WorldWideScience

Sample records for w99 honolulu hawaii

  1. Honolulu, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Honolulu, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  2. Selections from the ABC 2012 Annual Convention, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, D. Joel

    2013-01-01

    The 13 Favorite Assignments featured here were presented at the 2012 Association for Business Communication (ABC) Annual Convention, Honolulu, Hawaii. A variety of learning objectives are featured, including the following: enhancing resume's visual impact, interpersonal skills, social media, team building, web design, community service projects,…

  3. Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter Hill; Michael Penev

    2014-08-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011) identifies the use of hydrogen for government and fleet electric vehicles as a key step for achieving “reduced greenhouse gas emissions; reduced oil consumption; expanded use of renewable power …; highly efficient energy conversion; fuel flexibility …; reduced air pollution; and highly reliable grid-support.” This report synthesizes several pieces of existing information that can inform a decision regarding the viability of deploying a hydrogen (H2) fueling station at the Fort Armstrong site in Honolulu, Hawaii.

  4. 75 FR 36666 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ..., Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given in accordance... to repatriate a cultural item in the possession of the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI..., Kohala,'' is in the possession of the Hamilton Library, University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI. The...

  5. 76 FR 24514 - Honouliuli Special Resource Study, Honolulu, Maui, Hawaii, and Kauai Counties, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Honouliuli Special Resource Study, Honolulu, Maui, Hawaii, and Kauai Counties, HI..., Honolulu, HI 96850. Comments may also be transmitted through the Honouliuli Special Resource Study Web site...

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Honolulu Laboratory Renewal Project, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-08-01

    This brochure provides an overview of The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Honolulu Laboratory Renewal Project, a project designed to adhere to the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. Diagrams of the HVAC system and the rainwater collection system are included.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of trace element concentrations in an urban subtropical watershed, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinen de Carlo, E. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Dept. of Oceanography; U.S. Geological Survey, Honolulu, HI (United States); Anthony, S.S. [U.S. Geological Survey, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Trace metal concentrations in soils and in stream and estuarine sediments from a subtropical urban watershed in Hawaii are presented. The results are placed in the context of historical studies of environmental quality (water, soils, and sediment) in Hawaii to elucidate sources of trace elements and the processes responsible for their distribution. This work builds on earlier studies on sediments of Ala Wai Canal of urban Honolulu by examining spatial and temporal variations in the trace elements throughout the watershed. Natural processes and anthropogenic activity in urban Honolulu contribute to spatial and temporal variations of trace element concentrations throughout the watershed. Enrichment of trace elements in watershed soils result, in some cases, from contributions attributed to the weathering of volcanic rocks, as well as to a more variable anthropogenic input that reflects changes in land use in Honolulu. Varying concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in sediments reflect about 60 a of anthropogenic activity in Honolulu. Land use has a strong impact on the spatial distribution and abundance of selected trace elements in soils and stream sediments. As noted in continental US settings, the phasing out of Pb-alkyl fuel additives has decreased Pb inputs to recently deposited estuarine sediments. Yet, a substantial historical anthropogenic Pb inventory remains in soils of the watershed and erosion of surface soils continues to contribute to its enrichment in estuarine sediments. Concentrations of other elements (e.g., Cu, Zn, Cd), however, have not decreased with time, suggesting continued active inputs. Concentrations of Ba, Co, Cr, Ni, V and U, although elevated in some cases, typically reflect greater proportions attributed to natural sources rather than anthropogenic input. (author)

  8. Evacuation planning for plausible worst case inundation scenarios in Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Karl; Pant, Pradip; Yamashita, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Honolulu is susceptible to coastal flooding hazards. Like other coastal cities, Honolulu&s long-term economic viability and sustainability depends on how well it can adapt to changes in the natural and built environment. While there is a disagreement over the magnitude and extent of localized impacts associated with climate change, it is widely accepted that by 2100 there will be at least a meter in sea level rise (SLR) and an increase in extreme weather events. Increased exposure and vulnerabilities associated with urbanization and location of human activities in coastal areas warrants serious consideration by planners and policy makers. This article has three objectives. First, flooding due to the combined effects of SLR and episodic hydro-meteorological and geophysical events in Honolulu are investigated and the risks to the community are quantified. Second, the risks and vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure and the surface transportation system are described. Third, using the travel demand software, travel distances and travel times for evacuation from inundated areas are modeled. Data from three inundation models were used. The first model simulated storm surge from a category 4 hurricane similar to Hurricane Iniki which devastated the island of Kauai in 1992. The second model estimates inundation based on five tsunamis that struck Hawaii. A 1-m increase in sea level was included in both the hurricane storm surge and tsunami flooding models. The third model used in this article generated a 500-year flood event due to riverine flooding. Using a uniform grid cell structure, the three inundation maps were used to assess the worst case flooding scenario. Based on the flood depths, the ruling hazard (hurricane, tsunami, or riverine flooding) for each grid cell was determined. The hazard layer was analyzed with socioeconomic data layers to determine the impact on vulnerable populations, economic activity, and critical infrastructure. The analysis focused both

  9. Use of sunglasses in public outdoor recreation settings in Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Jay E; O'Riordan, David L; Lee, Taryn; Mayer, Joni A; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2009-02-01

    Approximately, 20.5 million Americans (17.2%) older than 40 years have a cataract in at least one eye, and rates are expected to rise to over 30 million by 2020. Wearing sunglasses, especially early in life, may reduce the risk of cataracts. Meanwhile, little is known about the prevalence of wearing sunglasses in the United States, especially in areas with high ultraviolet radiation. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of wearing sunglasses in public outdoor recreation settings. Systematic observations were made at beaches, parks and outdoor public swimming pools in Honolulu, Hawaii on sunny days between November 2005 and June 2007. Observations were conducted independently by two trained observers between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm. During each observation period, each individual in the area was coded for gender, age category, clothing coverage, shade use, and use of sunglasses. A total of 5171 people were observed by two independent observers, and the inter-rater reliability use of sunglasses was excellent (Cohen kappa = 0.83). Overall, 33.0% of people wore sunglasses. chi analysis revealed that significantly more people (p outdoor recreation settings revealed that only one third of the population wore sunglasses. Further research should examine the use of sunglasses in other locations and investigate the effectiveness of interventions that promote the wearing of sunglasses in settings with risk for ultraviolet radiation exposure.

  10. Use of Sunglasses in Public Outdoor Recreation Settings in Honolulu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Jay E.; O'Riordan, David L.; Lee, Taryn; Mayer, Joni A.; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 20.5 million Americans (17.2%) over age 40 have a cataract in at least one eye, and rates are expected to rise to over 30 million by 2020. Wearing sunglass, especially early in life, may reduce the risk of cataracts. Meanwhile, little is known about the prevalence of wearing sunglasses in the US, especially in areas with high UV radiation. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of wearing sunglasses in public outdoor recreation settings. Methods Systematic observations were made at beaches, parks and outdoor public swimming pools in Honolulu, Hawaii on sunny days between November 2005 and June 2007. Observations were conducted independently by two trained observers between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM. During each observation period each individual in the area was coded for gender, age category, clothing coverage, shade use, and use of sunglasses. Results A total of 5,171 people were observed by two independent observers, and the inter-rater reliability use of sunglasses was excellent (Cohen's kappa = 0.83). Overall, 33.0% of people wore sunglasses. Chi Square analysis revealed that significantly more people (p< .001) wore sunglasses at swimming pools (35.1%) and parks (34.8%) compared to beaches (30.4%). Adults (41.6%) were more likely to wear sunglasses than children (12.3%; p < .001). Gender was not significantly associated (p= 0.3) with the use of sunglasses (males = 32.7%; females = 33.3%). Those wearing hats were significantly more likely (p<.001) to wear sunglasses (46.6%) than those with bare heads (28.4%). Conclusions Direct observation in public outdoor recreation settings reveled that only one third of the population wore sunglasses. Further research should examine the use of sunglasses in other locations and investigate the effectiveness of interventions that promote the wearing of sunglasses in settings with risk for UVR exposure. PMID:19156011

  11. Fall 1975 Entering Students Continuing in the Same Community College in Spring 1976; Hawaii, Honolulu, Maui, and Windward Community Colleges. Student Flow Project, Report No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    As a part of a longitudinal study of student progress through the Hawaii community colleges, four campuses--Hawaii, Honolulu, Maui, and Windward--participated in a study of fall 1975 entering students continuing in the same college in spring 1976. The fall 1975 entering group numbered 3,924. Of the 2,790 who returned in the spring, 2,104 (75.4…

  12. Development of a model to simulate groundwater inundation induced by sea-level rise and high tides in Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Shellie; Fletcher, Charles H; Rotzoll, Kolja; El-Kadi, Aly I

    2017-05-01

    Many of the world's largest cities face risk of sea-level rise (SLR) induced flooding owing to their limited elevations and proximities to the coastline. Within this century, global mean sea level is expected to reach magnitudes that will exceed the ground elevation of some built infrastructure. The concurrent rise of coastal groundwater will produce additional sources of inundation resulting from narrowing and loss of the vertical unsaturated subsurface space. This has implications for the dense network of buried and low-lying infrastructure that exists across urban coastal zones. Here, we describe a modeling approach that simulates narrowing of the unsaturated space and groundwater inundation (GWI) generated by SLR-induced lifting of coastal groundwater. The methodology combines terrain modeling, groundwater monitoring, estimation of tidal influence, and numerical groundwater-flow modeling to simulate future flood scenarios considering user-specified tide stages and magnitudes of SLR. We illustrate the value of the methodology by applying it to the heavily urbanized and low-lying Waikiki area of Honolulu, Hawaii. Results indicate that SLR of nearly 1 m generates GWI across 23% of the 13 km2 study area, threatening $5 billion of taxable real estate and 48 km of roadway. Analysis of current conditions reveals that 86% of 259 active cesspool sites in the study area are likely inundated. This suggests that cesspool effluent is currently entering coastal groundwater, which not only leads to degradation of coastal environments, but also presents a future threat to public health as GWI would introduce effluent at the ground surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating localism in the management of post-consumer plastic bottles in Honolulu, Hawai'i: perspectives from industrial ecology and political ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Young; Gupta, Clare

    2015-05-01

    Localism or regionalization has become a popular topic in urban design, but recent critics raise the question of whether the local or regional scale is most desirable for industrial ecosystems. As a way to explore the claim that localized metabolism is more sustainable, this study examines the costs and benefits of two differentially scaled strategies for the management of post-consumer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles originating in the city of Honolulu, Hawai'i: local incineration and trans-continental recycling. We first estimate total environmental impacts of two options using life cycle assessment, and then disaggregate them into local versus non-local impacts to examine the spatial distribution of costs and benefits. We further assess the environmental justification for localized waste management in relation to the broader socio-economic motivations that underlie the way that plastics are managed in Honolulu. In doing so we assess the scale at which waste management is optimized from an environmental standpoint as well as the non-environmental considerations such as security and safety that influence the politics of scale involved in urban metabolic design. By illustrating the trade-offs between a local versus global metabolic pathway for plastic waste, the results from our Honolulu case study are globally relevant for communities interested in sustainable urban design and in particular urban waste management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metal phase associations in soils from an urban watershed, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, R A; Tack, F M

    2000-07-10

    Soils of Manoa watershed, Hawaii, have received varying inputs of anthropogenic trace metals, with roadside soils primarily influenced by automobile contributions. A four-stage sequential extraction procedure was used to fractionate 13 topsoil (0-2.5 cm) and 13 subsoil (7.5-10.0 cm) samples into: (i) an adsorbed, exchangeable and carbonate (AEC) phase; (ii) a reducible phase; (iii) an oxidizable phase; and (iv) a residual phase. Phases (i)-(iii) were considered 'labile', with the residual fraction 'non-labile' under normal circumstances. An examination of eight elements (Al, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) indicated that Pb was the trace metal most impacted by anthropogenic inputs. Roadside soil Pb enrichment was apparent with data from a 0.5 M HCI leach exhibiting a maximum concentration of 1000 mg/kg compared with a median background value of 12 mg/kg. Sequential extraction results indicated the following order with respect to phase dominance for Pb: reducible > residual > oxidizable > AEC. The identification of the reducible phase as the primary pool of available Pb supports previous work from temperate roadside soil environments. The reducible phase is characterized by hydrous Fe and Mn oxides and mobilization of fixed elements can occur with decreases in pH and redox potential. Iron was the least labile of the elements examined with only 5-6% of total Fe removed by the first three steps of the extraction procedure. Lead had the highest labile percentage with average values between 74 and 81%. Therefore, results from this study support earlier research in this watershed which identified Pb as the primary trace metal of concern from a contamination perspective.

  15. Libraries in Hawaii: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/hawaii.html Libraries in Hawaii To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Honolulu University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine Health Sciences ...

  16. Surface deformation as a guide to kinematics and three-dimensional shape of slow-moving, clay-rich landslides, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, R.L.; Messerich, J.; Fleming, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    Two slow-moving landslides in Honolulu, Hawaii, were the subject of photogrammetric measurements, field mapping, and subsurface investigation to learn whether surface observations can yield useful information consistent with results of subsurface investigation. Mapping focused on structural damage and on surface features such as scarps, shears, and toes. The x-y-z positions of photo-identifiable points were obtained from aerial photographs taken at three different times. The measurements were intended to learn if the shape of the landslide failure surface can be determined from systematic surface observations and whether surface observations about deformation are consistent with photogrammetrically-obtained displacement gradients. Field and aerial photographic measurements were evaluated to identify the boundaries of the landslides, distinguish areas of incipient landslide enlargement, and identify zones of active and passive failure in the landslides. Data reported here apply mainly to the Alani-Paty landslide, a translational, earth-block landslide that damaged property in a 3.4-ha residential area. It began moving in the 1970s and displacement through 1991 totaled 4 m. Thickness, determined from borehole data, ranges from about 7 to 10 m; and the slope of the ground surface averages about 9??. Field evidence of deformation indicated areas of potential landslide enlargement outside the well-formed landslide boundaries. Displacement gradients obtained photogrammetrically and deformation mapping both identified similar zones of active failure (longitudinal stretching) and passive failure (longitudinal shortening) within the body of the landslide. Surface displacement on the landslide is approximately parallel to the broadly concave slip surface.

  17. Proceedings 2012: Selected Papers from the Sixteenth College-Wide Conference for Students in Languages, Linguistics & Literature (16th, Honolulu, Hawai'i, April 21, 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyunah, Ed.; Vidal, Mónica, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The theme for this year's College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa was "Language and Community," bringing together graduate students and faculty members from the Departments of East Asian Languages and Literatures (EALL), Indo-Pacific Languages and Literatures (IPLL), Languages and…

  18. Cost Earnings Data 2000 - Hawaii Longline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Between March 2001 and January 2002, available Hawaii pelagic longline vessel owners and/or operators were interviewed at Kewalo Basin and Honolulu Harbor to obtain...

  19. Honolulu, Oceanic Urbanism

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelista, Jonathan "TookHNLA"; Labrador, Roderick N.

    2014-01-01

    The city of Honolulu is usually figured as Waikīkī, a global tourist playground often imaged/imagined as a tropical paradise with swaying palm trees and white, sandy beaches. Honolulu is also an urban center, surrounded and constituted by water, thus exhibiting an oceanic urbanism. This photo essay by photojournalist Jonathan Evangelista and anthropologist/Ethnic Studies scholar Roderick Labrador explores what this oceanic urbanism can mean by visually representing contemporary legacies of th...

  20. Hawaii-Okinawa Building Evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, I.; Salasovich, J.

    2013-05-01

    NREL conducted energy evaluations at the Itoman City Hall building in Itoman, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the Hawaii State Capitol building in Honolulu, Hawaii. This report summarizes the findings from the evaluations, including the best practices identified at each site and opportunities for improving energy efficiency and renewable energy. The findings from this evaluation are intended to inform energy efficient building design, energy efficiency technology, and management protocols for buildings in subtropical climates.

  1. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  2. Honolulu Rail Transit: International Lessons in Linking Form, Design, and Transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Boeing, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    The city of Honolulu, Hawaii is currently planning and developing a new rail transit system. While Honolulu has supportive density and topography for rail transit, questions remain about its ability to effectively integrate urban design and accessibility across the system. Every transit trip begins and ends with a walking trip from origins and to destinations: transportation planning must account for pedestrian safety, comfort, and access. Ildefons Cerda's 19th century utopian plan for Barcelona's Eixample district produced a renowned, livable urban form. The Eixample, with its well-integrated rail transit, serves as a model of urban design, land use, transportation planning, and pedestrian-scaled streets working in synergy to produce accessibility. This study discusses the urban form of Honolulu and the history and planning of its new rail transit system. Then it reviews the history of Cerda's plan for the Eixample and discusses its urban form and performance today. Finally it draws several lessons from Barc...

  3. Oahu, Hawaii's Water Supply: 1848-2020 A.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, John Henry

    Demand projections indicate that Oahu's natural ground water supply will be fully developed by the year 2000. Supplementary water resources will need to be developed in keeping with the growth of the economy and population. The author, chairman of the Honolulu Board of Water Supply, authoritatively discusses types of ground water in Hawaii, and…

  4. Enhanced Preliminary Assessment Report: Kapalama Military Reservation, Honolulu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    with polymer-type water repellents; packaging with isocyanate foam; "waste oil" drums (apparently empty) on pallet outside building. " Building 925...collect a sample representative of source contamination. For example, a soil sample collected directly under an area of asphalt paving would be contaminated...by semivolatile compounds present in the asphalt . In regard to persistence, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be present in groundwater but not

  5. John Dewey and the Beginnings of Progressive Early Education in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Alfred L.

    2015-01-01

    Hawai'i has often been the beneficiary of the insights of extraordinary men and women who visited the islands and made important observations. Among these was perhaps America's most famous philosopher, John Dewey (1859-1952). First visiting Honolulu in 1899 as the guest of Mary Tenney Castle and her family, Dewey would help establish Hawai'i's…

  6. Honolulu Retail Monitoring Price Data Collection (2007-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains a time series of consumer-level prices for a sample of retail markets in Honolulu between 2007-2011. Data include weekly prices for fish...

  7. Oahu Sewer Lateral Lines, Oahu County HI, 2016, Honolulu GIS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Inventory of sewer laterals, used for tracking, monitoring, and flow analysis as maintained by Honolulu ENV Department of Environmental Services. The base sewer...

  8. RadNet Air Data From Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Honolulu, HI from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  9. 77 FR 39506 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park..., Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone (808) 847-8216. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in accordance... remains should contact Noa Dettweiler, General Counsel, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, HI...

  10. 75 FR 23803 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park... in the possession and control of the Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI. The human remains were removed from...., Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone (808) 848-4144, before June 3, 2010. Repatriation of the human remains to the...

  11. 77 FR 11572 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI AGENCY: National Park..., Vice President, Cultural Collections, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice St., Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone..., Vice-President, Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice St., Honolulu, HI 96817, telephone (808...

  12. Feasibility rooftop landscaping with native Hawaiian plants in urban districts of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabugos, L. [Hawaii Univ., Manoa, HI (United States). Dept. of Botany, College of Natural Sciences; Kaufman, A.J. [Hawaii Univ., Manoa, HI (United States). Dept. of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, College of Tropical Agricultural and Human Resources; Cox, L.J. [Hawaii Univ., Manoa, HI (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, College of Tropical Agricultural and Human Resources; Miura, T. [Hawaii Univ., Manoa, HI (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, College of Tropical Agricultural and Human Resources; Easterday, D. [Hawaii Univ., Manoa, HI (United States)]|[Belt Collins Hawaii Ltd., Manoa, HI (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Hawaii's vegetation and natural environment are currently under extreme pressure, particularly in densely populated areas such as Honolulu. Greening of urban and industrial rooftops holds promise to address the concerns of existing and future development and the loss of vegetation. Green roofs are also known to mitigate the urban heat island effect and improve the urban aesthetics in tourist areas in Honolulu and urban districts throughout the islands. Although the green roof movement is in the developing stages in Hawaii, political interest is growing, given the urgent need to abate stormwater runoff that is damaging reefs and threatening human safety and the enjoyment of coastal waters. Hawaii State Senate passed Resolution 86 in 2006, requesting information on the feasibility of promoting rooftop landscaping and agriculture in urban areas of Hawaii. It was determined that native plants that are suitable for green roofs must be identified if green roofs are to be assisted financially by proposed legislation. This paper identified the available resources that promote these objectives through the use of native plants on green roofs. Challenges arising from local conditions and the potentially conflicting requirements for the realization of different green roof benefits were discussed. The broad range of environmental conditions in Hawaii has encouraged the development of 106 unique types of extant plant communities. However, the potential for invasive rooftop plants is an issue that bears consideration in Hawaii. Since native plants are under threat from external pressures, conservationists encourage the cultivation of culturally important plants as a means of relieving pressure on native ecosystems. It is anticipated that government assisted projects will encourage widespread adoption of green roofs in Hawaii. 28 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Trends in sheltering and welfare at the Hawaiian Humane Society, Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Brianna; Burns, Pamela; Lepczyk, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    One of the major goals of an animal welfare organization is to reduce the number of homeless, nonhuman animals in a community. In Hawaii, the Hawaiian Humane Society has provided numerous animal welfare services to work toward this goal, such as offering sterilizations and microchipping at reduced rates and facilitating animal adoptions and education. In addition, the Leash Law and the Cat Identification Program have increased animal welfare through increasing the responsibilities of companion animal caregivers (owners). The goal of this research was to assess if temporal changes in animal sheltering have occurred in Hawaii. The study assessed this by analyzing historical data on dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis catus) admitted, returned to owner, sterilized, euthanized, and adopted from the Humane Societies of Oahu, Hawaii, from 1993 to 2008. The study also analyzed dog and cat admittance and Honolulu population growth from 1975 to 2008. Sterilizations and pets returned to owners have increased significantly, whereas admittance and euthanasia rates have decreased significantly. Thus, although these data cannot conclusively state that there are fewer homeless animals in Hawaii, the results provide positive indicators of reducing homeless pets, especially when coupled with an increase in both the human population of Honolulu County and dog ownership.

  14. Cesspools in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesspools are more widely used in Hawaii than in any other state in the country. EPA Region 9 is responsible for implementing the regulations in Hawaii and works with the Hawaii State Department of Health (DOH) to ensure effective implementation.

  15. Pacific Armies Management Seminar IV Held at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 3-7 November 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-07

    governmental prescriptions and remedies to conat insurgencies. The representatives of the Republic of Korea highlighted their approach to...counterinfiltration training and coastal security planning to conat the surreptitious insertion of North Korean agents and commandos into South Korea...insurgency operations, regardless of which countries were involved. There is too much that can be learned from such operations and the price paid in human

  16. Pacific Armies Management Seminar II, held 16-20 April 1979, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Forces INDONESIA Col RINTO Sulaeman, Director for International Cooperation, Ofc of the Asst Chief of Staff for Planning and Budget, Army...Presentation: "Resource Management in the Territorial Commands" - Col Rinto , Indonesia 1330-1500 Panel Discussion: "Materiel/Facility Management" 1500...ABOO Samah bin Aboo Bakar Cal RINTO Sulaeman LTC CHOOCHART Hiranraks Cal Charles M. WILLS, Jr. LTC William E. CATES Mr. Tu’a TUPOU LTC Lima DOTAONA LTC

  17. Enhanced Preliminary Assessment, Kapalama Military Reservation, Honolulu, Hawaii. Task Order 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    insecticide, Vikane ( sulfuryl fluorides ), produced by Dow Chemical Co. is used. The fumigation procedure was described as follows. Items, such as pallets...bodies), and fumigation . ( Fumigation is conducted on all materials that are shipped off the island). Almost the entire KMR property is paved, and...111) 3-8 3.7 Building 929 - General Storage and Former Pallet Fumigation Area (Phase ,IT) 3-9 3.8 Building 929A - Former Sealed Source Radioactive

  18. Hickam AFB, Honolulu, Hawaii. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-21

    present at 120OG4 74-29961 -- ~~~ .*I-~- ,4A z 77 IL) CLMAOLG BRANC USIE A DA IL A M O U NTS___________________ AI WET2* ERIE/A AMUT (INCHES) ATLG PERAECH...millibars. Provided below is a scale to convert station pressure values in inches of mercury or millibars to pressure- altitude in 1000’s of ’feet...This scale is ant enlarged model of the pressure-valtitude scale in the Smithsonian Meteorological Tables. P R E S S UR E A LT I T UD0E (1 000O’S F T

  19. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CITY AND COUNTY OF HONOLULU, HAWAII, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  20. 1986 AMEDD (Army Medical Department) Clinical Psychology Short Course: Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Systems A. Ayurveda (India) B. Unani (Arab) C. Chinese Medicine 1. Acupuncture 2. Moxibustion 3. Herbal medicine 4. Massage and exercise D. Hawaiian...unresolved anxiety and grief has become an important cultural ethos. Indeed, the long sought for peace continues to remain beyond the Koreans’ reach as...an effective ventilation for grief and pain and is an essential part of the mourning process. Interpersonal Relations 1. In on. The concepts of fate

  1. History of the Honolulu Engineer District 1905-1965

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-30

    project of the same period was the removal of the Martha Davis, an American bark which burned and sank in HHo Harbor in May 1905, less than a...breakwater and dredging in the bay at HHo . The Nawiliwili Harbor project received its 16 first appropriation of $296,000 in fiscal year 1926 and the next...the completion of dredg- ing operations at Honolulu, HHo , Kahului, Nawili- wili, Port Allen, and Kaunakakai, each of the major islands were serviced

  2. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Hawaii Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Hawaii Island. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  3. Conservation vs. renewable energy. Cases studies from Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcintas, Melek; Kaya, Abidin [AMEL Technologies, Inc., Manoa Innovation Center, 2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 251, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    State of Hawaii generates about 90 percent of its electricity from imported fossil fuel sources. Thus, there is pressure from both public and policy makers to reduce the State dependency on foreign fossil fuel sources. To this extend, there are incentives created at State and Federal level for both residential and commercial buildings to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Although such incentives are necessary for long-term objectives, it is shown in this study that retrofitting inefficient old building-equipment is another viable source to reduce the State of Hawaii's electricity demand. Four case studies are presented to illustrate that building-equipment retrofitting is a viable and necessary tool for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings. Each case study presents an equipment retrofit project electricity savings with its payback periods, and compares with equivalent electricity capacity and economics PV systems in Honolulu, Hawaii. The case studies show that energy savings from retrofit projects ranged from 28% to 61% for individual equipment retrofits. These results indicate that equipment retrofitting with energy-efficient alternatives is about 50% or more cost-effective than installing PV systems. This is so even when large renewable energy tax incentives provided by the Federal and State Governments are taken into account. (author)

  4. Conservation vs. renewable energy: Cases studies from Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalcintas, Melek [AMEL Technologies, Inc., Manoa Innovation Center, 2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 251, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)], E-mail: melek@ameltech.com; Kaya, Abidin [AMEL Technologies, Inc., Manoa Innovation Center, 2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 251, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    State of Hawaii generates about 90 percent of its electricity from imported fossil fuel sources. Thus, there is pressure from both public and policy makers to reduce the State dependency on foreign fossil fuel sources. To this extend, there are incentives created at State and Federal level for both residential and commercial buildings to install photovoltaic (PV) systems. Although such incentives are necessary for long-term objectives, it is shown in this study that retrofitting inefficient old building-equipment is another viable source to reduce the State of Hawaii's electricity demand. Four case studies are presented to illustrate that building-equipment retrofitting is a viable and necessary tool for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings. Each case study presents an equipment retrofit project electricity savings with its payback periods, and compares with equivalent electricity capacity and economics PV systems in Honolulu, Hawaii. The case studies show that energy savings from retrofit projects ranged from 28% to 61% for individual equipment retrofits. These results indicate that equipment retrofitting with energy-efficient alternatives is about 50% or more cost-effective than installing PV systems. This is so even when large renewable energy tax incentives provided by the Federal and State Governments are taken into account.

  5. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report: DSM opportunity report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. 10 figs., 55 tabs.

  6. 76 FR 30753 - Notice of Availability of a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Proposed Honolulu High-Capacity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... Honolulu High-Capacity Transit Corridor Project (HHCTCP) Segment at Honolulu International Airport (HNL... for the construction and operation of a 3-mile segment at HNL for the proposed Honolulu High-Capacity...-mile project in January 2011. The Project would provide a high-capacity rapid transit service in the...

  7. Protection of Hawaii's Observatories from Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2018-01-01

    Maunakea Observatory, located on the island of Hawaii, is among the world darkest sites for astronomy. Strong efforts to preserve the dark night sky over the last forty years have proven successful. Artificial light presently adds only approximately 2% to the natural night sky brightness. The techniques being used to protect Maunakea from light pollution will be described, along with the challenges that are now being faced.Haleakala Observatory, located on the island of Maui, is also an excellent observing site, and is among the best sites in the United States. Lighting restrictions in Maui County are much weaker, and consequently, the night sky above Haleakala is less well protected. Haleakala is closer to Honolulu and the island of Oahu (population approximately 1 million), and the glow from Oahu makes the northwestern sky brighter.Much of the lighting across most of the United States, including Hawaii, is presently being converted to LED lighting. This provides an opportunity to replace existing poorly shielded lights with properly shielded LED fixtures, but careful spectral management is essential. It is critically important to only use LED lighting that is deficient in blue and green light. LED lighting also is easy to dim. Dimming of lights later at night, when there is no need for brighter lighting, is an important tool for reducing light pollution.Techniques used to protect astronomical observatories from light pollution are similar to the techniques that must be used to protect animals that are affected by light at night, such as endangered birds and turtles. These same techniques are compatible with recent human health related lighting recommendations from the American Medical Association.

  8. Understanding cervical cancer prevention and screening in Chuukese women in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Vanessa S; Kawamoto, Crissy T

    2010-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the primary cause of death due to cancer in women in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia. The Chuukese population is the fastest growing segment of the Micronesian community in Hawaii. Little is known about the health beliefs or practices of this population in Hawaii. The purpose of this project was to describe the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of Chuukese women in Hawaii regarding cervical cancer prevention and screening. Research assistants from the Chuukese community were recruited and trained as members of the research team. A culturally sensitive survey tool was developed and piloted by the research team and used to interview ten key informants from the Chuukese community in Honolulu, Hawaii. There is limited knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the association with human papillomavirus (HPV). This may be indicative of a lack of health information in general. Fear, privacy concerns, lack of awareness and cultural beliefs represent the main barriers mentioned when discussing cervical cancer. Education, done in a group setting with other women, is the most recommended method of informing this community and improving preventive and screening services for cervical cancer in these women. Hawaii Medical Journal Copyright 2010.

  9. 33 CFR 110.128b - Island of Hawaii, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Island of Hawaii, Hawaii. 110.128b Section 110.128b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128b Island of Hawaii, Hawaii. (a) Hilo Bay...

  10. Studying Hammerheads in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Alex; Duncan, Kanesa

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the High School Scalloped Hammerhead Shark Tagging Program in Hawaii which is an example of a successful partnership research collaboration. High school students and teachers worked with biologists from the University of Hawaii-Manoa (UHM) to conduct research on the life history of scalloped hammerhead sharks…

  11. Census Snapshot: Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Adam P; Rosky, Clifford J; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Gates, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, this report provides demographic and economic information about same-sex couples and same-sex couples raising children in Hawaii. We compare same-sex “unmarried partners,” which the Census Bureau defines as an unmarried couple who “shares living quarters and has a close personal relationship,” to different-sex married couples in Hawaii. In many ways, the more than 3,200 same-sex couples living in Hawaii are similar to married couples. According...

  12. HAWAII ALGAL BIOFUEL

    OpenAIRE

    Affandy, Gabriel; Bridges, Donald; Daniels, Quinn; Janicek, Drew; Martin, Julia; Poling, Edward; Schmalz, Jordan; Allen, Charles; Brown, Scott; Dobrowolski, Valerie; Jeffries, Jessica; McGovern, Jonathan; Praschak, Megan; Soques, Christopher; Black, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    This report investigates the feasibility and affordability of producing algae-derived biofuel in Hawaii for military aviation. The authors evaluated methods for cultivation of algae, investigated the processes necessary to locally refine bio-oil into bio-kerosene, researched the environmental impacts of cultivation and refinement facilities in Hawaii, and studied the resultant cost per gallon of bio-kerosene production. Based on the current state of technology and the proposed system of syste...

  13. Hawaii's Pelagic Fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Boggs, Christofer H.; Ito , Russell Y.

    1993-01-01

    Hawaii's diverse pelagic fisheries supply the bulk of the State's total catch. The largest Hawaii fishery is the recently expanded longline fishery, which now lands about 4,400 metric tons (t) of broadbill swordfish, Xiphias gladius; 1,500 t of bigeye tuna, Thunnus obesus, and 3,000 t of other pelagic species annually. The increased catch of these other species has raised concerns regarding the continued availability of yellowfin tuna, T. albacares; blue marlin, Makaira mazara; and mahimahi, ...

  14. Public Schools, Hawaii, 2009, Hawaii Department of Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Locations represent Hawaii's public schools. List of schools was furnished by the Hawaii Department of Education (DOE). Locations were developed by the US EPA Region...

  15. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  16. Surface Water in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  17. Hawaii Electric System Reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loose, Verne William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers’ views of reliability “worth” and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers’ views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  18. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  19. Warnings and reactions to the Tohoku tsunami in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, B. F.; Gregg, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku tsunami was the first chance within the USA to document and interpret large-scale response and protective action behavior with regard to a large, destructive tsunami since 1964. The 2011 tsunami offered a unique, short-lived opportunity to transform our understanding of individual and collective behavior in the US in response to a well-publicized tsunami warning and, in particular, to look at the complex interplay of official information sources, informal warnings and information-seeking in communities with significant physical impact from the 2011 tsunami. This study is focused in Hawaii, which suffered significant ($30 M), but localized damage, from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami and underwent a full-scale tsunami evacuation. The survey contrasts three Hawaiian communities which either experienced significant tsunami damage (Kona) or little physical impact (Hilo, Honolulu). It also contrasts a long-established local community with experience of evacuation, destruction and loss of life in two tsunamis (Hilo) with a metropolitan population with a large visitor presence (Honolulu) that has not experienced a damaging tsunami in decades. Many factors such as personal perceptions of risk, beliefs, past exposure to the hazard, forecast uncertainty, trust in information sources, channels of transmission of information, the need for message confirmation, responsibilities, obligations, mobility, the ability to prepare, the availability of transportation and transport routes, and an acceptable evacuation center affected behavior. We provide new information on how people reacted to warnings and tsunamis, especially with regard to social integration of official warnings and social media. The results of this study will strengthen community resilience to tsunamis, working with emergency managers to integrate strengths and weaknesses of the public responses with official response plans.

  20. Hawaii Longline Logbook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the logbook data of U.S. longline vessels based in Hawaii from 1990 to the present that fish in the central Pacific (120 deg W - 170 deg E and...

  1. Food insecurity prevalence among college students at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, M Pia; Zaghloul, Sahar S; Holck, Peter; Dobbs, Joannie

    2009-11-01

    To assess the prevalence and identify possible predictors of food insecurity among college students at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. Cross-sectional survey, including the US Department of Agriculture's Household Food Security Survey Module, demographic and spending variables. University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawai'i (USA). Four hundred and forty-one non-freshmen students from thirty-one randomly selected classes. Twenty-one per cent of students surveyed were food-insecure, while 24 % were at risk of food insecurity. Students at higher risk of food insecurity included those who reported living on campus and those living off-campus with room mates. Those identifying themselves as Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, Filipinos and mixed were also at increased risk of food insecurity. Food insecurity is a significant problem among college students at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa. Food availability and accessibility should be increased for these students through the establishment of on-campus food banks and student gardens. Future studies should assess the prevalence of food insecurity in other college campuses nationwide.

