WorldWideScience

Sample records for voyage data recorders

  1. VOYAGER 1 SATURN POSITION RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SECONDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter position data that have been generated at a 48.0 second sample rate using the NAIF SPICE kernals. The data set is...

  2. VOYAGER 2 SATURN POSITION RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SECONDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Saturn encounter position data that have been generated at a 48.0 second sample rate using the NAIF SPICE kernals. The data set is...

  3. VOYAGER 1 JUPITER POSITION RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SECONDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Jupiter encounter position data that have been generated at a 48.0 second sample rate using the NAIF SPICE kernals. The data set is...

  4. VOYAGER 2 JUPITER POSITION RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SECONDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter position data that have been generated at a 48.0 second sample rate using the NAIF SPICE kernals. The data set is...

  5. VOYAGER 1 SATURN MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 9.60 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 1 Saturn encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 9.6 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  6. VOYAGER 2 JUPITER MAGNETOMETER RESAMPLED DATA 48.0 SEC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes Voyager 2 Jupiter encounter magnetometer data that have been resampled at a 48.0 second sample rate. The data set is composed of 6 columns: 1)...

  7. 46 CFR 122.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....220 Section 122.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER... OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 122.220 Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty... custody thereof, shall make these records available upon request, to a duly authorized investigating...

  8. 46 CFR 185.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....220 Section 185.220 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) OPERATIONS Marine Casualties and Voyage Records § 185.220 Records of a... officer, or person responsible for the custody thereof, shall make these records available upon request...

  9. 46 CFR 4.05-15 - Voyage records, retention of.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... room logs, bell books, navigation charts, navigation work books, compass deviation cards, gyro records, stowage plans, records of draft, aids to mariners, night order books, radiograms sent and received, radio... request, to a duly authorized investigating officer, administrative law judge, officer or employee of the...

  10. Turbulence in the solar wind: spectra from Voyager 2 data at 5 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraternale, F; Gallana, L; Iovieno, M; Tordella, D; Opher, M; Richardson, J D

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations in the flow velocity and magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Solar System. These fluctuations are turbulent, in the sense that they are disordered and span a broad range of scales in both space and time. The study of solar wind turbulence is motivated by a number of factors all keys to the understanding of the Solar Wind origin and thermodynamics. The solar wind spectral properties are far from uniformity and evolve with the increasing distance from the sun. Most of the available spectra of solar wind turbulence were computed at 1 astronomical unit, while accurate spectra on wide frequency ranges at larger distances are still few. In this paper we consider solar wind spectra derived from the data recorded by the Voyager 2 mission during 1979 at about 5 AU from the sun. Voyager 2 data are an incomplete time series with a voids/signal ratio that typically increases as the spacecraft moves away from the sun (45% missing data in 1979), making the analysis challenging. In order to estimate the uncertainty of the spectral slopes, different methods are tested on synthetic turbulence signals with the same gap distribution as V2 data. Spectra of all variables show a power law scaling with exponents between −2.1 and −1.1, depending on frequency subranges. Probability density functions (PDFs) and correlations indicate that the flow has a significant intermittency. (invited comment)

  11. Communicating with Voyager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Larry N.; Hornstein, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The Deep Space Network for receiving Voyager 2 data is discussed. The functions of the earth-Voyager radio link are examined, including radiometrics, transmission of commands to the spacecraft, radio sciences, and the transmission of telemetry from the spacecraft to earth. The use of ranging, Doppler, and VLBI measurements to maintain position and velocity data on Voyager 2 is described. Emphasis is placed on the international tracking network for obtaining Voyager 2 data on Neptune and Triton.

  12. RECORDS REACHING RECORDING DATA TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. L. Gresik

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  13. Records Reaching Recording Data Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresik, G. W. L.; Siebe, S.; Drewello, R.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of RECORDS (Reaching Recording Data Technologies) is the digital capturing of buildings and cultural heritage objects in hard-to-reach areas and the combination of data. It is achieved by using a modified crane from film industry, which is able to carry different measuring systems. The low-vibration measurement should be guaranteed by a gyroscopic controlled advice that has been , developed for the project. The data were achieved by using digital photography, UV-fluorescence photography, infrared reflectography, infrared thermography and shearography. Also a terrestrial 3D laser scanner and a light stripe topography scanner have been used The combination of the recorded data should ensure a complementary analysis of monuments and buildings.

  14. The intelligent data recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Mamoru; Hidekuma, Sigeru.

    1985-01-01

    The intelligent data recorder has been developed to data acquisition for a microwave interferometer. The 'RS-232C' which is the standard interface is used for data transmission to the host computer. Then, it's easy to connect with any computer which has general purpose serial port. In this report, the charcteristics of the intelligent data recorder and the way of developing the software are described. (author)

  15. VOYAGE PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz SKÓRA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A sea voyage can be divided into three parts with varying degrees of risk: - from the berth at the port of departure to the pilot disembarkation point - from the pilot disembarkation to another pilot embarkation point near the port of call/destination - from the pilot embarkation point to the berth Results of statistical research into ship accidents at sea point to an increased number of incidents and accidents, including groundings, especially in restricted areas. Such areas are often narrow and have limited depths, while their short straight sections require frequent course alterations, often in varying hydrometeorological conditions. Due to all these factors, the voyage has to be carefully planned and all watchkeeping officers have to be well prepared to conduct the ship safely. The article presents the objectives, scope, legal basis and stages in the process of voyage planning. The compliance with the outlined principles will reduce the level of risk in maritime transport.

  16. Observations of Low-Frequency Magnetic Waves due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Ions Using ACE, Ulysses, and Voyager Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Aggarwal, Poornima; Argall, Matthew R.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Bzowski, Maciej; Cannon, Bradford E.; Gary, S. Peter; Fisher, Meghan K.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Hollick, Sophia J.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.; Pine, Zackary B.; Richardson, John D.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Sokół, Justyna M.; Taylor, David K.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2017-09-01

    Wave excitation by newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) plays a significant role in theories that attempt to describe IBEX and Voyager observations in the solar wind and heliosheath. The same dynamic processes can be far-reaching and extend into the inner heliosphere to at least 1AU and likely to smaller heliocentric distances. While the high-resolution magnetic field measurements required to study these waves are not yet available in the heliosheath, we have studied a range of available observations and found evidence of waves due to interstellar PUIs using ACE (1998-2015 at 1 AU), Ulysses (1996-2006 at 2 to 5 AU, high and low latitudes) and Voyager (1978-1979 and 2 to 6 AU) observations. Efforts to extend the Voyager observations to 35 AU are ongoing. We have examined these data sets and report on observations of low-frequency waves that result from newborn interstellar pickup H+ and He+ ions. Although not as common as theory originally predicted, we presently have identified 524 independent occurrences. Our conclusion from studying these waves is that they are seen only when the ambient turbulence is sufficiently weak. The instability that generates these waves requires a slow accumulation of wave energy over several to tens of hours to achieve observable wave amplitudes. In regions where the turbulence is moderate to strong, the turbulence absorbs the wave energy before it can reach observable levels and transports the energy to the dissipation scales where it heats the background thermal particles. Only intervals with the weakest turbulence will permit energy accumulation over this time scale. These conditions are most often, but not exclusively, achieved in solar wind rarefaction regions.

  17. Jupiter and the Voyager mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, L.; Spall, Henry

    1980-01-01

    In 1977, the United States launched two unmanned Voyager spacecraft that were to take part in an extensive reconnaissance of the outer planets over a 12-year period visiting the environs of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Their first encounter was with the complex Jupiter planetary system 400 million miles away. Sweeping by Jupiter and its five moons in 1979, the two spacecraft have sent back to Earth an enormous amount of data that will prove to be vital in understanding our solar system. Voyager 1 is scheduled to fly past Saturn on November 13 of this year; Voyager 2, in August of the following year. 

  18. Net current measurements and secondary electron emission characteristics of the Voyager plasma science experiment and their impact on data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) instrument is capable of returning integral (DC) current measurements, similar in some respects to measurements made with a Langmuir probe or a retarding potential analyzer, although there are significant differences. The integral measurements were made during a calibration sequence in the solar wind, during Cruise Science Maneuvers, and within the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn by Voyager 1. After the failure of the PLS experiment following the Saturn encounter, that instrument was placed in the DC return mode returning possibly usable data from early 1981 through early 1985. The DC return measurements are difficult to interpret and are above threshold values only for relatively large fluxes; the determination of the measured current level is dependent on the operating temperature of the preamplifiers which further complicates the interpretation. Nevertheless, these measurements can be used to determine the efficiency of the suppressor grid at preventing the loss of secondary electrons off the collector plate. Some DC return measurements have been invaluable in aiding in the interpretation of some electron plasma measurements not previously understood. It is found that electron spectra can be significantly modified by the presence of second generation secondary electrons produced by either first generation secondaries or photoelectrons on the support ring of the negative high voltage modulator grid within the instrument housing.

  19. Aspects of Voyager photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Schafer, Francis J.; Jordan, Raymond; Howington, Annie-Elpis

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986, Voyager 2 took a series of pictures of Uranus and its satellites with the Imaging Science System (ISS) on board the spacecraft. Based on six stereo images from the ISS narrow-angle camera, a topographic map was compiled of the Southern Hemisphere of Miranda, one of Uranus' moons. Assuming a spherical figure, a 20-km surface relief is shown on the map. With three additional images from the ISS wide-angle camera, a control network of Miranda's Southern Hemisphere was established by analytical photogrammetry, producing 88 ground points for the control of multiple-model compilation on the AS-11AM analytical stereoplotter. Digital terrain data from the topographic map of Miranda have also been produced. By combining these data and the image data from the Voyager 2 mission, perspective views or even a movie of the mapped area can be made. The application of these newly developed techniques to Voyager 1 imagery, which includes a few overlapping pictures of Io and Ganymede, permits the compilation of contour maps or topographic profiles of these bodies on the analytical stereoplotters.

  20. Discrete event simulation and the resultant data storage system response in the operational mission environment of Jupiter-Saturn /Voyager/ spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, A. K.

    1978-01-01

    The Data Storage Subsystem Simulator (DSSSIM) simulating (by ground software) occurrence of discrete events in the Voyager mission is described. Functional requirements for Data Storage Subsystems (DSS) simulation are discussed, and discrete event simulation/DSSSIM processing is covered. Four types of outputs associated with a typical DSSSIM run are presented, and DSSSIM limitations and constraints are outlined.

  1. Analysis of Satellite AIS Data to Derive Weather Judging Criteria for Voyage Route Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Fujii

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The operational limitations are discussed at the IMO as a part of the second generation intact stability criteria. Since it is a first attempt to introduce operational efforts into safety regulations, comprehensive discussions are necessary to realize practically acceptable ones. Therefore this study investigates actual navigation routes of container ships and pure car carriers in the trans-North Pacific Ocean in winter, because they are prone to suffer significant parametric roll which is one of stability failure modes. Firstly, interviews are made to shipmasters who have experiences to have operated the subject ships to identify major elements for route selection in the North Pacific Ocean. Secondly, sufficient number of actual navigation records is collected from Satellite AIS data to derive the weather criteria for the route selection in severe weather condition. Finally, shipmaster’s on-board decision-making criteria are discussed by analysing the ship tracking data and weather data.

  2. A note on the ring current in Saturn’s magnetosphere: Comparison of magnetic data obtained during the Pioneer-11 and Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Bunce

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We examine the residual (measured minus internal magnetic field vectors observed in Saturn’s magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 fly-by in 1979, and compare them with those observed during the Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys in 1980 and 1981. We show for the first time that a ring current system was present within the magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 encounter, which was qualitatively similar to those present during the Voyager fly-bys. The analysis also shows, however, that the ring current was located closer to the planet during the Pioneer-11 encounter than during the comparable Voyager-1 fly-by, reflecting the more com-pressed nature of the magnetosphere at the time. The residual field vectors have been fit using an adaptation of the current system proposed for Jupiter by Connerney et al. (1981a. A model that provides a reasonably good fit to the Pioneer-11 Saturn data extends radially between 6.5 and 12.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance of 17 RS, has a north-south extent of 4 RS, and carries a total current of 9.6 MA. A corresponding model that provides a qualitatively similar fit to the Voyager data, determined previously by Connerney et al. (1983, extends radially between 8 and 15.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance for Voyager-1 of 23–24 RS, has a north-south extent of 6 RS, and carries a total current of 11.5 MA.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems, magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, planetary magnetospheres

  3. Voyage to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4)…

  4. Observations from 1 to 6 AU of Low-Frequency Magnetic Waves due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Ions Using Ulysses, Voyager and ACE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Aggarwal, P.; Argall, M. R.; Burlaga, L. F.; Bzowski, M.; Cannon, B. E.; Gary, S. P.; Fisher, M. K.; Gilbert, J. A.; Hollick, S. J.; Isenberg, P. A.; Joyce, C. J.; Murphy, N.; Nuno, R. G.; Pine, Z. B.; Richardson, J. D.; Schwadron, N.; Skoug, R. M.; Sokol, J. M.; Taylor, D. K.; Vasquez, B. J.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2016-12-01

    Wave excitation by newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) play a significant role in theories that attempt to describe IBEX and Voyager observations in the heliosheath as well as solar wind heating. The same dynamic processes can be far-reaching and extend into the inner heliosphere to at least 1AU and likely to smaller heliocentric distances. While the high-resolution magnetic field measurements required to study these waves are not yet available in the heliosheath, we have studied a range of available observations and found evidence of waves due to interstellar PUIs using ACE (1998-2015 at 1 AU), Ulysses (1996-2006 at 2 to 5 AU, high and low latitudes) and Voyager (1978-1979 and 2 to 6 AU) observations. Efforts to extend the Voyager observations to 35 AU are ongoing. We have examined these data sets and report on observations of low-frequency waves that result from newborn interstellar pickup H+ and He+ ions. Although not as common as theory once predicted, we presently have identified 524 independent occurrences. Our conclusion from studying these waves is that they are seen only when the ambient turbulence is sufficiently weak. The instability that leads to the generation of these waves requires a slow accumulation of wave energy over several to tens of hours to achieve the observed wave amplitudes. In regions where the turbulence is moderate to strong, the turbulence consumes the wave energy before it can reach observable levels and transports the energy to the dissipation scales where it heats the background thermal particles. Only intervals with the weakest turbulence will permit energy accumulation over this time scale. These conditions are most often, but not exclusively, achieved in solar wind rarefaction regions.

  5. Voyager 2 Uranus targeting strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarone, R. J.; Gray, D. L.; Potts, C. L.; Francis, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the major challenges involved in the Voyager 2 Uranus flyby is to deliver the spacecraft to an appropriate aimpoint at the optimum time, so as to maximize the science return of the mission, while yet keeping propellant expenditure low. An unusual targeting strategy has been devised to satisfy these requirements. Its complexity arises from the great distance of the planet Uranus and the limited performance capabilities of Voyager. This selected strategy is developed in relation to a set of candidate strategies, mission requirements and shifting science objectives. The analysis of these candidates is conducted via a Monte Carlo simulation, the results of which yield data for the comparative evaluation and eventual and selection of the actual targeting strategy to be employed.

  6. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  7. Gravity Data for Indiana (300 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (300 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in February 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  8. Recent Observations of Energetic Particles from the Voyager Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.

    2013-05-01

    The Voyager spacecraft have been exploring the heliosheath since their crossings of the solar wind termination shock on December 2004 (Voyager 1) and August 2007 (Voyager 2). Starting on 7 May 2012, dramatic short-term changes in the intensities of heliospheric particles and galactic cosmic rays have been occurring periodically at Voyager 1. In July, a series of encounters with a heliospheric depletion region occurred, culminating on 25 August 2012 with the durable entry into the region by Voyager 1 (durable at least through the time of this writing in early February 2012). This depletion region is characterized by the disappearance of particles accelerated in the heliosphere, the anomalous cosmic rays and termination shock particles, and the increased intensity of galactic cosmic ray nuclei and electrons. The result is that the low-energy part of the galactic cosmic ray spectra is being revealed for the first time. Data from the magnetometer experiment on Voyager 1 implies that the spacecraft is not yet in the interstellar medium, but it apparently has a good connection path to it. At Voyager 2, dramatic changes haven't occurred but there are longer-term trends in the intensities that are different from what were observed on Voyager 1. We will report on the recent observations of energetic particles from both spacecraft. This work was supported by NASA under contract NNN12AA012.

  9. Recordable storage medium with protected data area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing data on a rewritable data storage medium, to a corresponding storage medium, to a corresponding recording apparatus and to a corresponding playback apparatus. Copy-protective measures require that on rewritable storage media some data must be stored which

  10. Evaluation of Data Recording at Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Karbasi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Medical records of patients have an undeniable role on education, research and evaluation of health care delivery, and also could be used as reliable documents of past in casesof patients’ legal complains. This study was done to evaluate medical data recording at teaching hospital of Birjand University of Medical Sciences in 2004.Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, 527 patients’ records of patients who had been discharged from general wards of the hospitals after 24 hours of hospitalization were randomly selected. 18 standard titles of records include in each patient’s record were evaluated using checklists. Data were analyzed using frequency distribution tables, independent t-test and Chi-square test.Results: Items on records’ titles were completed in a range of 0-100%. Titles of neonates and nursing care with 96% completeness were the most completed ones~ Titles of recovery, pre-delivery care, medical history, summary, and progress notes with 50% to 74% completeness were categorized as moderately completed titles; and titles of vital signs, pre-operation care and operation report were weak. Records of the infectious diseases ward were the most completed records (68% and the least completed were from ophthmology ward (35.8%. There were significant differences between the hospitals and between different wards.Conclusion: Results of this study show the need for further education on record writing, taking medical history, and order writing and more importantly the need for a system of continuous monitoringof the records.Keywords: MEDICAL RECORD, TEACHING HOSPITAL, EVALUATION

  11. Upper Limits on O VI Emission from Voyager Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    ., Bowyer, C. S., Korpela, E., Lampton, M., Trapero, J., Gomez, J. F., Morales, C.,. Orozco, V. 1999, American Astronomical Society Meeting, 195, 5302. Holberg, J. B., Watkins, R. 1992, Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometer Guest Observer and Data.

  12. Saturn radio emission and the solar wind - Voyager-2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desch, M.D.; Rucker, H.O.; Observatorium Lustbuhel, Graz, Austria)

    1985-01-01

    Voyager 2 data from the Plasma Science experiment, the Magnetometer experiment and the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment were used to analyze the relationship between parameters of the solar wind/interplanetary medium and the nonthermal Saturn radiation. Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field properties were combined to form quantities known to be important in controlling terrestrial magnetospheric processes. The Voyager 2 data set used in this investigation consists of 237 days of Saturn preencounter measurements. However, due to the immersion of Saturn and the Voyager 2 spacecraft into the extended Jupiter magnetic tail, substantial periods of the time series were lacking solar wind data. To cope with this problem a superposed epoch method (CHREE analysis) was used. The results indicate the superiority of the quantities containing the solar wind density in stimulating the radio emission of Saturn - a result found earlier using Voyager 1 data - and the minor importance of quantities incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field. 10 references

  13. 76 FR 47478 - Event Data Recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... increase the cost of memory for storage of acceleration data. It further commented that the revised... Requirements of Part 563 Part 563 specifies that if the EDR records acceleration data ``in non-volatile memory... protocols to better reflect current accelerometer technologies. \\4\\ See Docket number NHTSA-2004-18029. \\5...

  14. Reporting, Recording, and Transferring Contingency Demand Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    .... In this report, we develop a standard set of procedures for reporting and recording demand data at the contingency location and transferring contingency demand data to the home base - ensuring proper level allocation and valid worldwide peacetime operating stock (POS) and readiness spares package (RSP) requirements.

  15. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST... Emergencies § 122.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels shall prepare a voyage plan: (1) A... United States Great Lakes port from a Canadian Great Lakes port. (b) The voyage plan required by...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... voyage No. 1 having the prefixed designation NSA and followed by the General Agents' abbreviated designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change with... General Agent shall affix his abbreviated designation and initial voyage numbers, as NSA-13/XYZ-1. ...

  17. Ocean Color and Earth Science Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritorena, S.

    2014-12-01

    The development of consistent, high quality time series of biogeochemical products from a single ocean color sensor is a difficult task that involves many aspects related to pre- and post-launch instrument calibration and characterization, stability monitoring and the removal of the contribution of the atmosphere which represents most of the signal measured at the sensor. It is even more challenging to build Climate Data Records (CDRs) or Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs) from multiple sensors as design, technology and methodologies (bands, spectral/spatial resolution, Cal/Val, algorithms) differ from sensor to sensor. NASA MEaSUREs, ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) and IOCCG Virtual Constellation are some of the underway efforts that investigate or produce ocean color CDRs or ESDRs from the recent and current global missions (SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS). These studies look at key aspects of the development of unified data records from multiple sensors, e.g. the concatenation of the "best" individual records vs. the merging of multiple records or band homogenization vs. spectral diversity. The pros and cons of the different approaches are closely dependent upon the overall science purpose of the data record and its temporal resolution. While monthly data are generally adequate for biogeochemical modeling or to assess decadal trends, higher temporal resolution data records are required to look into changes in phenology or the dynamics of phytoplankton blooms. Similarly, short temporal resolution (daily to weekly) time series may benefit more from being built through the merging of data from multiple sensors while a simple concatenation of data from individual sensors might be better suited for longer temporal resolution (e.g. monthly time series). Several Ocean Color ESDRs were developed as part of the NASA MEaSUREs project. Some of these time series are built by merging the reflectance data from SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua and Envisat-MERIS in a semi-analytical ocean color

  18. Data recording and processing in mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKown, H. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1978-12-15

    When a mass spectrometer is going to be obtained, it must be specified to do a particular task. It follows that the data recording system must be designed to work satisfactorily with hardware that produces the ion current or currents. The author describes two systems: the AVCO mass spectrometer and the tandem mass spectrometer.

  19. 77 FR 47552 - Event Data Recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... as percentages. We also believed the change would better address state-of-the-art active steering... are recorded. We believe that section 563.9(b) is clear that when a memory buffer is available, EDRs... memory buffers are full, manufacturers may either overwrite any previous data that does not involve...

  20. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data.

  1. The Forensics Aspects of Event Data Recorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S. Daily

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The proper generation and preservation of digital data from Event Data Recorders (EDRs can provide invaluable evidence to automobile crash reconstruction investigations. However, data collected from the EDR can be difficult to use and authenticate, complicating the presentation of such information as evidence in legal proceedings. Indeed, current techniques for removing and preserving such data do not meet the court’s standards for electronic evidence. Experimentation with an EDR unit from a 2001 GMC Sierra pickup truck highlighted particular issues with repeatability of results. Fortunately, advances in the digital forensics field and memory technology can be applied to EDR analysis in order to provide more complete and usable data. The presented issues should assist in the identification and development of a model for forensically sound collection and investigation techniques for EDRs.

  2. Voyage vers un

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Caplan

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Los fuegos de San Telmo (1964 de José Pedro Diaz (Montevideo, 1921 est le récit du voyage en Italie de l’auteur-narrateur, pour visiter Marina di Camerota, le village natal de son oncle, un immigré italien disparu quelques années auparavant à Montevideo. Les histoires de l’oncle Domingo (Domenico, en italien à propos du village, avaient bercé l’enfance du narrateur et éveillé sa vocation d’écrivain ; le voyage est donc pour lui l’occasion de confronter une géographie imaginée - et largement mythifiée - à la réalité.Ce travail a pour but de mettre en avant le rôle joué par les mots italiens dans ce texte. Peu nombreux, ils tissent cependant le lien entre le passé et le présent, entre les souvenirs d’enfance et leur réélaboration littéraire. C’est seulement à partir de deux noms propres (celui du village, celui de l’oncle et de deux noms communs (celui d’un squale - le « pescecane » - et de quelques bandits - les « briganti » - que se construit cette évocation. Ces mots établissent un très riche réseau connotatif ; ils ont un pouvoir d’évocation qui va bien au-delà de leur signification (qui est parfois même secondaire ouvrant ainsi pour l’auteur-narrateur les portes de la littérature : l’enfant est devenu un homme, le voyageur devient écrivain.Los Fuegos de San Telmo (1964 by José Pedro Diaz (Montevideo is the account of a journey in Italy; the writer, who is also the narrator, was there to visit the village of Marina di Camerota, the birthplace of his uncle, an Italian immigrant who had died a few years before in Montevideo. The narrator had been reared with the stories about the village told by Uncle Domingo (Domenico, in Italian, and they had aroused in him the wish to become a writer; therefore the journey became an opportunity for him to compare imaginary and to a large extent mythical geography with reality.The purpose of this study is to bring to light the role played by

  3. NPOESS Environmental Data Record (EDR) Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R.; Grant, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products (aka, Environmental Data Records or EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process EDRs beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Algorithms and Data Products (A&DP) organization is responsible for the algorithms that produce the EDRs, including their quality aspects. Together, IDPS and A&DP must support the calibration, validation, and data quality improvement initiatives of the NPOESS program to ensure the production of atmospheric and environmental products that meet strict requirements for accuracy and precision. In support of this activity, A&DP and IDPS continually updates the estimated performance of the NPOESS system with respect to both latency and data quality, using the latest operational implementation of the data processing software and information from instrument test activities. This presentation will illustrate and describe the processing chains that create the data products, as well as describe the

  4. Short Narrative of the Voyage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaufort, de L.F.

    1913-01-01

    In the following pages I intend to give some informations about the voyage, which my wife and I made in the Indo-Australian Archipelago from November 1909 till March 1910, as an introduction to the reports of the zoological collections made during that trip, which are published in this periodical.

