor, Abdolrahman; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad R

    2017-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal pigmentation of the hair, skin, and iris as well as sensorineural hearing loss. WS is subdivided into 4 major types (WS1-4), where WS2 is characterized by the absence of dystopia canthorum. This study was launched to investigate clinical and molecular characteristics of WS in an extended Iranian WS2 family. A comprehensive clinical investigation was performed. Peripheral blood samples were collected and genomic DNA was extracted. Affected members of the family were studied for possible mutations within the SOX10 , MITF , and SNAI2 genes. Six WS2 individuals affected from a large Iranian WS2 kindred were enrolled. All affected members carried the novel substitution c.877C>T at exon 9 in the MITF gene, which resulted in p.Arg293* at the protein level. None of the healthy members and also of 50 ethnically matched controls had this variant. In addition, a spectrum of unique ocular findings, including nystagmus, chorioretinal degeneration, optic disc hypoplasia, astigmatism, and myopia, was segregated with the mutant allele in the pedigree. Our data provide insight into the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of WS2 in an Iranian family and could further expand the spectrum of MITF mutations and have implications for genetic counseling on WS in Iran.

  9. A novel mutation in SMOC1 and variable phenotypic expression in two patients with Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Javad; Abdollahi, Shokoufeh; Ghaedi, Hamid; Alehabib, Elham; Tafakhori, Abbas; Alinaghi, Somayeh; Chapi, Marjan; Johari, Amir Hossein; Darvish, Hossein

    2017-11-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS) is a rare disorder that mostly affects the eyes and distal limbs. In the current study we reported two Iranian patients with WAS. The first case was a 26-year-old girl with unilateral anophthalmia, bilateral camptodactyly and clinodactyly in her hands, oligodactly in her left foot and syndactyly of the second to fifth toes in her right foot. She also had severe hearing loss in both ears. The second case was a 12-year-old boy with bilateral anophthalmia, camptodactyly in his right hand, oligodactyly in his foot, clubfoot, and cryptorchidism. Both patients were mentally normal. To detect the causative mutation all exons and exon-intron boundaries of SMOC1 gene were sequenced in patients and other normal family members. We found a homozygous missense mutation (NM_001034852.2(SMOC1):c.367T > C) in exon 3 of SMOC1 gene in both patients. As the mutation segregated with the disease in the family, it should be the causative mutation. Our study extended the mutation spectrum of SMOC1 gene related to WAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel and recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Sandy; Balguerie, Xavier; Goldenberg, Alice; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Cabot, Annick; Amstutz-Montadert, Isabelle; Young, Paul; Joly, Pascal; Bodereau, Virginie; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Jamieson, Robyn V; Krause, Amanda; Chen, Hongsheng; Baumann, Clarisse; Nunes, Luis; Dollfus, Hélène; Goossens, Michel; Pingault, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor, which regulates melanocyte development and the biosynthetic melanin pathway. A notable relationship has been described between non-truncating mutations of its basic domain and Tietz syndrome, which is characterized by albinoid-like hypopigmentation of the skin and hair, rather than the patchy depigmentation seen in Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hearing loss. Twelve patients with new or recurrent non-truncating mutations of the MITF basic domain from six families were enrolled in this study. We observed a wide range of phenotypes and some unexpected features. All the patients had blue irides and pigmentation abnormalities that ranged from diffuse hypopigmentation to Waardenburg-like patches. In addition, they showed congenital complete hearing loss, diffuse hypopigmentation of the skin, freckling and ocular abnormalities, more frequently than patients with MITF mutations outside the basic domain. In conclusion, the non-truncating mutations of the basic domain do not always lead to Tietz syndrome but rather to a large range of phenotypes. Sun-exposed freckles are interestingly observed more frequently in Asian populations. This variability argues for the possible interaction with modifier loci. PMID:22258527

  11. Trastornos oculares y otras enfermedades en casos con síndrome de Waardenburg Ocular disorders and other diseases in patients suffering from Waardenburg’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el síndrome de Waardenburg es una entidad infrecuente, hereditaria, que presenta heterocromía del iris, Distopia cantorum y cursa con cierto grado de discapacidad cuando aparece la hipoacusia neurosensorial entre otras alteraciones. Objetivo: determinar las alteraciones oculares y otras enfermedades crónicas de una familia afectada con el síndrome de Waardenburg. Material y método: estudio de casos, observacional, transversal y descriptivo realizado a una familia con síndrome de Waardenburg en el municipio Sandino. Se confeccionó base de datos automatizada. Las variables utilizadas fueron los trastornos de la agudeza visual, refracción visual y otras alteraciones. Se utilizaron medidas de frecuencia: absolutas y relativas porcentuales. Resultados: entre las alteraciones visuales crónicas 17 presentaron trastornos de la refracción, cuatro individuos padecían glaucoma y uno cataratas, no se encontró ningún caso de discapacidad visual. Los 4 individuos con hipertensión arterial, dos coinciden con los que padecen de glaucoma y la otra es diabética. Conclusiones: fueron detectados varios trastornos de la refracción y la agudeza visual, sin llegar a la discapacidad.Introduction: Waardenburg’s syndrome is a rare, hereditary entity which presents heterochromia of the iris, dystopia canthorum and having a certain degree of disability when sensorineural hypoacusis appears; among other alterations. Objective: to determine ocular alterations and other chronic diseases that a family suffering from Waardenburg’s syndrome present. Material and Method: observational, cross-sectional and descriptive case study carried out with a family suffering from Waardenburg’s syndrome in Sandino municipality, Pinar del Rio. A database was created. The variables used were visual acuity, visual refraction and other alterations. Absolute and relative percentages were used as measures of frequency. Results: among these chronic visual

  12. A patient with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and severe hypoganglionosis associated with a novel SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akutsu, Yuko; Shirai, Kentaro; Takei, Akira; Goto, Yudai; Aoyama, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Akimitu; Imamura, Masatoshi; Enokizono, Takashi; Ohto, Tatsuyuki; Hori, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Keiko; Hayashi, Masaharu; Masumoto, Kouji; Inoue, Ken

    2018-05-01

    In this report, we present the case of a female infant with peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH) associated with a novel frameshift mutation (c.842dupT) in exon 5, the last exon of SOX10. She had severe hypoganglionosis in the small intestine and entire colon, and suffered from frequent enterocolitis. The persistence of ganglion cells made both the diagnosis and treatment difficult in the neonatal period. She also showed hypopigmentation of the irises, hair and skin, bilateral sensorineural deafness with hypoplastic inner year, severe demyelinating neuropathy with hypotonia, and diffuse brain hypomyelination. The p.Ser282GlnfsTer12 mutation presumably escapes from nonsense-mediated decay and may generate a dominant-negative effect. We suggest that hypoganglionosis can be a variant intestinal manifestation associated with PCWH and that hypoganglionosis and aganglionosis may share the same pathoetiological mechanism mediated by SOX10 mutations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Color del iris e hipoacusia en el Síndrome de Waardenburg. Pinar del Río, Cuba Color of the iris and hypoacusis in Waardenburg Syndrome. Pinar del Rio, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel Castro Pérez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Aunque se han descrito hipoacusia neurosensorial y cambios de color en el iris, la relación entre estos no ha sido estudiada previamente. Objetivos: Describir y analizar la posible asociación de la hipoacusia y profundidad de ésta con el color del iris en una familia afectada con el síndrome, lo que constituiría un nuevo aporte al conocimiento del Síndrome de Waardenburg (SW. Material y Método: Se realizó un estudio de casos, observacional, transversal y descriptivo con algunos aspectos analíticos en personas con SW del Municipio Sandino. Se utilizaron las medidas de resumen para variables cualitativas y la prueba de X² para medir asociación al 95 % de certeza. Resultados: 15 individuos presentaron hipoacusia neurosensorial de diferentes distribución e intensidad, con predominio de los ojos pardos y azules bilaterales. Se detectó mayor frecuencia de individuos hipoacúsicos entre los que tenían ojos azules con asociación entre las dos variables (X²= 6,47, gl = 1; p = 0.01. La intensidad de la hipoacusia fue mayor entre los individuos con ojos azules (85.7 % con hipoacusia severa o profunda 3 veces superior que en los otros colores de los ojos. Conclusiones: Existe relación entre el color azul del iris y la presencia de la hipoacusia y mayor intensidad de esta última en individuos con SW.Background: Although sensorineural hearing loss and iris pigmentary changes have been described, the association between these two elements has not been previously studied. Objectives: to describe and analyze the possible association of hypoacusis and the intensity of this with the color of the iris in a family suffering from this syndrome; which will constitute a new contribution to the understanding of Waardenburg Syndrome (WS. Material and Method: an observational, cross-sectional and descriptive case-study was carried out having some analytic aspects in people suffering from WS in Sandino municipality, Pinar del Rio. Measures

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Tietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... represent a severe form of a disorder called Waardenburg syndrome , which can also be caused by MITF gene ... MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes. Eur J Hum Genet. 2012 May;20(5): ...

  15. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A patient of WS presenting with neonatal intestinal obstruction or constipation since birth should be evaluated on the lines of SWS . Patients with SWS have a higher incidence of TCA or long-segment Hirschsprung's disease. In SWS when transition zone is not clear, an ileostomy would be preferable in view of nonavailability of frozen section.

  16. Phenotypic variability in Waardenburg syndrome resulting from a 22q12.3-q13.1 microdeletion involving SOX10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelena, Brezo; Christina, Lam; Eric, Vilain; Fabiola, Quintero-Rivera

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a neurocristopathy characterized by pigmentation abnormalities of the skin, hair, and iris, as well as sensorineural hearing loss. Contiguous gene deletions encompassing SOX10 are rare, which limits conclusions about genotype-phenotype correlation regarding patient prognosis and management. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by characterizing a 2.4 Mb deletion [arr[hg19] 22q12.3-q13.1 (36467502-38878207)x1] encompassing SOX10 and 53 additional RefSeq genes in a 15-year-old female with atypical WS. The patient presented with developmental delay, profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia iridis, hypotonia, and bilateral finger contractures. Published genomic and phenotypic profiles of patients with SOX10-encompassing deletions point toward several plausible candidate gene that could account for the considerable clinical heterogeneity. These studies suggest the existence of modifiers among the co-deleted, dosage-sensitive genes (e.g., MYH9) and among genes whose effect may depend on the unmasking of recessive mutations (e.g., PLA2G6). Finally, we highlight evidence illustrating extensive interconnectivity of SOX10-hypothesizing that haploinsufficiency of SOX10 may "unmask" subtler effects on expression or epistasis associated with variants in SOX10 targets (e.g., DHH), in its partners (e.g., PAX3, EGR2), and in genes with functional overlap (e.g., SOX8, SOX9). © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Identification of a Novel De Novo Variant in the PAX3 Gene in Waardenburg Syndrome by Diagnostic Exome Sequencing: The First Molecular Diagnosis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Mi-Ae; Lee, Taeheon; Lee, Junnam; Cho, Eun-Hae; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous hereditary auditory pigmentary disorder characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and iris discoloration. Many genes have been linked to WS, including PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDNRB, EDN3, and SOX10, and many additional genes have been associated with disorders with phenotypic overlap with WS. To screen all possible genes associated with WS and congenital deafness simultaneously, we performed diagnostic exome sequencing (DES) in a male patient with clinical features consistent with WS. Using DES, we identified a novel missense variant (c.220C>G; p.Arg74Gly) in exon 2 of the PAX3 gene in the patient. Further analysis by Sanger sequencing of the patient and his parents revealed a de novo occurrence of the variant. Our findings show that DES can be a useful tool for the identification of pathogenic gene variants in WS patients and for differentiation between WS and similar disorders. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of genetically confirmed WS in Korea.

  18. Novel nonsense mutation of the endothelin-B receptor gene in a family with Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrris, P; Carter, N D; Patton, M A

    1999-11-05

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) comprises sensorineural hearing loss, hypopigmentation of skin and hair, and pigmentary disturbances of the irides. Four types of WS have been classified to date; in WS type IV (WS4), patients additionally have colonic aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease, HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-3 (EDN3), endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB), and Sox10 genes have been identified as causative for WS type IV. We screened a family with a combined WS-HSCR phenotype for mutations in the EDNRB locus using standard DNA mutation analysis and sequencing techniques. We have identified a novel nonsense mutation at codon 253 (CGA-->TGA, Arg-->STOP). This mutation leads to a premature end of the translation of EDNRB at exon 3, and it is predicted to produce a truncated and nonfunctional endothelin-B receptor. All affected relatives were heterozygous for the Arg(253)-->STOP mutation, whereas it was not observed in over 50 unrelated individuals used as controls. These data confirm the role of EDNRB in the cause of the Waardenburg-Hirschsprung syndrome and demonstrate that in WS-HSCR there is a lack of correlation between phenotype and genotype and a variable expression of disease even within the same family. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    EHLERS-DANLOS SYNDROME HYPERMOBILITY TYPE Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type is a connective tissue disorder that mostly affects the bones and joints. People with this condition have loose joints ...

  20. SLUG (SNAI2) deletions in patients with Waardenburg disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, Manuel; Rodríguez-García, Arancha; Pérez-Losada, Jesús; Sagrera, Ana; Read, Andrew P; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2002-12-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS; deafness with pigmentary abnormalities) is a congenital disorder caused by defective function of the embryonic neural crest. Depending on additional symptoms, WS is classified into four types: WS1, WS2, WS3 and WS4. WS1 and WS3 are caused by mutations in PAX3, whereas WS2 is heterogenous, being caused by mutations in the microphthalmia (MITF) gene in some but not all affected families. The identification of Slugh, a zinc-finger transcription factor expressed in migratory neural crest cells, as the gene responsible for pigmentary disturbances in mice prompted us to analyse the role of its human homologue SLUG in neural crest defects. Here we show that two unrelated patients with WS2 have homozygous deletions in SLUG which result in absence of the SLUG product. We further show that Mitf is present in Slug-deficient cells and transactivates the SLUG promoter, and that Slugh and Kit genetically interact in vivo. Our findings further define the locus heterogeneity of WS2 and point to an essential role of SLUG in the development of neural crest-derived human cell lineages: its absence causes the auditory-pigmentary symptoms in at least some individuals with WS2.

  1. Duane retraction syndrome type 1 with Usher syndrome type 2: an unreported association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Bhawna Piplani; Khurana, Aruj Kumar; Grover, Sumit

    2015-05-07

    Duane retraction syndrome is characterized by globe retraction and palpebral fissure narrowing on adduction, with restriction of abduction, adduction, or both. Usher syndrome type 2 consists of congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. The authors present a case with a yet unreported association between Duane retraction syndrome type 1 and Usher syndrome type 2. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. [Mania associated with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Acharya, Mahima; Sarvanan, Arul; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Behere, Rishikesh V; Sharma, P S V N

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome (or Hallgren syndrome) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by sensorineural deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular deficit; Usher syndrome type II is the most common form. Various neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported to occur in those with Usher syndrome, including schizophrenia-like disorder, atypical psychosis, recurrent depressive illness, neurotic disorder, and mental retardation; however, bipolar disorder is not common in those with Usher syndrome. Herein we describe a 30-year-old male with Usher syndrome type II that developed features indicative of a probable manic episode. The patient had complete remission of symptoms in response to treatment with olanzapine 20 mg d-1. In persons with dual sensory impairment there are inherent problems with assessment and diagnosis is difficult due to their limited communication abilities. The diagnosis of Usher syndrome depends heavily on behavioral observation and disturbances in vegetative functions.

  3. Disease: H00169 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00169 Ocular albinism; Ocular albinism, type I (OA1); Waardenburg syndrome, type ...ia, nystagmus, translucent irides, strabismus, hypermetropic refractive errors. Waardenburg syndrome type II

  4. Genetics Home Reference: type A insulin resistance syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Type A insulin resistance syndrome Type A insulin resistance syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Ohdo syndrome, Maat-Kievit-Brunner type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blepharophimosis-mental retardation syndrome, Maat-Kievit-Brunner type BMRS, MKB type Ohdo syndrome, MKB type X-linked ... D, Brunner H, Bitoun P. Blepharophimosis-mental retardation (BMR) syndromes: A proposed clinical classification of the so- ...

  6. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Dancuart Omar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Na síndrome de Waardenburg, genodermatose autossômica dominante, distúrbios da pigmentação (hipo ou acromia de pele e cabelos, heterocromia da íris podem se associar a surdez, distopia do canto interno do olho e, eventualmente, outras malformações de intestino e ósseas. Os autores relatam um caso clínico da síndrome de Waardenburg tipo 2B, apresentam a classificação da doença com os critérios diagnósticos e discutem o diagnóstico diferencial, que deve ser feito com vitiligo, piebaldismo e diferentes formas de albinismo.Waardenburg syndrome is a dominant autosomal condition in which alterations of pigmentation (hypochromia or achromia of the skin and hair, heterochromia of the iris can be associated with deafness, lateral displacement of the inner canthi of the eyes and occasionally bowel or skeletal malformations. We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome type 2B, present the classification of the disease with diagnostic criteria and discuss differential diagnosis, which should include vitiligo, piebaldism and different forms of albinism.

  7. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieke Dahl, S; Kimberling, WJ; Gorin, MB; Weston, MD; Furman, JM; Pikus, A; Moller, C

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene for Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been localised to chromosome 1q32-q41. DNA from a family with four of seven sibs affected with clinical characteristics of Usher syndrome type II was genotyped using markers spanning the 1q32-1q41 region. These included D1S70 and D1S81, which are believed to flank USH2. Genotypic results and subsequent linkage analysis ...

  8. Pfeiffer syndrome type 2: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kiyoko Oyamada

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of Pfeiffer Syndrome, with a discussion of the diagnostic characteristics and features of disease types and the differential diagnosis. DESCRIPTION: The authors describe a newborn with cloverleaf skull, extreme bilateral exorbitism and choanal atresia, partial syndactyly of the second and third toes and broad medially-deviated big toes. The case reported was Pfeiffer Syndrome type 2, which usually has a poor prognosis. COMMENTS: Pfeiffer Syndrome is a clinically variable disorder and consists of an autosomal dominantly-inherited osteochondrodysplasia with craniosynostosis. It has been divided into three types. Type 1 is commonly associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Types 2 and 3 generally have severe neurological compromise, poor prognosis, early death and sporadic occurrence. Potential for prolonged useful survival outcome can be achieved in some cases with early aggressive medical and surgical management according to recent literature.

  9. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain Dominique P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS, is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular

  10. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Dominique P

    2007-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria) in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae) are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular complication in a patient suffering

  11. [Ehler-Danlos syndrome type VIII].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarloni, L; Perrigouard, C; Lipsker, D; Cribier, B

    2010-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases involving genetic collagen fibre impairment. We describe a case of a patient presenting the rare type VIII, in which dermatitis ocre was associated with parodontal disease, and which was diagnosed late. A 29-year-old man consulted for a pretibial ulcer present for seven years, resulting from a post-traumatic haematoma that had failed to heal. In view of the longiliner morphology, it had previously been diagnosed as Marfan syndrome. Subsequently, edentation was observed as well as "alveolar bone fragility". Examination revealed a marfanoid morphotype, a pretibial ulcer set within long-standing bilateral dermatitis ocre and papyraceous scars, but no joint hyperlaxity or cutaneous hyperelasticity. The diagnosis was consequently corrected to EDS type VIII. Type VIII is a rare form of EDS, and the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. The involvement of parodontal connective tissue suggests impairment of collagen I and III proteins. It is important to identify this type of the disease since it involves parodontal disease for which early treatment is required in order to try to prevent edentation. The present case demonstrates the importance of diagnosis, which may be based upon appearance of bilateral dermatitis ocre from the age of 15 years associated with skin fragility. This sign is not part of the classical picture of Marfan syndrome, with which EDS type VIII is often confounded. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Bartter's Syndrome with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting See

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of Bartter's syndrome in a 35-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The patient presented with leg weakness, fatigue, polyuria and polydipsia. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and high renin and aldosterone concentrations were present, but the patient was normotensive. Gitelman's syndrome was excluded because of the presence of hypercalciuria, secondary hyperparathyroidism and bilateral nephrocalcinosis. The patient's condition improved upon administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor (acemetacin, oral potassium chloride and potassium-sparing diuretics. Five months later, the patient discontinued acemetacin because of epigastric discomfort; at the same time, severe hypokalemia and hyperglycemia developed. Glucagon stimulation and water deprivation tests were performed. Type 2 diabetes mellitus with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was diagnosed. To avoid further gastrointestinal complications, the patient was treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor. This case serves as a reminder that Bartter's syndrome is associated with various metabolic derangements including nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, nephrocalcinosis and diabetes mellitus. When treating Bartter's syndrome, it is also prudent to remember that the long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and potassium-sparing diuretics may result in serious adverse reactions.

  13. Usher syndrome type III can mimic other types of Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, Ronald J E; Fields, Randall R; Huygen, Patrick L M; Deutman, August F; Kimberling, William J; Cremers, Cor W R J

    2003-06-01

    Clinical and genetic characteristics are presented of 2 patients from a Dutch Usher syndrome type III family who have a new homozygous USH3 gene mutation: 149-152delCAGG + insTGTCCAAT. One individual (IV:1) is profoundly hearing impaired and has normal vestibular function and retinitis punctata albescens (RPA). The other individual is also profoundly hearing impaired, but has well-developed speech, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento (RPSP). These findings suggest that Usher syndrome type III can be clinically misdiagnosed as either Usher type I or II; that Usher syndrome patients who are profoundly hearing impaired and have normal vestibular function should be tested for USH3 mutations; and that RPA and RPSP can occur as fundoscopic manifestations of pigmentary retinopathy in Usher syndrome.

  14. A rare type of Usher's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunica, Antonela Gverović; Kastelan, Snjezana; Bućan, Kajo; Ivanković, Mira; Radman, Maja; Karaman, Ksenija

    2013-12-01

    A case is presented of a very rare type of Usher's syndrome detected in a 30-year-old woman in her 28th week of pregnancy. She reported left eye visual impairment with a one-month history. She underwent standard ophthalmologic examination with additional procedures scheduled after childbirth, including fluorescein angiography, visual field (Goldman and Octopus) and electroretinography. Fundus examination revealed pallor of the optic disk, diffuse retinal blood vessel narrowing, no retinal pigmentation, left macular edema, vitreous liquefaction, and posterior vitreous detachment. Goldman perimetry showed narrowing of all isopters to 10 degrees, and Octopus perimetry showed peripheral decrease of retinal sensitivity. Electroretinography confirmed the diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa sine pigmento. Upon collecting case history records, hearing disorders originating from childhood were discovered. To our knowledge, this type of retinitis in Usher's syndrome has been reported only once in the available literature.

  15. Aase-Smith Syndrome type II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soker, Murat; Ayyildiz, Orhan; Isikdogan, Abdurrahman

    2004-01-01

    Aase-Smith syndrome type II is a rare in childhood and there a few reported cases. Here, we report an 8-months-old boy with congenital red cell aplasia and triphalangeal thumbs. In addition to thumb anomalies. He presented with growth failure, hypertelorism and novel osseous radiologic abnormalities, large fontanelles and micrognathia as extraordinary. Some clinical symptoms had complete clinical remission with deflazacort treatment. (author)

  16. [Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialettes, Bernard; Dubois-Leonardon, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS-2) are the most frequent disorders associating several organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Their high prevalence is due to the fact that the main manifestations of APS-2, such as thyroidal autoimmunity, type 1 diabetes, autoimmune gastric atrophy and vitiligo, are common diseases. APS-2 represents a clinical model that can serve to help unravel the mechanisms underlying autoimmunity. Diagnosis of APS-2 is a challenge for the clinician, especially in poorly symptomatic forms, and may require systematic screening based on measurement of autoantibodies and functional markers.

  17. Brain stem type neuro-Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Satoshi; Hirose, Genjiro; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi; Oda, Rokuhei; Yoshioka, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome were evaluated by brain CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Super-conducting type, 0.5 tesla) to correlate with the neurological findings. In the acute phase, low density area with peripheral enhancement effect and mass effect were seen at the brain stem in brain CT. MRI revealed a extensive high intensity signal area mainly involving the corticospinal tract in the meso-diencephalon as well as pons by T 2 weighted images (spin echo, TR = 1, 600 msec, TE = 90 msec) and the value of T 1 , T 2 , at the brain stem lesion were prolonged moderately. After high dose steroid treatment, the low density area in brain CT and high signal area in MRI were gradually reduced in its size. Peripheral enhancement effect in brain CT disappeared within 10 months in case 1, one month in the other case. In the chronic stage, the reduction of low density area and atrophy of brain stem were noted in brain CT. The lesion in chronic stage had low intensity in T 1 , T 2 weighted images and the T 1 , T 2 values at the lesion were mildly prolonged in MRI. Sequentially CT with enhancement and MRI examinations with T 1 , T 2 weighted images were useful to detect the lesion and to evaluate the activity, evolution of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome. (author)

  18. Usher syndrome type III can mimic other types of Usher syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Fields, R.R.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Deutman, A.F.; Kimberling, W.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical and genetic characteristics are presented of 2 patients from a Dutch Usher syndrome type III family who have a new homozygous USH3 gene mutation: 149-152delCAGG + insTGTCCAAT. One individual (IV:1) is profoundly hearing impaired and has normal vestibular function and retinitis punctata

  19. Nephrocalcinosis as adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Luiken, G P M; van Riemsdijk, I C; Petrij, F; Zandbergen, A A M; Dees, A

    2014-02-01

    Bartter syndrome consists a group of rare autosomal-recessive renal tubulopathies characterised by renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria and hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism. It is classified into five types. Mutations in the KCNJ1 gene (classified as type II) usually cause the neonatal form of Bartter syndrome. We describe an adult patient with a homozygous KCNJ1 mutation resulting in a remarkably mild phenotype of neonatal type Bartter syndrome.

  20. Current Understanding of Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Le; Song, Hongman; Sokolov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common deafness-blindness caused by genetic mutations. To date, three genes have been identified underlying the most prevalent form of Usher syndrome, the type II form (USH2). The proteins encoded by these genes are demonstrated to form a complex in vivo. This complex is localized mainly at the periciliary membrane complex in photoreceptors and the ankle-link of the stereocilia in hair cells. Many proteins have been found to interact with USH2 proteins in vitro, suggesting that they are potential additional components of this USH2 complex and that the genes encoding these proteins may be the candidate USH2 genes. However, further investigations are critical to establish their existence in the USH2 complex in vivo. Based on the predicted functional domains in USH2 proteins, their cellular localizations in photoreceptors and hair cells, the observed phenotypes in USH2 mutant mice, and the known knowledge about diseases similar to USH2, putative biological functions of the USH2 complex have been proposed. Finally, therapeutic approaches for this group of diseases are now being actively explored. PMID:22201796

  1. Histopathological types in adult nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ghulam Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, there are very few studies about biopsy proven adult Nephrotic syndrome (NS with histological types and their clinical findings. To determine the histological types of glomerulonephritis (GN in adult NS and correlate them with the clinical presentations and biochemical parameters, we studied 100 biopsies in 87 patients who underwent ultrasonography- guided renal biopsy in Rangpur Medical College and Hospital from July 2010 to June 2012. The mean age of the patients was 32.8 ± 13.2 years; male was preponderance (72.4% and most of the patients (67.8% came from rural areas. Membranoproliferative GN (MPGN was the most common underlying cause that was found in 32 (36.8% patients followed by mesangial prolife- rative GN in 27 (31% patients, membranous GN in 16 (18.4% cases, minimal change disease in four (4.6% patients, diffuse proliferative GN in four (4.6% patients, focal segmental GN, and focal proliferative GN in two (2.4% patients each. High proteinuria level was found in minimal change disease, which was 7.59 ± 0.24 g/24 h (mean ± standard deviation. The most common symptoms were oliguria (92% and edema (86.2% followed by hematuria (dark urine (72.4% and hypertension (35.6%. MPGN was the most common histological type of adult NS in Rangpur.

  2. Accentuated hyperparathyroidism in type II Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Daniel; Gurevich, Evgenia; Sinai-Treiman, Levana; Shalev, Hannah

    2016-07-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) may be associated with different degrees of hypercalciuria, but marked parathyroid hormone (PTH) abnormalities have not been described. We compared clinical and laboratory data of patients with either ROMK-deficient type II BS (n = 14) or Barttin-deficient type IV BS (n = 20). Only BS-IV patients remained mildly hypokalemic in spite of a higher need for potassium supplementation. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was mildly decreased in only four BS-IV patients. Average PTH values were significantly higher in BS-II (160.6 ± 85.8 vs. 92.5 ± 48 pg/ml in BS-IV, p = 0.006). In both groups, there was a positive correlation between age and log(PTH). Levels of 25(OH) vitamin D were not different. Total serum calcium was lower (within normal limits) and age-related serum phosphate (Pi)-SDS was increased in BS-II (1.19 ± 0.71 vs. 0.01 ± 1.04 in BS-IV, p < 0.001). The GFR threshold for Pi reabsorption was higher in BS-II (5.63 ± 1.25 vs. 4.36 ± 0.98, p = 0.002). Spot urine calcium/creatinine ratio and nephrocalcinosis rate (100 vs. 16 %) were higher in the BS-II group. PTH, serum Pi levels, and urinary threshold for Pi reabsorption are significantly elevated in type II vs. type IV BS, suggesting a PTH resistance state. This may be a response to more severe long-standing hypercalciuria, leading to a higher rate of nephrocalcinosis in BS-II.