  2. Eo na Mahu o Hawai'i: the extraordinary health needs of Hawai'i's Mahu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odo, C; Hawelu, A

    2001-09-01

    An overview of health and social issues is presented here regarding Native Hawaiian transgenders. Perhaps due to relatively greater tolerance of gender diversity among Polynesian cultures, approximately 70% of all male-to-female transgenders in Hawai'i are Native Hawaiian. However, the overall climate is one of discrimination and harassment such that transgenders--who tend to be under-educated, under-employed, and medically underserved--may be the most severely impacted of all Native Hawaiians. Lei Anuenue, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention program for Native Hawaiians, has provided a variety of services for transgenders, including outreach, educational workshops, support groups, HIV testing, and case management. All services are provided by peer leaders who are employed by the program. Data for this article are based on case management, including client self-disclosures and reports of peer staff who knew details of clients' lives having shared with them both generic experiences and specific activities. Information from 100 transgender clients and their case managers indicated that the transgender health profile is far more serious than that of mainstream Native Hawaiians. For example, 74% smoke, 31% use illegal drugs (excluding marijuana), more than 50% have been involved in street or domestic violence, and few individuals over age 50 have been found during three years of outreach. To some extent, employment options limit transgenders to prostitution, drug dealing, and minimum-wage jobs. In addition, a lifestyle of multiple sex partners and lack of opportunities for stable relationships place transgenders at much greater risk for HIV, sexually transmitted diseases (STD), and other infectious and non-infectious diseases as compared to the mainstream Native Hawaiian community. Clients in this study were from O'ahu, primarily from downtown Honolulu, Chinatown, and Wai'anae. Future studies should compare the results of this sample to transgenders from the

  3. Hawaii Macadamia Nut Company

    OpenAIRE

    Tompson, George H.; Verreault, Dan; Holly B Tompson

    2009-01-01

    Owners of the Hawaii Macadamia Nut Company (HMNC) are facing an expansion opportunity. A land owner has property available that would enable the HMNC to expand its acreage and revenue by about 20%. To fully consider this opportunity the owners must decide 1) whether the expansion is strategically and financially viable, 2) how to raise capital to finance the expansion, and 3) whether they have the skills to manage the company's growth during expansion. This is a case study describing a real c...

  4. State Energy Program in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-05-01

    The Hawaii Strategic Industry Division administers DOE's State Energy Program in Hawaii. The division's current accomplishments include establishing a Model Energy Code for the state, instituting a successful solar program, and making energy performance contracts available for government facilities.

  5. 21 CFR 808.61 - Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hawaii. 808.61 Section 808.61 Food and Drugs FOOD... and Local Exemptions § 808.61 Hawaii. (a) The following Hawaii medical device requirements are... from preemption under section 521(b) of the act: Hawaii Revised Statutes, chapter 451A, § 14.1...

  6. A Cross-National Analysis of the Japanese Character among Japanese-Americans in Honolulu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Attitudinal aspects of Japanese culture are focused upon in order to examine to what extent and in what ways Japanese character is found among Japanese Americans in Honolulu. Several suggestions are offered as to what constitute good indicators of the extent to which Japanese characteristics are maintained. (Author/GC)

  7. Pacific Armies Management Seminar IV, Held at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 3-7 November 1980. Addendum to Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-07

    root of troubles in different parts of the world. The Philippines, a member of the third world and an agrarian country itself, is not spared by the...izatiou EQ, personalit ~es) c. Disposition (Bases, operational craining, supply locations) d. Logistic capabilities e. Tactics f. Trainng S. Combat...invite trainees of the third world nations into NK. In this way, they are arousing international troubles . NK TRANSPORT AVAILABLE FOR INFILTRATION With

  8. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Honolulu Weather Forecast Office (HFO WFO) - Hawaii Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were created as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's efforts to create an online mapping viewer...

  9. 2011 U.S. Pacific Environmental Security Conference (PESC) held in Honolulu, Hawaii on 14-17 March 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    terrorist ideol- ogy. The conferences focused on issues as broad as WMD con- sequence management, maritime threats and fishery resources, reconstituting...can’t deliver basic services to its people, conditions become ripe for extremists and terrorist to flourish. The 1994 Rwanda genocide, 1974 Nigerian ... fisheries , it is expected that ocean acidification may exacerbate these changes in some parts of the world. Leading fishery scientists estimate

  10. Elvis : Aloha from Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Schröder, Imke; Amann, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Die einzige Show, die Elvis Presley selbst produziert hat, sollte gleich erfolgreicher werden als die Mondlandung: Über eine Milliarde Menschen sahen weltweit am 14. Januar 1973 Aloha from Hawaii, live oder zeitversetzt. Sie machten das erste per Satellit weltweit ausgestrahlte Konzert, das in 40 Ländern über die Fernsehsender ausgestrahlt wurde, zu einem riesigen Erfolg und zu Presleys großem Comeback. Das Konzert im Neal Blaisdell Center sorgte für so viel Aufsehen, dass der Bürgermeister v...

  11. Hawaii ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, terrestrial, and native stream invertebrate species in coastal Hawaii. Vector...

  12. Hawaii ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for reef, marine, estuarine, and native stream fish species in coastal Hawaii. Vector polygons in this data...

  13. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Oahu

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Oahu, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  14. Hawaii Abandoned Vessel Inventory, Molokai

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Molokai, Hawaii. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  15. Hawaii ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for native stream and anchialine pool fish species in coastal Hawaii. (Anchialine pools are small,...

  16. Hawaii ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for seabird nesting colonies in coastal Hawaii. Vector points in this data set represent locations of...

  17. Insights in Public Health: Initiating Bicycle Sharing in Hawai'i: Lessons Learned from a Small Pilot Bike Share Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Lehua B; Smith, Heidi Hansen; Espiritu, Justine; Higa, Earl; Lee, Thomas; Maddock, Jay

    2015-10-01

    In 2011, a small pilot bike share program was established in the town core of Kailua, Hawai'i, with funding from the Hawai'i State Department of Health. The Kailua system consisted of two stations with 12 bicycles, and the goal was to secure additional funding to expand the station network in the future. Community feedback consistently indicated support for the bike share program. However, system metrics showed low levels of usage, averaging 41.5 rides per month (2011-2014). From observational data, users were primarily tourists. With minimal local staff, the bike share program had limited resources for promotion and education, which may have hindered potential use by local residents. Management of station operations and bike maintenance were additional, ongoing barriers to success. Despite the challenges, the pilot bike share program was valuable in several ways. It introduced the bike share concept to Hawai'i, thereby helping to build awareness and connect an initial network of stakeholders. Furthermore, the pilot bike share program informed the development of a larger bike share program for urban Honolulu. As limited information exists in the literature about the experiences of smaller bike share programs and their unique considerations, this article shares lessons learned for other communities interested in starting similar bike share programs.

  18. Hawaii bibliographic database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Thomas L.; Takahashi, Taeko Jane

    The Hawaii bibliographic database has been created to contain all of the literature, from 1779 to the present, pertinent to the volcanological history of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain. References are entered in a PC- and Macintosh-compatible EndNote Plus bibliographic database with keywords and s or (if no ) with annotations as to content. Keywords emphasize location, discipline, process, identification of new chemical data or age determinations, and type of publication. The database is updated approximately three times a year and is available to upload from an ftp site. The bibliography contained 8460 references at the time this paper was submitted for publication. Use of the database greatly enhances the power and completeness of library searches for anyone interested in Hawaiian volcanism.

  19. Hawaii bibliographic database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T.L.; Takahashi, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Hawaii bibliographic database has been created to contain all of the literature, from 1779 to the present, pertinent to the volcanological history of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain. References are entered in a PC- and Macintosh-compatible EndNote Plus bibliographic database with keywords and abstracts or (if no abstract) with annotations as to content. Keywords emphasize location, discipline, process, identification of new chemical data or age determinations, and type of publication. The database is updated approximately three times a year and is available to upload from an ftp site. The bibliography contained 8460 references at the time this paper was submitted for publication. Use of the database greatly enhances the power and completeness of library searches for anyone interested in Hawaiian volcanism.

  20. Shelf stratigraphy and the influence of antecedent substrate on Holocene reef development, south Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, E.E.; Barnhardt, W.A.; Hart, P.; Richmond, B.M.; Field, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Paired analyses of drill cores and high-resolution seismic reflection data show that development of Holocene framework reefs on the Oahu (Hawaii) shelf is limited to settings of low wave energy and to the period 8000 to 3000 yr BP. A prominent bounding surface that is mapped across much of the Oahu shelf is an erosion surface cut into Marine Isotope Stages 5 and 7 limestones that show extensive loss of primary porosity, aragonite, and MgCO3 owing to meteoric and vadose-zone diagenesis. This acoustic reflector is found exposed at the surface where wave energy is high or in the shallow subsurface below Holocene reef and sand sheet deposits where energy is low. Ship-towed video along 30 km of the shelf reveals a steady decrease in limestone accumulation from offshore of Honolulu southeast to Koko Head where the seafloor is characterized by volcanic pavement and/or thin sand deposits. This may reflect the build-up of late Pleistocene volcanics associated with the Hanauma Bay eruption (30,000-7000 yr BP) that now comprise the substrate in depths shallow enough to limit reef accretion. The absence of significant Holocene reef build-up on the south Oahu shelf is consistent with observations from north-facing coasts that lack Holocene reefs, indicating that Holocene reef formation in Hawaii is complex and patchy.

  1. Industry and Public Sector Cooperation for Information Sharing: Port of Honolulu

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    region. Key Findings Incentives should match local motivations . Similar to our other sites, Honolulu called for improved logistics, better...many of the truckers that pass through his facility and knows most of them by their first name. This network embodies what he calls the “Aloha...in the following sections. Incentives and perceived benefits Incentives, both material and social, are important motivational factors in the

  2. Spatio-temporal changes in trophic categories of infaunal polychaetes near the four wastewater ocean outfalls on Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Xiufu; Bailey-Brock, Julie H; Lin, David T

    2014-07-01

    This study examines the effect of sewage discharge on benthic polychaete assemblages in the context of their functional trophic categories. We present data spanning 20 years of monitoring benthic invertebrate assemblages and sediment properties at all 4 primary- and secondary-treatment wastewater outfalls servicing Honolulu and the island of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. Samples collected within mandated zones of initial dilution (ZIDs) near outfall discharge sites were compared to samples collected at reference stations at varying distances away. Our findings indicate that sediment properties were not affected by the outfall discharge rate or distance from each ZID. The number of polychaete species in 4 functional trophic categories (carnivore, detritivore, omnivore, and suspension feeder) did not change with the outfall solid loading rate or with distance from each ZID, thus suggesting relatively little organic enrichment. We find no evidence of heavy organic enrichment beyond the designated ZIDs at these 4 wastewater outfalls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  4. Energy consumption trends in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Abidin; Yalcintas, Melek [AMEL Technologies, Inc, 2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 251, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    This study begins with a review of energy consumption by end-use sector in Hawaii. Then, the energy generated from renewable energy sources is analyzed between 1991 and 2006. The results show that while geothermal is a considerable source of renewable energy on the Island of Hawaii (also known as Big Island), fossil fuel is the main energy source in the State of Hawaii. The energy intensity index for the State of Hawaii is then calculated by dividing energy consumption per capita by the income per capita. The calculated energy intensity index reveals that energy consumption is directly controlled by per capita income. The results also indicate that the energy intensity index increases over time despite positive developments in energy efficient technologies. In the second part of the paper, the effect of the tourism industry on energy usage in the State of Hawaii is analyzed. The results show that tourism volume, measured in terms of tourist arrival numbers, does not change the energy consumption directly. However, a change in tourism volume does affect per capita income within a few months to a year. In the last part of the study, the energy efficiency index of Hawaii is compared with consumption averages for the US, California and the most energy efficient country in Europe, Denmark. The comparison shows that Hawaii lags behind California and Denmark in terms of energy efficiency. The comparison also shows that an increase in energy efficiency corresponds to an increase in per capita income across the board, which is in agreement with a recent report published by the American Physical Society. (author)

  5. Hawaii DAR Dealer Reporting System Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2000 January, the Hawaii Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) implemented a computerized data processing system for fish dealer data collected state-wide. Hawaii...

  6. Satellite View of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker green...

  7. Making Multi-Level Tsunami Evacuation Playbooks Operational in California and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. I.; Peterson, D.; Fryer, G. J.; Miller, K.; Nicolini, T.; Popham, C.; Richards, K.; Whitmore, P.; Wood, N. J.

    2016-12-01

    In the aftermath of the 2010 Chile, 2011 Japan, and 2012 Haida Gwaii tsunamis in California and Hawaii, coastal emergency managers requested that state and federal tsunami programs investigate providing more detailed information about the flood potential and recommended evacuation for distant-source tsunamis well ahead of their arrival time. Evacuation "Playbooks" for tsunamis of variable sizes and source locations have been developed for some communities in the two states, providing secondary options to an all or nothing approach for evacuation. Playbooks have been finalized for nearly 70% of the coastal communities in California, and have been drafted for evaluation by the communities of Honolulu and Hilo in Hawaii. A key component to determining a recommended level of evacuation during a distant-source tsunami and making the Playbooks operational has been the development of the "FASTER" approach, an acronym for factors that influence the tsunami flood hazard for a community: Forecast Amplitude, Storm, Tides, Error in forecast, and the Run-up potential. Within the first couple hours after a tsunami is generated, the FASTER flood elevation value will be computed and used to select the appropriate minimum tsunami phase evacuation "Playbook" for use by the coastal communities. The states of California and Hawaii, the tsunami warning centers, and local weather service offices are working together to deliver recommendations on the appropriate evacuation Playbook plans for communities to use prior to the arrival of a distant-source tsunami. These partners are working closely with individual communities on developing conservative and consistent protocols on the use of the Playbooks. Playbooks help provide a scientifically-based, minimum response for small- to moderate-size tsunamis which could reduce the potential for over-evacuation of hundreds of thousands of people and save hundreds of millions of dollars in evacuation costs for communities and businesses.

  8. Hawaii energy strategy report, October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This is a report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy Program. The topics of the report include the a description of the program including an overview, objectives, policy statement and purpose and objectives; energy strategy policy development; energy strategy projects; current energy situation; modeling Hawaii`s energy future; energy forecasts; reducing energy demand; scenario assessment, and recommendations.

  9. 40 CFR 81.409 - Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii. 81.409 Section 81.409... Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.409 Hawaii. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land manager Haleakala NP 27,208 87-744 USDI-NPS Hawaii Volcanoes 217,029 64-171 USDI-NPS ...

  10. 46 CFR 15.1020 - Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii. 15.1020 Section 15.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD... Trade § 15.1020 Hawaii. The following offshore marine oil terminals located within U.S. navigable waters of the State of Hawaii: Barbers Point, Island of Oahu. The waters including the Hawaiian Independent...

  11. Hawaii energy strategy: Executive summary, October 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This is an executive summary to a report on the Hawaii Energy Strategy Program. The topics of the report include the a description of the program including an overview, objectives, policy statement and purpose and objectives; energy strategy policy development; energy strategy projects; current energy situation; modeling Hawaii`s energy future; energy forecasts; reducing energy demand; scenario assessment, and recommendations.

  12. Hawaii technology utilization experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, D.W.; Miller, C.F.

    1976-12-08

    A one-year technology-transfer project involving ERDA installations and Hawaii consisted of sending teams from the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on week-long field trips every two months to test the effectiveness of different methods of transferring technology information from federal sources to civilian clients. The team was questioned primarily on non-energy matters, and the energy questions asked related mostly to individuals or small industries. The team responed to all questions and found that a wide range of knowledge was more effective than having a sequence of experts. Hawaiians considered current major ERDA projects to be irrelevant to their needs. The team was most successful on a one-to-one basis because large groups and state agencies tend to be more policy- than action-oriented. Personal followup was considered essential. The team also learned that their visits generated ten times as many inquiries as were received unsolicited by the laboratory. Most inquiries involved biomass and use of agricultural wastes, solar energy, and transportation. An important contribution of the team's workshops was linking groups to work together on common problems. An appendix lists the subjects of queries and the names and addresses of consortium participants and Hawaiian contacts. (DCK)

  13. The Big Island of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Boasting snow-covered mountain peaks and tropical forest, the Island of Hawaii, the largest of the Hawaiian Islands, is stunning at any altitude. This false-color composite (processed to simulate true color) image of Hawaii was constructed from data gathered between 1999 and 2001 by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument, flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. The Landsat data were processed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to develop a landcover map. This map will be used as a baseline to chart changes in land use on the islands. Types of change include the construction of resorts along the coastal areas, and the conversion of sugar plantations to other crop types. Hawaii was created by a 'hotspot' beneath the ocean floor. Hotspots form in areas where superheated magma in the Earth's mantle breaks through the Earth's crust. Over the course of millions of years, the Pacific Tectonic Plate has slowly moved over this hotspot to form the entire Hawaiian Island archipelago. The black areas on the island (in this scene) that resemble a pair of sun-baked palm fronds are hardened lava flows formed by the active Mauna Loa Volcano. Just to the north of Mauna Loa is the dormant grayish Mauna Kea Volcano, which hasn't erupted in an estimated 3,500 years. A thin greyish plume of smoke is visible near the island's southeastern shore, rising from Kilauea-the most active volcano on Earth. Heavy rainfall and fertile volcanic soil have given rise to Hawaii's lush tropical forests, which appear as solid dark green areas in the image. The light green, patchy areas near the coasts are likely sugar cane plantations, pineapple farms, and human settlements. Courtesy of the NOAA Coastal Services Center Hawaii Land Cover Analysis project

  14. Wastewater Treatment Plants Approved by Hawaii DOH, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains points indicating the centroid of the 189 TMKs in the state of Hawaii in which Hawaii DOH has approved a wastewater treatment plant,...

  15. Hawaii Student / Teacher Astronomy Research program (HI STAR): 10 years of high school students exploring the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Geoffrey; Armstrong, James; Nassir, Michael A.; Kaichi, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    For the past decade, the Hawaii Student / Teacher Astronomy Research program (HI STAR) at UH Manoa’s Institute for Astronomy has trained astronomy-enthusiastic high school students in research, data analysis and science presentation skills. Every summer, a selected group of 8th-to-12th-grade students attend a week-long residential astronomy "camp" in Honolulu, Hawaii. The students experience the profession of astronomy by learning scientific skills such as imaging and spectroscopy, data-reduction, and data analysis. The week culminates with presention of a research project guided by professional astronomer mentors. During the following six months, each student continues to work with a mentor to complete a research project for submission to their local science fair. From 2012 - 2015, ~80% of students completed their long-term projects. Many have performed well; in each of 2015 and 2016, 5 alumni progressed to the International Science and Engineering Fair. Here we present the current structure of HI STAR and plans for the future.

  16. Logistic regression modeling to assess groundwater vulnerability to contamination in Hawaii, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Alan; El-Kadi, Aly I

    2013-10-01

    Capture zone analysis combined with a subjective susceptibility index is currently used in Hawaii to assess vulnerability to contamination of drinking water sources derived from groundwater. In this study, we developed an alternative objective approach that combines well capture zones with multiple-variable logistic regression (LR) modeling and applied it to the highly-utilized Pearl Harbor and Honolulu aquifers on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Input for the LR models utilized explanatory variables based on hydrogeology, land use, and well geometry/location. A suite of 11 target contaminants detected in the region, including elevated nitrate (>1 mg/L), four chlorinated solvents, four agricultural fumigants, and two pesticides, was used to develop the models. We then tested the ability of the new approach to accurately separate groups of wells with low and high vulnerability, and the suitability of nitrate as an indicator of other types of contamination. Our results produced contaminant-specific LR models that accurately identified groups of wells with the lowest/highest reported detections and the lowest/highest nitrate concentrations. Current and former agricultural land uses were identified as significant explanatory variables for eight of the 11 target contaminants, while elevated nitrate was a significant variable for five contaminants. The utility of the combined approach is contingent on the availability of hydrologic and chemical monitoring data for calibrating groundwater and LR models. Application of the approach using a reference site with sufficient data could help identify key variables in areas with similar hydrogeology and land use but limited data. In addition, elevated nitrate may also be a suitable indicator of groundwater contamination in areas with limited data. The objective LR modeling approach developed in this study is flexible enough to address a wide range of contaminants and represents a suitable addition to the current subjective approach

  17. Hydrothermal Geothermal Subprogram, Hawaii Geothermal Research Station, Hawaii County, Hawaii: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This environmental impact assessment addresses the design, construction, and operation of an electric generating plant (3 to 4 MWe) and research station (Hawaii Geothermal Research Station (HGRS)) in the Puna district on the Island of Hawaii. The facility will include control and support buildings, parking lots, cooling towers, settling and seepage ponds, the generating plant, and a visitors center. Research activities at the facility will evaluate the ability of a successfully flow-tested well (42-day flow test) to provide steam for power generation over an extended period of time (two years). In future expansion, research activities may include direct heat applications such as aquaculture and the effects of geothermal fluids on various plant components and specially designed equipment on test modules. 54 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Keneti: South Seas Adventures of Kenneth Emory, by Bob Krause University of Hawaii Press, 1988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Christenson

    1991-11-01

    Full Text Available Most American archaeologists have not heard of Kenneth Emory, even though he is one of the senior American archaeologists. The problem is that he lives and did much of his work in the only state not in North America, an area not normally included in overviews or histories of "American" archaeology. Emory was raised in Hawaii (his parents moved there from Massachusetts when he was two, but received an Ivy League education (Dartmouth, Harvard, Yale. A biology major as an undergraduate at Dartmouth, he had developed an interest in Hawaiian language and folklore when growing up in Honolulu. The year he graduated (1921 . a meeting with Herbert Gregory, the new director of the Bishop Museum, netted him a $75 per month job as assistant ethnologist. According to his biographer, Emory had to look the word up after the interview! Gregory, a geologist and noted southwestern explorer, had grand plans of major ethnological research in the Pacific and Emory was one of the several people to be hired as part of this program (others included Robert T. Aitken. E.S. Handy, Ralph Linton, and E. W. Gifford.

  19. 40 CFR 81.312 - Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii. 81.312 Section 81.312... AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section 107 Attainment Status Designations § 81.312 Hawaii. Hawaii—TSP Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be...

  20. 14 CFR 99.49 - Hawaii ADIZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hawaii ADIZ. 99.49 Section 99.49 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC... Zones § 99.49 Hawaii ADIZ. (a) Outer boundary. The area included in the irregular octagonal figure...

  1. 50 CFR 32.30 - Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii. 32.30 Section 32.30 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL... Hawaii. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing, and are listed in...

  2. Toneren kvalitetskrise på Hawaii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redvall, Eva Novrup

    2012-01-01

    Syv år efter ’Sideways’ er Alexander Payne omsider tilbage med et nyt galleri af kantede karakterer og komplicerede livskriser i Hawaii-herligheden ’The Descendants’......Syv år efter ’Sideways’ er Alexander Payne omsider tilbage med et nyt galleri af kantede karakterer og komplicerede livskriser i Hawaii-herligheden ’The Descendants’...

  3. Report on Hawaii Geothermal Power Plant Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-01

    The report describes the design, construction, and operation of the Hawaii Geothermal Generator Project. This power plant, located in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii, produces three megawatts of electricity from the steam phase of a geothermal well. (ACR)

  4. 76 FR 24554 - Hawaii Disaster # HI-00022

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment to the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of HAWAII dated 03...

  5. 76 FR 18613 - Hawaii Disaster #HI-00022

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Hawaii dated 03/29/2011...

  6. 76 FR 21935 - Hawaii Disaster #HI-00022

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00022 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment to the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Hawaii dated 03...

  7. 7 CFR 318.13-25 - Sweet potatoes from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Hawaii. 318.13-25 Section 318.13... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATE OF HAWAII AND TERRITORIES QUARANTINE NOTICES Regulated Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-25 Sweet potatoes from Hawaii. (a) Sweet potatoes may be...

  8. 7 CFR 318.13-23 - Cut flowers from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cut flowers from Hawaii. 318.13-23 Section 318.13-23... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE STATE OF HAWAII AND TERRITORIES QUARANTINE NOTICES Regulated Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-23 Cut flowers from Hawaii. (a) Except for cut blooms and leis...

  9. Hawaii ESI: REPTILES (Reptile and Amphibian Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for threatened/endangered sea turtles in coastal Hawaii. Vector polygons in this data set represent sea...

  10. Hawaii ESI: POOLS (Anchialine Pool Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anchialine pools in Hawaii. Anchialine pools are small, relatively shallow coastal ponds that occur...

  11. Nawiliwili, Hawaii 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second Nawiliwili Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  12. Hawaii Volcanism: Impact on the Environment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fewer than one hundred people have been killed by eruptions in the recorded history of Hawaii, and only one death has occurred in the 20th Century. However, the lava...

  13. Hawaii 36 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 36-second Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 36-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  14. Aquaculture Willingness To Pay Hawaii Survey 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A survey was conducted and implemented in Hawaii in 2010 to investigate consumer perceptions and preferences including consumer awareness concerning production...

  15. The multiresource forest inventory for Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Buck; Jeanine M. Branam; Wllliam T. Stormont; Patrick G. Costales

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1986 multiresource forest inventory for Oahu, Hawaii. Tables and figures of forest area, timber volume, vegetation types, ownership, land classes, bird counts, and introduced plants are presented.

  16. The multiresource forest inventory for Kauai, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Buck; Jeanine M. Branam; William T. Stormont

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1986 multiresource forest inventory for Kauai, Hawaii. Tables and figures of forest acreage, timber volume, vegetation types, ownership, land classes, bird counts, and introduced plants are presented.

  17. Hawaii 6 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 6-second Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 6-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  18. Cost Earnings Data 2005 - Hawaii Longline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data collection project assessed the economic performance of Hawaii-based longline vessels that made trips in 2005. Operational and vessel costs were collected...

  19. Cost Earnings Data 2012 - Hawaii Longline

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data collection project assessed the economic performance of Hawaii-based longline vessels that made trips in 2012. Operational and vessel costs were collected...

  20. Gridded bathymetry of Kahoolawe Island, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (10m) of Kahoolawe Island, Hawaii, USA. The data include multibeam bathymetry from the EM120, EM122, EM710, EM1020, and EM1002 multibeam sonar...

  1. Hawaii ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology Polygons and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector arcs and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Hawaii. The...

  2. AIS Ship Traffic: Hawaii: 2011-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ship position data from a satellite-based Automatic Identification System (AIS) were obtained jointly by PacIOOS (J. Potemra), SOEST/ORE of the University of Hawaii...

  3. Hawaii ESI: REPTPT (Reptile and Amphibian Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for threatened/endangered sea turtles in coastal Hawaii. Vector points in this data set represent sea...

  4. Hawaii ESI: HABPT (Habitat and Plant Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for rare/native terrestrial plants in coastal Hawaii. Vector points in this data set represent rare/native...

  5. Weather Station: Hawaii: Oahu: Coconut Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) automatic weather station (AWS) records hourly measurements of precipitation, air temperature, wind speed and...

  6. Ocean Uses: Hawaii and West Maui

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaii Coastal Use Mapping Project is an innovative partnership between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center, NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science...

  7. Oahu, Hawaii 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1-second Oahu Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  8. Energy self-sufficiency for hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupe, J W

    1982-06-11

    Currently, Hawaii is almost totally dependent for energy on imported oil. The island state has a wide variety of renewable energy resources, however, and for the past decade has supported the development of these resources as substitutes for seaborne petroleum. Sufficient progress has been made to date in commercializing a number of these alternative energy sources to give cause for optimism tIhat Hawaii will be able to achieve energy self-sufficiency with its indigenous renewable resources.

  9. Kaneohe, Hawaii Wind Resource Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.; Green, J.; Meadows, B.

    2011-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has an interagency agreement to assist the Department of Defense (DOD) in evaluating the potential to use wind energy for power at residential properties at DOD bases in Hawaii. DOE assigned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to facilitate this process by installing a 50-meter (m) meteorological (Met) tower on residential property associated with the Marine Corps Base Housing (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay in Hawaii.

  10. Hawai'i: The Aloha State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Edward F.

    2009-01-01

    August 21, 2009, marks the 50th anniversary of the entry of the 50th state into the United States of America. All the states have their stories, but as a string of islands in the vast Pacific Ocean, more than 2,000 miles from any other land mass, Hawai'i has a story that is unique in many ways. Consider, for example, that Hawai'i has two official…

  11. Seismic studies on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island. Geothermal resources exploration in Hawaii: Number 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyenaga, W.; Broyles, M.; Furumoto, A.S.; Norris, R.; Mattice, M.D.

    1978-11-01

    This volume contains six reports on seismological studies done in conjunction with other geophysical and geochemical studies of the Hawaii Geothermal Project. The studies were conducted on the easternmost portion of the East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, near the eventual site of the initial well, HGP-A, drilled by the Hawaii Geothermal Project. Separate abstracts were prepared for each report. (MHR)

  12. Ferroic Materials: Design, Preparation and Characteristics. Ceramic Transactions. Volume 43. Proceedings of International Symposium Held in Honolulu, Hawaii on November 7-10, 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-10

    mainly of a -quartz or cristobalite in place of M gO as shown in Fig. 13. When PbTiO3 films were deposited on these glass ceramic substrates, the...was 70’C and the other was boiling temperature of 100’C. Starch in rice granule transformed from beta type to alpha type at 701C. This temperature was...that the rice should be heated around 100 °C as boiling period, where the beta starch changed to alpha as the granule kept its shape. The cooking curve

  13. Proceedings of the Joint International Symposium on Molten Salts. Held in Honolulu Hawaii on 18-23 October 1987. Volume 87-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    227 (1962) 7. V. Ljuhimov and A. Lund~n, Z. Naturforsch., 21a, 1952 (1966) 8. F. M. A. Hoeg, Z. Anal. Chem., 81, 115 (1930) 9. G. J. Jan ’, U. Krevs, H...York at Buffalo Buffalo , NY 14214 ABSTRACT 170 NMR spectroscopy has been ased to study tne species formed upon addition of witer to room-t-mperature...34 submitted to Journal of Power Sources. 4. G. H. Kucera , N. Q. Minh, J. L. Smith, and F. C. Mrazek, 1985 Fuel Cell Seminar, p.158, Tucson, AZ, May 19-22, 1985

  14. Conference Digest - International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves (13th) Held in Honolulu, Hawaii on 5-9 December 1988. Volume 1039.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-09

    San Diego, CA 92111; **Jaycor, Inc., W3.5 MINIMIZATION OF HEATING EFFECTS OF A MECHANI- Vienna, VA 22180 CALLY STABLE MOM POINT CONTACT DIODE FOR...accomplished in one of two several steady-state Orbitron MASERs, which ways. Either by electrons sucked from a have the unique property of having multiple cold...Physics. We are grateful to Dick o Phillips, Peter Dencher and Rex Binks for excellent technical assistance. FPI f~h REFERECES (1) P.A. Stimson, B.W. James

  15. Proceedings from the Pacific Islands Region Threatened, Endangered, and At-Risk Species Workshop held 6-8 Jun 2006 in Honolulu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    described the Guard’s “don’t feed the cats” initiative that he instituted to help reduce the number of feral cats that prey upon endangered birds... Albatross ° Humpback Whale ° Sperm Whale ° O’opu alamo’o ° Mariana moorhen ° Demonstration • Remote sensing of aquatic...effect of military noise on bats and crows in Guam o impacts of bombing on seabird colonies (see also monitoring tools for seabirds ) o effect of

  16. The Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (38th) Held in Honolulu, Hawaii on 10-14 December 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Instituto de Investigaciones Veterinarias , FONAIAP, Maracay, VENEZUELA. 2:30 230 SURVEILLANCE OF HUMAN EHRLICHIuIS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1988. T.R. Eng*, D.B...Investigaciones Veterinarias Agropecuerias, VENEZUELA. SCIENTIFIC SESSION L: ENTOMOLOGY - SANDFLIES 1:30 PM- 3:00 PM Sea Pearl IV - VI rlairperson...Instituto de Investigaciones Veterinarias , FONAIAP, Maracay, Venezuela. An ideal diagnostic assay should be sensitive, specific, reproducible, inexpensive

  17. Cerebrovascular pathology and dementia in autopsied Honolulu-Asia Aging Study participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lon; Petrovitch, Helen; Hardman, John; Nelson, James; Davis, Daron G; Ross, G Webster; Masaki, Kamal; Launer, Lenore; Markesbery, William R

    2002-11-01

    Clinicopathologic data from 285 autopsies were analyzed. The decedents were long-standing participants in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study, a prospective epidemiologic investigation of stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. We assessed the prevalence at death of four primary neuropathologic processes using specific microscopic lesions as indicators. An algorithm was developed to assign each decedent to one of six subsets, corresponding to pathologic dominance by microvascular lesions (14% of decedents), Alzheimer lesions (12%), hippocampal sclerosis (5%), cortical Lewy bodies (5%), codominance by two or more primary processes (9%), or without a dominant pathologic process recognized (55%). Definite or probable dementia had been identified in 118 of the decedents. The proportions of men in each subset identified as demented were (in the same order) 57%, 53%, 79%, 57%, 76%, and 25%. In this autopsied panel of older Japanese-American men, the importance of microvascular lesions as a likely explanation for dementia was nearly equal to that of Alzheimer lesions. The cerebrovascular lesion type most essentially and inclusively related to dementia was multiple microinfarction.

  18. The state of electric vehicles in Hawaii: 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report provides an update to the State of Electric Vehicles in Hawaii released in March 2015, a : synopsis of the dynamic landscape between electrified transportation and renewable energy integration : in Hawaii. Focus is placed on the interacti...

  19. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker green...

  20. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Hawaii, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  1. Grayscale Hawaii Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  2. Satellite View of Hawaii, with Shaded Relief - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  3. Color Hawaii Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  4. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Hawaii, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  5. Environmental Assessment Seafarers Training Center, Kalaeloa, Oahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    The Department of the Navy has prepared an Environmental Assessment for the establishment and operation of a Seafarers Training Center within the Hawaii Army National Guard's Kalaeloa Installation, Oahu, Hawaii...

  6. 76 FR 70118 - Notice of Public Meetings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Basing of MV-22 and H...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... tiltrotor (MV-22) and Cobra and Huey attack and utility (H-1) aircraft in support of III Marine... Libraries: Honolulu: Hawaii State Library, 478 S. King St, Honolulu, HI 96813. Honolulu: UH Manoa--Hamilton...

  7. Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011, the Mālama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), mālama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

  8. 24 CFR 598.515 - Alaska and Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alaska and Hawaii. 598.515 Section 598.515 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....515 Alaska and Hawaii. A nominated area in Alaska or Hawaii is deemed to satisfy the criteria of...

  9. 7 CFR 330.402 - Garbage generated in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Garbage generated in Hawaii. 330.402 Section 330.402... QUARRY PRODUCTS; GARBAGE Garbage § 330.402 Garbage generated in Hawaii. (a) Applicability. This section... to interstate movement from Hawaii, and includes used paper, discarded cans and bottles, and food...

  10. 14 CFR 136.5 - Additional requirements for Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional requirements for Hawaii. 136.5 Section 136.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... requirements for Hawaii. No person may conduct a commercial air tour in the State of Hawaii unless they comply...

  11. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander, U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is responsible for prescribing and enforcing such rules and...

  12. 50 CFR 665.210 - Hawaii restricted bottomfish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. 665... Fisheries § 665.210 Hawaii restricted bottomfish species. Hawaii restricted bottomfish species means the following species: Local name English common name Scientific name lehi silver jaw jobfish Aphareus rutilans...

  13. Menthol cigarette smoking and obesity in young adult daily smokers in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Marie M. Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates 1 the relationship between menthol cigarette smoking and obesity and 2 the association of body mass index with the nicotine metabolite ratio among menthol and non-menthol daily smokers aged 18–35 (n = 175. A brief survey on smoking and measures of height and weight, carbon monoxide, and saliva samples were collected from participants from May to December 2013 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Multiple regression was used to estimate differences in body mass index among menthol and non-menthol smokers and the association of menthol smoking with obesity. We calculated the log of the nicotine metabolite ratio to examine differences in the nicotine metabolite ratio among normal, overweight, and obese smokers. Sixty-eight percent of smokers used menthol cigarettes. Results showed that 62% of normal, 54% of overweight, and 91% of obese smokers used menthol cigarettes (p = .000. The mean body mass index was significantly higher among menthol compared with non-menthol smokers (29.4 versus 24.5, p = .000. After controlling for gender, marital status, educational attainment, employment status, and race/ethnicity, menthol smokers were more than 3 times as likely as non-menthol smokers to be obese (p = .04. The nicotine metabolite ratio was significantly lower for overweight menthol smokers compared with non-menthol smokers (.16 versus .26, p = .02 in the unadjusted model, but was not significant after adjusting for the covariates. Consistent with prior studies, our data show that menthol smokers are more likely to be obese compared with non-menthol smokers. Future studies are needed to determine how flavored tobacco products influence obesity among smokers.