  5. Developing NOAA's Climate Data Records From AVHRR and Other Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privette, J. L.; Bates, J. J.; Kearns, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the provisional NOAA Climate Service, NOAA is providing leadership in the development of authoritative, measurement-based information on climate change and variability. NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) recently initiated a satellite Climate Data Record Program (CDRP) to provide sustained and objective climate information derived from meteorological satellite data that NOAA has collected over the past 30+ years - particularly from its Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) program. These are the longest sustained global measurement records in the world and represent billions of dollars of investment. NOAA is now applying advanced analysis methods -- which have improved remarkably over the last decade -- to the POES AVHRR and other instrument data. Data from other satellite programs, including NASA and international research programs and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), are also being used. This process will unravel the underlying climate trend and variability information and return new value from the records. In parallel, NCDC will extend these records by applying the same methods to present-day and future satellite measurements, including the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Jason-3. In this presentation, we will describe the AVHRR-related algorithm development activities that CDRP recently selected and funded through open competitions. We will particularly discuss some of the technical challenges related to adapting and using AVHRR algorithms with the VIIRS data that should become available with the launch of the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite in early 2012. We will also describe IT system development activities that will provide data processing and reprocessing, storage and management. We will also outline the maturing Program framework, including the strategies for coding and development standards, community reviews, independent program oversight, and research-to-operations algorithm

  6. BrainVoyager--past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Rainer

    2012-08-15

    BrainVoyager started as a simple fMRI analysis tool in the mid 1990s; the software was primarily created to fulfill the needs of its author and his colleagues to analyze anatomical and functional MRI data in a way that would be most appropriate for their research questions in visual and auditory perception. More specifically, the software was designed with three major goals in mind. First, it should allow analyses that would exploit optimally the high-resolution information available in fMRI data. Second, it should integrate volume-based analysis and cortex-based analysis including the possibility to visualize topographic activation data on flattened cortex representations. Third, it should combine hypothesis testing with data-driven analysis including interactive visualization tools that would make it as easy as possible to look at and explore data. A fourth guiding principle was to develop a software package that fulfilled the author's preference for elegant user interfaces, beautiful visualizations and high-performance computing. These major guiding principles from the beginning of BrainVoyager development are still noticeable in the most recent incarnations of the software that has grown from a small fMRI analysis tool on the Windows platform to a comprehensive cross-platform multi-modal software package integrating (real-time) fMRI, DWI/DTI, (i)EEG, MEG, TMS and fNIRS analyses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental voyages of N.S. Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Masaaki

    1993-01-01

    The first Japanese nuclear ship, N.S. MUTSU was commissioned by the Government on February 14 1991, after power up test and official sea trial with much success. Four experimental voyages of the ship were taken in the Pacific Ocean from March to December 1991 to study the performance of the nuclear power plant when it was influenced by marine conditions. In such an environment, incessant ship motion and load changes due to wave, wind, maneuvering, etc. are experienced. The ship sailed for a total of 110 days, a total distance of 64,180 km and for a total reactor operating time of 2,321 hours. Integrated reactor power was about 2,250 efph (effective full power hour) including that during the power up test. Zero power experiments were done again in Jan. 1992 to measure the core characteristics after finishing all the N.S. MUTSU plant operation program. Thus the most essential parts in the R ampersand D program on N.S. MUTSU was completed. The voyages demonstrated that the nuclear power plant worked well in any case and that the plant system had excellent capability as a marine engine. The data acquired through the experiments will contribute to the research and development program of the advanced marine reactor in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This paper describes the technical informations obtained through the experimental voyages, such as load following abilities, system performances during the high sea sailing and the tropical sea sailing and behavior of system parameters accompanied with steering. The latest technical results yielded by the program are also summarized here

  8. Deux voyages d’hiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Barilier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La relation entre la vie et l’œuvre, chez un artiste, n’est jamais une simple relation de cause à effet. L’on peut trouver, à l’origine du Voyage d’hiver de Schubert, comme à celle de la Rhapsodie pour alto de Brahms (dont les paroles, tirées d’un poème de Goethe, racontent elles aussi un voyage hivernal, des douleurs amoureuses. Mais ces deux œuvres transcendent les événements biographiques dont elles sont issues. échappant au narcissisme du moi romantique, elles traduisent deux expériences du temps, cyclique ou progressif, racontent deux voyages spirituels. La douleur d’exister y devient pure présence de la vie, et récit purifié.For an artist, the link between life and work is never a simple cause-effect relationship. The loving pain can be considered as the source of Schubert's Winterreise and of the Brahms Alto Rhapsody as well (the latter being based also upon a poem by Goethe, which tells also a winter journey. But these works transcend the life events from which they arise. Beyond the narcissism of the romantic self, they reflect two experiences of time, cyclical or progressive, and they tell two spiritual journeys. The pain of existence becomes a pure presence of life, and a purified story.

  9. EOP TDRs (Temperature-Depth-Recordings) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature-depth-recorders (TDRs) were attached to commercial longline and research Cobb trawl gear to obtain absolute depth and temperature measurement during...

  10. VA Personal Health Record Sample Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — My HealtheVet (www.myhealth.va.gov) is a Personal Health Record portal designed to improve the delivery of health care services to Veterans, to promote health and...

  11. Duplicate Record Elimination in Large Data Files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    UNCLASSIFIJED CSTR -445 NL LmEE~hhE - I1.0 . 111112----5 1.~4 __112 ___IL25_ 1.4 111111.6 EI24 COMPUTER SCIENCES DEPARTMENT oUniversity of Wisconsin...we propose a combinatorial model for the use in the analysis of algorithms for duplicate elimination. We contend that this model can serve as a...duplicates in a multiset of records, knowing the size of the multiset and the number of distinct records in it. 3. Algorithms for Duplicate Elimination

  12. Radiation scanning system for data recording media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gucza, E.

    1975-01-01

    The scanner of an encoded record support operates by the reflection principle. The record support has tracks brocken down into individual fields which are assigned light-dark markers for encoding purposes.The support consists of a light, non-transparent card which can be pulled over a slot by a guide attached to the scanner. The slot is arranged at an oblique angle relative to the card and emits radiation, for instance, light. This radiation is reflected by the tracks, the empty fields reflecting more radiation than the blackend ones, and then after having been transformed into signals, impinges upon phototransistors through openings. The number of openings corresponds to the number of tracks. The light can be made diffuse prior to exposure of the card by means of a red transparent plastic foil. (DG/RF) [de

  13. Voyager 1 Saturn targeting strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarone, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A trajectory targeting strategy for the Voyager 1 Saturn encounter has been designed to accomodate predicted uncertainties in Titan's ephemeris while maximizing spacecraft safety and science return. The encounter is characterized by a close Titan flyby 18 hours prior to Saturn periapse. Retargeting of the nominal trajectory to account for late updates in Titan's estimated position can disperse the ascending node location, which is nominally situated at a radius of low expected particle density in Saturn's ring plane. The strategy utilizes a floating Titan impact vector magnitude to minimize this dispersion. Encounter trajectory characteristics and optimal tradeoffs are presented.

  14. Recording the LHCb data and software dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisovic, Ana; Couturier, Ben; Gibson, Val; Jones, Chris

    2017-10-01

    In recent years awareness of the importance of preserving the experimental data and scientific software at CERN has been rising. To support this effort, we are presenting a novel approach to structure dependencies of the LHCb data and software to make it more accessible in the long-term future. In this paper, we detail the implementation of a graph database of these dependencies. We list the implications that can be deduced from the graph mining (such as a search for the legacy software), with emphasis on data preservation. Furthermore, we introduce a methodology of recreating the LHCb data, thus supporting reproducible research and data stewardship. Finally, we describe how this information is made available to the users on a web portal that promotes data and analysis preservation and good practise with analysis documentation.

  15. Radio science investigations with Voyager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshleman, V.R.; Tyler, G.L.; Croft, T.A.

    1977-01-01

    The planned radio science investigations during the Voyager missions to the outer planets involve: (1) the use of the radio links to and from the spacecraft for occultation measurements of planetary and satellite atmospheres and ionospheres, the rings of Saturn, the solar corona, and the general-relativistic time delay for radiowave propagation through the Sun's gravity field; (2) radio link measurements of true or apparent spacecraft motion caused by the gravity fields of the planets, the masses of their larger satellites, and characteristics of the interplanetary medium; and (3) related measurements which could provide results in other areas, including the possible detection of long-wavelength gravitational radiation propagating through the Solar System. The measurements will be used to study: atmospheric and ionospheric structure, constituents, and dynamics; the sizes, radial distribution, total mass, and other characteristics of the particles in the rings of Saturn; interior models for the major planets and the mean density and bulk composition of a number of their satellites; the plasma density and dynamics of the solar corona and interplanetary medium; and certain fundamental questions involving gravitation and relativity. The instrumentation for these experiments is the same ground-based and spacecraft radio systems as will be used for tracking and communicating with the Voyager spacecraft, although several important features of these systems have been provided primarily for the radio science investigations. (Auth.)

  16. 77 FR 48492 - Event Data Recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... that [cir] Involve side or side curtain/tube air bags such that EDR data would only need to be locked... deployable restraints other than frontal, side or side/curtain air bags such that EDR data would not need to... definitions to alleviate any uncertainties in multiple event crashes; Revised certain sensor ranges and...

  17. Information retrieval for nonstationary data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M. Y.

    1971-01-01

    A review and a critical discussion are made on the existing methods for analysis of nonstationary time series, and a new algorithm for splitting nonstationary time series, is applied to the analysis of sunspot data.

  18. NIMS EXPERIMENT DATA RECORDS: SL-9 COMET IMPACT WITH JUPITER

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NIMS Experiment Data Record (EDR) files contain raw data from the Galileo Orbiter Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (CARLSONETAL1992). This raw data requires...

  19. NIMS EXPERIMENT DATA RECORDS: GASPRA/IDA ENCOUNTERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NIMS Experiment Data Record (EDR) files contain raw data from the Galileo Orbiter Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (CARLSONETAL1992). This raw data requires...

  20. High density data recording for SSCL linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanDeusen, A.L.; Crist, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and AlliedSignal Aerospace have collaboratively developed a high density data monitoring system for beam diagnostic activities. The 128 channel data system is based on a custom multi-channel high speed digitizer card for the VXI bus. The card is referred to as a Modular Input VXI (MIX) digitizer. Multiple MIX cards are used in the complete system to achieve the necessary high channel density requirements. Each MIX digitizer card also contains programmable signal conditioning, and enough local memory to complete an entire beam scan without assistance from the host processor

  1. Voyager 2 Neptune targeting strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, C. L.; Francis, K.; Matousek, S. E.; Cesarone, R. J.; Gray, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The success of the Voyager 2 flybys of Neptune and Triton depends upon the ability to correct the spacecraft's trajectory. Accurate spacecraft delivery to the desired encounter conditions will promote the maximum science return. However, Neptune's great distance causes large a priori uncertainties in Neptune and Triton ephemerides and planetary system parameters. Consequently, the 'ideal' trajectory is unknown beforehand. The targeting challenge is to utilize the gradually improving knowledge as the spacecraft approaches Neptune to meet the science objectives, but with an overriding concern for spacecraft safety and a desire to limit propellant expenditure. A unique targeting strategy has been developed in response to this challenge. Through the use of a Monte Carlo simulation, candidate strategies are evaluated by the degree to which they meet these objectives and are compared against each other in determining the targeting strategy to be adopted.

  2. Logbooks from the English East India Company voyages digitized in keyed format from 1789 to 1834

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection of keyed Logbooks from the East India Company voyages are formatted in a common digitized format. Data include daily instrumental measurements and...

  3. VOYAGER 1&2 JUPITER BRIGHTNESS NORTH/SOUTH MAP SET V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Voyager 1 and 2 measurements of the brightness of Jupiter at H Lyman alpha and in the H2 Lyman and Werner bands shortward of H Lyman alpha....

  4. Pioneer and Voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from the electrostatic analyzers aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft and from the Faraday cup aboard Voyager 2 were used to study spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Prior to mid-1985, both spacecraft observed nearly identical solar wind structures. After day 150 of 1985, the velocity structure at Voyager 2 became flatter, and the Voyager 2 velocities were smaller than those observed by Pioneer 11. It is suggested that these changes in the solar wind at low latitudes may be related to a change which occurred in the coronal hole structure in early 1985.

  5. Digital voice recording: An efficient alternative for data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; Thomas M. Juntti; Thomas W. Bonnot; Joshua J. Millspaugh

    2009-01-01

    Study designs are usually constrained by logistical and budgetary considerations that can affect the depth and breadth of the research. Little attention has been paid to increasing the efficiency of data recording. Digital voice recording and translation may offer improved efficiency of field personnel. Using this technology, we increased our data collection by 55...

  6. Health Data Recording, Reporting and Utilization Practices Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health Data Recording, Reporting and Utilization Practices Among Primary Health Care Workers in Enugu State, South Eastern Nigeria. ... of PHC workers used notepads, 52.3% used notebooks while only 47.7% used health management information system (HMIS) forms to record data. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. Gravity Data for Indiana-over 10,000 records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (10,629 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in December 1989. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  8. Gravity Data for Southwestern Alaska (1294 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1294 records) were compiled by the Alaska Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California. This data base was...

  9. Development of Software for dose Records Data Base Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, M.

    1990-01-01

    The CIEMAT personal dose records are computerized in a Dosimetric Data Base whose primary purpose was the individual dose follow-up control and the data handling for epidemiological studies. Within the Data Base management scheme, software development to allow searching of individual dose records by external authorised users was undertaken. The report describes the software developed to allow authorised persons to visualize on screen a summary of the individual dose records from workers included in the Data Base. The report includes the User Guide for the authorised list of users and listings of codes and subroutines developed. (Author) 2 refs

  10. Design of double tape recorder data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Tianrui; Du Yifei

    1995-01-01

    In the data acquisition system supported by the microcomputer tape recorder, as the acquisition speed is often limited by the low speed of tape recorder, so a double tape recorder system is designed. In this system, two tape recorders are used in on-line acquisition system simultaneously. One DMA channel used is one designed for soft disk driver, another DMA channel used is one retained for user. By this way, the speed of tape writing could be increased to nearly twice as much. In order to prevent the data confusion, the authors open two data buffers in system and write different mark in each buffer, then write the data block to two tape recorders according to the mark. The system complies with the principle: 'Double write, Double read'

  11. Dedicated data recording video system for Spacelab experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Shoji; Fujiwara, Shinji; Onozuka, Kuniharu

    1984-04-01

    A feasibility study of video tape recorder (VTR) modification to add the capability of data recording etc. was conducted. This system is an on-broad system to support Spacelab experiments as a dedicated video system and a dedicated data recording system to operate independently of the normal operation of the Orbiter, Spacelab and the other experiments. It continuously records the video image signals with the acquired data, status and operator's voice at the same time on one cassette video tape. Such things, the crews' actions, animals' behavior, microscopic views and melting materials in furnace, etc. are recorded. So, it is expected that experimenters can make a very easy and convenient analysis of the synchronized video, voice and data signals in their post flight analysis.

  12. Peut-on voyager dans le temps ?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    La possibilité de voyager dans le temps est régulièrement évoquée par les magazines scientifiques (et parfois même par les scientifiques). Elle est également le sujet de nombreux romans de science-fiction. Nous discuterons d’abord du sens qu’on peut donner à l’expression « voyager dans le temps », puis nous expliciterons ce que la physique contemporaine dit à ce propos.

  13. Multibeam collection for cv11_seai: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-04-21 to 2011-04-29, Unknown Port to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for CV11_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-05-10 to 2011-05-19, Galway, Ireland to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for CV10_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2010-09-27 to 2010-10-04, Cork, Ireland to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. Multibeam collection for CV12_SEAI: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-03-11 to 2012-03-22, Cobh, Ireland to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  17. Multibeam collection for CV09_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-07-28 to 2009-08-18, Cork, Ireland to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  18. Multibeam collection for CV08_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2008-09-23 to 2008-10-08, Galway, Ireland to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  19. Multibeam collection for cv12_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-08-30 to 2012-09-21, Galway, Ireland to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  20. Multibeam collection for CV07_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2007-09-06 to 2007-10-17, Cork, Ireland to Rosslare, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  1. Multibeam collection for CV10_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2010-07-12 to 2010-07-26, Cork, Ireland to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  2. Multibeam collection for CV14_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2014-08-29 to 2014-09-17, Cork, Ireland to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for Cork_Harbour: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2000-08-20 to 2000-08-21, Unknown Port to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Multibeam collection for CV08_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2008-11-19 to 2008-12-02, Lisahalley, Ireland to Killybegs, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Court Upholds Confidentiality of Research Records/Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, David H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the background of the Forsham v Harris case and discusses the implications of the Supreme Court's ruling that research records and data of federally funded grantees are not considered federal agency records subject to disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act. (Author/GC)

  6. 40 CFR 1065.202 - Data updating, recording, and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... command and control frequency Minimum recording frequency § 1065.510 Speed and torque during an engine step-map 1 Hz 1 mean value per step. § 1065.510 Speed and torque during an engine sweep-map 5 Hz 1 Hz... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments § 1065.202 Data updating, recording...

  7. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 2. Recording and Retaining Raw Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Libera, Agata E.; Pires, Amanda; Tellarini, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    A clear understanding of how "raw data" is defined, recorded, and retained in the laboratory record is essential to the chemist employed in the laboratory compliant with the Good Laboratory Practices regulations. This article is intended to provide an understanding by drawing upon examples taken from the modern pharmaceutical analysis…

  8. Data compression systems for home-use digital video recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    With, de P.H.N.; Breeuwer, M.; van Grinsven, P.A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors focus on image data compression techniques for digital recording. Image coding for storage equipment covers a large variety of systems because the applications differ considerably in nature. Video coding systems suitable for digital TV and HDTV recording and digital electronic still

  9. Record transfer of data between CERN and California

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    A data transfer record has been broken by transmitting at a rate of 2.38 gigabits per second for more than one hour between CERN and Sunnyvale in California, a distance of more than 10,000 km. This record-breaking performance was achieved in the framework of tests to develop a high-speed global network for the future computing grid.

  10. Data Mining of NASA Boeing 737 Flight Data: Frequency Analysis of In-Flight Recorded Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Ansel J.

    2001-01-01

    Data recorded during flights of the NASA Trailblazer Boeing 737 have been analyzed to ascertain the presence of aircraft structural responses from various excitations such as the engine, aerodynamic effects, wind gusts, and control system operations. The NASA Trailblazer Boeing 737 was chosen as a focus of the study because of a large quantity of its flight data records. The goal of this study was to determine if any aircraft structural characteristics could be identified from flight data collected for measuring non-structural phenomena. A number of such data were examined for spatial and frequency correlation as a means of discovering hidden knowledge of the dynamic behavior of the aircraft. Data recorded from on-board dynamic sensors over a range of flight conditions showed consistently appearing frequencies. Those frequencies were attributed to aircraft structural vibrations.

  11. Charles Darwin's beagle voyage, fossil vertebrate succession, and "the gradual birth & death of species".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he collected and some of the extant fauna of South America before he returned to Britain. These comparisons, recorded in his correspondence, his diary and his notebooks during the voyage, were instances of a phenomenon that he later called the "law of the succession of types." Moreover, on the Beagle, he was following a geological research agenda outlined in the second volume of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology, which implies that paleontological data alone could provide an insight into the laws which govern the appearance of new species. Since Darwin claims in On the Origin of Species that fossil vertebrate succession was one of the key lines of evidence that led him to question the fixity of species, it seems certain that he was seriously contemplating transmutation during the Beagle voyage. If so, historians of science need to reconsider both the role of Britain's expert naturalists and the importance of the fossil vertebrate evidence in the development of Darwin's ideas on transmutation.

  12. Tablet computers for recording tuberculosis data at a community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tablet computers for recording tuberculosis data at a community health centre in King Sabata Dalindyebo Local Municipality, ... South African Family Practice ... They expressed a desire to extend the use of tablets to other areas of their work.

  13. Usage reporting on recorded lectures using educational data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2012). Usage reporting on recorded lectures using educational data mining. International Journal of Learning Technology, 7, 23-40. doi:10.1504/IJLT.2012.046864

  14. MRO CRISM MULTISPECTRAL REDUCED DATA RECORD V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset contains CRISM Multispectral Reduced Data Records (MRDRs). MRDRs are organized into 30 subdirectories named by the Mars Chart containing the MRDR, e.g....

  15. Physicists set new record for network data transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "An international team of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers joined forces to set new records for sustained data transfer between storage systems durint the SuperComputing 2006 (SC06) Bandwidth Challenge (BWC). (3 pages)

  16. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Science.gov (United States)

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  17. RECORD OF THE BINARY DATA ON SD CARD ARDUINO DUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Mikhailov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The short review of microcontrollers of family Arduino, their characteristics and application fields is given. Importance of record of parameters of researched object is marked to produce debugging of control systems on microcontrollers Arduino. Unique possibility of registration of parameters in family Arduino is record on SD a card in an alpha mode with usage of functions print (, write (. The problems connected to record of the binary data on SD a card on microcontroller Arduino Due are considered. The analysis of methods of record of the binary data on SD card Arduino Due, originating problems with neo-cleaning of memory from the previous program leading to possibility of duplication of the data on SD to a card, presence of the erratic point of view about restriction of volumes of data record and necessity of usage become outdated SD cards is carried out. Ways of elimination of the marked lacks are considered. The estimation of high-speed performance of various approaches of a data recording on SD a card is led. On the basis of the led researches the approach of multiplexing of the writeable information at the expense of conversion of the binary data is offered is byte-serial in a character array in code ASCI without magnification of their volume and record by units on 240 byte. It allows to use as much as possible standard function possibilities write ( Arduino and specificity of the organization of memory SD of cards and to increase high-speed performance more than in 1100 times in comparison with record in a character type on one byte.It is marked that usage of decisions of an exception of duplication of the data offered at forums does not provide completeness of their elimination. For Arduino Due for storage cleaning it is necessary usages of the special programmator or setting of the new program of loading.

  18. High-Speed Data Recorder for Space, Geodesy, and Other High-Speed Recording Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveniku, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed data recorder and replay equipment has been developed for reliable high-data-rate recording to disk media. It solves problems with slow or faulty disks, multiple disk insertions, high-altitude operation, reliable performance using COTS hardware, and long-term maintenance and upgrade path challenges. The current generation data recor - ders used within the VLBI community are aging, special-purpose machines that are both slow (do not meet today's requirements) and are very expensive to maintain and operate. Furthermore, they are not easily upgraded to take advantage of commercial technology development, and are not scalable to multiple 10s of Gbit/s data rates required by new applications. The innovation provides a softwaredefined, high-speed data recorder that is scalable with technology advances in the commercial space. It maximally utilizes current technologies without being locked to a particular hardware platform. The innovation also provides a cost-effective way of streaming large amounts of data from sensors to disk, enabling many applications to store raw sensor data and perform post and signal processing offline. This recording system will be applicable to many applications needing realworld, high-speed data collection, including electronic warfare, softwaredefined radar, signal history storage of multispectral sensors, development of autonomous vehicles, and more.

  19. Voyager infrared spectroscopy and radiometry investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanel, R; Conrath, B; Gautier, D; Gierasch, P; Kumar, S; Kunde, V; Lowman, P; Maguire, W; Pearl, J; Pirraglia, J [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, Md. (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center

    1977-11-01

    The infrared investigation on Voyager uses two interferometers covering the spectral ranges 60-600 cm/sup -1/ (17-170 ..mu..m) and 1000-7000 cm/sup -1/ (1.4-10 ..mu..m), and a radiometer covering the range 8000-25000 cm/sup -1/ (0.4-1.2 ..mu..m). Two spectral resolutions (approximately 6.5 and 2.0 cm/sup -1/) are available for each of the interferometers. In the middle of the thermal channel (far infrared interferometer) the noise level is equivalent to the signal from a target at 50 K; in the middle of the reflected sunlight channel (near infrared interferometer) the noise level is equivalent to the signal from an object of albedo 0.2 at the distance of Uranus. For planets and satellites with substantial atmospheres, the data will be used to investigate cloud and gas composition (including isotopic ratios), haze scale height, atmospheric vertical thermal structure, local and planetary circulation and dynamics, and planetary energy balance. For satellites with tenuous atmospheres, data will be gathered on surface and atmospheric compositon, surface temperature and thermal properties, local and global phase functions, and surface structure. For Saturn's rings, the composition and radial structure, particle size and thermal characteristics will be investigated. Comparative studies of the planets and their satellite systems will be carried out.