  3. Late-onset Bartter syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollasch, Benjamin; Anistan, Yoland-Marie; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Gollasch, Maik

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in the ROMK1 potassium channel gene ( KCNJ1 ) cause antenatal/neonatal Bartter syndrome type II (aBS II), a renal disorder that begins in utero , accounting for the polyhydramnios and premature delivery that is typical in affected infants, who develop massive renal salt wasting, hypokalaemic metabolic alkalosis, secondary hyperreninaemic hyperaldosteronism, hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. This BS type is believed to represent a disorder of the infancy, but not in adulthood. We herein describe a female patient with a remarkably late-onset and mild clinical manifestation of BS II with compound heterozygous KCNJ1 missense mutations, consisting of a novel c.197T > A (p.I66N) and a previously reported c.875G > A (p.R292Q) KCNJ1 mutation. We implemented and evaluated the performance of two different bioinformatics-based approaches of targeted massively parallel sequencing [next generation sequencing (NGS)] in defining the molecular diagnosis. Our results demonstrate that aBS II may be suspected in patients with a late-onset phenotype. Our experimental approach of NGS-based mutation screening combined with Sanger sequencing proved to be a reliable molecular approach for defining the clinical diagnosis in our patient, and results in important differential diagnostic and therapeutic implications for patients with BS. Our results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and methodological approaches of genetic testing in other patients with clinical unclassified phenotypes of nephrocalcinosis and congenital renal electrolyte abnormalities.

  4. Visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type III.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, R.F.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Sankila, E.M.; Tuppurainen, K.; Kleemola, L.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Deutman, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) and compare this with visual impairment in Usher syndrome types 1b (USH1b) and 2a (USH2a). METHODS: We carried out a retrospective study of 28 Finnish USH3 patients, 24 Dutch USH2a patients and 17 Dutch USH1b patients.

  5. Partial absence of the posterior semicircular canal in Alagille syndrome: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Bernadette; Egelhoff, John; Benton, Corning [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati (United States); Goold, Amy [Tripler Army Medical Center, Family Practice, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2006-09-15

    We report a case of bilateral partial absence of the posterior semicircular canals (with normal lateral semicircular canals) imaged with CT in a patient with Alagille syndrome. Similar histologic findings have been reported in the pathology literature. This association has been previously reported only for Waardenburg syndrome in the imaging literature. We review the imaging findings and embryology of the semicircular canals, and suggest that this abnormality is specific to patients with Alagille or Waardenburg syndrome. (orig.)

  6. Partial absence of the posterior semicircular canal in Alagille syndrome: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Bernadette; Egelhoff, John; Benton, Corning; Goold, Amy

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral partial absence of the posterior semicircular canals (with normal lateral semicircular canals) imaged with CT in a patient with Alagille syndrome. Similar histologic findings have been reported in the pathology literature. This association has been previously reported only for Waardenburg syndrome in the imaging literature. We review the imaging findings and embryology of the semicircular canals, and suggest that this abnormality is specific to patients with Alagille or Waardenburg syndrome. (orig.)

  7. Longterm visual prognosis in Usher syndrome types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, André M; Eriksson, Kristina; Kimberling, William J; Sjöström, Anders; Möller, Claes

    2006-08-01

    To estimate the age at diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa and to determine visual acuity deterioration, visual field impairment and the frequency of cataracts in Usher syndrome types 1 and 2. We carried out a retrospective study of 328 affected subjects with Usher syndrome types 1 and 2. Study subjects were divided into seven different age groups by decade. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, general linear model anova and survival analysis. Retinitis pigmentosa was diagnosed significantly earlier in subjects with Usher syndrome type 1 than in those with type 2. Visual acuity was significantly more impaired in affected subjects with Usher syndrome type 1 than in those with type 2 from 50 years of age onwards. Survival analysis revealed a significant difference in visual field loss (type 2 subjects tending to be more impaired, while comparison indicated no significant differences between the groups in any of the other visual field categories. Cataract was found to be generally more common in Usher syndrome type 1 than type 2. Progressive loss of visual acuity and visual field begins to be substantial between the second and third decades of life in both Usher types. The rate of degeneration varies between individuals in both groups. The data are useful for the counselling of affected subjects with Usher syndrome types 1 and 2.

  8. Localization of Usher syndrome type II to chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, W J; Weston, M D; Möller, C; Davenport, S L; Shugart, Y Y; Priluck, I A; Martini, A; Milani, M; Smith, R J

    1990-06-01

    Usher syndrome is characterized by congenital hearing loss, progressive visual impairment due to retinitis pigmentosa, and variable vestibular problems. The two subtypes of Usher syndrome, types I and II, can be distinguished by the degree of hearing loss and by the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction. Type I is characterized by a profound hearing loss and totally absent vestibular responses, while type II has a milder hearing loss and normal vestibular function. Fifty-five members of eight type II Usher syndrome families were typed for three DNA markers in the distal region of chromosome 1q: D1S65 (pEKH7.4), REN (pHRnES1.9), and D1S81 (pTHH33). Statistically significant linkage was observed for Usher syndrome type II with a maximum multipoint lod score of 6.37 at the position of the marker THH33, thus localizing the Usher type II (USH2) gene to 1q. Nine families with type I Usher syndrome failed to show linkage to the same three markers. The statistical test for heterogeneity of linkage between Usher syndrome types I and II was highly significant, thus demonstrating that they are due to mutations at different genetic loci.

  9. Metabolic Syndrome among Type-2 Diabetic Patients in Benghazi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of three out of five conditions that are due to hyperinsulinemia: abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia (high triglycerides and/or low HDL), elevated blood pressure, and elevated plasma glucose. The syndrome is highly prevalent in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus ...

  10. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors that is responsible for most of the excess cardiovascular morbidity amongst persons with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The metabolic syndrome increases the risk for coronary heart disease and stroke by three-fold with a marked increase in cardiovascular ...

  11. Unusual case of failure to thrive: Type III Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, S; Subedi, K; Ray, P; Rayamajhi, A

    2016-09-01

    Bartter syndrome Type III is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from an inherited defect in the thick ascending limb of the loop of henle of the nephrons in kidney. The typical clinical manifestations in childhood are failure to thrive and recurrent episodes of vomiting. Typical laboratory findings which help in the diagnosis are hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypercalciuria. We report a case of Type III Bartter syndrome not responding to repeated conventional treatment of failure to thrive.

  12. [Problem and assignment for distinguishing the Usher syndrome type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Hidekane; Takeichi, Norito; Satou, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Kaga, Kimitaka; Kumakawa, Kozou; Nagai, Kyoko; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Naitou, Yasu; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Tono, Tetsuya; Kimitsuki, Takashi; Nishio, Shinya; Takumi, Yutaka; Usami, Shinichi

    2012-10-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder that causes bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and occasionally vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome types 1, 2, and 3 can be distinguished by differences in audiovestibular features. The objectives of this retrospective study were to evaluate 26 patients with Usher syndrome clinically. The 26 patients (male: 12 cases, female: 14 cases) with Usher syndrome, with a clinical diagnosis based on symptoms of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and RP, had been registered from 13 hospitals as a multicenter study. We assessed the clinical history and performed audiovestibular and ophthalmologic examinations, and genetic testing. Eleven of the patients were classified as having Usher type 1 (38.5%), 6 with Usher type 2 (23.1%), and 9 with Usher type 3 (38.5%). However, many patients with atypical Usher type 1 (70%) and type 2 (83.3%) were found compared with Usher type 3 (10%). The conductive rate of vestibular examinations including the caloric test (50%) was low. There were many variations in the clinical symptoms in Usher syndrome patients, therefore the classification of Usher types 1, 2, and 3 has been complicated. We have proposed a flowchart for the diagnosis of Usher types 1, 2, and 3.

  13. Gait Strategy in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoldi, Chiara; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Camerota, Filippo; Celletti, Claudia; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    People suffering from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) hypermobility type present a severe ligament laxity that results in difficulties in muscle force transmission. The same condition is present in people suffering from Down syndrome (DS) even if their clumsy movements are due to cerebral and cognitive impairments. The aim of this study was to…

  14. The risk for type B aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-01-27

    Aortic dissections involving the descending aorta are a major clinical problem in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters associated with type B aortic dissection and to develop a risk model to predict type B aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Patients with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic imaging of the aorta were followed for a median of 6 years for the occurrence of type B dissection or the combined end point of type B aortic dissection, distal aortic surgery, and death. A model using various clinical parameters as well as genotyping was developed to predict the risk for type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between 1998 and 2013, 54 type B aortic dissections occurred in 600 patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age 36 ± 14 years, 52% male). Independent variables associated with type B aortic dissection were prior prophylactic aortic surgery (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 3.8; p = 0.010) and a proximal descending aorta diameter ≥27 mm (hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 4.3; p = 0.020). In the risk model, the 10-year occurrence of type B aortic dissection in low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients was 6%, 19%, and 34%, respectively. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy was associated with fewer type B aortic dissections (hazard ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.030). Patients with Marfan syndrome with prior prophylactic aortic surgery are at substantial risk for type B aortic dissection, even when the descending aorta is only slightly dilated. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy may be protective in the prevention of type B aortic dissections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A case of oral-facial-digital syndrome with overlapping manifestations of type V and type VI: a possible new OFD syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Wongyiu; Chung Laupo

    1999-01-01

    We report a child with clinical and radiological manifestations characteristic of both V'aradi syndrome (oral-facial-digital syndrome type VI) and Thurston syndrome (oral-facial-digital syndrome type V). The findings have not been reported previously, and we believe that it represents a new variant. (orig.)

  16. [Types of dislipidemia in children with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromnats'ka, N M

    2014-01-01

    To study dyslipidemia types in children with metabolic syndrome. From 1520 children of total population 155 children aged from 9 to 18 years were selected, who formed 2 groups: 1 group--85 children with metabolic syndrome, 2 group--54 children with normal body mass. Anthropometry, blood pressure measurement, estimation of total cholesterol, low density cholesterol, very low density cholesterol, high density cholesterol, tryglicerides in blood were done. The total cholesterol level was 1,1 times higher (p = 0.001), low density cholesterol 1,4 times higher (p = 0.001), very low density cholesterol 1,1 times higher (p= 0.015), tryglicerides 1,1 times higher (p = 0.020) in children with metabolic syndrome than in children of control group. In children with metabolic syndrome sensitively more often IIa, IV dislipidemia types and isolated hypercholesterolemia and less often IIb, III dislipidemia types and high density cholesterol isolated decrease were diagnosed. So children with metabolic syndrome were characterized by atherogenic types of dislipidemias which determine early atherosclerosis development. Children with metabolic syndrome must be examined on the lipid metabolism violation with the aim of its prevention and correction.

  17. Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 in an Egyptian girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 (KCS1 (OMIM 244460 is a rare syndrome characterized by growth retardation, uniformly small slender long bones with medullary stenosis, thickened cortex of the long bones, hypocalcemia possibly with tetany at an early age and normal intelligence. The primary outcome of KCS1 is short stature. We present here an Egyptian girl aged 32 months with typical feature of KCS1.

  18. Genotype-Phenotype Aspects of Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimizu, Wataru; Moss, Arthur J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Ackerman, Michael J.; January, Craig T.; Tester, David J.; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L.; Qi, Ming; Vincent, G. Michael; Kaufman, Elizabeth S.; Hofman, Nynke; Noda, Takashi; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shah, Samit; Amin, Vinit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Andrews, Mark L.; McNitt, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of location, coding type, and topology of KCNH2(hERG) mutations on clinical phenotype in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Previous studies were limited by population size in their ability to examine phenotypic effect of

  19. Exercise beliefs and behaviours of individuals with Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Jane V; Herbland, Anthony; Hakim, Alan; Ninis, Nelly; Lever, William; Aziz, Qasim; Cairns, Mindy

    2017-11-10

    To explore exercise beliefs and behaviours of individuals with Joint Hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type and to explore patient experiences of physiotherapy. A cross sectional questionnaire survey design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data from adult members of the Hypermobility Syndromes Association and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Support UK. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. Qualitative data was analysed thematically. 946 questionnaires were returned and analysed. Participants who received exercise advice from a physiotherapist were 1.75 more likely to report high volumes of weekly exercise (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.30-2.36, p Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type in this survey. Implications for rehabilitation Exercise is a cornerstone of treatment for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type. Pain, fatigue and fear of injury are frequently reported barriers to exercise. Advice from physiotherapists may significantly influence exercise behaviour. Physiotherapists with condition specific knowledge and good verbal and non-verbal communication facilitate a positive therapeutic experience.

  20. Inventarisatiekamp in Waardenburg op 18—20 september 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1998-01-01

    Er zijn deze zomer weer enige gezellige kampen gehouden in verschillende districten van FLORON. Mocht u deze gemist hebben, maar alsnog zin hebben een inventarisatiekamp te bezoeken, dan is de laatste kans voor dit jaar: 18-20 september, Waardenburg (Utrechts rivierengebied). De informatie over dit

  1. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  2. Previously unreported abnormalities in Wolfram Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Halis Kaan; Yasa, Seda

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with non-autoimmune childhood onset insulin dependent diabetes and optic atrophy. WFS type 2 (WFS2) differs from WFS type 1 (WFS1) with upper intestinal ulcers, bleeding tendency and the lack ofdiabetes insipidus. Li-fespan is short due to related comorbidities. Only a few familieshave been reported with this syndrome with the CISD2 mutation. Here we report two siblings with a clinical diagnosis of WFS2, previously misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy-related blindness. We report possible additional clinical and laboratory findings that have not been pre-viously reported, such as asymptomatic hypoparathyroidism, osteomalacia, growth hormone (GH) deficiency and hepatomegaly. Even though not a requirement for the diagnosis of WFS2 currently, our case series confirm hypogonadotropic hypogonadism to be also a feature of this syndrome, as reported before. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  3. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: Definition, Etiopathogenesis, Diagnostics and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolic Tomislav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 (CRS-1 is defined as an acute worsening of heart function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. It is an important cause of hospitalization which affects the diagnosis as well as the prognosis and treatment of patients. The purpose of this paper is to analyze causes that lead to the development of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 and its clinical consequences, as well as to emphasize the clinical importance of its early detection. The clinical studies and professional papers dealing with etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cardiorenal syndrome type 1, have been analyzed. The most important role in the occurrence of cardio renal syndrome type 1 is played by hemodynamic mechanisms, activation of neurohumoral systems, inflammation and imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO. Diagnosis of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 involves biomarkers of acute renal injury among which the most important are: neutrophil gelatinaseassociated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP, IL-18 and the values of nitrogen compounds in serum. In addition to a pharmacological therapy, various modalities of extracorporeal ultrafiltration are applied in treatment of CRS-1, particularly if there is resistance to the use of diuretic therapy. As opposed to the experimental models, in clinical practice acute renal injury is often diagnosed late so that the measures taken do not give the expected results and the protective role shown in experimental conditions do not give the same results. For all these reasons, it is necessary to analyze the pathophysiology of renal impairment in cardiorenal syndrome as well as detect early indicators of kidney injury that could have clinical benefit and positive impact on reducing the cost of treatment.

  4. A Rare Cause of Pheochromocytoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Müslüm Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF Type 1 (NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disease with a prevalence of about 1/3000. NF-1 is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cafe au lait macules, neurofibroma, optic glioma, lisch nodules, and symptoms involving other systems. Noonan syndrome (NS is a clinically heterogeneous disorder predominantly characterized by dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart disease, proportionate post-natal short stature, neck abnormalities, and chest deformities. NF-NS is a very rare overlapping syndrome sharing many features of both syndromes. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, which can be life-threatening if not treated properly, is also a very rare complication of this disorder. Here, we report a patient who was admitted with a mass in the right upper quadrant and was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma and NFNS. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 227-31

  5. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Joke B G M; Kunze, Jürgen; Osinga, Jan; van Essen, Anthonie J; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2002-03-15

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural deafness; hypopigmentation of skin, hair, and irides; and HSCR. Therefore, we screened DNA of the index patient of the ABCD syndrome family for mutations in the endothelin B receptor (EDNRB) gene, a gene known to be involved in Shah-Waardenburg syndrome. A homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 3 (R201X) of the EDNRB gene was found. We therefore suggest that ABCD syndrome is not a separate entity, but an expression of Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

  6. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in patients with type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Ahmad, T.; Hussain, S.J.; Javed, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes, Hypertension, Obesity and Ischaemic Heart Disease have become a problem of public health magnitude with substantial economic burden both in the developed as well as the developing countries. Obesity is quite frequent in Type 2 diabetics and also plays a central role in causing Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Metabolic Syndrome significantly increases the incidence of cardiovascular complications. This study was done to determine the frequency of MetS in our Type 2 diabetic patients as most of the components of MetS can be modified and identifying/managing these at an early stage might be of considerable help in reducing cardiovascular complications. Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in Medical B and Medical A wards of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from Nov, 08 to April, 09. Type 2 Diabetic patients aged above 40 years who gave informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured proforma. Frequency of Metabolic Syndrome was estimated according to the IDF consensus worldwide definition of the MetS. Results: Of the 100 patients enrolled in this study 56 were females and 44 were males with a mean age of 59.9 years. Out of these 100 participants seventy six (76%) were diagnosed to have metabolic syndrome. Of the 56 females, forty eight (85.71%) were having metabolic syndrome while twenty eight (63.63%) of the 44 male participants were having the syndrome. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion: Frequency of MetS was found to be significantly high in this study with female preponderance. All the components, except Hypertension were more frequent in females. Diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome need more aggressive approach in management so as to decrease the incidence of cardiovascular complications. (author)

  7. Cardiovascular profile in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jem L; Au, Jason S; Guzman, Juan C; Morillo, Carlos A; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2017-04-01

    The cardiovascular profile of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome + Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (POTS + EDSIII) has not been described, despite suggestions that it plays a role in orthostatic intolerance. We studied nine individuals diagnosed with POTS + EDSIII and found that the arterial stiffness and cardiac profiles of patients with POTS + EDSIII were comparable to those of age- and sex-matched controls, suggesting an alternate explanation for orthostatic intolerance.

  8. Hearing loss in Usher syndrome type II is nonprogressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisser, Christoph F V; Kimberling, William J; Otterstedde, Christian R

    2002-12-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and progressive visual loss secondary to retinitis pigmentosa. In the literature, a possible progression of the moderate to severe hearing loss in Usher syndrome type II (Usher II) is controversial. We studied the development of the hearing loss of 125 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Usher syndrome type II intraindividually and interindividually by repeatedly performing complete audiological and neuro-otologic examinations. Our data show a very characteristic slope of the hearing curve in all Usher II patients and no clinically relevant progression of the hearing loss over up to 17 years. The subjective impression of a deterioration of the communicative abilities of Usher II patients must therefore be attributed to the progressive visual loss. The patients should be reassured that changes in their hearing abilities are unlikely and should be provided with optimally fitted modern hearing aids.

  9. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  10. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months. Introduction ... SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2004. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1 ... may be either trauma of external origin or iatrogenic, post surgery. In some patients particularly children ...

  11. [Complex regional pain syndrome type 1: negating the myth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolke, J.P.M.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Meent, H. van de

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) was identified in the Netherlands more than 30 years ago, but since then the arguments supporting this diagnosis have become weaker. Incidence has decreased, it is often not possible to make a definite diagnosis, the pathophysiology remains unclear and

  12. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, R.S.G.M.; Zollinger, P.E.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Thomassen-Hilgersom, I.L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Rosenbrand, C.J.G.M.; Geerzen, J.H.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I.Method: A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according

  13. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez, Roberto S.; Zollinger, Paul E.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Thomassen-Hilgersom, Ilona L.; Zuurmond, Wouter W.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J.; Geertzen, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method: A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according

  14. Oro-facial-digital syndrome Type 1: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Singh Dhull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oro-Facial Digital Syndrome (OFDS is a generic term for group of apparently distinctive genetic diseases that affect the development of the oral cavity, facial features, and digits. One of these is OFDS type I (OFDS-I which has rarely been reported in Asian countries. This is the case report of a 13 year old patient with OFDS type I who reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, with the complaint of discolored upper front teeth.

  15. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weaknes...

  16. [SPECIFIC CLINICAL FEATURES OF TYPE 1 AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhina, M S; Molashenko, N V; Troshina, E A; Orlova, E M; Sozaeva, L S; Eystein, S H; Breivik, S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a primary autoimmune disorder affecting two or more peripheral endocrine glands and responsible for their incompetence. It is frequently combined with various organ-specific non-endocrine diseases. Patients with this pathology need life-long replacement therapy and dynamic observation by endocrinologists and other specialists to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment and detect new components of the disease. We report a variant of type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Special emphasis is laid on the importance of succession of actions of endocrinologists and specialists in related medical disciplines dealing with children and adult patients.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Kindler syndrome - a rare type of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kindler syndrome is one of the types of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa with its onset related to mutations of the KIND1 gene. The authors describe a case of a family with three members suffering from this rare disease. All of these patients have typical clinical manifestations of the Kindler syndrome such as the formation of blisters on the skin and mucous membranes right after the birth, scarring with the formation of contractures, pseudosyndactyly, microstomia and ankyloglossia, progressive poikiloderma, photosensibility, affections of the gastrointestinal tract - dysphagia, esophagostenosis, stool disorders, dental pathology, phimosis vaginalis in women.

  19. Adult presentation of Bartter syndrome type IV with erythrocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Tótoli, Cláudia; Calado, Joaquim Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Bartter syndrome comprises a group of rare autosomal-recessive salt-losing disorders with distinct phenotypes, but one unifying pathophysiology consisting of severe reductions of sodium reabsorption caused by mutations in five genes expressed in the thick ascending limb of Henle, coupled with increased urinary excretion of potassium and hydrogen, which leads to hypokalemic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome type IV, caused by loss-of-function mutations in barttin, a subunit of chloride channel CLC-Kb expressed in the kidney and inner ear, usually occurs in the antenatal-neonatal period. We report an unusual case of late onset presentation of Bartter syndrome IV and mild phenotype in a 20 years-old man who had hypokalemia, deafness, secondary hyperparathyroidism and erythrocytosis.

  20. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classical type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jessica M; Sobey, Glenda J; Burrows, Nigel P; Colombi, Marina; Lavallee, Mark E; Malfait, Fransiska; Francomano, Clair A

    2017-03-01

    Classical EDS is a heritable disorder of connective tissue. Patients are affected with joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibilty, and skin fragility leading to atrophic scarring and significant bruising. These clinical features suggest consideration of the diagnosis which then needs to be confirmed, preferably by genetic testing. The most recent criteria for the diagnosis of EDS were devised in Villefranche in 1997. [Beighton et al. (1998); Am J Med Genet 77:31-37]. The aims set out in the Villefranche Criteria were: to enable diagnostic uniformity for clinical and research purposes, to understand the natural history of each subtype of EDS, to inform management and genetic counselling, and to identify potential areas of research. The authors recognized that the criteria would need updating, but viewed the Villefranche nosology as a good starting point. Since 1997, there have been major advances in the molecular understanding of classical EDS. Previous question marks over genetic heterogeneity have been largely surpassed by evidence that abnormalities in type V collagen are the cause. Advances in molecular testing have made it possible to identify the causative mutation in the majority of patients. This has aided the further clarification of this diagnosis. The aim of this literature review is to summarize the current knowledge and highlight areas for future research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type III with Primary Hypoparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jin Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome is defined as multiple endocrine gland insufficiencies accompanied by autoimmune diseases of the endocrine and nonendocrine system. After Schmidt introduced a case of nontuberculosis adrenal gland dysfunction with thyroiditis in 1926, Neufeld defined polyglandular autoimmune syndrome by I, II, and III subtypes in 1980 by their presentation of occurrence age, heredity methods, relationship with human leukocyte antigen, and accompanying diseases. We report a case of a 32-year-old female with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III accompanied by type 1 diabetes mellitus that was treated with insulin (36 units per day for 11 years. She had insulin deficiency and Hashimoto thyroiditis as an autoimmune disorder. In addition, she had several features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature, truncal obesity, round face, short neck, low intelligence (full IQ 84, and decreased memory. Although Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy is morphological evidence of pseudohypoparathyroidism or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, she had primary hypoparathyroidism on laboratory results. Here, we report a case of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome III with type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroiditis, and primary hypoparathyroidism, accompanied by clinical features similar to Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy.

  2. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Vergine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome (BS type 1 (OMIM #601678 is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  3. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergine, Gianluca; Fabbri, Elena; Pedini, Annalisa; Tedeschi, Silvana; Borsa, Niccolò

    2018-01-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) type 1 (OMIM #601678) is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  4. Features that exacerbate fatigue severity in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahe, Anne Maree; Adams, Roger David; Nicholson, Leslie Lorenda

    2018-08-01

    To assess the prevalence, severity and impact of fatigue on individuals with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and establish potential determinants of fatigue severity in this population. Questionnaires on symptoms and signs related to fatigue, quality of life, mental health, physical activity participation and sleep quality were completed by people with JHS/EDS-HT recruited through two social media sites. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of fatigue in this population. Significant fatigue was reported by 79.5% of the 117 participants. Multiple regression analysis identified five predictors of fatigue severity, four being potentially modifiable, accounting for 52.3% of the variance in reported fatigue scores. Predictors of fatigue severity were: the self-perceived extent of joint hypermobility, orthostatic dizziness related to heat and exercise, levels of participation in personal relationships and community, current levels of physical activity and dissatisfaction with the diagnostic process and management options provided for their condition. Fatigue is a significant symptom associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Assessment of individuals with this condition should include measures of fatigue severity to enable targeted management of potentially modifiable factors associated with fatigue severity. Implications for rehabilitation Fatigue is a significant symptom reported by individuals affected by joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type. Potentially modifiable features that contribute to fatigue severity in this population have been identified. Targeted management of these features may decrease the severity and impact of fatigue in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome - hypermobility type.

  5. Clinical Aspects of Type 3 Long-QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Moss, Arthur J; Kaufman, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Risk stratification in patients with type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) by clinical and genetic characteristics and effectiveness of ß-blocker therapy have not been studied previously in a large LQT3 population. METHODS: -The study population included 406 LQT3 patients with 51 different......-blocker therapy reduces this risk in females, but efficacy in males could not be conclusively determined due to low number of events....

  6. Short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type Verma-Naumoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, C.; Beluffi, G.

    1981-04-01

    A case of perinatal lethal dwarfism is described: owing to its clinical, radiological and histologic features the case can be classified as SRP syndrome type III (Verma-Naumoff). On the basis of the radiological features and - particularly - of those of the growing cartilage, stress is laid on the importance of these studies for a proper classification of such rare and not completely known chondrodysplastic dwarfisms.

  7. Short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type Verma-Naumoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, C.; Beluffi, G.; Ospedale Maggiore, Lodi

    1981-01-01

    A case of perinatal lethal dwarfism is described: owing to its clinical, radiological and histologic features the case can be classified as SRP syndrome type III (Verma-Naumoff). On the basis of the radiological features and - particularly - of those of the growing cartilage, stress is laid on the importance of these studies for a proper classification of such rare and not completely known chondrodysplastic dwarfisms. (orig.) [de

  8. Tractional retinal detachment in Usher syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Alka; Pal, Nikhil; Azad, Raj Vardhan; Sharma, Yog Raj; Chandra, Parijat; Vikram Singh, Deependra

    2005-08-01

    Retinal detachment is a rare complication in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. A case is reported of tractional retinal detachment in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa and sensorineural hearing loss, which was diagnosed as Usher syndrome type II. Because of the poor visual prognosis, the patient refused surgery in that eye. Tractional retinal detachment should be added to the differential diagnoses of visual loss in patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  9. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Clinical and Genetic Spectrum of Bartter Syndrome Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Elsa; Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Simian, Christophe; Deschenes, Georges; Kwon, Theresa; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Bobrie, Guillaume; Borde, Jean Sébastien; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhène; Decramer, Stéphane; Cailliez, Mathilde; Krug, Pauline; Cozette, Paul; Delbet, Jean Daniel; Dubourg, Laurence; Chaveau, Dominique; Fila, Marc; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lavocat, Marie-Pierre; Lemoine, Sandrine; Djeddi, Djamal; Llanas, Brigitte; Louillet, Ferielle; Merieau, Elodie; Mileva, Maria; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Mousson, Christiane; Nobili, François; Novo, Robert; Roussey-Kesler, Gwenaëlle; Vrillon, Isabelle; Walsh, Stephen B; Teulon, Jacques; Blanchard, Anne; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa

    2017-08-01

    Bartter syndrome type 3 is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary salt-losing tubulopathy caused by mutations of the chloride voltage-gated channel Kb gene ( CLCNKB ), which encodes the ClC-Kb chloride channel involved in NaCl reabsorption in the renal tubule. To study phenotype/genotype correlations, we performed genetic analyses by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and retrospectively analyzed medical charts for 115 patients with CLCNKB mutations. Functional analyses were performed in Xenopus laevis oocytes for eight missense and two nonsense mutations. We detected 60 mutations, including 27 previously unreported mutations. Among patients, 29.5% had a phenotype of ante/neonatal Bartter syndrome (polyhydramnios or diagnosis in the first month of life), 44.5% had classic Bartter syndrome (diagnosis during childhood, hypercalciuria, and/or polyuria), and 26.0% had Gitelman-like syndrome (fortuitous discovery of hypokalemia with hypomagnesemia and/or hypocalciuria in childhood or adulthood). Nine of the ten mutations expressed in vitro decreased or abolished chloride conductance. Severe (large deletions, frameshift, nonsense, and essential splicing) and missense mutations resulting in poor residual conductance were associated with younger age at diagnosis. Electrolyte supplements and indomethacin were used frequently to induce catch-up growth, with few adverse effects. After a median follow-up of 8 (range, 1-41) years in 77 patients, chronic renal failure was detected in 19 patients (25%): one required hemodialysis and four underwent renal transplant. In summary, we report a genotype/phenotype correlation for Bartter syndrome type 3: complete loss-of-function mutations associated with younger age at diagnosis, and CKD was observed in all phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Usher syndrome type 1: early detection of electroretinographic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Guevara, Roberto; Renault, Francis; Loundon, Natalie; Marlin, Sandrine; Pelosse, Béatrice; Momtchilova, Martha; Auzoux-Chevé, Monique; Vermersch, Anne Isabelle; Richard, Pascal

    2009-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 needs to be diagnosed at early age in order to timely manage speech therapy, cochlear implantation, and genetic counseling. Few data are available regarding electroretinographic testing before the age of six years. To describe electroretinographic changes in young children with Usher syndrome type 1. Retrospective study of fourteen patients. Age at first neurophysiologic testing was between 17 months and 5 years 4 months. Electroretinogram was performed using flash stimulation in mesopic conditions in the conscious child. Analysis was focused on the amplitudes and latencies of a- and b-waves. Whatever the age, an abnormal fundus was always confirmed with an absent electroretinogram. The youngest patient with absent electroretinogram was 17 month-old. When recorded on and after the 29th month of age, electroretinogram was absent in all cases, including 6 patients with normal fundus. In three patients a low-amplitude electroretinogram was present at first recording within the 26th and 27th months. Electroretinogram showed retinopathy in young children with Usher syndrome type 1, even in the absence of fundoscopic signs of retinal degeneration.