  14. History of Aedes mosquitoes in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Jonathan C; Kapan, Durrell D

    2013-06-01

    As a geographically isolated island chain with no native mosquitoes, Hawaii is a model for examining the mechanisms behind insect vector invasions and their subsequent interactions with each other and with human populations. The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, and the Asian tiger mosquito, Ae. albopictus, have been responsible for epidemics of dengue in Hawaii. As one of the world's earliest locations to be invaded by both species, Hawaii's history is particularly relevant because both species are currently invading new areas worldwide and are implicated in outbreaks of emergent or reemergent pathogens such as dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever. Here we analyze the historical records of mosquito introductions in order to understand the factors that have led to the current distribution of these 2 mosquitoes in the Hawaiian Islands.

  15. Hawai'i physician workforce assessment 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withy, Kelley; Dall, Tim; Sakamoto, David

    2012-04-01

    National policy experts have estimated that the United States will be 15-20% short of physicians by the year 2020. In 2008, the Big Island of Hawai'i was found to be 15% short of physicians. The current article describes research to determine the physician supply and demand across the State of Hawai'i. The researchers utilized licensure lists, all available sources of physician practice location information, and contacted provider offices to develop a database of practicing physicians in Hawai'i. A statistical model based on national utilization of physician services by age, ethnicity, gender, insurance, and obesity rates was used to estimate demand for services. Using number of new state licenses per year, the researchers estimated the number of physicians who enter the Hawai'i workforce annually. Physician age data were used to estimate retirements. Researchers found 2,860 full time equivalents of practicing, non-military, patient-care physicians in Hawai'i (excluding those still in residency or fellowship programs). The calculated demand for physician services by specialty indicates a current shortage of physicians of over 600. This shortage may grow by 50 to 100 physicians per year if steps are not taken to reverse this trend. Physician retirement is the single largest element in the loss of physicians, with population growth and aging playing a significant role in increasing demand. Study findings indicate that Hawai'i is 20% short of physicians and the situation is likely to worsen if mitigating steps are not taken immediately.

  16. Perspective view, Landsat overlay Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Honolulu, on the island of Oahu, is a large and growing urban area with limited space and water resources. This perspective view, combining a Landsat image with SRTM topography, shows how the topography controls the urban growth pattern, causes cloud formation, and directs the rainfall runoff pattern. Features of interest in this scene include downtown Honolulu (right), Honolulu Harbor (right), Pearl Harbor (center), and offshore reef patterns (foreground). The Koolau mountain range runs through the center of the image. On the north shore of the island are the Mokapu Peninsula and Kaneohe Bay (upper right). Clouds commonly hang above ridges and peaks of the Hawaiian Islands, and in this rendition appear draped directly on the mountains. The clouds are actually about 1000 meters (3300 feet) above sea level. High resolution topographic and image data allow ecologists and planners to assess the effects of urban development on the sensitive ecosystems in tropical regions.This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat 7 satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated about six times vertically. The Landsat 7 image was acquired on February 12, 2000, and was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS)Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11, 2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, an additional C-band imaging antenna and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is

  17. Nonindigenous marine species at Waikiki and Hawaii Kai, Oahu, Hawaii in 2001 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0001061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surveys of the marine algae, invertebrates and reef fishes of Waikiki and the Kuapa Pond and Maunalua Bay areas of Hawaii Kai were conducted with the objective of...

  18. Wave Climate and Wave Response, Kawaihae Deep Draft Harbor, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Edward F; Demirbilek, Zeki; Briggs, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Present and projected commercial activities in Kawaihae Deep Draft Harbor, Island of Hawaii, HI, indicate that a deeper basin and entrance channel and better protected berthing areas will be needed. The U.S...

  19. Gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5 m cell size) of Penguin Bank, Hawaii, USA. The netCDF grid and ArcGIS ASCII file include multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM3002d, and...

  20. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Hawaii showed improvement in reading and math in grade 8 at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for Asian and white students, low income students, and boys and girls. Gains in math tended to be larger than in reading. Trends in closing achievement gaps were mixed. Comparable data were available from 2007 through 2009. (Contains 9 tables.)…

  1. Digital Broadcasting in Hawaii: The Aloha System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Norman

    1974-01-01

    A look at the ALOHA SYSTEM research project at the University of Hawaii, which developed and built a computer-communication network based upon the use of UHF radio broadcast channels for console to computer and computer to computer communication. (Author)

  2. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Hawaii edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher…

  3. Monitoring and projecting snow on Hawaii Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunxi; Hamilton, Kevin; Wang, Yuqing

    2017-05-01

    The highest mountain peaks on Hawaii Island are snow covered for part of almost every year. This snow has aesthetic and recreational value as well as cultural significance for residents and visitors. Thus far there have been almost no systematic observations of snowfall, snow cover, or snow depth in Hawaii. Here we use satellite observations to construct a daily index of Hawaii Island snow cover starting from 2000. The seasonal mean of our index displays large interannual variations that are correlated with the seasonal mean freezing level and frequency of trade wind inversions as determined from nearby balloon soundings. Our snow cover index provides a diagnostic for monitoring climate variability and trends within the extensive area of the globe dominated by the North Pacific trade wind meteorological regime. We have also conducted simulations of the Hawaii climate with a regional atmospheric model. Retrospective simulations for 1990-2015 were run with boundary conditions prescribed from gridded observational analyses. Simulations for the end of 21st century employed boundary conditions based on global climate model projections that included standard scenarios for anticipated anthropogenic climate forcing. The future projections indicate that snowfall will nearly disappear by the end of the current century.

  4. Public versus Private Education in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina Espiritu

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a time-series evidence on the timing and degree of feedback relationship between participation in education and income growth in Hawaii. Using the unrestricted vector autoregression approach and two related measures of linear dependence and feedback, the results suggest that across all educational levels, i.e., K-12 and tertiary, participation in public education could be a good predictor of income growth in Hawaii. However, decomposing the feedback effect by frequency suggests that the dominance of public education over private education in explaining the variation in income growth to be concentrated mainly on the short-run to medium-run for tertiary level and long-run to permanent effect for K-12 level. Hawaii state legislature and educators should perhaps take these results as a motivation not to ignore the problems plaguing Hawaii's public schools but should work towards greater improvement and support for public education given its predicted significant overall contribution to the Hawaiian economy.

  5. Parts of Plants. Hawaii Nature Study Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Curriculum Research and Development Group.

    This teaching guide is one of a series developed by the Curriculum Research and Development Group at the University of Hawaii. The program is laboratory and field oriented for elementary students. The focus of study for the project is the plant and animal life and the physical components of the Hawaiian environment, and their ecological…

  6. 76 FR 21935 - Hawaii Disaster #HI-00023

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00023 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  7. 77 FR 25010 - Hawaii Disaster # HI-00026

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster HI-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  8. Global phylogeographic limits of Hawaii's avian malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadell, J.S.; Ishtiaq, F.; Covas, R.; Melo, M.; Warren, B.H.; Atkinson, C.T.; Bensch, S.; Graves, G.R.; Jhala, Y.V.; Peirce, M.A.; Rahmani, A.R.; Fonseca, D.M.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) to Hawaii has provided a model system for studying the influence of exotic disease on naive host populations. Little is known, however, about the origin or the genetic variation of Hawaii's malaria and traditional classification methods have confounded attempts to place the parasite within a global ecological and evolutionary context. Using fragments of the parasite mitochondrial gene cytochrome b and the nuclear gene dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase obtained from a global survey of greater than 13 000 avian samples, we show that Hawaii's avian malaria, which can cause high mortality and is a major limiting factor for many species of native passerines, represents just one of the numerous lineages composing the morphological parasite species. The single parasite lineage detected in Hawaii exhibits a broad host distribution worldwide and is dominant on several other remote oceanic islands, including Bermuda and Moorea, French Polynesia. The rarity of this lineage in the continental New World and the restriction of closely related lineages to the Old World suggest limitations to the transmission of reproductively isolated parasite groups within the morphological species. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  9. Intermarriage in Hawaii, 1950-1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labov, Teresa; Jacobs, Jerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the extent of intermarriage between racial, occupational, age, prior-marital-status, and residential groups in Hawaii from 1950 to 1983. Evidence suggests increases in the extent of intermarriage. Blau's hypotheses concerning structural constraints as determinants of intermarriage are tested. (Author/ABL)

  10. EX1006 Hawaii to San Francisco Transit to Drydock (EX1006, EM302) on Okeanos Explorer in Hawaii, US West Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Okeanos Explorer (EX) will transit from Honolulu, HI to San Francisco for the winter inport and drydock period. During the transit, the EX will perform 24-hour...

  11. Hawaii alternative fuels utilization program. Phase 3, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Staackmann, M.

    1996-08-01

    The Hawaii Alternative Fuels Utilization Program originated as a five-year grant awarded by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) of the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The overall program included research and demonstration efforts aimed at encouraging and sustaining the use of alternative (i.e., substitutes for gasoline and diesel) ground transportation fuels in Hawaii. Originally, research aimed at overcoming technical impediments to the widespread adoption of alternative fuels was an important facet of this program. Demonstration activities centered on the use of methanol-based fuels in alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). In the present phase, operations were expanded to include flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) which can operate on M85 or regular unleaded gasoline or any combination of these two fuels. Additional demonstration work was accomplished in attempting to involve other elements of Hawaii in the promotion and use of alcohol fuels for ground transportation in Hawaii.

  12. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 6. Property rights to geothermal resources in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamins, R.M.

    1979-12-01

    A sharp discontinuity in the administration of Hawaii's unique land laws has created uncertainty as to the ownership of geothermal resources in the state. Until Hawaii was annexed to the United States and governed under the Organic Act of 1900, mineral rights had with rare exception been reserved to the government, even though the statutory requirement for making the reservation had been repealed in 1859. Beginning in 1900 and through 1955, the practice was reversed and lands were patented without mineral reservations -- even some lands which had originally been granted subject to a reservation. Further, the Land Court created by the Territory issued certificates of titles to lands registered under the Torrens system, omitting mineral reservations made at the time of original conveyance by the government. It is unclear whether reservations are to be implied in some or all of the titles issued without express reservation clauses. The uncertainty is compounded by contradictory arguments which can be readily made as to whether mineral reservations in Hawaii encompassed geothermal resources in grants made prior to a 1974 statute which states that they do. The Hawaii Supreme Court has recently shown a receptivity to social policy arguments, while in parallel cases regarding ownership of natural resources, the federal District Court in Hawaii has been the more protective of private property rights under the 14th amendment.

  13. Angiostrongyliasis (Rat Lungworm Disease): Viewpoints from Hawai'i Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Kathleen; Jarvi, Susan I

    2017-09-20

    Hawai'i, particularly east Hawai'i Island, is the epicenter for angiostrongyliasis in the United States. Case numbers have been increasing and appear to parallel the introduction and spread of the semislug (Parmarion martensi) to east Hawai'i. The infective larvae in rainwater catchment as a source for household and agricultural water may also play a role. The spread of Angiostrongylus cantonensis as well as the potential introduction of the semislug P. martensi should be a concern to the mainland United States. The State of Hawai'i should recognize the seriousness of this growing problem and thus collaborate to fund studies to address the growing challenges surrounding angiostrongyliasis.

  14. Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 2: Fossil energy in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breazeale, K. [ed.; Yamaguchi, N.D.; Keeville, H. [and others

    1993-12-01

    In Task 2, the authors establish a baseline for evaluating energy use in Hawaii, and examine key energy and economic indicators. They provide a detailed look at fossil energy imports by type, current and possible sources of oil, gas and coal, quality considerations, and processing/transformation. They present time series data on petroleum product consumption by end-use sector, though they caution the reader that the data is imperfect. They discuss fuel substitutability to identify those end-use categories that are most easily switched to other fuels. They then define and analyze sequential scenarios of fuel substitution in Hawaii and their impacts on patterns of demand. They also discuss energy security--what it means to Hawaii, what it means to neighboring economies, whether it is possible to achieve energy security. 95 figs., 48 tabs.

  15. Assessment of wave energy resources in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopa, Justin E.; Cheung, Kwok Fai [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chen, Yi-Leng [Department of Meteorology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Hawaii is subject to direct approach of swells from distant storms as well as seas generated by trade winds passing through the islands. The archipelago creates a localized weather system that modifies the wave energy resources from the far field. We implement a nested computational grid along the major Hawaiian Islands in the global WaveWatch3 (WW3) model and utilize the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model to provide high-resolution mesoscale wind forcing over the Hawaii region. Two hindcast case studies representative of the year-round conditions provide a quantitative assessment of the regional wind and wave patterns as well as the wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain. These events of approximately two weeks each have a range of wind speeds, ground swells, and wind waves for validation of the model system with satellite and buoy measurements. The results demonstrate the wave energy potential in Hawaii waters. While the episodic swell events have enormous power reaching 60 kW/m, the wind waves, augmented by the local weather, provide a consistent energy resource of 15-25 kW/m throughout the year. (author)

  16. Moored ADCP Current Measurements from Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii during 1997-1998 (NODC Accession 0000624)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A downward-looking moored ADCP instrument was deployed at the surface about a mile south of Honolulu Harbor in waters of about 280 feet. The instrument was in...

  17. Goddard and Caldwell: Oahu, Hawaii surf observation data set for 1968 - 2004 (NODC Accession 0001754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surf reports are typically made several times per day at select locations around Oahu, primarily by Honolulu City and County lifeguards and the Surf News Network,...

  18. Goddard and Caldwell Oahu, Hawaii Surf Observation Dataset for 1968-2004 (NODC Accession 0001754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surf reports are typically made several times per day at select locations around Oahu, primarily by Honolulu City and County lifeguards and the Surf News Network,...

  19. Wave and Current Data from Southeast Oahu, Hawaii during August - September 2005 (NODC Accession 0051075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field data collection was conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer District, Pacific Ocean, Honolulu (POH), during August 9 - September 14, 2005, off Kailua, Lanikai,...

  20. Moored ADCP current measurements from Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii during 1997 - 1998 (NODC Accession 0000624)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A downward-looking moored ADCP instrument was deployed at the surface about a mile south of Honolulu Harbor in waters of about 280 feet. The instrument was in...

  1. Inked Nostalgia: Displaying Identity through Tattoos as Hawaii Local Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Mie

    2015-01-01

    Almost a century after the end of the period of Japanese immigration to Hawaii plantations, the Japanese language is no longer the main medium of communication among local Japanese in Hawaii. Today, use of the Japanese language and associated traditional images are often used symbolically rather than literally to convey their meanings, and this is…

  2. 33 CFR 110.128c - Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 110.128c Section 110.128c Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128c Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Nawiliwili Bay. The...

  3. Invasive grasses change landscape structure and fire behavior in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa M. Ellsworth; Creighton M. Litton; Alexander P. Dale; Tomoaki Miura

    2014-01-01

    How does potential fire behavior differ in grass-invaded non-native forests vs open grasslands? How has land cover changed from 1950–2011 along two grassland/forest ecotones in Hawaii with repeated fires? A study on non-native forest with invasive grass understory and invasive grassland (Megathyrsus maximus) ecosystems on Oahu, Hawaii, USA was...

  4. Climate change, diversified agriculture and adaptive capacity in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Export-oriented sugar cane and pineapple plantation agriculture once dominated Hawaii's economy but over the latter half of the 20th Century, there was a rapid decline in the production of these crops as Hawaii's competitive advantage over foreign producers dwindled. The decline of the plantations c...

  5. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. 7.25 Section 7.25 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.25 Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. (a...

  6. Renewable Energy Permitting Barriers in Hawaii: Experience from the Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Donnelly, C.; Atkins, D.; Fields, R.; Black, C.

    2013-03-01

    This white paper presents a summary of the solicited input from permitting agencies and renewable energy developers on the permitting process in Hawaii to provide stakeholders in Hawaii, particularly those involved in permitting, with information on current permitting barriers that renewable energy developers are experiencing.

  7. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line drawn...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1409 - Security Zones; Hawaii, HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Hawaii, HI. 165..., HI. (a) Location. The following areas, from the surface of the water to the ocean floor, are security..., Hawaii, HI or within 3 nautical miles seaward of the Hilo Harbor COLREGS DEMARCATION (See 33 CFR 80.1480...

  10. 50 CFR 665.260 - Hawaii precious coral fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii precious coral fisheries. 665.260 Section 665.260 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii...

  11. 50 CFR 665.240 - Hawaii crustacean fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii crustacean fisheries. 665.240 Section 665.240 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii...

  12. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canon, P.

    1980-06-01

    The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

  13. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  14. 76 FR 75557 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan/Wilderness Study, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ..., Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent... is being prepared for updating the General Management Plan (GMP) for Hawaii Volcanoes National Park... effects associated with possible designation of additional wilderness within Hawaii Volcanoes National...

  15. Geoelectric studies on the east rift, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii Island. Geothermal resources exploration in Hawaii: Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, G.V.; Skokan, C.K.; Skokan, J.J.; Daniels, J.; Kauahikaua, J.P.; Klein, D.P.; Zablocki, C.J.

    1977-12-01

    Three geophysical research organizations, working together under the auspices of the Hawaii Geothermal Project, have used several electrical and electromagnetic exploration techniques on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii to assess its geothermal resources. This volume contains four papers detailing their methods and conclusions. Separate abstracts were prepared for each paper. (MHR)

  16. 33 CFR 334.1380 - Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii-Ulupau Crater Weapons Training Range; danger zone. 334.1380 Section... Bay, Island of Oahu, Hawaii—Ulupau Crater Weapons Training Range; danger zone. (a) The danger zone...

  17. Family-centered care: thriving in Hawaii under Part H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J L; Yuen, J; Nishimoto, P; Johnson, R C; Johnson, R L

    1994-12-01

    Hawaii's system of prevention and early intervention embodies Part H principles that a child with a disability is first surrounded by a family, then by a community. Since 1986, families in Hawaii have been active in early intervention, first by persuading the governor to name the Department of Health as the lead agency, and then by writing much of the original grant application, interviewing and selecting staff members, and serving on the Hawaii Early Intervention Coordinating Council and its subcommittees. Families helped develop Hawaii's broad definition of the population to be served and were vocal advocates before the legislature to obtain funding for the program. Under Part H, Hawaii serves 6% of all children under the age of three, a larger percentage than any other state. Services focus on the family's needs as much as on the child's. The Individualized Family Support Plan (IFSP), developed jointly by the parents and professionals, recognizes families as the final decision-maker on the IFSP team. Families choose options that fit their needs. IFSP meetings are at times and places convenient to families and, to the extent feasible, in the family's native language. Care coordinators, of whom several are parents of children with special needs, monitor services to ensure that families receive quality care. Families receive (1) services at no cost, (2) preference when applying for positions in the Zero-to-Three Hawaii Project, and (3) compensation when serving in advisory or policy-making areas. In Hawaii, families are the center of early intervention services.

  18. Sociodemographic characterization of ECT utilization in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona, Celia M; Onoye, Jane M; Goebert, Deborah; Hishinuma, Earl; Bumanglag, R Janine; Takeshita, Junji; Carlton, Barry; Fukuda, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Minimal research has been done on sociodemographic differences in utilization of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for refractory depression, especially among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. This study examined sociodemographic and diagnostic variables using retrospective data from Hawaii, an island state with predominantly Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Retrospective data were obtained from an inpatient and outpatient database of ECT patients from 2008 to 2010 at a tertiary care community hospital on O'ahu, Hawaii. There was a significant increase in overall ECT utilization from 2008 to 2009, with utilization remaining stable from 2009 to 2010. European Americans (41%) and Japanese Americans (29%) have relatively higher rates of receiving ECT, and Filipino Americans and Native Hawaiians have relatively lower rates in comparison with their population demographics. Japanese Americans received significantly more ECT procedures than European Americans. Electroconvulsive therapy is underutilized by certain sociodemographic groups that may benefit most from the treatment. There are significant differences in ECT usage based on ethnicity. Such differences may be related to help-seeking behavior, economic differences, and/or attitudes regarding mental illness. Further research is needed to elucidate the reasons for differences in utilization.

  19. New earthquake catalog reexamines Hawaii's seismic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Thomas L.; Klein, Fred W.

    2000-01-01

    On April 2,1868, an earthquake of magnitude 7.9 occurred beneath the southern part of the island of Hawaii. The quake, which was felt throughout all of the Hawaiian Islands, had a Modified Mercalli (MM) intensity of XII near its source.The destruction caused by a quake that large is nearly complete. A landslide triggered by the quake buried a small village, killing 31 people, and a tsunami that swept over coastal settlements added to the death toll. We know as much as we do about this and other early earthquakes thanks to detailed records kept by Hawaiian missionaries, including the remarkable diary maintained by the Lyman family that documented every earthquake felt at their home in Hilo between 1833 and 1917 [Wyss et al., 1992].Our analysis of these and other historical records indicates that Hawaii was at least as intensely seismic in the 19th century and first half of the 20th century as in its more recent past, with 26 M ≥6.0 earthquakes occurring from 1823 to 1903 and 20 M ≥6.0 earthquakes from 1904 to 1959. Just five M ≥6.0 earthquakes occurred from 1960 to 1999. The potential damage caused by a repeat of some of the larger historic events could be catastrophic today.

  20. Wind turbine on line in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The largest wind machine in the United States started generating electricity in late July in Hawaii. The Mod-5B wind-powered turbine, located on the northern tip of the island of Oahu, is rated at 3.2 megawatts and is expected to generate enough clean electricity to supply the needs of 1300 homes. The machine was developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio, and paid for by the Department of Energy.The turbine is based on new technology that allows its 320-ft (˜100-m) rotor to operate at variable speeds to suit changing wind conditions. It is the result of 15 years of federally sponsored research at NASA-Lewis. Conventional turbines operate at a fixed speed. After 6 months of tests, Mod-5B will be taken over and operated by the Hawaiian Electric Company, under a sales agreement with NASA. The turbine was located at the northend of Oahu primarily because of the high incidence of steady trade winds in that part of the Hawaiian chain. Renewable energy sources like the turbine are also desirable in Hawaii because of the high cost of electricity on the islands, which is principally the result of the need to import all diesel fuel and a prohibition on nuclear power plants in the state.

  1. Roadside Survey of Ants on Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Reina L; Grace, J Kenneth; Krushelnycky, Paul D; Spafford, Helen

    2018-02-11

    Hawaii is home to over 60 ant species, including five of the six most damaging invasive ants. Although there have been many surveys of ants in Hawaii, the last island-wide hand-collection survey of ants on Oahu was conducted in 1988-1994. In 2012, a timed hand-collection of ants was made at 44 sites in a systematic, roadside survey throughout Oahu. Ants were identified and species distribution in relation to elevation, precipitation and soil type was analyzed. To assess possible convenience sampling bias, 15 additional sites were sampled further from roads to compare with the samples near roads. Twenty-four species of ants were found and mapped; Pheidole megacephala (F.), Ochetellus glaber (Mayr), and Technomyrmex difficilis Forel were the most frequently encountered ants. For six ant species, a logistic regression was performed with elevation, average annual precipitation, and soil order as explanatory variables. O. glaber was found in areas with lower precipitation around Oahu. Paratrechina longicornis (Latrielle) and Tetramorium simillimum (Smith, F.) were found more often in lower elevations and in areas with the Mollisol soil order. Elevation, precipitation, and soil type were not significant sources of variation for P. megacephala, Plagiolepis alluaudi Emery, and T. difficilis . P. megacephala was associated with fewer mean numbers of ants where it occurred. Ant assemblages near and far from roads did not significantly differ. Many species of ants remain established on Oahu, and recent invaders are spreading throughout the island. Mapping ant distributions contributes to continued documentation and understanding of these pests.

  2. Resistance to Alzheimer Disease Neuropathologic Changes and Apparent Cognitive Resilience in the Nun and Honolulu-Asia Aging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Caitlin S; Keene, C Dirk; Flanagan, Margaret E; Hemmy, Laura S; Lim, Kelvin O; White, Lon R; Montine, Kathleen S; Montine, Thomas J

    2017-06-01

    Two population-based studies key to advancing knowledge of brain aging are the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (HAAS) and the Nun Study. Harmonization of their neuropathologic data allows cross comparison, with findings common to both studies likely generalizable, while distinct observations may point to aging brain changes that are dependent on sex, ethnicity, environment, or lifestyle factors. Here, we expanded the neuropathologic evaluation of these 2 studies using revised NIA-Alzheimer's Association guidelines and compared directly the neuropathologic features of resistance and apparent cognitive resilience. There were significant differences in prevalence of Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change, small vessel vascular brain injury, and Lewy body disease between these 2 studies, suggesting that sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle factors may significantly influence resistance to developing brain injury with age. In contrast, hippocampal sclerosis prevalence was very similar, but skewed to poorer cognitive performance, suggesting that hippocampal sclerosis could act sequentially with other diseases to impair cognitive function. Strikingly, despite these observed differences, the proportion of individuals resistant to all 4 diseases of brain or displaying apparent cognitive resilience was virtually identical between HAAS and Nun Study participants. Future in vivo validation of these results awaits comprehensive biomarkers of these 4 brain diseases. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in Frailty Predict Changes in Cognition in Older Men: The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Joshua J; Godin, Judith; Launer, Lenore J; White, Lon R; Mitnitski, Arnold; Rockwood, Kenneth; Andrew, Melissa K

    2016-06-15

    As cognitive decline mostly occurs in late life, where typically it co-exists with many other ailments, it is important to consider frailty in understanding cognitive change. Here, we examined the association of change in frailty status with cognitive trajectories in a well-studied cohort of older Japanese-American men. Using the prospective Honolulu-Asia Aging Study (HAAS), 2,817 men of Japanese descent were followed (aged 71-93 at baseline). Starting in 1991 with follow-up health assessments every two to three years, cognition was measured using the Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI). For this study, health data was used to construct an accumulation of deficits frailty index (FI). Using six waves of data, multilevel growth curve analyses were constructed to examine simultaneous changes in cognition in relation to changes in FI, controlling for baseline frailty, age, education, and APOE-ɛ4 status. On average, CASI scores declined by 2.0 points per year (95% confidence interval 1.9-2.1). Across six waves, each 10% within-person increase in frailty from baseline was associated with a 5.0 point reduction in CASI scores (95% confidence interval 4.7-5.2). Baseline frailty and age were associated both with lower initial CASI scores and with greater decline across the five follow-up assessments (p age. Using a multidimensional measure of frailty, both baseline status and within-person changes in frailty were predictive of cognitive trajectories.

  4. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  5. Coastal Use Mapping Project - Northwest Hawai'i

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaii Coastal Use Mapping Project is an innovative partnership between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center, NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science...

  6. Hawaii Longline Fishery Trip Expenditure (2004 to present)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a time-series dataset of trip expenditure data for the Hawaii-based longline fleet for the period August 2004 to present. The data collection includes 10...

  7. 100-Meter Resolution Natural Earth of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains a natural-earth image of Hawaii. The image is land cover in natural colors combined with shaded relief, which produces a naturalistic...

  8. Nawiliwili, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Nawiliwili, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  9. Keauhou, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Keauhou, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  10. Hawaii Clean Water Branch (CWB) Beach Water Quality Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Exposure to sewage contaminated recreational waters may cause gastrointestinal illnesses in swimmers. The State of Hawaii Department of Health (HIDOH) Clean Water...

  11. Kailua-Kona, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Kailua-Kona, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  12. Hanalei, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hanalei, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  13. Gridded bathymetry of Barbers Point, Oahu Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (1m) of Barbers Point ship grounding site, Oahu, Hawaii, USA. The data include multibeam bathymetry from the Reson 8101 multibeam sonar collected...

  14. Gridded bathymetry of Reef Runway, Oahu Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (1m) of Reef Runway ship grounding site, Oahu, Hawaii, USA. The data include multibeam bathymetry from the Reson 8101 multibeam sonar collected in...

  15. Reson 8101 Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  16. Kahului, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Kahului, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  17. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Pearl Harbor Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  18. Hawaii Small Boat Cost-Earnings Data: 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent a cost-earnings study of the Hawaii small boat fishery in 2014. Data collected include fisher classification, vessel characteristics, levels of...

  19. Hawaii Small Boat Cost-Earnings Data: 2007-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent a cost-earnings study of the Hawaii small boat fishery in 2007-2008. Data collected include fisher classification, vessel characteristics,...

  20. Astronauts Armstrong and Scott arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong (center), command pilot, and David R. Scott, pilot, arrive at Hickam Field, Hawaii on their way from Naha, Okinawa, to Cape Kennedy, Florida. Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr. is at extreme left.

  1. Hilo, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hilo, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  2. Hilo, Hawaii 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Hilo, Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  3. Infiltration Control Landfill Cover Demonstration at Marine Corps Base, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karr, Leslie

    1999-01-01

    .... Demonstration caps were installed at Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) Kaneohe Bay in 1994. The study used an innovative but simple concept to manipulate the fate of rain water falling on waste sites with moderate to high precipitation...

  4. 2015 Gridded bathymetry of Reef Runway, Oahu Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (1m) of Reef Runway ship grounding site, Oahu, Hawaii, USA. The data include multibeam bathymetry from the Reson 8101 multibeam sonar collected in...

  5. Hawaii Small Boat Cost-Earnings Data: 1995-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent a cost-earnings study of the Hawaii small boat fishery in 1995-1996. Data collected include fisher classification, vessel characteristics,...

  6. Tier II Facilities, Hawaii, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This GIS dataset contains point features that represent the locations of Tier II facilities. Reporting to the State of Hawaii includes information on hazardous...

  7. Haleiwa, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Haleiwa, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  8. Lahaina, Hawaii Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Lahaina, Hawaii Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  9. GeoPowering the West: Hawaii; Why Geothermal?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-04-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Hawaii. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  10. Nawiliwili, Hawaii 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Nawiliwili Hawaii Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  11. Northwest Hawaii and West Maui Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaii Coastal Use Mapping Project is an innovative partnership between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center, NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science...

  12. Environmental Assessment. Moanalua Shopping Center Redevelopment Oahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pingree, Ryan; Halperin, William

    2004-01-01

    The Department of the Navy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and determined that an Environmental Impact Statement is not required for the redevelopment of the Moanalua Shopping Center (MSC) Oahu Hawaii...

  13. Seismic Hazards at Kilauea and Mauna LOA Volcanoes, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Fred W.

    1994-04-22

    A significant seismic hazard exists in south Hawaii from large tectonic earthquakes that can reach magnitude 8 and intensity XII. This paper quantifies the hazard by estimating the horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) in south Hawaii which occurs with a 90% probability of not being exceeded during exposure times from 10 to 250 years. The largest earthquakes occur beneath active, unbuttressed and mobile flanks of volcanoes in their shield building stage.

  14. Legal and institutional problems facing geothermal development in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    The problems discussed confronting future geothermal development in Hawaii include: a seemingly insoluble mismatch of resource and market; the burgeoning land claims of the Native Hawaiian community; a potential legal challenge to the State's claim to hegemony over all of Hawaii's geothermal resources, regardless of surface ownership; resistance to any sudden, large scale influx of Mainland industry, and questionable economics for the largest potential industrial users. (MHR)

  15. Regional Sediment Budgets for the Haleiwa Region, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    ERDC/CHL CHETN-XIV-38 June 2014 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Regional Sediment Budgets for the Haleiwa Region, Oahu ...regional sediment budgets (RSB) for the Haleiwa Region on the island of Oahu , Hawaii, as part of the Hawaii Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program...morphology and coastal processes have on sediment pathways and transport volumes. In the Southeast Oahu Region, Mokapu Point to Makapuu Point RSB

  16. Induced Thermoluminescence Dating of Volcanism on Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Sears, H.; Hughes, S. S.; Sehlke, A.

    2016-12-01

    Last year we demonstrated that a suite of tholeiitic basalts that had erupted about 2.2 ka to nearly 500 ka ago in the east Snake River Plain (Idaho) showed a correlation between induced TL and age, although there was considerable scatter. This correlation is consistent with petrographic changes in the feldspar, the major TL-producing mineral in these rocks, such as crystallization of glassy or amorphous phases to produce feldspar or the diffusional loss of incompatible elements, such as Fe, that quench TL in feldspars. We have now measured 19 basalts from Hawaii. The Kohala alkali basalts (130-470 ka) have higher induced TL than the Kilauea tholeiitic basalts (<10ka) by a factor of 10-100. Benoit et al. (2001) showed that there is a strong relationship between induced TL and composition of feldspars. Applying the results of Benoit et al. (2001) to correct for compositional differences between the alkali and tholeiitic basalts, by normalizing them all to a tholeiitic feldspar composition, the correlation between induced TL and age for the Hawaii basalts is identical to the correlation observed for the Idaho basalts within our experimental uncertainties. These results suggest that there is an induced TL vs. age trend for basalts that is not specific to one location, and that there is the potential for a non-isotopic method of dating volcanism. The main challenge now is to identify and correct for causes of scatter in the data, other than composition, such as the amount of crystallization before, during, and immediately after emplacement of the lava (e.g., devitrification of the residual glasses within the basalts). If this can be done, the TL method, which is low-weight, low-power, low data-rate, would be suitable to spacecraft use. Part of FINESSE (PI Jennifer Heldmann) SSERVI node. We thank BASALT (PI Darlene Lim) for logistical support. [AS1]Any others you would consider?

  17. Roadside Survey of Ants on Oahu, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reina L. Tong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hawaii is home to over 60 ant species, including five of the six most damaging invasive ants. Although there have been many surveys of ants in Hawaii, the last island-wide hand-collection survey of ants on Oahu was conducted in 1988–1994. In 2012, a timed hand-collection of ants was made at 44 sites in a systematic, roadside survey throughout Oahu. Ants were identified and species distribution in relation to elevation, precipitation and soil type was analyzed. To assess possible convenience sampling bias, 15 additional sites were sampled further from roads to compare with the samples near roads. Twenty-four species of ants were found and mapped; Pheidole megacephala (F., Ochetellus glaber (Mayr, and Technomyrmex difficilis Forel were the most frequently encountered ants. For six ant species, a logistic regression was performed with elevation, average annual precipitation, and soil order as explanatory variables. O. glaber was found in areas with lower precipitation around Oahu. Paratrechina longicornis (Latrielle and Tetramorium simillimum (Smith, F. were found more often in lower elevations and in areas with the Mollisol soil order. Elevation, precipitation, and soil type were not significant sources of variation for P. megacephala, Plagiolepis alluaudi Emery, and T. difficilis. P. megacephala was associated with fewer mean numbers of ants where it occurred. Ant assemblages near and far from roads did not significantly differ. Many species of ants remain established on Oahu, and recent invaders are spreading throughout the island. Mapping ant distributions contributes to continued documentation and understanding of these pests.

  18. Nonindigenous Marine Species at Waikiki and Hawaii Kai, Oahu, Hawaii in 2001-2002 (NODC Accession 0001061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surveys of the marine algae, invertebrates and reef fishes of Waikiki and the Kuapa Pond and Maunalua Bay areas of Hawaii Kai were conducted with the objective of...

  19. Neuropsychological test performance of Hawai'i high school athletes: Hawai'i ImPACT normative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, William T; Oshiro, Ross; Zimbra, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Establishing normative data of the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) performance of high school athletes in Hawai'i. Pre-season ImPACT testing was performed on 751 participants in football, baseball, basketball, soccer, volleyball, softball, and track from 4 Oahu public high schools. The ImPACT composite scores included measures of Verbal Memory, Visual Memory Processing Speed, and Reaction Time. The descriptive statistical data collected were the group means, standard deviations, standard errors of measurement, distribution of scores and percentile ranks of (1) 262 boys ages 13 to 15; (2) 297 boys ages 16 to 18; and (3) 192 girls ages 13 to 18. The means and standard deviations of the 4 ImPACT composite scores for the 751 student-athletes in Hawai'i were similar to the ImPACT scores obtained from a master database of ImPACT test results. Although differences between the Hawai'i and mainland data were nonsignificant, there appeared to be a trend revealing somewhat lower scores in the Hawai'i sample of athletes. The similarity in ImPACT test performance of Hawai'i high school athletes as compared to the mainland normative data provides support for the applicability of this computerized neuropsychological battery in Hawai'i. However in view of a trend reflecting slightly lower ImPACT scores among Hawai'i participants, the use of the normative data produced by this study may be desirable in assessing Hawai'i high school athletes.