  20. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczak, Anna L; Babin, Steven; Moniz, Linda

    2010-10-14

    New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs) that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia) and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1) synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2) identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3) adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders). The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious diseases. The pilot synthetic background records were in the 4

  1. An overview of European efforts in generating climate data records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Z.; Timmermans, W.J.; Zeng, Y.; Schulz, J.; John, V.O.; Roebeling, R.A.; Poli, P.; Tan, D.; Kaspar, F.; Kaiser-Weiss, A.; Swinnen, E.; Tote, C.; Gregow, H.; Manninen, T.; Riihela, A.; Calvet, J.C.; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Jun

    2018-01-01

    The Coordinating Earth Observation Data Validation for Reanalysis for Climate Services project (CORE-CLIMAX) aimed to substantiate how Copernicus observations and products can contribute to climate change analyses. CORE-CLIMAX assessed the European capability to provide climate data records (CDRs)

  2. Data Recording in Performance Management: Trouble With the Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth Andersson, Signe; Denvall, Verner

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, performance management (PM) has become a buzzword in public sector organizations. Well-functioning PM systems rely on valid performance data, but critics point out that conflicting rationale or logic among professional staff in recording information can undermine the quality of the data. Based on a case study of social service…

  3. Event metadata records as a testbed for scalable data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemmeren, P van; Malon, D

    2010-01-01

    At a data rate of 200 hertz, event metadata records ('TAGs,' in ATLAS parlance) provide fertile grounds for development and evaluation of tools for scalable data mining. It is easy, of course, to apply HEP-specific selection or classification rules to event records and to label such an exercise 'data mining,' but our interest is different. Advanced statistical methods and tools such as classification, association rule mining, and cluster analysis are common outside the high energy physics community. These tools can prove useful, not for discovery physics, but for learning about our data, our detector, and our software. A fixed and relatively simple schema makes TAG export to other storage technologies such as HDF5 straightforward. This simplifies the task of exploiting very-large-scale parallel platforms such as Argonne National Laboratory's BlueGene/P, currently the largest supercomputer in the world for open science, in the development of scalable tools for data mining. Using a domain-neutral scientific data format may also enable us to take advantage of existing data mining components from other communities. There is, further, a substantial literature on the topic of one-pass algorithms and stream mining techniques, and such tools may be inserted naturally at various points in the event data processing and distribution chain. This paper describes early experience with event metadata records from ATLAS simulation and commissioning as a testbed for scalable data mining tool development and evaluation.

  4. Building clinical data groups for electronic medical record in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haibo; Yu, Yingtao; Yang, Peng; Tang, Xuejun; Hu, Jianping; Rao, Keqin; Pan, Feng; Xu, Yongyong; Liu, Danhong

    2012-04-01

    This article aims at building clinical data groups for Electronic Medical Records (EMR) in China. These data groups can be reused as basic information units in building the medical sheets of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMRS) and serve as part of its implementation guideline. The results were based on medical sheets, the forms that are used in hospitals, which were collected from hospitals. To categorize the information in these sheets into data groups, we adopted the Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Model (HL7 CDA R2 Model). The regulations and legal documents concerning health informatics and related standards in China were implemented. A set of 75 data groups with 452 data elements was created. These data elements were atomic items that comprised the data groups. Medical sheet items contained clinical records information and could be described by standard data elements that exist in current health document protocols. These data groups match different units of the CDA model. Twelve data groups with 87 standardized data elements described EMR headers, and 63 data groups with 405 standardized data elements constituted the body. The later 63 data groups in fact formed the sections of the model. The data groups had two levels. Those at the first level contained both the second level data groups and the standardized data elements. The data groups were basically reusable information units that served as guidelines for building EMRS and that were used to rebuild a medical sheet and serve as templates for the clinical records. As a pilot study of health information standards in China, the development of EMR data groups combined international standards with Chinese national regulations and standards, and this was the most critical part of the research. The original medical sheets from hospitals contain first hand medical information, and some of their items reveal the data types characteristic of the Chinese socialist national health system

  5. Data-driven approach for creating synthetic electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniz Linda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New algorithms for disease outbreak detection are being developed to take advantage of full electronic medical records (EMRs that contain a wealth of patient information. However, due to privacy concerns, even anonymized EMRs cannot be shared among researchers, resulting in great difficulty in comparing the effectiveness of these algorithms. To bridge the gap between novel bio-surveillance algorithms operating on full EMRs and the lack of non-identifiable EMR data, a method for generating complete and synthetic EMRs was developed. Methods This paper describes a novel methodology for generating complete synthetic EMRs both for an outbreak illness of interest (tularemia and for background records. The method developed has three major steps: 1 synthetic patient identity and basic information generation; 2 identification of care patterns that the synthetic patients would receive based on the information present in real EMR data for similar health problems; 3 adaptation of these care patterns to the synthetic patient population. Results We generated EMRs, including visit records, clinical activity, laboratory orders/results and radiology orders/results for 203 synthetic tularemia outbreak patients. Validation of the records by a medical expert revealed problems in 19% of the records; these were subsequently corrected. We also generated background EMRs for over 3000 patients in the 4-11 yr age group. Validation of those records by a medical expert revealed problems in fewer than 3% of these background patient EMRs and the errors were subsequently rectified. Conclusions A data-driven method was developed for generating fully synthetic EMRs. The method is general and can be applied to any data set that has similar data elements (such as laboratory and radiology orders and results, clinical activity, prescription orders. The pilot synthetic outbreak records were for tularemia but our approach may be adapted to other infectious

  6. Suprathermal ions in the solar wind from the Voyager spacecraft: Instrument modeling and background analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randol, B M; Christian, E R

    2015-01-01

    Using publicly available data from the Voyager Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instruments, we investigate the form of the solar wind ion suprathermal tail in the outer heliosphere inside the termination shock. This tail has a commonly observed form in the inner heliosphere, that is, a power law with a particular spectral index. The Voyager spacecraft have taken data beyond 100 AU, farther than any other spacecraft. However, during extended periods of time, the data appears to be mostly background. We have developed a technique to self-consistently estimate the background seen by LECP due to cosmic rays using data from the Voyager cosmic ray instruments and a simple, semi-analytical model of the LECP instruments

  7. Using the FAIMS Mobile App for field data recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballsun-Stanton, Brian; Klump, Jens; Ross, Shawn

    2016-04-01

    Multiple people creating data in the field poses a hard technical problem: our ``web 2.0'' environment presumes constant connectivity, data ``authority'' held by centralised servers, and sees mobile devices as tools for presentation rather than origination. A particular design challenge is the remoteness of the sampling locations, hundreds of kilometres away from network access. The alternative, however, is hand collection with a lengthy, error prone, and expensive digitisation process. This poster will present a field-tested open-source solution to field data recording. This solution, originally created by a community of archaeologists, needed to accommodate diverse recording methodologies. The community could not agree on standard vocabularies, workflows, attributes, or methodologies, but most agreed that at app to ``record data in the field'' was desirable. As a result, the app is generalised for field data collection; not only can it record a range of data types, but it is deeply customisable. The NeCTAR / ARC funded FAIMS Project, therefore, created an app which allows for arbitrary data collection in the field. In order to accomplish this ambitious goal, FAIMS relied heavily on OSS projects including: spatialite and gdal (for GIS support), sqlite (for a lightweight key-attribute-value datastore), Javarosa and Beanshell (for UI and scripting), Ruby, and Linux. Only by standing on the shoulders of giants, FAIMS was able to make a flexible and highly generalisable field data collection system that CSIRO geoscientists were able to customise to suit most of their completely unanticipated needs. While single-task apps (i.e. those commissioned by structural geologists to take strikes and dips) will excel in their domains, other geoscientists (palaeoecologists, palaeontologists, anyone taking samples) likely cannot afford to commission domain- and methodology-specific recording tools for their custom recording needs. FAIMS shows the utility of OSS software

  8. THE USE OF EVENT DATA RECORDER (EDR – BLACK BOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Nowacki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the registration of road events by a modern device called EDR – black box for all types of the motor vehicles. The device records data concerning vehicle’s technical condition, the way it was driven and RTS. The recorder may be used in private and commercial cars, taxies, buses and trucks. The recorder may serve the purpose of a neutral witness for the police, courts and insurance firms, for which it will facilitate making the reconstruction of the road accidents events and will provide a proof for those who caused them. The device will bring efficient driving, which will significantly contribute to decreasing the number of road accidents and limiting the environmental pollution. In the end in the last year German parliament backed a proposal to the European Commission to put black boxes, which gather information from vehicles involved in accidents, in all the new cars from 2015 on.

  9. Continuing the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.; Kopp, G.; Richard, E. C.; Sparn, T.; Woods, T. N.

    2017-12-01

    Radiative energy from the Sun establishes the basic climate of the Earth's surface and atmosphere and defines the terrestrial environment that supports all life on the planet. External solar variability on a wide range of scales ubiquitously affects the Earth system, and combines with internal forcings, including anthropogenic changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols, and natural modes such as ENSO, and volcanic forcing, to define past, present, and future climates. Understanding these effects requires continuous measurements of total and spectrally resolved solar irradiance that meet the stringent requirements of climate-quality accuracy and stability over time. The current uninterrupted 39-year total solar irradiance (TSI) climate data record is the result of several overlapping instruments flown on different missions. Measurement continuity, required to link successive instruments to the existing data record to discern long-term trends makes this important climate data record susceptible to loss in the event of a gap in measurements. While improvements in future instrument accuracy will reduce the risk of a gap, the 2017 launch of TSIS-1 ensures continuity of the solar irradiance record into the next decade. There are scientific and programmatic motivations for addressing the challenges of maintaining the solar irradiance data record beyond TSIS-1. The science rests on well-founded requirements of establishing a trusted climate observing network that can monitor trends in fundamental climate variables. Programmatically, the long-term monitoring of solar irradiance must be balanced within the broader goals of NASA Earth Science. New concepts for a low-risk, cost efficient observing strategy is a priority. New highly capable small spacecraft, low-cost launch vehicles and a multi-decadal plan to provide overlapping TSI and SSI data records are components of a low risk/high reliability plan with lower annual cost than past implementations. This paper provides the

  10. Smart responsive phosphorescent materials for data recording and security protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huibin; Liu, Shujuan; Lin, Wenpeng; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Lv, Wen; Huang, Xiao; Huo, Fengwei; Yang, Huiran; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-04-07

    Smart luminescent materials that are responsive to external stimuli have received considerable interest. Here we report ionic iridium (III) complexes simultaneously exhibiting mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. These complexes share the same phosphorescent iridium (III) cation with a N-H moiety in the N^N ligand and contain different anions, including hexafluorophosphate, tetrafluoroborate, iodide, bromide and chloride. The anionic counterions cause a variation in the emission colours of the complexes from yellow to green by forming hydrogen bonds with the N-H proton. The electronic effect of the N-H moiety is sensitive towards mechanical grinding, solvent vapour and electric field, resulting in mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. On the basis of these findings, we construct a data-recording device and demonstrate data encryption and decryption via fluorescence lifetime imaging and time-gated luminescence imaging techniques. Our results suggest that rationally designed phosphorescent complexes may be promising candidates for advanced data recording and security protection.

  11. Voyager Interactive Web Interface to EarthScope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Meertens, C. M.; Estey, L.; Weingroff, M.; Hamburger, M. W.; Holt, W. E.; Richard, G. A.

    2004-12-01

    Visualization of data is essential in helping scientists and students develop a conceptual understanding of relationships among many complex types of data and keep track of large amounts of information. Developed initially by UNAVCO for study of global-scale geodynamic processes, the Voyager map visualization tools have evolved into interactive, web-based map utilities that can make scientific results accessible to a large number and variety of educators and students as well as the originally targeted scientists. A portal to these map tools can be found at: http://jules.unavco.org. The Voyager tools provide on-line interactive data visualization through pre-determined map regions via a simple HTML/JavaScript interface (for large numbers of students using the tools simultaneously) or through student-selectable areas using a Java interface to a Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) engine. Students can access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales for the earth and other planets of the solar system. Students can also choose from a variety of base maps (satellite mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others) and can then add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays, for example coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, and observed and model plate motion, as well as deformation velocity vectors representing a compilation of over 5000 geodetic measurements from around the world. The related educational website, "Exploring our Dynamic Planet", (http://www.dpc.ucar.edu/VoyagerJr/jvvjrtool.html) incorporates background materials and curricular activities that encourage students to explore Earth processes. One of the present curricular modules is designed for high school students or introductory-level undergraduate non-science majors. The purpose of the module is for students to examine real data to investigate how plate

  12. Record transfer of data between CERN and California

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    On 27 February 2003 the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), CERN, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) broke a data transfer record by transmitting 1 terabyte of data in less than an hour across the 10,000 kilometres between CERN and Sunnyvale in California. The team sustained a transmission rate of 2.38 gigabits per second for over an hour, which is equivalent to transferring 26 CDs per minute. The record-breaking performance was achieved in the framework of tests directly linked to the DataGrid project, which involves the creation of a network of distributed computers able to deliver the unprecedented computing power and data management capacity that will be needed by the data-intensive experiments at the LHC. CERN's participation in these high-speed data transfer tests is led by IT division's External Networking team in the framework of the CERN-led European DataTAG project. Pictured here are some of the members of the CERN DataTAG project te...

  13. Cooled CCDs for recording data from electron microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Faruqi, A R

    2000-01-01

    A cooled-CCD camera based on a low-noise scientific grade device is described in this paper used for recording images in a 120 kV electron microscope. The primary use of the camera is for recording electron diffraction patterns from two-dimensionally ordered arrays of proteins at liquid-nitrogen temperatures leading to structure determination at atomic or near-atomic resolution. The traditional method for recording data in the microscope is with electron sensitive film but electronic detection methods offer the following advantages over film methods: the data is immediately available in a digital format which can be displayed on a monitor screen for visual inspection whereas a film record needs to be developed and digitised, a lengthy process taking at least several hours, prior to inspection; the dynamic range of CCD detectors is about two orders of magnitude greater with better linearity. The accuracy of measurements is also higher for CCDs, particularly for weak signals due to inherent fog levels in film. ...

  14. Ethics and subsequent use of electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lisa M

    2017-07-01

    The digital health landscape in the United States is evolving and electronic health record data hold great promise for improving health and health equity. Like many scientific and technological advances in health and medicine, there exists an exciting narrative about what we can do with the new technology, as well as reflection about what we should do with it based on what we value. Ethical reflections about the use of EHR data for research and quality improvement have considered the important issues of privacy and informed consent for subsequent use of data. Additional ethical aspects are important in the conversation, including data validity, patient obligation to participate in the learning health system, and ethics integration into training for all personnel who interact with personal health data. Attention to these ethical issues is paramount to our realizing the benefits of electronic health data. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Multi-Channel Data Recording of Marx switch closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, G.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Ziska, G.R.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have measured the optical signals associated with switch closure on the Demon marx at Sandia National Laboratories. Using the High Speed Multi-Channel Data Recorder(HSMCDR), they have recorded the time histories of the optical signals from the thirty switches in the marx generator. All thirty switches were fiber connected to the HSMCDR. The HSMCDR consists of a high speed streak camera, and a microcomputer-based video digitizing system. Since the thirty signals are recorded on a single streak, the time sequence can be determined with great accuracy. The appearance of a given signal can be determined to within two samples of the 256 samples that make up the time streak. The authors have found that the light intensity and time history of any given switch varied over a large range from shot to shot. Thus, the ability to record the entire optical signal as a function of time for each switch on every shot is necessary if accurate timing results are required

  16. Analyzing a 35-Year Hourly Data Record: Why So Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    At the Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center, we have recently added a 35-Year record of output data from the North American Land Assimilation System (NLDAS) to the Giovanni web-based analysis and visualization tool. Giovanni (Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) offers a variety of data summarization and visualization to users that operate at the data center, obviating the need for users to download and read the data themselves for exploratory data analysis. However, the NLDAS data has proven surprisingly resistant to application of the summarization algorithms. Algorithms that were perfectly happy analyzing 15 years of daily satellite data encountered limitations both at the algorithm and system level for 35 years of hourly data. Failures arose, sometimes unexpectedly, from command line overflows, memory overflows, internal buffer overflows, and time-outs, among others. These serve as an early warning sign for the problems likely to be encountered by the general user community as they try to scale up to Big Data analytics. Indeed, it is likely that more users will seek to perform remote web-based analysis precisely to avoid the issues, or the need to reprogram around them. We will discuss approaches to mitigating the limitations and the implications for data systems serving the user communities that try to scale up their current techniques to analyze Big Data.

  17. Climate windows for Polynesian voyaging to New Zealand and Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Ian D; Browning, Stuart A; Anderson, Atholl J

    2014-10-14

    Debate about initial human migration across the immense area of East Polynesia has focused upon seafaring technology, both of navigation and canoe capabilities, while temporal variation in sailing conditions, notably through climate change, has received less attention. One model of Polynesian voyaging observes that as tradewind easterlies are currently dominant in the central Pacific, prehistoric colonization canoes voyaging eastward to and through central East Polynesia (CEP: Society, Tuamotu, Marquesas, Gambier, Southern Cook, and Austral Islands) and to Easter Island probably had a windward capacity. Similar arguments have been applied to voyaging from CEP to New Zealand against prevailing westerlies. An alternative view is that migration required reliable off-wind sailing routes. We investigate the marine climate and potential voyaging routes during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), A.D. 800-1300, when the initial colonization of CEP and New Zealand occurred. Paleoclimate data assimilation is used to reconstruct Pacific sea level pressure and wind field patterns at bidecadal resolution during the MCA. We argue here that changing wind field patterns associated with the MCA provided conditions in which voyaging to and from the most isolated East Polynesian islands, New Zealand, and Easter Island was readily possible by off-wind sailing. The intensification and poleward expansion of the Pacific subtropical anticyclone culminating in A.D. 1140-1260 opened an anomalous climate window for off-wind sailing routes to New Zealand from the Southern Austral Islands, the Southern Cook Islands, and Tonga/Fiji Islands.

  18. Low-cost automatic activity data recording system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes M.F.D.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a low-cost, high quality device capable of monitoring indirect activity by detecting touch-release events on a conducting surface, i.e., the animal's cage cover. In addition to the detecting sensor itself, the system includes an IBM PC interface for prompt data storage. The hardware/software design, while serving for other purposes, is used to record the circadian activity rhythm pattern of rats with time in an automated computerized fashion using minimal cost computer equipment (IBM PC XT. Once the sensor detects a touch-release action of the rat in the upper portion of the cage, the interface sends a command to the PC which records the time (hours-minutes-seconds when the activity occurred. As a result, the computer builds up several files (one per detector/sensor containing a time list of all recorded events. Data can be visualized in terms of actograms, indicating the number of detections per hour, and analyzed by mathematical tools such as Fast Fourier Transform (FFT or cosinor. In order to demonstrate method validation, an experiment was conducted on 8 Wistar rats under 12/12-h light/dark cycle conditions (lights on at 7:00 a.m.. Results show a biological validation of the method since it detected the presence of circadian activity rhythm patterns in the behavior of the rats

  19. Satellite Climate Data Records: Development, Applications, and Societal Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenze Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review paper discusses how to develop, produce, sustain, and serve satellite climate data records (CDRs in the context of transitioning research to operation (R2O. Requirements and critical procedures of producing various CDRs, including Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs, Thematic CDRs (TCDRs, Interim CDRs (ICDRs, and climate information records (CIRs are discussed in detail, including radiance/reflectance and the essential climate variables (ECVs of land, ocean, and atmosphere. Major international CDR initiatives, programs, and projects are summarized. Societal benefits of CDRs in various user sectors, including Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries, Energy, Heath, Water, Transportation, and Tourism are also briefly discussed. The challenges and opportunities for CDR development, production and service are also addressed. It is essential to maintain credible CDR products by allowing free access to products and keeping the production process transparent by making source code and documentation available with the dataset.

  20. Continuity of Climate Data Records derived from Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, C. A.; Wentz, F. J.; Brewer, M.; Meissner, T.; Ricciardulli, L.

    2017-12-01

    Remote Sensing Systems (www.remss.com) has been producing and distributing microwave climate data products from microwave imagers (SSMI, TMI, AMSR, WindSat, GMI, Aquarius, SMAP) over the global oceans since the launch of the first SSMI in 1987. Interest in these data products has been significant as researchers around the world have downloaded the approximate equivalent of 1 million satellite years of processed data. Users, including NASA, NOAA, US National Laboratories, US Navy, UK Met, ECMWF, JAXA, JMA, CMC, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, as well as many hundreds of other agencies and universities routinely access these microwave data products. The quality of these data records has increased as more observations have become available and inter-calibration techniques have improved. The impending end of missions for WindSat, AMSR-2, and the remaining SSMIs will have significant impact on the quality and continuity of long term microwave climate data records. In addition to the problem of reduced numbers of observations, there is a real danger of losing overlapping observations. Simultaneous operation of satellites, especially when the observations are at similar local crossing times, provides a significant benefit in the effort to inter-calibrate satellites to yield accurate and stable long-term records. The end of WindSat and AMSR-2 will leave us without microwave SSTs in cold water, as there will be no microwave imagers with C-band channels. Microwave SSTs have a crucial advantage over IR SSTs, which is not able to measure SST in clouds or if aerosols are present. The gap in ocean wind vectors will be somewhat mitigated as the European ASCAT C-band scatterometer mission on MetOp is continuing. Nonetheless, the anticipated cease of several microwave satellite radiometers retrieving ocean winds in the coming years will lead to a significant gap in temporal coverage. Atmospheric water vapor, cloud liquid water, and rain rate are all important climate

  1. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DATA AND THE RECORDING OF MATERIAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parenti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The “description” of a material structure requires a high degree of objectivity to serve the scientific interests of certain disciplines (archeological documentation, conservation and restoration, safeguarding of cultural assets and heritage. Geometric data and photographic documentation of surfaces are thus the best instruments for efficacious, clear and objective recording of architectural objects and other anthropic manifestations. In particular, the completeness and diachrony of photographic documentation has always proven essential in recording the material structure of historical buildings.The aim of our contribution is to show the results of several projects carried out with the aid of survey methodologies that utilize digital photographic images to generate RGB (ZScan point clouds of architectural monuments (urban standing buildings, monuments in archaeological areas, etc. and art objects. These technologies allow us to capture data using digital photogrammetric techniques; although not based on laser scanners, they can nonetheless create dense 3D point clouds, simply by using images that have been obtained via digital camera. The results are comparable to those achieved with laser scanner technology, although the procedures are simpler, faster and cheaper. We intend to try to adapt these technologies to the requirements and needs of scientific research and the conservation of cultural heritage. Furthermore, we will present protocols and procedures for data recording, processing and transfer in the cultural heritage field, especially with regard to historical buildings. Cooperation among experts from different disciplines (archaeology, engineering and photogrammetry will allow us to develop technologies and proposals for a widely adoptable workflow in the application of such technologies, in order to build an integrated system that can be used throughout the scientific community. Toward this end, open formats and integration will be

  2. Improving Metadata Compliance for Earth Science Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Chang, O.; Foster, D.

    2014-12-01

    One of the recurring challenges of creating earth science data records is to ensure a consistent level of metadata compliance at the granule level where important details of contents, provenance, producer, and data references are necessary to obtain a sufficient level of understanding. These details are important not just for individual data consumers but also for autonomous software systems. Two of the most popular metadata standards at the granule level are the Climate and Forecast (CF) Metadata Conventions and the Attribute Conventions for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). Many data producers have implemented one or both of these models including the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) for their global SST products and the Ocean Biology Processing Group for NASA ocean color and SST products. While both the CF and ACDD models contain various level of metadata richness, the actual "required" attributes are quite small in number. Metadata at the granule level becomes much more useful when recommended or optional attributes are implemented that document spatial and temporal ranges, lineage and provenance, sources, keywords, and references etc. In this presentation we report on a new open source tool to check the compliance of netCDF and HDF5 granules to the CF and ACCD metadata models. The tool, written in Python, was originally implemented to support metadata compliance for netCDF records as part of the NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observing System. It outputs standardized scoring for metadata compliance for both CF and ACDD, produces an objective summary weight, and can be implemented for remote records via OPeNDAP calls. Originally a command-line tool, we have extended it to provide a user-friendly web interface. Reports on metadata testing are grouped in hierarchies that make it easier to track flaws and inconsistencies in the record. We have also extended it to support explicit metadata structures and semantic syntax for the GHRSST project that can be

  3. Radial evolution of the solar wind from IMP 8 to Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John D.; Paularena, Karolen I.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Belcher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 and Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 data from 1977 through 1994 are presented and compared. Radial velocity and temperature structures remain intact over the distance from 1 to 43 AU, but density structures do not. Temperature and velocity changes are correlated and nearly in phase at 1 AU, but in the outer heliosphere temperature changes lead velocity changes by tens of days. Solar cycle variations are detected by both spacecraft, with minima in flux density and dynamic pressure near solar maxima. Differences between Voyager 2 and IMP 8 observations near the solar minimum in 1986-1987 are attributed to latitudinal gradients in solar wind properties. Solar rotation variations are often present even at 40 AU. The Voyager 2 temperature profile is best fit with a R(exp -0.49 +/- 0.01) decrease, much less steep than an adiabatic profile.

  4. The Voyager Journey to Interstellar Space

    KAUST Repository

    Stone, Edward

    2017-01-09

    Edward Stone joined Caltech as a research fellow in physics after receiving his Master of Science degree and Ph.D. in physics at the University of Chicago. Over the years, he held a variety of positions, from assistant professor to Vice-President for Astronomical Facilities. In 1972 he became project scientist for the Voyager mission, a position he currently still holds. He was nationally known as the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) public spokesman during the planetary flybys, explaining the Voyager\\'s scientific discoveries to the public. He became the Director of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) from January 1991 to April 2001. While Stone was Director, JPL\\'s Mars Pathfinder and its Sojourner rover sent back images that were seen by millions of people on television and the Web. Highlights of his decade of leadership as the Direction of JPL include Galileo\\'s five-year orbital mission to Jupiter, the launch of Cassini to Saturn, the launch of Mars Global Surveyor and a new generation of Earth science satellites such as TOPEX/Poseidon and SeaWinds.