  12. Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: a revision of the rehabilitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT are two clinically overlapping heritable connective tissue disorders strongly associating with pain, fatigue and other secondary aspects. No specific treatment exist for this syndrome and rehabilitation play a role in the management of these patients. The aim of this paper is to evaluate what are the evidence in literature about rehabilitation. Research was done using database PUBMED and consist in a revision of the studies published in the last 15 years. All studies agree to the beneficial role of the rehabilitative treatment and physical therapy but it’s necessary to add more further studies to establish a high quality, evidence-based physical therapy for this specific population.

  13. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural

  14. Achalasia in a Patient with Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar S. Amr

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Achalasia is a rare disease characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax. The etiology of this disease remains unknown. Polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II is a well-identified disease characterized by the occurrence of autoimmune Addison's disease in combination with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or type 1 diabetes mellitus. We report a case that suggests autoimmunity and immunogenicity as a probable contributing factor for association of these two rare disorders.

  15. DRESS syndrome associated with type 2 diabetes in a child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Bag, Ozlem; Karkiner, Canan Sule Unsal; Korkmaz, Huseyin Anil; Can, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is an uncommon, life-threatening drug reaction. The basic findings are skin rash, multiorgan involvement, and eosinophilia. Most of the aromatic anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital and carbamazepine can induce DRESS. Herein we report a 14-year-old patient with DRESS syndrome related to carbamazepine use. The patient presented with signs of involvement of the skin, lungs, liver, and microscopic hematuria. Carbamazepine treatment was discontinued; antihistamines and steroids were started. Hyperglycemia, commencing on the first dose of the steroid given, persisted even after the discontinuation of steroids and improvement of other signs. There were no signs of pancreatitis or type 1 diabetes clinically in laboratory tests. Her blood glucose levels were regulated at first with insulin and later with metformin. Within 1 year of follow-up, still regulated with oral antidiabetics, she has been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Formerly, long-term sequelae related to “drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome” such as hepatic and renal failure, type 1 diabetes mellitus, Grave's disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and lupus have also been reported. However, up to date, no cases with type 2 diabetes have been reported as long-term sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature presenting with type 2 diabetes as long-term sequelae. PMID:26862317

  16. Visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Rutger F; Pennings, Ronald J E; Huygen, Patrick L M; Sankila, Eeva-Marja; Tuppurainen, Kaija; Kleemola, Leenamaija; Cremers, Cor W R J; Deutman, August F

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate visual impairment in Finnish Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) and compare this with visual impairment in Usher syndrome types 1b (USH1b) and 2a (USH2a). We carried out a retrospective study of 28 Finnish USH3 patients, 24 Dutch USH2a patients and 17 Dutch USH1b patients. Cross-sectional regression analyses of the functional acuity score (FAS), functional field score (FFS*) and functional vision score (FVS*) related to age were performed for all patients. The FFS* and FVS* were calculated using the isoptre V-4 test target instead of the usual III-4 target. Statistical tests relating to regression lines and Student's t-test were used to compare between USH3 patients and the other genetic subtypes of Usher syndrome. Cross-sectional analyses revealed significant deterioration in the FAS (1.3% per year), FFS* (1.4% per year) and FVS* (1.8% per year) with advancing age in the USH3 patient group. At a given age the USH3 patients showed significantly poorer visual field function than the USH2a patients. The rate of deterioration in visual function in Finnish USH3 patients was fairly similar to that in Dutch USH1b or USH2a patients. At a given age, visual field impairment in USH3 patients was similar to that in USH1b patients but poorer than in USH2a patients.

  17. [Discussion of Chinese syndrome typing in acute hepatic failure model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-liang; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Xian-bo

    2011-05-01

    To study Chinese syndrome typing of acute hepatic failure (AHF) mice model by screening effective formulae. Lipoplysaccharides (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GaIN) was intraperitoneally injected to mice to establish the AHF mice model. Yinchenhao Decoction, Huanglian Jiedu Decoction, Buzhong Yiqi Decoction, and Xijiao Dihuang Decoction were administered to model mice respectively by gastrogavage. The behavior and the survival rate were monitored. The liver function and pathological changes of liver tissues were detected. In all the tested classic recipes, the survival rate was elevated from 10% to 60% by administration of Xijiao Dihuang Decoction. Five h after modeling, the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was (183.95 +/- 52.00) U/L, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (235.70 +/- 34.03) U/L in Xijiao Di-huang Decoction Group, lower than those of the model control group, but with insignificant difference (ALT: 213.32 +/- 71.93 U/L; AST: 299.48 +/- 70.56 U/L, both P > 0.05). Xijiao Dihuang Decoction could obviously alleviate the liver injury. Xijiao Dihuang Decoction was an effective formula for LPS/D-GaIN induced AHF model. According to syndrome typing through formula effect, heat toxin and blood stasis syndrome dominated in the LPS/D-GalN induced AHF mice model.

  18. Macrophage activation syndrome associated with griscelli syndrome type 2: case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefsafi, Zakia; Hasbaoui, Brahim El; Kili, Amina; Agadr, Aomar; Khattab, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a severe and potentially fatal life-threatening condition associated with excessive activation and expansion of T cells with macrophages and a high expression of cytokines, resulting in an uncontrolled inflammatory response, with high levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and causing multiorgan damage. This syndrome is classified into primary (genetic/familial) or secondary forms to several etiologies, such as infections, neoplasias mainly hemopathies or autoimmune diseases. It is characterised clinically by unremitting high fever, pancytopaenia, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, encephalopathy, coagulation abnormalities and sharply increased levels of ferritin. The pathognomonic feature of the syndrome is seen on bone marrow examination, which frequently, though not always, reveals numerous morphologically benign macrophages exhibiting haemophagocytic activity. Because MAS can follow a rapidly fatal course, prompt recognition of its clinical and laboratory features and immediate therapeutic intervention are essential. However, it is difficult to distinguish underlying disease flare, infectious complications or medication side effects from MAS. Although, the pathogenesis of MAS is unclear, the hallmark of the syndrome is an uncontrolled activation and proliferation of T lymphocytes and macrophages, leading to massive hypersecretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Mutations in cytolytic pathway genes are increasingly being recognised in children who develop MAS in his secondary form. We present here a case of Macrophage activation syndrome associated with Griscelli syndrome type 2 in a 3-years-old boy who had been referred due to severe sepsis with non-remitting high fever, generalized lymphoadenopathy and hepato-splenomegaly. Laboratory data revealed pancytopenia with high concentrations of triglycerides, ferritin and lactic dehydrogenase while the bone marrow revealed numerous morphologically benign

  19. Complex regional pain syndrome type I following pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Kamath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old woman presented with burning pain and swelling over dorsum of right hand and small joints of the fingers, associated with redness, feeling of warmth, and stiffness of the fingers, with inability to bend the fingers since 2 months. The symptoms were progressively increasing in intensity for the past 1 month. There was no history of fever or trauma to the hand. Two months before her symptoms started, she had permanent pacemaker implanted for complete heart block with syncope. She was hypertensive and was on regular medication. Her X-ray of right hand showed decreased bone density (demineralisation, suggestive of osteopenia. A diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome type I induced by pacemaker insertion was made. She was treated with amitriptyline and steroids, after which her symptoms improved dramatically.

  20. Successful Pregnancy Outcome In Maternal Crigler Najjar Syndrome Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuntala PN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimated incidence of Crigler-Najjar syndrome(CNS is 1 case per 1,000,000 births(1 million. The overall prevalence of CN syndrome is unknown, with only several hundred people reported to have this disease. It is interestingly very rare to encounter a pregnant adult women with congenital jaundice. Pregnancy in CN type II patients is a diagnostic and a therapeutic challenge because of the high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy with serious neurological damage as life-threatening complications for the fetus. To date 8 pregnancy outcome have been reported from 5 women and we report the6 woman with a successful 9 th pregnancy outcome. We have discussed detail history, presentation and management during pregnancy and care of the new born.

  1. The congenital long QT syndrome Type 3: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Ricardo Pérez-Riera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3 is the third in frequency compared to the 15 forms known currently of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS. Cardiac events are less frequent in LQT3 when compared with LQT1 and LQT2, but more likely to be lethal; the likelihood of dying during a cardiac event is 20% in families with an LQT3 mutation and 4% with either an LQT1 or an LQT2 mutation. LQT3 is consequence of mutation of gene SCN5A which codes for the Nav1.5 Na+ channel α-subunit and electrocardiographically characterized by a tendency to bradycardia related to age, prolonged QT/QTc interval (mean QTc value 478 ± 52 ms, accentuated QT dispersion consequence of prolonged ST segment, late onset of T wave and frequent prominent U wave because of longer repolarization of the M cell across left ventricular wall.

  2. Type IV neonatal Bartter syndrome complicated with congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakallı, Hale; Bucak, Hakan İbrahim

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-Bartter syndrome encompasses a heterogenous group of disorders similar to Bartter syndrome. Sometimes a few status may be nested, as in our case presented here. An 8-month-old boy was referred to our hospital with of intractable diarrhea, polyuria, persistent hypokalemia, abdominal distension and failure to thrive. He was born in the 34 6/7 gestational week (GW) to consanguineous parents. In the 30(th) GW polyhydramnios was verified by ultrasonography. The laboratory results showed hypokalemic-hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, and increased urinary loss of chloride, potassium and calcium. An audiogram test revealed complete sensorineural deafness. Ultrasonography revealed medullary nephrocalcinosis in both kidneys. Elevated plasma renin activity and aldosterone were found and a provisional diagnosis of type-IV neonatal Bartter syndrome was made. Treatment with indomethacin, spironolactone and additional intake of NaCl/KCl was initiated. Despite these therapies, the child's diarrhea persisted but serum potassium concentration normalized, and hypercalciuria and urine output reduced. After determining the high fecal chloride concentration, there was an immediate decompensation of the disease on indomethacin withdrawal, thus a diagnosis of type IV neonatal Bartter syndrome complicated with congenital chloride diarrhea was considered. Indomethacin, spironolactone and supplementary therapies with NaCl/KCl were continued, which resulted in the normalization of serum electrolytes as well as his physical development, but high contents of chloride in urine and faeces and nephrocalcinosis remains unchanged during 1-year follow-up. Because of the clinical and laboratory simulations between the various diseases that lead to hypokalemic-hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis, patients must be evaluated carefully.

  3. The ophthalmological course of Usher syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, L; Tuppurainen, K; Laippala, P; Mäntyjärvi, M; Puhakka, H

    Usher syndrome is a recessive hereditary disease group with clinical and genetical heterogeneity leading to handicapped hearing and visual loss until middle age. It is the most common cause for deaf-blindness. Three distinct phenotypes and five distinct genotypes are already known. In Finland the distribution of known Usher types is different than elsewhere. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is common in Finland and it is thought to include 40% of patients. Progressive hearing loss is characteristic of USH3. Elsewhere USH3 has been regarded as a rarity covering only several percent of the whole Usher population. The aim of this paper is to describe, for the first time, the course of visual handicap and typical refractive errors in USH3 and compare it with other USH types. From a total patient sample consisting of 229 Finnish USH patients, 200 patients' visual findings were analyzed in a multicenter retrospective follow-up study. The average progress rate during a 10-year follow-up period in different USH types was similar. The essential progress occurred below the age of 40 and was continuous up to that age. Visual acuity dropped below 0.05 (severely impaired) at the age of 37 and the visual fields were of tubular shape without any peripheric islands at the average age of 30. Clinically significant hypermetropia with astigmatism seems to be a pathognomonic clinical sign of USH3.

  4. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old Ugandan girl. ... Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa ... Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasisectodermal dystrophy syndrome, is a very rare disorder of ...

  5. Oral and dental findings of griscelli syndrome type 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Marti Akgun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by variable immunodeficiency, partial albinism, abnormal accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes, pigmentary dilution of the skin, and shiny silver-gray hair. GS has three types, with the first and second types caused by mutations in two genes being located at band 15q21: RAB27A and MYO5A. The expression of the third form of GS is restricted to the characteristic hypopigmentation of GS, and results from mutation in the gene that encodes melanophilin MLPH. It has also been shown that an identical phenotype can result from the deletion of the MYO5A F-exon. The aim of this case report is the presentation of oral and dental features and SEM images of the hair of a 12-year-old girl with GS type 3. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 164-167

  6. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2 is defined as adrenal insufficiency associated with autoimmune primary hypothyroidism and/or with autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus, but very rare with myasthenia gravis. Case report. We presented a case of an autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 2 associated with myasthenia gravis. A 49-year-old female with symptoms of muscle weakness and low serum levels of cortisol and aldosterone was already diagnosed with primary adrenal insufficiency. Primary hypothyroidism was identified with low values of free thyroxine 4 (FT4 and raised values of thyroidstumulating hormone (TSH. The immune system as a cause of hypothyroidism was confirmed by the presence of thyroid antibodies to peroxidase and TSH receptors. Myasthenia gravis was diagnosed on the basis of a typical clinical feature, positive diagnostic tests and an increased titre of antibodies against the acetylcholine receptors. It was not possible to confirm the immune nature of adrenal insufficiency by the presence of antibodies to 21- hydroxylase. The normal morphological finding of the adrenal glands was an indirect confirmation of the condition as well as the absence of other diseases that might have led to adrenal insufficiency and low levels of both serum cortisol and aldosterone. Hormone replacement therapy, anticholinergic therapy and corticosteroid therapy for myasthenia gravis improved the patient’s general state of health and muscle weakness. Conclusion. This case report indicates a need to examine each patient with an autoimmune disease carefully as this condition may be associated with another autoimmune diseases.

  7. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  8. Griscelli syndrome type 2: A rare and fatal syndrome in a South Indian boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rajyalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutation in the MYO5A (GS1, RAB27A (GS2, and MLPH (GS3 genes, characterized by a common feature, partial albinism. The common variant of three, GS type 2, in addition, shows primary immunodeficiency which leads to recurrent infections and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. We, herewith, describe a case of GS type 2, in a 4-year-old male child who presented with chronic and recurrent fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and secondary neurological deterioration; highlighting the cytological and histopathological features of lymph nodes. Hair shaft examination of the child confirmed the diagnosis.

  9. Frequency of metabolic syndrome in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiani, I.G.; Khan, A.N.; Yasir, S.; Baluch, U.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of coronary risk factors such as diabetes and pre-diabetes, abdominal obesity, high triglyceride (TG), low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and high blood pressure (BP). It is estimated that around a quarter of the world adult population have MetS and they are twice as likely to die from it and three times as likely to have a coronary event or stroke compared with people without the syndrome. Methods: This observational descriptive study was conducted at the Department of General Medicine, Federal Government Polyclinic Islamabad. All type-2 diabetics presenting in the outpatient and inpatient department during 11 months between the ages of 30-80 were enrolled. They were interviewed, blood pressure, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profiles were checked. Results: Of the 300 patients 165 (55 percentage) were females and 135 (45 percentage) were males with mean age 52.47±11.24 years. The mean duration of Diabetes Mellitus was 7.38±3.85 years. Metabolic Syndrome was present in 83 percentage of the study population, 129 (43 percentage) were male and 171 (57 percentage) were female. The p-value was statistically significant on comparing the presence of the Metabolic Syndrome with waist circumference, serum triglyceride levels, and blood pressure as it was <0.05. The most commonly occurring finding was a decreased HDL-cholesterol in both genders. Conclusions: The MetS was present in 83 percentage of the diabetic population, mostly in females with decreased HDL-cholesterol being the most common in both genders. (author)

  10. Myositis in Griscelli syndrome type 2 treated with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Müller, Klaus; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and is occasionally associated with a hemophagocytic syndrome (type 2). We present a 13-year-old girl with Griscelli syndrome type 2, who developed a hemophagocytic syndrome along with marked muscle weakness...... and elevated plasma creatine kinase. Muscle biopsy showed massive inflammatory changes in some fascicles, while other fascicles were relatively spared. Clinical symptoms and biopsy changes resolved after immunosuppression and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Our results suggest that muscle...

  11. Asymmetric severity of diabetic retinopathy in Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kashima, Tomoyuki; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Tomoyuki Kashima, Hideo Akiyama, Shoji KishiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Gunma 371-8511, JapanAbstract: A 30-year-old female patient was referred to our institution due to vitreous hemorrhage. Best corrected visual acuity of her right and left eyes at her initial visit was 10/20 and 20/20, respectively. Although hypochromic iris was observed in the superior iris between the 10 and 2 o’clock positions in her right eye, her entire left eye exhibite...

  12. Síndrome de Waardenburg tipo I: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Capua Vieira da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Waardenburg tipo I é uma desordem auditivo-pigmentária que inclui, entre outros, perda auditiva neurossensorial congênita não progressiva, telecanto, distúrbios pigmentares de íris, cabelo e pele. Indivíduos afetados podem ter maior risco de: defeitos no tubo neural, fendas labial e palatina, anormalidades nos membros e doença de Hirschsprung. O diagnóstico é clínico, sendo necessários dois critérios maiores ou um maior e dois menores. PAX3 é o único gene conhecido associado à síndrome, sendo, entretanto, mais usado no aconselhamento genético. Quanto ao diagnóstico diferencial, podemos citar: outras causas de perda auditiva neurossensorial congênita não progressiva, outros tipo de síndrome de Waardenburg, piebaldismo, albinismo, vitiligo e síndrome de Teitz. Neste trabalho, apresenta-se um paciente masculino de 11 anos com diagnóstico de síndrome de Waardenburg tipo I. Ressalta-se a importância do oftalmologista no auxílio do diagnóstico deste raro quadro sistêmico, uma vez que inclui algumas alterações oftalmológicas. O diagnóstico precoce da síndrome permite estimulação adequada para a perda auditiva, assim como medidas preventivas em caso de gestantes afetadas no aconselhamento genético.

  13. Difficulty eating and significant weight loss in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Velasco, Carolina; Van den Bossche, Thomas; Grossin, Daniel; Hamonet, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Joint Hypermobility Syndrome, also known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a heritable disorder of connective tissue, common but poorly known by the medical community. Although generalized joint hypermobility and fragility of tissues have been described as core features, recent research highlights the multisystemic nature of JHS/EDS-HT, which presents with a wide range of articular and extra-articular symptoms. Among these, gastrointestinal problems, temporomandibular disorders, and smell and taste abnormalities are common among those affected, having significant implications for eating. The present work reviews the literature linking JHS/EDS-HT and eating problems. Two illustrative case reports, in which JHS/EDS-HT manifestations contribute to developing and maintaining disturbed eating behaviors and significant weight loss, are presented.

  14. Audiological findings in Usher syndrome types IIa and II (non-IIa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Cohn, Edward S; Kelly, William J; Kimberling, William J; Tranebjoerg, Lisbeth; Möller, Claes

    2004-03-01

    The aim was to define the natural history of hearing loss in Usher syndrome type IIa compared to non-IIa. People with Usher syndrome type II show moderate-to-severe hearing loss, normal balance and retinitis pigmentosa. Several genes cause Usher syndrome type II. Our subjects formed two genetic groups: (1) subjects with Usher syndrome type IIa with a mutation and/or linkage to the Usher IIa gene; (2) subjects with the Usher II phenotype with no mutation and/or linkage to the Usher IIa gene. Four hundred and two audiograms of 80 Usher IIa subjects were compared with 435 audiograms of 87 non-IIa subjects. Serial audiograms with intervals of > or = 5 years were examined for progression in 109 individuals Those with Usher syndrome type IIa had significantly worse hearing thresholds than those with non-IIa Usher syndrome after the second decade. The hearing loss in Usher syndrome type IIa was found to be more progressive, and the progression started earlier than in non-IIa Usher syndrome. This suggests an auditory phenotype for Usher syndrome type IIa that is different from that of other types of Usher syndrome II. Thus, this is to our knowledge one of the first studies showing a genotype-phenotype auditory correlation.

  15. Delineation and Diagnostic Criteria of Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poretti, Andrea; Vitiello, Giuseppina; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bertini, Enrico; Borgatti, Renato; Brancati, Francesco; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Faravelli, Francesca; Giordano, Lucio; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.; Iannicelli, Miriam; Kluger, Gerhard; Kyllerman, Marten; Landgren, Magnus; Lees, Melissa M.; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Romaniello, Romina; Scheer, Ianina; Schwarz, Christoph E.; Spiegel, Ronen; Tibussek, Daniel; Valente, Enza Maria; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome type VI (OFD VI) represents a rare phenotypic subtype of Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD). In the original report polydactyly, oral findings, intellectual disability, and absence of the cerebellar vermis at post-mortem characterized the syndrome.

  16. Acromion types and role of corticosteroid with shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, M.; Gillani, S.F.U.S.; Awais, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the association between shoulder impingement and morphological characteristics of acromion and the role of sub-acromial injection of methylprednisolone in the short-term treatment for relieving pain and improve functional disability of these patients. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Unit-I (DOST-I), Mayo Hospital, Lahore, between November 2013 to June 2014. Methodology: All patients presented in OPD with shoulder pain were included as subjects and evaluated by clinical test and categorised using X-ray scapula Y-view. Patients with impingement syndrome were correlated with Bigliani types and offered intra-lesional injection into sub-acromial space with 2ml of xylocaine 2% and 40 mg of methylprednisolone using 22 gauge needle. The effectiveness was assessed in terms of relieving pain and good functional outcomes; and rotator cuff tear was clinically assessed among impingement positive patient. The pain was assessed using visual analogue score before and after the administration of the injection. Demographic variables for frequencies and their associations were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. Significance level was p<0.05. Among the 101 cases, there was no case of tear of rotator cuff tendon on clinical assessment. Majority of the patients (58.4%) were females with mean age of 31.38 +-1.13 years. Majority 57 (56.4%) of the patients had acromion type II (curved), which was the most common cause of shoulder impingement. Most had moderate pain. Thirty-four patients required intralesional steroid, which relieved the pain in 31 of them. Conclusion: Shoulder impingement syndrome without tear of rotator cuff tendon was found in younger age group between 40 to 45 years, which was relieved by intralesional corticosteroid administration. These patients had type II (curved) acromion, according to Bigliani classification. (author)

  17. Type V Pouch Colon, Prune Belly Syndrome, and Congenital Anterior Urethrocutaneous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Prince; Birua, Hirendra

    2017-01-01

    Congenital pouch colon (CPC) or short colon syndrome is a rare type of anorectal malformation(ARM). Type V is the rarest form of CPC. We present a 1-day-old male child with type V CPC with prune belly syndrome and congenital anterior urethrocutaneous fistula (CAUF).

  18. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type: it is a challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheper MC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mark C Scheper,1,2 Janneke E de Vries,1–3 Jeanine Verbunt,3,4 Raoul HH Engelbert1,2 1School of Physiotherapy, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, 2Department of Rehabilitation, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht; 4Adelante, Center of expertise in Rehabilitation and Audiology, Hoensbroek, the Netherlands Abstract: Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers–Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers–Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT. Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1 and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2. In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3. Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the

  19. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3).

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIIC: A Mexican Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rosa Rincón-Sánchez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders whose primary clinical features include soft and extensible skin, articular hypermobility and tissue fragility. EDS type VIIC or ‘human dermatosparaxis’ is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by severe skin fragility and sagging redundant skin (major criteria with a soft, doughy texture, easy bruising, premature rupture of fetal membranes and large hernias (minor criteria. Dermatosparaxis (meaning ‘tearing of skin’, which has been described in several non-human species, is a disorder of the connective tissue resulting from a deficiency of the enzyme that cleaves the registration peptide off the N-terminal end of collagen after it has been secreted from fibroblasts. We describe a Mexican case from consanguineous parents with all the phenotypical characteristics previously described, plus skeletal abnormalities.

  1. Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in a patient with narcolepsy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas; Lim, Ming; VanDenEshof, Kirandeep; Gringras, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) is a chronic primary disorder of hypersomnolence characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disrupted nocturnal sleep. NT1 is linked to hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, strongly associated with Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) marker DQB1*06:02 and of probable autoimmune origin. NT1 is usually associated with increased rates of overweight and obesity, and sometimes with increases in overnight blood pressure and increased rates of hypoventilation with raised CO 2 levels overnight. Many of these are predisposing factors for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS). We present a case of a young girl with both NT1 and PTCS that responded well to treatment with acetazolamide after early identification, with improvement of headache and resolution of hypoventilation. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Type III Mixed Cryoglobulinemia and Antiphospholipid Syndrome in a Patient With Partial DiGeorge Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice D. Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a 14 year-old boy with partial DiGeorge syndrome (DGS, status post complete repair of Tetralogy of Fallot, who developed antiphospholipid syndrome (APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia. He presented with recurrent fever and dyspnea upon exertion secondary to right pulmonary embolus on chest computed tomography (CT. Coagulation studies revealed homozygous methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase 677TT mutations, elevated cardiolipin IgM antibodies, and elevated β2-glycoprotein I IgM antibodies. Infectious work-up revealed only positive anti-streptolysin O (ASO and anti-DNAse B titers. Autoimmune studies showed strongly positive anti-platelet IgM, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF, and positive cryocrit. Renal biopsy for evaluation of proteinuria and hematuria showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN with membranoproliferative features consistent with cryoglobulinemia. Immunofixation showed polyclonal bands. Our patient was treated successfully with antibiotics, prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF. This is the first report of a patient with partial DGS presenting with APS and type III mixed cryoglobulinemia possibly due to Streptococcal infection.

  3. Genetic heterogeneity in patients with Bartter syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingran; Ning, Jing; Xu, Weihong; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Kaishu; Li, Wenfu; Li, Guiying; Li, Shibo

    2017-02-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) type 1 is an autosomal recessive kidney disorder caused by loss‑of‑function mutations in the solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) gene. To date, 72 BS type 1 patients harboring SLC12A1 mutations have been documented. Of these 144 alleles studied, 68 different disease‑causing mutations have been detected in 129 alleles, and no mutation was detected in the remaining 15 alleles. The mutation types included missense/nonsense mutations, splicing mutations and small insertions and deletions ranging from 1 to 4 nucleotides. A large deletion encompassing a whole exon in the SLC12A1 gene has not yet been reported. The current study initially identified an undocumented homozygous frameshift mutation (c.1833delT) by Sanger sequencing analysis of a single infant with BS type 1. However, in a subsequent analysis, the mutation was detected only in the father's DNA. Upon further investigation using a next‑generation sequencing approach, a deletion in exons 14 and 15 in both the patient and patient's mother was detected. The deletion was subsequently confirmed by use of a long‑range polymerase chain reaction and was determined to be 3.16 kb in size based on sequencing of the junction fragment. The results of the present study demonstrated that pathogenic variants of SLC12A1 are heterogeneous. Large deletions appear to serve an etiological role in BS type 1, and may be more prevalent than previously thought.