  20. Environmental, life-style, and physical precursors of clinical Parkinson's disease: recent findings from the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Robert D; Ross, G Webster; White, Lon R; Sanderson, Wayne T; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Kashon, Michael; Sharp, Dan S; Masaki, Kamal H; Curb, J David; Petrovitch, Helen

    2003-10-01

    Increased westernization with Japanese migration to the U. S. in the early 20(th) century is thought to have altered the risk of cardiovascular disease. Whether similar effects include changes in the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not clear. This report describes the relations between environmental, life-style, and physical attributes and the incidence of PD that have been observed in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study. Beginning in 1965, environmental, life-style, and physical attributes were recorded at selected examinations in a cohort of 8,006 Japanese-American men. Subjects were followed for clinical PD. During 30 years of follow- up, PD was observed in 137 men. Overall incidence (7.1/10,000 person-years) was generally higher than in Asia and similar to rates observed in Europe and the U. S. Precursors of PD included constipation, adiposity, years worked on a sugar or pineapple plantation, years of exposure to pesticides, and exposure to sugar cane processing. Factors showing an inverse association with PD included coffee intake and cigarette smoking. Among dietary factors, carbohydrates increased the risk of PD while the intake of polyunsaturated fats appeared protective. Total caloric intake, saturated and monounsaturated fats, protein, niacin, riboflavin, beta-carotene, vitamins A, B, and C, dietary cholesterol, cobalamin, alpha-tocopherol, and pantothenic acid showed no clear relation with clinical PD. Findings suggest that several environmental, life-style, and physical attributes appear to be precursors of PD. Whether patterns of precursors can be used to identify individuals at high risk of future PD or can broaden the scope of early interventions or recruitment into neuroprotective trials warrants further study.

  1. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Satellite View of Hawaii 200603 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker green...

  2. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View of Hawaii 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker green...

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Hawaii. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2006 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Hawaii.

  4. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Color Hawaii Shaded Relief - 200-Meter Resolution 200512 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  5. West Hawaii Aquarium Project 1999-2003 Fish and Substrate Data (NODC Accession 0001467)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to declines in reef fishes, the Hawaii state legislature created the West Hawaii Regional Fishery Management Area in 1998 to improve fishery resources...

  6. West Hawaii Aquarium Project 1999-2002 Fish and Substrate Data (NODC Accession 0000938)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to declines in reef fishes, the Hawaii state legislature created the West Hawaii Regional Fishery Management Area in 1998 to improve fishery resources...

  7. West Hawaii Aquarium Project 1999-2004, Fish and Substrate Data (NODC Accession 0002288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to declines in reef fishes, the Hawaii state legislature created the West Hawaii Regional Fishery Management Area in 1998 to improve fishery resources...

  8. West Hawaii Aquarium Project (WHAP): fish and substrate data, 1999-2002 (NODC Accession 0000938)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to declines in reef fishes, the Hawaii state legislature created the West Hawaii Regional Fishery Management Area in 1998 to improve fishery resources...

  9. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View with Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Hawaii, with relief shading added to accentuate...

  10. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Color-Sliced Elevation of Hawaii 201303 TIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The map layer of Color-Sliced Elevation of Hawaii is a 100-meter resolution elevation image of Hawaii, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Each color tint...

  11. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Satellite View of Hawaii, with Shaded Relief 200603 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Hawaii, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Hawaii. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  12. 100-Meter Resolution Color-Sliced Elevation of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The map layer of Color-Sliced Elevation of Hawaii is a 100-meter resolution elevation image of Hawaii, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Each color tint...

  13. Color Hawaii Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution, Albers projection - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  14. West Hawaii Aquarium Project (WHAP): fish and substrate data, 1999-2003 (NODC Accession 0001467)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to declines in reef fishes, the Hawaii state legislature created the West Hawaii Regional Fishery Management Area in 1998 to improve fishery resources...

  15. Adverse childhood events and current depressive symptoms among women in Hawaii: 2010 BRFSS, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remigio-Baker, Rosemay A; Hayes, Donald K; Reyes-Salvail, Florentina

    2014-12-01

    Research on the association between adverse childhood events (ACEs) and depression among women in Hawaii is scarce. ACEs have been linked to unfavorable health behaviors such as smoking and binge drinking which are more prevalent in the state compared to the US overall. The concomitant presence of ACEs with smoking or binge drinking may explain the excess depression prevalence in Hawaii compared to the national average. Using data of women residing in the state (2010 Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey), we examined the association between ACEs count or type (household dysfunction and physical, verbal and sexual abuse) and current depressive symptoms (CDS), in addition to modification by current smoking status (smoked >100 cigarettes in a lifetime and currently smoke) and binge drinking (consumed ≥4 alcoholic beverage within the past month and in ≥1 occasion(s)). Evaluation of ACEs before age 18 consisted of 11 indicators. Eight indicators of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8) were used to assess CDS. All analyses utilized logistic regression taking into account sampling design. The odds ratio of having CDS between those with versus without ACEs increased per increasing number of ACEs (1 ACE: OR = 2.11, CI = 1.16-3.81; 2 ACEs: OR = 2.90, CI = 1.51-5.58; 3 or 4 ACEs: OR = 3.94, CI = 2.13-7.32; 5+ ACEs: OR = 4.04, CI = 2.26-7.22). Household dysfunction (OR = 2.10, CI = 1.37-3.23), physical abuse (OR = 1.67, CI = 1.08-2.59), verbal abuse (OR = 3.21, CI = 2.03-5.09) and sexual abuse (OR = 1.68, CI = 1.04-2.71) were all positively associated with CDS. Verbal abuse had the strongest magnitude of association. Neither current smoking status nor binge drinking modified the relationship between ACEs count (or type) and CDS. In conclusion, the presence of ACEs among women in Hawaii was indicative of CDS in adulthood, notably verbal abuse. Further, a dose response existed between the number of ACEs and the odds for CDS. The concomitant exposure

  16. Sex differences in pacing during 'Ultraman Hawaii'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T

    2016-01-01

    To date, little is known for pacing in ultra-endurance athletes competing in a non-stop event and in a multi-stage event, and especially, about pacing in a multi-stage event with different disciplines during the stages. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of age, sex and calendar year on triathlon performance and variation of performance by events (i.e., swimming, cycling 1, cycling 2 and running) in 'Ultraman Hawaii' held between 1983 and 2015. Within each sex, participants were grouped in quartiles (i.e., Q1, Q2, Q3 and Q4) with Q1 being the fastest (i.e., lowest overall time) and Q4 the slowest (i.e., highest overall time). To compare performance among events (i.e., swimming, cycling 1, cycling 2 and running), race time in each event was converted in z score and this value was used for further analysis. A between-within subjects ANOVA showed a large sex × event (p = 0.015, η2 = 0.014) and a medium performance group × event interaction (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.012). No main effect of event on performance was observed (p = 0.174, η2 = 0.007). With regard to the sex × event interaction, three female performance groups (i.e., Q2, Q3 and Q4) increased race time from swimming to cycling 1, whereas only one male performance group (Q4) revealed a similar trend. From cycling 1 to cycling 2, the two slower female groups (Q3 and Q4) and the slowest male group (Q4) increased raced time. In women, the fastest group decreased (i.e., improved) race time from swimming to cycling 1 and thereafter, maintained performance, whereas in men, the fastest group decreased race time till cycling 2 and increased it in the running. In summary, women pace differently than men during 'Ultraman Hawaii' where the fastest women decreased performance on day 1 and could then maintain on day 2 and 3, whereas the fastest men worsened performance on day 1 and 2 but improved on day 3.

  17. New Opportunities for Astronomy in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasinger, Guenther

    2012-01-01

    As one of the premier astronomy sites in the world, Hawai'i is well positioned to assume a leadership role in the development of the next generation of the world's most powerful ground-based telescopes: the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT), the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), and Pan-STARRS, all slated for the Hawaiian islands. The development of these new facilities represents great scientific potential for the astronomy research community. Pan-STARRS, an innovative wide-field imaging facility developed at IfA, has been operational via its first telescope, PS1, since 2010. With the largest digital camera ever built - 1.4 Gigapixels - and an unprecedented field of 7 deg2, PS1 generates a time-lapse movie of the Northern sky in 5 pass-bands. PS1 has already discovered a number of potentially hazardous asteroids, comets, and a new class of very luminous supernova explosions. The second telescope, PS-2, is under construction on Haleakala, with an ultimate aim a four-telescope system in one enclosure on Mauna Kea. Haleakala--the House of the Sun--is the best place on Earth for solar astronomy and has therefore been chosen by NSF as the site of the world's largest solar telescope, the ATST. ATST will employ a 4m primary mirror with a unique off-axis design optimized for high-contrast solar imaging and spectropolarimetry. Construction, which is already funded, is expected to start soon with two of the first-light instruments being developed in Hawaii. The TMT, ready for construction on Mauna Kea, will be among the world's most advanced ground-based observatories, operating in wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared, integrating the most modern innovations in precision control, segmented mirror design, and adaptive optics. It will address bold scientific questions like the search for habitable extrasolar planets, the First Light in the Universe, the earliest Black Holes and the nature of space itself.

  18. Temperature measurements from a moored thermistor chain in Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii during 1997-1998 (NODC Accession 0000625)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A moored thermistor chain was deployed about a mile south of Honolulu Harbor in waters of about 260 feet depth. The instrument was in operation from August 1997 -...

  19. Wave and Current Data from Kuhio Bay in Hilo, Hawaii March through June 2007 (NODC Accession 0050188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field data collection was conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer District, Pacific Ocean, Honolulu (POH), during 21 March through 7 June 2007, in Kuhio Bay of Hilo,...

  20. Ah Dai Comes to Hawaii: The Story of a Chinese Immigrant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Dai Sen; And Others

    The story presented in this booklet is concerned with the life of an eighty year old Chinese immigrant woman living in Hawaii. The narration provides a brief overview of the woman's birth, childhood, early adulthood in China, and immigration to Hawaii. Her life in Hawaii is described in terms of the work she did, her arranged marriage, her…

  1. 77 FR 27671 - State of Hawaii; Regional Haze Federal Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Air Act (CAA) establishes as a national goal the ``prevention of any future, and the remedying of any... University of Hawaii, Maui College in the Pilina Multipurpose Room, 310 W. Kaahumanu Ave., Kahului, Hawaii...: Waiakea High School in the Cafeteria, 155 W. Kawili St., Hilo, Hawaii 96720. To provide opportunities for...

  2. 76 FR 2800 - Amendment of VOR Federal Airways V-2 and V-21; Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ...; Hawaii AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends two VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR) Federal airway legal descriptions in the State of Hawaii. The... Federal Airways, V-2 and V-21, located in the State of Hawaii by removing all references to Restricted...

  3. 76 FR 8330 - Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Modification to Advance Notification Period...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-BA58 Hawaii Bottomfish and.... NMFS and the State of Hawaii monitor progress towards the TAC based on commercial bottomfish landings... approach the TAC, NMFS, the State of Hawaii, and the Council meet to determine the specified date the TAC...

  4. 32 CFR 552.25 - Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in Hawaii. 552.25 Section 552.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE... Regulations for Certain Army Training Areas in Hawaii § 552.25 Entry regulations for certain Army training areas in Hawaii. (a) Purpose. (1) This regulation establishes procedures governing the entry onto...

  5. 7 CFR 318.13-21 - Avocados from Hawaii to Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Avocados from Hawaii to Alaska. 318.13-21 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-21 Avocados from Hawaii to Alaska. Avocados may be moved... marking requirements. The avocados may be moved interstate for distribution in Alaska only, the boxes of...

  6. 77 FR 61477 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Hawaii; Regional Haze Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    .... The second hearing was at the Waiakea High School in Hilo on the Big Island. Four people provided oral... Baldwin, the parent company of Hawaii Commercial and Sugar (HC&S), Maui Electric Company (MECO), Hawaii.... EPA also agrees that the 0.5 dv threshold is appropriate for Hawaii. Comment 2: Disagreement with part...

  7. Social Stratification and Higher Education Outcomes: The Case of Filipinos in Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libarios, Ernest Niki D., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Filipinos are the second largest ethnic group in Hawai'i and their population continues to grow at a rapid pace. However, they are among the lower socioeconomic groups in Hawai'i and are disproportionately represented in the University of Hawai'i system--overrepresented in the community colleges while underrepresented at the flagship campus, the…

  8. Modeling the colonization of Hawaii by hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, Frank J.; McGuire, Liam P.

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian archipelago, the most isolated cluster of islands on Earth, has been colonized successfully twice by bats. The putative “lava tube bat” of Hawaii is extinct, whereas the Hawaiian Hoary Bat, Lasiurus cinereus semotus, survives as an endangered species. We conducted a three-stage analysis to identify conditions under which hoary bats originally colonized Hawaii. We used FLIGHT to determine if stores of fat would provide the energy necessary to fly from the Farallon Islands (California) to Hawaii, a distance of 3,665 km. The Farallons are a known stopover and the closest landfall to Hawaii for hoary bats during migrations within North America. Our modeling variables included physiological, morphological, and behavioral data characterizing North American Hoary Bat populations. The second step of our modeling process investigated the potential limiting factor of water during flight. The third step in our modeling examines the role that prevailing trade winds may have played in colonization flights. Of our 36 modeling scenarios, 17 (47 %) require tailwind assistance within the range of observed wind speeds, and 7 of these scenarios required −1 tailwinds as regularly expected due to easterly trade winds. Therefore the climatic conditions needed for bats to colonize Hawaii may not occur infrequently either in contemporary times or since the end of the Pleistocene. Hawaii’s hoary bats have undergone divergence from mainland populations resulting in smaller body size and unique pelage color.

  9. Coronary Artery Calcification in Japanese Men in Japan and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Robert D.; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; Kadowaki, Takashi; Masaki, Kamal H.; Willcox, Bradley J.; Sekikawa, Akira; Kuller, Lewis H.; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Shin, Chol; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; El-Saed, Aiman; Okamura, Tomonori; White, Roger; Curb, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Explanations for the low prevalence of atherosclerosis in Japan versus United States are often confounded with genetic variation. To help remove such confounding, coronary artery calcification (CAC), a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, was compared between Japanese men in Japan and Japanese men in Hawaii. Findings are based on risk factor and CAC measurements that were made from 2001 to 2005 in 311 men in Japan and 300 men in Hawaii. Men were aged 40 to 50 years and without cardiovascular disease. After age-adjustment, there was a 3-fold excess in the odds of prevalent CAC scores ≥10 in Hawaii versus Japan (relative odds [RO] = 3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1,4.9). While men in Hawaii had a generally poorer risk factor profile, men in Japan were 4-times more likely to smoke cigarettes (49.5 vs. 12.7%, pHawaii versus Japan was 4.0 (95% CI = 2.2,7.4). Further studies are needed to identify factors that offer protection against atherosclerosis in Japanese men in Japan. PMID:17728270

  10. [To cast a spell on reality. On actions of Soviet authorities in connection with the 6th Congress of the World Psychiatric Association at Honolulu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasierowski, T

    1999-01-01

    At the 6th Congress of the World Psychiatric Association, held at Honolulu in August 1977, its participants accepted by acclamation a--so called--"Hawaiian Declaration" and a Resolution of the Royal College of Psychiatrists. The Declaration condemned all kinds of abuse in psychiatry, and the Resolution condemned the abuses in the Soviet psychiatry in particular. The Congress of Honolulu carried out, at last, the action initiated at the Congress of Mexico City six years earlier. But by then there was a lack of courage yet to take these measures, and the counter-action of the Soviet authorities proved to be effective. Aware of the fact that this time the pressure to condemn the misuses practiced in the Soviet psychiatry would be ever stronger, the KGB and the Ministry of Health of the USSR began their "preparations" for the next Congress as early as in 1976. This article describes the tactics of action promoted by the Soviet authorities in order to prevent the condemnation. The Author made a proper use of some documents that he had recovered at the Moscow "Centre for Storing the Contemporary Archives".

  11. Hydroelectric power in Hawaii: a reconnaissance survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-02-01

    The major conclusion of this study is that hydropower resources in the State of Hawaii are substantial, and they offer the potential for major increases in hydropower generating capacity. Hydropower resources on all islands total about 50 megawatts of potential generating capacity. Combined with the 18 megawatts of existing hydropower capacity, hydropower resources potentially could generate about 307 million kilowatt-hours of electric energy annually. This represents about 28% of the present combined electricity needs of the Neighbor Islands - Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and the Big Island. Hydropower resources on Kauai equal 72% of that island's electricity needs; on Molokai, 40%; on the Big Island, 20%; and on Maui, 18%. The island of Oahu, however, has only small hydropower resources, and could only generate a negligible portion of its electricity needs from this energy source. Existing and future (potential) hydropower capacities are summarized, and annual outputs for each island are estimated. Future hydropower facilities are subdivided into two categories, which show how much of the potential capacity is being actively considered for development, and how much is only tentatively proposed at the time.

  12. Permafrost on tropical Maunakea volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Matthias; Schorghofer, Norbert; Yoshikawa, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    Maunakea volcano on Hawaii Island is known for one of the most unusual occurrences of sporadic permafrost. It was first documented in two cinder cone craters in the 1970's near the summit of the mountain where mean annual air temperatures are currently around +4 deg. Our study investigates the current state of this permafrost, by acquiring multi-year ground temperature data and by applying electrical resistivity tomography and ground penetrating radar techniques along several survey lines. Both of the previously known ice bodies still exist, but one of them has dramatically shrunken in volume. Based on current warming trends it might disappear soon. In addition insolation modelling, temperature probing, and geomorphological indicators were used to prospect for additional permafrost bodies on the wider summit region, however, none was found. It seems that permafrost preferentially appears in the interiors of cinder cones, even though there are exterior slopes that receive less sunlight annually. We hypothesis that snow cover with its high albedo, and a layer of coarse boulders where cold air settles in the pore space during calm nights, play a significant role in cooling the subsurface. Due to the relatively simple setting, the study site is an ideal model system and may also serve as an analogue to Mars.

  13. Hawaii Natural Energy Institute: Annual report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This progress report from the University of Hawaii at Manoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology describes state of the art research in tapping the energy in and around the Hawaiian Islands. Researchers are seeking new ways of generating electricity and producing methanol from sugarcane waste and other biomass. They are finding ways to encourage the expanded use of methanol as a transportation fuel. They are creating innovative and cost-efficient methods of producing and storing hydrogen gas, considered the fuel of the future''. Researchers are also developing the techniques and technologies that will enable us to tap the unlimited mineral resources of the surrounding ocean. they are testing methods of using the oceans to reduce the carbon dioxide being discharged to the atmosphere. And they are mapping the strategies by which the seas can become a major source of food, precious metals, and space for living and for industry. The achievements described in this annual report can be attributed to the experience, creativity, painstaking study, perseverance, and sacrifices of our the dedicated corps of researchers.

  14. 7 CFR 319.73-3 - Conditions for transit movement of certain products through Puerto Rico or Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... through Puerto Rico or Hawaii. 319.73-3 Section 319.73-3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... or Hawaii. (a) Mail. Samples of unroasted coffee that are transiting Hawaii or Puerto Rico en route.... These samples must be returned to origin or forwarded to a destination outside Hawaii or Puerto Rico in...

  15. The University of Hawaii NEO Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohring, Dora; Tholen, David J.; Claytor, Zach; Ramanjooloo, Yudish; Hung, Denise; Aspin, Colin

    2017-10-01

    At the University of Hawaii, we carry out NEO follow-up observations for orbital refinement. We regularly observe eight nights a month using the University of Hawaii 88-inch (UH88) telescope and utilise Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope queue time for recovery of targets with large ephemeris uncertainties. Our focus is follow-up of Virtual Impactors and faint asteroids with magnitudes V>21. The combination of excellent atmospheric conditions on Mauna Kea and long integration times allow us to observe asteroids as faint as V=25. Recent extensive improvements to our workhorse UH88 telescope have included renovations to the telescope exterior, software upgrades, and the commissioning of the new monolithic STA-1600 10K CCD. Recent observational highlights include astrometry of 2017 JB2 during its diurnal retrograde loop and photometric observations 2016 HO3 which was measured to have a synodic period of 27.90 minutes.

  16. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Groundwater in the Puna District of the Island of Hawaii (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staub, W.P.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on groundwater during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17,1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its notice of intent (Fed. Regis. 575433) of February 14,1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report were collected for the geothermal resource subzones in the Puna District on the island of Hawaii. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. This paper summarizes the current state of knowledge with respect to groundwater in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Groundwater quality inside and outside the lower east rift zone (LERZ) of Kilauea is compared with that of meteoric water, seawater, and geothermal fluid. The degree of mixing between meteoric water, sea water, and geothermal water in and adjacent to the LERZ also is discussed. Finally, groundwater pathways and use in the Puna District are discussed. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey publications and open-file reports.

  17. Hawaii Department of Education. Historical Development and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James R.

    In tracing the educational history of Hawaii from the days of the monarchy up to the present time, the uniqueness of the state is stressed in terms of (1) its highly centralized (and therefore simplified) administration and control of the schools and (2) its provision of "a high degree of equal opportunity for education and an integration…

  18. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

  19. The Active Lava Flows of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 6. The Active Lava Flows of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Hetu Sheth. General Article Volume 8 Issue 6 June 2003 pp 24-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/06/0024-0033. Keywords.

  20. Electric vehicle greenhouse gas emission assessment for Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This study estimates greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) compared to that of other popular and similar cars in Hawaii, by county over an assumption of 150,000 miles driven. The GHG benefits of EVs depend critically on the electr...

  1. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Ecological Resources (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R.; Jones, A.T.; Smith, C.R.; Kalmijn, A.J.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (COE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regist. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed. Regst. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County, including the southeastern coast, a potential development corridor along the Saddle Road between Hilo and the North Kohala District on the northwestern coast, and on the southeastern coast of Maui. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for future research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  2. Hawai'i's nursing workforce: keeping pace with healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Qureshi, Kristine

    2015-02-01

    Nursing is the largest segment of the healthcare workforce, but over the next decade even more nurses will be required. Changing population demographics, new technologies, and evolving models of healthcare will stimulate expansion of nursing roles and the need for a highly educated nursing workforce. The current nursing workforce is aging, and large numbers of retirements are anticipated. By 2025, the United States is expected to experience a nursing shortage; in Hawai'i this shortfall is forecast to be 3,311 professional nurses. Currently there are nine nursing programs across the state in public and private universities and colleges. These programs are partnering to implement the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for the future of nursing. In Hawai'i, nursing practice is being expanded; different pathways to advanced nursing education are being implemented; and nurses are partnering with other groups to reshape healthcare. The Hawai'i State Center for Nursing collects ongoing data on the nursing workforce to inform strategic planning. Current gaps in nursing specialty education include school health and mental health. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of Hawai'i's nursing workforce in relationship to statewide population demographics, healthcare needs and gaps, and then outline steps being taken by the profession to address these needs and gaps while implementing the Institute of Medicine recommendations.

  3. Project Aloha: Mainland Demonstration of the Hawaii English Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryessa Union Elementary School District, San Jose, CA.

    This newsletter describes the Hawaii Language Skills Program, a total instructional system that provides teacher materials, pupil materials, instructional approaches, and ways of assessing children's progress in language skills, literature, and language systems. Key approaches used include self-direction and peer tutoring. The children are trained…

  4. Splendid Possibilities: Isabella Bird Visits Hawai'i in 1874.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that invites students to view 19th-century Hawaii through the eyes of Isabella Bird. Bird left Victorian England hoping that traveling would improve her ill health. In the process she became a celebrated writer and explorer. Includes excerpts from her letters and books. (MJP)

  5. Hoea Ea: Land Education and Food Sovereignty in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Manulani Aluli

    2014-01-01

    This short piece offers two literal and figurative snapshots of what land education looks like in action in Hawaii. The first snapshot depicts a contemporary example of Indigenous Hawaiian taro cultivation in the Limahuli valley on the island of Kauai. The second snapshot illustrates the food sovereignty movement in Waianae, Oahu located at the…

  6. Accelerating the College and Career Readiness of Hawaii's Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Hawaii is in the process of transitioning to new English language arts and mathematics standards that will better prepare students to be successful in college and their careers. Time, effort, and resources must be dedicated to effective implementation in order to realize the promise of these new common core state standards. This paper captures the…

  7. Hawaii Integrated Biofuels Research Program: Final Subcontract Report, Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    This report is a compilation of studies done to develop an integrated set of strategies for the production of energy from renewable resources in Hawaii. Because of the close coordination between this program and other ongoing DOE research, the work will have broad-based applicability to the entire United States.

  8. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed. Regis. 5925638), withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 57:5433), of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGPEIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District (Fig. 1). Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. This report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are (1) population, (2) housing, (3) land use, (4) economic structure (primarily employment and income), (5) infrastructure and public services (education, ground transportation, police and fire protection, water, wastewater, solid waste disposal, electricity, and emergency planning), (6) local government revenues and expenditures, and (7) tourism and recreation.

  9. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Socioeconomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saulsbury, J.W.; Sorensen, B.M.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexnayder, S.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background information on socioeconomic resources collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3--4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The USDOE published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This document provides background information on socioeconomic resources in Hawaii County, with particular emphasis on the Puna District. Information is being made available for use by others in conducting future socioeconomic impact assessments in this area. this report describes existing socioeconomic resources in the areas studied and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. The socioeconomic resources described are primarily those that would be affected by employment and population growth associated with any future large-scale development. These resource categories are population, housing, land use, economic structure, infrastructure and public services, local government revenues and expenditures, and tourism and recreation.

  10. New plant records from Hawai'i Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Linda W.; Bio, Keali'i F.

    2012-01-01

    The following plant records from the island of Hawai'i include 2 new state records, 6 new island records, 3 new records of naturalized species previously known to be present on the island, and 1 range extension of an orchid recently reported as naturalized. All cited voucher specimens are deposited at BISH.

  11. 78 FR 56129 - Interstate Movement of Sharwil Avocados From Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... continuing to provide protection against the introduction of quarantine pests. DATES: Effective Date: October... Sharwil avocados is not a pathway for introduction of Medfly. Therefore, we have determined that... Part 318 Cotton, Cottonseeds, Fruits, Guam, Hawaii, Plant diseases and pests, Puerto Rico, Quarantine...

  12. Land Use for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, circa 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a map of land use and vegetation for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, circa 2010. This dataset is a modified version of the U.S. Geological Survey...

  13. 77 FR 28419 - Hawaii Disaster Number HI-00026

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Hawaii Disaster Number HI-00026 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance...

  14. Species trials for biomass plantations in Hawaii: a first appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas H. Shubert; Craig D. Whitesell

    1985-01-01

    Species trials have been conducted in Hawaii since the 1870's. Many species have been successfully established and harvested, whereas native species have failed in numerous reforestation projects. Since the early 1960's silviculture research concentrated on developing methodology for establishing and developing forest stands for timber production.

  15. Planting trials of 10 Mexican pine species in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig D. Whitesell

    1974-01-01

    Ten species of Mexican pines were planted on adverse sites at 6450 feet (1970 m) elevation on Maui, and five species on similar sites at 3200 feet (975 m) elevation on Molokai, Hawaii. Initial survival was poor because of the low quality of the planting stock and harsh site conditions, but subsequent mortality was low. Growth and vigor has been satisfactory. Average...

  16. Asian American Literature of Hawaii: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiura, Arnold T.; Sumida, Stephen H.

    This annotated bibllography focuses on the drama, prose fiction, and poetry of people of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Filipino descent in Hawaii. All works cited were written in English, between the 1920s and 1970, with the exception of poems translated into English by their authors. The bibliography begins with an overview of the cultural and…

  17. Gestational diabetes and macrosomia by race/ethnicity in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pai-Jong Stacy; Roberson, Emily; Dye, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) has been shown to have long-term sequelae for both the mother and infant. Women with GDM are at increased risk of macrosomia, which predisposes the infant to birth injuries. Previous studies noted increased rates of GDM in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) women; however, the rate of macrosomia in API women with GDM is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between ethnicity, gestational diabetes (GDM), and macrosomia in Hawaii. A retrospective cohort study was performed using Hawaii Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) data. Data from 2009-2011, linked with selected items from birth certificates, were used to examine GDM and macrosomia by ethnicity. SAS-callable SUDAAN 10.0 was used to generate odds ratios, point estimates and standard errors. Data from 4735 respondents were weighted to represent all pregnancies resulting in live births in Hawaii from 2009-2011. The overall prevalence of GDM in Hawaii was 10.9%. The highest prevalence of GDM was in Filipina (13.1%) and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (12.1%) women. The lowest prevalence was in white women (7.4%). Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women all had an increased risk of GDM compared to white women using bivariate analysis. Adjusting for obesity, age, maternal nativity, and smoking, Asian Pacific Islander (API) women, which includes Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, Filipina, and other Asian women, had a 50% increased odds of having GDM compared to white women when compared using multivariate analysis. Among women with GDM, the highest prevalence of macrosomia was in white women (14.5%) while the lowest was in Filipina (5.3%) women. API women in Hawaii have increased rates of GDM compared to white women. Paradoxically, this elevated GDM risk in API women is not associated with an increased rate of macrosomia. This suggests the relationship between GDM and macrosomia is more complex in this population.

  18. Reconciliation at a Crossroads: The Implications of the Apology Resolution and "Rice v. Cayetano" for Federal and State Programs Benefiting Native Hawaiians. Summary Report of the August 1998 and September 2000 Community Forums in Honolulu, Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Thomas V.

    This report focuses on a 1998 community forum that examined the impact of the 1993 Apology Resolution enacted to recognize the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy, subsequent meetings in 2000 with Na Kupuna (Hawaiian elders), and a 2000 community forum to collect information on concerns of Native Hawaiians and others regarding the impact of…

  19. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 4. Impact of geothermal resource development in Hawaii (including air and water quality)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.

    1980-06-01

    The environmental consequences of natural processes in a volcanic-fumerolic region and of geothermal resource development are presented. These include acute ecological effects, toxic gas emissions during non-eruptive periods, the HGP-A geothermal well as a site-specific model, and the geothermal resources potential of Hawaii. (MHR)

  20. Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment: Program Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is becoming apparent that insufficient mixing occurs in the pelagic ocean to maintain the large scale thermohaline circulation. Observed mixing rates fall a factor of ten short of classical indices such as Munk's "Abyssal Recipe." The growing suspicion is that most of the mixing in the sea occurs near topography. Exciting recent observations by Polzin et al., among others, fuel this speculation. If topographic mixing is indeed important, it must be acknowledged that its geographic distribution, both laterally and vertically, is presently unknown. The vertical distribution of mixing plays a critical role in the Stommel Arons model of the ocean interior circulation. In recent numerical studies, Samelson demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of flow in the abyssal ocean to the spatial distribution of mixing. We propose to study the topographic mixing problem through an integrated program of modeling and observation. We focus on tidally forced mixing as the global energetics of this process have received (and are receiving) considerable study. Also, the well defined frequency of the forcing and the unique geometry of tidal scattering serve to focus the experiment design. The Hawaiian Ridge is selected as a study site. Strong interaction between the barotropic tide and the Ridge is known to take place. The goals of the Hawaiian Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) are to quantify the rate of tidal energy loss to mixing at the Ridge and to identify the mechanisms by which energy is lost and mixing generated. We are challenged to develop a sufficiently comprehensive picture that results can be generalized from Hawaii to the global ocean. To achieve these goals, investigators from five institutions have designed HOME, a program of historic data analysis, modeling and field observation. The Analysis and Modeling efforts support the design of the field experiments. As the program progresses, a global model of the barotropic (depth independent) tide, and two models of the

  1. ASTER Images the Island of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    These images of the Island of Hawaii were acquired on March 19, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. Data are shown from the short wavelength and thermal infrared spectral regions, illustrating how different and complementary information is contained in different parts of the spectrum.Left image: This false-color image covers an area 60 kilometers (37 miles) wide and 120 kilometers (75 miles) long in three bands of the short wavelength infrared region. While, much of the island was covered in clouds, the dominant central Mauna Loa volcano, rising to an altitude of 4115 meters (13,500 feet), is cloud-free. Lava flows can be seen radiating from the central crater in green and black tones. As they reach lower elevations, the flows become covered with vegetation, and their image color changes to yellow and orange. Mauna Kea volcano to the north of Mauna Loa has a thin cloud-cover, producing a bluish tone on the image. The ocean in the lower right appears brown due to the color processing.Right image: This image is a false-color composite of three thermal infrared bands. The brightness of the colors is proportional to the temperature, and the hues display differences in rock composition. Clouds are black, because they are the coldest objects in the scene. The ocean and thick vegetation appear dark green because they are colder than bare rock surfaces, and have no thermal spectral features. Lava flows are shades of magenta, green, pink and yellow, reflecting chemical changes due to weathering and relative age differences.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched

  2. Deep magma transport at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T.L.; Klein, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    The shallow part of Kilauea's magma system is conceptually well-understood. Long-period and short-period (brittle-failure) earthquake swarms outline a near-vertical magma transport path beneath Kilauea's summit to 20 km depth. A gravity high centered above the magma transport path demonstrates that Kilauea's shallow magma system, established early in the volcano's history, has remained fixed in place. Low seismicity at 4-7 km outlines a storage region from which magma is supplied for eruptions and intrusions. Brittle-failure earthquake swarms shallower than 5 km beneath the rift zones accompany dike emplacement. Sparse earthquakes extend to a decollement at 10-12 km along which the south flank of Kilauea is sliding seaward. This zone below 5 km can sustain aseismic magma transport, consistent with recent tomographic studies. Long-period earthquake clusters deeper than 40 km occur parallel to and offshore of Kilauea's south coast, defining the deepest seismic response to magma transport from the Hawaiian hot spot. A path connecting the shallow and deep long-period earthquakes is defined by mainshock-aftershock locations of brittle-failure earthquakes unique to Kilauea whose hypocenters are deeper than 25 km with magnitudes from 4.4 to 5.2. Separation of deep and shallow long-period clusters occurs as the shallow plumbing moves with the volcanic edifice, while the deep plumbing is centered over the hotspot. Recent GPS data agrees with the volcano-propagation vector from Kauai to Maui, suggesting that Pacific plate motion, azimuth 293.5?? and rate of 7.4 cm/yr, has been constant over Kilauea's lifetime. However, volcano propagation on the island of Hawaii, azimuth 325??, rate 13 cm/yr, requires southwesterly migration of the locus of melting within the broad hotspot. Deep, long-period earthquakes lie west of the extrapolated position of Kilauea backward in time along a plate-motion vector, requiring southwesterly migration of Kilauea's magma source. Assumed ages of 0

  3. Transportation energy strategy: Project {number_sign}5 of the Hawaii Energy Strategy Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This study was prepared for the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) as part of the Hawaii Energy Strategy program. Authority and responsibility for energy planning activities, such as the Hawaii Energy Strategy, rests with the State Energy Resources Coordinator, who is the Director of DBEDT. Hawaii Energy Strategy Study No. 5, Transportation Energy Strategy Development, was prepared to: collect and synthesize information on the present and future use of energy in Hawaii`s transportation sector, examine the potential of energy conservation to affect future energy demand; analyze the possibility of satisfying a portion of the state`s future transportation energy demand through alternative fuels; and recommend a program targeting energy use in the state`s transportation sector to help achieve state goals. The analyses and conclusions of this report should be assessed in relation to the other Hawaii Energy Strategy Studies in developing a comprehensive state energy program. 56 figs., 87 tabs.