  5. Data-mining of medication records to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Peterson, Gregory M; Jackson, Shane L; Walters, E Haydn; Fitzmaurice, Kimbra D; Gee, Peter R

    2008-07-07

    To use community pharmacy medication records to identify patients whose asthma may not be well managed and then implement and evaluate a multidisciplinary educational intervention to improve asthma management. We used a multisite controlled study design. Forty-two pharmacies throughout Tasmania ran a software application that "data-mined" medication records, generating a list of patients who had received three or more canisters of inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists in the preceding 6 months. The patients identified were allocated to an intervention or control group. Pre-intervention data were collected for the period May to November 2006 and post-intervention data for the period December 2006 to May 2007. Intervention patients were contacted by the community pharmacist via mail, and were sent educational material and a letter encouraging them to see their general practitioner for an asthma management review. Pharmacists were blinded to the control patients' identities until the end of the post-intervention period. Dispensing ratio of preventer medication (inhaled corticosteroids [ICSs]) to reliever medication (inhaled short-acting beta(2)-agonists). Thirty-five pharmacies completed the study, providing 702 intervention and 849 control patients. The intervention resulted in a threefold increase in the preventer-to-reliever ratio in the intervention group compared with the control group (P < 0.01) and a higher proportion of patients in the intervention group using ICS therapy than in the control group (P < 0.01). Community pharmacy medication records can be effectively used to identify patients with suboptimal asthma management, who can then be referred to their GP for review. The intervention should be trialled on a national scale to determine the effects on clinical, social, emotional and economic outcomes for people in the Australian community, with a longer follow-up to determine sustainability of the improvements noted.

  6. Physicists set new record for network data transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "An internatinal team of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers led by the California Institute of Technology, CERN and the University of Michigan and partners at the University of Florida and Vanderbilt, as well as participants from Brazil (Rio de Janeiro State University, UERJ, and the State Universities of Sao Paulo, USP and UNESP) and Korea (Kyungpook National University, KISTI) joined forces to set new records for sustained data transfer between storage systems during the SuperComputing 2006 (SC06) Bandwidth Challenge (BWC)." (2 pages)

  7. Recording real case data of earth faults in distribution lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, S. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The most common fault type in the electrical distribution networks is the single phase to earth fault. According to the earlier studies, for instance in Nordic countries, about 80 % of all faults are of this type. To develop the protection and fault location systems, it is important to obtain real case data of disturbances and faults which occur in the networks. For example, the earth fault initial transients can be used for earth fault location. The aim of this project was to collect and analyze real case data of the earth fault disturbances in the medium voltage distribution networks (20 kV). Therefore, data of fault occurrences were recorded at two substations, of which one has an unearthed and the other a compensated neutral, measured as follows: (a) the phase currents and neutral current for each line in the case of low fault resistance (b) the phase voltages and neutral voltage from the voltage measuring bay in the case of low fault resistance (c) the neutral voltage and the components of 50 Hz at the substation in the case of high fault resistance. In addition, the basic data of the fault occurrences were collected (data of the line, fault location, cause and so on). The data will be used in the development work of fault location and earth fault protection systems

  8. Recording real case data of earth faults in distribution lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, S [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The most common fault type in the electrical distribution networks is the single phase to earth fault. According to the earlier studies, for instance in Nordic countries, about 80 % of all faults are of this type. To develop the protection and fault location systems, it is important to obtain real case data of disturbances and faults which occur in the networks. For example, the earth fault initial transients can be used for earth fault location. The aim of this project was to collect and analyze real case data of the earth fault disturbances in the medium voltage distribution networks (20 kV). Therefore, data of fault occurrences were recorded at two substations, of which one has an unearthed and the other a compensated neutral, measured as follows: (a) the phase currents and neutral current for each line in the case of low fault resistance (b) the phase voltages and neutral voltage from the voltage measuring bay in the case of low fault resistance (c) the neutral voltage and the components of 50 Hz at the substation in the case of high fault resistance. In addition, the basic data of the fault occurrences were collected (data of the line, fault location, cause and so on). The data will be used in the development work of fault location and earth fault protection systems

  9. A downstream voyage with mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective essay for the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.As I look back on my paper, “Effects of Low Dietary Levels of Methyl Mercury on Mallard Reproduction,” published in 1974 in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, a thought sticks in my mind. I realize just how much my mercury research was not unlike a leaf in a stream, carried this way and that, sometimes stalled in an eddy, restarted, and carried downstream at a pace and path that was not completely under my control. I was hired in 1969 by the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to study the effects of environmental pollutants on the behavior of wildlife. A colleague was conducting a study on the reproductive effects of methylmercury on mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and he offered to give me some of the ducklings. I conducted a pilot study, testing how readily ducklings approached a tape-recorded maternal call. Sample sizes were small, but the results suggested that ducklings from mercury-treated parents behaved differently than controls. That’s how I got into mercury research—pretty much by chance.

  10. Homogeneity of a Global Multisatellite Soil Moisture Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Dorigo, Wouter; Zwieback, Simon; Gruber, Alexander; Albergel, Clement; Reichle, Rolf H.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Climate Data Records (CDR) that blend multiple satellite products are invaluable for climate studies, trend analysis and risk assessments. Knowledge of any inhomogeneities in the CDR is therefore critical for making correct inferences. This work proposes a methodology to identify the spatiotemporal extent of the inhomogeneities in a 36-year, global multisatellite soil moisture CDR as the result of changing observing systems. Inhomogeneities are detected at up to 24 percent of the tested pixels with spatial extent varying with satellite changeover times. Nevertheless, the contiguous periods without inhomogeneities at changeover times are generally longer than 10 years. Although the inhomogeneities have measurable impact on the derived trends, these trends are similar to those observed in ground data and land surface reanalysis, with an average error less than 0.003 cubic meters per cubic meter per year. These results strengthen the basis of using the product for long-term studies and demonstrate the necessity of homogeneity testing of multisatellite CDRs in general.

  11. Applying Metrological Techniques to Satellite Fundamental Climate Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolliams, Emma R.; Mittaz, Jonathan PD; Merchant, Christopher J.; Hunt, Samuel E.; Harris, Peter M.

    2018-02-01

    Quantifying long-term environmental variability, including climatic trends, requires decadal-scale time series of observations. The reliability of such trend analysis depends on the long-term stability of the data record, and understanding the sources of uncertainty in historic, current and future sensors. We give a brief overview on how metrological techniques can be applied to historical satellite data sets. In particular we discuss the implications of error correlation at different spatial and temporal scales and the forms of such correlation and consider how uncertainty is propagated with partial correlation. We give a form of the Law of Propagation of Uncertainties that considers the propagation of uncertainties associated with common errors to give the covariance associated with Earth observations in different spectral channels.

  12. MULTIFRACTAL STRUCTURES DETECTED BY VOYAGER 1 AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, W. M.; Wawrzaszek, A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence

  13. MULTIFRACTAL STRUCTURES DETECTED BY VOYAGER 1 AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, W. M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University, Wóycickiego 1/3, 01-938 Warsaw (Poland); Wawrzaszek, A. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18 A, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Burlaga, L. F., E-mail: macek@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: anna.wawrzaszek@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence.

  14. Multilevel recording of complex amplitude data pages in a holographic data storage system using digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-09-05

    A holographic data storage system using digital holography is proposed to record and retrieve multilevel complex amplitude data pages. Digital holographic techniques are capable of modulating and detecting complex amplitude distribution using current electronic devices. These techniques allow the development of a simple, compact, and stable holographic storage system that mainly consists of a single phase-only spatial light modulator and an image sensor. As a proof-of-principle experiment, complex amplitude data pages with binary amplitude and four-level phase are recorded and retrieved. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed holographic data storage system.

  15. Unbiased analysis of geomagnetic data sets and comparison of historical data with paleomagnetic and archeomagnetic records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneitz, Patrick; Egli, Ramon; Leonhardt, Roman

    2017-03-01

    Reconstructions of the past geomagnetic field provide fundamental constraints for understanding the dynamics of the Earth's interior, as well as serving as basis for magnetostratigraphic and archeomagnetic dating tools. Such reconstructions, when extending over epochs that precede the advent of instrumental measurements, rely exclusively on magnetic records from archeological artifacts, and, further in the past, from rocks and sediments. The most critical component of such indirect records is field intensity because of possible biases introduced by material properties and by laboratory protocols, which do not reproduce exactly the original field recording conditions. Large biases are usually avoided by the use of appropriate checking procedures; however, smaller ones can remain undetected in individual studies and might significantly affect field reconstructions. We introduce a new general approach for analyzing geomagnetic databases in order to investigate the reliability of indirect records. This approach is based on the comparison of historical records with archeomagnetic and volcanic data, considering temporal and spatial mismatches with adequate weighting functions and error estimation. A good overall agreement is found between indirect records and historical measurements, while for several subsets systematic bias is detected (e.g., inclination shallowing of lava records). We also demonstrate that simple approaches to analyzing highly inhomogeneous and internally correlated paleomagnetic data sets can lead to incorrect conclusions about the efficiency of quality checks and corrections. Consistent criteria for selecting and weighting data are presented in this review and can be used to improve current geomagnetic field modeling techniques.

  16. Integrating cancer genomic data into electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy L. Warner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rise of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapy has revolutionized the practice of oncology in the last 10–15 years. At the same time, new technologies and the electronic health record (EHR in particular have permeated the oncology clinic. Initially designed as billing and clinical documentation systems, EHR systems have not anticipated the complexity and variety of genomic information that needs to be reviewed, interpreted, and acted upon on a daily basis. Improved integration of cancer genomic data with EHR systems will help guide clinician decision making, support secondary uses, and ultimately improve patient care within oncology clinics. Some of the key factors relating to the challenge of integrating cancer genomic data into EHRs include: the bioinformatics pipelines that translate raw genomic data into meaningful, actionable results; the role of human curation in the interpretation of variant calls; and the need for consistent standards with regard to genomic and clinical data. Several emerging paradigms for integration are discussed in this review, including: non-standardized efforts between individual institutions and genomic testing laboratories; “middleware” products that portray genomic information, albeit outside of the clinical workflow; and application programming interfaces that have the potential to work within clinical workflow. The critical need for clinical-genomic knowledge bases, which can be independent or integrated into the aforementioned solutions, is also discussed.

  17. Uncertainty information in climate data records from Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Christopher J.; Paul, Frank; Popp, Thomas; Ablain, Michael; Bontemps, Sophie; Defourny, Pierre; Hollmann, Rainer; Lavergne, Thomas; Laeng, Alexandra; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Mittaz, Jonathan; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam C.; Reuter, Max; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Sandven, Stein; Sofieva, Viktoria F.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The question of how to derive and present uncertainty information in climate data records (CDRs) has received sustained attention within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (CCI), a programme to generate CDRs addressing a range of essential climate variables (ECVs) from satellite data. Here, we review the nature, mathematics, practicalities, and communication of uncertainty information in CDRs from Earth observations. This review paper argues that CDRs derived from satellite-based Earth observation (EO) should include rigorous uncertainty information to support the application of the data in contexts such as policy, climate modelling, and numerical weather prediction reanalysis. Uncertainty, error, and quality are distinct concepts, and the case is made that CDR products should follow international metrological norms for presenting quantified uncertainty. As a baseline for good practice, total standard uncertainty should be quantified per datum in a CDR, meaning that uncertainty estimates should clearly discriminate more and less certain data. In this case, flags for data quality should not duplicate uncertainty information, but instead describe complementary information (such as the confidence in the uncertainty estimate provided or indicators of conditions violating the retrieval assumptions). The paper discusses the many sources of error in CDRs, noting that different errors may be correlated across a wide range of timescales and space scales. Error effects that contribute negligibly to the total uncertainty in a single-satellite measurement can be the dominant sources of uncertainty in a CDR on the large space scales and long timescales that are highly relevant for some climate applications. For this reason, identifying and characterizing the relevant sources of uncertainty for CDRs is particularly challenging. The characterization of uncertainty caused by a given error effect involves assessing the magnitude of the effect, the shape of the

  18. Phenological records as a complement to aerobiological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, Rafael; Silva, Inmaculada; Gonzalo, Ángela; Moreno, Alfonsa; Pérez, Remedios; Fernández, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Phenological studies in combination with aerobiological studies enable one to observe the relationship between the release of pollen and its presence in the atmosphere. To obtain a suitable comparison between the daily variation of airborne pollen concentrations and flowering, it is necessary for the level of accuracy of both sets of data to be as similar as possible. To analyse the correlation between locally observed flowering data and pollen counts in pollen traps in order to set pollen information forecasts, pollen was sampled using a Burkard volumetric pollen trap working continuously from May 1993. For the phenological study we selected the main pollen sources of the six pollen types most abundant in our area: Cupressaceae, Platanus, Quercus, Plantago, Olea, and Poaceae with a total of 35 species. We selected seven sites to register flowering or pollination, two with semi-natural vegetation, the rest being urban sites. The sites were visited weekly from March to June in 2007, and from January to June in 2008 and 2009. Pollen shedding was checked at each visit, and recorded as the percentage of flowers or microsporangia in that state. There was an association between flowering phenology and airborne pollen records for some of the pollen types ( Platanus, Quercus, Olea and Plantago). Nevertheless, for the other types (Cupressaceae and Poaceae) the flowering and airborne pollen peaks did not coincide, with up to 1 week difference in phase. Some arguments are put forward in explanation of this phenomenon. Phenological studies have shown that airborne pollen results from both local and distant sources, although the pollen peaks usually appear when local sources are shedding the greatest amounts of pollen. Resuspension phenomena are probably more important than long-distance transport in explaining the presence of airborne pollen outside the flowering period. This information could be used to improve pollen forecasts.

  19. The use of photography to record geologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClay, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Although photography is generally used today by geologists to record important data and features of interest, no strong effort has been made to systematically photo-document preliminary investigations and siting of critical facilities such as nuclear power plants, Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) terminals, or dams At a time when the safe siting of critical facilities is coming under ever closer scrutiny by regulatory agencies and the public, the importance and usefulness of photographic evidence and authentication is clear. Photography by no means replaces the accurate, detailed log or map. However, when used together, the photograph and graphic log or map can provide a clearer, more understandable representation of geologic data. This can be extremely important to the non-technical reviewer or decision maker. A simple method of presenting documentary photographs has been used for the proposed LNG facility at Little Cojo Bay, near Point Conception, California. This method combines both geologic data and photographic images through the use of clear mylar or acetate overlays

  20. Part Twelve. The Voyages of John Matthias

    OpenAIRE

    Printz-Påhlson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    In August 1974, when the Watergate scandal was moving into its last phase, the American poet John Matthias returned to his home, in South Bend, Indiana, after a year’s stay in England, traveling on the Polish ocean-liner Stefan Bathory. In June of 1976 he set out to sea again, this time on a Russian ship, the Mikhail Lermontov, in order to spend another year in England, as a Visiting Fellow in Poetry in Clare Hall, Cambridge. The voyages took approximately nine days each, and on both ships he...

  1. Evaluating and Extending the Ocean Wind Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardulli, Lucrezia; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Stiles, Bryan W.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Long, David G.; Hoffman, Ross N.; Stoffelen, Ad; Verhoef, Anton; O'Neill, Larry W.; Farrar, J. Tomas; Vandemark, Douglas; Fore, Alexander G.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Turk, F. Joseph; Gaston, Robert; Tyler, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Satellite microwave sensors, both active scatterometers and passive radiometers, have been systematically measuring near-surface ocean winds for nearly 40 years, establishing an important legacy in studying and monitoring weather and climate variability. As an aid to such activities, the various wind datasets are being intercalibrated and merged into consistent climate data records (CDRs). The ocean wind CDRs (OW-CDRs) are evaluated by comparisons with ocean buoys and intercomparisons among the different satellite sensors and among the different data providers. Extending the OW-CDR into the future requires exploiting all available datasets, such as OSCAT-2 scheduled to launch in July 2016. Three planned methods of calibrating the OSCAT-2 σo measurements include 1) direct Ku-band σo intercalibration to QuikSCAT and RapidScat; 2) multisensor wind speed intercalibration; and 3) calibration to stable rainforest targets. Unfortunately, RapidScat failed in August 2016 and cannot be used to directly calibrate OSCAT-2. A particular future continuity concern is the absence of scheduled new or continuation radiometer missions capable of measuring wind speed. Specialized model assimilations provide 30-year long high temporal/spatial resolution wind vector grids that composite the satellite wind information from OW-CDRs of multiple satellites viewing the Earth at different local times. PMID:28824741

  2. Archetype-based data warehouse environment to enable the reuse of electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Moner, David; Maldonado, José A; Kolstrup, Nils; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-09-01

    The reuse of data captured during health care delivery is essential to satisfy the demands of clinical research and clinical decision support systems. A main barrier for the reuse is the existence of legacy formats of data and the high granularity of it when stored in an electronic health record (EHR) system. Thus, we need mechanisms to standardize, aggregate, and query data concealed in the EHRs, to allow their reuse whenever they are needed. To create a data warehouse infrastructure using archetype-based technologies, standards and query languages to enable the interoperability needed for data reuse. The work presented makes use of best of breed archetype-based data transformation and storage technologies to create a workflow for the modeling, extraction, transformation and load of EHR proprietary data into standardized data repositories. We converted legacy data and performed patient-centered aggregations via archetype-based transformations. Later, specific purpose aggregations were performed at a query level for particular use cases. Laboratory test results of a population of 230,000 patients belonging to Troms and Finnmark counties in Norway requested between January 2013 and November 2014 have been standardized. Test records normalization has been performed by defining transformation and aggregation functions between the laboratory records and an archetype. These mappings were used to automatically generate open EHR compliant data. These data were loaded into an archetype-based data warehouse. Once loaded, we defined indicators linked to the data in the warehouse to monitor test activity of Salmonella and Pertussis using the archetype query language. Archetype-based standards and technologies can be used to create a data warehouse environment that enables data from EHR systems to be reused in clinical research and decision support systems. With this approach, existing EHR data becomes available in a standardized and interoperable format, thus opening a world

  3. Vegetation Earth System Data Record from DSCOVR EPIC Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazikhin, Y.; Song, W.; Yang, B.; Mottus, M.; Rautiainen, M.; Stenberg, P.

    2017-12-01

    The NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) onboard NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission was launched on February 11, 2015 to the Sun-Earth Lagrangian L1 point where it began to collect radiance data of the entire sunlit Earth every 65 to 110 min in June 2015. It provides imageries in near backscattering directions with the scattering angle between 168° and 176° at ten ultraviolet to near infrared (NIR) narrow spectral bands centered at 317.5 (band width 1.0) nm, 325.0 (2.0) nm, 340.0 (3.0) nm, 388.0 (3.0) nm, 433.0 (3.0) nm, 551.0 (3.0) nm, 680.0 (3.0) nm, 687.8 (0.8) nm, 764.0 (1.0) nm and 779.5 (2.0) nm. This poster presents current status of the Vegetation Earth System Data Record of global Leaf Area Index (LAI), solar zenith angle dependent Sunlit Leaf Area Index (SLAI), Fraction vegetation absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from the DSCOVR EPIC observations. Whereas LAI is a standard product of many satellite missions, the SLAI is a new satellite-derived parameter. Sunlit and shaded leaves exhibit different radiative response to incident Photosynthetically Active Radiation (400-700 nm), which in turn triggers various physiological and physical processes required for the functioning of plants. FPAR, LAI and SLAI are key state parameters in most ecosystem productivity models and carbon/nitrogen cycle. The product at 10 km sinusoidal grid and 65 to 110 min temporal frequency as well as accompanying Quality Assessment (QA) variables will be publicly available from the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center. The Algorithm Theoretical Basis (ATBD) and product validation strategy are also discussed in this poster.

  4. Predicting 30-Day Pneumonia Readmissions Using Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makam, Anil N; Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Clark, Christopher; Zhang, Song; Xie, Bin; Weinreich, Mark; Mortensen, Eric M; Halm, Ethan A

    2017-04-01

    Readmissions after hospitalization for pneumonia are common, but the few risk-prediction models have poor to modest predictive ability. Data routinely collected in the electronic health record (EHR) may improve prediction. To develop pneumonia-specific readmission risk-prediction models using EHR data from the first day and from the entire hospital stay ("full stay"). Observational cohort study using stepwise-backward selection and cross-validation. Consecutive pneumonia hospitalizations from 6 diverse hospitals in north Texas from 2009-2010. All-cause nonelective 30-day readmissions, ascertained from 75 regional hospitals. Of 1463 patients, 13.6% were readmitted. The first-day pneumonia-specific model included sociodemographic factors, prior hospitalizations, thrombocytosis, and a modified pneumonia severity index; the full-stay model included disposition status, vital sign instabilities on discharge, and an updated pneumonia severity index calculated using values from the day of discharge as additional predictors. The full-stay pneumonia-specific model outperformed the first-day model (C statistic 0.731 vs 0.695; P = 0.02; net reclassification index = 0.08). Compared to a validated multi-condition readmission model, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services pneumonia model, and 2 commonly used pneumonia severity of illness scores, the full-stay pneumonia-specific model had better discrimination (C statistic range 0.604-0.681; P pneumonia. This approach outperforms a first-day pneumonia-specific model, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services pneumonia model, and 2 commonly used pneumonia severity of illness scores. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:209-216. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  5. Uncertainty information in climate data records from Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    How to derive and present uncertainty in climate data records (CDRs) has been debated within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative, in search of common principles applicable across a range of essential climate variables. Various points of consensus have been reached, including the importance of improving provision of uncertainty information and the benefit of adopting international norms of metrology for language around the distinct concepts of uncertainty and error. Providing an estimate of standard uncertainty per datum (or the means to readily calculate it) emerged as baseline good practice, and should be highly relevant to users of CDRs when the uncertainty in data is variable (the usual case). Given this baseline, the role of quality flags is clarified as being complementary to and not repetitive of uncertainty information. Data with high uncertainty are not poor quality if a valid estimate of the uncertainty is available. For CDRs and their applications, the error correlation properties across spatio-temporal scales present important challenges that are not fully solved. Error effects that are negligible in the uncertainty of a single pixel may dominate uncertainty in the large-scale and long-term. A further principle is that uncertainty estimates should themselves be validated. The concepts of estimating and propagating uncertainty are generally acknowledged in geophysical sciences, but less widely practised in Earth observation and development of CDRs. Uncertainty in a CDR depends in part (and usually significantly) on the error covariance of the radiances and auxiliary data used in the retrieval. Typically, error covariance information is not available in the fundamental CDR (FCDR) (i.e., with the level-1 radiances), since provision of adequate level-1 uncertainty information is not yet standard practice. Those deriving CDRs thus cannot propagate the radiance uncertainty to their geophysical products. The FIDUCEO project (www.fiduceo.eu) is

  6. Comparison of dementia recorded in routinely collected hospital admission data in England with dementia recorded in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anna; Kirichek, Oksana; Balkwill, Angela; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie; Sudlow, Cathie; Gallacher, John; Green, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Electronic linkage of UK cohorts to routinely collected National Health Service (NHS) records provides virtually complete follow-up for cause-specific hospital admissions and deaths. The reliability of dementia diagnoses recorded in NHS hospital data is not well documented. For a sample of Million Women Study participants in England we compared dementia recorded in routinely collected NHS hospital data (Hospital Episode Statistics: HES) with dementia recorded in two separate sources of primary care information: a primary care database [Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), n = 340] and a survey of study participants' General Practitioners (GPs, n = 244). Dementia recorded in HES fully agreed both with CPRD and with GP survey data for 85% of women; it did not agree for 1 and 4%, respectively. Agreement was uncertain for the remaining 14 and 11%, respectively; and among those classified as having uncertain agreement in CPRD, non-specific terms compatible with dementia, such as 'memory loss', were recorded in the CPRD database for 79% of the women. Agreement was significantly better (p primary care (CPRD) than in hospital (HES) data. Age-specific rates for dementia based on the hospital admission data were lower than the rates based on the primary care data, but were similar if the delay in recording in HES was taken into account. Dementia recorded in routinely collected NHS hospital admission data for women in England agrees well with primary care records of dementia assessed separately from two different sources, and is sufficiently reliable for epidemiological research.

  7. The thermal structure of Triton's atmosphere - Pre-Voyager models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Zent, Aaron P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Courtin, Regis

    1989-01-01

    Spectral data from earth observations have indicated the presence of N2 and CH4 on Triton. This paper outlines the use of the 1-D radiative-convective model developed for Titan to calculate the current pressure of N2 and CH4 on Triton. The production of haze material is obtained by scaling down from the Titan value. Results and predictions for the Voyager Triton encounter are as follows: A N2-CH4 atmosphere on Triton is thermodynamically self consistent and would have a surface pressure of approximately 50 millibar; due to the chemically produced haze, Triton has a hot atmosphere with a temperature of approximately 130 K; Triton's troposphere is a region of saturation of the major constituent of the atmosphere, N2.