  4. Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Severe Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I (Hurler Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, Elizabeth; Steinberger, Julia; DeFor, Todd; Orchard, Paul; Kelly, Aaron S

    2018-02-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a life-saving procedure, but one associated with increasing long-term cardiovascular risk requiring frequent long-term follow-up. This therapy has significantly lengthened survival in mucopolysaccharidosis type IH (Hurler syndrome), a disease with known coronary artery involvement. Metabolic syndrome-a constellation of central obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose-is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, and occurs when any 3 or more of these 5 components is present within a single individual. The incidence of metabolic syndrome and its components is poorly defined after transplantation for Hurler syndrome. Chart review of all long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome ≥9 years of age for factors comprising the metabolic syndrome: obesity, high blood pressure, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and fasting blood glucose. Sixty-three patients were evaluated, 20 of whom had components of the metabolic syndrome available for review. There was no significant difference in age at transplantation, sex, number of transplants, pretransplant radiation, or percent engraftment between those with and without these data. Median follow-up after transplantation for the 20 patients with data was 14.3 years. Only 1 (5%) patient of this group fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Fifty-three percent of the patients had 1 or more components of metabolic syndrome: the most common was high blood pressure occurring in 40%. Metabolic syndrome is uncommon in this cohort of long-term survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Hurler syndrome but almost half of the patients had 1 or more components of the syndrome, with high blood pressure being the most common. Further studies are needed to develop guidelines in this diagnosis as well as other nonmalignant diseases of children

  5. Hyperuricaemia and the metabolic syndrome in type 2 DM

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    Ogbera Anthonia O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated serum uric acid levels (SUA have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and the metabolic syndrome (MetS and are often reported to be higher in females than in males. The aim of this report is to determine the prevalence and clinical correlates of hyperuricaemia and also to evaluate associations with the MetS in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted in people with type 2 DM in Lagos, Nigeria. Hyperuricaemia was defined by cut-off values of > 7 mg/dl for men and > 6 mg/dl for women. The diagnosis of MetS was made using the new definition by the American Heart Association and other related bodies. Clinical and biochemical parameters were compared between subjects with hyperuricaemia and normouricaemia. Statistical analysis included usage of Student's t test, Pearson correlation coefficients, multivariate regression analysis and chi square. Results 601 patients with type 2 DM aged between 34-91 years were recruited for the study. The prevalence rates of hyperuricaemia and the MetS were 25% and 60% respectively. The frequency of occurrence of hyperuricaemia was comparable in both genders (59% vs 41%, p = 0.3. Although, the prevalence of the MetS in subjects with hyperuricaemia and normouricaemia was comparable (61 vs 56%, p = 0.1, a higher proportion of hyperuricaemic subjects had 3 or more components of the Mets compared with normouricaemic subjects. Possible predictors of hyperuricaemia include central obesity, smoking and elevated serum triglycerides (TG. SUA levels were found to be positively and significantly associated with serum TG (r = 0.2, p = 0.0001 and total cholesterol (r = 13, p = 0.001. Conclusion The prevalence of hyperuricaemia in subjects with type 2 DM is comparable in both genders and possible predictors of hyperuricaemia are potentially modifiable. SUA is positively and significantly associated with serum TG and total

  6. Targeted exon sequencing in Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujakowska, Kinga M; Consugar, Mark; Place, Emily; Harper, Shyana; Lena, Jaclyn; Taub, Daniel G; White, Joseph; Navarro-Gomez, Daniel; Weigel DiFranco, Carol; Farkas, Michael H; Gai, Xiaowu; Berson, Eliot L; Pierce, Eric A

    2014-12-02

    Patients with Usher syndrome type I (USH1) have retinitis pigmentosa, profound congenital hearing loss, and vestibular ataxia. This syndrome is currently thought to be associated with at least six genes, which are encoded by over 180 exons. Here, we present the use of state-of-the-art techniques in the molecular diagnosis of a cohort of 47 USH1 probands. The cohort was studied with selective exon capture and next-generation sequencing of currently known inherited retinal degeneration genes, comparative genomic hybridization, and Sanger sequencing of new USH1 exons identified by human retinal transcriptome analysis. With this approach, we were able to genetically solve 14 of the 47 probands by confirming the biallelic inheritance of mutations. We detected two likely pathogenic variants in an additional 19 patients, for whom family members were not available for cosegregation analysis to confirm biallelic inheritance. Ten patients, in addition to primary disease-causing mutations, carried rare likely pathogenic USH1 alleles or variants in other genes associated with deaf-blindness, which may influence disease phenotype. Twenty-one of the identified mutations were novel among the 33 definite or likely solved patients. Here, we also present a clinical description of the studied cohort at their initial visits. We found a remarkable genetic heterogeneity in the studied USH1 cohort with multiplicity of mutations, of which many were novel. No obvious influence of genotype on phenotype was found, possibly due to small sample sizes of the genotypes under study. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  7. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS type 1 validating case histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has been advocated as the corner stone and most important aspect of treatment in the rehabilitation of these individuals but unfortunately it has been difficult to execute when pain is exacerbated due to allodynia (unbearable to touch or move and hyperalgesia. Best results have been obtained if the patients are recognised and treated in the early or acute phase and it has been found that through careful assessment and analysis these patients can be recognised by previous events that have occurred in their initial case history. The treatment in the acute stage with physiotherapy modalities such as electrical stimulation and acupuncture will produce an early cessation of the symptoms and prevention of the disease developing into the fully blown CRPS type 1 with irreversible and possibly atrophic consequences. Case histories have been presented that illustrate these important aspects and demonstrate  the value of early and the appropriate physiotherapy that may be more successful than other pharmacological and physical interventions in this disease.

  8. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Botha

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS, type 1 is a pain disorder that develops unpredictably and can follow a minor injury. A 12-year-old boy presented with severe pain in the feet and could not walk or stand weight bearing. Normal X-rays showed osteopenic changes and radiolucent lines, which appeared to be stress fractures. Three-phase bone scintigraphy showed no uptake in the left lower leg on the blood pool phase or on the immediate or delayed images. This indicated typical CPRS type 1 in children. The uptake in the right foot was increased and the stress fracture and other illness could not be differentiated. Computed tomography was done to exclude stress fractures. Only osteopenic changes in both calcaneus bones were found and there was no evidence of cortical stress fractures. Magnetic resonance images revealed oedema in the calcaneus and talus bones of both feet. The patient received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for 1 week combined with extensive physiotherapy. The blood pool phase of the bone scan became normal within 2 weeks, and increased uptake in both feet was noticed. The patient was followed up with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months.

  9. Endovascular repair of multiple infrageniculate aneurysms in a patient with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenick, Natalie; Cho, Jae S; Abu Hamad, Ghassan; Makaroun, Michel S; Chaer, Rabih A

    2011-09-01

    Patients with vascular type Ehler-Danlos syndrome can develop aneurysms in unusual locations. We describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who developed metachronous tibial artery aneurysms that were sequentially treated with endovascular means. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Usher syndrome type I associated with bronchiectasis and immotile nasal cilia in two brothers.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonneau, D; Raymond, F; Kremer, C; Klossek, J M; Kaplan, J; Patte, F

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disease characterised by congenital sensorineural deafness, involvement of the vestibular system, and progressive visual loss owing to retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report the association of this disease with bronchiectasis, chronic sinusitis, and reduced nasal mucociliary clearance in two sibs and we suggest Usher syndrome type I could be a primary ciliary disorder.

  11. Bartter syndrome type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westland, Rik; Hack, Wilfried W; van der Horst, Henricus J R; Uittenbogaard, Lukas B; van Hagen, Johanna M; van der Valk, Paul; Kamsteeg, Erik J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Wijk, Joanna A E

    2012-12-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2 years of life, known as classic Bartter syndrome. However, in rare cases Bartter syndrome Type III has an antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios, premature delivery and severe dehydration in the first weeks of life. Associations between congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract and Bartter syndrome are extremely rare. This case report presents a girl with Bartter syndrome Type III due to a homozygous CLCNKB mutation and bilateral congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. In addition, we describe the antenatal presentation as well as its perinatal management.

  12. Usher syndrome clinical types I and II: could ocular symptoms and signs differentiate between the two types?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilou, Ekaterini T; Rubin, Benjamin I; Caruso, Rafael C; Reed, George F; Pikus, Anita; Hejtmancik, James F; Iwata, Fumino; Redman, Joy B; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel I

    2002-04-01

    Usher syndrome types I and II are clinical syndromes with substantial genetic and clinical heterogeneity. We undertook the current study in order to identify ocular symptoms and signs that could differentiate between the two types. Sixty-seven patients with Usher syndrome were evaluated. Based on audiologic and vestibular findings, patients were classified as either Usher type I or II. The severity of the ocular signs and symptoms present in each type were compared. Visual acuity, visual field area, electroretinographic amplitude, incidence of cataract and macular lesions were not significantly different between Usher types I and II. However, the ages when night blindness was perceived and retinitis pigmentosa was diagnosed differed significantly between the two types. There seems to be some overlap between types I and II of Usher syndrome in regard to the ophthalmologic findings. However, night blindness appears earlier in Usher type I (although the difference in age of appearance appears to be less dramatic than previously assumed). Molecular elucidation of Usher syndrome may serve as a key to understanding these differences and, perhaps, provide a better tool for use in clinical diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counseling.

  13. Meretoja’s Syndrome: Lattice Corneal Dystrophy, Gelsolin Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Casal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lattice corneal dystrophy gelsolin type was first described in 1969 by Jouko Meretoja, a Finnish ophthalmologist. It is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in gelsolin gene resulting in unstable protein fragments and amyloid deposition in various organs. The age of onset is usually after the third decade of life and typical diagnostic triad includes progressive bilateral facial paralysis, loose skin, and lattice corneal dystrophy. We report a case of a 53-year-old female patient referred to our Department of Ophthalmology by severe dry eye and incomplete eyelid closure. She had severe bilateral facial paresis, significant orbicularis, and perioral sagging as well as hypoesthesia of extremities and was diagnosed with Meretoja’s syndrome at the age of 50, confirmed by the presence of gelsolin mutation. At our observation she had bilateral diminished tear film break-up time and Schirmer test, diffuse keratitis, corneal opacification, and neovascularization in the left eye. She was treated with preservative-free lubricants and topical cyclosporine, associated with nocturnal complete occlusion of both eyes, and underwent placement of lacrimal punctal plugs. Ocular symptoms are the first to appear and our role as ophthalmologists is essential for the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of ocular alterations in these patients.

  14. [Oral diseases in auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proust-Lemoine, Emmanuelle; Guyot, Sylvie

    2017-09-01

    Auto-immune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS1) also called Auto-immune Polyendocrinopathy Candidiasis Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) is a rare monogenic childhood-onset auto-immune disease. This autosomal recessive disorder is caused by mutations in the auto-immune regulator (AIRE) gene, and leads to autoimmunity targeting peripheral tissues. There is a wide variability in clinical phenotypes in patients with APSI, with auto-immune endocrine and non-endocrine disorders, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. These patients suffer from oral diseases such as dental enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis. Both are frequently described, and in recent series, enamel hypoplasia and candidiasis are even the most frequent components of APS1 together with hypoparathyroidism. Both often occur during childhood (before 5 years old for canrdidiasis, and before 15 years old for enamel hypoplasia). Oral candidiasis is recurrent all life long, could become resistant to azole antifungal after years of treatment, and be carcinogenic, leading to severe oral squamous cell carcinoma. Oral components of APS1 should be diagnosed and rigorously treated. Dental enamel hypoplasia and/or recurrent oral candidiasis in association with auto-immune diseases in a young child should prompt APS1 diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomassen-Hilgersom Ilona L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines.

  16. Neurodevelopmental attributes of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type: Update and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibellini, Giulia; Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been devoted to the extra-articular and extra-cutaneous manifestations of joint hypermobility syndrome, also termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (i.e., JHS/EDS-HT). Despite the fact that the current diagnostic criteria for both disorders remain focused on joint hypermobility, musculoskeletal pain and skin changes, medical practice and research have started investigating a wide spectrum of visceral, neurological and developmental complications, which represent major burdens for affected individuals. In particular, children with generalized joint hypermobility often present with various neurodevelopmental issues and can be referred for neurological consultation. It is common that investigations in these patients yield negative or inconsistent results, eventually leading to the exclusion of any structural neurological or muscle disorder. In the context of specialized clinics for connective tissue disorders, a clear relationship between generalized joint hypermobility and a characteristic neurodevelopmental profile affecting coordination is emerging. The clinical features of these patients tend to overlap with those of developmental coordination disorder and can be associated with learning and other disabilities. Physical and psychological consequences of these additional difficulties add to the chief manifestations of the pre-existing connective tissue disorder, affecting the well-being and development of children and their families. In this review, particular attention is devoted to the nature of the link between joint hypermobility, coordination difficulties and neurodevelopmental issues in children. Presumed pathogenesis and management issues are explored in order to attract more attention on this association and nurture future clinical research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Multiple long bone cysts revealed by MRI in trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II predisposing to pathological fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konala, Praveen; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Kiely, Nigel [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry (United Kingdom); Noakes, Charlotte [Oxford University Hospital, The Oxford Genetics Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom); Blair, Edward [Oxford University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-15

    Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II is a rare genetic disorder with the few published case reports mainly reporting the radiographic skeletal manifestations. There are no published imaging reports of long bone cysts involving multiple bones in this condition. We report a unique case of bone cysts involving multiple long bones detected with MRI in a patient with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II complicated by a subsequent pathological fracture. It is possible that the bone cysts are a previously undescribed feature of this syndrome; however, the evidence is insufficient to establish a definite association. Chromosomal abnormality identified in this patient is consistent with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type II with no unusual features. Although the nature of these bone cysts is unclear, they are one of the causes of the known increased fracture risk observed in this syndrome. (orig.)

  18. Neuromuscular involvement in various types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Alfen, N. van; Pillen, S.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Schalkwijk, J.; Zwarts, M.J.; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Hamel, B.C.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Muscle involvement is plausible based on recently discovered interactions between

  19. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DM), there is a multiple set of risk factors that commonly appear together forming what is now known as the 'Metabolic Syndrome' (MS). This 'clustering' of metabolic abnormalities that occur in the same individual appear to confer substantial ...

  20. [Ehler-Danlos syndrome (type V) with urethra bifida and polydactyly: an unusual combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, R; Modugno, I; Pala, M A; Caputo, S; Caradonna, E; Greco, A V

    1981-06-30

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is currently regarded as a connective tissue dysplasia. Its genetic, biochemical, histological and clinical features are described, together with a personal case in a patient who presented the fundamental symptoms, plus polydactyly and bifid urethra. This association had not been hitherto reported in the literature. The case itself is classed as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type V.

  1. (GPR98) gene in an Iranian family with Usher syndrome type II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Genetics Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran 1985713834, Iran. [Kahrizi K. ... Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease .... missense variants on the protein structures, pathogen severity .... genes to a Spanish Usher syndrome type 2 cohort.

  2. Serum Progranulin Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafaei Azam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The role of progranulin in individuals with metabolic syndrome is not exactly clear.We aimed to assess the serum level of progranulin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and compare them with healthy controls.

  3. Serum Progranulin Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaei, Azam; Marjani, Abdoljalal; Khoshnia, Masoud

    2016-12-01

    The role of progranulin in individuals with metabolic syndrome is not exactly clear.We aimed to assess the serum level of progranulin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and compare them with healthy controls. The study included 60 patients with type 2 diabetes and 30 healthy individuals as control groups. Biochemical parameters and progranulin levels were determined. Subjects with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher levels of triglyceride, waist circumference, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure than subjects without metabolic syndrome and the control groups, while HDL-cholesterol level was significantly lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Fasting blood sugar was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients than in the control groups. Serum level of progranulin was slightly increased in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Serum progranulin level had no significant relationship with metabolic syndrome components. Serum progranulin was also not dependent on cardiometabolic risk factors for subjects with metabolic syndrome, but it could be considered for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further studies are recommended to explain the effect of progranulin on the pathogenesis of metabolic risk factors.

  4. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...

  5. The metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetic subjects in Gorgan, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjani, A.; Mojerloo, M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in subjects diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in Gorgan, Iran. Methods: Data were collected from 200 subjects with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and they were categorized as with or without the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed using Adult Treatment Panel-III (ATP-III) guidelines. Results: The overall metabolic syndrome prevalence was 51.50%. The mean age of all the subjects was 53.65+-9.50 years. There were 122 females and 78 males of whom 65 females and 38 males had the metabolic syndrome. The mean duration of diabetes was 7.70+-1.29 years. Mean triglycerides were 185.15+-56.63 mg/dl, and fasting blood glucose 153 +-19.6 mg/dl. These levels were significantly higher in the subjects with type-2 diabetes with metabolic syndrome, but the mean HDL-cholesterol was 37.96+-5.09 mg/dl and this was lower (p< 0.001). Female and male subjects with metabolic syndrome had significantly longer (except HDL-cholesterol) duration of diabetes, higher Triglyceride, and fasting blood glucose levels (p < 0.001, p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Females were more affected than males. (author)

  6. Bartter syndrome Type III and congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract: an antenatal presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westland, R.; Hack, W.W.; van der Horst, H.J.; Uittenbogaard, L.B.; van Hagen, J.M.; van der Valk, P.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; van Wijk, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Bartter syndrome encompasses a variety of inheritable renal tubular transport disorders characterized by hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. Bartter syndrome Type III is caused by genetic alterations in the chloride channel kidney B (CLCNKB) gene and often presents in the first 2

  7. Stickler Syndrome Type 1 with Short Stature and Atypical Ocular Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stickler syndrome or hereditary progressive arthroophthalmopathy is a heterogeneous group of collagen tissue disorders, characterized by orofacial features, ophthalmological features (high myopia, vitreoretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, and presenile cataracts, hearing impairment, mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and/or early onset arthritis. Stickler syndrome type I (ocular form is caused by mutation in the COL2A1 gene. Ptosis and uveitis are relatively rare ophthalmological manifestations of this syndrome. We report an Indian boy having 2710C>T mutation in COL2A1 gene demonstrating short stature, ptosis, and uveitis with Stickler syndrome.

  8. Scaffold protein harmonin (USH1C) provides molecular links between Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiners, J.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Zimmermann, U.; Jurgens, K.; Brinke, H. te; Overlack, N.; Roepman, R.; Knipper, M.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Wolfrum, U.

    2005-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined deaf-blindness in man. USH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to the three USH types (USH1A-G, USH2A-C, USH3A). Although the different USH types exhibit almost the same phenotype in human,

  9. Novel and recurrent MYO7A mutations in Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Weining; Chen, Xue; Zhao, Kanxing; Liu, Yani; Liu, Xiaoxing; Ha, Shaoping; Liu, Wenzhou; Kang, Xiaoli; Sheng, Xunlun; Zhao, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a group of disorders manifested as retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with or without vestibular dysfunction. Here, we recruited three Chinese families affected with autosomal recessive USH for detailed clinical evaluations and for mutation screening in the genes associated with inherited retinal diseases. Using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach, three new alleles and one known mutation in MYO7A gene were identified in the three families. In two families with USH type 1, novel homozygous frameshift variant p.Pro194Hisfs*13 and recurrent missense variant p.Thr165Met were demonstrated as the causative mutations respectively. Crystal structural analysis denoted that p.Thr165Met would very likely change the tertiary structure of the protein encoded by MYO7A. In another family affected with USH type 2, novel biallelic mutations in MYO7A, c.[1343+1G>A];[2837T>G] or p.[?];[Met946Arg], were identified with clinical significance. Because MYO7A, to our knowledge, has rarely been correlated with USH type 2, our findings therefore reveal distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A. We also conclude that targeted NGS is an effective approach for genetic diagnosis for USH, which can further provide better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationship of the disease.

  10. Novel and recurrent MYO7A mutations in Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weining Rong

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is a group of disorders manifested as retinitis pigmentosa and bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with or without vestibular dysfunction. Here, we recruited three Chinese families affected with autosomal recessive USH for detailed clinical evaluations and for mutation screening in the genes associated with inherited retinal diseases. Using targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS approach, three new alleles and one known mutation in MYO7A gene were identified in the three families. In two families with USH type 1, novel homozygous frameshift variant p.Pro194Hisfs*13 and recurrent missense variant p.Thr165Met were demonstrated as the causative mutations respectively. Crystal structural analysis denoted that p.Thr165Met would very likely change the tertiary structure of the protein encoded by MYO7A. In another family affected with USH type 2, novel biallelic mutations in MYO7A, c.[1343+1G>A];[2837T>G] or p.[?];[Met946Arg], were identified with clinical significance. Because MYO7A, to our knowledge, has rarely been correlated with USH type 2, our findings therefore reveal distinguished clinical phenotypes associated with MYO7A. We also conclude that targeted NGS is an effective approach for genetic diagnosis for USH, which can further provide better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationship of the disease.

  11. Cushing's syndrome in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Ucan, Bekir; Cakir, Evrim; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Karbek, Basak; Calıskan, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome may be more frequent in some specific patient groups such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome in outpatients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least 3-months insulin therapy. Outpatients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite receiving at least 3-months long insulin treatment (insulin alone or insulin with oral antidiabetics) were included. Patients with classic features of Cushing's syndrome were excluded. Overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was performed as a screening test. A total of 277 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite insulin therapy were included. Two of the 277 patients with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome (0.72 %). Hypertension was statistically more frequent in the patients with cortisol levels ≥1.8 μg/dL than the patients with cortisol levels Cushing's syndrome among patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite insulin therapy is much higher than in the general population. The patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least three months of insulin therapy should be additionally tested for Cushing's syndrome if they have high dose insülin requirements.

  12. Features of burnout syndrome development in healthcare workers with different types of work motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vezhnovets T.A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of researches of peculiarities of burnout syndrome formation in healthcare workers with different types of work motivation. It is discovered that the syndrome is formed for each motivational type as mechanism of psychological protection against the action of certain stressful factors, namely: for instrumental type – an excessive concentration on obtaining material rewards; for professional type – an excessive control of emotions in substantial professional communications and high psycho-emotional overload; for patriotic type – high level of dependence on social approval, a high level of communicative activity, a high level of psycho-emotional overload, for economical type – distrust, for lumpenized – any labor. Prevention of burnout syndrome in healthcare workers has to be realized taking into account peculiarities of psycho-traumatic factors depending on the type of work motivation.

  13. Oral–Facial–Digital Syndrome type VI with self mutilations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-06-24

    Jun 24, 2014 ... associated with Joubert Syndrome and related disorders ... types of the JSRD spectrum have been recently defined: (1) .... family history of a similar condition. .... [21] Holroyd S, Reiss A, Bryan N. Autistic features in Joubert.

  14. Analysis of SOX10 mutations identified in Waardenburg-Hirschsprung patients: Differential effects on target gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwok Keung; Wong, Corinne Kung Yen; Lui, Vincent Chi Hang; Tam, Paul Kwong Hang; Sham, Mai Har

    2003-10-15

    SOX10 is a member of the SOX gene family related by homology to the high-mobility group (HMG) box region of the testis-determining gene SRY. Mutations of the transcription factor gene SOX10 lead to Waardenburg-Hirschsprung syndrome (Waardenburg-Shah syndrome, WS4) in humans. A number of SOX10 mutations have been identified in WS4 patients who suffer from different extents of intestinal aganglionosis, pigmentation, and hearing abnormalities. Some patients also exhibit signs of myelination deficiency in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although the molecular bases for the wide range of symptoms displayed by the patients are still not clearly understood, a few target genes for SOX10 have been identified. We have analyzed the impact of six different SOX10 mutations on the activation of SOX10 target genes by yeast one-hybrid and mammalian cell transfection assays. To investigate the transactivation activities of the mutant proteins, three different SOX target binding sites were introduced into luciferase reporter gene constructs and examined in our series of transfection assays: consensus HMG domain protein binding sites; SOX10 binding sites identified in the RET promoter; and Sox10 binding sites identified in the P0 promoter. We found that the same mutation could have different transactivation activities when tested with different target binding sites and in different cell lines. The differential transactivation activities of the SOX10 mutants appeared to correlate with the intestinal and/or neurological symptoms presented in the patients. Among the six mutant SOX10 proteins tested, much reduced transactivation activities were observed when tested on the SOX10 binding sites from the RET promoter. Of the two similar mutations X467K and 1400del12, only the 1400del12 mutant protein exhibited an increase of transactivation through the P0 promoter. While the lack of normal SOX10 mediated activation of RET transcription may lead to intestinal aganglionosis

  15. Sirenomelia: a new type, showing VACTERL association with Thomas syndrome and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuaire, Martin; Jestin, Agnès; Boulagnon, Camille; Loock, Mélanie; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Gaillard, Dominique; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Avisse, Claude; Labrousse, Marc

    2013-03-01

    Sirenomelia or "mermaid syndrome" is a rare congenital anomaly known since antiquity. This congenital anomaly is defined as a polymalformative syndrome that associates major muscle and skeleton abnormalities (unique lower limbs) with visceral abnormalities (unilateral or bilateral renal agenesis, anomalies of the abdominal vascularisation). This phenotype, typical of sirenomelia syndrome, may be more or less severe. The pathogenic mechanisms of this syndrome are still debated and its etiology remains unknown. We report here a new type of sirenomelia that we observed in a fetus belonging to the collection of the Department of Anatomy of Reims, which led us to perform a comprehensive review of the literature on the subject: this type has never been reported and cannot be classified according to the Stocker and Heifetz classification. Moreover, this case also presents a VACTERL association with Thomas syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Choroidal Thickness Analysis in Patients with Usher Syndrome Type 2 Using EDI OCT

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, L.; Sala, B.; Montesano, G.; Pierrottet, C.; De Cillà, S.; Maltese, P.; Bertelli, M.; Rossetti, L.

    2015-01-01

    To portray Usher Syndrome type 2, analyzing choroidal thickness and comparing data reported in published literature on RP and healthy subjects. Methods. 20 eyes of 10 patients with clinical signs and genetic diagnosis of Usher Syndrome type 2. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), axial length (AL), automated visual field (VF), and EDI OCT. Both retinal and choroidal measures were measured. Stati...

  17. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  18. Association between habitual coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, B; Ahola, A J; Harjutsalo, V; Forsblom, C; Groop, P-H

    2018-05-01

    In the general population, habitual coffee consumption is inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome, a syndrome that is rather common also in patients with type 1 diabetes. However, whether coffee intake is beneficially related to the metabolic syndrome also in type 1 diabetes, is not known. We, therefore, studied the potential association between coffee consumption and the metabolic syndrome in a large population of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Furthermore, we investigated whether coffee consumption is associated with insulin resistance (estimated glucose disposal rate, eGDR), kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR), and low-grade chronic inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hsCRP). Data from 1040 participants in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study were included in these cross-sectional analyses. Metabolic syndrome was assumed if at least 3 of the following cardiovascular risk factors were present: central obesity, high blood pressure, low HDL-cholesterol concentration, high triglyceride concentration, and hyperglycaemia. Subjects were categorized based on self-reported daily coffee intake: non-consumers (metabolic syndrome. Moreover, any level of coffee consumption was associated with increased risk of the blood pressure-component. An increasing trend was observed in the eGFR with increasing coffee consumption. In type 1 diabetes, high coffee intake is associated with the metabolic syndrome, and especially its blood pressure-component. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Surgical Emergency? A Case of Massive Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Stephen G; Pedro, Patrick; Yu, Mihae; Takanishi, Danny M

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hemorrhagic bleeding is a known manifestation of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome that is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the pro-alpha-1 chains of type III pro-collagen (COL3A1) resulting in vascular fragility. A number of previous reports describe futile surgical intervention for retroperitoneal bleeding in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with high post-operative mortality, although the rarity of retroperitoneal bleeding associated with Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome precludes an evidence-based approach to clinical management. We report a 23-year-old male with history of Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome who presented with severe abdominal pain and tachycardia following an episode of vomiting. Further work-up of his abdominal pain revealed massive retroperitoneal bleeding by CT-scan of the abdomen. Given numerous cases of catastrophic injury caused by surgical intervention in Type-IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, the patient was treated non-operatively, and the patient made a full recovery. This case suggests that even in cases of large retroperitoneal hemorrhages associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, it may not truly represent a surgical emergency. PMID:21966332

  20. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  1. Waardinburg syndrome — inherited deafness with pigmentary involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Macrae

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available The Waardenburg syndrome was first clearly defined in 1951. The major clinical importance lies in the fact that about 20% of affected individuals are deaf. Furthermore, because the condition is inherited autosomal dominantly, there is a risk of the disorder being handed down from generation to generation. The syndrome consists of six major features which may appear in any combination and to any degree in the affected individual.

  2. Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus syndrome type 2 with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our patient had normal psychomotor development. His father was similarly affected suggesting autosomal dominant inheritance. The patient had red brown hair, lymphedema of lower limbs and kidney stones which were not reported before with this syndrome. Most probably these additional features are associations with ...

  3. Acute coronary syndromes amongst type 2 diabetics with ischaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority had three coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors: obesity 86%, elevated LDL 73% and hypertension 60%. Therapy in use was OHA 43%, insulin 42%, insulin and OHA 1%; prophylactic aspirin 14.7% and statins 8.4%. Thirty four (35.8%) were classified as acute coronary syndrome (ACS); 29 ( 30.5%) acute ...