  4. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus Among Medicaid Beneficiaries in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Chinn, Chuan C; Fernandes, Ritabelle; Wang, Christina M B; Smith, Myra D; Ozaki, Rebecca Rude

    2017-11-22

    Medicaid is the largest primary health insurance for low-income populations in the United States, and it provides comprehensive benefits to cover treatment and services costs for chronic diseases, including diabetes. The standardized per capita spending on diabetes by Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the fee-for-service program in Hawaii increased from 2012 to 2015. We examined the difference in odds of diabetes between Medicaid and non-Medicaid populations in major racial/ethnic groups in Hawaii. We used data from 2013 through 2015 from the Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in this cross-sectional study to compare the difference in risk for self-reported diabetes between Medicaid (n = 1,889) and non-Medicaid (n = 17,207) beneficiaries. We used multivariate logistic regression models that could accommodate the complex sampling design to examine the difference in odds of diabetes between the 2 populations. In Hawaii, the Medicaid population was younger, was less educated, had more health impairments, and was more likely to be obese and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (NH/OPI) than the non-Medicaid population. The unadjusted prevalence of diabetes in the Medicaid population in Hawaii was higher than that for the non-Medicaid population (10.3% vs 8.9%, P = .02). After adjusting for confounding variables, the odds of diabetes in the Medicaid population was still significantly higher than those in the non-Medicaid population (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.31). Adjusted analysis stratified by race/ethnicity showed that non-Hispanic Asian (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.31-3.78) and NH/OPI (AOR = 3.17; 95% CI, 1.05-9.54) Medicaid beneficiaries had significantly higher odds of diabetes than their non-Medicaid counterparts. The odds of diabetes was significantly higher among the Hawaii Medicaid population than among the non-Medicaid population. Diabetes prevention programs should address the challenges and barriers

  5. Multi-Directional Microaggressions: Filipino Students and Everyday Racism in Hawai`i's K-12 Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Viernes, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines Filipino Americans, Hawai`i's largest Asian Pacific Islander (API) group and their experiences with racism in Hawai`i, specifically in its K-12 educational system. Perceptions of Hawai`i as a model of "multiculturalism" obscure how the state's racially diverse population lives in the condition of settler colonialism which reproduce processes of racialization enabled by the islands' white colonizers. Through Critical Race Theory (CRT), I document how racial microaggression...

  6. Digital database of the geologic map of the island of Hawai'i [Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Morris, Jean

    2006-01-01

    This online publication (DS 144) provides the digital database for the printed map by Edward W. Wolfe and Jean Morris (I-2524-A; 1996). This digital database contains all the information used to publish U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2524-A (available only in paper form; see http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/i/i2524A). The database contains the distribution and relationships of volcanic and surficial-sedimentary deposits on the island of Hawai‘i. This dataset represents the geologic history for the five volcanoes that comprise the Island of Hawai'i. The volcanoes are Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa and Kīlauea.This database of the geologic map contributes to understanding the geologic history of the Island of Hawai‘i and provides the basis for understanding long-term volcanic processes in an intra-plate ocean island volcanic system. In addition the database also serves as a basis for producing volcanic hazards assessment for the island of Hawai‘i. Furthermore it serves as a base layer to be used for interdisciplinary research.This online publication consists of a digital database of the geologic map, an explanatory pamphlet, description of map units, correlation of map units diagram, and images for plotting. Geologic mapping was compiled at a scale of 1:100,000 for the entire mapping area. The geologic mapping was compiled as a digital geologic database in ArcInfo GIS format.

  7. Hawaii Energy Strategy Project 2: Fossil Energy Review. Task IV. Scenario development and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, N.D.; Breazeale, K. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    The Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) Program is a seven-project effort led by the State of Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism (DBEDT) to investigate a wide spectrum of Hawaii energy issues. The East-West Center`s Program on Resources: Energy and Minerals, has been assigned HES Project 2, Fossil Energy Review, which focuses on fossil energy use in Hawaii and the greater regional and global markets. HES Project 2 has four parts: Task I (World and Regional Fossil Energy Dynamics) covers petroleum, natural gas, and coal in global and regional contexts, along with a discussion of energy and the environment. Task II (Fossil Energy in Hawaii) focuses more closely on fossil energy use in Hawaii: current utilization and trends, the structure of imports, possible future sources of supply, fuel substitutability, and energy security. Task III`s emphasis is Greenfield Options; that is, fossil energy sources not yet used in Hawaii. This task is divided into two sections: first, an in-depth {open_quotes}Assessment of Coal Technology Options and Implications for the State of Hawaii,{close_quotes} along with a spreadsheet analysis model, which was subcontracted to the Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division of Argonne National Laboratory; and second, a chapter on liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the Asia-Pacific market and the issues surrounding possible introduction of LNG into the Hawaii market.

  8. Native Hawaiian Ethnographic Study for the Hawaii Geothermal Project Proposed for Puna and Southeast Maui

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, J.K; Minerbi, L. [Cultural Advocacy Network for Developing Options (CANDO) (United States); Kanahele, P.; Kelly, M.; Barney-Campbell, N.; Saulsbury [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Trettin, L.D. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This report makes available and archives the background scientific data and related information collected for an ethnographic study of selected areas on the islands of Hawaii and Maui. The task was undertaken during preparation of an environmental impact statement for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. Information is included on the ethnohistory of Puna and southeast Maui; ethnographic fieldwork comparing Puna and southeast Maui; and Pele beliefs, customs, and practices.

  9. Causes of owl mortality in Hawaii, 1992 to 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Hale, Jon

    1996-01-01

    Eighty-one barn owls (Tyto alba) and five Hawaiian owls or pueo (Asio flammeus sandwichensis) from Kauai, Oahu, Lanai, Molokai, Maui and Hawaii (USA) were evaluated for cause of death, November 1992 through August 1994. The most common cause of death in barn owls was trauma (50%) followed by infectious disease (28%) and emaciation (22%). Most traumas apparently resulted from vehicular collisions. Trichomoniasis was the predominant infectious disease and appeared to be a significant cause of death in barn owls in Hawaii. Pasteurellosis and aspergillosis were encountered less commonly. No predisposing cause of emaciation was detected. Stomach contents from 28 barn owls contained mainly insects (64%) of the family Tetigoniidae and Gryllidae, and rodents (18%); the remainder had mixtures of rodents and insects or grass. Three pueo died from trauma and one each died from emaciation and pasteurellosis. We found no evidence of organochlorine, organophosphorus, or carbamate pesticides as causes of death in pueo or barn owls.

  10. Quantifying food waste in Hawaii's food supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Matthew K; Leung, PingSun

    2015-12-01

    Food waste highlights a considerable loss of resources invested in the food supply chain. While it receives a lot of attention in the global context, the assessment of food waste is deficient at the sub-national level, owing primarily to an absence of quality data. This article serves to explore that gap and aims to quantify the edible weight, economic value, and calorie equivalent of food waste in Hawaii. The estimates are based on available food supply data for Hawaii and the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) loss-adjusted food availability data for defined food groups at three stages of the food supply chain. At its highest aggregated level, we estimate Hawaii's food waste generation at 237,122 t or 26% of available food supply in 2010. This is equivalent to food waste of 161.5 kg per person, per annum. Additionally, this food waste is valued at US$1.025 billion annually or the equivalent of 502.6 billion calories. It is further evident that the occurrence of food waste by all three measures is highest at the consumer stage, followed by the distribution and retail stage, and is lowest at the post-harvest and packing stage. The findings suggest that any meaningful intervention to reduce food waste in Hawaii should target the consumer, and distribution and retail stages of the food supply chain. Interventions at the consumer stage should focus on the two protein groups, as well as fresh fruits and fresh vegetables. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Assessment of Modifications for Improving Navigation at Hilo Harbor, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    proposed modifications, (5) develop hydrodynamic conditions for the ship simulator study, and (6) document study results by a technical report. The...breakwater, and (f) developing hydrodynamic conditions for the ship simulator study. 1.3 Study area Hilo Harbor is a deep-draft port located in Hilo Bay...on the Island of Hawaii at the mouth of two rivers, the Wailuku River and the smaller Wailoa River. There is also a small- boat harbor in Radio Bay

  12. Race and asthma control in the pediatric population of Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brian H; Cabana, Michael D; Hilton, Joan F; Ly, Ngoc P

    2011-05-01

    The racially unique population of Hawaii has one of the highest prevalences of childhood asthma in America. We estimate the prevalence of impaired asthma control among asthmatic children in Hawaii and determine which factors are associated with impaired control. We analyzed data from 477 asthmatic children living in Hawaii participating in the 2006-2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Asthma Call-Back Surveys. Impaired asthma control was modeled after 2007 National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with impaired asthma control. Children (53.8%) with asthma were either part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. While 35.6% of asthmatic children met criteria for impaired asthma control, being part or full Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander was not associated with impaired control. Only 31.1% of children with impaired control reported the use of inhaled corticosteroids despite >80% having had a routine checkup for asthma in the past year and receipt of asthma education from a healthcare provider. A large proportion of asthmatic children in Hawaii have impaired asthma control that does not appear to be associated with race but may be associated with inadequate pharmacologic therapy. While a significant percentage reported receiving routine asthma care and asthma education, a minority reported using inhaled corticosteroids. Reasons for this discrepancy between asthma assessment and treatment are unclear. However, additional education on part of the physician, community, and healthcare system are likely to improve management and reduce morbidity in this population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Siting Evaluation for Biomass-Ethanol Production in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, C.M.; Zhou, J.

    2000-10-15

    This report examines four Hawaiian islands, Oahu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai, to identify three best combinations of potential sites and crops for producing dedicated supplies of biomass for conversion to ethanol. Key technical and economic factors considered in the siting evaluation include land availability (zoning and use), land suitability (agronomic conditions), potential quantities and costs of producing biomass feedstocks, infrastructure (including water and power supplies), transportation, and potential bioresidues to supplement dedicated energy crops.

  14. Nutrient intakes in relation to cancer incidence in Hawaii.

    OpenAIRE

    Kolonel, L.N.; Hankin, J. H.; Lee, J.; Chu, S. Y.; Nomura, A M; Hinds, M W

    1981-01-01

    A representative sample of 4657 adults greater than or equal to 45 years of age from the 5 main ethnic groups in Hawaii (Caucasians, Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos and Hawaiians) were interviewed during 1977-1979 regarding their diets. Quantitative food-consumption histories were obtained, from which average daily intakes of fat (saturated, unsaturated, cholesterol, meat, dairy, fish, animal, vegetable and total), protein (animal, meat, fish, dairy and total), carbohydrate, and vitamins A and C...

  15. Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR), Division of Lands and Natural Resources (DLNR) of the State of Hawaii Fish Stock Surveys from 41 sites on Oahu and Island of Hawaii from 1952-2000 (NODC Accession 0002754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data are from underwater visual surveys of fish stocks from 41 survey sites on the islands of Oahu and Hawaii, conducted by biologists and technicians of Hawaii's...

  16. Sandia-Power Surety Task Force Hawaii foam analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, Annie

    2010-11-01

    The Office of Secretary of Defense (OSD) Power Surety Task Force was officially created in early 2008, after nearly two years of work in demand reduction and renewable energy technologies to support the Warfighter in Theater. The OSD Power Surety Task Force is tasked with identifying efficient energy solutions that support mission requirements. Spray foam insulation demonstrations were recently expanded beyond field structures to include military housing at Ft. Belvoir. Initial results to using the foam in both applications are favorable. This project will address the remaining key questions: (1) Can this technology help to reduce utility costs for the Installation Commander? (2) Is the foam cost effective? (3) What application differences in housing affect those key metrics? The critical need for energy solutions in Hawaii and the existing relationships among Sandia, the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Forest City, make this location a logical choice for a foam demonstration. This project includes application and analysis of foam to a residential duplex at the Waikulu military community on Oahu, Hawaii, as well as reference to spray foam applied to a PACOM facility and additional foamed units on Maui, conducted during this project phase. This report concludes the analysis and describes the utilization of foam insulation at military housing in Hawaii and the subsequent data gathering and analysis.

  17. Noi'i o Puna: Geothermal Research in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Arthur; Chen, Bill; Takahashi, Patrick; Woodruff, Jim

    1986-01-21

    Noi'i 0 Puna - The Puna Research Center (PRC), located on the grounds of the HGP-A power plant site in Puna, Hawaii, was dedicated on August 24, 1985. Research projects, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), State, County, utility, and the private sector have been initiated in the areas of geothermal reservoir engineering, silica utilization, and corrosion of materials. An international geothermal applications workshop was held in Hilo, Hawaii the day before the dedication to discuss common problems and methods of solution by cooperative research. The three main categories addressed were process chemistry design, reservoir engineering, and agriculture/aquaculture applications. The workshop identified how PRC might be used for these research purposes. The advantages provided by PRC include the availability of non-proprietary information, an operational power plant with adjacent laboratory, proximity of private wells, the Fellows in Renewable Energy Engineering program, and strong support from the State, County, and utility. A second workshop is in the planning stages to follow through on the recommendations and will be held in the Orient next year. The Community Geothermal Technology Program, featuring projects conducted by individuals and companies in the local community, has been funded and will actively initiate projects this month. This program received matching funds from the USDOE, County of Hawaii and the private sector.

  18. Translational research education and training needs in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; Inouye, Jillian; Seto, Todd B; Braun, Kathryn L

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this needs assessment was to identify the translational research education and training needs of researchers and administrators working in Hawai'i's communities and to use the finding to develop an education and training plan. The assessment was led by a community advisory board with members from community health centers, social agencies, hospitals, and academia on O'ahu. The survey, developed with input of the community advisory board, was sent to 94 administrators and researchers involved or affiliated with research being conducted in Hawai'i. Forty-one respondents (43%) completed the survey. Respondents wanted education and training in research processes, specific research-related skills, and facilitating interactions between community and academic researchers. Sixty-one percent were interested in training related to community-engaged research and yearly seminars on "collaborative mentoring." Popular topics of interest were related to data monitoring, networking with different cultural groups, statistics, and human subjects review. A majority of respondents wanted to attend workshops, seminars, and presentations rather than take a class. Approximately 50% of the respondents wanted to gain information through on-line training. Findings guided the development of a translational research education and training plan for the University of Hawai'i National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Centers in Minority Institutions Multidisciplinary and Translational Research Infrastructure Expansion (RMATRIX) grant.

  19. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii 201304 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Hawaii map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Hawaii, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  20. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Color Hawaii Shaded Relief - 200-Meter Resolution, Albers projection 200603 GeoTIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Hawaii shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Hawaii at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  1. Near shore water chemistry data from Island of Hawaii and Lanai 1988-2011 (NODC Accession 0104398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coastal water quality was measured at seven shoreline locations on the west side of the Island of Hawaii and one site on Lanai, Hawaii during 1988-2011. Each...

  2. Fish and substrate data collected in support of the West Hawaii Aquarium Project, 1999 - 2004 (NODC Accession 0002288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In response to declines in reef fishes, the Hawaii state legislature created the West Hawaii Regional Fishery Management Area in 1998 to improve fishery resources...

  3. Nonindigenous Marine Species Introductions in the harbors of the South and West Shores of Oahu, Hawaii 1997-1998 (NODC Accession 0000324)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Despite the potential importance of Honolulu Harbor or other commercial harbors on Oahu as potential gateways for nonindigenous marine species to enter the Hawaiian...

  4. Wave and current data collected by the US Army Corps of Engineers in Kuhio Bay, Hawaii, from March 2007 to June 2007 (NODC Accession 0050188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field data collection was conducted for the U.S. Army Engineer District, Pacific Ocean, Honolulu (POH), during 21 March through 7 June 2007, in Kuhio Bay of Hilo,...

  5. 78 FR 59650 - Subzone 9F, Authorization of Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Subzone 9F, Authorization of Production Activity, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas, (Synthetic Natural Gas), Kapolei, Hawaii On May 22, 2013, The Gas Company, LLC dba Hawai'i Gas submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board...

  6. 41 CFR 302-3.216 - When must I begin my first tour renewal travel from Alaska or Hawaii?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... first tour renewal travel from Alaska or Hawaii? 302-3.216 Section 302-3.216 Public Contracts and... must I begin my first tour renewal travel from Alaska or Hawaii? You must begin your first tour renewal travel within 5 years of your first consecutive tours in either Alaska or Hawaii. ...

  7. 14 CFR 91.138 - Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... disaster areas in the State of Hawaii. 91.138 Section 91.138 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... areas in the State of Hawaii. (a) When the Administrator has determined, pursuant to a request and justification provided by the Governor of the State of Hawaii, or the Governor's designee, that an inhabited...

  8. 78 FR 39198 - Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... Part 334 Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii... of the Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii... Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii by increasing the water area...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 136 - Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Operators in the State of Hawaii A Appendix A to Part 136 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Appendix A to Part 136—Special Operating Rules for Air Tour Operators in the State of Hawaii Section 1... flights conducted in the State of Hawaii under 14 CFR parts 91, 121, and 135. This appendix does not apply...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and...), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Location. The following area is established as a safety zone during launch operations at PMRF, Kauai, Hawaii: The waters bounded by the following coordinates: (22°01...

  11. 78 FR 76060 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone. AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD..., Hawaii. The U.S. Navy conducts weapon systems testing and other military testing and training activities... Kauai, Hawaii. The proposed rule was published in the July 1, 2013 issue of the Federal Register (78 FR...

  12. Macro-Level Profile of Hawai'i's Schools Participating in the Significant Bilingual Instructional Features Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavieres, Milagros; And Others

    This document contains six chapters: (1) The introduction discusses the State of Hawaii, its residents, and major industries. (2) "Education in Hawaii" presents the state's education plan, Department of Education rules and regulations, and student services. (3) "Bilingual Education Program Data" describes Hawaii's bilingual…

  13. Stockability: A major factor in productivity differences between Pinus taeda plantations in Hawaii and the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean S. DeBell; William R. Harms; Craig D. Whitesell

    1989-01-01

    Basal area and volume production in loblolly pine spacing trials in Hawaii were nearly double the average production in research plantings in the Southeastern United States. The higher productivity in Hawaii was associated, to some extent, with site index and more rapid growth of individual trees. Competition-related mortality, however, was considerably lower in Hawaii...

  14. 33 CFR 165.T14-204 - Safety Zone; fixed mooring balls, south of Barbers Pt Harbor Channel, Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., south of Barbers Pt Harbor Channel, Oahu, Hawaii. 165.T14-204 Section 165.T14-204 Navigation and... Pt Harbor Channel, Oahu, Hawaii. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters... position is approximately 2,500 yards south of Barbers Point Harbor channel buoy #2, Oahu, Hawaii. This...

  15. Releases of natural enemies in Hawaii since 1980 for classical biological control of weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Conant; J. N. Garcia; M. T. Johnson; W. T. Nagamine; C. K. Hirayama; G. P. Markin; R. L. Hill

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive review of biological control of weeds in Hawaii was last published in 1992, covering 74 natural enemy species released from 1902 through 1980. The present review summarizes releases of 21 natural enemies targeting seven invasive weeds from 1981 to 2010. These projects were carried out by Hawaii Department of Agriculture (HDOA), USDA Forest Service (USFS...

  16. Hardness, density, and shrinkage characteristics of silk-oak from Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. L. Youngs

    1964-01-01

    Shrinkage, specific gravity, and hardness of two shipments of silk-oak (Grevillea robusta) from Hawaii were evaluated to provide basic information pertinent to the use of the wood for cabinet and furniture purposes. The wood resembles Hawaii-grown shamel ash (Fraxinus uhdei ) in the properties evaluated. Shrinkage compares well with that of black cherry, silver maple,...

  17. Evaluation of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides for biological control of Miconia calvescens in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, E. M.; Sugiyama, L. S.; Barreto, R. W.; Gardner, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae), from the Neotropics, is a noxious forest weed in Hawaii. We evaluated an isolate of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides that causes leaf spots on Miconia spp. in Brazil for its potential in biological control. Hawaii has no native Melastomataceae genera but does have members of 12 introduced genera.

  18. 78 FR 65955 - Migratory Bird Permits; Control Order for Introduced Migratory Bird Species in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 21 RIN 1018-AZ69 Migratory Bird Permits; Control Order for Introduced Migratory Bird Species in Hawaii AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Proposed... alba), two introduced migratory bird species in Hawaii. We also make the supporting draft environmental...

  19. 78 FR 41184 - Noise Exposure Map Notice for Hilo International Airport, Hilo, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice for Hilo International Airport, Hilo, Hawaii... determination that the noise exposure maps submitted by Hawaii State Department of Transportation, Airports... announces that the FAA finds that the noise exposure maps submitted for Hilo International Airport are in...

  20. Made in Hawai'i: Critical Studies and the Academy for Creative Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Konrad

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author offers a brief history of the Academy for Creative Media (ACM)--the University of Hawai'i's primary academic program for the production and study of film, animation, and computer game design--and its mission to fulfill the Hawai'i state government's agenda to diversify the economy with creative media and high…

  1. 76 FR 12278 - Amendment to and Revocation of Reporting Points; Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment to and Revocation of Reporting Points; Hawaii... scope of that authority as it amends Reporting Points in Hawaii. Environmental Review The FAA has...

  2. 47 CFR 22.603 - 488-494 MHz fixed service in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 488-494 MHz fixed service in Hawaii. 22.603 Section 22.603 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... fixed service in Hawaii. Before filing applications for authorization of inter-island control and/or...

  3. The first non-heart-beating organ donor in Hawaii--medical and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, A H; Kailani, H K; Limm, W M

    2000-09-01

    The shortage of organ donors remains a major obstacle in transplantation in Hawaii. Some patients die while waiting for a life-saving organ. Across the nation, "marginal" donors, including non-heart-beating donors are used. The authors describe the first successful non-heart-beating organ donor transplant in Hawaii, and include medical and ethical considerations.

  4. 33 CFR 334.1400 - Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. 334.1400 Section 334.1400 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.1400 Pacific Ocean, at Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; restricted area. (a) The area. That portion of the Pacific Ocean lying offshore of Oahu between Ewa Beach and Barbers Point, basically...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1350 - Pacific Ocean, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone. 334.1350 Section 334.1350 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Ocean, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. Beginning at point of origin at Kaena...

  6. Rickettsia typhi and R. felis in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis), Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremeeva, Marina E; Warashina, Wesley R; Sturgeon, Michele M; Buchholz, Arlene E; Olmsted, Gregory K; Park, Sarah Y; Effler, Paul V; Karpathy, Sandor E

    2008-10-01

    Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii. The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.

  7. 33 CFR 334.1370 - Pacific Ocean at Keahi Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Keahi Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone. 334.1370 Section 334.1370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1370 Pacific Ocean at Keahi Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. The waters...

  8. 33 CFR 110.128d - Island of Oahu, Hawaii. (Datum: OHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Island of Oahu, Hawaii. (Datum: OHD) 110.128d Section 110.128d Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.128d Island of Oahu, Hawaii. (Datum...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1360 - Pacific Ocean at Barber's Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Barber's Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone. 334.1360 Section 334.1360 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1360 Pacific Ocean at Barber's Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. The...

  10. Rickettsia typhi and R. felis in Rat Fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis), Oahu, Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Eremeeva, Marina E.; Warashina, Wesley R.; Sturgeon, Michele M.; Buchholz, Arlene E.; Olmsted, Gregory K.; Park, Sarah Y.; Effler, Paul V.; Karpathy, Sandor E.

    2008-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii. The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.

  11. 50 CFR 665.220 - Hawaii coral reef ecosystem fisheries. [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hawaii coral reef ecosystem fisheries. 665.220 Section 665.220 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii...

  12. Butyltin Concentrations in Selected US Harbor Systems. A Baseline Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    ecological resources exist in both Pearl Harbo , and Honolulu Harbor. .0 Pearl Harbor exhibits the characteristically high biological complexity and...Naval Shipyard. Bremerton, Washington; Pearl Harbor and Honolulu Harbor/Kewalo Basin. Hawaii; Mayport-St. John’s River Complex. Florida; Charleston...18 Bremerton (Sinclair Inlet) Washington ....................................... 20 Pearl Harbor. Honolulu Harbor and

  13. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch Special Surveys for Bellow Beach, Oahu, Hawaii 1992-1999 (NODC Accession 0014264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collected water quality samples at six sites near the mouth of streams and...

  14. Water quality data from the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, from the Coastal Waters of Hawaii from 05 November 2005 to 15 November 2006 (NODC Accession 0020391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collected water quality data at 8 sites centered on Hanalei Bay on the north...

  15. Hawaii Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP): digital still images from transects on Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii 2008-2010 (NCEI Accession 0104357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of digital still images from the Hawaii Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP) taken 2008-2010 from 24 sites within 5 main...

  16. Hawaii Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP): digital still images from transects on Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii 2011-2012 (NODC Accession 0119360)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of digital still images from the Hawaii Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP) taken 2011-2012 from 29 sites within 5 main...

  17. Hawaii Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP): digital still images from transects on Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii 2011-2012 (NCEI Accession 0119360)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of digital still images from the Hawaii Coral Reef Assessment and Monitoring Program (CRAMP) taken 2011-2012 from 29 sites within 5 main...

  18. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, India; Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464, Japan; Department of Physics, University of Hawaii, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, ...

  19. Contrastive Analysis, Difficulty, and Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller, John W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Revised and expanded version of a paper presented at the Pacific Conference on Contrastive Linguistics and Language Universals held at the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, in January 1971. (DS)

  20. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O' Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

    2010-04-01

    This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

  1. Hawaii Geothermal Project: initial Phase II progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    Results of Phase I of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP), which consisted of a two-year study on the potential of geothermal energy for the Big Island of Hawaii, are reviewed. One conclusion from Phase I was that preliminary results looked sufficiently encouraging to warrant the drilling of the first experimental geothermal well in the Puna area of the Big Island. During the first two months of drilling, parallel activity has continued in all research and support areas. Additional gravity, seismic, and electrical surveys were conducted; water and rock samples were collected; and analysis and interpretation of data has proceeded. Earlier work on mathematical and physical modeling of geothermal reservoirs was expanded; analysis of liquid-dominated geothermal systems continued; and studies on testing of geothermal wells were initiated. An environmental assessment statement of HGP No. 1 was prepared and baselines established for crucial environmental parameters. Economic, legal, and regulatory studies were completed and alternatives identified for the development of geothermal power in Hawaii. Early stages of the drilling program proceeded slowly. The initial 9 7/8-inch drill hole to 400 feet, as well as each of the three passes required to open the hole to 26 inches, were quite time consuming. Cementing of the 20-inch surface casing to a depth of 400 feet was successfully accomplished, and drilling beyond that depth has proceeded at a reasonable rate. Penetration below the surface casing to a depth of 1050 feet was accomplished at a drilling rate in excess of 150 feet per day, with partial circulation over the entire range.

  2. Hawaii Energy and Environmental Technologies Initiative 2010 (HEET10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Professional Master of Geoscience, Department of Geology and Geophysics of the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii...TEMPERATURE A~ IO RELATIVE HUIIflOITY Q.otrc UGHT "’"""’""’"""" -----,. :.00 ....... Lt)pet· lml ---- CARBON DIOXIlE - WIND DIRECnDN T ~ Web...5 ft-cd and Illuminance rat iO < 5). In the East buUdlng. du ring active days between 6:00AM and 6:30PM. the llghts were on for 6’ , of the time

  3. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

  4. Microbial oceanography and the Hawaii Ocean Time-series programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, David M; Church, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    The Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) programme has been tracking microbial and biogeochemical processes in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre since October 1988. The near-monthly time series observations have revealed previously undocumented phenomena within a temporally dynamic ecosystem that is vulnerable to climate change. Novel microorganisms, genes and unexpected metabolic pathways have been discovered and are being integrated into our evolving ecological paradigms. Continued research, including higher-frequency observations and at-sea experimentation, will help to provide a comprehensive scientific understanding of microbial processes in the largest biome on Earth.

  5. Epiphytes as an Indicator of Climate Change in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettwich, S. K.

    2013-12-01

    Although climate change threatens many ecosystems, current research in this field suggests tropical vegetation lags in response. Epiphytes, or arboreal vegetation, occupy tight, climate-defined niches compared with co-occurring life forms such as trees, yet there have been few studies of Hawaii's epiphyte communities. Because of Hawaii Island's natural climatic diversity, it is an ideal location to understand how these intrinsically climate sensitive plants interact with the atmosphere and evaluate how they may serve as a near-term indicator of climate change. Here we establish a baseline from which changes in corticolous epiphyte communities can be monitored as a leading indicator of likely forest changes by 1) investigating patterns of epiphyte abundance and species composition across elevation and precipitation gradients on windward Hawaii Island, and 2) using physiological measurements to investigate the relative importance of rain vs. fog in epiphyte-atmosphere interactions. The precipitation gradient keeps elevation constant at 1000m, while varying precipitation between 2,400 and 6,400 mm/year. The elevation gradient keeps rainfall constant at 3000mm/year, and varies elevation between 200 and 1750 m. Forest sites are dominated by Ohia Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) across broad geographic and climatological ranges thus allowing examination of epiphytes on this single host. We quantified bryophytes and vascular plants growing on Ohia trunks with standardized diameter and branching characteristics. Overall, epiphyte communities showed much finer scale responses to climate variation when compared with structurally dominant vegetation (which was broadly similar at all sites). The precipitation gradient exhibits a clear increase in abundance of all epiphyte groups and a definable increase in diversity with increasing rainfall. Results across the elevation gradient show a higher abundance of filmy ferns and bryophytes above the lifting condensation level (about

  6. A Climate Transect through Tropical Montane Rain Forest in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvik, James O.; Nullet, Dennis

    1994-11-01

    Two years of climate data from a transect of three surface meteorological stations on the windward slopes of Mauna Loa, Hawaii, are analyzed. The stations constitute a transect between 700 and 1640 m through the wet, montane rain forest zone below the trade-wind inversion. Data are compared with previous short-term measurements for the area, and previously unreported climate elements such as photosynthetically active radiation and soil temperature are presented. While absolute values vary between the sites, annual and diurnal climate patterns for the sites are remarkably similar, despite the altitudinal range involved and the close proximity of the trade-wind inversion level to the upper station.

  7. Kauai, Hawaii: Solar Resource Analysis and High Penetration PV Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, C.; Burman, K.

    2010-04-01

    Overview of the solar resource assessment conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in cooperation with Kauai Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) in Hawaii to determine the technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of solar renewable energy generation on the island of Kauaii through the use of photovoltaic (PV) arrays. The analysis, which was performed using a custom version of NREL's In My Back Yard (IMBY) software tool, showed that there is potential to generate enough energy to cover the peak load as reported for Kauai in 2007.

  8. International lunar observatory / power station: from Hawaii to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, S.

    Astronomy's great advantages from the Moon are well known - stable surface, diffuse atmosphere, long cool nights (14 days), low gravity, far side radio frequency silence. A large variety of astronomical instruments and observations are possible - radio, optical and infrared telescopes and interferometers; interferometry for ultra- violet to sub -millimeter wavelengths and for very long baselines, including Earth- Moon VLBI; X-ray, gamma-ray, cosmic ray and neutrino detection; very low frequency radio observation; and more. Unparalleled advantages of lunar observatories for SETI, as well as for local surveillance, Earth observation, and detection of Earth approaching objects add significant utility to lunar astronomy's superlatives. At least nine major conferences in the USA since 1984 and many elsewhere, as well as ILEWG, IAF, IAA, LEDA and other organizations' astronomy-from-the-Moon research indicate a lunar observatory / power station, robotic at first, will be one of the first mission elements for a permanent lunar base. An international lunar observatory will be a transcending enterprise, highly principled, indispensable, soundly and broadly based, and far- seeing. Via Astra - From Hawaii to the Moon: The astronomy and scie nce communities, national space agencies and aerospace consortia, commercial travel and tourist enterprises and those aspiring to advance humanity's best qualities, such as Aloha, will recognize Hawaii in the 21st century as a new major support area and pan- Pacific port of embarkation to space, the Moon and beyond. Astronomical conditions and facilities on Hawaii's Mauna Kea provide experience for construction and operation of observatories on the Moon. Remote and centrally isolated, with diffuse atmosphere, sub-zero temperature and limited working mobility, the Mauna Kea complex atop the 4,206 meter summit of the largest mountain on the planet hosts the greatest collection of large astronomical telescopes on Earth. Lunar, extraterrestrial

  9. C-MORE Scholars Program: Encouraging Hawaii`s Undergraduates to Explore the Ocean and Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Gibson, B.

    2008-05-01

    Hawaii residents make up 60% of the undergraduate student body at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), but they are not studying ocean and earth science. The UHM School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology offers four undergraduate majors: Geology (22%), Geology & Geophysics (19%), Meteorology (16%), and Global Environmental Science (23%). The numbers in parentheses show the proportion of Hawaii residents in each major, based on 2006 data obtained from the UHM Institutional Research Office. The numbers of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) are considerably smaller. The primary goal of the C-MORE Scholars Program, which will launch in Summer 2008, is to recruit and retain local Hawaii students (esp. NHPI) into earth and ocean science majors. To achieve this goal, the C-MORE Scholars Program will: 1. Actively recruit local students, partly by introducing them and their families to job opportunities in their community. Recruiting will be done in partnership with organizations that have successful track records in working with NHPI students; 2. Retain existing students through proactive counseling and course tutoring. Math and physics courses are stumbling blocks for many ocean and earth science majors, often delaying or even preventing graduation. By offering individual and group tutoring, we hope to help local students succeed in these courses; 3. Provide closely mentored, paid undergraduate research experiences at three different academic levels (trainee, intern, and fellow). This research is the cornerstone of the C-MORE Scholars Program. As students progress through the levels, they conduct higher level research with less supervision. Fellows (the highest level) may serve as peer advisors and tutors to underclassmen and assist with recruitment-related activities; and 4. Create a sense of community among the cohort of C-MORE scholars. A two-day summer residential experience will be instrumental in developing a strong cohort, emphasizing links

  10. Hawaii Geothermal Project summary report for Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-05-01

    Results of Phase I of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) are reported. It was a multidisciplinary research effort in the following program areas: (1) geophysical--exploratory surveys to define the most favorable areas for geothermal investigations; (2) engineering-- analytical models to assist in interpretation of geophysical results, and studies on energy recovery from hot brine; and (3) socioeconomic--legal and regulatory aspects of ownership and administration of geothermal resources, and economic planning studies on the impact of geothermal resources, and economic planning studies on the impact of geothermal power. The major emphasis of Phase I was on the Geophysical Program, since the issue of if and where geothermal resources exist is crucial to the project. However, parallel studies were initiated in all supporting programs, so that progress was made in identifying and clarifying the technological, environmental, legal, regulatory, social and economic problems that could impede the development of geothermal power in Hawaii. Although the analysis and interpretation of field data are still incomplete, the consensus developed early--both on the basis of preliminary geophysical results and from complementary studies conducted on the Big Island over the past several decades--that an exploratory drilling program would be essential to check out the subsurface conditions predicted by the surveys.

  11. Geotechnical properties of ash deposits near Hilo, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Jibson, R.W.; Wilson, R.C.; Buchanan-Banks, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two holes were hand augered and sampled in ash deposits near Hilo, Hawaii. Color, water content and sensitivity of the ash were measured in the field. The ash alternated between reddish brown and dark reddish brown in color and had water contents as high as 392%. A downhole vane shear device measured sensitivities as high as 6.9. A series of laboratory tests including grain size distribution, Atterberg limits, X-ray diffraction analysis, total carbon determination, vane shear, direct shear and triaxial tests were performed to determine the composition and geotechnical properties of the ash. The ash is very fine grained, highly plastic and composed mostly of gibbsite and amorphous material presumably allophane. The ash has a high angle of internal friction ranging from 40-43? and is classified as medium to very sensitive. A series of different ash layers was distinguished on the basis of plasticity and other geotechnical properties. Sensitivity may be due to a metastable fabric, cementation, leaching, high organic content, and thixotropy. The sensitivity of the volcanic ash deposits near Hilo is consistent with documented slope instability during earthquakes in Hawaii. The high angles of internal friction and cementation permit very steep slopes under static conditions. However, because of high sensitivity of the ash, these slopes are particularly susceptible to seismically-induced landsliding.