  8. Magnetic reconnection physics in the solar wind with Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael L.

    2009-08-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the process by which the magnetic topology evolves in collisionless plasmas. This phenomenon is fundamental to a broad range of astrophysical processes such as stellar flares, magnetospheric substorms, and plasma accretion, yet it is poorly understood and difficult to observe in situ . In this thesis, the solar wind plasma permeating interplanetary space is treated as a laboratory for reconnection physics. I present an exhaustive statistical approach to the identification of reconnection outflow jets in turbulent plasma and magnetic field time series data. This approach has been automated and characterized so that the resulting reconnection survey can be put in context with other related studies. The algorithm is shown to perform similarly to ad hoc studies in the inner heliosphere. Based on this technique, I present a survey of 138 outflow jets for the Voyager 2 spacecraft mission, including the most distant in situ evidence of reconnection discovered to date. Reconnection in the solar wind is shown to be strongly correlated with stream interactions and with solar activity. The solar wind magnetic field is found to be reconnecting via large, quasi-steady slow- mode magnetohydrodynamic structures as far out as the orbit of Neptune. The role of slow-mode shocks is explored and, in one instance, a well-developed reconnection structure is shown to be in good agreement with the Petschek theory for fast reconnection. This is the first reported example of a reconnection exhaust that satisfies the full jump conditions for a stationary slow-mode shock pair. A complete investigation into corotating stream interactions over the Voyager 2 mission has revealed that detectable reconnection structure occurs in about 23% of forced, global-scale current sheets. Contrary to previous studies, I find that signatures of this kind are most likely to be observed for current sheets where the magnetic field shear and the plasma-b are high. Evidence has been found

  9. 14 CFR 135.152 - Flight data recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... roll or the rotorcraft begins the lift-off until the airplane has completed the landing roll or the...) Heading—primary flight crew reference (if selectable, record discrete, true or magnetic); (5) Normal...

  10. Combining Satellite and in Situ Data with Models to Support Climate Data Records in Ocean Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson

    2011-01-01

    The satellite ocean color data record spans multiple decades and, like most long-term satellite observations of the Earth, comes from many sensors. Unfortunately, global and regional chlorophyll estimates from the overlapping missions show substantial biases, limiting their use in combination to construct consistent data records. SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua differed by 13% globally in overlapping time segments, 2003-2007. For perspective, the maximum change in annual means over the entire Sea WiFS mission era was about 3%, and this included an El NinoLa Nina transition. These discrepancies lead to different estimates of trends depending upon whether one uses SeaWiFS alone for the 1998-2007 (no significant change), or whether MODIS is substituted for the 2003-2007 period (18% decline, P less than 0.05). Understanding the effects of climate change on the global oceans is difficult if different satellite data sets cannot be brought into conformity. The differences arise from two causes: 1) different sensors see chlorophyll differently, and 2) different sensors see different chlorophyll. In the first case, differences in sensor band locations, bandwidths, sensitivity, and time of observation lead to different estimates of chlorophyll even from the same location and day. In the second, differences in orbit and sensitivities to aerosols lead to sampling differences. A new approach to ocean color using in situ data from the public archives forces different satellite data to agree to within interannual variability. The global difference between Sea WiFS and MODIS is 0.6% for 2003-2007 using this approach. It also produces a trend using the combination of SeaWiFS and MODIS that agrees with SeaWiFS alone for 1998-2007. This is a major step to reducing errors produced by the first cause, sensor-related discrepancies. For differences that arise from sampling, data assimilation is applied. The underlying geographically complete fields derived from a free-running model is unaffected

  11. [ELGA--the electronic health record in the light of data protection and data security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströher, Alexander; Honekamp, Wilfried

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of an electronic health record (ELGA) is a subject discussed for a long time in Austria. Another big step toward ELGA is made at the end of 2010 on the pilot project e-medication in three model regions; other projects should follow. In addition, projects of the ELGA structure are sped up on the part of the ELGA GmbH to install the base of a functioning electronic health record. Unfortunately, many of these initiatives take place, so to speak, secretly, so that in the consciousness of the general public - and that includes not only patients but also physicians and other healthcare providers - always concerns about protection and security of such a storage of health data arouse. In this article the bases of the planned act are discussed taking into account the data protection and data security.

  12. A system for classifying wood-using industries and recording statistics for automatic data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.W. Fobes; R.W. Rowe

    1968-01-01

    A system for classifying wood-using industries and recording pertinent statistics for automatic data processing is described. Forms and coding instructions for recording data of primary processing plants are included.

  13. VIIRS Climate Raw Data Record (C-RDR) from Suomi NPP, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Suomi NPP Climate Raw Data Record (C-RDR) developed at the NOAA NCDC is an intermediate product processing level (NOAA Level 1b) between a Raw Data Record (RDR)...

  14. Data Records derived from GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data from 30 March 1985 to 31 December 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection contains Sensor Data Records (SDRs), Geodetic Data Records (GDRs), Waveform Data Records (WDRs), and Crossover Difference data Records (XDRs) from...

  15. Validation of multisource electronic health record data: an application to blood transfusion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeven, Loan R van; Bruijne, Martine C de; Kemper, Peter F; Koopman, Maria M W; Rondeel, Jan M M; Leyte, Anja; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Janssen, Mart P; Roes, Kit C B

    2017-07-14

    Although data from electronic health records (EHR) are often used for research purposes, systematic validation of these data prior to their use is not standard practice. Existing validation frameworks discuss validity concepts without translating these into practical implementation steps or addressing the potential influence of linking multiple sources. Therefore we developed a practical approach for validating routinely collected data from multiple sources and to apply it to a blood transfusion data warehouse to evaluate the usability in practice. The approach consists of identifying existing validation frameworks for EHR data or linked data, selecting validity concepts from these frameworks and establishing quantifiable validity outcomes for each concept. The approach distinguishes external validation concepts (e.g. concordance with external reports, previous literature and expert feedback) and internal consistency concepts which use expected associations within the dataset itself (e.g. completeness, uniformity and plausibility). In an example case, the selected concepts were applied to a transfusion dataset and specified in more detail. Application of the approach to a transfusion dataset resulted in a structured overview of data validity aspects. This allowed improvement of these aspects through further processing of the data and in some cases adjustment of the data extraction. For example, the proportion of transfused products that could not be linked to the corresponding issued products initially was 2.2% but could be improved by adjusting data extraction criteria to 0.17%. This stepwise approach for validating linked multisource data provides a basis for evaluating data quality and enhancing interpretation. When the process of data validation is adopted more broadly, this contributes to increased transparency and greater reliability of research based on routinely collected electronic health records.

  16. Records Management Handbook; Source Data Automation Equipment Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC. Office of Records Management.

    A detailed guide to selecting appropriate source data automation equipment is presented. Source data automation equipment is used to prepare data for electronic data processing or computerized recordkeeping. The guide contains specifications, performance data cost, and pictures of the major types of machines used in source data automation.…

  17. Electronic Health Records Data and Metadata: Challenges for Big Data in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren E; Moulaison, Heather Lea

    2013-12-01

    This article, written by researchers studying metadata and standards, represents a fresh perspective on the challenges of electronic health records (EHRs) and serves as a primer for big data researchers new to health-related issues. Primarily, we argue for the importance of the systematic adoption of standards in EHR data and metadata as a way of promoting big data research and benefiting patients. EHRs have the potential to include a vast amount of longitudinal health data, and metadata provides the formal structures to govern that data. In the United States, electronic medical records (EMRs) are part of the larger EHR. EHR data is submitted by a variety of clinical data providers and potentially by the patients themselves. Because data input practices are not necessarily standardized, and because of the multiplicity of current standards, basic interoperability in EHRs is hindered. Some of the issues with EHR interoperability stem from the complexities of the data they include, which can be both structured and unstructured. A number of controlled vocabularies are available to data providers. The continuity of care document standard will provide interoperability in the United States between the EMR and the larger EHR, potentially making data input by providers directly available to other providers. The data involved is nonetheless messy. In particular, the use of competing vocabularies such as the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms, MEDCIN, and locally created vocabularies inhibits large-scale interoperability for structured portions of the records, and unstructured portions, although potentially not machine readable, remain essential. Once EMRs for patients are brought together as EHRs, the EHRs must be managed and stored. Adequate documentation should be created and maintained to assure the secure and accurate use of EHR data. There are currently a few notable international standards initiatives for EHRs. Organizations such as Health Level Seven

  18. Tramp ship routing and scheduling with voyage separation requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Charlotte; Lusby, Richard Martin; Larsen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    spread between some voyages. The incorporation of these separation requirements helps balance the conflicting objectives of maximising profit for the tramp operator and minimising inventory costs for the charterer, since these costs increase if similar voyages are not performed with some separation......In this paper we explore tramp ship routing and scheduling. Tramp ships operate much like taxies following the available demand. Tramp operators can determine some of their demand in advance by entering into long-term contracts and then try to maximise profits from optional voyages found...

  19. The first confirmed breeding record and new distribution data for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On 17 November 2007 during fieldwork for the Tanzania Birds Atlas in western Tanzania, we were ... The nest was about 5 m high on the end of a thin downward branch and could not be reached to check the ... Region of W Tanzania at 5-7ºS.” The Tanzania Bird Atlas currently holds 72 records for this species for all.

  20. Financial Record Checking in Surveys: Do Prompts Improve Data Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Joe; Rosen, Jeffrey; Richards, Ashley; Riley, Sarah; Peytchev, Andy; Lindblad, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Self-reports of financial information in surveys, such as wealth, income, and assets, are particularly prone to inaccuracy. We sought to improve the quality of financial information captured in a survey conducted by phone and in person by encouraging respondents to check records when reporting on income and assets. We investigated whether…

  1. U.S. Arctic Voyage Planning Guide (AVPG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Arctic Voyage Planning Guide is a compilation of official U.S. Government information and references to sources of information that may be consulted by mariners...

  2. The maiden voyage of enterprise systems and micro foundational institutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    This short paper presents an in-progress research work aimed at establishing a theoretical lens for describing, understanding and explaining the period from going live with an enterprise system and until this system is stabilized and normal organizational performance is achieved - this period is ...... is metaphorically labeled the maiden voyage. The paper presents a short overview of institutional theory, and proposes methodologically guidelines for investigating the maiden voyage by institutional theory....

  3. Tablet computers for recording tuberculosis data at a community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Don O’Mahony

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... There are essentially two data collection systems at CHCs. The first pertains to ... The second pertains to patient management. Patient data and .... operating system for clinical applications on tablet devices. Based on the above ... tool for data collection as it supports a total process and environment to help ...

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) is a record for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE) spanning from October 4, 1966 to present, updated monthly...

  5. Sharing Neuron Data: Carrots, Sticks, and Digital Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio A Ascoli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Routine data sharing is greatly benefiting several scientific disciplines, such as molecular biology, particle physics, and astronomy. Neuroscience data, in contrast, are still rarely shared, greatly limiting the potential for secondary discovery and the acceleration of research progress. Although the attitude toward data sharing is non-uniform across neuroscience subdomains, widespread adoption of data sharing practice will require a cultural shift in the community. Digital reconstructions of axonal and dendritic morphology constitute a particularly "sharable" kind of data. The popularity of the public repository NeuroMorpho.Org demonstrates that data sharing can benefit both users and contributors. Increased data availability is also catalyzing the grassroots development and spontaneous integration of complementary resources, research tools, and community initiatives. Even in this rare successful subfield, however, more data are still unshared than shared. Our experience as developers and curators of NeuroMorpho.Org suggests that greater transparency regarding the expectations and consequences of sharing (or not sharing data, combined with public disclosure of which datasets are shared and which are not, may expedite the transition to community-wide data sharing.

  6. Pipe break prediction based on evolutionary data-driven methods with brief recorded data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang; Chen Qiuwen; Li Weifeng; Ma Jinfeng

    2011-01-01

    Pipe breaks often occur in water distribution networks, imposing great pressure on utility managers to secure stable water supply. However, pipe breaks are hard to detect by the conventional method. It is therefore necessary to develop reliable and robust pipe break models to assess the pipe's probability to fail and then to optimize the pipe break detection scheme. In the absence of deterministic physical models for pipe break, data-driven techniques provide a promising approach to investigate the principles underlying pipe break. In this paper, two data-driven techniques, namely Genetic Programming (GP) and Evolutionary Polynomial Regression (EPR) are applied to develop pipe break models for the water distribution system of Beijing City. The comparison with the recorded pipe break data from 1987 to 2005 showed that the models have great capability to obtain reliable predictions. The models can be used to prioritize pipes for break inspection and then improve detection efficiency.

  7. Telling data: The accountancy record of a Chinese farmer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Ploeg, van der J.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents and analyses the notebook of a Chinese farmer. The notebook contains a wealth of farm accountancy data. The data and the many interrelations contained in them, are used to describe the structure and dynamics of farming in NW China. The availability of former notebooks that played

  8. Visualizing Research Data Records for their Better Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, Alexander; Darlington, Mansur; Howard, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    As academia in general, and research funders in particular, place ever greater importance on data as an output of research, so the value of good research data management practices becomes ever more apparent. In response to this, the Innovative Design and Manufacturing Research Centre (IdMRC) at t......As academia in general, and research funders in particular, place ever greater importance on data as an output of research, so the value of good research data management practices becomes ever more apparent. In response to this, the Innovative Design and Manufacturing Research Centre (Id...... with the associations between them. This method, called Research Activity Information Development (RAID) Modelling, is based on the Unified Modelling Language (UML) for portability. It is offered to the wider research community as an intuitive way for researchers both to keep track of their own data and to communicate...

  9. Continuous data recording on fast real-time systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabeo, L., E-mail: lzabeo@jet.u [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sartori, F. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Neto, A. [Associacao Euratom-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccolo, F. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D. [Associacao Euratom-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Vitelli, R. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Universita di Roma, Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico, 1-00133 Roma (Italy); Barbalace, A. [Euratom-ENEA Association, Consorzio RFX, 35127 Padova (Italy); De Tommasi, G. [Associazione EURATOM/ENEA/CREATE, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The PCU-Project launched for the enhancement of the vertical stabilisation system at JET required the design of a new real-time control system with the challenging specifications of 2Gops and a cycle time of 50 {mu}s. The RTAI based architecture running on an x86 multi-core processor technology demonstrated to be the best platform for meeting the high requirements. Moreover, on this architecture thanks to the smart allocation of the interrupts it was possible to demonstrate simultaneous data streaming at 50 MBs on Ethernet while handling a real-time 100 kHz interrupt source with a maximum jitter of just 3 {mu}s. Because of the memory limitation imposed by 32 bit version Linux running in kernel mode, the RTAI-based new controller allows a maximum practical data storage of 800 MB per pulse. While this amount of data can be accepted for JET normal operation it posed some limitations in the debugging and commissioning of the system. In order to increase the capability of the data acquisition of the system we have designed a mechanism that allows continuous full bandwidth (56 MB/s) data streaming from the real-time task (running in kernel mode) to either a data collector (running in user mode) or an external data acquisition server. The exploited architecture involves a peer to peer mechanisms where the sender running in RTAI kernel mode broadcasts large chunks of data using UDP packets, implemented using the 'fcomm' RTAI extension , to a receiver that will store the data. The paper will present the results of the initial RTAI operating system tests, the design of the streaming architecture and the first experimental results.

  10. Using Electronic Health Records to Build an Ophthalmologic Data Warehouse and Visualize Patients' Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, Karsten U; Müller, Michael; Kern, Christoph; Babenko, Alexander; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Kampik, Anselm; Kreutzer, Thomas C; Priglinger, Siegfried; Hirneiss, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    To develop a near-real-time data warehouse (DW) in an academic ophthalmologic center to gain scientific use of increasing digital data from electronic medical records (EMR) and diagnostic devices. Database development. Specific macular clinic user interfaces within the institutional hospital information system were created. Orders for imaging modalities were sent by an EMR-linked picture-archiving and communications system to the respective devices. All data of 325 767 patients since 2002 were gathered in a DW running on an SQL database. A data discovery tool was developed. An exemplary search for patients with age-related macular degeneration, performed cataract surgery, and at least 10 intravitreal (excluding bevacizumab) injections was conducted. Data related to those patients (3 142 204 diagnoses [including diagnoses from other fields of medicine], 720 721 procedures [eg, surgery], and 45 416 intravitreal injections) were stored, including 81 274 optical coherence tomography measurements. A web-based browsing tool was successfully developed for data visualization and filtering data by several linked criteria, for example, minimum number of intravitreal injections of a specific drug and visual acuity interval. The exemplary search identified 450 patients with 516 eyes meeting all criteria. A DW was successfully implemented in an ophthalmologic academic environment to support and facilitate research by using increasing EMR and measurement data. The identification of eligible patients for studies was simplified. In future, software for decision support can be developed based on the DW and its structured data. The improved classification of diseases and semiautomatic validation of data via machine learning are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluating the data completeness in the Electronic Health Record after the Implementation of an Outpatient Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Mauricio; Capurro, Daniel; Catalán, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) present an opportunity for quality improvement in health organitations, particularly at the primary health level. However, EHR implementation impacts clinical workflows, and physicians frequently prefer to document in a non-structured way, which ultimately hinders the ability to measure quality indicators. We present an assessment of data completeness-a key data quality indicator-during the first 12 months after the implementation of an EHR at a teaching outpatient center in Santiago, Chile.

  12. On the location of the Io plasma torus: Voyager 1 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Volwerk

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The Voyager 1 outbound ultraviolet observations of the Io plasma torus are used to determine the location of the ansae, to obtain a third viewing angle of this structure in the Jovian magnetosphere. At an angle of −114° with respect to the Sun–Jupiter line, or a Jovian local time of 04:30 LT, the Voyager 1 data deliver a distance of 5.74±0.10 RJ for the approaching and 5.83±0.15 RJ for the receding ansa. Various periodicities in the radial distance, brightness and width of the ansae are seen with respect to system III longitude and Io phase angle. The torus ribbon feature does not appear in all ansa scans.

  13. NOAA/NSIDC Climate Data Record of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides a Climate Data Record (CDR) of sea ice concentration from passive microwave data. It provides a consistent, daily and monthly time series of...

  14. MESSENGER H XRS 5 REDUCED DATA RECORD (RDR) FOOTPRINTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER XRS reduced data record (RDR) footprints which are derived from the navigational meta-data for each...

  15. GPS location data enhancement in electronic traffic records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In this project we developed a new GPS-based Geographical Information Exchange : Framework (GIEF) to improve the correctness and accuracy of location data reported on : electronic police forms in Oklahoma. A second major goal was to provide a base le...

  16. Changing Requirements for Archiving Climate Data Records Derived From Remotely Sensed Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleig, A. J.; Tilmes, C.

    2007-05-01

    With the arrival of long term sets of measurements of remotely sensed data it becomes important to improve the standard practices associated with archival of information needed to allow creation of climate data records, CDRs, from individual sets of measurements. Several aspects of the production of CDRs suggest that there should be changes in standard best practices for archival. A fundamental requirement for understanding long- term trends in climate data is that changes with time shown by the data reflect changes in actual geophysical parameters rather than changes in the measurement system. Even well developed and validated data sets from remotely sensed measurements contain artifacts. If the nature of the measurement and the algorithm is consistent over time, these artifacts may have little impact on trends derived from the data. However data sets derived with different algorithms created with different assumptions are likely to introduce non-physical changes in trend data. Yet technology for making measurements and analyzing data improves with time and this must be accounted for. To do this for an ongoing long term data set based on multiple instruments it is important to understand exactly how the preceding data was produced. But we are reaching the point where the scientists and engineers that developed the initial measurements and algorithms are no longer available to explain and assist in adapting today's systems for use with future measurement systems. In an era where tens to hundreds of man years are involved in calibrating an instrument and producing and validating a set of geophysical measurements from the calibrated data we have long passed the time when it was reasonable to say "just give me the basic measurement and a bright graduate student and I can produce anything I need in a year." Examples of problems encountered and alternative solutions will be provided based on developing and reprocessing data sets from long term measurements of

  17. Disturbances observed near Ganymede by Voyager 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlaga, L.F.; Belcher, J.W.; Ness, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    We investigated disturbances in the field and particle environment observed by Voyager 2 as it passed near the Jovian moon Ganymede in Jupiter's magnetosphere. The plasma analyzer observed at least a dozen sharply bounded depressions in density (cavities). We estimated that they probably extended at least 20 RGAMMA along the ambient magnetic field lines (R/sub G/=2635 km is the radius of Ganymede) and between 2--50 R/sub G/ in the directions transverse to B. Depressions in the magnetic field strength of the order of 5% of the ambient field strength (60nT to 135nT) were observed at the boundaries of the cavities in more than half of the cases; they were probably produced by currents flowing transverse to B on the boundaries. In some cases, the magnetic field strength inside the cavities was a few percent higher than the ambient value. This gives an upper limit on β=nkT/(B 2 /8π) outside the cavities, viz. Beta 2.5 MeV protons was strongly anti-correlated with the plasma density, the flux being higher inside the cavities than outside. One possible mechanism for the production of these flux enhancements and the cavities themselves is a local, magnetic field-aligned electric field, E. It is possible that Ganymede is responsible for the energetic protons in the cavities, in which case vertical-bar E vertical-barapprox.50 mV/m. Such a localized source implies radial motions of the magnetospheric plasma with speeds of the order of a few hundred km/s. Such motions could be produced by long-wavelength, small-amplitude Alfven waves in Jupiter's magnetosphere

  18. Voyager observations of O(+6) and other minor ions in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Louis; Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Lazarus, Alan J.; Steinberg, John T.

    1994-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) experiments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft began making measurements of the solar wind shortly after the two launches in the fall of 1977. In reviewing the data obtained prior to the Jupiter encounters in 1979, we have found that the large dynamic range of the PLS instrument generally allows a clean separation of signatures of minor ions (about 2.5% of the time) during a single instrument scan in energy per charge. The minor ions, most notably O(+6), are well separated from the protons and alpha particles during times when the solar wind Mach number (ratio of streaming speed to thermal speed) is greater than approximately 15. During the Earth to Jupiter cruise we find that the average ratio of alpha particle number density to that of oxygen is 66 +/- 7 (Voyager 1) and 71 +/- 17 (Voyager 2). These values are consistent with the value 75 +/- 20 inferred from the Ion Composition Instrument on ISEE 3 during the period spanning 1978 and 1982. We have inferred an average coronal temperature of (1.7 +/- 0.1) x 10(exp 6) K based on the ratio of O(+7) to O(+6) number densities. Our observations cover a period of increasing solar activity. During this time we have found that the alpha particle to proton number density ratio is increasing with the solar cycle, the oxygen to proton ratio increases, and the alpha particle to oxygen ratio remains relatively constant in time.

  19. Going from lectures to expeditions: Creating a virtual voyage in undergraduate ocean science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D.; Garfield, N.; Locke, J.; Anglin, J.; Karl, H.; Edwards, B.

    2003-04-01

    The WWW provides for new collaborations in distributed learning in higher education. The lead author has developed a highly successful online course at the undergraduate level with an enrollment of more than 300 non-science majors each year, We are currently initiating a new focus for the course by emphasizing sea-going research, primarily in the northeastern Pacific Ocean, through the development of a virtual oceanographic voyage over the WWW. The "virtual voyage" courseware combines elements of experiential learning with anytime, anywhere access of the WWW to stimulate inquiry-based learning in the ocean sciences. The first leg of the voyage is currently being synthesized from contemporary ocean research sponsored by a collaboration of U.S. government agencies, including NSF, NOAA, and the USGS. The initial portion of this effort involves transforming portions of USGS Circular 1198, Beyond the Golden Gate -- Oceanography, Geology, Biology, and Environmental Issues in the Gulf of the Farallones, into an interactive expedition by which students participate as scientists aboard a research vessel departing from San Francisco. Virtual experiments on the voyage are patterned after research cruises over the past decade in two national marine sanctuaries and include the technologies of data acquisition and data analysis, as well as providing insight into the methodologies of working marine scientists. Real-time data for monitoring the marine environment are embedded into several modules; for example, students will analyze data from offshore buoys and satellite imagery to assess ocean conditions prior to departing from port. Multibeam sonar is used to create seafloor maps near the Golden Gate Bridge and sediment cores provide evidence of sea-level change in the region. Environmental studies in the region include locating canisters of low-level radioactive waste and assessing potential sites for the disposal for dredged materials from the San Francisco Bay. Upon completion

  20. Data Management for a Climate Data Record in an Evolving Technical Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K. D.; Walter, J.; Gleason, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    For nearly twenty years, NASA Langley Research Center's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Science Team has been producing a suite of data products that forms a persistent climate data record of the Earth's radiant energy budget. Many of the team's physical scientists and key research contributors have been with the team since the launch of the first CERES instrument in 1997. This institutional knowledge is irreplaceable and its longevity and continuity are among the reasons that the team has been so productive. Such legacy involvement, however, can also be a limiting factor. Some CERES scientists-cum-coders might possess skills that were state-of-the-field when they were emerging scientists but may now be outdated with respect to developments in software development best practices and supporting technologies. Both programming languages and processing frameworks have evolved significantly in the past twenty years, and updating one of these factors warrants consideration of updating the other. With the imminent launch of a final CERES instrument and the good health of those in flight, the CERES data record stands to continue far into the future. The CERES Science Team is, therefore, undergoing a re-architecture of its codebase to maintain compatibility with newer data processing platforms and technologies and to leverage modern software development best practices. This necessitates training our staff and consequently presents several challenges, including: Development continues immediately on the next "edition" of research algorithms upon release of the previous edition. How can code be rewritten at the same time that the science algorithms are being updated and integrated? With limited time to devote to training, how can we update the staff's existing skillset without slowing progress or introducing new errors? The CERES Science Team is large and complex, much like the current state of its codebase. How can we identify, in a breadth-wise manner

  1. Quality of record linkage in a highly automated cancer registry that relies on encrypted identity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidtmann, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the absence of unique ID numbers, cancer and other registries in Germany and elsewhere rely on identity data to link records pertaining to the same patient. These data are often encrypted to ensure privacy. Some record linkage errors unavoidably occur. These errors were quantified for the cancer registry of North Rhine Westphalia which uses encrypted identity data. Methods: A sample of records was drawn from the registry, record linkage information was included. In parallel, plain text data for these records were retrieved to generate a gold standard. Record linkage error frequencies in the cancer registry were determined by comparison of the results of the routine linkage with the gold standard. Error rates were projected to larger registries.Results: In the sample studied, the homonym error rate was 0.015%; the synonym error rate was 0.2%. The F-measure was 0.9921. Projection to larger databases indicated that for a realistic development the homonym error rate will be around 1%, the synonym error rate around 2%.Conclusion: Observed error rates are low. This shows that effective methods to standardize and improve the quality of the input data have been implemented. This is crucial to keep error rates low when the registry’s database grows. The planned inclusion of unique health insurance numbers is likely to further improve record linkage quality. Cancer registration entirely based on electronic notification of records can process large amounts of data with high quality of record linkage.