  4. People with Usher Syndrome, Type II: Issues and Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, I. D.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the experiences of individuals with Usher Syndrome, discusses the lack of appropriate services and the failure of professionals to provide sufficient information on the condition, and stresses the importance of access to information and the acquisition of new skills before the visual impairment becomes severe. (Author/CR)

  5. Importance of genetic factors in the occurrence of epilepsy syndrome type: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corey, Linda A; Pellock, John M; Kjeldsen, Marianne J

    2011-01-01

    not appear to play an important role in determining risk for frontal, occipital or temporal lobe epilepsy. These results suggest that, while genetic factors contribute to risk for major syndrome types, determined when possible, their contribution to risk for localization-related syndrome sub......Although there is strong evidence that genetic factors contribute to risk for epilepsy, their role in the determination of syndrome type is less clear. This study was undertaken to address this question. Information related to epilepsy was obtained from twins included in 455 monozygotic and 868...... dizygotic pairs ascertained from population-based twin registries in Denmark, Norway and the United States. Syndrome type was determined based on medical record information and detailed clinical interviews and classified using the International Classification Systems for the Epilepsies and Epileptic...

  6. Klinefelter's Syndrome with Seizure, Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ib and Multiple Endocrine Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwen-Yi Yang

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome is rarely associated with hypocalcemia, especially pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP type Ib. We describe a case of Klinefelter's syndrome associated with seizure, PHP type Ib and multiple endocrine dysfunctions. A 19-year-old Taiwanese male was admitted due to seizures with loss of consciousness. He had been diagnosed with Klinefelter's syndrome with seizure disorder and hypocalcemia 3 months previously. Physical examination revealed eunuchoidism but no osteodystrophy, while laboratory data revealed severe hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated parathyroid hormone. Chromosomal study showed 47, XXY. Osteoporosis was found on chest and abdominal radiography. Dense calcification in the cerebrum and cerebellum was shown on brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Elevation of the patient's serum calcium level was noted after vitamin D and calcium carbonate supplements were given. Klinefelter's syndrome is rarely associated with PHP type Ib; our patient's hypocalcemia improved after long-term aggressive treatment.

  7. Depression is associated with the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahola, Aila J; Thorn, Lena M; Saraheimo, Markku; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2010-10-01

    Both depression and the metabolic syndrome are frequently found among patients with type 1 diabetes, but their potential association has not yet been investigated. In this paper the relationship between depression and the metabolic syndrome among patients with type 1 diabetes was evaluated. A total of 1226 patients participating in the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study between 2003 and 2009 were included. Depression was defined as use of antidepressive medication or Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score ≥16. The metabolic syndrome was defined using the criteria established by the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention (IDF); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI); American Heart Association (AHA); World Heart Federation (WHF); International Atherosclerosis Society (IAS); and International Association for the Study of Obesity (IASO). The metabolic syndrome was more frequently observed among depressed patients (57% versus 46%, P = 0.008). Of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome, waist, triglyceride, and HDL components were more frequently fulfilled among patients with depression. The BDI score increased with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome present. The BDI score was independently associated with the waist component (odds ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.05) when adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status, smoking, nephropathy, and HbA(1c). The metabolic syndrome is frequently found among depressed patients with type 1 diabetes. Whether this association influences the development of diabetic complications is not known.

  8. Gastrointestinal disorders in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type: A review for the gastroenterologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, A B; Keszthelyi, D; Fikree, A; Vork, L; Masclee, A; Farmer, A D; Aziz, Q

    2017-08-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT) is the most common hereditary non-inflammatory disorder of connective tissue, characterized by a wide range of symptoms, mainly joint hyperextensibility and musculoskeletal symptoms. A majority of patients also experiences gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Furthermore, JHS/EDS-HT has specifically been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with functional GI disorders, such as functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. The aim of this review was to examine the nature of GI symptoms and their underlying pathophysiology in JHS/EDS-HT. In addition, we consider the clinical implications of the diagnosis and treatment of JHS/EDS-HT for practicing clinicians in gastroenterology. Observations summarized in this review may furthermore represent the first step toward the identification of a new pathophysiological basis for a substantial subgroup of patients with functional GI disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Estudio epidemiológico del Síndrome de Waardenburg en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodríguez

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Ampliar los conocimientos clínicos y genéticos sobre el Síndrome de Waardenburg (WS, definiendo la frecuencia de los tipos de síndrome y su distribución geográfica en la población sorda colombiana.

  10. Neuroendocrine-type prostatic adenocarcinoma with microsatellite instability in a patient with lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David G; Gatalica, Zoran; Lynch, Henry T; Kohl, Shane; Johansson, Sonny L; Lele, Subodh M

    2010-12-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal-dominant cancer syndrome that can be identified with microsatellite instability molecular tests or immunohistochemical stains on pathologic material from patients who meet the Amsterdam Criteria II. The development of prostatic carcinoma in situ or invasive small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate has not been previously reported in a patient with this syndrome. In this report, an 87-year-old White man with the Lynch syndrome had a prostate biopsy that revealed a mixed high-grade conventional adenocarcinoma and SCC of the prostate with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia of the small cell neuroendocrine-type (HGPIN-NE), all showing MSH2 microsatellite instability and loss of MSH2 expression, a finding not previously published. These findings suggest that HGPIN-NE is a precursor of invasive SCC and also that prostatic SCC can develop in a patient with the Lynch syndrome.

  11. Wolfram syndrome: A rare mimic of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of disorders also known as diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus (DM, optic atrophy, and deafness. Patients present with DM and optic atrophy in the first decade, diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness in the second decade, and renal outflow tract anomalies and other neurological manifestations later in life. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who was diagnosed with insulin-dependent DM and subsequently discovered to have optic atrophy, sensorineural hearing loss, and cardiovascular defect with a positive family history. Such cases need to be evaluated thoroughly with respect to Wolfram syndrome and its associated anomalies.

  12. Albumin treatment regimen for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Francesco; Navickis, Roberta J; Wilkes, Mahlon M

    2015-11-25

    Recommended treatment for type 1 hepatorenal syndrome consists of albumin and vasoconstrictor. The optimal albumin dose remains poorly characterized. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the impact of albumin dose on treatment outcomes. Clinical studies of type 1 hepatorenal syndrome treatment with albumin and vasoconstrictor were sought. Search terms included: hepatorenal syndrome; albumin; vasoconstrictor; terlipressin; midodrine; octreotide; noradrenaline; and norepinephrine. A meta-analysis was performed of hepatorenal syndrome reversal and survival in relation to albumin dose. Nineteen clinical studies with 574 total patients were included, comprising 8 randomized controlled trials, 8 prospective studies and 3 retrospective studies. The pooled percentage of patients achieving hepatorenal syndrome reversal was 49.5% (95% confidence interval, 40.0-59.1%). Increments of 100 g in cumulative albumin dose were accompanied by significantly increased survival (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.31; p = 0.023). A non-significant increase of similar magnitude in hepatorenal syndrome reversal was also observed (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.37; p = 0.10). Expected survival rates at 30 days among patients receiving cumulative albumin doses of 200, 400 and 600 g were 43.2% (95% confidence interval, 36.4-51.3%), 51.4% (95% confidence interval, 46.3-57.1%) and 59.0% (95% confidence interval, 51.9-67.2), respectively. Neither survival nor hepatorenal syndrome reversal was significantly affected by vasoconstrictor dose or type, treatment duration, age, baseline serum creatinine, bilirubin or albumin, baseline mean arterial pressure, or study design, size or time period. This meta-analysis suggests a dose-response relationship between infused albumin and survival in patients with type 1 hepatorenal syndrome. The meta-analysis provides the best current evidence on the potential role of albumin dose selection in improving outcomes of

  13. Bartter Syndrome Type 3: Phenotype-Genotype Correlation and Favorable Response to Ibuprofen

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    Xuejun Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the phenotype-genotype correlation in different genetic kinds of Bartter syndrome type 3 in children.Methods: Clinical and genetic data of 2 patients with different mutations in Bartter syndrome type 3 was analyzed while the prognosis was compared after a 6-year follow-up or 2-year follow-up, respectively.Results: Bartter syndrome is a kind of autosomal recessive inherited renal disorder. The manifestation and prognosis of Bartter syndrome change with mutation types, and severe mutation were often accompanied with unfavorable prognosis. Comprehensive therapy with ibuprofen, antisterone, captopril, and potassium have remarkable effect, while ibuprofen may improve growth retardation partly.Conclusion: Bartter syndrome should be considered when children have unreasonable continuous electrolyte disturbance, metabolic alkalosis and growth retardation.As a genetic disease, its clinical features depend on the mutation type. It can be ameliorated by electrolyte supplementation, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and potassium-sparing diuretic. Considering the following electrolyte disturbances, infections, growth retardation, kidney failure and even death, Bartter syndrome need lifelong treatment, early diagnosis and treatment is the most important.

  14. Mutation Profile of the CDH23 Gene in 56 Probands with Usher Syndrome Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, A.; Jaijo, T.; Aller, E.; Millan, J.M.; Carney, C.; Usami, S.; Moller, C.; Kimberling, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human gene encoding cadherin 23 (CDH23) cause Usher syndrome type 1D (USH1D) and nonsyndromic hearing loss. Individuals with Usher syndrome type I have profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia and usually begin to exhibit signs of RP in early adolescence. In the present study, we carried out the mutation analysis in all 69 exons of the CDH23 gene in 56 Usher type 1 probands already screened for mutations in MYO7A. A total of 18 of 56 subjects (32.1%) were observed to have one or two CDH23 variants that are presumed to be pathologic. Twenty one different pathologic genome variants were observed of which 15 were novel. Out of a total of 112 alleles, 31 (27.7%) were considered pathologic. Based on our results it is estimated that about 20% of patients with Usher syndrome type I have CDH23 mutations. PMID:18429043

  15. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Gera, D. N.; Ghuge, P. P.; Gandhi, S.; Vanikar, A. V.; Shrimali, J. D.; Kute, V. B.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated...

  16. Cognitive capacities and composite cognitive skills in individuals with Usher syndrome type 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Henricson, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis belongs to the research area disability research and deal with specific aspects of cognition in individuals with Usher syndrome type 1 and 2. The subject has been investigated and is discussed within an interdisciplinary framework, though the theories applied and described are derived from the area of cognitive psychology. Usher syndrome is a rare genetic condition causing a combination of visual and hearing impairment: deafblindness. There is a congenital hearing loss that...

  17. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) with multiple vascular complications misdiagnosed as Dubowitz syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dieks, Jana-Katharina; Baumer, Alessandra; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Rauch, Anita; Sigler, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    To date, the genetic basis of Dubowitz syndrome (short stature, microcephaly, facial abnormalities, eczema) is unknown and vascular complications are not known to be associated with this syndrome. In microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II; disproportionate short statue, microcephaly, facial abnormalities), however, cerebral aneurysms and other vascular abnormalities are frequent complications. MOPD II is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the pericentrin (PC...

  18. Quality of life and cochlear implantation in Usher syndrome type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, G.W.J.A.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this descriptive, retrospective study were to evaluate quality of life, hearing, and vision in patients with Usher syndrome type I with and without cochlear implant. METHODS: Quality of life (QoL) of 14 patients with Usher type I (USH1) with a cochlear implant (CI)

  19. Two families from New England with usher syndrome type IC with distinct haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, M M; McGee, T L; Keats, B J; Slim, R; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    2001-03-01

    To search for patients with Usher syndrome type IC among those with Usher syndrome type I who reside in New England. Genotype analysis of microsatellite markers closely linked to the USH1C locus was done using the polymerase chain reaction. We compared the haplotype of our patients who were homozygous in the USH1C region with the haplotypes found in previously reported USH1C Acadian families who reside in southwestern Louisiana and from a single family residing in Lebanon. Of 46 unrelated cases of Usher syndrome type I residing in New England, two were homozygous at genetic markers in the USH1C region. Of these, one carried the Acadian USH1C haplotype and had Acadian ancestors (that is, from Nova Scotia) who did not participate in the 1755 migration of Acadians to Louisiana. The second family had a haplotype that proved to be the same as that of a family with USH1C residing in Lebanon. Each of the two families had haplotypes distinct from the other. This is the first report that some patients residing in New England have Usher syndrome type IC. Patients with Usher syndrome type IC can have the Acadian haplotype or the Lebanese haplotype compatible with the idea that at least two independently arising pathogenic mutations have occurred in the yet-to-be identified USH1C gene.

  20. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type) : it is a challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul HH

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH

  1. Relationship between Fatigue and Gait Abnormality in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The…

  2. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Mark C.; de Vries, Janneke E.; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in >= 4 joints over a period >= 3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition,

  3. Cytokine expression in patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis ESSIC type 3C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logadottir, Yr; Delbro, Dick; Fall, Magnus; Gjertsson, Inger; Jirholt, Pernilla; Lindholm, Catharina; Peeker, Ralph

    2014-11-01

    Bladder wall nitric oxide production in patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C is increased compared to undetectable nitric oxide in patients with nonHunner bladder pain syndrome and healthy controls. However, the underlying mechanism/s of the increased nitric oxide production is largely unknown. We compared mRNA expression of a select group of cytokines in patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis type 3C and in pain-free controls. Cold cup biopsies from 7 patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C and 6 healthy subjects were analyzed. mRNA expression of IL-4, 6, 10 and 17A, iNOS, TNF-α, TGF-β and IFN-γ was estimated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. IL-17 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Mast cells were labeled with tryptase to evaluate cell appearance and count. IL-6, 10 and 17A, and iNOS mRNA levels as well as the number of mast cells infiltrating the bladder mucosa were significantly increased in patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C compared to healthy controls. TNF-α, TGF-β and IFN-γ mRNA levels were similar in patients and controls. IL-17A expression at the protein level was up-regulated and localized to inflammatory cells and urothelium in patients with bladder pain syndrome type 3C. Patients with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis had increased mRNA levels of IL-17A, 10 and 6, and iNOS. IL-17A might be important in the inflammatory process. To our knowledge the increase in IL-17A is a novel finding that may have new treatment implications. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic fatigue in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-Hypermobile type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Alan; De Wandele, Inge; O'Callaghan, Chris; Pocinki, Alan; Rowe, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Chronic fatigue is an important contributor to impaired health-related quality of life in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. There is overlap in the symptoms and findings of EDS and chronic fatigue syndrome. A proportion of those with CFS likely have EDS that has not been identified. The evaluation of chronic fatigue in EDS needs to include a careful clinical examination and laboratory testing to exclude common causes of fatigue including anemia, hypothyroidisim, and chronic infection, as well as dysfunction of major physiological or organ systems. Other problems that commonly contribute to fatigue in EDS include sleep disorders, chronic pain, deconditioning, cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, bowel and bladder dysfunction, psychological issues, and nutritional deficiencies. While there is no specific pharmacological treatment for fatigue, many medications are effective for specific symptoms (such as headache, menstrual dysfunction, or myalgia) and for co-morbid conditions that result in fatigue, including orthostatic intolerance and insomnia. Comprehensive treatment of fatigue needs to also evaluate for biomechanical problems that are common in EDS, and usually involves skilled physical therapy and attention to methods to prevent deconditioning. In addition to managing specific symptoms, treatment of fatigue in EDS also needs to focus on maintaining function and providing social, physical, and nutritional support, as well as providing on-going medical evaluation of new problems and review of new evidence about proposed treatments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Albuminuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate in Individuals with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Contribution of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Wiechers, Ana Cecilia; Janka-Zires, Marcela; Almeda-Valdés, Paloma; López-Gutiérrez, Joel; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The development of metabolic syndrome has been described in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus as the disease progresses over time. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationship between metabolic syndrome, albuminuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, in a group of Mexican patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a cross-sectional study that included patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who were diagnosed over 10 years ago and who are seen at the Diabetes Intensive Control Clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran in Mexico City. The presence of metabolic syndrome was determined by using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. A total of 81 individuals were studied. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 18.5% (n = 15). A higher albuminuria was found in subjects with metabolic syndrome (34.9 mg/24 hours; 8.3-169.3) than in those without metabolic syndrome (9.0 mg/24 hours; 5.0-27.0; p = 0.02). Glomerular filtration rate was lower in patients with metabolic syndrome (95.3 ml/minute; [64.9-107.2] vs. 110.2 ml/minute [88.1-120.3]; p = 0.04). After classifying the population according to the number of metabolic syndrome criteria, a progressive increase in albuminuria and a progressive decrease in glomerular filtration rate were found with each additional metabolic syndrome criterion (p = 0.008 and p = 0.032, respectively). After adjusting for age, time from diagnosis, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, we found that age, time from diagnosis, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol were independent factors associated with glomerular filtration rate (R2 = 0.286; p diabetes mellitus. Metabolic syndrome was present in 18.5% of this group of Mexican individuals with type 1 diabetes

  6. Canagliflozin improves risk factors of metabolic syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome

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    Davies MJ

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Davies,1 Katherine W Merton,1 Ujjwala Vijapurkar,2 Dainius A Balis,2 Mehul Desai2 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USA; 2Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Raritan, NJ, USA Objective: Metabolic syndrome refers to a collection of risk factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, improves glycemic control and reduces body weight and blood pressure (BP in a broad range of patients with T2DM. This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of canagliflozin on the components of metabolic syndrome in patients with T2DM and metabolic syndrome.Methods: This analysis was based on data from 2 head-to-head studies of canagliflozin in patients with T2DM on background metformin versus glimepiride (study 1 and background metformin plus sulfonylurea versus sitagliptin 100 mg (study 2. Changes from baseline in glycemic efficacy, anthropometric measures, BP, and lipids were evaluated with canagliflozin versus glimepiride and sitagliptin at week 52 in patients who met ≥2 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome (in addition to T2DM: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C <1.0 mmol/L (men or <1.3 mmol/L (women; waist circumference ≥102 cm (non-Asian men, ≥88 cm (non-Asian women, >90 cm (Asian men, or >80 cm (Asian women; diagnosis of hypertension or meeting BP-related criteria (systolic BP ≥130 mmHg or diastolic BP ≥85 mmHg. Safety was assessed based on adverse event reports.Results: In study 1, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg provided similar and greater HbA1c reductions versus glimepiride, respectively. In study 2, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater HbA1c lowering versus sitagliptin 100 mg. Canagliflozin also reduced fasting plasma glucose, body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, BP, and triglycerides, and increased HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol versus

  7. Evidence of genetic heterogeneity in Alberta Hutterites with Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Lenger, Chaeli; Smith, Richard; Kimberling, William J; Ye, Ming; Lehmann, Ordan; MacDonald, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a Hutterite population from northern Alberta with Usher syndrome type I. Complete ophthalmic examinations were conducted on two boys and two girls from two related Hutterite families diagnosed with Usher syndrome type I. DNA from patients and their parents was first evaluated for a mutation in exon 10 of the protocadherin-related 15 (PCDH15) gene (c.1471delG), previously reported in southern Alberta Hutterite patients with Usher syndrome (USH1F). Single nucleotide polymorphic linkage analysis was then used to confirm another locus, and DNA was analyzed with the Usher Chip v4.0 platform. Severe hearing impairment, unintelligible speech, and retinitis pigmentosa with varying degrees of visual acuity and visual field loss established a clinical diagnosis of Usher syndrome type I. The patients did not carry the exon 10 mutation in the PCDH15 gene; however, with microarray analysis, a previously reported mutation (c.52C>T; p.Q18X) in the myosin VIIA (MYO7A) gene was found in the homozygous state in the affected siblings. The finding of a MYO7A mutation in two related Hutterite families from northern Alberta provides evidence of genetic heterogeneity in Hutterites affected by Usher syndrome type I.

  8. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Children With Type 1 Diabetes in South of Iran

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    Saki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, in children with type one diabetes mellitus (T1DM for the first time in a population in the Middle East, and assess the influence of type of insulin therapy, daily dosage of insulin, family history of type 2 diabetes, gender and level of HbA1c on the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on children with T1DM aged 2 years during years 2013 to 2014. Waist circumference, blood pressure, height and weight of children with diabetes, for calculation of body mass index (BMI, were measured by one physician. Fasting blood glucose and lipids were also measured. According to the age-modified standards of the ATPIII, metabolic syndrome was defined. All data were analyzed using the SPSS 18 software. Results In this study, 87 children with diabetes (48 females and 39 males aged 12.38 ± 4.2 were enrolled. Overall, 40.9% of our patients had hypertension, 55.2% had hypertriglyceridemia, 36.8% had low high-density lipoprotein (HDL and 6.9% of patients had abdominal obesity. Furthermore, 29.9% of these children had metabolic syndrome, which did not have a significant association with the type of insulin regimen (P = 0.97, nor the daily dosage of insulin (P = 0.234, however the serum concentration of HbA1c had a significant correlation with metabolic syndrome (P = 0.027. Conclusions This study provides evidence indicating high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in children with T1DM in southern Iran. Preventive programs aimed towards decreasing the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and interpretation of a healthier diet and physical activity for children with T1DM should be considered in our country.

  9. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in a patient with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bipul Kumar; Saiki, Uma Kaimal; Sarm, Dipti; Choudhury, Bikash Narayan; Choudhury, Sarojini Dutta; Saharia, Dhiren; Saikia, Mihir

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes (APS) comprise a wide clinical spectrum of autoimmune disorders. APS is divided into Type I, Type II, Type I and Type IV depending upon the pattern of disease combination. Ghronic diarrhoea is one of the many manifestations of APS and many aetiological factors have been suggested for it. Apart from the established aetiological factors, intestinal lymphangiectasia may be responsible for chronic diarrhea in some cases.Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported in Type I APS. We report a case of Type III APS with hypocalcaemia and hypothyroidism who had chronic diarrhea of long duration and was finally diagnosed to have intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  10. First Case Report of Turcot Syndrome Type 1 in Colombia

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    Vallejo Dora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turcot syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder clinically characterized by the occurrence of primary tumors of the central nervous system and adenomatous colonic polyps during the first or second decades of life, with a spectrum of clinical features such as “café-au-lait” spots, axillary freckling, and hyperpigmented spots. Currently its prevalence globally and in Colombia remains unknown. We present the case of a 20-year-old male with a clinical presentation of both glioblastoma multiforme and multiple adenomatous colonic polyps. The molecular genetics study revealed a mutation in KrasAsp12 gene and altered expression of HMSH2 and HMSH6 proteins encoded by the DNA mismatch repair genes in two of the colonic polyps. Even though this clinical presentation may suggest a shorter survival rate, this patient is still alive after seven months of treatment. A literature review complements this report.

  11. Shaken baby syndrome manifesting as infantile spasms seizure type

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    Der-Shiun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of child maltreatment leading to head injury is challenging. Here, we present the case of a 3-month-old female infant who presented with focal seizures that lasted for several minutes. After admission, she began to show intermittent clusters of head nods, irritable crying, arching, writhing, stiffening, and jerking of both arms. These results and electroencephalography findings were attributed as the diagnosis of infantile spasms (IS. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of chronic subdural hematoma mixed with acute ischemic injuries. Examination of the eye fundus confirmed the presence of retinal hemorrhage. Therefore, all evidence pointed to a diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome (SBS. Based on this case, we suggest that physicians should consider a diagnosis of SBS for children with new-onset IS and that should be evaluated, diagnosed, and treated as promptly as possible.

  12. Digenic mutations involving both the BSND and GJB2 genes detected in Bartter syndrome type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Han; Feng, Yong; Li, Hai-Bo; Wu, Hong; Mei, Ling-Yun; Wang, Xing-Wei; Jiang, Lu; He, Chu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by salt-losing nephropathies and sensorineural deafness, is caused by mutations of BSND or simultaneous mutations of both CLCNKA and CLCNKB. GJB2 is the primary causative gene for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness and associated with several syndromic sensorineural deafness. Owing to the rarity of Bartter syndrome, only a few mutations have been reported in the abovementioned causative genes. To investigate the underlying mutations in a Chinese patient with Bartter syndrome type IV, genetic analysis of BSND, CLCNKA, CLCNKB and GJB2 were performed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Finally, double homozygous mutations c.22C > T (p.Arg8Trp) and c.127G > A (Val43Ile) were detected in exon 1 of BSND. Intriguingly, compound heterozygous mutations c.235delC (p.Leu79CysfsX3) and c.109G > A (p.Val37Ile) were also revealed in exon 2 of GJB2 in the same patient. No pathogenic mutations were found in CLCNKA and CLCNKB. Our results indicated that the homozygous mutation c.22C > T was the key genetic reason for the proband, and a digenic effect of BSND and GJB2 might contributed to sensorineural deafness. To our knowledge, it was the first report showing that the GJB2 gene mutations were detected in Bartter syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Usher syndrome Type I in an adult Nepalese male: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sabin; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Usher syndrome, also known as retinitis pigmentosa-dysacusis syndrome, is an extremely rare genetic disorder, characterized by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. It has been estimated to account for 3-6% of the congenitally deaf population, upto 8-33% of individuals with RP and half of all cases with combined deafness and blindness (Vernon M,1969; Boughman JA et al,1983). The prevalence of Usher syndrome have been reported to range from 3.5 to 6.2 per 100,000 in different populations (Vernon M,1969; Boughman JA et al,1983; Yan D et al, 2010). We report a case of Usher syndrome type I in an adult Nepalese male with typical congenital profound hearing loss, and night blindness secondary to retinitis pigmentosa. © NEPjOPH.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II: localisation to chromosome 5q

    OpenAIRE

    Pieke-Dahl, S; Moller, C; Kelley, P; Astuto, L; Cremers, C; Gorin, M; Kimberling, W

    2000-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive disorders that includes retinitis pigmentosa (RP) with hearing loss. Usher syndrome type II is defined as moderate to severe hearing loss with RP. The USH2A gene at 1q41 has been isolated and characterised. In 1993, a large Usher II family affected with a mild form of RP was found to be unlinked to 1q41 markers. Subsequent linkage studies of families in our Usher series identified several type II families unlinked to USH2A and USH3 on 3q25. Aft...

  15. Impaired glucose tolerance, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lisa J; Misso, Marie L; Wild, Robert A; Norman, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition in reproductive-aged women associated with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and the metabolic syndrome. METHODS A literature search was conducted (MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, clinical trial registries and hand-searching) identifying studies reporting prevalence or incidence of IGT, DM2 or metabolic syndrome in women with and without PCOS. Data were presented as odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] with fixed- and random-effects meta-analysis by Mantel-Haenszel methods. Quality testing was based on Newcastle-Ottawa Scaling and The Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool. Literature searching, data abstraction and quality appraisal were performed by two investigators. RESULTS A total of 2192 studies were reviewed and 35 were selected for final analysis. Women with PCOS had increased prevalence of IGT (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.63, 3.77; BMI-matched studies OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.44, 4.47), DM2 (OR 4.43, 95% CI 4.06, 4.82; BMI-matched studies OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.97, 8.10) and metabolic syndrome (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.40, 3.45; BMI-matched studies OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.36, 3.56). One study assessed IGT/DM2 incidence and reported no significant differences in DM2 incidence (OR 2.07, 95% CI 0.68, 6.30). One study assessed conversion from normal glucose tolerance to IGT/DM2 (OR 2.4, 95% CI 0.7, 8.0). No studies reported metabolic syndrome incidence. CONCLUSIONS Women with PCOS had an elevated prevalence of IGT, DM2 and metabolic syndrome in both BMI and non-BMI-matched studies. Few studies have determined IGT/DM2 or metabolic syndrome incidence in women with and without PCOS and further research is required.

  16. Massively parallel DNA sequencing facilitates diagnosis of patients with Usher syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekane Yoshimura

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder manifesting hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction, and having three clinical subtypes. Usher syndrome type 1 is the most severe subtype due to its profound hearing loss, lack of vestibular responses, and retinitis pigmentosa that appears in prepuberty. Six of the corresponding genes have been identified, making early diagnosis through DNA testing possible, with many immediate and several long-term advantages for patients and their families. However, the conventional genetic techniques, such as direct sequence analysis, are both time-consuming and expensive. Targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using the massively parallel DNA sequencing technology will potentially enable us to systematically tackle previously intractable monogenic disorders and improve molecular diagnosis. Using this technique combined with direct sequence analysis, we screened 17 unrelated Usher syndrome type 1 patients and detected probable pathogenic variants in the 16 of them (94.1% who carried at least one mutation. Seven patients had the MYO7A mutation (41.2%, which is the most common type in Japanese. Most of the mutations were detected by only the massively parallel DNA sequencing. We report here four patients, who had probable pathogenic mutations in two different Usher syndrome type 1 genes, and one case of MYO7A/PCDH15 digenic inheritance. This is the first report of Usher syndrome mutation analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing and the frequency of Usher syndrome type 1 genes in Japanese. Mutation screening using this technique has the power to quickly identify mutations of many causative genes while maintaining cost-benefit performance. In addition, the simultaneous mutation analysis of large numbers of genes is useful for detecting mutations in different genes that are possibly disease modifiers or of digenic inheritance.