  12. Medical education in paradise: another facet of Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Joshua L; Kasuya, Richard; Sakai, Damon; Haning, William; Izutsu, Satoru

    2008-06-01

    Hawaii is synonymous with paradise in the minds of many. Few know that it is also an environment where high quality medical education is thriving. This paper outlines medical education initiatives beginning with native Hawaiian healers of centuries ago, and continuing to present-day efforts to support top-notch multicultural United States medical education across the continuum of training. The undergraduate medical education program has as its core community-based problem-based learning. The community basis of training is continued in graduate medical education, with resident doctors in the various programs rotating through different clinical experiences at various hospitals and clinics. Continuing medical education is provided by nationally accredited entities, within the local context. Educational outreach activities extend into primary and secondary schools, homeless shelters, neighbouring islands, and to countries throughout the Pacific. Challenges facing the medical education community in Hawaii are similar to those faced elsewhere and include incorporating more technology to improve efficiency, strengthening the vertical integration of the training continuum, better meeting the needs of the state, and paying for it all. Readers are invited to join in addressing these challenges to further the realisation of medical education in paradise as a paradise of medical education.

  13. Fatal toxoplasmosis in free-ranging endangered 'Alala from Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Massey, J. Gregory; Rideout, Bruce A.; Gardiner, Chris H.; Ledig, David B.; Kwok, O.C.H.; Dubey, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    The ‘Alala (Corvus hawaiiensis) is the most endangered corvid in the world, and intensive efforts are being made to reintroduce it to its former native range in Hawaii. We diagnosed Toxoplasma gondii infection in five free-ranging ‘Alala. One ‘Alala, recaptured from the wild because it was underweight and depressed, was treated with diclazuril (10 mg/kg) orally for 10 days. Antibodies were measured before and after treatment by the modified agglutination test (MAT) using whole T. gondii tachyzoites fixed in formalin and mercaptoethanol. The MAT titer decreased four-fold from an initial titer of 1:1,600 with remarkable improvement in physical condition. Lesions of toxoplasmosis also were seen in two partially scavenged carcasses and in a third fresh intact carcass. Toxoplasma gondii was confirmed immunohistochemically by using anti-T. gondii specific serum. The organism was also cultured by bioassay in mice from tissues of one of these birds and the brain of a fifth ‘Alala that did not exhibit lesions. The life cycle of the parasite was experimentally completed in cats. This is the first record of toxoplasmosis in ‘Alala, and the parasite appears to pose a significant threat and management challenge to reintroduction programs for ‘Alala in Hawaii.

  14. Molecular characterization of closteroviruses infecting Cordyline fruticosa L. in Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMelzer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In Hawaii, common green ti plants (Cordyline fruticosa L. have been shown to harbor Cordyline virus 1 (CoV-1 which, along with Little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1 and Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 (GLRaV-7, form a distinct clade within the family Closteroviridae. Preliminary work has indicated that, aside from CoV-1, three additional closteroviruses may infect common green ti plants in Hawaii. In this study, pyrosequencing was used to characterize the genomes of closteroviruses infecting a single common green ti plant. The sequence data confirmed the presence of CoV-1 as well as three additional closteroviruses. Although all four viruses had the same general genome organization, the sequence divergence between the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, heat shock protein 70 homolog, and coat protein ranged from 22 to 61%, indicating these represent four distinct closterovirus species. The names CoV-2, CoV-3, and CoV-4 are proposed for the three new viruses. Phylogenetic analyses placed CoV-2, CoV-3, and CoV-4 in the same clade as CoV-1, LChV-1, and GLRaV-7.

  15. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Hawaii, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjemian, Jennifer; Frankland, Timothy B; Daida, Yihe G; Honda, Jennifer R; Olivier, Kenneth N; Zelazny, Adrian; Honda, Stacey; Prevots, D Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies found Hawaiians and Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders to be independently at increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) and tuberculosis (TB). To better understand NTM infection and TB risk patterns in Hawaii, USA, we evaluated data on a cohort of patients in Hawaii for 2005-2013. Period prevalence of NTMPD was highest among Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese patients (>300/100,000 persons) and lowest among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (50/100,000). Japanese patients were twice as likely as all other racial/ethnic groups to have Mycobacterium abscessus isolated (adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.2) but were not at increased risk for infection with other mycobacteria species. In contrast, incidence of TB was stable and was lowest among Japanese patients (no cases) and highest among Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese patients (>50/100,000). Substantial differences exist in the epidemiology of NTMPD by race/ethnicity, suggesting behavioral and biologic factors that affect disease susceptibility.

  16. Females lead population collapse of the endangered Hawaii creeper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard A Freed

    Full Text Available Population collapses result from drastic environmental changes, but the sexes may differ in vulnerability. Collapse of the endangered Hawaii creeper (Oreomystis mana at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge resulted from food limitation associated with increased numbers of an introduced bird (Japanese white-eye, Zosterops japonicus, which competes with the creeper for food. Both creeper sexes had stunted bill growth and the greatest change in molt of native species in the community. With a surge in numbers of white-eyes, a recent cohort of adult females had very low survival after breeding, while adult males from the same cohort, and older females and males, continued to have high survival. Lower female survival resulted in a significantly more male-biased adult sex ratio. Recent low female survival was based on a great cost of reproduction, indicated by molt-breeding overlap that was previously avoided, and lower fat during the lengthy fledgling period. The difference in female survival between cohorts was associated with stunted bills from being reared in and then breeding in an increasingly poor food environment. Trend analysis of survey data indicate that the bird is declining throughout the refuge, with males being 72-80% of adults left six years after the white-eye increased. Competition over time was consistent with that previously documented over space on the Island of Hawaii. Adaptive management to recover the bird in this protected area needs to focus on improving both adult female survival and the adult sex ratio.

  17. Pathogenicity of avian malaria in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Carter T.; Dusek, Robert J.; Woods, K.L.; Iko, W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) and mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus) to the Hawaiian Islands (USA) is believed to have played a major role in the decline and extinction of native Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae). This introduced disease is thought to be one of the primary factors limiting recovery of honeycreepers at elevations below 1,200 m where native forest habitats are still relatively intact. One of the few remaining species of honeycreepers with a wide elevational distribution is the Hawaii Amakihi (Hernignathus virens). We measured morbidity and mortality in experimentally-infected Hawaii Amakihi that were captured in a high elevation, xeric habitat that is above the current range of the mosquito vector. Mortality among amakihi exposed to a single infective mosquito bite was 65% (13/20). All infected birds had significant declines in food consumption and a corresponding loss in body weight over the 60 day course of the experiment. Gross and microscopic lesions in birds that succumbed to malaria included enlargement and discoloration of the spleen and liver and parasitemias as high as 50% of circulating erythrocytes. Mortality in experimentally-infected amakihi was similar to that observed in Apapane (Himnatione sanguinea) and lower than that observed in Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) infected under similar conditions with the same parasite isolate. We conclude that the current elevational and geographic distribution of Hawaiian honeycreepers is determined by relative susceptibility to avian malaria.

  18. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.; Walker, A.; Roberts, J.; Falcey, J.

    2011-11-01

    DOD's U.S. Pacific Command has partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawaii installations. NREL selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  19. 2017-09-27T02:01:14Z https://www.ajol.info/index.php/all/oai oai:ojs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    - Eau -Plante, Institut d'Economie Rurale, BP 262, Bamako, Mali Bationo, A.; ICRISAT, BP 2814, Niamey, Niger Kablan, R. A.; The University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA Yost, R. S.; The University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA Hossner, L. R.; ...

  20. Alcohol consumption and gender in rural Samoa

    OpenAIRE

    Tui Agaapapalagi Lauilefue; et al; Barnes, Shawn S; Small, Christian R

    2010-01-01

    Shawn S Barnes1,4, Christian R Small2,4, Tui Agaapapalagi Lauilefue1, Jillian Bennett3, Seiji Yamada11University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, HI, USA; 2University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; 3Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu, HI, USA; 4Outbound Eye Health International, Honolulu, HI, USAIntroduction and aims: There are significant gender differences in alcohol consumption throughout the world. Here we report the results of an alcohol consumption sur...

  1. Hawaii Integrated Energy Assessment. Volume V. Rules, regulations, permits and policies affecting the development of alternate energy sources in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive presentaton of the major permits, regulations, rules, and controls which are likely to affect the development of alternate energy sources in Hawaii is presented. An overview of the permit process, showing the major categories and types of permits and controls for energy alternatives is presented. This is followed by a brief resume of current and projected changes designed to streamline the permit process. The permits, laws, regulations, and controls that are applicable to the development of energy alternatives in Hawaii are described. The alternate energy technologies affected, a description of the permit or control, and the requirements for conformance are presented for each applicable permit. Federal, state, and county permits and controls are covered. The individual energy technologies being considered as alternatives to the State's present dependence on imported fossil fuels are emphasized. The alternate energy sources covered are bioconversion, geothermal, ocean thermal, wind, solar (direct), and solid waste. For each energy alternative, the significant permits are summarized with a brief explanation of why they may be necessary. The framework of policy development at each of the levels of government with respect to the alternate energy sources is covered.

  2. Apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele genotype and the effect of depressive symptoms on the risk of dementia in men: the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Fumiko; Masaki, Kamal H; Petrovitch, Helen; Abbott, Robert D; Ross, G Webster; Taaffe, Dennis R; Launer, Lenore J; White, Lon R

    2008-08-01

    The apolipoprotein E epsilon4 (APOE epsilon4) allele is a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease. Recently, depression has also become recognized as a risk factor for dementia. However, the possible effect of the APOE genotype on the association between depression and dementia is unexamined. To examine the independent and combined effects of depression and APOE epsilon4 on the risk of dementia and its subtypes. The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study, a population-based prospective cohort study of Japanese American men. Depressive symptoms and presence of the APOE epsilon4 allele were assessed between March 1991 and October 1993 in 1932 cognitively healthy men aged 71 to 90 years. Incident cases of dementia were diagnosed during approximately 6 years of follow-up based on neurologic assessment at 2 repeated examinations (April 1994-April 1996 and October 1997-February 1999). Overall dementia, Alzheimer disease, and vascular dementia. The interaction of depression and APOE epsilon4 was statistically significant in the analytical models. Compared with men with neither APOE epsilon4 nor depression, the risk of dementia in nondepressed men with APOE epsilon4 was not significant (hazard ratio, 1.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.6-1.8); however, depressed men without APOE epsilon4 had a 1.6-fold greater risk (95% CI, 0.8-3.0), whereas depressed men with APOE epsilon4 had a 7.1-fold greater risk (95% CI, 3.0-16.7) of dementia. For subtypes, we found similar increased risks of Alzheimer disease. The APOE epsilon4 status modifies the association between depressive symptoms and dementia in elderly men. Because individuals with depressive symptoms and the APOE epsilon4 allele had a markedly increased risk of dementia, one might be especially watchful for early signs of dementia in the older person with depression who is also positive for the APOE epsilon4 allele. Because this cohort includes only men, further investigation in women is required.

  3. Does cultural assimilation influence prevalence and presentation of depressive symptoms in older Japanese American men? The Honolulu-Asia aging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Nobuharu; Takeshita, Junji; Ahmed, Iqbal; Chen, Randi; Petrovitch, Helen; Ross, G Webster; Masaki, Kamal

    2012-04-01

    : Sociocultural factors have been implicated in affecting prevalence, incidence, and diagnosis of depression but previous studies have included heterogeneous ethnic populations. We studied the influence of cultural assimilation on the prevalence and presentation of depressive symptoms in elderly Japanese American men. : This analysis was based on 3,139 Japanese American men aged 71-93 years who were participants in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study between 1991 and 1993. We created a Cultural Assimilation Scale (CAS) using 8 questions assessing the degree of Japanese identity and lifestyle compared to a Western one. Subjects were divided into tertiles of CAS score for analysis. Prevalence of depressive symptoms was measured using an 11-question version of the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale questionnaire, and presence of depressive symptoms was defined as score 9 or more. : Prevalent depressive symptoms did not reach a statistically significant association with CAS tertiles (Western, 10.8%; Mixed, 9.6%; and Japanese, 8.5%). However after adjusting for demographic, functional, and disease factors, the most culturally Japanese group had significantly lower odds for prevalent depressive symptoms, compared to the most Western group. Among the subset of subjects with a high-Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-11 score, there were no significant differences in both mean psychological scores and mean somatic scores between the three CAS groups. : Prevalent depressive symptoms were significantly lower among elderly Japanese American men who were most culturally Japanese, compared to more westernized men. Improving knowledge and understanding about the pathogenesis of depression will have important public health implications.

  4. Does cultural assimilation influence prevalence and presentation of depressive symptoms in older Japanese-American men? The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Nobuharu; Takeshita, Junji; Ahmed, Iqbal; Chen, Randi; Petrovitch, Helen; Ross, G. Webster; Masaki, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Objective Sociocultural factors have been implicated in affecting prevalence, incidence, and diagnosis of depression but previous studies have included heterogeneous ethnic populations. We studied the influence of cultural assimilation on the prevalence and presentation of depressive symptoms in elderly Japanese-American men. Method This analysis was based on 3,139 Japanese-American men aged 71–93 years who were participants in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study between 1991 and 1993. We created a Cultural Assimilation Scale (CAS) using 8 questions assessing the degree of Japanese identity and lifestyle compared to a Western one. Subjects were divided into tertiles of CAS score for analysis. Prevalence of depressive symptoms was measured using an 11-question version of the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale questionnaire (CESD-11), and presence of depressive symptoms was defined as score ≥ 9. Results Prevalent depressive symptoms did not reach a statistically significant association with CAS tertiles (Western 10.8%, Mixed 9.6%, Japanese 8.5%). However after adjusting for demographic, functional and disease factors, the most culturally Japanese group had significantly lower odds for prevalent depressive symptoms, compared to the most Western group. Among the subset of subjects with a high CESD-11 score, there were no significant differences in both mean psychological scores and mean somatic scores between the three Cultural Assimilation Scale groups. Conclusions Prevalent depressive symptoms were significantly lower among elderly Japanese-American men who were most culturally Japanese, compared to more Westernized men. Improving knowledge and understanding about the pathogenesis of depression will have important public health implications. PMID:21358388

  5. Geologic map of the northeast flank of Mauna Loa volcano, Island of Hawai'i, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2017-05-01

    SummaryMauna Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, has erupted 33 times since written descriptions became available in 1832. Some eruptions were preceded by only brief seismic unrest, while others followed several months to a year of increased seismicity.The majority of the eruptions of Mauna Loa began in the summit area (>12,000-ft elevation; Lockwood and Lipman, 1987); yet the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) was the source of eight flank eruptions since 1843 (table 1). This zone extends from the 13,680-ft-high summit towards Hilo (population ~60,000), the second largest city in the State of Hawaii. Although most of the source vents are farther than 30 km away, the 1880 flow from one of the vents extends into Hilo, nearly reaching Hilo Bay. The city is built entirely on flows erupted from the NERZ, most older than that erupted in 1843.Once underway, Mauna Loa's eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities in their path. For example, lava flows erupted from the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) in 1950 advanced at an average rate of 9.3 km per hour, and all three lobes reached the ocean within approximately 24 hours (Finch and Macdonald, 1953). The flows near the eruptive vents must have traveled even faster.In terms of eruption frequency, pre-eruption warning, and rapid flow emplacement, Mauna Loa poses an enormous volcanic-hazard threat to the Island of Hawai‘i. By documenting past activity and by alerting the public and local government officials of our findings, we can anticipate the volcanic hazards and substantially mitigate the risks associated with an eruption of this massive edifice.From the geologic record, we can deduce several generalized facts about the geologic history of the NERZ. The middle to the uppermost section of the rift zone were more active in the past 4,000 years than the lower part, perhaps due to buttressing of the lower east rift zone by Mauna Kea and Kīlauea volcanoes. The historical flows

  6. Hawaii ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Polygons and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector arcs and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Hawaii classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  7. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Raita Bank, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Raita Bank, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 166...

  8. Striped Marlin Hardparts and Gonads Collected by the PIRO Hawaii Longline Observer Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Compilation of all samples collected from striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) collected and brought to the Aiea Heights Research Facility by the PIRO Hawaii Longline...

  9. CRED Optical Validation Data in the Auau Channel, Hawaii, April 2009 to Support Benthic Habitat Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Optical validation data were collected using a RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL). Data were...

  10. CRED Optical Validation Data in the Auau Channel, Hawaii, February 2009 to Support Benthic Habitat Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Optical validation data were collected using a RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL). Data were...

  11. CRED Optical Validation Data in the Auau Channel, Hawaii, 2007, to Support Benthic Habitat Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Optical validation data were collected using a RCV-150 remotely operated vehicle (ROV) operated by the Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL). Data were...

  12. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Pioneer Bank, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry of the shelf and slope environments of Pioneer Bank, Hawaii, USA. Bottom coverage was achieved in depths between 20 and 1000 meters. The ASCII...

  13. Simrad em3002d Backscatter imagery of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Penguin Bank, Molokai, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters....

  14. Land-Cover Map for the Island of Maui, Hawaii, circa 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset describes land cover and vegetation for the island of Maui, Hawaii, circa 2017, hereinafter the 2017 land-cover map. The 2017 land-cover map is a...

  15. 77 FR 54902 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Input From Hawaii's Boat-based Anglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... From Hawaii's Boat-based Anglers AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ACTION... local boat-based anglers under NOAA's National Recreational Saltwater Fishing Initiative. II. Method of...

  16. CRED 20m Gridded bathymetry of Nihoa Island, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20m) of the shelf and slope environments of Nihoa Island, Hawaii, USA. The netCDF includes multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM120, Simrad...

  17. CRED REA Algal Assessments at Hawaii, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines, as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments, conducted at 17 sites at Hawaii in the Main...

  18. Gridded bathymetry of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA - Arc ASCII format

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5m) of the shelf environment of French Frigate Shoals, Hawaii, USA. The ASCII includes multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM3002d, and Reson...

  19. Simrad em300 Backscatter imagery of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Backscatter imagery extracted from gridded bathymetry of Ni'ihau Island, Hawaii, USA. These data provide almost complete coverage between 0 and 100 meters. The...

  20. Notes from the Field: Outbreak of Locally Acquired Cases of Dengue Fever--Hawaii, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, David; Viray, Melissa; Ushiroda, Jenny; Whelen, A Christian; Sciulli, Rebecca; Gose, Remedios; Lee, Roland; Honda, Eric; Park, Sarah Y

    2016-01-22

    On October 21, 2015, the Hawaii Department of Health (HDOH) was notified of a positive dengue immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody result in a woman residing on Hawaii Island (also known as the Big Island). The patient had no history of travel off the island, and other family members reported having similar signs and symptoms, which consisted of fever, headache, myalgias and arthralgias, and a generalized erythematous rash. HDOH initiated an investigation to identify any additional cases and potential exposure sources. On October 24, HDOH received report of a group of mainland U.S. visitors who had traveled together on Hawaii Island, including several who had developed a febrile illness. Additionally, on October 27, HDOH was notified of an unrelated person, also on Hawaii Island, with a positive dengue IgM result. As of November 26, 2015, HDOH had identified 107 laboratory-confirmed cases of dengue fever, with dates of onset ranging from September 11 to November 18, 2015.

  1. Hawaii ESI: CASS_PT (Coral Areas of Special Significance - Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for Coral Areas of Special Significance in coastal Hawaii. Coral Areas of Special Significance were...

  2. 1:1,000,000-Scale Contours of Hawaii - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer shows elevation contour lines for Hawaii. The map layer was derived from the 100-meter resolution elevation data set which is published by the...

  3. USGS Small-scale Dataset - 100-Meter Resolution Natural Earth of Hawaii 201308 TIFF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer contains a natural-earth image of Hawaii. The image is land cover in natural colors combined with shaded relief, which produces a naturalistic...

  4. EPA Pacific Southwest Enforcement Division Inspected Tax Map Key Polygons, Hawaii, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains the 64 tax map key polygons across the state of Hawaii that have been inspected by US EPA Pacific Southwest Enforcement Division as of...

  5. Maui Wastewater Plant Points, Maui County HI, 2008, Hawaii State Department of Health

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class contains wastewater treatment plant points for the county of Maui. Features were produced by a Hawaii DOH intern in 2008 and represent an...

  6. MoonRIDERS: NASA and Hawaii's Lunar Surface Flight Experiment for Late 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    This briefing will update the MoonRIDERS lunar surface flight experiment project between NASA-KSC, PISCES, and two Hawaii high schools investigating critical lunar dust-removal technologies. Launch planned in early 2017 on GLXP mission.

  7. Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Existing Building Energy Efficiency Analysis: November 17, 2009 - June 30, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, P.; Potes, A.

    2010-06-01

    In June 2009, the State of Hawaii enacted an Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) with a target of 4,300 gigawatt hours (GWh) by 2030 (Hawaii 2009). Upon setting this goal, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), working with select local stakeholders, partnered to execute the first key step toward attaining the EEPS goal: the creation of a high-resolution roadmap outlining key areas of potential electricity savings. This roadmap was divided into two core elements: savings from new construction and savings from existing buildings. BAH focused primarily on the existing building analysis, while NREL focused on new construction forecasting. This report presents the results of the Booz Allen Hamilton study on the existing building stock of Hawaii, along with conclusions on the key drivers of potential energy efficiency savings and on the steps necessary to attain them.

  8. NPP Tropical Forest: Maui, Hawaii, U.S.A., 1996-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to quantify net primary productivity as a function of rainfall in mesic to wet montane rainforests in Maui, Hawaii. The...

  9. Environmental Assessment for Waterfront Facilities Maintenance and Improvements, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex, Oahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    Commander, Navy Region Hawaii (CNRH) proposes to repair, maintain, and improve waterfront berthing and maintenance facilities for ships and submarines on an as-needed basis within the Pearl Harbor Naval Complex (PHNC...

  10. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5m) of the shelf and slope environments of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA. The ASCII includes multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM300, Simrad...

  11. 75 FR 17070 - Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Fishery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 665 RIN 0648-XU60 Fisheries in the Western Pacific; Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Fishery Closure AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ] ACTION...

  12. Wood CO2 efflux and foliar respiration for Eucalyptus in Hawaii and Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Ryan; Molly A. Cavaleri; Auro C. Almeida; Ricardo Penchel; Randy S. Senock; Jose Luiz Stape

    2009-01-01

    We measured CO2 efflux from wood for Eucalyptus in Hawaii for 7 years and compared these measurements with those on three- and four-and-a-halfyear- old Eucalyptus in Brazil. In Hawaii, CO2 efflux from wood per unit biomass declined ~10x from age two to age five, twice as much as the decline in tree growth. The CO2 efflux from wood in Brazil was 8-10· lower than that...

  13. A Tour de Force by Hawaii's invasive mammals: establishment, takeover, ecosystem restoration through eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Invasive mammals, large and small, have irreversibly altered Hawaii's ecosystems in numerous cases through unnatural herbivory, predation, and the transmission of zoonotic diseases, thereby causing the disproportionate extinction of flora and fauna that occur nowhere else on Earth. The control and eradication of invasive mammals is the single most expensive management activity necessary for restoring ecological integrity to many natural areas of Hawai'i and other Pacific Islands, and has already

  14. Breastfeeding Supports and Services in Rural Hawaii: Perspectives of Community Healthcare Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanie L. Flood

    2017-01-01

    Background. In the state of Hawaii, breastfeeding initiation rates are higher than the national average but fall below target rates for duration. Accessing breastfeeding support services is challenging for mothers living in rural areas of the state. Healthcare workers (HCWs) working with mothers and infants are in a key position to encourage and support breastfeeding efforts. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of a Hawaiian community's (specifically Hilo, Hawai?i) bre...

  15. Climate change adaptation and planning: An example from Kailua Beach, Oahu, Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Bohlander, Andy; Eversole, Dolan

    2010-01-01

    The University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program (UHSG) in partnership with the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands (OCCL) is developing a beach and dune management plan for Kailua Beach on the eastern shoreline of Oahu. The objective of the plan is to develop a comprehensive beach management and land use development plan for Kailua Beach that reflects the state of scientific understanding of beach processes in Kailua Bay and abut...

  16. Stripping of Acacia koa bark by rats on Hawaii and Maui

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Scowcroft; Howard F. Sakai

    1984-01-01

    Koa (Acacia koa) is the most valuable native timber species in Hawaii. Bark stripping of young trees by rats, a common but unstudied phenomenon, may affect survival, growth, and quality of koa. Up to 54% of the trees sampled in 4- to 6-year-old stands in the Laupahoehoe and Waiakea areas on Hawaii were wounded by rats; only 5% of trees sampled in a l-year-old stand on...

  17. Potential Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Projects in the Haleiwa Region, Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    the Haleiwa Region, Oahu , Hawaii by Thomas D. Smith PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) provides a summary of...Regional Sediment Management (RSM) opportunities in the Haleiwa Region on the island of Oahu , Hawaii. The intent of this CHETN is the identification...been instrumental in quantifying coastal processes and identifying sediment related issues in various regions shown on Figure 1: (a) Island of Oahu

  18. Hawaii Geothermal Project initial Phase II progress report, February 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-02-01

    Additional gravity, seismic, and electrical surveys were conducted; water and rock samples were collected; and analysis and interpretation of data has proceeded. The engineering program has expanded its earlier work on mathematical and physical modeling of geothermal reservoirs; continued with the analysis of liquid-dominated geothermal systems; and initiated studies on geothermal well testing. An environmental assessment statement of HGP No. 1 was prepared and baselines established for crucial environmental parameters. Economic, legal, and regulatory studies were completed and alternatives identified for the development of geothermal power in Hawaii. The Drilling Program has provided assistance in contract negotiations, preparation of the drilling and testing programs, and scientific input to the drilling operation. (MHR)

  19. Evidence of Newell's Shearwater breeding in Puna District, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michelle H.; Ritchotte, George L.

    1997-01-01

    Nocturnal surveys using auditory cues and night-vision equipment were conducted during the seabird breeding season in 1993 to determine use of inland areas in the Puna District, Hawaii by Newell's Shearwater (Puffinus auricularus newelli). Two hundred sixty Newell's Shearwater auditory or visual detections were made during 275 survey hours from 23 Jul. 1993 - 20 Sep. 1993. Mean detection rates were 1.26 birds/h at Puulena Crater (n = 160 Newell's Shearwater detections), 1.05 birds/h at Heiheiahulu (n = 99) and 0.04 birds/ h at Puu Kaliu (n = 2). Vocalizing peaked between 50 and 90 min after sunset and 4 h before sunrise. Although night-vision equipment was used on most of the seabird surveys, only 4% of seabirds were detected visually. Two road-killed birds collected in Puna in June 1993, and four burrows located in Puulena Crater after the 1994 breeding season, provided additional evidence of breeding.

  20. Geologic Map of the State of Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.; Sinton, John M.; Watkins, Sarah E.; Brunt, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    About This Map The State's geology is presented on eight full-color map sheets, one for each of the major islands. These map sheets, the illustrative meat of the publication, can be downloaded in pdf format, ready to print. Map scale is 1:100,000 for most of the islands, so that each map is about 27 inches by 36 inches. The Island of Hawai`i, largest of the islands, is depicted at a smaller scale, 1:250,000, so that it, too, can be shown on 36-inch-wide paper. The new publication isn't limited strictly to its map depictions. Twenty years have passed since David Clague and Brent Dalrymple published a comprehensive report that summarized the geology of all the islands, and it has been even longer since the last edition of Gordon Macdonald's book, Islands in the Sea, was revised. Therefore the new statewide geologic map includes an 83-page explanatory pamphlet that revisits many of the concepts that have evolved in our geologic understanding of the eight main islands. The pamphlet includes simplified page-size geologic maps for each island, summaries of all the radiometric ages that have been gathered since about 1960, generalized depictions of geochemical analyses for each volcano's eruptive stages, and discussion of some outstanding topics that remain controversial or deserving of additional research. The pamphlet also contains a complete description of map units, which enumerates the characteristics for each of the state's many stratigraphic formations shown on the map sheets. Since the late 1980s, the audience for geologic maps has grown as desktop computers and map-based software have become increasingly powerful. Those who prefer the convenience and access offered by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can also feast on this publication. An electronic database, suitable for most GIS software applications, is available for downloading. The GIS database is in an Earth projection widely employed throughout the State of Hawai`i, using the North American datum of

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions in Hawaii: Household and visitor expenditure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konan, Denise Eby, E-mail: konan@hawaii.ed [Department of Economics, Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Saunders Hall 542, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chan, H.L., E-mail: hingc@hawaii.ed [OmniTrak Group Inc., 1250 Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop Street, Honolulu, HI 96813 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    This paper focuses on petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions associated with economic activities in Hawaii. Data on economic activity, petroleum consumption by type (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel, residual, propane), and emissions factors are compiled and analyzed. In the baseline year 1997, emissions are estimated to total approximately 23.2 million metric tons of carbon, 181 thousand metric tons of nitrous oxide, and 31 thousand metric tons of methane in terms of carbon-equivalent global warming potential over a 100-year horizon. Air transportation, electricity, and other transportation are the key economic activity responsible for GHG emissions associated with fossil fuel use. More than 22% of total emissions are attributed to visitor expenditures. On a per person per annum basis, emission rates generated by visitor demand are estimated to be higher than that of residents by a factor of 4.3 for carbon, 3.2 for methane, and 4.8 for nitrous oxide.

  2. Analysis of hypothetical geothermal hydrogen systems in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Penev, Mike [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Devlin, Peter [U.S. Department of Energy, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Analysis is presented for three theoretical geothermal energy systems on the Big Island of Hawaii. This preliminary study evaluates performance and economics for several strategies for enhancing integration of a geothermal renewable resource into the grid and for producing vehicle fuel by way of hydrogen production and storage. The analysis includes production of hydrogen and ammonia for use as fuels in light duty vehicles, and production of peak power using hydrogen produced off-peak, stored, and later use in a steam turbine to produce electricity during peak demand. Technological performance and costs are assessed for a near-term installation (next 2-3 years) and are compared on an apples-to-apples basis using consistent economic assumptions for two key metrics: (1) the ratio of geothermal energy product costs to comparable commodity prices, and (2) fuel costs per mile. (orig.)

  3. The Status of Hawaii Askaryan Salt Radi Array (HASRA) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milincic, R [3141 Chestnut St. 12-816, Philadelphia, PA, 19104 USA (United States); Gorham, P W [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Miocinovic, P [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Rosen, M [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States); Saltzberg, D [3166 Knudsen Hall, Los Angeles CA 90095 (United States); Varner, G [2505 Correa Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96822 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    The exploration of GZK neutrinos through their interactions with matter via produced radio signals requires highly homogeneous material with small attenuation for radio frequencies. Rock salt in some salt dome formations provide dielectric material with great potential to host a large scale (100 km{sup 3}) water-equivalent ultra-high energy neutrino detector The Hawaii Askaryan in Salt Radio Array (HASRA) detector was built as a testbed for exploration of coherent radio Cherenkov emission in salt from interaction of cosmic ray induced cascades. We report results of 1 year of measurements of Askaryan effect with HASRA detector. Peformance of the detector its sensitivity and analysis of a newest data set will be presented.

  4. Greenhouse gas emissions in Hawaii. Household and visitor expenditure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konan, Denise Eby [Department of Economics, Economic Research Organization, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, Saunders Hall 542, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chan, Hing Ling [OmniTrak Group Inc., 1250 Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop Street, Honolulu, HI 96813 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    This paper focuses on petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions associated with economic activities in Hawaii. Data on economic activity, petroleum consumption by type (gasoline, diesel, aviation fuel, residual, propane), and emissions factors are compiled and analyzed. In the baseline year 1997, emissions are estimated to total approximately 23.2 million metric tons of carbon, 181 thousand metric tons of nitrous oxide, and 31 thousand metric tons of methane in terms of carbon-equivalent global warming potential over a 100-year horizon. Air transportation, electricity, and other transportation are the key economic activity responsible for GHG emissions associated with fossil fuel use. More than 22% of total emissions are attributed to visitor expenditures. On a per person per annum basis, emission rates generated by visitor demand are estimated to be higher than that of residents by a factor of 4.3 for carbon, 3.2 for methane, and 4.8 for nitrous oxide. (author)

  5. Monitoring very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Benítez, M. C.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Wilson, David; Okubo, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    On 19 March, 2008 eruptive activity returned to the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii with the formation of a new vent within the Halemaumau pit crater. The new vent has been gradually increasing in size, and exhibiting sustained degassing and the episodic bursting of gas slugs at the surface of a lava pond ∼200 m below the floor of Halemaumau. The spectral characteristics, source location obtained by radial semblance, and Hidden Markov Model pattern recognition of the degassing burst signals are consistent with an increase in gas content in the magma transport system beginning in October, 2007. This increase plateaus between March – September 2008, and exhibits a fluctuating pattern until 31 January, 2010, suggesting that the release of gas is slowly diminishing over time.

  6. Age and petrology of alkalic postshield and rejuvenated-stage lava from Kauai, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1988-01-01

    At the top of the Waimea Canyon Basalt on the island of Kauai, rare flows of alkalic postshield-stage hawaiite and mugearite overlie tholeiitic flows of the shield stage. These postshield-stage flows are 3.92 Ma and provide a younger limit for the age of the tholeiitic shield stage. The younger Koloa Volcanics consist of widespread alkalic rejuvenated-stage flows and vents of alkalic basalt, basanite, nephelinite, and nepheline melilitite that erupted between 3.65 and 0.52 Ma. All the flows older than 1.7 Ma occur in the west-northwestern half of the island and all the flows younger than 1.5 Ma occur in the east-southeastern half. The lithologies have no spatial or chronological pattern. The flows of the Koloa Volcanics are near-primary magmas generated by variable small degrees of partial melting of a compositionally heterogeneous garnet-bearing source that has about two-thirds the concentration of P2O5, rare-earth elements, and Sr of the source of the Honolulu Volcanics on the island of Oahu. The same lithology in the Koloa and Honolulu Volcanics is generated by similar degrees of partial melting of distinct source compositions. The lavas of the Koloa Volcanics can be generated by as little as 3 percent to as much as 17 percent partial melting for nepheline melilitite through alkalic basalt, respectively. Phases that remain in the residue of the Honolulu Volcanics, such as rutile and phlogopite, are exhausted during formation of the Koloa Volcanics at all but the smallest degrees of partial melting. The mantle source for Kauai lava becomes systematically more depleted in 87Sr/86Sr as the volcano evolves from the tholeiitic shield stage to the alkalic postshield stage to the alkalic rejuvenated stage: at the same time, the lavas become systematically more enriched in incompatible trace elements. On a shorter timescale, the lavas of the Koloa Volcanics display the same compositional trends, but at a lower rate of change. The source characteristics of the Koloa

  7. Validity and reliability of the Hawaii anaerobic run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Iris F; Stickley, Christopher D; Lentz, Melissa A; Wages, Jennifer J; Yanagi, Kazuhiko; Hetzler, Ronald K

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the Hawaii anaerobic run test (HART) by comparing anaerobic capacity measures obtained to those during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT). Ninety-six healthy physically active volunteers (age, 22.0 ± 2.8 years; height, 163.9 ± 9.5 cm; body mass, 70.6 ± 14.7 kg; body fat %, 19.29 ± 5.39%) participated in this study. Each participant performed 2 anaerobic capacity tests: the WAnT and the HART by random assignment on separate days. The reliability of the HART was calculated from 2 separate trials of the test and then determined through intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Blood samples were collected, and lactate was analyzed both pretest and posttest for each of the 2 exercise modes. Heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were also measured pre- and post-exercise. Hawaii anaerobic run test peak and mean momentum were calculated as body mass times highest or average split velocity, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients between trials of the HART for peak and mean momentum were 0.98 and 0.99, respectively (SEM = 18.8 and 25.7, respectively). Validity of the HART was established through comparison of momentum on the HART with power on the WAnT. High correlations were found between peak power and peak momentum (r = 0.88), as well as mean power and mean momentum (r = 0.94). The HART was considered to be a reliable test of anaerobic power. The HART was also determined to be a valid test of anaerobic power when compared with the WAnT. When testing healthy college-aged individuals, the HART offers an easy and inexpensive alternative maximal effort anaerobic power test to other established tests.