  2. 78 FR 47210 - National Practitioner Data Bank and Privacy Act; Exempt Records System; Technical Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... reference cited in the Privacy Act regulations. The National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) system of records... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 45 CFR Part 5b RIN 0906-AA97 National Practitioner Data Bank and Privacy Act; Exempt Records System; Technical Correction AGENCY: Health Resources and Services...

  3. 42 CFR 417.806 - Financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Financial records, statistical data, and cost... MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Health Care Prepayment Plans § 417.806 Financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) The principles specified in § 417.568 apply to HCPPs, except those in...

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Atmospheric Layer Temperatures, Version 3.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Atmospheric Layer Temperature Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is a monthly analysis of the tropospheric and stratospheric data using temperature sounding...

  5. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sensor Data Records (SDRs), or Level 1b data, from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are the calibrated and geolocated radiance and reflectance...

  6. JUNO JUPITER MWR 2 EXPERIMENT DATA RECORDS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Juno MWR EDR data sets will ultimately include all uncalibrated MWR science data records for the entire Juno mission. The set in this volume will contain only...

  7. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Mask Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud masks from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard...

  8. BASE Temperature Data Record (TDR) from the SSM/I and SSMIS Sensors, CSU Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The BASE Temperature Data Record (TDR) dataset from Colorado State University (CSU) is a collection of the raw unprocessed antenna temperature data that has been...

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset version has been superseded by version 2. This data set provides a Climate Data Record (CDR) of passive microwave sea ice concentration based on the...

  10. MGN V RDRS 5 GLOBAL DATA RECORD TOPOGRAPHIC V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the Magellan Global Topographic Data Record (GTDR). The range to surface is derived by fitting altimeter echoes from the fan-beam altimetry...

  11. MGN V RDRS 5 GLOBAL DATA RECORD SLOPE V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the Magellan Global Slope Data Record (GSDR). The surface meter-scale slopes are derived by fitting altimeter echoes from the fan-beam...

  12. Earth System Data Records of Mass Transport from Time-Variable Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, V.; Talpe, M.; Nerem, R. S.; Landerer, F. W.; Watkins, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite measurements of time variable gravity have revolutionized the study of Earth, by measuring the ice losses of Greenland, Antarctica and land glaciers, changes in groundwater including unsustainable losses due to extraction of groundwater, the mass and currents of the oceans and their redistribution during El Niño events, among other findings. Satellite measurements of gravity have been made primarily by four techniques: satellite tracking from land stations using either lasers or Doppler radio systems, satellite positioning by GNSS/GPS, satellite to satellite tracking over distances of a few hundred km using microwaves, and through a gravity gradiometer (radar altimeters also measure the gravity field, but over the oceans only). We discuss the challenges in the measurement of gravity by different instruments, especially time-variable gravity. A special concern is how to bridge a possible gap in time between the end of life of the current GRACE satellite pair, launched in 2002, and a future GRACE Follow-On pair to be launched in 2017. One challenge in combining data from different measurement systems consists of their different spatial and temporal resolutions and the different ways in which they alias short time scale signals. Typically satellite measurements of gravity are expressed in spherical harmonic coefficients (although expansions in terms of 'mascons', the masses of small spherical caps, has certain advantages). Taking advantage of correlations among spherical harmonic coefficients described by empirical orthogonal functions and derived from GRACE data it is possible to localize the otherwise coarse spatial resolution of the laser and Doppler derived gravity models. This presentation discusses the issues facing a climate data record of time variable mass flux using these different data sources, including its validation.

  13. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  14. Multibeam collection for CV09_05: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-11-26 to 2009-12-04, Galway Harbour, Ireland to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for CV13_NEPHROPS_CELTIC_SEA: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-09-01 to 2013-09-05, Unknown Port to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. Multibeam collection for CV1202: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-02-01 to 2012-02-28, Cork, Ireland to D??n Laoghaire, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  17. Multibeam collection for CV03_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2003-11-05 to 2003-12-03, Dublin Port, Ireland to Dublin Port, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  18. Organizational needs for managing and preserving geospatial data and related electronic records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Downs

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Government agencies and other organizations are required to manage and preserve records that they create and use to facilitate future access and reuse. The increasing use of geospatial data and related electronic records presents new challenges for these organizations, which have relied on traditional practices for managing and preserving records in printed form. This article reports on an investigation of current and future needs for managing and preserving geospatial electronic records on the part of localand state-level organizations in the New York City metropolitan region. It introduces the study and describes organizational needs observed, including needs for organizational coordination and interorganizational cooperation throughout the entire data lifecycle.

  19. Analyzing the reliability of volcanic and archeomagnetic data by comparison with historical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneitz, Patrick; Egli, Ramon; Leonhardt, Roman

    2017-04-01

    Records of the past geomagnetic field are obtained from historical observations (direct records) on the one hand, and by the magnetization acquired by archeological artifacts, rocks and sediments (indirect records) on the other hand. Indirect records are generally less reliable than direct ones due to recording mechanisms that cannot be fully reproduced in the laboratory, age uncertainties and alteration problems. Therefore, geomagnetic field modeling approaches must deal with random and systematic errors of field values and age estimates that are hard to assess. Here, we present a new approach to investigate the reliability of volcanic and archeomagnetic data, which is based on comparisons with historical records. Temporal and spatial mismatches between data are handled by the implementation of weighting functions and error estimates derived from a stochastic model of secular variation. Furthermore, a new strategy is introduced for the statistical analysis of inhomogeneous and internally correlated data sets. Application of these new analysis tools to an extended database including direct and indirect records shows an overall good agreement between different record categories. Nevertheless, some biases exist between selected material categories, laboratory procedures, and quality checks/corrections (e.g., inclination shallowing of volcanic records). These findings can be used to obtain a better understanding of error sources affecting indirect records, thereby facilitating more reliable reconstructions of the geomagnetic past.

  20. The body voyage as visual representation and art performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsén, Jan Eric

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at the notion of the body as an interior landscape that is made intelligible through visual representation. It discerns the key figure of the inner corporeal voyage, identifies its main elements and examines how contemporary artists working with performances and installations deal with it. A further aim with the paper is to discuss what kind of image of the body that is conveyed through medical visual technologies, such as endoscopy, and relate it to contemporary discussions on embodiment, embodied vision and bodily presence. The paper concludes with a recent exhibition by the French artist Christian Boltanski, which gives a somewhat different meaning to the idea of the body voyage.

  1. Integrating phenotypic data from electronic patient records with molecular level systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracti...... Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently are mapped to systems biology frameworks....

  2. Voyager radio science observations of Neptune and triton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, G.L.; Eshleman, V.R.; Gresh, D.L.; Gurrola, E.M.; Hinson, D.P.; Marouf, E.A.; Rosen, P.A.; Simpson, R.A. (Stanford Univ. (USA)); Sweetnam, D.N.; Anderson, J.D.; Borutzki, S.E.; Campbell, J.K.; Kursinski, E.R.; Levy, G.S.; Lindal, G.F.; Lyons, J.R.; Wood, G.E. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA)); Kawashima, N. (Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara (Japan))

    1989-12-15

    The Voyager 2 encounter with the Neptune system included radio science investigations of the masses and densities of Neptune and Triton, the low-order gravitational harmonics of Neptune, the vertical structures of the atmospheres and ionospheres of Neptune and Triton, the composition of the atmosphere of Neptune, and characteristics of ring material. Demanding experimental requirements were met successfully, and study of the large store of collected data has begun. Neptune's atmosphere was probed to a pressure level of about 5 x 10{sup 5} pascals, and effects of a methane cloud region and probable ammonia absorption below the cloud are evident in the data. Results for the mixing ratios of helium and ammonia are still being investigated; the methane abundance below the clouds is at least 1 percent by volume. Derived temperature-pressure profiles to 1.2 x 10{sup 5} pascals and 78 kelvins (K) show a lapse rate corresponding to frozen equilibrium of the para- and ortho-hydrogen states. Neptune's ionosphere exhibits an extended topside at a temperature of 950 {plus minus} 160 K if H{sup +} is the dominant ion, and narrow ionization layers of the type previously seen at the other three giant planets. Triton has a dense ionosphere with a peak electron concentration of 46 x 10{sup 9} per cubic meter at an altitude of 340 kilometers measured during occultation egress. Its topside plasma temperature is about 80 {plus minus} 16 K in N{sub 2}{sup +} is the principal ion. The tenuous neutral atmosphere of Triton produced distinct signatures in the occultation data; however, the accuracy of the measurements is limited by uncertainties in the frequency of the spacecraft reference oscillator. Preliminary values for the surface pressure of 1.6 {plus minus} 0.3 pascals and an equivalent isothermal temperature of 48 {plus minus} 5 K are suggested, on the assumption that molecular nitrogen dominates the atmosphere.

  3. Grant Proposal for the Continuation of the Voyager Interstellar Mission: LECP Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Ip, Wing-H.; Decker, Robert B.; Keath, Edwin P.; Mauk, Barry H.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Gloeckler, George; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    AU, despite an enhanced level of seed particles; (b) a large transient shock in September 1991 of global scale, with intensities of shock-accelerated ions greater than or equal to 30 keV to approx. 30 MeV showing complex, highly energy-dependent spatial evolution, and small-scale (approx. few gyroradii), often anisotropic, micro-structures; (c) recurrent intensity increases in greater than or equal to 30 keV to -few MeV ions, with structures that, in some cases, show no correlation with the associated corotating shock. (2) Superthermal ion pressure: A global merged interaction region with a leading shock, downstream of which the superthermal ion (greater than or equal to 30 keV to approx. 4 MeV) pressure is comparable to that of the thermal plasma, and the total particle pressure yields a plasma beta of order unity. (3) Pickup ions: Measurements of the C/O ratio within transient structures at 35-45 AU showing the first clear evidence that transient shocks can pre-accelerate interstellar pickup ions from approx. 1 keV/nuc to at least 1 MeV/nuc. (4) Seed particles: Injection of ions for acceleration to high energies at the termination shock is unlikely to be a problem, since interplanetary transient and recurrent shocks are continually accelerating ions, of solar wind or interstellar origin, to highly superthermal energies. (5) Precursor electrons: Ambient solar electrons (greater than or equal to few tens of keV) that exist in the outer heliosphere ca form a broad precursor, several days wide, that is upstream of the termination shock and potentially observable a few months prior to the shock crossing. (6) Solar wind velocity at Voyager 1: We can use LECP ion data to obtain the solar wind velocity at Voyager 1, enabling us to provide critical measurement of the plasma flow as we approach and encounter the termination shock and other regions (necessary due to the partial failure of the Voyager 1 PLS experiment). The work of the LECP investigator team during the VIM

  4. Vital Recorder-a free research tool for automatic recording of high-resolution time-synchronised physiological data from multiple anaesthesia devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Chul; Jung, Chul-Woo

    2018-01-24

    The current anaesthesia information management system (AIMS) has limited capability for the acquisition of high-quality vital signs data. We have developed a Vital Recorder program to overcome the disadvantages of AIMS and to support research. Physiological data of surgical patients were collected from 10 operating rooms using the Vital Recorder. The basic equipment used were a patient monitor, the anaesthesia machine, and the bispectral index (BIS) monitor. Infusion pumps, cardiac output monitors, regional oximeter, and rapid infusion device were added as required. The automatic recording option was used exclusively and the status of recording was frequently checked through web monitoring. Automatic recording was successful in 98.5% (4,272/4,335) cases during eight months of operation. The total recorded time was 13,489 h (3.2 ± 1.9 h/case). The Vital Recorder's automatic recording and remote monitoring capabilities enabled us to record physiological big data with minimal effort. The Vital Recorder also provided time-synchronised data captured from a variety of devices to facilitate an integrated analysis of vital signs data. The free distribution of the Vital Recorder is expected to improve data access for researchers attempting physiological data studies and to eliminate inequalities in research opportunities due to differences in data collection capabilities.

  5. Manual editing of automatically recorded data in an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, David B; Beilin, Yaakov; Hossain, Sabera; Lin, Hung-Mo; Reich, David L

    2008-11-01

    Anesthesia information management systems allow automatic recording of physiologic and anesthetic data. The authors investigated the prevalence of such data modification in an academic medical center. The authors queried their anesthesia information management system database of anesthetics performed in 2006 and tabulated the counts of data points for automatically recorded physiologic and anesthetic parameters as well as the subset of those data that were manually invalidated by clinicians (both with and without alternate values manually appended). Patient, practitioner, data source, and timing characteristics of recorded values were also extracted to determine their associations with editing of various parameters in the anesthesia information management system record. A total of 29,491 cases were analyzed, 19% of which had one or more data points manually invalidated. Among 58 attending anesthesiologists, each invalidated data in a median of 7% of their cases when working as a sole practitioner. A minority of invalidated values were manually appended with alternate values. Pulse rate, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry were the most commonly invalidated parameters. Data invalidation usually resulted in a decrease in parameter variance. Factors independently associated with invalidation included extreme physiologic values, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification, emergency status, timing (phase of the procedure/anesthetic), presence of an intraarterial catheter, resident or certified registered nurse anesthetist involvement, and procedure duration. Editing of physiologic data automatically recorded in an anesthesia information management system is a common practice and results in decreased variability of intraoperative data. Further investigation may clarify the reasons for and consequences of this behavior.

  6. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Snow Cover Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of snow cover from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  7. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Active Fires Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational environmental data record (EDR) that contains pinpoint locations of active fires (AF) as identified by an algorithm...

  8. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Near Surface Atmospheric Properties, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature; near-surface wind speed, air temperature, and specific...

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Heat Fluxes, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature; near-surface wind speed, air temperature, and specific...

  10. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature - WHOI, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  11. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Detection Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of suspended matter from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  12. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), NRLTSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains total solar irradiance (TSI) as a function of time created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for spectral and total...

  13. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), NRLSSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains solar spectral irradiance (SSI) as a function of time and wavelength created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for...

  14. A new prosthetic alignment device to read and record prosthesis alignment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirouzi, Gholamhossein; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Ali, Sadeeq; Davoodi Makinejad, Majid

    2017-12-01

    Prosthetic alignment is an essential process to rehabilitate patients with amputations. This study presents, for the first time, an invented device to read and record prosthesis alignment data. The digital device consists of seven main parts: the trigger, internal shaft, shell, sensor adjustment button, digital display, sliding shell, and tip. The alignment data were read and recorded by the user or a computer to replicate prosthesis adjustment for future use or examine the sequence of changes in alignment and its effect on the posture of the patient. Alignment data were recorded at the anterior/posterior and medial/lateral positions for five patients. Results show the high level of confidence to record alignment data and replicate adjustments. Therefore, the device helps patients readjust their prosthesis by themselves, or prosthetists to perform adjustment for patients and analyze the effects of malalignment.

  15. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is generated using daily gridded brightness temperatures from the Defense...

  16. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Extended (APP-X) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of the extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) cryosphere contains 19 geophysical variables over the Arctic and Antarctic for the...

  17. Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-07-01

    All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)

  18. NOAA Climate Data Records (CDR) of AMSU-A/B and MHS Hydrological Properties, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hydrological Properties for Applications Thematic Climate Data Record (TCDR) consist of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A), Advanced Microwave...

  19. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Monthly Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 2.2-1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) of monthly mean High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) flux at the top of the atmosphere...

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Daily Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the daily mean Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) time series in global 1 degree x 1 degree equal-angle gridded maps spanning...

  1. An Open Architecture Scaleable Maintainable Software Defined Commodity Based Data Recorder And Correlator, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses the need for higher data rate recording capability, increased correlation speed and flexibility needed for next generation VLBI systems. The...

  2. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains gridded daily Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from the NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Very High Resolution...

  3. NUCAPS: NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System Environmental Data Record (EDR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of numerous retrieved estimates of hydrological variables and trace gases as Environmental Data Record (EDR) products from the NOAA Unique...

  4. Development of requirements and functional specifications for crash event data recorders : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. DOT has conducted research on the requirements for a Crash Event Data Recorder to facilitate the reconstruction of commercial motor vehicle crashes. This report documents the work performed on the Development of Requirements and Functiona...

  5. MRO CRISM MAP-PROJECTED TARGETED REDUCED DATA RECORD V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This volume contains the CRISM Map-projected Targeted Reduced Data Record (MTRDR) archive, a collection of multiband image cubes derived from targeted (gimbaled)...

  6. NOAA Fundamental Climate Data Record (CDR) of AMSU-B and MHS Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) brightness temperature (Tb) in "window...

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) product. APP is a fundamental CDR comprised of calibrated and navigated AVHRR channel...

  8. Unified Sea Ice Thickness Climate Data Record Collection Spanning 1947-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Unified Sea Ice Thickness Climate Data Record is the result of a concerted effort to collect as many observations as possible of Arctic sea-ice draft, freeboard,...

  9. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Active Fires Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) that contains pinpoint locations of active fires (AF) as identified by an algorithm...

  10. Protocol for Validation of the Land Surface Reflectance Fundamental Climate Data Record using AERONET: Application to the Global MODIS and VIIRS Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, J. C.; Vermote, E.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface reflectance is a fundamental climate data record at the basis of the derivation of other climate data records (Albedo, LAI/Fpar, Vegetation indices) and a key parameter in the understanding of the land-surface-climate processes. It is essential that a careful validation of its uncertainties is performed on a global and continuous basis. One approach is the direct comparison of this product with ground measurements but that approach presents several issues related to scale, the episodic nature of ground measurements and the global representativeness. An alternative is to compare the surface reflectance product to reference reflectance determined from Top of atmosphere reflectance corrected using accurate radiative transfer code and very detailed measurements of the atmosphere obtained over the AERONET sites (Vermote and al, 2014, RSE) which allows to test for a large range of aerosol characteristics; formers being important inputs for atmospheric corrections. However, the application of this method necessitates the definition of a very detailed protocol for the use of AERONET data especially as far as size distribution and absorption are concerned, so that alternative validation methods or protocols could be compared. This paper describes the protocol we have been working on based on our experience with the AERONET data and its application to the MODIS and VIIRS record.

  11. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely-collected health Data (RECORD statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric I Benchimol

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Routinely collected health data, obtained for administrative and clinical purposes without specific a priori research goals, are increasingly used for research. The rapid evolution and availability of these data have revealed issues not addressed by existing reporting guidelines, such as Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely collected health Data (RECORD statement was created to fill these gaps. RECORD was created as an extension to the STROBE statement to address reporting items specific to observational studies using routinely collected health data. RECORD consists of a checklist of 13 items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion section of articles, and other information required for inclusion in such research reports. This document contains the checklist and explanatory and elaboration information to enhance the use of the checklist. Examples of good reporting for each RECORD checklist item are also included herein. This document, as well as the accompanying website and message board (http://www.record-statement.org, will enhance the implementation and understanding of RECORD. Through implementation of RECORD, authors, journals editors, and peer reviewers can encourage transparency of research reporting.

  12. Data book of the component failure rate stored in the RECORD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Testukuni; Sasaki, Shinobu; Hikawa, Michihiro; Higuchi, Suminori.

    1989-04-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Insitute (JAERI) has developed a computerized component reliability data base and its retrieval system, RECORD, on collected failure rates from published literatures in order to promote convenience and efficiency of systems reliability analysis in the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment). In order to represent collected failure rates in a uniform format, codes are defined for component category, failure mode, data source, unit of failure rate and statistocal parameter. Up to now, approximately 11,500 pieces of component failure rate data from about 35 open literatures have been stored in the RECORD. This report provides the failure rate stored in the RECORD data base for the usage by systems analysts, as well as brief descriptions about the data base structure and how to use this data book. (author)

  13. Abstracting ICU Nursing Care Quality Data From the Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Jennifer B; Evans, Anna C; Sciulli, Andrea M; Barnato, Amber E; Sereika, Susan M; Happ, Mary Beth

    2017-09-01

    The electronic health record is a potentially rich source of data for clinical research in the intensive care unit setting. We describe the iterative, multi-step process used to develop and test a data abstraction tool, used for collection of nursing care quality indicators from the electronic health record, for a pragmatic trial. We computed Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) to assess interrater agreement or reliability of data abstracted using preliminary and finalized tools. In assessing the reliability of study data ( n = 1,440 cases) using the finalized tool, 108 randomly selected cases (10% of first half sample; 5% of last half sample) were independently abstracted by a second rater. We demonstrated mean κ values ranging from 0.61 to 0.99 for all indicators. Nursing care quality data can be accurately and reliably abstracted from the electronic health records of intensive care unit patients using a well-developed data collection tool and detailed training.

  14. Geometric Data Perturbation-Based Personal Health Record Transactions in Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, S.; Kavitha, V.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud. PMID:25767826

  15. Geometric Data Perturbation-Based Personal Health Record Transactions in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud.

  16. Geometric data perturbation-based personal health record transactions in cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, S; Kavitha, V

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud.

  17. Using weather data to determine dry and wet periods relative to ethnographic records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felzer, B. S.; Jiang, M.; Cheng, R.; Ember, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Ethnographers record flood or drought events that affect a society's food supply and can be interpreted in terms of a society's ability to adapt to extreme events. Using daily weather station data from the Global Historical Climatology Network for wet events, and monthly gridded climatic data from the Climatic Research Unit for drought events, we determine if it is possible to relate these measured data to the ethnographic records. We explore several drought and wetness indices based on temperature and precipitation, as well as the Colwell method to determine the predictability, seasonality, and variability of these extreme indices. Initial results indicate that while it is possible to capture the events recorded in the ethnographic records, there are many more "false" captures of events that are not recorded in these records. Although extreme precipitation is a poor indicator of floods due to antecedent moisture conditions, even using streamflow for selected sites produces false captures. Relating drought indices to actual food supply as measured in crop yield only related to minimum crop yield in half the cases. Further mismatches between extreme precipitation and drought indices and ethnographic records may relate to the fact that only extreme events that affect food supply are recorded in the ethnographic records or that not all events are recorded by the ethnographers. We will present new results on how predictability measures relate to the ethnographic disasters. Despite the highlighted technical challenges, our results provide a historic perspective linking environmental stressors with socio-economic impacts, which in turn, will underpin the current efforts of risk assessment in a changing environment.

  18. Pemanfaatan Data ARR (Automatic Rainfall Recorder) untuk Peningkatan Efektifitas Model Hujan Satelit (Studi Kasus DAS Indragiri)

    OpenAIRE

    Hendra, Yuli; Fauzi, Manyuk; Sutikno, Sigit

    2015-01-01

    The availability of data on hydrological modeling always become a problem considering the incompleteness and the imprecision of data. As the development of technology, many models of hidrology using data acquired from the satellite have emerged. The accuracy and the model correlation was still unachieved from the previous research using satellite data. This problems was caused by the unstable weather conditions thus the process of recording and dowloading of the satellite data become less opt...

  19. Data Matching Concepts and Techniques for Record Linkage, Entity Resolution, and Duplicate Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Christen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Data matching (also known as record or data linkage, entity resolution, object identification, or field matching) is the task of identifying, matching and merging records that correspond to the same entities from several databases or even within one database. Based on research in various domains including applied statistics, health informatics, data mining, machine learning, artificial intelligence, database management, and digital libraries, significant advances have been achieved over the last decade in all aspects of the data matching process, especially on how to improve the accuracy of da

  20. Using data from ambient assisted living and smart homes in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, P; Schöpe, L

    2014-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". To increase efficiency in the health care of the future, data from innovative technology like it is used for ambient assisted living (AAL) or smart homes should be available for individual health decisions. Integrating and aggregating data from different medical devices and health records enables a comprehensive view on health data. The objective of this paper is to present examples of the state of the art in research on information management that leads to a sustainable use and long-term storage of health data provided by innovative assistive technologies in daily living. Current research deals with the perceived usefulness of sensor data, the participatory design of visual displays for presenting monitoring data, and communication architectures for integrating sensor data from home health care environments with health care providers either via a regional health record bank or via a telemedical center. Integrating data from AAL systems and smart homes with data from electronic patient or health records is still in an early stage. Several projects are in an advanced conceptual phase, some of them exploring feasibility with the help of prototypes. General comprehensive solutions are hardly available and should become a major issue of medical informatics research in the near future.

  1. Identifying FRBR Work-Level Data in MARC Bibliographic Records for Manifestations of Moving Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Bisko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The library metadata community is dealing with the challenge of implementing the conceptual model, Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR. In response, the Online Audiovisual Catalogers (OLAC created a task force to study the issues related to creating and using FRBR-based work-level records for moving images. This article presents one part of the task force's work: it looks at the feasibility of creating provisional FRBR work-level records for moving images by extracting data from existing manifestation-level bibliographic records. Using a sample of 941 MARC records, a subgroup of the task force conducted a pilot project to look at five characteristics of moving image works. Here they discuss their methodology; analysis; selected results for two elements, original date (year and director name; and conclude with some suggested changes to MARC coding and current cataloging policy.