  17. Massively parallel DNA sequencing facilitates diagnosis of patients with Usher syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Kumakawa, Kozo; Tono, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yumiko; Sato, Hiroaki; Nagai, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kotaro; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Naito, Yasushi; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Oshikawa, Chie; Kimitsuki, Takashi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder manifesting hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction, and having three clinical subtypes. Usher syndrome type 1 is the most severe subtype due to its profound hearing loss, lack of vestibular responses, and retinitis pigmentosa that appears in prepuberty. Six of the corresponding genes have been identified, making early diagnosis through DNA testing possible, with many immediate and several long-term advantages for patients and their families. However, the conventional genetic techniques, such as direct sequence analysis, are both time-consuming and expensive. Targeted exon sequencing of selected genes using the massively parallel DNA sequencing technology will potentially enable us to systematically tackle previously intractable monogenic disorders and improve molecular diagnosis. Using this technique combined with direct sequence analysis, we screened 17 unrelated Usher syndrome type 1 patients and detected probable pathogenic variants in the 16 of them (94.1%) who carried at least one mutation. Seven patients had the MYO7A mutation (41.2%), which is the most common type in Japanese. Most of the mutations were detected by only the massively parallel DNA sequencing. We report here four patients, who had probable pathogenic mutations in two different Usher syndrome type 1 genes, and one case of MYO7A/PCDH15 digenic inheritance. This is the first report of Usher syndrome mutation analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing and the frequency of Usher syndrome type 1 genes in Japanese. Mutation screening using this technique has the power to quickly identify mutations of many causative genes while maintaining cost-benefit performance. In addition, the simultaneous mutation analysis of large numbers of genes is useful for detecting mutations in different genes that are possibly disease modifiers or of digenic inheritance.

  18. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. ClC-K chloride channels: emerging pathophysiology of Bartter syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Briones, Rodolfo; Lourdel, Stéphane; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Teulon, Jacques

    2015-06-15

    The mutations in the CLCNKB gene encoding the ClC-Kb chloride channel are responsible for Bartter syndrome type 3, one of the four variants of Bartter syndrome in the genetically based nomenclature. All forms of Bartter syndrome are characterized by hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and secondary hyperaldosteronism, but Bartter syndrome type 3 has the most heterogeneous presentation, extending from severe to very mild. A relatively large number of CLCNKB mutations have been reported, including gene deletions and nonsense or missense mutations. However, only 20 CLCNKB mutations have been functionally analyzed, due to technical difficulties regarding ClC-Kb functional expression in heterologous systems. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the functional consequences of CLCNKB mutations on ClC-Kb chloride channel activity. It has been observed that 1) all ClC-Kb mutants have an impaired expression at the membrane; and 2) a minority of the mutants combines reduced membrane expression with altered pH-dependent channel gating. Although further investigation is needed to fully characterize disease pathogenesis, Bartter syndrome type 3 probably belongs to the large family of conformational diseases, in which the mutations destabilize channel structure, inducing ClC-Kb retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and accelerated channel degradation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. The impaired proprioception in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobility Type/Joint hypermobility Syndrome: the rehabilitation role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Camerota

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type/Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT is an hereditary disorder of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility and skin hyperextensibility with an involvement of the connective tissue matrix proteins. Collagen alterations may influence the quality of movement in these patients but also movement has a role for the collagen quality: motion has a prevention role in the formation of contractures and adhesions. A poor sense of proprioception correlated with the collagenous connective tissues alterations could explain why people with JHS/EDS-HT become injured, having a lack of sensation of the joint at the end of the range. Rehabilitation approach may consider all these aspects.

  1. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III/Ehlers-Danlos overlap syndrome in a Chinese man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqin; Wang, Yanzhou; Rauch, Frank; Li, Hu; Zhang, Yao; Zhai, Naixiang; Zhang, Jian; Ren, Xiuzhi; Han, Jinxiang

    2018-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are rare genetic disorders that are typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Few cases of OI/EDS overlap syndrome have been documented. Described here is a 30-year-old Chinese male with OI type III and EDS. Sequencing of genomic DNA revealed a heterozygous COL1A1 mutation (c.671G>A, p.Gly224Asp) that affected the N-anchor domain of the alpha 1 chain of collagen type I. Ultrastructural analysis of a skin biopsy specimen revealed thin collagen fibers with irregular alignment of collagen fibers. These findings have expanded the genotypic spectrum of the OI/EDS overlap syndrome.

  2. Clinical profile and outcomes of acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in sepsis: An eight-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Sakhuja, Ankit; Geske, Jeffrey B; Kumar, Mukesh; Kashyap, Rahul; Kashani, Kianoush; Jentzer, Jacob C

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical features and outcomes of acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Historical cohort study of all adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care units (ICU) at Mayo Clinic Rochester from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2014. Patients with prior renal or cardiac dysfunction were excluded. Patients were divided into groups with and without cardiorenal syndrome type-5. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) was defined by both serum creatinine and urine output criteria of the AKI Network and the cardiac injury was determined by troponin-T levels. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality, ICU and hospital length of stay, and one-year survival. Of 602 patients meeting the study inclusion criteria, 430 (71.4%) met criteria for acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5. Patients with cardiorenal syndrome type-5 had higher severity of illness, greater vasopressor and mechanical ventilation use. Cardiorenal syndrome type-5 was associated higher unadjusted in-hospital mortality, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, and lower one-year survival. When adjusted for age, gender, severity of illness and mechanical ventilation, cardiorenal syndrome type-5 was independently associated with 1.7-times greater odds of in-hospital mortality (p = .03), but did not predict one-year survival (p = .06) compared to patients without cardiorenal syndrome. In sepsis, acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 is associated with worse in-hospital mortality compared to patients without cardiorenal syndrome.

  3. Syndromes, disorders and maternal risk factors associated with neural tube defects (I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Fetuses with neural tube defects (NTDs) may be associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors. This article provides a comprehensive review of syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, such as acrocallosal syndrome, autosomal dominant brachydactyly-clinodactyly syndrome, Manouvrier syndrome, short rib-polydactyly syndrome, Disorganization ( Ds )-like human malformations, isolated hemihyperplasia, X-linked NTDs, meroanencephaly, schisis association, diprosopus, fetal valproate syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome/velocardiofacial syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, folic acid antagonists, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors are a rare but important cause of NTDs. The recurrence risk and the preventive effect of maternal folic acid intake in NTDs associated with syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors may be different from those of non-syndromic multifactorial NTDs. Perinatal identification of NTDs should alert one to the syndromes, disorders, and maternal risk factors associated with NTDs, and prompt a thorough etiologic investigation and genetic counseling.

  4. Shoulder function, pain and health related quality of life in adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Elise Christine; Reiten, Helle Sundnes; Løvaas, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate shoulder function, pain and Health-Related Quality of life (HRQoL) among adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), compared with the general population (controls). Method In a cross-sectional study using postal survey...

  5. Osteomyelitis in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Ardalan, Maryam; H.Rafati, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) is a rare, inherited immunodeficiency that affects one per million people yearly and usually presents with recurrent, indolent bacterial infections of the skin, mouth, and respiratory tract and impaired pus formation and wound healing. A 13-year-old girl...

  6. Prenatal diagnosis and confirmation of the acrofacial dysostosis syndrome type Rodriguez.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, M.W.; Hollander, N.S.; Cohen-Overbeek, T.E.; Lesnik Oberstein, M.S.; Nash, R.M.; Wladimiroff, J.W.; Niermeijer, M.F.; Willems, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The group of acrofacial dysostosis (AFD) syndromes is very heterogeneous and contains many different entities. In 1990, Rodriguez et al. [1990: Am J Med Genet 35:484-489] described a new type of AFD characterized by severe mandibular hypoplasia, phocomelia and oligodactyly of the upper limbs,

  7. The impact of metabolic syndrome and CRP on vascular phenotype in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alizadeh Dehnavi, R.; Beishuizen, E.D.; Ree, M.A. van de; Le Cessie, S.; Huisman, M.V.; Kluft, C.; Princen, H.M.G.; Tamsma, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The burden of cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) patients is variable. We hypothesize that metabolic syndrome (MS) and low-grade systemic inflammation modify the extent of atherosclerosis in DM2. Methods: Vascular phenotype was determined using the following

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle tissue of complex regional pain syndrome type I patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Janssen, A.J.W.M.; Roestenberg, P.M.H.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Goris, R.J.A.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in the pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I). Since the mitochondrial respiratory chain is a major source of ROS, we hypothesized that mitochondria play a role in the pathophysiology of CRPS I. The hypothesis was

  9. Mannitol as salvage treatment for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.C.T.H.; Tacken, M.C.; Groenewoud, J.M.M.; Goor, H. van; Frolke, J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (CRPS I) is a continuation of symptoms and signs due to a pathological exaggerated reaction in an extremity of the human body after an injury or operation. Although the clinical picture of CRPS I in the majority of patients is well known, the

  10. Evidence for local inflammation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. P. M. Huygen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pathophysiology of complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1 is still a matter of debate. Peripheral afferent, efferent and central mechanisms are supposed. Based on clinical signs and symptoms (e.g. oedema, local temperature changes and chronic pain local inflammation is suspected.

  11. Informed Decision-Making Regarding Amputation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, Marlies I.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Schrier, Michiel; van den Dungen, Johannes; den Dunnen, Wilfred E.; Geertzen, Joannes

    2014-01-01

    Background: Literature on complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) discussing the decision to amputate or not, the level of amputation, or the timing of the amputation is scarce: We evaluated informed decision-making regarding amputation for CRPS-I. Methods: We describe our findings in a

  12. Some Relations of Type 2 Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome to Colorectal Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svačina, Š.; Matoulek, M.; Svobodová, S.; Visokai, V.; Lipská, L.; Plavcová, Marie; Zvárová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 29, 4 suppl. (2003), s. 359 ISSN 0338-1684. [International Diabetes Federation Congress /18./. 24.08.2003-29.08.2003, Paris] R&D Projects: GA MZd NB6635; GA MŠk LN00B107 Keywords : diabetes type 2 * metabolic syndrome * colorectal cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  13. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-08-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  14. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) linked to chromosome 3q in an Italian family.

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparini, P; De Fazio, A; Croce, A I; Stanziale, P; Zelante, L

    1998-01-01

    We report an Italian family affected by Usher type III syndrome. Linkage study, performed using markers corresponding to the Usher loci already mapped, clearly showed linkage with markers on chromosome 3q24-25. Our data further support the presence of an Usher III locus on chromosome 3, as recently reported in a Finnish population.

  15. USH2A mutation analysis in 70 Dutch families with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Weston, M.D.; Claassen, A.M.W.; Orten, D.J.; Weekamp, H.; Aarem, A. van; Huygen, P.L.M.; Deutman, A.F.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kimberling, W.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is characterised by moderate to severe high-frequency hearing impairment, progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa and intact vestibular responses. Three loci are known for USH2, however, only the gene for USH2a (USH2A) has been identified. Mutation analysis

  16. Cerebral activation during motor imagery in complex regional pain syndrome type 1 with dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Esther W.; van Rijn, Monique A.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Renken, Remco; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    The pathogenesis of dystonia in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is unclear. In primary dystonia, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revealed changes in cerebral networks during execution of movement. The aim of this study was to determine cerebral network function in

  17. Metachronous Bilateral Posterior Tibial Artery Aneurysms in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagspiel, Klaus D.; Bonatti, Hugo; Sabri, Saher; Arslan, Bulent; Harthun, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is a life-threatening genetic connective tissue disorder. We report a 24-year-old woman with EDS-IV who presented with metachronous bilateral aneurysms/pseudoaneurysms of the posterior tibial arteries 15 months apart. Both were treated successfully with transarterial coil embolization from a distal posterior tibial approach.

  18. Physical and Psychological Health in Persons with Deafblindness that Is due to Usher Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Moa; Moller, Claes; Moller, Kerstin; Danermark, Berth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of the study reported here were to describe the physical and psychological health of persons with Usher syndrome Type II (USH2) and to explore any differences in terms of gender. Methods: The participants were recruited from the Swedish Usher database. In the first step, 122 persons received the questionnaire by mail,…

  19. Psychosocial Implications of Usher Syndrome, Type I, throughout the Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, I. D.

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome, Type I, requires multiple adaptations throughout the life cycle because each stage of life has tasks and losses associated with deafness and progressive retinitis pigmentosa. This article examines the issues raised at each stage, using clinical vignettes from persons who have this condition and their families. (Author/DB)

  20. Cochlear Implantation in Patients With Usher Syndrome Type IIa Increases Performance and Quality of Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, B.P.; Nierop, J.W.I. van; Huinck, W.J.; Rotteveel, L.J.C.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Snik, A.F.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Pennings, R.J.E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Usher syndrome type IIa (USH2a) is characterized by congenital moderate to severe hearing impairment and retinitis pigmentosa. Hearing rehabilitation starts in early childhood with the application of hearing aids. In some patients with USH2a, severe progression of hearing impairment

  1. Stressful life events and psychological dysfunction in complex regional pain syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; de Bruijn-Kofman, AT; de Bruijn, HP; van de Wiel, HBM; Dijkstra, PU

    Objective: To determine to what extent stressful life events and psychological dysfunction play a role in the pathogenesis of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I (CRPS). Design: A comparative study between a CRPS group and a control group. Stressful life events and psychological dysfunction

  2. Resilience in patients with amputation because of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, Marlies I.; Schrier, Ernst; Krans, Hilde K.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although controversial, an amputation for longstanding and therapy-resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (CRPS-I) may improve quality of life and pain intensity. Resilience, the way people deal with adversity in a positive way may be related to these positive outcomes. This study

  3. Prevalence of dry eye syndrome and diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afkhami-Ardekani Mohammad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to assess the prevalence of dry eye syndrome and diabetic retinopathy (DR in type 2 diabetic patients and their contributing factors. Methods 199 type 2 diabetic patients referred to Yazd Diabetes Research Center were consecutively selected. All Subjects were assessed by questionnaire about other diseases and drugs. Dry eye syndrome was assessed with Tear break up time tests and Schirmer. All the subjects underwent indirect ophthalmoscopy and retinal color photography. DR was graded according to early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy (ETDRS criteria. Results Of 199 subjects, 108 patients (54.3% suffer from dry eye syndrome. Although dry eye syndrome was more common in older and female patients, this association was not significant. But there was significantly association between dry eye syndrome and duration of diabetes (P = 0.01. Dry eye syndrome was more frequent in diabetic patients with DR (P = 0.02. DR was found in 140 patients (70.35%, which included 34 patients (17.1% with mild non proliferative DR (NPDR, 34 patients (17.1% with moderate NPDR, 22 patients (11.1% with severe NPDR and 25 patients (25.1% with proliferative DR (PDR. There were significant relation between age, sex and duration of diabetes and DR. Conclusion In this study the prevalence of dry eye syndrome was 54.3%. Diabetes and dry eyes appear to have a common association. Further studies need to be undertaken to establish an etiologic relationship. However, examination for dry eye should be an integral part of the assessment of diabetic eye disease.

  4. Low doses of terlipressin and albumin in the type I hepatorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Pulvirenti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hepatorenal syndrome is a pre-renal like dysfunction that generally onsets in cirrhotic patients presenting ascites. MATERIALS AND METHODS We investigated the improvement of renal function in subjects with hepatorenal syndrome after terlipressin administration and the survival times after this treatment. 30 patients affected by cirrhosis, with diagnosis of type I hepatorenal syndrome were treated with intravenous terlipressin plus albumin (group A or with albumin alone (group B. Liver function, renal function, sodium plasma level and plasma renin activity were monitored. RESULTS Patients of group A showed a significant improvement (p < 0.001 of renal function valued by creatinine rate compared with the results obtained in group B. The probability of survival was higher in the group A (p < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS Our results seem to confirm that the administration of terlipressin plus albumin improves renal function in patients with cirrhosis and type I hepatorenal syndrome and that a reversal of hepatorenal syndrome is strongly associated with an improved survival.

  5. Long-term follow-up of patients with Bartter syndrome type I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puricelli, Elena; Bettinelli, Alberto; Borsa, Nicolò; Sironi, Francesca; Mattiello, Camilla; Tammaro, Fabiana; Tedeschi, Silvana; Bianchetti, Mario G

    2010-09-01

    Little information is available on a long-term follow-up in Bartter syndrome type I and II. Clinical presentation, treatment and long-term follow-up (5.0-21, median 11 years) were evaluated in 15 Italian patients with homozygous (n = 7) or compound heterozygous (n = 8) mutations in the SLC12A1 (n = 10) or KCNJ1 (n = 5) genes. Thirteen new mutations were identified. The 15 children were born pre-term with a normal for gestational age body weight. Medical treatment at the last follow-up control included supplementation with potassium in 13, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in 12 and gastroprotective drugs in five patients. At last follow-up, body weight and height were within normal ranges in the patients. Glomerular filtration rate was Bartter syndrome had a lower renin ratio (P Bartter syndrome. Patients with Bartter syndrome type I and II tend to present a satisfactory prognosis after a median follow-up of more than 10 years. Gallstones might represent a new complication of antenatal Bartter syndrome.

  6. Subjective health complaints and illness perception amongst adults with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-HypermobilityType - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Lena; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Løvaas, Helene; Løvvik, Camilla; Maeland, Silje

    2017-10-17

    To investigate the prevalence and severity of subjective health complaints and describe illness perception in a population of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type. This study was a postal survey with a questionnaire battery on demographic data, subjective health complaints inventory, and illness perception. A total of 110 individuals diagnosed with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type from two specialized hospitals in Norway were offered participation. Further, 140 gender- and age-matched healthy controls from statistics Norway representing the general population were sent the questionnaire for reference. Overall response rate was 30.4% (n = 76), with 44.5% (n = 49) in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type and 19.3% (n = 27) in controls. Subjective health complaints were significantly higher in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type - than in the controls (32.06 vs. 11.08; p Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type had low understanding of their illness and symptoms (understanding, mean: 3.93, SD 2.88), and reported to have moderate personal and treatment control over their illness. Adults with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type reported higher frequency and severity of subjective health complaints than the matched controls from the general adult population in Norway. Furthermore, Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-Hypermobile Type reported low understanding of their illness and associated symptoms, and moderate belief that their illness can be kept under control through self-management or treatment. This may indicate one of the reasons why prognosis for these patients is poor. Implications for rehabilitation Awareness of the complexity of the subjective health complaints and inquiry into illness perception could contribute with valuable information about these

  7. A rare combination of type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) or multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS-3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betterle, Corrado; Garelli, Silvia; Coco, Graziella; Burra, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS-3) is defined by the presence of an autoimmune thyroid disease and another autoimmune illness, excluding Addison's disease; this is a frequent combination. We report the case of a 55 years old female patient with APS-3, with seven clinical or latent autoimmune manifestations. At 49 years of age she was admitted at the General Hospital for leukopenia, weight loss, tremors, anxiety and diarrhea. The personal history revealed ulcerative colitis and, during the last year, episodes of fever with migrant arthralgia and cutaneous lesions. The patient was evaluated for thyroid function and imaging, mielobiopsy, glycaemic control, gastrointestinal and rheumatologic disorders with specific biochemical tests, imaging and endoscopic procedures. We concluded that the patient was affected by APS-3, characterized by the association of Graves' disease, autoimmune leukopenia, latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), autoimmune gastritis, ulcerative colitis, Sjögren's and anti-phospholipid syndromes. The patient started low doses of corticosteroid drugs for leukopenia, underwent (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism and later started substitutive thyroid therapy with l-thyroxine, insulin therapy for LADA, mesalazine for ulcerative colitis and artificial tears for Sjögren's syndrome. In this article we report a complex case of APS-3, characterized by the association of seven different autoimmune diseases, which required a complex therapeutic strategy.

  8. Alogliptin after acute coronary syndrome in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, William B; Cannon, Christopher P; Heller, Simon R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess potentially elevated cardiovascular risk related to new antihyperglycemic drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes, regulatory agencies require a comprehensive evaluation of the cardiovascular safety profile of new antidiabetic therapies. We assessed cardiovascular outcomes...... with alogliptin, a new inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4), as compared with placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes who had had a recent acute coronary syndrome. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients with type 2 diabetes and either an acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina requiring...... of hypoglycemia, cancer, pancreatitis, and initiation of dialysis were similar with alogliptin and placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes who had had a recent acute coronary syndrome, the rates of major adverse cardiovascular events were not increased with the DPP-4 inhibitor alogliptin...

  9. Metabolic syndrome and the development of vascular disease and type 2 diabetes in high-risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, A.M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and its associated insulin resistance play a key role in the clustering of vascular risk factors, known as Metabolic Syndrome. Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome are at increased risk for the development of both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Type 2 diabetes and

  10. Síndrome de Waardenburg. Presentación de un caso con glaucoma pigmentario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol Inés Parapar Tena

    2017-11-01

    Caso clínico: Paciente femenina de 30 años de edad que acude con diagnóstico de síndrome de Waardenburg tipo ii subtipo B, con heterocromía del iris, huso de Krukenberg, hipermetropía, hiperpigmentación de la malla trabecular del ángulo iridocorneal y presión ocular ligeramente elevada que nos hicieron pensar en un glaucoma pigmentario.

  11. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin, S.; Gondal, G.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  12. Genetic and Dyanmic Analysis of Murine Peak Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    These homologous segments have provided important clues to mapping human genes associated with a number of diseases including Waardenburg syndrome (14...Newton, V., Wellesley, D., Harris, R., and Read, A. P. Assignment of the locus for Waardenburg syndrome type 1 to human chromosone 2q37 and possible...and Strachan, T. Waardenburg’s syndrome patients have mutations in the human homologue of the Pax-3 paired box gene, Nature. 355: 635-636, 1992

  13. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, D N; Ghuge, P P; Gandhi, S; Vanikar, A V; Shrimali, J D; Kute, V B; Trivedi, H L

    2013-11-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated genetic or inherited risk factors.

  14. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D N Gera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection (AD is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated genetic or inherited risk factors.

  15. Unusual manifestations of ectodermal dysplasia-syndactyly syndrome type I in two Yemeni siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Alshami

    2015-01-15

    Ectodermal dysplasias (EDs) are a group of genodermatoses characterized by malformations of tissues derived from the ectoderm, including the skin, its appendages (hair, nails, sweat glands), teeth, and the breasts. Ectodermal dysplasia syndactyly syndrome (EDSS) is a rare, newly described type of ED involving syndactyly. We report 2 Yemeni siblings with typical EDSS manifestations, including bilateral, partial cutaneous syndactyly of the fingers and toes; sparse, coarse, brittle scalp hair, eyebrows, and eyelashes; and conical, widely spaced teeth with enamel notches. In addition, the siblings presented with other features hitherto not described for this syndrome, such as adermatoglyphia, onychogryphosis, hypoplastic widely spaced nipples, hypoplastic thumbs, and red scalp hair.

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 mimicking Raynaud’s phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1 is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by severe pain, swelling, autonomic dysfunction and dystrophic changes in affected extremity. RSDS is a rare disease in children and usually occurs after trauma, however, without trauma may also occur. We were detected CRPS-1 activated by cold and stress and characterized by recurrent attacks in the bilateral upper extremities in 14 year-old girl, which is similar to Raynaud’s phenomenon. We present this case with the literature because of its rarity and atypical course.

  17. Review of evidence that epidemics of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome are polar opposite responses to iatrogenic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, John B

    2012-11-01

    There is an epidemic in children of metabolic syndrome, obesity, type 2 diabetes and other individual diseases that form the components of metabolic syndrome. Poor diet and low exercise can not explain many facets of the epidemic including the onset in children 6 month of age, the protective effect of obesity on the incidence of type 1 diabetes and the epidemic of type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome in grass fed horses. Poor diet and exercise also do not explain the epidemic of type 1 diabetes in children that resembles the epidemic of type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome. Several papers have been published to indicate that the epidemics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome in children are linked and are polar opposite responses to iatrogenic inflammation. Several lines of research support this. Data from different races indicates that there is an inverse relationship between developing type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Races with high risk of developing type 2 diabetes have a decreased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Data from Italy confirmed an inverse association between obesity and type 1 diabetes. Further studies indicate the inverse relationship between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes/obesity is due to cortisol production. Data indicates those with low cortisol responses have a predilection for type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders following inflammation, while those with high cortisol/ immune suppressive responses develop type 2 diabetes/metabolic syndrome/obesity which resembles a Cushingoid state but are spared in the autoimmune disorders. Japanese children produce much more cortisol following immunization than Caucasian children. The later explains why discontinuation of BCG vaccination was associated with a decrease in type 1 diabetes in European children and a decrease in type 2 diabetes in Japanese children. Both the epidemics of type 1 diabetes and metabolic syndrome correlate with an increase in immunization. Finally

  18. Mediterranean diet and metabolic syndrome prevalence in type 2 diabetes patients in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veissi, Masoud; Anari, Razieh; Amani, Reza; Shahbazian, Hajieh; Latifi, Seyed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome as a cardiovascular disease predictor, is proposed to be reduced by following a Mediterranean diet. This study was aimed to explore the relationships between metabolic syndrome and Mediterranean diet in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. A cross-sectional study was performed on 158 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients 28-75 years old (mean age: 54.3±9.6 yrs). Fasting glucose and lipid profile were measured. Blood pressure and anthropometric characteristics of each participant were recorded. Food frequency questionnaires were evaluated using an 11-item score to determine the adherence to Mediterranean diet. Totally, 55.4% of participants had a good adherence to Mediterranean diet. The risk of metabolic syndrome in women was significantly higher than in men (OR=8.65, CI 95%=2.88-25.99; pMediterranean diet (p=0.167). Results demonstrated no association between Mediterranean diet adherence and metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. However, nuts, legumes and seeds might have greater benefits for diabetics. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in Type 2 diabetes: Comparison of WHO, modified ATPIII and IDF criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Khan, T.E.; Yasmeen, T.; Awan, S.; Islam, N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes according to three commonly used operational definitions (World Health Organization(WHO), National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel( NCEP ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation( IDF)). To evaluate the agreement between these classifications in the Pakistani cohort. Methods: Data was collected retrospectively of 210 patients with type 2 diabetes visiting outpatient clinics of one of the large tertiary care hospitals at Karachi, Pakistan between June 2008 to November 2008. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was found to be 81.4% (WHO), 86.7 %( IDF) and 91.9 %( NCEP ATPIII). The degree of agreement (kappa statistic) was found to be highest among IDF and NCEP ATPIII (0.728) as compared to (0.436 and 0.417) between WHO and ATP and WHO and IDF respectively. The most significant predictors for metabolic syndrome were found out to be female gender OR= 8.74 95% CI 1.51-50.53, low HDL cholesterol levels OR= 0.89 95% CI 0.84-0.94 and high systolic blood pressure OR= 1.06 95% CI 1.009-1.11. Conclusion: Our study results suggested that NCEP ATPIII and IDF are the most reliable criteria for diagnosing metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetic patients, with NECP capturing more patients in comparison to IDF definition. The alarmingly high frequency of metabolic syndrome in type 2 diabetes found in this study suggests that primary prevention strategies should be initiated earlier and early in this ethnic group and our health care system should be geared up to cope with this deadly quartet. (author)

  20. Severe conjunctivochalasis in association with classic type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitaker John K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferior conjunctivochalasis is common, but is rarely severe enough to require conjunctival excision. This report describes a patient with severe conjunctivochalasis who was subsequently diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, Classic Type. Case presentation A patient suffering from foreign body sensation, frequent blinking and bilateral inferior conjunctivochalasis was referred and treated by topical ocular lubrication. However, no improvement was observed prompting potential excision of conjunctivochalasis. Following patient consultation and clinical diagnosis including hypermobile joints and skin elasticity, poor wound healing and wide scar morphology, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was confirmed in the patient. Conclusion This case highlights the need for direct patient questioning and provides the first reported association between conjunctiovochalasis and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  1. Amikacin-induced type 5 Bartter-like syndrome with severe hypocalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrispal A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside-induced renal toxicity is well known and may manifest with nonoliguric renal failure or renal tubular dysfunction. Aminoglycoside-induced renal tubular dysfunction could result in diffuse damage or manifest as a Fanconi-like syndrome, Bartter-like syndrome, or distal renal tubular acidosis. We discuss a patient who developed severe renal tubular dysfunction secondary to short-term therapy with Amikacin, resulting in refractory hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis, and polyuria. This constellation of biochemical abnormalities mimic Type 5 Bartter′s syndrome, where there is activating mutation of the calcium sensing receptor in the thick ascending loop of Henle and the distal tubule. In this case this activation of the calcium sensing receptor was triggered by amikacin. This phenomenon has been described with gentamicin though never with amikacin. Recovery of the tubular dysfunction took 15 days following cessation of the offending drug, Amikacin.

  2. Coffee intake and risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Thomsen, Mette; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2015-01-01

    convincingly with obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, body mass index, waist circumference, weight, height, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or glucose levels. Per-allele meta-analysed odds ratios for type 2 diabetes were 1....../diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides and total cholesterol and with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but not with glucose levels. In genetic analyses, 9-10 vs 0-3 coffee-intake alleles were associated with 29% higher coffee intake. However, genetically derived high coffee intake was not associated...... to 78,021 additional individuals from the DIAGRAM consortium. RESULTS: Observationally, high coffee intake was associated with low risk of obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Further, high coffee intake was associated with high body mass index, waist circumference, weight, height, systolic...