  8. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of applications, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. For the State of Hawaii, elevation data are critical for infrastructure and construction management, flood risk management, geologic resource assessment and hazard mitigation, natural resources conservation, coastal zone management, and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary sources for deriving elevation models and other datasets. Federal, State, Tribal, U.S. territorial, and local agencies work in partnership to (1) replace data that are older and of lower quality and (2) provide coverage where publicly accessible data do not exist. A joint goal of State and Federal partners is to acquire consistent, statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment evaluated multiple elevation data acquisition options to determine the optimal data quality and data replacement cycle relative to cost to meet the identified requirements of the user community. The evaluation demonstrated that lidar acquisition at quality level 2 for the conterminous United States, Hawaii, and selected U.S. territories, and quality level 5 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) data for Alaska, all with a 6- to 10-year acquisition cycle, provided the highest benefit/cost ratios. The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative selected an 8-year acquisition cycle for the respective quality levels. 3DEP, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey, the Office of Management and Budget Circular A–16 lead agency for terrestrial elevation data, responds to the growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional (3D) representations of the Nation’s natural and constructed features.

  9. Active surveillance and risk factors for leptospirosis in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, D M; Pang, L; Minette, H P; Wakida, C K; Fujimoto, W J; Manea, S J; Kunioka, R; Middleton, C R

    1993-01-01

    A clinic-hospital-based leptospirosis surveillance program was conducted to determine the morbidity and risk factors in nonepidemic settings. The study was conducted on two islands, Kauai and Hawaii (Big Island), in the state of Hawaii for one year during 1988 and 1989. An active, more comprehensive case detection system was used on the Big Island that enabled us to determine the incidence of clinical disease. Subjects from both islands were used to conduct a case-control study for risk factors. One hundred seventy-two subjects from the Big Island (who presented with any two of the following symptoms: fever, headache, myalgia, or nausea/vomiting) were enrolled in the study. Twenty cases were diagnosed by culture, serology, or fluorescent antibody tissue staining at autopsy. Six cases required hospitalization and two succumbed to fatal infections. We estimated that these cases represented an annual incidence rate of 128 per 100,000 person-years in our target population. For 33 cases, 77 controls were matched for island, age, sex, and time of onset of illness. Interviews were conducted retrospectively in a double-blinded fashion with cases and controls and evaluated approximately 30 risk factors. Factors that were associated most strongly with development of leptospirosis were household use of rainwater catchment systems (P = 0.003), presence of skin cuts during the incubation period (P = 0.008), contact with cattle or the urine of cattle (P = 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively), and handling of animal tissues (P = 0.005).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Modeling Anomalous Rayleigh-wave Azimuthal Anisotropy near Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Gabi; Ramme, Lennart

    2017-04-01

    The 2005-2007 Hawaiian PLUME (Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment) deployment yielded continuous seismic data at ten land stations and nearly 70 ocean bottom sites. Both the usage broad-band seismometers as well as the central location of Hawaii with good azimuthal seismicity coverage has allowed us to conduct a comprehensive analysis of surface wave azimuthal anisotropy at periods between 20 and 100 s. We use a sub-array approach to obtain 'in-situ' estimates of azimuthal variations in the attempt to minimize imaging trade-offs and cross-mapping with lateral heterogeneity. We apply the standard Smith-and-Dahlen trigonometric expansion to express azimuthal variations. A systematic comparison between results obtained for different truncation levels in the trigonometric expansion allows us to assess stability of the results and assign error bars. At long periods, azimuthal anisotropy is increasingly disturbed away from the pattern expected for a cooling Pacific plate where ambient plate motion is 'frozen' to the bottom of the thickening plate. We present results from grid-search modeling for best-fitting several-layer models that contain anisotropic mantle material with hexagonal symmetry. Finding the optimal orientation of the symmetry axis and the corresponding thickness of anisotropic layers are some of the focus aspects in the grid search. Results suggest that ascending mantle plume material penetrates the asthenosphere to the southwest of Hawaii but does not reach into the upper lithosphere. Part of this work was conducted through a DAAD-sponsored (Deutscher Akademischer AustauschDienst) undergraduate RISE fellowship.

  11. Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative 2008-2018: Celebrating 10 Years of Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-04

    Launched in January 2008, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) set out transform Hawaii into a world model for energy independence and sustainability. With its leading-edge vision to transition to a Hawaii-powered clean energy economy within a single generation, HCEI established the most aggressive clean energy goals in the nation. Ten years after its launch, HCEI has significantly outdistanced the lofty targets established as Hawaii embarked on its ambitious quest for energy independence. The state now generates 27 percent of its electricity sales from clean energy sources like wind and solar, placing it 12 percentage points ahead of HCEI's original 2015 RPS target of 15 percent. This brochure highlights some of HCEI's key accomplishments and impacts during its first decade and reveals how its new RPS goal of 100 percent by 2045, which the Hawaii state legislature adopted in May 2015, has positioned Hawaii to become the first U.S. state to produce all of its electricity from indigenous renewable sources.

  12. Potential of Renewable Energy to Reduce the Dependence of the State of Hawaii on Oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arent, D.; Barnett, J.; Mosey, G.; Wise, A.

    2009-01-01

    Deriving nearly 90% of its primary energy resources from oil, the State of Hawaii is more dependent on oil than any other U.S. state. The price of electricity in Hawaii is also more than twice the U.S. average. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 directed assessment of the economic implications of Hawaii's oil dependence and the feasibility of using renewable energy to help meet the state's electrical generation and transportation fuel use. This paper is based on the assessments and report prepared in response to that directive.Current total installed electrical capacity for the State of Hawaii is 2,414 MWe, 83% of which is fuel-oil generated, but already including about 170 MWe of renewable capacity. The assessments identified about 2,133 MWe (plus another estimated 2,000 MWe of rooftop PV systems) of potential new renewable energy capacity. Most notable, in addition to the rooftop solar potential, is 750 MWe and 140 MWe of geothermal potential on Hawaii and Maui, respectively, 840 MWe of potential wind capacity, primarily on Lanai and Molokai, and one potential 285 MWe capacity specific solar project (PV or solar thermal) identified on Kauai. Important social, political, and electrical-grid infrastructure challenges would need to be overcome to realize this potential. Among multiple crop and acreage scenarios, biofuels assessment found 360,000 acres in Hawaii zoned for agriculture and appropriate for sugarcane, enough to produce 429 million gallons of ethanol-enough to meet about 64% of current 2005 Hawaiian gasoline use. Tropical oil seed crops-potentially grown on the same land-might meet a substantial portion of current diesel use, but there has been little experience growing such crops in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy and the State of Hawaii initiated in January 2008 a program that seeks to reduce Hawaii's oil dependence and provide 70% of the state's primary energy from clean energy sources by 2030. The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative

  13. A prospective study of the health effects of alcohol consumption in middle-aged and elderly men. The Honolulu Heart Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R J; Burchfiel, C M; Reed, D M; Wergowske, G; Chiu, D

    1994-02-01

    The study objective was to determine the association between reported alcohol consumption and total mortality, mortality from selected causes, and incident nonfatal chronic disease events in middle-aged (51 to 64 years old) and elderly (65 to 75 years old) men during an approximate 15-year follow-up period. We conducted a prospective epidemiological study of Japanese-American men who were participating in the Honolulu Heart Program and were free from coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer at baseline examination and at subsequent reexamination 6 years later. Self-reported alcohol consumption was determined twice: at the baseline examination in 1965 through 1968 and at reexamination approximately 6 years later (1971 through 1974). Four primary alcohol consumption groups who reported similar alcohol intake at the time of these two clinical examinations were considered: abstainers and light (1 to 14 mL of alcohol per day), moderate (15 to 39 mL of alcohol per day), and heavy (> or = 40 mL of alcohol per day) drinkers. Study end points were also determined in very light (1 to 4.9 mL of alcohol per day) drinkers and in men who reported a change in their alcohol intake between examinations. Longitudinal follow-up was carried out through the end of 1988 with determination of selected fatal and nonfatal events according to alcohol intake. After controlling for several potentially confounding factors, total mortality exhibited a J-shaped pattern in relation to alcohol consumption in middle-aged and elderly men. There was a trend for lower rates of occurrence of combined fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease events with increasing alcohol consumption in both middle-aged and elderly men. Increasing alcohol consumption was related to an increased risk of fatal and nonfatal strokes in middle-aged men, whereas elderly light and moderate drinkers were at increased risk for fatal and nonfatal strokes. Heavy drinkers were at increased risk for fatal and

  14. Growth and maximum size of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carl G; O'Malley, Joseph M; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; Dale, Jonathan J; Hutchinson, Melanie R; Anderson, James M; Royer, Mark A; Holland, Kim N

    2014-01-01

    Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier) are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL), with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts) compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (24°13'17″N 109°52'14″W), in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites  =  approximately 5,000 km), after 366 days at liberty (DAL). We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured). We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates.

  15. Growth and maximum size of tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier in Hawaii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl G Meyer

    Full Text Available Tiger sharks (Galecerdo cuvier are apex predators characterized by their broad diet, large size and rapid growth. Tiger shark maximum size is typically between 380 & 450 cm Total Length (TL, with a few individuals reaching 550 cm TL, but the maximum size of tiger sharks in Hawaii waters remains uncertain. A previous study suggested tiger sharks grow rather slowly in Hawaii compared to other regions, but this may have been an artifact of the method used to estimate growth (unvalidated vertebral ring counts compounded by small sample size and narrow size range. Since 1993, the University of Hawaii has conducted a research program aimed at elucidating tiger shark biology, and to date 420 tiger sharks have been tagged and 50 recaptured. All recaptures were from Hawaii except a single shark recaptured off Isla Jacques Cousteau (24°13'17″N 109°52'14″W, in the southern Gulf of California (minimum distance between tag and recapture sites  =  approximately 5,000 km, after 366 days at liberty (DAL. We used these empirical mark-recapture data to estimate growth rates and maximum size for tiger sharks in Hawaii. We found that tiger sharks in Hawaii grow twice as fast as previously thought, on average reaching 340 cm TL by age 5, and attaining a maximum size of 403 cm TL. Our model indicates the fastest growing individuals attain 400 cm TL by age 5, and the largest reach a maximum size of 444 cm TL. The largest shark captured during our study was 464 cm TL but individuals >450 cm TL were extremely rare (0.005% of sharks captured. We conclude that tiger shark growth rates and maximum sizes in Hawaii are generally consistent with those in other regions, and hypothesize that a broad diet may help them to achieve this rapid growth by maximizing prey consumption rates.

  16. Quantitative biomass and time required to remove Gracliaria Salicornia and Kappaphycus from 1-meter-squared plots in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii in Spring 2002 (NODC Accession 0001011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primarily from the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative, yet also support from The Nature Conservancy of Hawai'i, State Division of Aquatic Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  17. Quantitave Biomass and Time Required to Remove Gracliaria Salicornia and Kappaphycus from 1-Meter-Squared Plots in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii in Spring 2002, (NODC Accession 0001011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primarily from the Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative, yet also support from The Nature Conservancy of Hawai'i, State Division of Aquatic Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  18. Establishment of a Permanent Campus for the Seafarers Training Center of the Paul Hall Institute for Human Development, in Kalaelova, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dietz, Neil

    2006-01-01

    ... (the former Barber's Point Naval Air Station). The facility is located on Hawaii Army National Guard property licensed for use by the Seafarers Training Center, as the Hawaii campus of the Paul Hall Institute for Human Development...

  19. Flood-Frequency Estimates for Streams on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i, State of Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Rosa, Sarah N.; Yeung, Chiu W.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides an updated analysis of the magnitude and frequency of peak stream discharges in Hawai`i. Annual peak-discharge data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during and before water year 2008 (ending September 30, 2008) at stream-gaging stations were analyzed. The existing generalized-skew value for the State of Hawai`i was retained, although three methods were used to evaluate whether an update was needed. Regional regression equations were developed for peak discharges with 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence intervals for unregulated streams (those for which peak discharges are not affected to a large extent by upstream reservoirs, dams, diversions, or other structures) in areas with less than 20 percent combined medium- and high-intensity development on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i. The generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression equations relate peak stream discharge to quantified basin characteristics (for example, drainage-basin area and mean annual rainfall) that were determined using geographic information system (GIS) methods. Each of the islands of Kaua`i,O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i was divided into two regions, generally corresponding to a wet region and a dry region. Unique peak-discharge regression equations were developed for each region. The regression equations developed for this study have standard errors of prediction ranging from 16 to 620 percent. Standard errors of prediction are greatest for regression equations developed for leeward Moloka`i and southern Hawai`i. In general, estimated 100-year peak discharges from this study are lower than those from previous studies, which may reflect the longer periods of record used in this study. Each regression equation is valid within the range of values of the explanatory variables used to develop the equation. The regression equations were developed using peak-discharge data from streams that are mainly unregulated, and they should not be used to

  20. 7 CFR 318.13-6 - Transit of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii or the territories into or through the continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transit of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii or the... the Territories § 318.13-6 Transit of fruits and vegetables from Hawaii or the territories into or through the continental United States. Fruits and vegetables from Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, the...

  1. Ground Water Atlas of the United States: Segment 13, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Whitehead, R.L.; Oki, Delwyn S.; Gingerich, Stephen B.; Olcott, Perry G.

    1997-01-01

    and 1 79 degrees west longitude and about 19 to 28 degrees north latitude. The main inhabited islands are at the southeastern end of the group (fig. 31 ); not all the small islands, reefs, and shoals included in the State are shown. The Hawaiian islands are geologically youngest in the southeast and oldest in the northwest. This report discusses only the eight largest islands near the southeastern end of the group; these eight main islands account for practically all of the 6,426-square-mile land area of the State. The eight islands and their approximate size, in square miles, from southeast to northwest are Hawaii, 4 ,021; Maui, 728; Kahoolawe, 45; Lanai, 141; Molokai, 259; Oahu, 603; Kauai, 553; and Niihau, 71. The total resident population in 1995 was 1, 179,198, of which about 75 percent were on the island of Oahu. Honolulu, which is on Oahu, is the largest and most developed city and had a population of 369,485 in 1995. In addition to the resident population, a visitor population of about 150,000 has typically been present at any given time during the 1990's. Many of these visitors stay in Honolulu. The State Land Use Commission is responsible for classifying the lands of the State into one of four categories called districts: conservation, agricultural, urban, or rural (fig. 32). In 1995, conservation, agricultural, urban, and rural districts accounted for about 48, 47, 5, and 0.2 percent of the land area in the State, respectively. Conservation districts include areas necessary for protecting the State's watersheds and water resources and are typically located in high-altitude, high-rainfall areas. Much of the urban development in Hawaii is in the lowland coastal areas of each island. Agricultural irrigation can place large demands on the water resources; prior to the 1990's, one of the largest uses of water was for sugarcane irrigation. The five largest islands (Hawaii, Maui, Molokai, Oahu, and Kauai) have extensive areas of mountainous land where urbanization

  2. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  3. Environmental Assessment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Well Flow Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-11-01

    The Hawaii Geothermal Project, a coordinated research effort of the University of Hawaii, funded by the County and State of Hawaii, and ERDA, was initiated in 1973 in an effort to identify, generate, and use geothermal energy on the Big Island of Hawaii. A number of stages are involved in developing geothermal power resources: exploration, test drilling, production testing, field development, power plant and powerline construction, and full-scale production. Phase I of the Project, which began in the summer of 1973, involved conducting exploratory surveys, developing analytical models for interpretation of geophysical results, conducting studies on energy recovery from hot brine, and examining the legal and economic implications of developing geothermal resources in the state. Phase II of the Project, initiated in the summer of 1975, centers on drilling an exploratory research well on the Island of Hawaii, but also continues operational support for the geophysical, engineering, and socioeconomic activities delineated above. The project to date is between the test drilling and production testing phase. The purpose of this assessment is to describe the activities and potential impacts associated with extensive well flow testing to be completed during Phase II.

  4. Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Climate, Ambient Air Quality, and Noise (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Hamilton, C.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 withdrawing its Notice of Intent of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate and air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui, and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of hydrogen sulfide. the scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

  5. Characterization of a New Burrowing Nematode Population, Radopholus citrophilus, from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettel, R N; Kaplan, D T; Dickson, D W

    1986-01-01

    Karyotype, host preference, isozyzme patterns, morphometrics, and mating behavior of two burrowing nematode populations from Hawaii, one infecting Anthurium sp. and the second infecting Musa sp., were compared with Radopholus similis and R. citrophilus populations from Florida. The population from Anthurium sp. had five chromosomes (n = 5), and that from Musa sp. had four (n = 4). Neither of the Hawaiian nematode populations persisted in roots of Citrus limon or C. aurantium. Anthurium clarinerivum and A. hookeri were hosts of the burrowing nematode population from anthurium in Hawaii and of R. citrophilus from Florida, whereas the two anthurium species were poor hosts of the population from Musa sp. in Hawaii and R. similis from Florida. The isozyme pattern of the population isolated from anthurium was identical to that of R. citrophigus, whereas the pattern of the population from banana in Hawaii was identical to that of R. similis. Mating behavior between the burrowing nematode population isolated from Anthurium sp. and a Florida population of R. citrophilus supports their close taxonomic relationship. Mating was observed between the population from Anthurium sp. and the Florida population of R. citrophilus but not between the Hawaiian burrowing nematode population isolated from Musa sp. and a Florida population of R. citrophilus. These findings indicate that a previously unidentified population of R. citrophilus which does not parasitize citrus occurs in Hawaii.

  6. Irradiation to control insects in fruits and vegetables for export from Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, P.A. E-mail: pfollett@pbarc.ars.usda.gov

    2004-10-01

    Phytosanitary or quarantine treatments are often required to disinfest host commodities of economically important arthropod pests before they are moved through market channels to areas where the pest does not occur. Irradiation is an accepted treatment to control quarantine pests in 10 fruits and five vegetables for export from Hawaii to the US mainland. Irradiation is the ideal technology for developing generic quarantine treatments because it is effective against most insect and mite pests at dose levels that do not affect the quality of most commodities. A generic dose of 150 Gy has been proposed for tephritid fruit flies. Contrary to the 150 Gy dose, approved irradiation quarantine treatment doses for Mediterranean fruit fly, melon fly, and oriental fruit fly in Hawaii are 210-250 Gy. Irradiation studies were conducted to determine if the approved doses were unnecessarily high and could be reduced. Irradiation is also a viable alternative to methyl bromide fumigation to disinfest Hawaii sweetpotatoes, and studies are in progress to identify an effective dose for two key sweetpotato insect pests. Results indicate that irradiation doses <150 Gy will control Hawaii's fruit flies, which supports the proposed generic dose. The idea of generic doses is appealing because it would greatly accelerate the process of approving irradiation quarantine treatments for specific crops, and thereby rapidly expand exports. Preliminary results show that 250-300 Gy will control Hawaii's sweetpotato pests.

  7. Irradiation to control insects in fruits and vegetables for export from Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Peter A.

    2004-09-01

    Phytosanitary or quarantine treatments are often required to disinfest host commodities of economically important arthropod pests before they are moved through market channels to areas where the pest does not occur. Irradiation is an accepted treatment to control quarantine pests in 10 fruits and five vegetables for export from Hawaii to the US mainland. Irradiation is the ideal technology for developing generic quarantine treatments because it is effective against most insect and mite pests at dose levels that do not affect the quality of most commodities. A generic dose of 150 Gy has been proposed for tephritid fruit flies. Contrary to the 150 Gy dose, approved irradiation quarantine treatment doses for Mediterranean fruit fly, melon fly, and oriental fruit fly in Hawaii are 210-250 Gy. Irradiation studies were conducted to determine if the approved doses were unnecessarily high and could be reduced. Irradiation is also a viable alternative to methyl bromide fumigation to disinfest Hawaii sweetpotatoes, and studies are in progress to identify an effective dose for two key sweetpotato insect pests. Results indicate that irradiation doses <150 Gy will control Hawaii's fruit flies, which supports the proposed generic dose. The idea of generic doses is appealing because it would greatly accelerate the process of approving irradiation quarantine treatments for specific crops, and thereby rapidly expand exports. Preliminary results show that 250-300 Gy will control Hawaii's sweetpotato pests.

  8. The Paradox of Discrimination, the "Aloha Spirit," and Symptoms of Depression in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossakowski, Krysia N; Wongkaren, Turro S

    2016-01-01

    It remains to be determined whether the "aloha spirit" is a cultural resource that influences psychological well-being in Hawai'i. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate whether the aloha spirit is associated with levels of psychological distress and the risk of depression, while taking into account various risk factors. Data for this study were drawn from an anonymous survey of undergraduate students (N = 1,028) at the University of Hawai'i. Regression results revealed that having learned the aloha spirit was associated with significantly lower levels (b = -1.76; P levels of ethnic identification, race/ethnicity, immigrant status, duration of residence in Hawai'i, and other sociodemographic factors. In contrast, everyday discrimination was associated with significantly higher levels (b = 0.41; P spirit in Hawai'i by documenting their distinct relationships with mental health. Overall, this study contributes to medical and public health research on mental health disparities during the transition to adulthood by delving into the social context of daily life in the understudied, multicultural location of Hawai'i.

  9. Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 3 -- Greenfield options: Prospects for LNG use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breazeale, K. [ed.; Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Pezeshki, S.; Wu, K.

    1993-12-01

    This paper begins with an overview of the Asia-Pacific LNG market, its major players, and the likely availability of LNG supplies in the region. The discussion then examines the possibilities for the economic supply of LNG to Hawaii, the potential Hawaiian market, and the viability of an LNG project on Oahu. This survey is far from a complete technical assessment or an actual engineering/feasibility study. The economics alone cannot justify LNG`s introduction. The debate may continue as to whether fuel diversification and environmental reasons can outweigh the higher costs. Several points are made. LNG is not a spot commodity. Switching to LNG in Hawaii would require a massive, long-term commitment and substantial investments. LNG supplies are growing very tight in the Asia-Pacific region. Some of the environmental benefits of LNG are not entirely relevant in Hawaii because Hawaii`s air quality is generally excellent. Any air quality benefits may be more than counterbalanced by the environmental hazards connected with large-scale coastal zone construction, and by the safety hazards of LNG carriers, pipelines, etc. Lastly, LNG is not suitable for all energy uses, and is likely to be entirely unsuitable for neighbor island energy needs.

  10. A Technical and Economic Optimization Approach to Exploring Offshore Renewable Energy Development in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Kyle B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tagestad, Jerry D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Perkins, Casey J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oster, Matthew R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Warwick, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This study was conducted with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO) as part of ongoing efforts to minimize key risks and reduce the cost and time associated with permitting and deploying ocean renewable energy. The focus of the study was to discuss a possible approach to exploring scenarios for ocean renewable energy development in Hawaii that attempts to optimize future development based on technical, economic, and policy criteria. The goal of the study was not to identify potentially suitable or feasible locations for development, but to discuss how such an approach may be developed for a given offshore area. Hawaii was selected for this case study due to the complex nature of the energy climate there and DOE’s ongoing involvement to support marine spatial planning for the West Coast. Primary objectives of the study included 1) discussing the political and economic context for ocean renewable energy development in Hawaii, especially with respect to how inter-island transmission may affect the future of renewable energy development in Hawaii; 2) applying a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach that has been used to assess the technical suitability of offshore renewable energy technologies in Washington, Oregon, and California, to Hawaii’s offshore environment; and 3) formulate a mathematical model for exploring scenarios for ocean renewable energy development in Hawaii that seeks to optimize technical and economic suitability within the context of Hawaii’s existing energy policy and planning.

  11. Pufferfish mortality associated with novel polar marine toxins in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M.; Moeller, Perer D. R.; Beauchesne, Kevin R.; Dagenais, Julie; Breeden, Renee; Rameyer, Robert; Walsh, Willliam A.; Abecassis, Melanie; Kobayashi, Donald R.; Conway, Carla M.; Winton, James

    2017-01-01

    Fish die-offs are important signals in tropical marine ecosystems. In 2010, a mass mortality of pufferfish in Hawaii (USA) was dominated by Arothron hispidus showing aberrant neurological behaviors. Using pathology, toxinology, and field surveys, we implicated a series of novel, polar, marine toxins as a likely cause of this mass mortality. Our findings are striking in that (1) a marine toxin was associated with a kill of a fish species that is itself toxic; (2) we provide a plausible mechanism to explain clinical signs of affected fish; and (3) this epizootic likely depleted puffer populations. Whilst our data are compelling, we did not synthesize the toxin de novo, and we were unable to categorically prove that the polar toxins caused mortality or that they were metabolites of an undefined parent compound. However, our approach does provide a template for marine fish kill investigations associated with marine toxins and inherent limitations of existing methods. Our study also highlights the need for more rapid and cost-effective tools to identify new marine toxins, particularly small, highly polar molecules.

  12. Pineapple nematode research in hawaii: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, E P; Apt, W J

    1989-04-01

    The first written record of pineapple in Hawaii is from 1813. In 1901 commercial pineapple production started, and in 1924 the Experiment Station for pineapple research was established. Nematode-related problems were recognized in the early 1900s by N. A. Cobb. From 1920 to approximately 1945 nematode management in Hawaiian pineapple was based on fallowing and crop rotation. During the 1920s and 1930s G. H. Godfrey conducted research on pineapple nematode management. In the 1930s and 1940s M. B. Linford researched biological control and described several new species of nematodes including Rotylenchulus reniformis. In 1941 nematology and nematode management were advanced by Walter Carter's discovery of the first economical soil fumigant for nematodes, D-D mixture. Subsequently, DBCP was discovered and developed at the Pineapple Research Institute (PRI). Since 1945 soil fumigation has been the main nematode management strategy in Hawaiian pineapple production. Recent research has focused on the development of the nonvolatile nematicides, their potential as systemic nematicides, and their application via drip irrigation. Current and future research addresses biological and cultural alternatives to nematicide-based nematode management.

  13. Pufferfish mortality associated with novel polar marine toxins in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Thierry M; Moeller, Peter D R; Beauchesne, Kevin R; Dagenais, Julie; Breeden, Renee; Rameyer, Robert; Walsh, William J; Abecassis, Melanie; Kobayashi, Donald R; Conway, Carla; Winton, James

    2017-03-06

    Fish die-offs are important signals in tropical marine ecosystems. In 2010, a mass mortality of pufferfish in Hawaii (USA) was dominated by Arothron hispidus showing aberrant neurological behaviors. Using pathology, toxinology, and field surveys, we implicated a series of novel, polar, marine toxins as a likely cause of this mass mortality. Our findings are striking in that (1) a marine toxin was associated with a kill of a fish species that is itself toxic; (2) we provide a plausible mechanism to explain clinical signs of affected fish; and (3) this epizootic likely depleted puffer populations. Whilst our data are compelling, we did not synthesize the toxin de novo, and we were unable to categorically prove that the polar toxins caused mortality or that they were metabolites of an undefined parent compound. However, our approach does provide a template for marine fish kill investigations associated with marine toxins and inherent limitations of existing methods. Our study also highlights the need for more rapid and cost-effective tools to identify new marine toxins, particularly small, highly polar molecules.

  14. Quantifying How Observations Inform a Numerical Reanalysis of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, B. S.

    2017-11-01

    When assimilating observations into a model via state-estimation, it is possible to quantify how each observation changes the modeled estimate of a chosen oceanic metric. Using an existing 2 year reanalysis of Hawaii that includes more than 31 million observations from satellites, ships, SeaGliders, and autonomous floats, I assess which observations most improve the estimates of the transport and eddy kinetic energy. When the SeaGliders were in the water, they comprised less than 2.5% of the data, but accounted for 23% of the transport adjustment. Because the model physics constrains advanced state-estimation, the prescribed covariances are propagated in time to identify observation-model covariance. I find that observations that constrain the isopycnal tilt across the transport section provide the greatest impact in the analysis. In the case of eddy kinetic energy, observations that constrain the surface-driven upper ocean have more impact. This information can help to identify optimal sampling strategies to improve both state-estimates and forecasts.

  15. Estimated Water Use in 1990, Island of Kauai, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shade, Patricia J.

    1995-01-01

    The estimated total quantity of freshwater withdrawn on the island of Kauai, Hawaii, in 1990 was 370.84 million gallons per day of which 46.29 million gallons per day (12 percent) was from ground-water sources, and 324.55 million gallons per day (88 percent) was from surface-water sources. An additional estimated 40.94 million gallons per day of saline water was withdrawn for thermoelectric power generation. Agricultural irrigation was the principal use, accounting for 66 percent of the total freshwater withdrawals. Irrigation accounted for about 40 percent of the fresh ground-water withdrawals, followed by public supply, thermoelectric power generation, self-supplied domestic, self-supplied commercial, and self-supplied industrial withdrawals. Agricultural irrigation accounted for 69 percent of the total fresh surface-water withdrawals, followed by hydroelectric power generation, self-supplied industrial, public-supply and self-supplied livestock withdrawals. A comparison of water-use data for 1980 and 1990 shows total freshwater uses decreased during 1990 by slightly more than 100 million gallons per day because of decreased withdrawals for sugarcane irrigation and processing. During this time, increased domestic, commercial, and thermoelectric power usage reflects increases in the resident population and in tourism on the island.

  16. Hawaii solar integration study. Solar modelling developments and study results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwko, Richard [GE Energy Consulting, Schenectady, NY (United States); Roose, Leon [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, Honolulu, HI (United States); Orwig, Kirsten; Corbus, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Matsuura, Marc [Hawaiian Electric Company, Honolulu, HI (United States); Schuerger, Matt [Energy Systems Consulting Services LLC, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Hawaii Solar Integration Study (HSIS) is a follow up to the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) completed in 2010. HSIS examines the impacts of higher penetrations of solar energy on the electrical grid, focusing on impacts to the operation of the bulk power transmission system and other interconnected generation resources. Issues specific to generation resource interconnection (normally the subject of a generator interconnection requirements study) and distribution system impacts of high distributed solar penetration scenarios were not the focus of the study. HSIS goes beyond the island of Oahu and investigates Maui as well. The study examines reserve strategies, impacts on thermal unit commitment and dispatch, utilization of energy storage, renewable energy curtailment, and other aspects of grid reliability and operation. For the study, high-resolution (2-second) solar power profiles were generated using a new combined Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model / stochastic-kinematic cloud model approach, which represents the ''sharp-edge'' effects of clouds passing over solar facilities. As part of the validation process, the solar data was evaluated using a variety of techniques including: wavelets, power spectral densities, ramp distributions, extreme values, and cross correlations. This paper provides an overview of the study objectives, results of the solar profile validation, and results for the Oahu portion of the study. (orig.)

  17. Temperature trends at the Mauna Loa observatory, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. D. Malamud

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Observations at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, established the systematic increase of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. For the same reasons that this site provides excellent globally averaged CO2 data, it may provide temperature data with global significance. Here, we examine hourly temperature records, averaged annually for 1977–2006, to determine linear trends as a function of time of day. For night-time data (22:00 to 06:00 LST (local standard time there is a near-uniform warming of 0.040 °C yr−1. During the day, the linear trend shows a slight cooling of −0.014 °C yr−1 at 12:00 LST (noon. Overall, at Mauna Loa Observatory, there is a mean warming trend of 0.021 °C yr−1. The dominance of night-time warming results in a relatively large annual decrease in the diurnal temperature range (DTR of −0.050 °C yr−1 over the period 1977–2006. These trends are consistent with the observed increases in the concentrations of CO2 and its role as a greenhouse gas (demonstrated here by first-order radiative forcing calculations, and indicate the possible relevance of the Mauna Loa temperature measurements to global warming.

  18. Time dependent ethnic convergence in colorectal cancer survival in hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundahl Scott A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although colorectal cancer death rates have been declining, this trend is not consistent across all ethnic groups. Biological, environmental, behavioral and socioeconomic explanations exist, but the reason for this discrepancy remains inconclusive. We examined the hypothesis that improved cancer screening across all ethnic groups will reduce ethnic differences in colorectal cancer survival. Methods Through the Hawaii Tumor Registry 16,424 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were identified during the years 1960–2000. Cox regression analyses were performed for each of three cohorts stratified by ethnicity (Caucasian, Japanese, Hawaiian, Filipino, and Chinese. The models included stage of diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex as predictors of survival. Results Mortality rates improved significantly for all ethnic groups. Moreover, with the exception of Hawaiians, rates for all ethnic groups converged over time. Persistently lower survival for Hawaiians appeared linked with more cancer treatment. Conclusion Ethnic disparities in colorectal cancer mortality rates appear primarily the result of differential utilization of health care. If modern screening procedures can be provided equally to all ethnic groups, ethnic outcome differences can be virtually eliminated.

  19. Identifying sex and age of apapane and iiwi on Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancy, S.G.; Pratt, T.K.; Lindsey, G.D.; Harada, C.K.; Parent, A.H.; Jacobi, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Methods to determine the sex and age of Apapane (Himatione sanguinea) and Iiwi (Vestiaria coccinea) were developed on the basis of 189 museum specimens and 91 live birds captured in mist nets on the Island of Hawaii (USA). Both species retain all juvenal primaries and some juvenal secondaries and body feathers after the first prebasic molt and attain full adult plumage after the second prebasic molt. Apapane in their first basic plumage retain some buff-edged juvenal secondaries (particularly secondaries five and six) and sometimes retain a few gray-brown feathers on the head. The first basic plumage of Iiwi is characterized by secondaries 6-9 being longer and darker than secondaries 1-4 and the presence of a few yellowish juvenal body feathers with black spots at the tips. Adult male Apapane and Iiwi have longer wing, tail, exposed culmen, culmen and tarso-metatarsus lengths than females. Linear discriminant functions are presented to sex adult Apapane and Iiwi from lengths of their wing chord and exposed culmen.

  20. Termite Species Distribution and Flight Periods on Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Reina L; Grace, J Kenneth; Mason, Makena; Krushelnycky, Paul D; Spafford, Helen; Aihara-Sasaki, Maria

    2017-06-05

    Termites are economically-important structural pests, costing residents of Hawaii over $100 million annually. On Oahu, the last published termite swarming survey occurred from 1969 to 1971, and the last termite hand-collection survey occurred from 1998 to 2000. To contribute data on termite occurrences on Oahu, a light-trap survey took place from February 2011 to September 2012, and a hand-collection survey occurred from September to November 2012. Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, swarming was compared over the duration of the study, finding peak swarming in May 2011. C. formosanus alate activity density was regressed with environmental factors, finding a negative correlation with average wind speed and a positive correlation with average rainfall. Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) alates were observed in April, June, and July 2011 and in June 2012. Four species of termites were found in the hand-collection survey of 44 sites: Incisitermes immigrans (Snyder) ( n = 8/44), C. formosanus ( n = 2/44), Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light ( n = 1/44), and Neotermes sp. ( n = 1/44). This study contributes to distribution data for termite species on Oahu and records alate activity for two important termite pests.

  1. National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen S.

    1998-01-01

    During the past 25 years, our Nation has sought to improve its water quality; however, many water-quality issues remain unresolved. To address the need for consistent and scientifically sound information for managing the Nation's water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey began a full-scale National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in 1991. This program is unique compared with other national water-quality assessment studies in that it integrates the monitoring of the quality of surface and ground waters with the study of aquatic ecosystems. The goals of the NAWQA Program are to (1) describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's freshwater streams and aquifers, (2) describe how water quality is changing over time, and (3) improve our understanding of the primary natural and human factors affecting water quality. Assessing the quality of water in every location of the Nation would not be practical; therefore, NAWQA Program studies are conducted within a set of areas called study units. These study units represent the diverse geography, water resources, and land and water uses of the Nation. The island of Oahu, Hawaii, is one such study unit designed to supplement water-quality information collected in other study units across the Nation while addressing issues relevant to the island of Oahu.