  2. MODELING THE SOLAR WIND AT THE ULYSSES , VOYAGER , AND NEW HORIZONS SPACECRAFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78238 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    The outer heliosphere is a dynamic region shaped largely by the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. While interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations by the Voyager spacecraft have significantly improved our understanding of this vast region, modeling the outer heliosphere still remains a challenge. We simulate the three-dimensional, time-dependent solar wind flow from 1 to 80 astronomical units (au), where the solar wind is assumed to be supersonic, using a two-fluid model in which protons and interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as separate fluids. We use 1 day averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set as inner boundary conditions to reproduce time-dependent effects in a simplified manner which involves interpolation in both space and time. Our model generally agrees with Ulysses data in the inner heliosphere and Voyager data in the outer heliosphere. Ultimately, we present the model solar wind parameters extracted along the trajectory of the New Horizons spacecraft. We compare our results with in situ plasma data taken between 11 and 33 au and at the closest approach to Pluto on 2015 July 14.

  3. Modeling the Solar Wind at the Ulysses, Voyager, and New Horizons Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    The outer heliosphere is a dynamic region shaped largely by the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. While interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations by the Voyager spacecraft have significantly improved our understanding of this vast region, modeling the outer heliosphere still remains a challenge. We simulate the three-dimensional, time-dependent solar wind flow from 1 to 80 astronomical units (au), where the solar wind is assumed to be supersonic, using a two-fluid model in which protons and interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as separate fluids. We use 1 day averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set as inner boundary conditions to reproduce time-dependent effects in a simplified manner which involves interpolation in both space and time. Our model generally agrees with Ulysses data in the inner heliosphere and Voyager data in the outer heliosphere. Ultimately, we present the model solar wind parameters extracted along the trajectory of the New Horizons spacecraft. We compare our results with in situ plasma data taken between 11 and 33 au and at the closest approach to Pluto on 2015 July 14.

  4. MODELING THE SOLAR WIND AT THE ULYSSES , VOYAGER , AND NEW HORIZONS SPACECRAFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Elliott, H. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    The outer heliosphere is a dynamic region shaped largely by the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. While interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations by the Voyager spacecraft have significantly improved our understanding of this vast region, modeling the outer heliosphere still remains a challenge. We simulate the three-dimensional, time-dependent solar wind flow from 1 to 80 astronomical units (au), where the solar wind is assumed to be supersonic, using a two-fluid model in which protons and interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as separate fluids. We use 1 day averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set as inner boundary conditions to reproduce time-dependent effects in a simplified manner which involves interpolation in both space and time. Our model generally agrees with Ulysses data in the inner heliosphere and Voyager data in the outer heliosphere. Ultimately, we present the model solar wind parameters extracted along the trajectory of the New Horizons spacecraft. We compare our results with in situ plasma data taken between 11 and 33 au and at the closest approach to Pluto on 2015 July 14.

  5. Digital data recording system for the 4 πβ-γ coincidence apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaha, V.V.; Srivastava, P.K.

    1975-01-01

    The data recording system for the 4πβ-γ coincidence apparatus consists of three scalers, a timer, a day-clock, a print control unit and a Hewlett-Packard printer. The print control unit serves as an interface unit as well as generates necessary electronic commands for starting, scanning, recycling and actuating the printer. It also generates the run number and identification number. It has made the data recording and recycling completely automatic. The report describes the data recording system which has been in continuous use since March 1973. Brief description of the scalers, the timer, the day-clock and the printer is given. The print control unit is described and the working of the data handling, scanning and cycle counting sections is explained. (author)

  6. Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS) [machine-readable data file].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock. General Education Div.

    The Migrant Student Record Transfer System (MSRTS) machine-readable data file (MRDF) is a collection of education and health data on more than 750,000 migrant children in grades K-12 in the United States (except Hawaii), the District of Columbia, and the outlying territories of Puerto Rico and the Mariana and Marshall Islands. The active file…

  7. The use of MP3 recorders to log data from equine hoof mounted accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, K J; Wilson, A M

    2006-11-01

    MP3 recorders are readily available, small, lightweight and low cost, providing the potential for logging analogue hoof mounted accelerometer signals for the characterisation of equine locomotion. These, however, require testing in practice. To test whether 1) multiple MP3 recorders can maintain synchronisation, giving the ability to synchronise independent recorders for the logging of multiple limbs simultaneously; and 2) features of a foot mounted accelerometer signal attributable to foot-on and foot-off can be accurately identified from horse foot mounted accelerometers logged directly into an MP3 recorder. Three experiments were performed: 1) Maintenance of synchronisation was assessed by counting the number of samples recorded by each of 4 MP3 recorders while mounted on a trotting horse and over 2 consecutive 30 min periods in 8 recorders on a bench. 2) Foot-on and foot-off times obtained from manual transcription of MP3 logged data and directly logged accelerometer signal were compared. 3) MP3/accelerometer acquisition units were used to log accelerometer signals from racehorses during extended training sessions. Mean absolute error of synchronisation between MP3 recorders was 10 samples per million (compared to mean number of samples, range 1-32 samples per million). Error accumulation showed a linear correlation with time. Features attributable to foot on and foot off were equally identifiable from the MP3 recorded signal over a range of equine gaits. Multiple MP3 recorders can be synchronised and used as a relatively cheap, robust, reliable and accurate logging system when combined with an accelerometer and external battery for the specific application of the measurement of stride timing variables across the range of equine gaits during field locomotion. Footfall timings can be used to identify intervals between the fore and hind contacts, the identification of diagonal advanced placement and to calculate stride timing variables (stance time, protraction

  8. VOYAGER 2 OBSERVES A LARGE DENSITY INCREASE IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Wang, C.

    2012-01-01

    Voyager 2 (V2) entered the heliosheath in 2007 August at roughly the same time solar minimum conditions were reaching the outer heliosphere. Soon after crossing the termination shock the solar wind density at Voyager decreased by a factor of two and the temperature decreased by a factor of three. At the beginning of 2011 the plasma density in the heliosheath began to increase and in mid-2012 it was up by more than a factor of two. The temperature rose by about 50% and the speed remained constant, although the flow direction continues to turn tailward. These changes may signal the end of solar minimum conditions at V2 in the heliosheath, although we do not understand why the speed did not decrease. The increased dynamic pressure has lead to an outward movement of the termination shock from its very compressed state at solar minimum.

  9. PRESSURE PULSES AT VOYAGER 2 : DRIVERS OF INTERSTELLAR TRANSIENTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wang, C.; Liu, Y. D. [State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kurth, W. S., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: cw@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: jana.safrankova@mff.cuni.cz, E-mail: william-kurth@uiowa.edu [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    Voyager 1 ( V1 ) crossed the heliopause into the local interstellar medium (LISM) in 2012. The LISM is a dynamic region periodically disturbed by solar transients with outward-propagating shocks, cosmic-ray intensity changes and anisotropies, and plasma wave oscillations. Voyager 2 ( V2 ) trails V1 and thus may observe the solar transients that are later observed at V1. V2 crossed the termination shock in 2007 and is now in the heliosheath. Starting in 2012, when solar maximum conditions reached V2 , five possible merged interaction regions (MIRs) have been observed by V2 in the heliosheath. The timing is consistent with these MIRs driving the transients observed by V1 in the LISM. The largest heliosheath MIR was observed by V2 in late 2015 and should reach V1 in 2018.

  10. -Omic and Electronic Health Record Big Data Analytics for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yen; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Kaddi, Chanchala D; Venugopalan, Janani; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, May D

    2017-02-01

    Rapid advances of high-throughput technologies and wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have led to fast accumulation of -omic and EHR data. These voluminous complex data contain abundant information for precision medicine, and big data analytics can extract such knowledge to improve the quality of healthcare. In this paper, we present -omic and EHR data characteristics, associated challenges, and data analytics including data preprocessing, mining, and modeling. To demonstrate how big data analytics enables precision medicine, we provide two case studies, including identifying disease biomarkers from multi-omic data and incorporating -omic information into EHR. Big data analytics is able to address -omic and EHR data challenges for paradigm shift toward precision medicine. Big data analytics makes sense of -omic and EHR data to improve healthcare outcome. It has long lasting societal impact.

  11. -Omic and Electronic Health Records Big Data Analytics for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yen; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Venugopalan, Janani; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, May D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Rapid advances of high-throughput technologies and wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have led to fast accumulation of -omic and EHR data. These voluminous complex data contain abundant information for precision medicine, and big data analytics can extract such knowledge to improve the quality of health care. Methods In this article, we present -omic and EHR data characteristics, associated challenges, and data analytics including data pre-processing, mining, and modeling. Results To demonstrate how big data analytics enables precision medicine, we provide two case studies, including identifying disease biomarkers from multi-omic data and incorporating -omic information into EHR. Conclusion Big data analytics is able to address –omic and EHR data challenges for paradigm shift towards precision medicine. Significance Big data analytics makes sense of –omic and EHR data to improve healthcare outcome. It has long lasting societal impact. PMID:27740470

  12. Gridded sunshine duration climate data record for Germany based on combined satellite and in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walawender, Jakub; Kothe, Steffen; Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Cremer, Roswitha

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to create a 1 km2 gridded daily sunshine duration data record for Germany covering the period from 1983 to 2015 (33 years) based on satellite estimates of direct normalised surface solar radiation and in situ sunshine duration observations using a geostatistical approach. The CM SAF SARAH direct normalized irradiance (DNI) satellite climate data record and in situ observations of sunshine duration from 121 weather stations operated by DWD are used as input datasets. The selected period of 33 years is associated with the availability of satellite data. The number of ground stations is limited to 121 as there are only time series with less than 10% of missing observations over the selected period included to keep the long-term consistency of the output sunshine duration data record. In the first step, DNI data record is used to derive sunshine hours by applying WMO threshold of 120 W/m2 (SDU = DNI ≥ 120 W/m2) and weighting of sunny slots to correct the sunshine length between two instantaneous image data due to cloud movement. In the second step, linear regression between SDU and in situ sunshine duration is calculated to adjust the satellite product to the ground observations and the output regression coefficients are applied to create a regression grid. In the last step regression residuals are interpolated with ordinary kriging and added to the regression grid. A comprehensive accuracy assessment of the gridded sunshine duration data record is performed by calculating prediction errors (cross-validation routine). "R" is used for data processing. A short analysis of the spatial distribution and temporal variability of sunshine duration over Germany based on the created dataset will be presented. The gridded sunshine duration data are useful for applications in various climate-related studies, agriculture and solar energy potential calculations.

  13. An ontology-based method for secondary use of electronic dental record data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Titus KL; Ruttenberg, Alan; Duncan, William; Haendel, Melissa; Torniai, Carlo; Acharya, Amit; Song, Mei; Thyvalikakath, Thankam P.; Liu, Kaihong; Hernandez, Pedro

    A key question for healthcare is how to operationalize the vision of the Learning Healthcare System, in which electronic health record data become a continuous information source for quality assurance and research. This project presents an initial, ontology-based, method for secondary use of electronic dental record (EDR) data. We defined a set of dental clinical research questions; constructed the Oral Health and Disease Ontology (OHD); analyzed data from a commercial EDR database; and created a knowledge base, with the OHD used to represent clinical data about 4,500 patients from a single dental practice. Currently, the OHD includes 213 classes and reuses 1,658 classes from other ontologies. We have developed an initial set of SPARQL queries to allow extraction of data about patients, teeth, surfaces, restorations and findings. Further work will establish a complete, open and reproducible workflow for extracting and aggregating data from a variety of EDRs for research and quality assurance. PMID:24303273

  14. An ontology-based method for secondary use of electronic dental record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Titus Kl; Ruttenberg, Alan; Duncan, William; Haendel, Melissa; Torniai, Carlo; Acharya, Amit; Song, Mei; Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Liu, Kaihong; Hernandez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    A key question for healthcare is how to operationalize the vision of the Learning Healthcare System, in which electronic health record data become a continuous information source for quality assurance and research. This project presents an initial, ontology-based, method for secondary use of electronic dental record (EDR) data. We defined a set of dental clinical research questions; constructed the Oral Health and Disease Ontology (OHD); analyzed data from a commercial EDR database; and created a knowledge base, with the OHD used to represent clinical data about 4,500 patients from a single dental practice. Currently, the OHD includes 213 classes and reuses 1,658 classes from other ontologies. We have developed an initial set of SPARQL queries to allow extraction of data about patients, teeth, surfaces, restorations and findings. Further work will establish a complete, open and reproducible workflow for extracting and aggregating data from a variety of EDRs for research and quality assurance.

  15. MORE EVIDENCE THAT VOYAGER 1 IS STILL IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    The investigators of the Voyager mission currently exploring the heliosheath have concluded and announced that Voyager 1 (V1) has crossed the heliopause and is now in the interstellar medium. This conclusion is based primarily on the plasma wave observations of Gurnett et al., which reveal a plasma electron density that resembles the density expected in the local interstellar medium. Fisk and Gloeckler have disputed the conclusion that V1 has crossed the heliopause, pointing out that to account for all the V1 observations, particularly the magnetic field direction together with the density, it is necessary to conclude that the higher densities observed by Gurnett et al. are due to compressed solar wind. In this Letter it is shown that the model of Fisk and Gloeckler for the nose region of the heliosheath can account in detail for the intensity and spectral shape of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in the directions of V1 and Voyager 2 (V2). A key feature of the Fisk and Gloeckler model is the existence of a region in the heliosheath where the solar wind is compressed and heated, followed by a region where the solar wind is compressed but cold. The region of cold compressed solar wind provides a unique explanation for the low-energy IBEX observations, and since this is the region where V1 must now reside, the low-energy IBEX observations provide strong evidence that V1 is still in the heliosphere

  16. Smart-card-based automatic meal record system intervention tool for analysis using data mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, Satoko; Nishiuchi, Hiromu; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2010-04-01

    The Smart-card-based Automatic Meal Record system for company cafeterias (AutoMealRecord system) was recently developed and used to monitor employee eating habits. The system could be a unique nutrition assessment tool for automatically monitoring the meal purchases of all employees, although it only focuses on company cafeterias and has never been validated. Before starting an interventional study, we tested the reliability of the data collected by the system using the data mining approach. The AutoMealRecord data were examined to determine if it could predict current obesity. All data used in this study (n = 899) were collected by a major electric company based in Tokyo, which has been operating the AutoMealRecord system for several years. We analyzed dietary patterns by principal component analysis using data from the system and extracted 5 major dietary patterns: healthy, traditional Japanese, Chinese, Japanese noodles, and pasta. The ability to predict current body mass index (BMI) with dietary preference was assessed with multiple linear regression analyses, and in the current study, BMI was positively correlated with male gender, preference for "Japanese noodles," mean energy intake, protein content, and frequency of body measurement at a body measurement booth in the cafeteria. There was a negative correlation with age, dietary fiber, and lunchtime cafeteria use (R(2) = 0.22). This regression model predicted "would-be obese" participants (BMI >or= 23) with 68.8% accuracy by leave-one-out cross validation. This shows that there was sufficient predictability of BMI based on data from the AutoMealRecord System. We conclude that the AutoMealRecord system is valuable for further consideration as a health care intervention tool. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of a Big Data Accessing and Processing Platform for Medical Records in Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Tung; Liu, Jung-Chun; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lu, Hsin-Wen

    2017-08-18

    Big Data analysis has become a key factor of being innovative and competitive. Along with population growth worldwide and the trend aging of population in developed countries, the rate of the national medical care usage has been increasing. Due to the fact that individual medical data are usually scattered in different institutions and their data formats are varied, to integrate those data that continue increasing is challenging. In order to have scalable load capacity for these data platforms, we must build them in good platform architecture. Some issues must be considered in order to use the cloud computing to quickly integrate big medical data into database for easy analyzing, searching, and filtering big data to obtain valuable information.This work builds a cloud storage system with HBase of Hadoop for storing and analyzing big data of medical records and improves the performance of importing data into database. The data of medical records are stored in HBase database platform for big data analysis. This system performs distributed computing on medical records data processing through Hadoop MapReduce programming, and to provide functions, including keyword search, data filtering, and basic statistics for HBase database. This system uses the Put with the single-threaded method and the CompleteBulkload mechanism to import medical data. From the experimental results, we find that when the file size is less than 300MB, the Put with single-threaded method is used and when the file size is larger than 300MB, the CompleteBulkload mechanism is used to improve the performance of data import into database. This system provides a web interface that allows users to search data, filter out meaningful information through the web, and analyze and convert data in suitable forms that will be helpful for medical staff and institutions.

  18. Dal record al dato. Linked data e ricerca dell’informazione nell’OPAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Iacono

    2013-12-01

    In this paper the author explores the possibility the new record deconstructed and connected with the other data on the Web is able to facilitate the creation of knowledge in the use of the catalogue. The author then analyzes the potential of application of linked data to the catalogue with regards to the capabilities for research, the new possibilities of semantic search and the ways to access bibliographic data.

  19. Accuracy of Laboratory Data Communication on ICU Daily Rounds Using an Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, Kathryn A; Dyer, Edward; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2017-02-01

    Accurately communicating patient data during daily ICU rounds is critically important since data provide the basis for clinical decision making. Despite its importance, high fidelity data communication during interprofessional ICU rounds is assumed, yet unproven. We created a robust but simple methodology to measure the prevalence of inaccurately communicated (misrepresented) data and to characterize data communication failures by type. We also assessed how commonly the rounding team detected data misrepresentation and whether data communication was impacted by environmental, human, and workflow factors. Direct observation of verbalized laboratory data during daily ICU rounds compared with data within the electronic health record and on presenters' paper prerounding notes. Twenty-six-bed academic medical ICU with a well-established electronic health record. ICU rounds presenter (medical student or resident physician), interprofessional rounding team. None. During 301 observed patient presentations including 4,945 audited laboratory results, presenters used a paper prerounding tool for 94.3% of presentations but tools contained only 78% of available electronic health record laboratory data. Ninty-six percent of patient presentations included at least one laboratory misrepresentation (mean, 6.3 per patient) and 38.9% of all audited laboratory data were inaccurately communicated. Most misrepresentation events were omissions. Only 7.8% of all laboratory misrepresentations were detected. Despite a structured interprofessional rounding script and a well-established electronic health record, clinician laboratory data retrieval and communication during ICU rounds at our institution was poor, prone to omissions and inaccuracies, yet largely unrecognized by the rounding team. This highlights an important patient safety issue that is likely widely prevalent, yet underrecognized.

  20. Satellite-based climate data records of surface solar radiation from the CM SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Cremer, Roswitha; Kothe, Steffen; Müller, Richard; Pfeifroth, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The incoming surface solar radiation has been defined as an essential climate variable by GCOS. Long term monitoring of this part of the earth's energy budget is required to gain insights on the state and variability of the climate system. In addition, climate data sets of surface solar radiation have received increased attention over the recent years as an important source of information for solar energy assessments, for crop modeling, and for the validation of climate and weather models. The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) is deriving climate data records (CDRs) from geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite instruments. Within the CM SAF these CDRs are accompanied by operational data at a short time latency to be used for climate monitoring. All data from the CM SAF is freely available via www.cmsaf.eu. Here we present the regional and the global climate data records of surface solar radiation from the CM SAF. The regional climate data record SARAH (Surface Solar Radiation Dataset - Heliosat, doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/SARAH/V002) is based on observations from the series of Meteosat satellites. SARAH provides 30-min, daily- and monthly-averaged data of the effective cloud albedo, the solar irradiance (incl. spectral information), the direct solar radiation (horizontal and normal), and the sunshine duration from 1983 to 2015 for the full view of the Meteosat satellite (i.e, Europe, Africa, parts of South America, and the Atlantic ocean). The data sets are generated with a high spatial resolution of 0.05° allowing for detailed regional studies. The global climate data record CLARA (CM SAF Clouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data, doi: 10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLARA_AVHRR/V002) is based on observations from the series of AVHRR satellite instruments. CLARA provides daily- and monthly-averaged global data of the solar irradiance (SIS) from 1982 to 2015 with a spatial resolution of 0.25°. In addition to the solar surface

  1. The realization of the storage of XML and middleware-based data of electronic medical records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuzhen; Gu Peidi; Luo Yanlin

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, using the technology of XML and middleware to design and implement a unified electronic medical records storage archive management system and giving a common storage management model. Using XML to describe the structure of electronic medical records, transform the medical data from traditional 'business-centered' medical information into a unified 'patient-centered' XML document and using middleware technology to shield the types of the databases at different departments of the hospital and to complete the information integration of the medical data which scattered in different databases, conducive to information sharing between different hospitals. (authors)

  2. The tip of the iceberg : challenges of accessing hospital electronic health record data for biological data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denaxas, Spiros C; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Modern cohort studies include self-reported measures on disease, behavior and lifestyle, sensor-based observations from mobile phones and wearables, and rich -omics data. Follow-up is often achieved through electronic health record (EHR) linkages across primary and secondary healthcare providers.

  3. Ontology-Based Data Integration of Open Source Electronic Medical Record and Data Capture Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Alicia F.

    2013-01-01

    In low-resource settings, the prioritization of clinical care funding is often determined by immediate health priorities. As a result, investment directed towards the development of standards for clinical data representation and exchange are rare and accordingly, data management systems are often redundant. Open-source systems such as OpenMRS and…

  4. Global Trends in Chlorophyll Concentration Observed with the Satellite Ocean Colour Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, F.; Vantrepotte, V.; Chuprin, A.; Grant, M.; Jackson, T.; Sathyendranath, S.

    2016-08-01

    To detect climate change signals in the data records derived from remote sensing of ocean colour, combining data from multiple missions is required, which implies that the existence of inter-mission differences be adequately addressed prior to undertaking trend studies. Trend distributions associated with merged products are compared with those obtained from single-mission data sets in order to evaluate their suitability for climate studies. Merged products originally developed for operational applications such as near-real time distribution (GlobColour) do not appear to be proper climate data records, showing large parts of the ocean with trends significantly different from trends obtained with SeaWiFS, MODIS or MERIS. On the other hand, results obtained from the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) data are encouraging, showing a good consistency with single-mission products.

  5. The ESA climate change initiative: Satellite data records for essential climate variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, R.; Merchant, C.J.; Saunders, R.

    2013-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) to provide satellite-based climate data records (CDRs) that meet the challenging requirements of the climate community. The aim is to realize the full potential of the long-term Earth observation (EO) archives...... that both ESA and third parties have established. This includes aspects of producing a CDR, which involve data acquisition, calibration, algorithm development, validation, maintenance, and provision of the data to the climate research community. The CCI is consistent with several international efforts...... targeting the generation of satellite derived climate data records. One focus of the CCI is to provide products for climate modelers who increasingly use satellite data to initialize, constrain, and validate models on a wide range of space and time scales....

  6. Snpp CrIS Instrumental Status and Raw Data Record Quality Since the Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X.; Han, Y.; Sun, N.; Weng, F.; Wang, L.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The SNPP CrIS (cross-track infrared sounder) has been in service for more than two years. As the first operational interferometric hyper-spectral sounder onboard the new-generation polar-orbit meteorological satellite, CrIS's instrumental performance and data quality are widely concerned. NOAA/NESDIS/STAR CrIS Cal/Val team have been actively involved since the beginning of the mission. An intact record of the CrIS instrumental performance and raw data record (RDR) has been established. In this presentation, the continuous records of some critical indicators such as noise, gain, laser wavelength drifting and many other parameters related to the internal thermal status, are presented. It is found that the hardware performance is extremely stable in the past two years and the degradation is very small. These features make CrIS a great candidate for long-term climate studies. Moreover, the completeness of RDR data is another advantage of taking CrIS for climate studies. NOAA/NESDIS/STAR has recorded all of the CrIS RDR data since the launch and has been dedicated to improving the data quality.