  3. Obese patients with type 2 diabetes submitted to banded gastric bypass: greater incidence of dumping syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padoin, Alexandre Vontobel; Galvão Neto, Manoel; Moretto, Myriam; Barancelli, Fabiano; Schroer, Caroline Eckerdt; Mottin, Cláudio Corá

    2009-11-01

    Dumping syndrome is one of ten most common complications in morbidly obese patients operated. Recent studies in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in patients submitted to gastric bypass led us to examine the different outcomes in this group of patients. Our objective was to determine the difference in the prevalence of dumping syndrome in patients with DM2 submitted to gastric bypass. In this retrospective study, 49 diabetic and 54 non-diabetic morbidly obese patients were submitted to gastric bypass and followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. The occurrence of dumping was determined by the patient's medical chart, where it was considered positive if recorded in at least one of three evaluations. The 103 patients evaluated had a mean BMI of 49.5 +/- 9.3 kg/m(2) and mean age of 38 +/- 9.7 years, with 75.7% being women. The prevalence of dumping syndrome in this population was 24.3%. The prevalence of dumping was greater in patients with DM2 (44.9%) when compared to the control group (5.6%; p DM2 as the only variable associated with dumping syndrome. Dumping syndrome is a common postoperative complication in gastric bypass. Patients with DM2 show a greater postoperative prevalence of dumping.

  4. Clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients: A cross-sectional investigation in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peierdun, Mi-ji-ti; Liu, Wen-xian; Renaguli, Ai-ze-zi; Nurmuhammat, Amat; Li, Xiao-chun; Gulibaier, Ka-ha-er; Ainivaer, Wu-la-mu; Halmurat, Upur

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the distribution of abnormal hilit syndromes in traditional Uighur medicine (TUM) among human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients, and to find out the clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type HIV/AIDS patients. Between June and July in 2012, 307 eligible HIV/AIDS patients from in-patient department and out-patient clinics of Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region the Sixth People's Hospital in Urumqi were investigated. TUM syndrome differentiation was performed by a senior TUM physician. Each participant completed a Sign and Symptom Check-List for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS (SSC-HIV) questionnaire. Depression was evaluated by using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression Questionnaire. Blood specimen was collected from each participant to test the levels of blood chemicals. Of 307 HIV/AIDS patients, 189 (61.6%) were abnormal savda syndrome type, 118 (38.4%) were non-abnormal-savda syndrome type. Mean CD4 counts of abnormal savda syndrome type patients was (227.61±192.93) cells/µL, and the prevalence of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated cystatin C were 49.7%, 28.6%, and 44.7%, which were significantly higher than those in the non-abnormal-savda syndrome type patients (26.3%, 16.0% and 25.0%,PHIV/AIDS-related symptoms such as fatigue (42.3%), back aches (40.7%), lack of appetite (33.9%), night sweats (31.7%) were more common among abnormal savda syndrome patients (PHIV/AIDS patients, and they present a more sever clinical manifestation.

  5. Why is coronary collateral growth impaired in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocic, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are strong predictors of severity of occlusive coronary disease and poorer outcomes of coronary revascularization therapies. Coronary collateral growth can provide an alternative or accessory pathway of revascularization. However, collateral growth is impaired in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Although many factors necessary for collateral growth are known and many interventions have shown promising results in animal studies, not a single attempt to induce coronary collateral growth in human clinical trials has led to satisfactory results. Accordingly, the first part of this review outlines the known deleterious effects of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome on factors necessary for collateral growth, including pro-angiogenic growth factors, endothelial function, the redox state of the coronary circulation, intracellular signaling, leukocytes and bone marrow-derived progenitors cells. The second section highlights the gaps in our current knowledge of how these factors interact with the radically altered environment of the coronary circulation in diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The interplay between these pathologies and inadequately explored areas related to the temporal regulation of collateral remodeling and the roles of the extracellular matrix, vascular cell phenotype and pro-inflammatory cytokines are emphasized with implications to development of efficient therapies. PMID:22342811

  6. Inflammatory Cytokine Profile Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Ferreira-Hermosillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the serum concentration of IL-6, IL-10, TNF, IL-8, resistin, and adiponectin in type 1 diabetic patients with and without metabolic syndrome and to determine the cut-off point of the estimated glucose disposal rate that accurately differentiated these groups. Design. We conducted a cross-sectional evaluation of all patients in our type 1 diabetes clinic from January 2012 to January 2013. Patients were considered to have metabolic syndrome when they fulfilled the joint statement criteria and were evaluated for clinical, biochemical, and immunological features. Methods. We determined serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF with flow cytometry and adiponectin and resistin concentrations with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. We also compared estimated glucose disposal rate between groups. Results. We tested 140 patients. Forty-four percent fulfilled the metabolic syndrome criteria (n=61, 54% had central obesity, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia, 29% had hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and 19% had hypertension. We observed that resistin concentrations were higher in patients with MS. Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of MS in Mexican patients with T1D. The increased level of resistin may be related to the increased fat mass and could be involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  7. Burnout Syndrome Among Health Care Students: The Role of Type D Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodova, Zuzana; Lajciakova, Petra; Banovcinova, Lubica

    2016-07-18

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Type D personality, along with other personality traits (resilience and sense of coherence), on burnout syndrome and its counterpart, engagement, among students of nursing, midwifery, and psychology. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 97 university students (91.9% females; M age = 20.2 ± 1.49 years). A Type D personality subscale, School Burnout Inventory, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Sense of Coherence Questionnaire, and Baruth Protective Factor Inventory were used. Linear regression models, Student's t test, and Pearson's correlation analysis were employed. Negative affectivity, a dimension of Type D personality, was a significant personality predictor for burnout syndrome (β = .54; 95% CI = [0.33, 1.01]). The only significant personality predictor of engagement was a sense of coherence. Students who were identified as having Type D personality characteristics scored significantly higher on the burnout syndrome questionnaire (t = -2.58, p burnout. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Knowledge, assessment, and management of adults with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type among Flemish physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombaut, Lies; Deane, Janet; Simmonds, Jane; De Wandele, Inge; De Paepe, Anne; Malfait, Fransiska; Calders, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Physiotherapy plays a fundamental role in managing adults with the joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT). However, it is a challenge for both the patient and the physiotherapist as the condition is poorly understood and treatment for JHS/EDS-HT is currently undefined. Insight into current practice is, therefore, necessary in order to establish baseline knowledge in this area and in the long term to improve the standard of patient care. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate current physiotherapists' knowledge of JHS/EDS-HT and to gain insight into current physiotherapy practice with emphasis on assessment, management, and treatment efficacy. Three hundred twenty-five Flemish physiotherapists participated in the study by filling out electronically a modified version of the "Hypermobility and Hypermobility Syndrome Questionnaire" (HHQ), which covered theoretical constructs such as general knowledge, assessment, management, and learning in relation to generalized joint hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT. The results show that physiotherapists report a low level of confidence with regard to assessment and management of JHS/EDS-HT. Knowledge of hypermobility and JHS/EDS-HT is weak, especially regarding the features associated with JHS/EDS-HT. Many treatment approaches are used by physiotherapists with the majority showing preference for education, reassurance, muscle strengthening, proprioceptive and core stability training. Almost all approaches were perceived as being clinically effective by the physiotherapists, highlighting a lack of consensus. In conclusion, this study in Flemish physiotherapists confirms that JHS/EDS-HT is under-recognized, not well known and deemed difficult to treat. Further education is required and sought by the physiotherapists surveyed, and future research is needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mouse model for Usher syndrome: linkage mapping suggests homology to Usher type I reported at human chromosome 11p15.

    OpenAIRE

    Heckenlively, J R; Chang, B; Erway, L C; Peng, C; Hawes, N L; Hageman, G S; Roderick, T H

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of diseases with autosomal recessive inheritance, congenital hearing loss, and the development of retinitis pigmentosa, a progressive retinal degeneration characterized by night blindness and visual field loss over several decades. The causes of Usher syndrome are unknown and no animal models have been available for study. Four human gene sites have been reported, suggesting at least four separate forms of Usher syndrome. We report a mouse model of type I Usher syndr...

  10. Identification of 51 novel exons of the Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) gene that encode multiple conserved functional domains and that are mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, E. van; Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Claassen, A.M.W.; Yntema, H.G.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, J.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The USH2A gene is mutated in patients with Usher syndrome type IIa, which is the most common subtype of Usher syndrome and is characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. Since mutation analysis by DNA sequencing of exons 1-21 revealed only ~63% of the expected USH2A mutations, we

  11. [Preliminary study on syndrome differentiation types and acupuncture for whiplash injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye-meng; Li, Hui; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Qun-ce; Wang, Tian-fang

    2011-04-01

    Whiplash injury is a relatively common injury of clinical acupuncture and moxibustion in the United States. The mechanism and clinical manifestation of whiplash injuries as well as its pathogenesis described in TCM were analyzed in this present article. The authors introduced the TCM syndrome differentiation of whiplash injuries and claimed that both the location and the stage of disease should be considered. For the different injury locations, the meridian musculature differentiation was applied to classify the whiplash injuries as Taiyang, Yangming, Shaoyang and Shaoyin Meridian syndromes. Considering the duration of the injury, qi stagnation and blood stasis types were classified in the acute stage and phlegm accumulation, insufficiency of the liver and kidney and qi and blood deficiencies types were classified during the chronic stage. An acupuncture protocol for whiplash injuries and typical cases were also introduced.

  12. Mutations in the novel protocadherin PCDH15 cause Usher syndrome type 1F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagramam, K N; Yuan, H; Kuehn, M H; Murcia, C L; Wayne, S; Srisailpathy, C R; Lowry, R B; Knaus, R; Van Laer, L; Bernier, F P; Schwartz, S; Lee, C; Morton, C C; Mullins, R F; Ramesh, A; Van Camp, G; Hageman, G S; Woychik, R P; Smith, R J; Hagemen, G S

    2001-08-01

    We have determined the molecular basis for Usher syndrome type 1F (USH1F) in two families segregating for this type of syndromic deafness. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we placed the human homolog of the mouse protocadherin Pcdh15 in the linkage interval defined by the USH1F locus. We determined the genomic structure of this novel protocadherin, and found a single-base deletion in exon 10 in one USH1F family and a nonsense mutation in exon 2 in the second. Consistent with the phenotypes observed in these families, we demonstrated expression of PCDH15 in the retina and cochlea by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. This report shows that protocadherins are essential for maintenance of normal retinal and cochlear function.

  13. Evaluation of Kinesiophobia and Its Correlations with Pain and Fatigue in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Celletti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type a. k. a. joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT is a hereditary musculoskeletal disorder associating generalized joint hypermobility with chronic pain. Anecdotal reports suggest a prominent role for kinesiophobia in disease manifestations, but no study has systematically addressed this point. Objective. To investigate the impact of kinesiophobia and its relationship with pain, fatigue, and quality of life in JHS/EDS-HT. Design. Cross-sectional study. Subjects/Patients. 42 patients (40 female and 2 male with JHS/EDS-HT diagnosis following standardized diagnostic criteria were selected. Methods. Disease features were analyzed by means of specific questionnaires and scales evaluating kinesiophobia, pain, fatigue, and quality of life. The relationships among variables were investigated using the Spearman bivariate analysis. Results. Kinesiophobia resulted predominantly in the patients’ sample. The values of kinesiophobia did not correlate with intensity of pain, quality of life, and (or the single component of fatigue. A strong correlation was discovered between kinesiophobia and general severity of fatigue. Conclusions. In JHS/EDS-HT, the onset of pain-avoiding strategies is related to the presence of pain but not to its intensity. The clear-cut correlation between kinesiophobia and severity of fatigue suggests a direct link between musculoskeletal pain and fatigue. In JHS/EDS-HT, the underlying mechanism is likely to be facilitated by primary disease characteristics, including hypotonia.

  14. Cerebro-fronto-facial syndrome type 3 with polymicrogyria: a clinical presentation of Baraitser-Winter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eker, Hatice Koçak; Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Ünal, Sevim; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Drunat, Séverine; Verloes, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Baraitser-Winter syndrome (BRWS) is a rare condition affecting the development of the brain and the face. The most common characteristics are unusual facial appearance including hypertelorism and ptosis, ocular colobomas, hearing loss, impaired neuronal migration and intellectual disability. BRWS is caused by mutations in the ACTB and ACTG1 genes. Cerebro-fronto-facial syndrome (CFFS) is a clinically heterogeneous condition with distinct facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities. Three subtypes are identified. We report a female infant with striking facial features and brain anomalies (included polymicrogyria) that fit into the spectrum of the CFFS type 3 (CFFS3). She also had minor anomalies on her hands and feet, heart and kidney malformations, and recurrent infections. DNA investigations revealed c.586C>T mutation (p.Arg196Cys) in ACTB. This mutation places this patient in the spectrum of BRWS. The same mutation has been detected in a polymicrogyric patient reported previously in literature. We expand the malformation spectrum of BRWS/CFFS3, and present preliminary findings for phenotype-genotype correlation in this spectrum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Type III Bartter-like syndrome in an infant boy with Gitelman syndrome and autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnara, Milena; Gaudino, Rossella; Tedeschi, Silvana; Syrèn, Marie-Louise; Perrotta, Silverio; Maines, Evelina; Zaffanello, Marco

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of an infant boy with polyuria and a familial history of central diabetes insipidus. Laboratory blood tests disclosed hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, and hyperaldosteronism. Plasma magnesium concentration was slightly low. Urine analysis showed hypercalciuria, hyposthenuria, and high excretion of potassium. Such findings oriented toward type III Bartter syndrome (BSIII). Direct sequencing of the CLCNKB gene revealed no disease-causing mutations. The water deprivation test was positive. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lack of posterior pituitary hyperintensity. Finally, direct sequencing of the AVP-NPII gene showed a point mutation (c.1884G>A) in a heterozygous state, confirming an autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (adFNDI). This condition did not explain the patient's phenotype; thus, we investigated for Gitelman syndrome (GS). A direct sequencing of the SLC12A3 gene showed c.269A>C and c.1205C>A new mutations. In conclusion, the patient had a genetic combination of GS and adFNDI with a BSIII-like phenotype.

  16. Radiologic investigation of apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type 1) -a case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Hee; Cho, Whi Youl; Kim, Myung Soon; Hong, In Soo; Sung, Ki Joon; Yang, Jae Seung [Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    Apert syndrome (Acrocephalosyndactyly type 1) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by craniosynosis and symmetric-syndactyly of both extremities. Radiological examination of the skull shows hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. In the facial bones, the hypoplastic maxilla and relatively prominent mandible are observed associated with other anomalies such as cleft palate. Radiologic examination of both hands and feet show bony or subcutaneous syndactylism and typical mitten hands and webbed toes.

  17. Syringomyelia in mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome): imaging findings following bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hite, S.H.; Krivit, W.; Haines, S.J.; Whitley, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    We present the imaging findings in a patient with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type VI (Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) who developed holocord syringomyelia. This represents the only reported case of syrinx formation in a child with MPS VI. Clinical, neurologic and spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented. The patient has maintained a stable clinical and neurologic course over the period following allogeneic bone marrow transplant. (orig.). With 3 figs

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency is Associated with the Metabolic Syndrome in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Nikooyeh

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: Our data showed that firstly higher vitamin D status is inversely associated with fasting glycemia, and secondly serum 25(OHD3 predicts MeS risk in the subjects with T2D. Demonstrating the association of hypovitaminosis D with disorders of glucose metabolism and higher risk for development of further complications, notably CVD, may lead to a new target for preventive efforts at the population level. Keywords: Vitamin D, Type 2 diabetes, Metabolic syndrome, Cardiovascular disease

  19. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 – a case report from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahniyah Haq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 26 years old man who presented with adrenocortical insufficiency followed by hypoparathyroidism and subsequently mucocutaneous candidiasis. He also had nail dystrophy, cataract and alopecia, but no other endocrinopathies. He was diagnosed as a case of autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1(APS 1. APS1 is a rare endocrine disorder and only a few cases have been reported from Bangladesh. IMC J Med Sci 2016; 10(1: 33-35

  20. Radiologic investigation of apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type 1) -a case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Hee; Cho, Whi Youl; Kim, Myung Soon; Hong, In Soo; Sung, Ki Joon; Yang, Jae Seung

    1991-01-01

    Apert syndrome (Acrocephalosyndactyly type 1) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by craniosynosis and symmetric-syndactyly of both extremities. Radiological examination of the skull shows hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. In the facial bones, the hypoplastic maxilla and relatively prominent mandible are observed associated with other anomalies such as cleft palate. Radiologic examination of both hands and feet show bony or subcutaneous syndactylism and typical mitten hands and webbed toes

  1. An unusual type of congenital heart disease associated with the Holt-Oram-Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzic, B.; Bosnar, B.; Beleznay, O.

    1981-01-01

    Case report of a very rare case of Holt-Oram-Syndrome (in a seven months old baby) associated with tricuspid atresia (itself a rare condition of isolated congenital heart desease) and anomalous return of pulmonary vein into the right atrium. According to the classification based on anatomy, our case corresponds to type Ia. The diagnosis was confirmed clinically, electrocardiographically, radiologically and angiographically. (orig.) [de

  2. Effects of Dairy Protein and Fat on the Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnshave, Ann; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing worldwide. Evidence supports a negative relationship between the consumption of dairy products and risk of MetS and T2D. Dairy proteins are known to have a directly beneficial effect on hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia, but a detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms is missing. It has been confirmed by observations that the insulinotropic effect of dairy proteins is associated with t...

  3. Choroidal Thickness Analysis in Patients with Usher Syndrome Type 2 Using EDI OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, L; Sala, B; Montesano, G; Pierrottet, C; De Cillà, S; Maltese, P; Bertelli, M; Rossetti, L

    2015-01-01

    To portray Usher Syndrome type 2, analyzing choroidal thickness and comparing data reported in published literature on RP and healthy subjects. Methods. 20 eyes of 10 patients with clinical signs and genetic diagnosis of Usher Syndrome type 2. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), axial length (AL), automated visual field (VF), and EDI OCT. Both retinal and choroidal measures were measured. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate choroidal thickness with age, BCVA, IOP, AL, VF, and RT. Comparison with data about healthy people and nonsyndromic RP patients was performed. Results. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) was 248.21 ± 79.88 microns. SFCT was statistically significant correlated with age (correlation coefficient -0.7248179, p patients (p = 0.2138). Conclusions. Our study demonstrated in vivo choroidal thickness reduction in patients with Usher Syndrome type 2. These data are important for the comprehension of mechanisms of disease and for the evaluation of therapeutic approaches.

  4. Stroke in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Kyphoscoliotic Type: Dissection or Vasculitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, Annegret; Wiesmann, Martin; Weis, Joachim; Kurth, Ingo; Jalaie, Houman; Rohrbach, Marianne; Häusler, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Patients with the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome have an increased risk of vascular complications such as aortic dissection and perforation. Cerebral ischemia has only rarely been documented. This 13-year-old girl with the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome experienced a large right middle cerebral artery distribution infarction. Full intravenous heparinization was started in response to presumed arterial dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging studies including magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography, however, did not confirm dissection but suggested with cerebral vasculitis extending from the intradural right internal carotid artery to the M2 branches of the middle cerebral artery. Combined steroid and cyclophosphamide therapy was associated with clinical improvement. Two months later she died from hemorrhagic shock caused by a two-sided spontaneous rupture of the aortic artery. Cerebral vasculitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of vascular complications in kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Choroidal Thickness Analysis in Patients with Usher Syndrome Type 2 Using EDI OCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To portray Usher Syndrome type 2, analyzing choroidal thickness and comparing data reported in published literature on RP and healthy subjects. Methods. 20 eyes of 10 patients with clinical signs and genetic diagnosis of Usher Syndrome type 2. Each patient underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA, intraocular pressure (IOP, axial length (AL, automated visual field (VF, and EDI OCT. Both retinal and choroidal measures were measured. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate choroidal thickness with age, BCVA, IOP, AL, VF, and RT. Comparison with data about healthy people and nonsyndromic RP patients was performed. Results. Mean subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT was 248.21±79.88 microns. SFCT was statistically significant correlated with age (correlation coefficient −0.7248179, p<0.01. No statistically significant correlation was found between SFCT and BCVA, IOP, AL, VF, and RT. SFCT was reduced if compared to healthy subjects (p<0.01. No difference was found when compared to choroidal thickness from nonsyndromic RP patients (p=0.2138. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated in vivo choroidal thickness reduction in patients with Usher Syndrome type 2. These data are important for the comprehension of mechanisms of disease and for the evaluation of therapeutic approaches.

  6. Sasang constitutional types for the risk prediction of metabolic syndrome: a 14-year longitudinal prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; Lee, Seung Ku; Kim, Jong Yeol; Cho, Namhan; Shin, Chol

    2017-09-02

    To examine whether the use of Sasang constitutional (SC) types, such as Tae-yang (TY), Tae-eum (TE), So-yang (SY), and So-eum (SE) types, increases the accuracy of risk prediction for metabolic syndrome. From 2001 to 2014, 3529 individuals aged 40 to 69 years participated in a longitudinal prospective cohort. The Cox proportional hazard model was utilized to predict the risk of developing metabolic syndrome. During the 14 year follow-up, 1591 incident events of metabolic syndrome were observed. Individuals with TE type had higher body mass indexes and waist circumferences than individuals with SY and SE types. The risk of developing metabolic syndrome was the highest among individuals with the TE type, followed by the SY type and the SE type. When the prediction risk models for incident metabolic syndrome were compared, the area under the curve for the model using SC types was significantly increased to 0.8173. Significant predictors for incident metabolic syndrome were different according to the SC types. For individuals with the TE type, the significant predictors were age, sex, body mass index (BMI), education, smoking, drinking, fasting glucose level, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglyceride level. For Individuals with the SE type, the predictors were sex, smoking, fasting glucose, HDL cholesterol level, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglyceride level, while the predictors in individuals with the SY type were age, sex, BMI, smoking, drinking, total cholesterol level, fasting glucose level, HDL cholesterol level, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglyceride level. In this prospective cohort study among 3529 individuals, we observed that utilizing the SC types significantly increased the accuracy of the risk prediction for the development of metabolic syndrome.

  7. Timing and Type of Alcohol Consumption and the Metabolic Syndrome - ELSA-Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Bruna Angelo; Luft, Vivian Cristine; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Chambless, Lloyd Ellwood; Chor, Dora; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is rising worldwide. Its association with alcohol intake, a major lifestyle factor, is unclear, particularly with respect to the influence of drinking with as opposed to outside of meals. We investigated the associations of different aspects of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome and its components. In cross-sectional analyses of 14,375 active or retired civil servants (aged 35–74 years) participating in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil), we fitted logistic regression models to investigate interactions between the quantity of alcohol, the timing of its consumption with respect to meals, and the predominant beverage type in the association of alcohol consumption with the metabolic syndrome. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, educational level, income, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, smoking, body mass index, and physical activity, light consumption of alcoholic beverages with meals was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome (≤4 drinks/week: OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.74–0.97; 4 to 7 drinks/week: OR = 0.75, 95%CI 0.61–0.92), compared to abstention/occasional drinking. On the other hand, greater consumption of alcohol consumed outside of meals was significantly associated with the metabolic syndrome (7 to 14 drinks/week: OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.11–1.57; ≥14 drinks/week: OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.29–1.98). Drinking predominantly wine, which occurred mostly with meals, was significantly related to a lower syndrome prevalence; drinking predominantly beer, most notably when outside of meals and in larger quantity, was frequently associated with a greater prevalence. In conclusion, the alcohol—metabolic syndrome association differs markedly depending on the relationship of intake to meals. Beverage preference—wine or beer—appears to underlie at least part of this difference. Notably, most alcohol was consumed in metabolically unfavorable type and timing. If further investigations

  8. Math Learning Disability and Math LD Subtypes: Evidence from Studies of Turner Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, and Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, Michele M. M.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether indicators of math learning disability were observed in 35 5- and 6-year-olds with either neurofibromatosis, Turner Syndrome, or fragile X syndrome and compared to controls. Findings indicate that girls with fragile X or Turner syndrome but not neurofibromatosis are significantly more likely to have specific math…

  9. Addison's disease in a patient with hypothyroidism: autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Anna; Stewart, Munro; Mwamure, Peter; Nirmalaraj, Kingsley

    2015-08-03

    A 57-year-old Caucasian woman with known autoimmune hypothyroidism diagnosed in 2006 presented to hospital with flu-like symptoms and circulatory collapse. She reported weight loss and gradual increase in her skin pigmentation over a 1-year period. Aggressive fluid resuscitation was instituted. Hormonal tests showed primary adrenal insufficiency. Appropriate steroid replacement was started with rapid clinical response. Subsequent antibody tests confirmed the diagnosis of autoimmune polyglandular type 2 (Schmidt's) syndrome. The adrenal crisis had been precipitated by influenza virus type B infection. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Chronic Heart Failure and Comorbid Renal Dysfunction - A Focus on Type 2 Cardiorenal Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preeti, Jois; Alexandre, Mebazaa; Pupalan, Iyngkaran; Merlin, Thomas C.; Claudio, Ronco

    2016-01-01

    The most important advancements in the Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) are its definition and subsequent classifications. When the predominant pathology and pathophysiology is the heart, i.e. chronic heart failure (CHF), and where any renal impairment (RI) subsequent to this is secondary, the classification is type 2 CRS. There are unique differences in the pathophysiology and progression of individual subclasses. It is important to understand the evolution of CHF and consequences of subsequent RI as they are becoming increasingly prevalent, aggravate morbidity and mortality and limit many therapeutic options. In this paper we discuss the significance of the type 2 CRS patients in the context of the thematic series. PMID:27280302

  11. Type A aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome: extent of initial surgery determines long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylski, Bartosz; Bavaria, Joseph E; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Branchetti, Emanuela; Desai, Nimesh D; Milewski, Rita K; Szeto, Wilson Y; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A

    2014-04-01

    Data on outcomes after Stanford type A aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome are limited. We investigated the primary surgery and long-term results in patients with Marfan syndrome who suffered aortic dissection. Among 1324 consecutive patients with aortic dissection type A, 74 with Marfan syndrome (58% men; median age, 37 years [first and third quartiles, 29 and 48 years]) underwent surgical repair (85% acute dissections; 68% DeBakey I; 55% composite valved graft, 30% supracoronary ascending replacement, 15% valve-sparing aortic root replacement; 12% total arch replacement; 3% in-hospital mortality) at 2 tertiary centers in the United States and Europe over the past 25 years. The rate of aortic reintervention with resternotomy was 24% (18 of 74) and of descending aorta (thoracic+abdominal) intervention was 30% (22 of 74) at a median follow-up of 8.4 years (first and third quartiles, 2.2 and 12.7 years). Freedom from need for aortic root reoperation in patients who underwent primarily a composite valved graft or valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedure was 95±3%, 88±5%, and 79±5% and in patients who underwent supracoronary ascending replacement was 83±9%, 60±13%, 20±16% at 5, 10, and 20 years. Secondary aortic arch surgery was necessary only in patients with initial hemi-arch replacement. Emergency surgery for type A dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome is associated with low in-hospital mortality. Failure to extend the primary surgery to aortic root or arch repair leads to a highly complex clinical course. Aortic root replacement or repair is highly recommended because supracoronary ascending replacement is associated with a high need (>40%) for root reintervention.

  12. [Comparative study on Chinese medical syndrome typing and treatment combined different surgical methods for treating clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lei; Zeng, Cheng; Tao, Li-Li

    2012-11-01

    To observe the therapeutic efficacy of Chinese medical syndrome typing and treatment combined cold needle puncture drainage operation or unipolar electrocoagulation drilling technique under laparoscope for treating clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Forty infertility patients with clomiphene-resistant PCOS were assigned to two groups using stratified random sampling method according to age, infertility time, and body mass index, 20 in each group. Patients in Group A were treated with Chinese medical syndrome typing and treatment combined cold needle puncture drainage operation, while those in Group B were treated with Chinese medical syndrome typing and treatment combined unipolar electrocoagulation drilling technique. After operation Chinese herbal treatment was administered to all patients according to syndrome typing. The serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), androgen (T), estradiol (E2), and prolactin (PRL) were determined before and after operation. The ovulation was monitored. The pregnancy rate and the pregnancy outcomes were recorded after operation. There was no statistical difference in the 3-month spontaneous ovulation rate or the 1-year pregnancy rate (P > 0.05). The levels of LH, T, and PRL were significantly lower after operation than before operation in the two groups (P typing and treatment combined cold needle puncture drainage operation or unipolar electrocoagulation drilling technique could effectively promote the ovulation. The two methods showed similar therapeutic effects.

  13. Botulinum neurotoxin type A injections for vaginismus secondary to vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolasi, Laura; Frasson, Emma; Cappelletti, Jee Yun; Vicentini, Silvana; Bordignon, Monia; Graziottin, Alessandra

    2009-11-01

    To investigate whether botulinum neurotoxin type A improves vaginismus and study its efficacy with repeated treatments. Outpatients were referred because standard cognitive-behavioral and medical treatment for vaginismus and vulvar vestibular syndrome failed. From this group, we prospectively recruited consecutive women (n=39) whose diagnostic electromyogram (EMG) recordings from the levator ani muscle showed hyperactivity at rest and reduced inhibition during straining. These women were followed for a mean (+/-standard deviation) of 105 (+/-50) weeks. Recruited patients underwent repeated cycles of botulinum neurotoxin type A injected into the levator ani under EMG guidance and EMG monitoring thereafter. At enrollment and 4 weeks after each cycle, women were asked about sexual intercourse; underwent EMG evaluation and examinations to grade vaginal resistance according to Lamont; and completed a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the Female Sexual Function Index Scale, a quality-of-life questionnaire (Short-Form 12 Health Survey), and bowel and bladder symptom assessment. At 4 weeks after the first botulinum neurotoxin type A cycle, the primary outcome measures (the possibility of having sexual intercourse, and levator ani EMG hyperactivity) both improved, as did the secondary outcomes, Lamont scores, VAS, Female Sexual Function Index Scales, Short-Form 12 Health Survey, and bowel-bladder symptoms. These benefits persisted through later cycles. When follow-up ended, 63.2% of the patients completely recovered from vaginismus and vulvar vestibular syndrome, 15.4% still needed reinjections (censored), and 15.4% had dropped out. Botulinum neurotoxin type A is an effective treatment option for vaginismus secondary to vulvar vestibular syndrome refractory to standard cognitive-behavioral and medical management. After patients received botulinum neurotoxin type A, their sexual activity improved and reinjections provided sustained benefits. III.