  2. Dating Violence Victimization: Associated Drinking and Sexual Risk Behaviors of Asian, Native Hawaiian, and Caucasian High School Students in Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Goebert, Deborah; Nishimura, Stephanie; Caetano, Raul

    2006-01-01

    Ethnic minority groups such as Asian/Pacific Islanders (APIs) and native populations in Hawaii are seldom studied in the area of intimate relationships. Using the 1999 Hawaii Youth Risk Behavior Survey, this study examined gender and ethnic differences in experiencing physical dating violence and whether drinking (early initiation, binge…

  3. An introduction to the square-necked grain beetle as a predator of coffee berry borer in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control can be an important component of integrated pest management programs. Coffee berry borer is a new pest of Hawaii coffee that arrived with no apparent natural enemies. The square-necked grain beetle, Cathartus quadricollis, has been present in Hawaii for many years and has become o...

  4. A Systems Approach to Mitigate Oriental Fruit Fly Risk in ‘Sharwil’ Avocados Exported From Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avocados, Persea americana Miller, grown in Hawaii cannot be exported to the United States mainland without quarantine treatment for melon fly, oriental fruit fly, and Mediterranean fruit fly. The most widely grown cultivar of avocado in Hawaii is ‘Sharwil’. ‘Sharwil’, like other avocado varieties, ...

  5. 76 FR 2095 - Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: ’Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... of Public Scoping Meetings for the Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: 'Wind Programmatic... Islands to receive comments on the scope of the Hawai`i Interisland Renewable Energy Program: Wind.... The EIS will assess the foreseeable environmental impacts that may arise from wind energy development...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1410 - Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii, Makai Undersea Test Range. 334.1410 Section 334.1410 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1410 Pacific Ocean, at Makapuu Point, Waimanalo, Island of Oahu, Hawaii...

  7. 33 CFR 110.236 - Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal anchorages. 110.236 Section 110.236 Navigation and... Grounds § 110.236 Pacific Ocean off Barbers Point, Island of Oahu, Hawaii: Offshore pipeline terminal...

  8. A comparison of participation and performance in age group finishers competing in and qualifying for Ironman Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stiefel M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael Stiefel,1 Christoph Alexander Rüst,1 Thomas Rosemann,1 Beat Knechtle2 1Institute of General Practice and for Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland Background: Athletes intending to compete in Ironman Hawaii need to qualify in an age-group based qualification system. We compared participation and top ten performances of athletes in various age groups between Ironman Hawaii and its qualifier races.Methods: Finishes in Ironman Hawaii and in its qualifier races in 2010 were analyzed in terms of performance, age, and sex. Athletes were categorized into age groups from 18–24 to 75–79 years and split and race times were determined for the top ten athletes in each age group.Results: A higher proportion of athletes aged 25–49 years finished in the qualifier races than in Ironman Hawaii. In athletes aged 18–24 and 50–79 years, the percentage of finishes was higher in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races. For women, the fastest race times were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races for those aged 18–24 (P < 0.001, 25–29 (P < 0.05, and 60–64 (P < 0.05 years. Swim split times were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races for all age groups (P < 0.05. Cycling times were slower in Ironman Hawaii for 18–24, 25–29, 40–44, 50–54, and 60–64 years (P < 0.05 in age groups. For men, finishers aged 18–24 (P < 0.001, 40–44 (P < 0.001, 50–54 (P < 0.01, 55–59 (P < 0.001, 60–64 (P < 0.01, and 65–69 (P < 0.001 years were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races. Swim split times were slower in Ironman Hawaii than in the qualifier races for all age groups (P < 0.05. Cycling times were slower in Ironman Hawaii for those aged 18–24 and those aged 40 years and older (P < 0.05.Conclusion: There are differences in terms of participation and performance for athletes in different age groups between Ironman Hawaii and

  9. Insights in Public Health: For the Love of Data! The Hawai'i Health Data Warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chosy, Julia; Benson, Katherine; Belen, Dulce; Starr, Ranjani; Lowery St John, Tonya; Starr, Ranjani R; Ching, Lance K

    2015-11-01

    Data form the framework around which important public health decisions are made. Public health data are essential for surveillance and evaluating change. In Hawai'i, public health data come from a multitude of sources and agencies. The Hawai'i Health Data Warehouse (HHDW) was created to pull those data into a single location and to present results in a form that is easy for the public to access and utilize. In the years since its creation, HHDW has built a second consumer-focused web site, Hawai'i Health Matters, and is now introducing new functionality on the original site that allows users to define their own enquiry. The newly adopted Indicator-Based Information System (IBIS) uses a web interface to perform real-time data analysis and display results. This gives users the power to examine health data by a wide range of demographic and socioeconomic dimensions, permitting them to pinpoint the data they need.

  10. Significance of Concussions in Hawai'i: From Land to Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifu, David X; Uchima, Olivia K; Davis, Alaina S; Lower, Amy E; Jin, Jingyu L; Lew, Henry L

    2016-09-01

    Head injuries are a particular concern in Hawai'i given the large military population, the presence of many land and water sports such as football and surfing, and the lenient helmet laws for motorcycle and bicycle riders. Physical, psychological, and cognitive symptoms from single or repeated concussions can affect an individual's reentry to society and activity. Current literature indicates that repeated head injuries are associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) which is thought to lead to dementia. This paper reviews literature discussing causes of concussion including its incidence and prevalence in Hawai'i. Furthermore, the neurophysiological and neurobiological etiologies are discussed followed by an overview of methods for identification and management of concussion. The paper serves as information for professionals in the community such as educators, military personnel, and healthcare workers to identify risks of concussion, management of symptoms, and to connect with resources and programs available in Hawai'i.

  11. Depression, Anxiety, and Pharmacotherapy Around the Time of Pregnancy in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Emily K; Hurwitz, Eric L; Li, Dongmei; Cooney, Robert V; Katz, Alan R; Collier, Abby C

    2016-08-01

    Depression and anxiety are common conditions among pregnant and postpartum women, but population-based information is lacking on treatments and help-seeking behaviors. This study described the prevalence of depression, anxiety, pharmaceutical treatment, and help-seeking behaviors among a multiethnic population of women with recent live births in Hawaii. Hawaii Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data from 4735 respondents were weighted to be representative of all pregnancies resulting in live births in Hawaii in 2009-2011 and were used to estimate the prevalence of several indicators related to anxiety and depression before, during, and after pregnancy among women with recent live births. Of Hawaii women with live births in 2009-2011, 7.3 % reported visiting a healthcare worker to be checked or treated for depression or anxiety in the year before their most recent pregnancy, 4.9 % reported having depression in the 3 months before pregnancy, 5.9 % reported having anxiety in the same period, 9.1 % screened positive for postpartum depression, and 6.9 % reported asking a doctor, nurse, or other healthcare worker for help for anxiety postpartum. The prevalence of antianxiety and antidepressant prescription drug use was 2.3 % in the month before pregnancy and 1.4 % during pregnancy. Hawaii had lower prevalence of pre-pregnancy depression, anxiety, and depression/anxiety health visits than other US states. Pre-pregnancy depression and anxiety and postpartum anxiety help-seeking behaviors differed significantly by race/ethnicity. Depression and anxiety are common among pregnant and postpartum women in Hawaii. More research could better inform heath care professionals and patients of the treatment options available and their potential risks and benefits.

  12. Forecast, Measurement, and Modeling of an Unprecedented Polar Ozone Filament Event over Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Om Prakash; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart; Lefevre, Frank; Marchand, Marion; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2006-01-01

    In mid-March 2005 the northern lower stratospheric polar vortex experienced a severe stretching episode, bringing a large polar filament far south of Alaska toward Hawaii. This meridional intrusion of rare extent, coinciding with the polar vortex final warming and breakdown, was followed by a zonal stretching in the wake of the easterly propagating subtropical main flow. This caused polar air to remain over Hawaii for several days before diluting into the subtropics. After being successfully forecasted to pass over Hawaii by the high-resolution potential vorticity advection model Modele Isentrope du transport Meso-echelle de l'Ozone Stratospherique par Advection (MIMOSA), the filament was observed on isentropic surfaces between 415 K and 455 K (17-20 km) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory stratospheric ozone lidar measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, between 16 and 19 March 2005. It was materialized as a thin layer of enhanced ozone peaking at 1.6 ppmv in a region where the climatological values usually average 1.0 ppmv. These values were compared to those obtained by the three dimensional Chemistry-Transport Model MIMOSA-CHIM. Agreement between lidar and model was excellent, particularly in the similar appearance of the ozone peak near 435 K (18.5 km) on 16 March, and the persistence of this layer at higher isentropic levels for the following three days. Passive ozone, also modeled by MIMOSA-CHIM, was at about 3-4 ppmv inside the filament while above Hawaii. A detailed history of the modeled chemistry inside the filament suggests that the air mass was still polar ozone- depleted when passing over Hawaii. The filament quickly separated from the main vortex after its Hawaiian overpass. It never reconnected and, in less than 10 days, dispersed entirely in the subtropics.

  13. Skill of Canonical Correlation Analysis Forecasts of 3-Month Mean Surface Climate in Hawaii and Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnston, Anthony G.; He, Yuxiang

    1996-10-01

    Statistical short-term climate predictive skills and their sources for 3-month mean local surface climate (temperature and precipitation) in Hawaii and Alaska have been explored at lead times of up to one year using a canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Four consecutive 3-month predictor periods are followed by a variable lead time and then a single 3-month predictand period. Predictor fields are quasi-global sea surface temperature, Northern Hemisphere 700-mb height, and prior values of the predictand field itself Forecast skill is estimated using cross-validation.Short-term global climate fluctuations such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon are found to play an important role in the climate variability in Hawaii and the southern half of Alaska. During the late winter and spring of mature warm (cold) ENSO events, Hawaii tends to be anomalously warm and dry (wet and cool), while southern Alaska tends to be warm (cold). Hawaii's responses occur more strongly the year after a mature ENSO event rather than the year of the event, even if the opposite phase of ENSO has already begun. Persistence is the best seasonal temperature prediction for Hawaii at short leads. Winter and spring temperature (precipitation) can be predicted up to one year (a few months) in advance with modest but usable skill for Hawaii, where temperature forecasts are generally more skillful. Southern Alaska has temperature prediction possibilities up to 7-10 months in advance. While Alaskan seasonal precipitation prediction is poor on the large spatial scale, forecasts on terrain-dependent local scales may he more fruitful using methods other than CCA.

  14. Identifications of captive and wild tilapia species existing in Hawaii by mitochondrial DNA control region sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tilapia family of the Cichlidae includes many fish species, which live in freshwater and saltwater environments. Several species, such as O. niloticus, O. aureus, and O. mossambicus, are excellent for aquaculture because these fish are easily reproduced and readily adapt to diverse environments. Historically, tilapia species, including O. mossambicus, S. melanotheron, and O. aureus, were introduced to Hawaii many decades ago, and the state of Hawaii uses the import permit policy to prevent O. niloticus from coming into the islands. However, hybrids produced from O. niloticus may already be present in the freshwater and marine environments of the islands. The purpose of this study was to identify tilapia species that exist in Hawaii using mitochondrial DNA analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analyzed 382 samples collected from 13 farm (captive and wild tilapia populations in Oahu and the Hawaii Islands. Comparison of intraspecies variation between the mitochondrial DNA control region (mtDNA CR and cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene from five populations indicated that mtDNA CR had higher nucleotide diversity than COI. A phylogenetic tree of all sampled tilapia was generated using mtDNA CR sequences. The neighbor-joining tree analysis identified seven distinctive tilapia species: O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. niloticus, S. melanotheron, O. urolepies, T. redalli, and a hybrid of O. massambicus and O. niloticus. Of all the populations examined, 10 populations consisting of O. aureus, O. mossambicus, O. urolepis, and O. niloticus from the farmed sites were relatively pure, whereas three wild populations showed some degree of introgression and hybridization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This DNA-based tilapia species identification is the first report that confirmed tilapia species identities in the wild and captive populations in Hawaii. The DNA sequence comparisons of mtDNA CR appear to be a valid method for

  15. HYDROLOGIC ANALYSIS, HONOLULU COUNTY, HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  16. Prevention and treatment of injuries from cave exploration in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowart, David W; Halleck, John B; Park, Benjamin R

    2014-11-01

    Cave exploration is a popular activity in the United States that can be challenging, thrilling, and dangerous. In addition to common risks associated with caves on the mainland, caves in Hawai'i may be filled with tidal water, or contain large pools of water that are accessible only through underwater entrances. This paper will discuss common injuries in caves on the mainland United States, as well as cave related injuries in Hawai'i as reported to the National Speleological Society from 1984-2013.

  17. Generalized skew coefficient for flood frequency computations for the State of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Reuben

    1984-01-01

    In 1976, the Hydrology Committee of the U.S. Water Resources Council estimated a generalized skew coefficient for flood frequency computations of -0.05 for the State of Hawaii. This value is the average of 30 stream gaging stations with 25 or more years of record through water year 1973. This report updates the generalized skew coefficient for the State of Hawaii to -0.14. It is the average of 68 stream gaging stations with 25 or more years of record. (USGS)

  18. Rates of subsidence and relative sea level rise in the Hawaii Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Albert

    2016-12-01

    The major cause of the Hawaiian Islands coastal erosion is shown to be not global warming, but the sinking of the volcanic islands. The geologic "circle-of-life" beyond the Hawaiian hot spot is the true explanation of the beach erosion. The sea levels are slow rising and not accelerating worldwide as well as in the United States. In the specific of the Hawaii Islands, they have been decelerating over the last 3 decades because of the phasing of the multi-decadal oscillations for this area of the Pacific. There is therefore no evidence coastal erosion will double in the Hawaii by 2050 because of global warming.

  19. Hawai'i's "Going Home Plus" project: a new option to support community living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Christy M; Johnson, Jean; Silverman, Madi; Ozaki, Rebecca; Koller, Lillian

    2009-08-01

    The Going Home Plus project facilitates the transition of individuals from hospitals, nursing facilities, and intermediate care facilities for the mentally retarded (ICF-MRs) into community settings. The project is a collaborative effort between the State of Hawai'i Department of Human Services (DHS), the University of Hawai'i Center on Disability Studies and their community partners to help elderly and younger persons with disabilities who have been living in an institution for at least six months and express a choice for community living. The project, which provides services such as transition coordination and telemedicine, strives to become a valuable resource for institutionalized patients, their families, and medical professionals.

  20. Characterization of a community cluster of group a streptococcal invasive disease in Maui, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Guliz; Abe, Lucienne; Kanenaka, Rebecca Y; Pang, Lorrin; Mills, Kristin; Mizumoto, Carla; Yamaga, Karen; Effler, Paul V

    2004-07-01

    A community cluster of severe group A streptococcal skin infections occurred in Maui, Hawaii with 3 fatal cases of necrotizing fasciitis in 2002. emm types 1, 12, 58, 74, 85 and 109 were identified from 8 patients. emm types 74 and 109 have not been previously described in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention database. The identification of uncommon emm types suggested that group A streptococcal sero-types in Hawaii are different from those in the continental United States and can result in serious disease.

  1. Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) www.psrd.hawaii.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, L.; Taylor, J.

    2010-12-01

    NASA's Year of the Solar System is celebrating not only Solar System mission milestones but also the collective data reduction and analysis that happens here on Earth. The Cosmochemistry Program of NASA's Science Mission Directorate takes a direct approach to enhance student learning and engage the public in the latest research on meteorites, asteroids, planets, moons, and other materials in our Solar System with the website known as PSRD. The Planetary Science Research Discoveries (PSRD) website at www.psrd.hawaii.edu explores the science questions that researchers are actively pursuing about our Solar System and explains how the answers are discovered and what they mean. The site helps to convey the scientific basis for sample study to the broader scientific community and the excitement of new results in cosmochemistry to the general public. We share with our broad audience the fascinating discoveries made by cosmochemists, increasing public awareness of the value of sample-focused research in particular and of fundamental scientific research and space exploration in general. The scope of the website covers the full range of cosmochemical research and highlights the investigations of extraterrestrial materials that are used to better understand the origin of the Solar System and the processes by which planets, moons, and small bodies evolve. We relate the research to broader planetary science themes and mission results. Articles are categorized into: asteroids, comets, Earth, instruments of cosmochemistry, Jupiter system, Mars, Mars life issues, Mercury, meteorites, Moon, origins, and space weathering. PSRD articles are based on peer-reviewed, journal publications. Some PSRD articles are based on more than one published paper in order to present multiple views and outcomes of research on a topic of interest. To date, 150 PSRD articles have been based on 184 journal articles (and counting) written by some of the most active cosmochemists and planetary scientists

  2. Primary production and sediment trap flux measurements and calculations by the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program at Station ALOHA in the North Pacific 100 miles north of Oahu, Hawaii for Cruises HOT1-227 during 1988-2010 (NODC Accession 0089168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program makes repeated observations of the physics, biology and chemistry at a site approximately 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii....

  3. Land Use on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasner, Frederick L.; Mikami, Clinton D.

    2003-01-01

    A hierarchical land-use classification system for Hawaii was developed, and land use on the island of Oahu was mapped. The land-use classification system emphasizes agriculture, developed (urban), and barren/mining uses. Areas with other land uses (conservation, forest reserve, natural areas, wetlands, water, and barren [sand, rock, or soil] regions, and unmanaged vegetation [native or exotic]) were defined as 'other.' Multiple sources of digital orthophotographs from 1998 and 1999 were used as source data. The 1998 island of Oahu land-use data are provided in digital format at http://water.usgs.gov/lookup/getspatial?oahu_lu98 for use in a Geographic Information System (GIS), at 1:24,000-scale with minimum mapping units of 2 hectares (4.9 acres) area and 30-meters (98.4 feet) feature width. In 1998, a total of 59,195 acres (15.4 percent) of the island of Oahu were classified as agricultural land use; 98,663 acres (25.7 percent) were classified as developed; 1,522 acres (0.4 percent) were classified as barren/mining; and 224,331 acres (58.5 percent) were classified as other. An accuracy assessment identified 98 percent accuracy for all land-use classes. In windward (moister) areas, dense vegetation and canopy cover along with rapid recolonization by vegetation potentially obscured land use from photo-interpretation. While in leeward (drier) areas, sparse vegetative cover and slower vegetation recolonization may have resulted in more frequent recognition of apparent land-use patterns.

  4. Subsidence and volcanism of the Haleakala Ridge, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.A.; Ludwig, K. R.; Mark, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Side-looking sonar (GLORIA) mapping has revealed a series of four arcuate bands of high sonic backscatter on the crest of the Haleakala Ridge, a major rift-zone ridge extending 135 km east of the island of Maui. Dredge recovery indicates that the shallowest of these bands is a drowned coral reef, and the deeper bands are also inferred to be coral reefs. The reefs occur above a prominent submarine bench 1500-2500 m deep on the ridge (H-terrace) that marks the shoreline at the end of vigorous shield building of Haleakala volcano when lava flows ceased crossing and reworking the shoreline. Since their growth these reefs have subsided as much as 2200 m and have tilted systematically about 20 m/km southward as a result of post-reef volcanic loading on the island of Hawaii, whose center of mass is about directly south of the Haleakala Ridge. The 234U/238U age of the dredged coral is 750 ?? 13 ka, in reasonable agreement with an age of 850 ka for the underlying H terrace previously estimated from its relationship to other dated reefs to the southwest. Basalt glass fragments dredged from the Haleakala Ridge below the H terrace are tholeiitic and contain high sulfur indicative of eruption in water deeper than 200 m. Basalt glass fragments associated with the reefs above the H terrace are dominantly tholeiitic and contain intermediate sulfur contents, indicative of subaqueous eruption in shallow, near-shore conditions. One alkalic glass fragment was recovered above the H terrace. These relations indicate that the morphologic end of shield building as recorded by construction of the H terrace was not accompanyed by a change from tholeiitic to alkalic basalt; instead tholeiite eruptions continued for some time before the erupted lava became alkalic. ?? 1990.

  5. Heterogeneity of Water Concentrations in the Mantle Lithosphere Beneath Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizimis, M.; Peslier, A. H.; Clague, D.

    2017-01-01

    The amount and distribution of water in the oceanic mantle lithosphere has implications on its strength and of the role of volatiles during plume/lithosphere interaction. The latter plays a role in the Earth's deep water cycle as water-rich plume lavas could re-enrich an oceanic lithosphere depleted in water at the ridge, and when this heterogeneous lithosphere gets recycled back into the deep mantle. The main host of water in mantle lithologies are nominally anhydrous minerals like olivine, pyroxene and garnet, where hydrogen (H) is incorporated in mineral defects by bonding to structural oxygen. Here, we report water concentrations by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) on olivine, clino- and orthopyroxenes (Cpx & Opx) from spinel peridotites from the Pali vent and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from Aliamanu vent, both part of the rejuvenated volcanism at Oahu (Hawaii). Pyroxenes from the Aliamanu pyroxenites have high water concentrations, similar to the adjacent Salt Lake Crater (SLC) pyroxenites (Cpx 400-500 ppm H2O, Opx 200 ppm H2O). This confirms that pyroxenite cumulates form water-rich lithologies within the oceanic lithosphere. In contrast, the Pali peridotites have much lower water concentrations than the SLC ones (10% modal Cpx and low spinel Cr# (0.09-0.10). The contrast between the two peridotite suites is also evident in their trace elements and radiogenic isotopes. The Pali Cpx are depleted in light REE, consistent with minimal metasomatism. Those of SLC have enriched light REE patterns and Nd and Hf isotopes consistent with metasomatism by alkaline melts. These observations are consistent with heterogeneous water distribution in the oceanic lithosphere that may be related to metasomatism, as well as relatively dry peridotites cross-cut by narrow (?) water-rich melt reaction zones.

  6. Trace metal levels in sediments of Pearl Harbor (Hawaii)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L.; Tamura, T.

    1986-09-01

    This study was conducted to measure the distribution of lead and other trace metals in the sediments of Pearl Harbon (Hawaii) to determine whether paint chips from vessels of the US Navy's Inactive Fleet have affected the environmental quality of Middle Loch. Sediment cores (ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 m long) were collected from Middle Loch near the Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility and in an area of West Loch that is relatively isolated and unaffected by naval operations. Concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc averaged 180 ..mu..g/g, 49 ..mu..g/g, and 272 ..mu..g/g, respectively, in recent Middle Loch sediments. These concentrations are significantly higher than those in either historical Middle Loch sediments or recent West Loch sediments. However, except for lead, the concentrations in recent Middle Loch sediments are similar to those of older Middle Loch sediments, which indicates that the increase in trace metal contamination began before the onset of Inactive Fleet operations (about 1946). Increased trace metal levels in recent Middle Loch sediments might be expected to result from two potential sources: (1) sewage discharges and (2) paint from inactive vessels. Since paint contains elevated levels of lead and zinc but little copper, the elevated copper levels in Middle Loch sediments tend to implicate sewage as the source of trace metal contamination. Moreover, the lead:zinc ratio of recent Middle Loch sediments (0.18:1) is a factor of 10 lower than that measured in paint (2.1:1), and the Middle Loch lead:zinc ratio is not significantly greater than that measured in recent West Loch sediments (0.21:1). Hence, we suggest that sewage rather than paint is the major source of trace metal contamination of Middle Loch. This is consistent with the findings of a previous study by US navy personnel.

  7. RESOLVE's Field Demonstration on Mauna Kea, Hawaii 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captain, Janine; Quinn, Jacqueline; Moss, Thomas; Weis, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    In cooperation with the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology, Inc., NASA has undertaken the In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project called RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction). This project is an Earth-based lunar precursor demonstration of a system that could be sent to explore permanently shadowed polar lunar craters, where it would drill into regolith, quantify the volatiles that are present, and extract oxygen by hydrogen reduction of iron oxides. The resulting water could be electrolyzed into oxygen to support exploration and hydrogen, which would be recycled through the process. The RESOLVE chemical processing system was mounted on a Canadian Space Agency mobility chasis and successfully demonstrated on Hawaii's Mauna Kea volcano in February 2010. The RESOLVE unit is the initial prototype of a robotic prospecting mission to the Moon. RESOLVE is designed to go to the poles of the Moon to "ground truth" the form and concentration of the hydrogen/water/hydroxyl that has been seen from orbit (M3, Lunar Prospector and LRO) and to test technologies to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith. RESOLVE has the ability to capture a one-meter core sample of lunar regolith and heat it to determine the volatiles that may be released and then demonstrate the production of oxygen from minerals found in the regolith. The RESOLVE project, which is led by KSC, is a multi-center and multi-organizational effort that includes representatives from KSC, JSC, GRC, the Canadian Space Agency, and the Northern Center for Advanced Technology (NORCAT). This paper details the results obtained from four days of lunar analog testing that included gas chromatograph analysis for volatile components, remote control of chemistry and drilling operations via satalite communications, and real-time water quantification using a novel capacitance measurement technique.

  8. Giant blocks in the South Kona landslide, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James G.; Bryan, Wilfred B.; Beeson, Melvin H.; Normark, William R.

    1995-02-01

    A large field of blocky sea-floor hills, up to 10 km long and 500 m high, are gigantic slide blocks derived from the west flank of Mauna Loa volcano on the island of Hawaii. These megablocks are embedded in the toe of the South Kona landslide, which extends ˜80 km seaward from the present coastline to depths of nearly 5 km. A 10 15-km-wide belt of numerous, smaller, 1 3-km-long slide blocks separates the area of giant blocks from two submarine benches at depths of 2600 and 3700 m depth that terminate seaward 20 to 30 km from the shoreline. Similar giant blocks are found on several other major submarine Hawaiian landslides, including those north of Oahu and Molokai, but the South Kona blocks are the first to be examined in detail using high-resolution bathymetry, dredging, and submersible diving. Dredging of two of the giant blocks brought up pillowed tholeiitic lava. Observations from the U.S. Navy submersible Sea Cliff on the asymmetrically steep eastern flank of one block 10 km long and 300 m high revealed a succession of fractured massive basalt, laminar lava flows, hyaloclastite, and pillow lavas. Chemical analyses of dredged lava identified 19 units that overlap compositionally with lavas from the south rift-zone ridge of Mauna Loa. Sulfur content indicates that most of the lavas were erupted in subaerial and shallow submarine (<200 m depth) sites, but some were erupted in deeper submarine sites. These results indicate that the megablocks were carried by a late Pleistocene giant landslide 40 80 km west from the ancestral shoreline of Mauna Loa volcano before growth of the midslope benches by later slump movement.

  9. Hawaii Geothermal Project annotated bibliography: Biological resources of the geothermal subzones, the transmission corridors and the Puna District, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S.E.; Burgett, J.M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Honolulu, HI (United States). Pacific Islands Office

    1993-10-01

    Task 1 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project Interagency Agreement between the Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Energy-Oak Ridge National Laboratory (DOE) includes an annotated bibliography of published and unpublished documents that cover biological issues related to the lowland rain forest in Puna, adjacent areas, transmission corridors, and in the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP). The 51 documents reviewed in this report cover the main body of biological information for these projects. The full table of contents and bibliography for each document is included along with two copies (as requested in the Interagency Agreement) of the biological sections of each document. The documents are reviewed in five main categories: (1) geothermal subzones (29 documents); (2) transmission cable routes (8 documents); (3) commercial satellite launching facility (Spaceport; 1 document); (4) manganese nodule processing facility (2 documents); (5) water resource development (1 document); and (6) ecosystem stability and introduced species (11 documents).

  10. Geophysical Log Data from Basalt Aquifers Near Waipahu on the Island of Oahu and Pahoa on the Island of Hawaii, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Hess, Alfred E.

    1995-01-01

    Two relatively new geophysical logging techniques, the digitally enhanced borehole acoustic televiewer and the heat-pulse flowmeter, were tested from 1987 to 1991 at two sites in Hawaii: Waipahu on the island of Oahu, and Pahoa on the island of Hawaii. Although these data were obtained in an effort to test and improve these two logging techniques, the measurements are of interest to hydrologists studying the aquifers in Hawaii. This report presents a review of the measurements conducted during this effort and summarizes the data obtained in a form designed to make that data available to hydrologists studying the movement of ground water in Hawaiian aquifers. Caliper logs obtained at the Waipahu site indicate the distribution of openings in interbed clinker zones between relatively dense and impermeable basalt flows. The flowmeter data indicate the pattern of flow induced along seven observation boreholes that provide conduits between interbed zones in the vicinity of the Mahoe Pumping Station at the Waipahu site. The televiewer image logs obtained in some of the Waipahu Mahoe boreholes do not show any significant vertical or steeply dipping fractures that might allow communication across the dense interior of basalt flows. Acoustic televiewer logs obtained at the Pahoa site show that a number of steeply dipping fractures and dikes cut across basalt flows. Although flow under ambient hydraulic-head conditions in the Waipahu Mahoe Observation boreholes is attributed to hydraulic gradients associated with pumping from a nearby pumping station, flow in the Waipio Deep Observation borehole on Oahu and flow in the Scientific Observation borehole on Hawaii are attributed to the effects of natural recharge and downward decreasing hydraulic heads associated with that recharge.

  11. A brief survey to identify priorities for improving clinician recruitment and retention: results from Hawai'i Island physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, Karen L

    2012-04-01

    In light of the documented physician shortage on Hawai'i Island, the Hawai'i Clinician Recruitment and Retention survey was designed and implemented to assess perceptions of quality of life and the work environment among clinicians on Hawai'i Island and to identify aspects of the environment on Hawai'i Island that predict responses to questions regarding recruitment and retention. The respondents were 127 Hawai'i Island clinicians, specifically 96 physicians, 15 nurses, five pharmacists, four physician assistants, two social workers, and five "other" healthcare workers. The internal reliability of the survey was high (alpha=.91) and its convergent validity was supported by the significant correlation of item total scores with anchor items that measured overall ratings of the environment and likelihood of recruitment and retention. Given the small number of non-physician clinicians responding, descriptive analyses included only physicians. Physicians who indicated they plan to retire within 5 years were excluded from the correlation analyses to focus on patterns within the target group for retention. Overall, results indicate that, while the majority of physicians who relocated to Hawai'i Island did so primarily for the quality of life, the best predictors of retention are financial sustainability, professional opportunities, community support, and access to good K-12 schools. Survey results also indicate that Hawai'i Island will lose 32% of its current physicians within the next five years due to retirement or other causes. These findings indicate that increased urgency to find solutions is warranted.

  12. Drug take back in Hawai'i: partnership between the University of Hawai'i Hilo College of Pharmacy and the Narcotics Enforcement Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Carolyn S; Batz, Forrest; Juarez, Deborah Taira; Ladao, Lani C

    2014-01-01

    Unused/unwanted medications in households and patient care facilities expose vulnerable populations, including children, elders, and pets, to potential harm through inadvertent ingestion, as well as the potential for theft and assault. Hawai'i Administrative Rules prohibit the return of any prescription medications to retail pharmacies after dispensing. The Hawai'i Narcotics Enforcement Division (NED) partnered with the University of Hawai'i at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (CoP) in eleven Drug Take Back events throughout the state. Most participants heard of the events via newspaper and television marketing. The most common methods of medication disposal are via trash or down household drains. Over 8,000 lbs of unused/unwanted medications was collected, identified and logged from 2011 through 2012. The majority of returned drugs were non-controlled substances (90%). Commonly returned medications included prescription cardiac medications such as simvastatin and lisinopril, non-prescription analgesics such as aspirin and ibuprofen, and dietary supplements such as vitamins and iron. Commonly returned controlled substance medications included narcotics such as hydrocodone/acetaminophen combinations and oxycodone, and sedative hypnotics such as zolpidem and lorazepam.

  13. Integrating Geologic, Geochemical and Geophysical Data in a Statistical Analysis of Geothermal Resource Probability across the State of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautze, N. C.; Ito, G.; Thomas, D. M.; Hinz, N.; Frazer, L. N.; Waller, D.

    2015-12-01

    Hawaii offers the opportunity to gain knowledge and develop geothermal energy on the only oceanic hotspot in the U.S. As a remote island state, Hawaii is more dependent on imported fossil fuel than any other state in the U.S., and energy prices are 3 to 4 times higher than the national average. The only proven resource, located on Hawaii Island's active Kilauea volcano, is a region of high geologic risk; other regions of probable resource exist but lack adequate assessment. The last comprehensive statewide geothermal assessment occurred in 1983 and found a potential resource on all islands (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, 1983). Phase 1 of a Department of Energy funded project to assess the probability of geothermal resource potential statewide in Hawaii was recently completed. The execution of this project was divided into three main tasks: (1) compile all historical and current data for Hawaii that is relevant to geothermal resources into a single Geographic Information System (GIS) project; (2) analyze and rank these datasets in terms of their relevance to the three primary properties of a viable geothermal resource: heat (H), fluid (F), and permeability (P); and (3) develop and apply a Bayesian statistical method to incorporate the ranks and produce probability models that map out Hawaii's geothermal resource potential. Here, we summarize the project methodology and present maps that highlight both high prospect areas as well as areas that lack enough data to make an adequate assessment. We suggest a path for future exploration activities in Hawaii, and discuss how this method of analysis can be adapted to other regions and other types of resources. The figure below shows multiple layers of GIS data for Hawaii Island. Color shades indicate crustal density anomalies produced from inversions of gravity (Flinders et al. 2013). Superimposed on this are mapped calderas, rift zones, volcanic cones, and faults (following Sherrod et al., 2007). These features were used

  14. Achieving a Net Zero Energy Retrofit: Lessons from the University of Hawaii at Manoa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    The University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce energy consumption by at least 30% as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program.

  15. Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Cultural environment and aesthetic resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trettin, L.D. [Univ. of Tennessee (United States); Petrich, C.H.; Saulsbury, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on the cultural environment and aesthetic resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The cultural environment in the Geothermal Resource Zone (GRZ) and associated study area consists of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious practices and both Native Hawaiian and non-Native Hawaiian cultural resources. This report consists of three sections: (1) a description of Native Hawaiian cultural and religious rights, practices, and values; (2) a description of historic, prehistoric, and traditional Native Hawaiian sites; and (3) a description of other (non-native) sites that could be affected by development in the study area. Within each section, the level of descriptive detail varies according to the information currently available. The description of the cultural environment is most specific in its coverage of the Geothermal Resource Subzones in the Puna District of the island of Hawaii and the study area of South Maui. Ethnographic and archaeological reports by Cultural Advocacy Network Developing Options and International Archaeological Research Institute, Inc., respectively, supplement the descriptions of these two areas with new information collected specifically for this study. Less detailed descriptions of additional study areas on Oahu, Maui, Molokai, and the island of Hawaii are based on existing archaeological surveys.

  16. Transborder Tourism, Borderless Classroom: Reflections on a Hawaii-Singapore Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses a virtual or borderless classroom exercise conducted by the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the University of Hawaii, Manoa (UHM). By reflecting on the experiences and views of the NUS participants, the article explores the possibility of virtual explorations as a substitute for conventional fieldtrips and…

  17. 2012 Moon Mars Analog Mission Activities on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, Lee; Graff, Trevor G.; Aileen Yingst, R.; Ten Kate, Inge L.; Russell, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Rover-based 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) scientific investigations were completed at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Scientific investigations, scientific input, and science operations constraints were tested in the context of an existing project and protocols for the field activities

  18. How much ethanol fuel can be produced from sugarcane in Hawaii

    OpenAIRE

    Kwong, John

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates how much sugar ethanol Hawaii can produce. Fossilfuel reserves will diminish with time, and alternative energy may not be effectivein totally replacing combustible engines for all application. Factors important tosugar ethanol production and distribution are examined and evaluated.  

  19. National Hydroelectric Power Resources Study:Regional Assessment: Volume XXIII: Alaska and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    expenditures, and agriculture. The bulk of agricultural activity is in the production of sugar and pineapple . The most rapid growth in the past...2 • ~~UI TR-KALUA PEEL . 151 • • STATE OF HAWAII ULN~ • • * • * • " * * 9.2 * 3.0 • 2 * • * IS UP * HIKPOH0027 " PAIA * 5 • MAUl

  20. Investigation of Hydrophobic Concrete Additive for Seawall Replacement at Pililaau Army Recreation Center, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    17 4.2 Projected return on investment (ROI) .............................................................19 5...Eugene Arter – Engineering Technician, US Army Garrison Hawaii (USAP-PTA/DPW) The Commander of ERDC was COL Bryan S. Green , and the Director was...evalua- tions would have provided a method to conduct a return on investment analysis and estimate life cycle; however this phase of the project could