  14. Natural course of visual field loss in patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald A; Bozbeyoglu, Simge; Massof, Robert W; Kimberling, William

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the natural course of visual field loss in patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome and different patterns of visual field loss. Fifty-eight patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome who had at least three visual field measurements during a period of at least 3 years were studied. Kinetic visual fields measured on a standard calibrated Goldmann perimeter with II4e and V4e targets were analyzed. The visual field areas in both eyes were determined by planimetry with the use of a digitalizing tablet and computer software and expressed in square inches. The data for each visual field area measurement were transformed to a natural log unit. Using a mixed model regression analysis, values for the half-life of field loss (time during which half of the remaining field area is lost) were estimated. Three different patterns of visual field loss were identified, and the half-life time for each pattern of loss was calculated. Of the 58 patients, 11 were classified as having pattern type I, 12 with pattern type II, and 14 with pattern type III. Of 21 patients whose visual field loss was so advanced that they could not be classified, 15 showed only a small residual central field (Group A) and 6 showed a residual central field with a peripheral island (Group B). The average half-life times varied between 3.85 and 7.37 for the II4e test target and 4.59 to 6.42 for the V4e target. There was no statistically significant difference in the half-life times between the various patterns of field loss or for the test targets. The average half-life times for visual field loss in patients with Usher syndrome Type 2 were statistically similar among those patients with different patterns of visual field loss. These findings will be useful for counseling patients with Type 2 Usher syndrome as to their prognosis for anticipated visual field loss.

  15. Pathophysiology, prognostic significance and clinical utility of B-type natriuretic peptide in acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiviott, Stephen D; de Lemos, James A; Morrow, David A

    2004-08-16

    The natriuretic hormones are a family of vasoactive peptides that can be measured circulating in the blood. Because they serve as markers of hemodynamic stress, the major focus of the use of natriuretic peptide levels [predominantly B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal (NT)-pro-BNP] has been as an aid to the clinical diagnosis and management of congestive heart failure (CHF). Recently, however, the measurement of natriuretic peptides in the acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has been shown to provide information complementary to traditional biomarkers (of necrosis) such as cardiac troponins and creatine kinase (CK). Studies in several types of acute coronary syndromes [ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI) and unstable angina (UA)] have shown that elevated levels of natriuretic peptides are independently associated with adverse outcomes, particularly mortality. Additional information is obtained from the use natriuretic peptides in combination with other markers of risk including biomarkers of necrosis and inflammation. This review will summarize the scientific rationale and clinical evidence supporting measurement of natriuretic peptides for risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes. Future research is needed to identify therapies of particular benefit for patients with ACS and natriuretic peptide elevation.

  16. Cone responses in Usher syndrome types 1 and 2 by microvolt electroretinography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, Wadih M; Falsini, Benedetto; Tsilou, Ekaterina T; Turriff, Amy E; Schultz, Julie M; Friedman, Thomas B; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher K; King, Kelly A; Muskett, Julie A; Rehman, Atteeq U; Morell, Robert J; Griffith, Andrew J; Sieving, Paul A

    2014-11-25

    Progressive decline of psychophysical cone-mediated measures has been reported in type 1 (USH1) and type 2 (USH2) Usher syndrome. Conventional cone electroretinogram (ERG) responses in USH demonstrate poor signal-to-noise ratio. We evaluated cone signals in USH1 and USH2 by recording microvolt level cycle-by-cycle (CxC) ERG. Responses of molecularly genotyped USH1 (n = 18) and USH2 (n = 24) subjects (age range, 15-69 years) were compared with those of controls (n = 12). A subset of USH1 (n = 9) and USH2 (n = 9) subjects was examined two to four times over 2 to 8 years. Photopic CxC ERG and conventional 30-Hz flicker ERG were recorded on the same visits. Usher syndrome subjects showed considerable cone flicker ERG amplitude losses and timing phase delays (P Usher subjects showed abnormal ERG response latency, but this changed less than amplitude with time. In USH syndrome, CxC ERG is more sensitive than conventional ERG and warrants consideration as an outcome measure in USH treatment trials. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  17. Expressivity of hearing loss in cases with Usher syndrome type IIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, André M; Cohn, Edward S; Kimberling, William J; Halvarsson, Glenn; Möller, Claes

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the genotype/phenotype relationship between siblings with identical USH2A pathologic mutations and the consequent audiologic phenotypes, in particular degree of hearing loss (HL). Decade audiograms were also compared among two groups of affected subjects with different mutations of USH2A. DNA samples from patients with Usher syndrome type II were analysed. The audiological features of patients and affected siblings with USH2A mutations were also examined to identify genotype-phenotype correlations. Genetic and audiometric examinations were performed in 18 subjects from nine families with Usher syndrome type IIA. Three different USH2A mutations were identified in the affected subjects. Both similarities and differences of the auditory phenotype were seen in families with several affected siblings. A variable degree of hearing loss, ranging from mild to profound, was observed among affected subjects. No significant differences in hearing thresholds were found the group of affected subjects with different pathological mutations. Our results indicate that mutations in the USH2A gene and the resulting phenotype are probably modulated by other variables, such as modifying genes, epigenetics or environmental factors which may be of importance for better understanding the etiology of Usher syndrome.

  18. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1: Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Duda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral-facial-digital syndrome (OFD is a collective term describing thirteen distinctive, rare genetic disorders based on inheritance pattern and phenotypic expression. OFD is characterized by malformations of the oral cavity, the maxillofacial region and the arms and legs. Central nervous system anomalies, include intracerebral cysts, agenesis of the corpus callosum, hydrocephalus, cerebral/cerebellar atrophy, and berry aneurysms. Some degree of compromised intellectual ability and speech are present in affected individuals that correlate with the degree of central nervous system involvement. Furthermore, renal involvement in the form of polycystic kidney disease is evident in affected individuals in adulthood. In this article, we present a 37-year-old female patient that presented to the Rutgers School of Dental Medicine with oral-facial-digital syndrome, type 1.

  19. The subtle signs of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome: not all juvenile diabetes is type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Claudia; Brosig, Burkhard; Zimmer, Klaus P; Wudy, Stefan A

    2011-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (also known as DIDMOAD = diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of childhood non-immune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM) with progressive bilateral optic atrophy. Additional symptoms including signs of severe neurodegeneration and psychiatric illness are likely to evolve over time resulting in premature death. We report on two siblings of Turkish origin from our diabetes clinic who were diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome after 6 years and 2 years duration of DM, respectively. Subtle symptoms such as attitude changes, growing reading difficulties in the history of children or adolescents with antibody negative and ketone negative DM should alert the treating physician and lead to re-evaluation of the diagnosis, keeping in mind that not all juvenile DM is type 1 DM.

  20. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type VIII: A Rare Cause of Leg Ulcers in Young Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Ronceray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIII (EDS-VIII is a very rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by early-onset periodontitis associated with features of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report a 32-year-old man whose chronic leg ulcer led to the diagnosis of EDS-VIII. He had severe periodontitis with complete loss of permanent teeth and skin fragility with thin skin, atrophic scars, and brownish atrophic pretibial plaques. Leg ulcer is not a prominent feature of EDS-VIII. We suggest adding EDS-VIII to the list of rare diseases accounting for chronic leg ulcers, if this case report prompts others to report leg ulcers associated with EDS-VIII.

  1. [Cardiorenal syndrome type 1 in the intensive coronary care unit of the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preza, Paul M; Hurtado, Abdías; Armas, Victoria; Cárcamo, César P

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the incidence of cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) type 1 in a coronary care unit and its association with hospital mortality within 30 days of admission, as well as other epidemiological characteristics. The medical records of all the patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of acute heart failure in a 4-year period were reviewed. CRS type 1 was characterized by the presence of acute heart failure and an elevation of serum creatinine ≥0.3mg/dL in comparison to the baseline creatinine calculated by the MDRD75 equation and/or the elevation of ≥50% of the admission serum creatinine within a 48 h period. The incidence of CRS type 1 was 27.87%, 95% CI: 20.13-36.71 (34 of 122). There was a higher frequency of CRS type 1 in those patients who were admitted with the diagnosis of cardiogenic shock (adjusted RR 2.02, 95% CI: 1.20-3.93, p=0.0378) and in those with higher hemoglobin levels (p=0.0412). The CRS type 1 was associated with an increase of 30-day mortality (HR: 4.11, 95% CI: 1.20-14.09, p=0.0244). The incidence of CRS type 1 in the coronary care unit found in our study is similar to those found in foreign studies. The history of stroke and the higher values of hemoglobin were associated with a higher incidence of cardiorenal syndrome type 1. Patients with CRS type 1 had a higher hospital mortality within 30 days of admission. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Central sensitization as the mechanism underlying pain in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, G; Celletti, C; Baron, R; Castori, M; Di Franco, M; La Cesa, S; Leone, C; Pepe, A; Cruccu, G; Truini, A; Camerota, F

    2016-09-01

    Patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) commonly suffer from pain. How this hereditary connective tissue disorder causes pain remains unclear although previous studies suggested it shares similar mechanisms with neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. In this prospective study seeking information on the mechanisms underlying pain in patients with JHS/EDS-HT, we enrolled 27 consecutive patients with this connective tissue disorder. Patients underwent a detailed clinical examination, including the neuropathic pain questionnaire DN4 and the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool. As quantitative sensory testing methods, we included thermal-pain perceptive thresholds and the wind-up ratio and recorded a standard nerve conduction study to assess non-nociceptive fibres and laser-evoked potentials, assessing nociceptive fibres. Clinical examination and diagnostic tests disclosed no somatosensory nervous system damage. Conversely, most patients suffered from widespread pain, the fibromyalgia rapid screening tool elicited positive findings, and quantitative sensory testing showed lowered cold and heat pain thresholds and an increased wind-up ratio. While the lack of somatosensory nervous system damage is incompatible with neuropathic pain as the mechanism underlying pain in JHS/EDS-HT, the lowered cold and heat pain thresholds and increased wind-up ratio imply that pain in JHS/EDS-HT might arise through central sensitization. Hence, this connective tissue disorder and fibromyalgia share similar pain mechanisms. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD?: In patients with JHS/EDS-HT, the persistent nociceptive input due to joint abnormalities probably triggers central sensitization in the dorsal horn neurons and causes widespread pain. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  3. Spectrum of mucocutaneous manifestations in 277 patients with joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Dordoni, Chiara; Morlino, Silvia; Sperduti, Isabella; Ritelli, Marco; Valiante, Michele; Chiarelli, Nicola; Zanca, Arianna; Celletti, Claudia; Venturini, Marina; Camerota, Filippo; Calzavara-Pinton, Piergiacomo; Grammatico, Paola; Colombi, Marina

    2015-03-01

    Cutaneous manifestations are a diagnostic criterion of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). These two conditions, originally considered different disorders, are now accepted as clinically indistinguishable and often segregate as a single-familial trait. EDS-HT and JHS are still exclusion diagnoses not supported by any specific laboratory test. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis is, therefore, crucial for appropriate patients' classification and management, but it is actually hampered by the low consistency of many applied criteria including the cutaneous one. We report on mucocutaneous findings in 277 patients with JHS/EDS-HT with both sexes and various ages. Sixteen objective and five anamnestic items were selected and ascertained in two specialized outpatient clinics. Feature rates were compared by sex and age by a series of statistical tools. Data were also used for a multivariate correspondence analysis with the attempt to identify non-causal associations of features depicting recognizable phenotypic clusters. Our findings identified a few differences between sexes and thus indicated an attenuated sexual dimorphism for mucocutaneous features in JHS/EDS-HT. Ten features showed significantly distinct rates at different ages and this evidence corroborated the concept of an evolving phenotype in JHS/EDS-HT also affecting the skin. Multivariate correspondence analysis identified three relatively discrete phenotypic profiles, which may represent the cutaneous counterparts of the three disease phases previously proposed for JHS/EDS-HT. These findings could be used for revising the cutaneous criterion in a future consensus for the clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Generalized Hyperalgesia in Children and Adults Diagnosed With Hypermobility Syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type: A Discriminative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, M C; Pacey, V; Rombaut, L; Adams, R D; Tofts, L; Calders, P; Nicholson, L L; Engelbert, R H H

    2017-03-01

    Lowered pressure-pain thresholds have been demonstrated in adults with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but whether these findings are also present in children is unclear. Therefore, the objectives of the study were to determine whether generalized hyperalgesia is present in children with hypermobility syndrome (HMS)/EDS-HT, explore potential differences in pressure-pain thresholds between children and adults with HMS/EDS-HT, and determine the discriminative value of generalized hyperalgesia. Patients were classified in 1 of 3 groups: HMS/EDS-HT, hypermobile (Beighton score ≥4 of 9), and healthy controls. Descriptive data of age, sex, body mass index, Beighton score, skin laxity, and medication usage were collected. Generalized hyperalgesia was quantified by the average pressure-pain thresholds collected from 12 locations. Confounders collected were pain locations/intensity, fatigue, and psychological distress. Comparisons between children with HMS/EDS-HT and normative values, between children and adults with HMS/EDS-HT, and corrected confounders were analyzed with multivariate analysis of covariance. The discriminative value of generalized hyperalgesia employed to differentiate between HMS/EDS-HT, hypermobility, and controls was quantified with logistic regression. Significantly lower pressure-pain thresholds were found in children with HMS/EDS-HT compared to normative values (range -22.0% to -59.0%; P ≤ 0.05). When applying a threshold of 30.8 N/cm 2 for males and 29.0 N/cm 2 for females, the presence of generalized hyperalgesia discriminated between individuals with HMS/EDS-HT, hypermobility, and healthy controls (odds ratio 6.0). Children and adults with HMS/EDS-HT are characterized by hypermobility, chronic pain, and generalized hyperalgesia. The presence of generalized hyperalgesia may indicate involvement of the central nervous system in the development of chronic pain. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Transcriptome-Wide Expression Profiling in Skin Fibroblasts of Patients with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type.

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    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Dordoni, Chiara; Ritelli, Marco; Venturini, Marina; Castori, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common systemic heritable connective tissue disorder, and is mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility, joint instability complications, minor skin changes and a wide range of satellite features. JHS/EDS-HT is considered an autosomal dominant trait but is still without a defined molecular basis. The absence of (a) causative gene(s) for JHS/EDS-HT is likely attributable to marked genetic heterogeneity and/or interaction of multiple loci. In order to help in deciphering such a complex molecular background, we carried out a comprehensive immunofluorescence analysis and gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from five women affected with JHS/EDS-HT. Protein study revealed disarray of several matrix structural components such as fibrillins, tenascins, elastin, collagens, fibronectin, and their integrin receptors. Transcriptome analysis indicated perturbation of different signaling cascades that are required for homeostatic regulation either during development or in adult tissues as well as altered expression of several genes involved in maintenance of extracellular matrix architecture and homeostasis (e.g., SPON2, TGM2, MMP16, GPC4, SULF1), cell-cell adhesion (e.g., CDH2, CHD10, PCDH9, CLDN11, FLG, DSP), immune/inflammatory/pain responses (e.g., CFD, AQP9, COLEC12, KCNQ5, PRLR), and essential for redox balance (e.g., ADH1C, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, MAOB, GSTM5). Our findings provide a picture of the gene expression profile and dysregulated pathways in JHS/EDS-HT skin fibroblasts that correlate well with the systemic phenotype of the patients.

  6. Refining patterns of joint hypermobility, habitus, and orthopedic traits in joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

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    Morlino, Silvia; Dordoni, Chiara; Sperduti, Isabella; Venturini, Marina; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Colombi, Marina; Castori, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (EDS-HT) are two overlapping heritable disorders (JHS/EDS-HT) recognized by separated sets of diagnostic criteria and still lack a confirmatory test. This descriptive research was aimed at better characterizing the clinical phenotype of JHS/EDS-HT with focus on available diagnostic criteria, and in order to propose novel features and assessment strategies. One hundred and eighty-nine (163 females, 26 males; age: 2-73 years) patients from two Italian reference centers were investigated for Beighton score, range of motion in 21 additional joints, rate and sites of dislocations and sprains, recurrent soft-tissue injuries, tendon and muscle ruptures, body mass index, arm span/height ratio, wrist and thumb signs, and 12 additional orthopedic features. Rough rates were compared by age, sex, and handedness with a series of parametric and non-parametric tools. Multiple correspondence analysis was carried out for possible co-segregations of features. Beighton score and hypermobility at other joints were influenced by age at diagnosis. Rate and sites of joint instability complications did not vary according to age at diagnosis except for soft-tissue injuries. No major difference was registered by sex and dominant versus non-dominant body side. At multiple correspondence analysis, selected features tend to co-segregate in a dichotomous distribution. Dolichostenomelia and arachnodactyly segregated independently. This study pointed out a more protean musculoskeletal phenotype than previously considered according to available diagnostic criteria for JHS/EDS-HT. Our findings corroborated the need for a re-thinking of JHS/EDS-HT on clinical grounds in order to find better therapeutic and research strategies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The role of narrative medicine in the management of joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Isobel

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is a hereditary connective tissue disorder affecting every bodily system. It is largely underdiagnosed by many practitioners, with the result of a considerable delay in diagnosis and, consequently, in the onset of adequate management schedule and treatment. Patients may also experience to be misbelieved, erroneously considered affected by a psychiatric or psychosomatic disorders, and rejected by the medical profession, which can lead to feelings of anger and resentment. Patient journeys are often long and complicated, but if doctors allowed the patient time to tell the full story, and were more prepared to think holistically, there may be a far more positive outcome. Here, the patients' perspective is presented with a narrative medicine approach, illustrating the tri-dimensional experience of a JHS/EDS-HT patient, who is also a Bowen Practitioner and a medical writer/educator. Narrative medicine would be invaluable in working with JHS/EDS-HT so that the patient can tell the story, and offer the practitioner a whole picture of her/his suffering and, often, the key for understanding the cause(s). Once this has been achieved, it might be possible to build upon a more positive and therapeutic dialogue which would result in better treatment and more effective management. It is also important for doctors to communicate with JHS/EDS-HT experts who will ultimately improve the patient journey and treatment outcomes of such a complex connective tissue disorder. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comprehensive screening of the USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II and non-syndromic recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedahmadi, Babak Jian; Rivolta, Carlo; Keene, Julia A; Berson, Eliot L; Dryja, Thaddeus P

    2004-08-01

    A screen of the entire coding region of the USH2A gene in 129 unrelated patients with Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and in 146 unrelated patients with non-syndromic autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (ARRP) uncovered 54 different sequence variations, including 18 likely pathogenic mutations (13 frameshift, three nonsense, and two missense), 12 changes of uncertain pathogenicity (11 missense changes and one in-frame deletion), and 24 non-pathogenic rare variants or polymorphisms. Of the 18 likely pathogenic mutations, nine were novel. Among the USH2 patients, 50 (39%) had one or two likely pathogenic mutations. The most common mutant allele in USH2 patients was E767fs, which was found in 29 patients, including one homozygote. Among the ARRP patients, we found 17 (12%) with one or two likely pathogenic mutations. The most common mutant allele in ARRP patients was C759F and it was found in 10 patients. The C759F allele was also found in two USH2 patients; in neither of them was a change in the other allele found. The second most common mutant allele in both patient groups was L1447fs (found in 6/50 USH2 patients and 6/17 ARRP patients). Of the 50+17=67 patients with identified USH2A mutations, only one mutation in one allele was found in 41+12=53 (79%); the reason for the high proportion of patients with only one identified mutation is obscure. Our results indicate that USH2A mutations are found in about 7% of all cases of RP in North America, a frequency similar to the RPGR gene (8%) and the rhodopsin gene (10%).

  9. Mutation screening of the PCDH15 gene in Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaijo, Teresa; Oshima, Aki; Aller, Elena; Carney, Carol; Usami, Shin-ichi; Millán, José M; Kimberling, William J

    2012-01-01

    PCDH15 codes for protocadherin-15, a cell-cell adhesion protein essential in the morphogenesis and cohesion of stereocilia bundles and in the function or preservation of photoreceptor cells. Mutations in the PCDH15 gene are responsible for Usher syndrome type I (USH1F) and non-syndromic hearing loss (DFNB23). The purpose of this work was to perform PCDH15 mutation screening to identify the genetic cause of the disease in a cohort of Spanish patients with Usher syndrome type I and establish phenotype-genotype correlation. Mutation analysis of PCDH15 included additional exons recently identified and was performed by direct sequencing. The screening was performed in 19 probands with USH already screened for mutations in the most prevalent USH1 genes, myosin VIIA (MYO7A) and cadherin-23 (CDH23), and for copy number variants in PCDH15. Seven different point mutations, five novel, were detected. Including the large PCDH15 rearrangements previously reported in our cohort of patients, a total of seven of 19 patients (36.8%) were carriers of at least one pathogenic allele. Thirteen out of the 38 screened alleles carried pathogenic PCDH15 variants (34.2%). Five out of the seven point mutations reported in the present study are novel, supporting the idea that most PCDH15 mutations are private. Furthermore, no mutational hotspots have been identified. In most patients, detected mutations led to a truncated protein, reinforcing the hypothesis that severe mutations cause the Usher I phenotype and that missense variants are mainly responsible for non-syndromic hearing impairment.

  10. Síndrome de Waardenburg tipo 1 en gemelos monocigóticos y su familia

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    Gustavo Andrés Duque

    2016-04-01

    Los hallazgos aquí reportados muestran la variabilidad de las manifestaciones fenotípicas del síndrome de Waardenburg tipo 1 dentro de una familia y especialmente en gemelos monocigóticos, lo que se ha explicado por la expresión variable de genes específicos o por la interacción de ellos con genes modificadores. Cabe resaltar que los gemelos fueron expuestos a alcohol en el primer trimestre del embarazo, por lo cual se propone que la expresión variable del SW fue influenciada por exposiciones a agentes medioambientales.

  11. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

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    Claudia Celletti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT, is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods. The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results. Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  12. Orthostatic Intolerance and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: Neurovegetative Dysregulation or Autonomic Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Castori, Marco; Censi, Federica; Gioffrè, Laura; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Strano, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Background . Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT), is a hereditary connective tissue disorder mainly characterized by generalized joint hypermobility, skin texture abnormalities, and visceral and vascular dysfunctions, also comprising symptoms of autonomic dysfunction. This study aims to further evaluate cardiovascular autonomic involvement in JHS/EDS-HT by a battery of functional tests. Methods . The response to cardiovascular reflex tests comprising deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver, 30/15 ratio, handgrip test, and head-up tilt test was studied in 35 JHS/EDS-HT adults. Heart rate and blood pressure variability was also investigated by spectral analysis in comparison to age and sex healthy matched group. Results . Valsalva ratio was normal in all patients, but 37.2% of them were not able to finish the test. At tilt, 48.6% patients showed postural orthostatic tachycardia, 31.4% orthostatic intolerance, 20% normal results. Only one patient had orthostatic hypotension. Spectral analysis showed significant higher baroreflex sensitivity values at rest compared to controls. Conclusions. This study confirms the abnormal cardiovascular autonomic profile in adults with JHS/EDS-HT and found the higher baroreflex sensitivity as a potential disease marker and clue for future research.

  13. Clinical Study of the Relationship between Eczema TCM Syndrome Types and TCM constitution

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    Weian Mao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between Eczema TCM syndrome types and TCM constitutional. Methods 100 cases of eczema were randomly selected and numbered, then sum up the results of report after using DSO1- A system that collect lingual, facial and sphygmic to identify the types of TCM constitution. Finally, the results were analyzed. Results The results show that the nine types of moderate physical quality account for 58.3% of spreading damp-heat pattern , Phlegm-dampness constitution 25.7% of the pattern of spleen vacuity with damp-heat, and yin deficiency 32.1% of the pattern of blood vacuity and wind-dryness. Conclusion There was a correlation between Eczema TCM syndrome types and TCM constitutional. Spreading damp-heat pattern was associated with moderate physical quality. The pattern of spleen vacuity with damp-heat was connected to Phlegm-dampness constitution. The pattern of blood vacuity and wind-dryness had relation with yin deficiency.

  14. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia as a component of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I: a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharia, Govind K; Tandon, Nikhil; Stephen, Neil de Jesus Rangel; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Tandon, Rakesh K

    2007-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea and steatorrhea occur frequently in patients with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) type I. Intestinal lymphangiectasia has been reported earlier as a cause of steatorrhea in a young girl with APS Type I. We describe 2 patients with APS Type I who were found to have intestinal lymphangiectasia, one of whom had symptomatic protein-losing enteropathy.

  15. New lethal disease involving type I and III collagen defect resembling geroderma osteodysplastica, De Barsy syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Jukkola, A; Kauppila, S; Risteli, L; Vuopala, K; Risteli, J; Leisti, J; Pajunen, L

    1998-01-01

    We describe the clinical findings and biochemical features of a male child suffering from a so far undescribed lethal connective tissue disorder characterised by extreme hypermobility of the joints, lax skin, cataracts, severe growth retardation, and insufficient production of type I and type III procollagens. His features are compared with Ehlers-Danlos type IV, De Barsy syndrome, and geroderma osteodysplastica, as these disorders show some symptoms and signs shared with our patient. The chi...

  16. An unfortunate challenge: Ketogenic diet for the treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in tyrosinemia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Silvana; Pichard, Samia; Ilea, Adina; Greneche, Marie-Odile; François, Laurent; Delanoë, Catherine; Schiff, Manuel; Auvin, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    The ketogenic diet is an evidence-based treatment for resistant epilepsy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This diet is based on low carbohydrate-high fat intakes. Dietary treatment is also therapeutic for inborn errors of metabolism such as aminoacdiopathies. We report a child with both Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and tyrosinemia type 1. This epilepsy syndrome resulted form a porencephalic cyst secondary to brain abscesses that occurred during the management of malnutrition due to untreated tyrosinemia type 1. We used a ketogenic diet as treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome taking into account dietary requirements for tyrosinemia type 1. The patient was transiently responder during a 6-month period. This report illustrates that ketogenic diet remains a therapeutic option even when additional dietary requirements are needed. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Detección de mutaciones en los genes PAX3 y MITF en pacientes colombianos con Síndrome Waardenburg

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    N. Gélvez

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Identificar las mutaciones en los genes PAX3 y MITF, responsables del Síndrome de Waardenburg en Colombia, determinar su frecuencia y establecer la correlación genotipo-fenotipo.

  18. Spontaneous Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in the Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Gyun; Cho, Won-Sang; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2014-02-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited connective disease. Among several subgroups, type IV EDS is frequently associated with spontaneous catastrophic bleeding from a vascular fragility. We report on a case of carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with type IV EDS. A 46-year-old female presented with an ophthalmoplegia and chemosis in the right eye. Subsequently, seizure and cerebral infarction with micro-bleeds occurred. CCF was completely occluded with transvenous coil embolization without complications. Thereafter, the patient was completely recovered. Transvenous coil embolization can be a good treatment of choice for spontaneous CCF with type IV EDS. However, every caution should be kept during invasive procedure.

  19. Pregnancy and Delivery in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (Hypermobility Type: Review of the Literature

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    Indranil Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a group of connective tissue disorders which are divided into various distinguishable phenotypes. The type of EDS determines the potential obstetric complications. Due to the spectrum of clinical manifestation and overlap between phenotypes, there are no standardised obstetric management guidelines. Existing literature illustrates different obstetric management in hypermobility type of EDS, including uneventful term vaginal deliveries as well as preterm cesarean section deliveries. This paper discusses obstetric management of a woman with EDS hypermobility type. Cesarean section was deemed the most appropriate delivery method in this patient due to the possible complications including risk of joint dislocation and pain morbidity. No obstetric complications were experienced, and good maternal and neonatal outcomes were achieved.

  20. Spontaneous Carotid-Cavernous Fistula in the Type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Gyun; Cho, Won-Sang; Kim, Jeong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited connective disease. Among several subgroups, type IV EDS is frequently associated with spontaneous catastrophic bleeding from a vascular fragility. We report on a case of carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a patient with type IV EDS. A 46-year-old female presented with an ophthalmoplegia and chemosis in the right eye. Subsequently, seizure and cerebral infarction with micro-bleeds occurred. CCF was completely occluded with transvenous coil embolization without complications. Thereafter, the patient was completely recovered. Transvenous coil embolization can be a good treatment of choice for spontaneous CCF with type IV EDS. However, every caution should be kept during invasive procedure. PMID:24653803