  7. Recent advances in recording electrophysiological data simultaneously with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laufs, H. [Univ Frankfurt, Zentrum Neurol and Neurochirurg, Neurol Klin, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Laufs, H. [Univ Frankfurt, Dept Neurol, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Laufs, H. [Univ Frankfurt, Brain Imaging Ctr, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Laufs, H.; Carmichael, D.W. [UCL, Inst Neurol, Dept Clin and Expt Epilepsy, London (United Kingdom); Daunizeau, J. [Wellcome Trust Ctr Neuroimaging, London (United Kingdom); Kleinschmidt, A. [INSERM, Unite 562, F-91191 Gif SurYvette (France); Kleinschmidt, A. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, NeuroSpin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Kleinschmidt, A. [Univ Paris 11, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Simultaneous recording of brain activity by different neuro-physiological modalities can yield insights that reach beyond those obtained by each technique individually, even when compared to those from the post-hoc integration of results from each technique recorded sequentially. Success in the endeavour of real-time multimodal experiments requires special hardware and software as well as purpose-tailored experimental design and analysis strategies. Here,we review the key methodological issues in recording electrophysiological data in humans simultaneously with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), focusing on recent technical and analytical advances in the field. Examples are derived from simultaneous electro-encephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) during functional MRI in cognitive and systems neuroscience as well as in clinical neurology, in particular in epilepsy and movement disorders. We conclude with an outlook on current and future efforts to achieve true integration of electrical and haemodynamic measures of neuronal activity using data fusion models. (authors)

  8. Progress towards NASA MODIS and Suomi NPP Cloud Property Data Record Continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, S.; Meyer, K.; Holz, R.; Ackerman, S. A.; Heidinger, A.; Wind, G.; Platnick, S. E.; Wang, C.; Marchant, B.; Frey, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Suomi NPP VIIRS imager provides an opportunity to extend the 17+ year EOS MODIS climate data record into the next generation operational era. Similar to MODIS, VIIRS provides visible through IR observations at moderate spatial resolution with a 1330 LT equatorial crossing consistent with the MODIS on the Aqua platform. However, unlike MODIS, VIIRS lacks key water vapor and CO2 absorbing channels used for high cloud detection and cloud-top property retrievals. In addition, there is a significant mismatch in the spectral location of the 2.2 μm shortwave-infrared channels used for cloud optical/microphysical retrievals and cloud thermodynamic phase. Given these instrument differences between MODIS EOS and VIIRS S-NPP/JPSS, a merged MODIS-VIIRS cloud record to serve the science community in the coming decades requires different algorithm approaches than those used for MODIS alone. This new approach includes two parallel efforts: (1) Imager-only algorithms with only spectral channels common to VIIRS and MODIS (i.e., eliminate use of MODIS CO2 and NIR/IR water vapor channels). Since the algorithms are run with similar spectral observations, they provide a basis for establishing a continuous cloud data record across the two imagers. (2) Merged imager and sounder measurements (i.e.., MODIS-AIRS, VIIRS-CrIS) in lieu of higher-spatial resolution MODIS absorption channels absent on VIIRS. The MODIS-VIIRS continuity algorithm for cloud optical property retrievals leverages heritage algorithms that produce the existing MODIS cloud mask (MOD35), optical and microphysical properties product (MOD06), and the NOAA AWG Cloud Height Algorithm (ACHA). We discuss our progress towards merging the MODIS observational record with VIIRS in order to generate cloud optical property climate data record continuity across the observing systems. In addition, we summarize efforts to reconcile apparent radiometric biases between analogous imager channels, a critical consideration for

  9. Top of Atmosphere Radiation MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record within the Climate Monitoring SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas; Ipe, Alessandro; Tornow, Florian; Hollmann, Rainer; Baudrez, Edward; Velazquez Blazquez, Almudena; Moreels, Johan; Trentmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The CM SAF Top of Atmosphere (TOA) Radiation MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record provides a homogeneous satellite-based climatology of the TOA Reflected Solar (TRS) and Emitted Thermal (TET) radiation in all-sky conditions. The continuous monitoring of these two components of the Earth Radiation Budget is of prime importance to study climate variability and change. The Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI - from 1983 until 2004) and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI - from 2004 onward) on board the Meteosat First and Second Generation satellites are combined to generate a long Thematic Climate Data Record (TCDR). Combining MVIRI and SEVIRI allows an unprecedented temporal (30 minutes / 15 minutes) and spatial (2.5 km / 3 km) resolution compared to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. This is a step forward as it helps to increase the knowledge of the diurnal cycle and the small-scale spatial variations of radiation. The MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record covers a 32 years time period from 1 February 1983 to 30 April 2015. The TOA radiation products are provided as daily mean, monthly mean and monthly averages of the hourly integrated values (diurnal cycle). To ensure consistency with other CM SAF products, the data is provided on a regular grid at a spatial resolution of 0.05 degrees (i.e. about 5.5 km) and covers the region between +/- 70° longitude and +/- 70° latitude. Validation of the MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record has been performed by intercomparison with several references such as the CERES products (EBAF, SYN1deg-Day and SYN1deg-M3Hour), the HIRS OLR Climate Data Record (Daily and Monthly), the reconstructed ERBS WFOV-CERES (or DEEP-C) dataset and the ISCCP FD products. CERES is considered as the best reference from March 2000 onward. The quality of the early part of the Data Record is verified against the other references. In general, the stability of all the TOA radiation products is estimated to be better than 4 W.m-2

  10. Management of laboratory data and information exchange in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Myra L; Henricks, Walter H; Castellani, William J; Whitsitt, Mark S; Sinard, John H

    2015-03-01

    In the era of the electronic health record, the success of laboratories and pathologists will depend on effective presentation and management of laboratory information, including test orders and results, and effective exchange of data between the laboratory information system and the electronic health record. In this third paper of a series that explores empowerment of pathology in the era of the electronic health record, we review key elements of managing laboratory information within the electronic health record and examine functional issues pertinent to pathologists and laboratories in the exchange of laboratory information between electronic health records and both anatomic and clinical pathology laboratory information systems. Issues with electronic order-entry and results-reporting interfaces are described, and considerations for setting up these interfaces are detailed in tables. The role of the laboratory medical director as mandated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 and the impacts of discordance between laboratory results and their display in the electronic health record are also discussed.

  11. Record completeness and data concordance in an anesthesia information management system using context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Weissman, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Use of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) does not insure record completeness and data accuracy. Mandatory data-entry fields can be used to assure data completeness. However, they are not suited for data that is mandatory depending on the clinical situation (context sensitive). For example, information on equal breath sounds should be mandatory with tracheal intubation, but not with mask ventilation. It was hypothesized that employing context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields can insure high data-completeness and accuracy while maintaining usability. A commercial off-the-shelf AIMS was enhanced using its built-in VBScript programming tool to build event-driven forms with context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields. One year after introduction of the system, all anesthesia records were reviewed for data completeness. Data concordance, used as a proxy for accuracy, was evaluated using verifiable age-related data. Additionally, an anonymous satisfaction survey on general acceptance and usability of the AIMS was performed. During the initial 12 months of AIMS use, 12,241 (99.6%) of 12,290 anesthesia records had complete data. Concordances of entered data (weight, size of tracheal tubes, laryngoscopy blades and intravenous catheters) with patients' ages were 98.7-99.9%. The AIMS implementation was deemed successful by 98% of the anesthesiologists. Users rated the AIMS usability in general as very good and the data-entry forms in particular as comfortable. Due to the complexity and the high costs of implementation of an anesthesia information management system it was not possible to compare various system designs (for example with or without context-sensitive mandatory data entry-fields). Therefore, it is possible that a different or simpler design would have yielded the same or even better results. This refers also to the evaluation of usability, since users did not have the opportunity to work with different design approaches or even different

  12. Radiology Reporting System Data Exchange With the Electronic Health Record System: A Case Study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Ghazisaeidi, Marjan; Bashiri, Azadeh

    2015-03-18

    In order to better designing of electronic health record system in Iran, integration of health information systems based on a common language must be done to interpret and exchange this information with this system is required. This study provides a conceptual model of radiology reporting system using unified modeling language. The proposed model can solve the problem of integration this information system with the electronic health record system. By using this model and design its service based, easily connect to electronic health record in Iran and facilitate transfer radiology report data. This is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2013. The study population was 22 experts that working at the Imaging Center in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran and the sample was accorded with the community. Research tool was a questionnaire that prepared by the researcher to determine the information requirements. Content validity and test-retest method was used to measure validity and reliability of questioner respectively. Data analyzed with average index, using SPSS. Also Visual Paradigm software was used to design a conceptual model. Based on the requirements assessment of experts and related texts, administrative, demographic and clinical data and radiological examination results and if the anesthesia procedure performed, anesthesia data suggested as minimum data set for radiology report and based it class diagram designed. Also by identifying radiology reporting system process, use case was drawn. According to the application of radiology reports in electronic health record system for diagnosing and managing of clinical problem of the patient, with providing the conceptual Model for radiology reporting system; in order to systematically design it, the problem of data sharing between these systems and electronic health records system would eliminate.

  13. Can Link Analysis Be Applied to Identify Behavioral Patterns in Train Recorder Data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathie, Ailsa; Walker, Guy H

    2016-03-01

    A proof-of-concept analysis was conducted to establish whether link analysis could be applied to data from on-train recorders to detect patterns of behavior that could act as leading indicators of potential safety issues. On-train data recorders capture data about driving behavior on thousands of routine journeys every day and offer a source of untapped data that could be used to offer insights into human behavior. Data from 17 journeys undertaken by six drivers on the same route over a 16-hr period were analyzed using link analysis, and four key metrics were examined: number of links, network density, diameter, and sociometric status. The results established that link analysis can be usefully applied to data captured from on-vehicle recorders. The four metrics revealed key differences in normal driver behavior. These differences have promising construct validity as leading indicators. Link analysis is one method that could be usefully applied to exploit data routinely gathered by on-vehicle data recorders. It facilitates a proactive approach to safety based on leading indicators, offers a clearer understanding of what constitutes normal driving behavior, and identifies trends at the interface of people and systems, which is currently a key area of strategic risk. These research findings have direct applications in the field of transport data monitoring. They offer a means of automatically detecting patterns in driver behavior that could act as leading indicators of problems during operation and that could be used in the proactive monitoring of driver competence, risk management, and even infrastructure design. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  14. A Satellite-Based Sunshine Duration Climate Data Record for Europe and Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Kothe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Besides 2 m - temperature and precipitation, sunshine duration is one of the most important and commonly used parameter in climatology, with measured time series of partly more than 100 years in length. EUMETSAT’s Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF presents a climate data record for daily and monthly sunshine duration (SDU for Europe and Africa. Basis for the advanced retrieval is a highly resolved satellite product of the direct solar radiation from measurements by Meteosat satellites 2 to 10. The data record covers the time period 1983 to 2015 with a spatial resolution of 0.05° × 0.05°. The comparison against ground-based data shows high agreement but also some regional differences. Sunshine duration is overestimated by the satellite-based data in many regions, compared to surface data. In West and Central Africa, low clouds seem to be the reason for a stronger overestimation of sunshine duration in this region (up to 20% for monthly sums. For most stations, the overestimation is low, with a bias below 7.5 h for monthly sums and below 0.4 h for daily sums. A high correlation of 0.91 for daily SDU and 0.96 for monthly SDU also proved the high agreement with station data. As SDU is based on a stable and homogeneous climate data record of more than 30 years length, it is highly suitable for climate applications, such as trend estimates.

  15. DRAGONDATA: A computerized system to record data on fuel for the Dragon reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Loggia, V. E.

    1974-10-15

    The paper describes the data handling computer code set-up to maintain the as-fabricated records of DRAGON fuel elements that could be used to check against specifications and to provide inputs to future heat transfer, physics and chemistry calculations.

  16. 40 CFR 65.161 - Continuous records and monitoring system data handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... section. (D) Owners and operators shall retain the current description of the monitoring system as long as... Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.161 Continuous records and monitoring system data handling...) Monitoring system breakdowns, repairs, preventive maintenance, calibration checks, and zero (low-level) and...

  17. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data : A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blakey, John D.; Price, David B.; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A.; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Josephs, Lynn K.; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V.; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    BACKGROUND: Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent

  18. 21 CFR 58.190 - Storage and retrieval of records and data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Storage and retrieval of records and data. 58.190 Section 58.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., protocols, specimens, and interim and final reports. Conditions of storage shall minimize deterioration of...

  19. 75 FR 50791 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Recording, Reporting, and Data Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ...: Recording, Reporting, and Data Collection Requirements Under 22 CFR Part 62, the Exchange Visitor Program--Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS); Forms DS-3036, DS-3037, and DS-7000, OMB No. 1405... the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act...

  20. Analysis of recorded earthquake response data at the Hualien large-scale seismic test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.H.; Tang, H.T.; Dermitzakis, S.; Esfandiari, S.

    1997-01-01

    A soil-structure interaction (SSI) experiment is being conducted in a seismically active region in Hualien, Taiwan. To obtain earthquake data for quantifying SSI effects and providing a basis to benchmark analysis methods, a 1/4-th scale cylindrical concrete containment model similar in shape to that of a nuclear power plant containment was constructed in the field where both the containment model and its surrounding soil, surface and sub-surface, are extensively instrumented to record earthquake data. In between September 1993 and May 1995, eight earthquakes with Richter magnitudes ranging from 4.2 to 6.2 were recorded. The author focuses on studying and analyzing the recorded data to provide information on the response characteristics of the Hualien soil-structure system, the SSI effects and the ground motion characteristics. An effort was also made to directly determine the site soil physical properties based on correlation analysis of the recorded data. No modeling simulations were attempted to try to analytically predict the SSI response of the soil and the structure. These will be the scope of a subsequent study

  1. How will we ensure the long-term sea ice data record continues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Kaleschke, L.

    2017-12-01

    The multi-channel satellite passive microwave record has been of enormous benefit to the science community and society at large since the late 1970s. Starting with the launch of the Nimbus-7 Scanning Multi-Channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) in October 1978, and continuing with the launch of a series of Special Sensor Microwave Imagers (SSM/Is) in June 1987 by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), places previously difficult to monitor year-round, such as the polar regions, came to light. Together these sensors have provided nearly 4 decades of climate data records on the state of sea ice cover over the ocean and snow on land. This data has also been used to map melt extent on the large ice sheets, timing of snow melt onset over land and sea ice. Application also extend well beyond the polar regions, mapping important climate variables, such as soil moisture content, oceanic wind speed, rainfall, water vapor, cloud liquid water and total precipitable water. Today the current SSMIS operational satellite (F18) is 7 years old and there is no follow-on mission planned by the DMSP. With the end of the SSMI family of Sensors, will the polar regions once again be in the dark? Other sensors that may contribute to the long-term data record include the JAXA AMSR2 (5 years old as of May 2017), the Chinese Fen-Yung-3 and the Russian Meteor-N2. Scatterometry and L-band radiometry from SMOS and NASA's SMOS may also provide some potential means of extending the sea ice extent data record, as well as future sensors by the DoD, JAXA and ESA. However, this will require considerable effort to intercalibrate the different sensors to ensure consistency in the long-term data record. Differences in measurement approach, frequency and spatial resolution make this a non-trivial matter. The passive microwave sea ice extent data record is one of the longest and most consistent climate data records available. It provides daily monitoring of one of the most striking changes in

  2. Conflict Detection Performance Analysis for Function Allocation Using Time-Shifted Recorded Traffic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Butler, Ricky W.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Hagen, George E.; Lewis, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the conflict detection function in a separation assurance system is dependent on the content and quality of the data available to perform that function. Specifically, data quality and data content available to the conflict detection function have a direct impact on the accuracy of the prediction of an aircraft's future state or trajectory, which, in turn, impacts the ability to successfully anticipate potential losses of separation (detect future conflicts). Consequently, other separation assurance functions that rely on the conflict detection function - namely, conflict resolution - are prone to negative performance impacts. The many possible allocations and implementations of the conflict detection function between centralized and distributed systems drive the need to understand the key relationships that impact conflict detection performance, with respect to differences in data available. This paper presents the preliminary results of an analysis technique developed to investigate the impacts of data quality and data content on conflict detection performance. Flight track data recorded from a day of the National Airspace System is time-shifted to create conflicts not present in the un-shifted data. A methodology is used to smooth and filter the recorded data to eliminate sensor fusion noise, data drop-outs and other anomalies in the data. The metrics used to characterize conflict detection performance are presented and a set of preliminary results is discussed.

  3. A near real-time satellite-based global drought climate data record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AghaKouchak, Amir; Nakhjiri, Navid

    2012-01-01

    Reliable drought monitoring requires long-term and continuous precipitation data. High resolution satellite measurements provide valuable precipitation information on a quasi-global scale. However, their short lengths of records limit their applications in drought monitoring. In addition to this limitation, long-term low resolution satellite-based gauge-adjusted data sets such as the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) one are not available in near real-time form for timely drought monitoring. This study bridges the gap between low resolution long-term satellite gauge-adjusted data and the emerging high resolution satellite precipitation data sets to create a long-term climate data record of droughts. To accomplish this, a Bayesian correction algorithm is used to combine GPCP data with real-time satellite precipitation data sets for drought monitoring and analysis. The results showed that the combined data sets after the Bayesian correction were a significant improvement compared to the uncorrected data. Furthermore, several recent major droughts such as the 2011 Texas, 2010 Amazon and 2010 Horn of Africa droughts were detected in the combined real-time and long-term satellite observations. This highlights the potential application of satellite precipitation data for regional to global drought monitoring. The final product is a real-time data-driven satellite-based standardized precipitation index that can be used for drought monitoring especially over remote and/or ungauged regions. (letter)

  4. SOLAR MODULATION OF THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR SPECTRUM WITH VOYAGER 1 , AMS-02, PAMELA , AND BESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corti, C.; Bindi, V.; Consolandi, C.; Whitman, K., E-mail: corti@hawaii.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    In recent years, the increasing precision of direct cosmic rays measurements opened the door to high-sensitivity indirect searches of dark matter and to more accurate predictions for radiation doses received by astronauts and electronics in space. The key ingredients in the study of these phenomena are the knowledge of the local interstellar spectrum (LIS) of galactic cosmic rays and the understanding of how the solar modulation affects the LIS inside the heliosphere. Voyager 1 , AMS-02, PAMELA , and BESS measurements of proton and helium fluxes provide valuable information, allowing us to shed light on the shape of the LIS and the details of the solar modulation during solar cycles 22-24. A new parametrization of the LIS is presented, based on the latest data from Voyager 1 and AMS-02. Using the framework of the force-field approximation, the solar modulation parameter is extracted from the time-dependent fluxes measured by PAMELA and BESS . A modified version of the force-field approximation with a rigidity-dependent modulation parameter is introduced, yielding better fits than the force-field approximation. The results are compared with the modulation parameter inferred by neutron monitors.

  5. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project H-Series climate data record product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alisa H.; Knapp, Kenneth R.; Inamdar, Anand; Hankins, William; Rossow, William B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes the new global long-term International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) H-series climate data record (CDR). The H-series data contain a suite of level 2 and 3 products for monitoring the distribution and variation of cloud and surface properties to better understand the effects of clouds on climate, the radiation budget, and the global hydrologic cycle. This product is currently available for public use and is derived from both geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite imaging radiometers with common visible and infrared (IR) channels. The H-series data currently span July 1983 to December 2009 with plans for continued production to extend the record to the present with regular updates. The H-series data are the longest combined geostationary and polar orbiter satellite-based CDR of cloud properties. Access to the data is provided in network common data form (netCDF) and archived by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) under the satellite Climate Data Record Program (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5QZ281S" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.7289/V5QZ281S). The basic characteristics, history, and evolution of the dataset are presented herein with particular emphasis on and discussion of product changes between the H-series and the widely used predecessor D-series product which also spans from July 1983 through December 2009. Key refinements included in the ISCCP H-series CDR are based on improved quality control measures, modified ancillary inputs, higher spatial resolution input and output products, calibration refinements, and updated documentation and metadata to bring the H-series product into compliance with existing standards for climate data records.

  6. Electronic Health Record in Occupational Medicine: Specific Aspects and Requirements of Data Structuring and Standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin TRIFF

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The service of occupational medicine of a specific economic agent, as integrated part of the System of Labor Health and Safety, requires efficient, well-organized information management through standardized and computerized data processing and exploitation. Legal requirements and practical aspects of information management in occupational medicine trigger necessary operational modifications in the Electronic Health File. The goal of the paper is to present basic requirements of structuring the electronic health file and the necessary standards in recording specific data.

  7. Use of TV in space science activities - Some considerations. [onboard primary experimental data recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Advantages in the use of TV on board satellites as the primary data-recording system in a manned space laboratory when certain types of experiments are flown are indicated. Real-time or near-real-time validation, elimination of film weight, improved depth of field and low-light sensitivity, and better adaptability to computer and electronic processing of data are spelled out as advantages of TV over photographic techniques, say, in fluid dynamics experiments, and weightlessness studies.

  8. Identifying risk factors for healthcare-associated infections from electronic medical record home address data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenman Marc B

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential address is a common element in patient electronic medical records. Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention specify that residence in a nursing home, skilled nursing facility, or hospice within a year prior to a positive culture date is among the criteria for differentiating healthcare-acquired from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Residential addresses may be useful for identifying patients residing in healthcare-associated settings, but methods for categorizing residence type based on electronic medical records have not been widely documented. The aim of this study was to develop a process to assist in differentiating healthcare-associated from community-associated MRSA infections by analyzing patient addresses to determine if residence reported at the time of positive culture was associated with a healthcare facility or other institutional location. Results We identified 1,232 of the patients (8.24% of the sample with positive cultures as probable cases of healthcare-associated MRSA based on residential addresses contained in electronic medical records. Combining manual review with linking to institutional address databases improved geocoding rates from 11,870 records (79.37% to 12,549 records (83.91%. Standardization of patient home address through geocoding increased the number of matches to institutional facilities from 545 (3.64% to 1,379 (9.22%. Conclusions Linking patient home address data from electronic medical records to institutional residential databases provides useful information for epidemiologic researchers, infection control practitioners, and clinicians. This information, coupled with other clinical and laboratory data, can be used to inform differentiation of healthcare-acquired from community-acquired infections. The process presented should be extensible with little or no added data costs.

  9. Possible Sources of Bias in Primary Care Electronic Health Record Data Use and Reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Robert A; Curcin, Vasa; Delaney, Brendan C; McGilchrist, Mark M

    2018-05-29

    Enormous amounts of data are recorded routinely in health care as part of the care process, primarily for managing individual patient care. There are significant opportunities to use these data for other purposes, many of which would contribute to establishing a learning health system. This is particularly true for data recorded in primary care settings, as in many countries, these are the first place patients turn to for most health problems. In this paper, we discuss whether data that are recorded routinely as part of the health care process in primary care are actually fit to use for other purposes such as research and quality of health care indicators, how the original purpose may affect the extent to which the data are fit for another purpose, and the mechanisms behind these effects. In doing so, we want to identify possible sources of bias that are relevant for the use and reuse of these type of data. This paper is based on the authors' experience as users of electronic health records data, as general practitioners, health informatics experts, and health services researchers. It is a product of the discussions they had during the Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm) project, which was funded by the European Commission and sought to develop, pilot, and evaluate a core information architecture for the learning health system in Europe, based on primary care electronic health records. We first describe the different stages in the processing of electronic health record data, as well as the different purposes for which these data are used. Given the different data processing steps and purposes, we then discuss the possible mechanisms for each individual data processing step that can generate biased outcomes. We identified 13 possible sources of bias. Four of them are related to the organization of a health care system, whereas some are of a more technical nature. There are a substantial number of possible sources of bias; very little is

  10. A Satellite-Based Surface Radiation Climatology Derived by Combining Climate Data Records and Near-Real-Time Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo Ahrens

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a method for adjusting long-term climate data records (CDRs for the integrated use with near-real-time data using the example of surface incoming solar irradiance (SIS. Recently, a 23-year long (1983–2005 continuous SIS CDR has been generated based on the visible channel (0.45–1 μm of the MVIRI radiometers onboard the geostationary Meteosat First Generation Platform. The CDR is available from the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF. Here, it is assessed whether a homogeneous extension of the SIS CDR to the present is possible with operationally generated surface radiation data provided by CM SAF using the SEVIRI and GERB instruments onboard the Meteosat Second Generation satellites. Three extended CM SAF SIS CDR versions consisting of MVIRI-derived SIS (1983–2005 and three different SIS products derived from the SEVIRI and GERB instruments onboard the MSG satellites (2006 onwards were tested. A procedure to detect shift inhomogeneities in the extended data record (1983–present was applied that combines the Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT and a penalized maximal T-test with visual inspection. Shift detection was done by comparing the SIS time series with the ground stations mean, in accordance with statistical significance. Several stations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN and about 50 stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA over Europe were used as the ground-based reference. The analysis indicates several breaks in the data record between 1987 and 1994 probably due to artefacts in the raw data and instrument failures. After 2005 the MVIRI radiometer was replaced by the narrow-band SEVIRI and the broadband GERB radiometers and a new retrieval algorithm was applied. This induces significant challenges for the homogenisation across the satellite generations. Homogenisation is performed by applying a mean-shift correction depending on the shift size of

  11. The interaction between schema matching and record matching in data integration (extended abstract)

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin

    2017-05-18

    Schema Matching (SM) and Record Matching (RM) are two necessary steps in integrating multiple relational tables of different schemas, where SM unifies the schemas and RM detects records referring to the same real-world entity. The two processes have been thoroughly studied separately, but few attention has been paid to the interaction of SM and RM. In this work we find that, even alternating them in a simple manner, SM and RM can benefit from each other to reach a better integration performance (i.e., in terms of precision and recall). Therefore, combining SM and RM is a promising solution for improving data integration.

  12. The interaction between schema matching and record matching in data integration (extended abstract)

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin; Li, Zhixu; Zhang, Xiangliang; Liu, An; Liu, Guanfeng; Zheng, Kai; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Xiaofang

    2017-01-01

    Schema Matching (SM) and Record Matching (RM) are two necessary steps in integrating multiple relational tables of different schemas, where SM unifies the schemas and RM detects records referring to the same real-world entity. The two processes have been thoroughly studied separately, but few attention has been paid to the interaction of SM and RM. In this work we find that, even alternating them in a simple manner, SM and RM can benefit from each other to reach a better integration performance (i.e., in terms of precision and recall). Therefore, combining SM and RM is a promising solution for improving data integration.

  13. Effect of a data buffer on the recorded distribution of time intervals for random events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, J C [Polytechnic of North London (UK)

    1976-03-15

    The use of a data buffer enables the distribution of the time intervals between events to be studied for times less than the recording system dead-time but the usual negative exponential distribution for random events has to be modified. The theory for this effect is developed for an n-stage buffer followed by an asynchronous recorder. Results are evaluated for the values of n from 1 to 5. In the language of queueing theory the system studied is of type M/D/1/n+1, i.e. with constant service time and a finite number of places.

  14. Gas expulsions and biological activity recorded offshore Molene Island, Brittany (France): video supervised recording of OBS data and analogue modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Géli, L.; Dellong, D.; Evangelia, B.; Tary, J. B.; Bayrakci, G.; Lantéri, N.; Lin, J. Y.; Chen, Y. F.; Chang, E. T. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) commonly record signals from Short Duration Events (SDEs), having characteristics that are very different from those produced by tectonic earthquakes, e.g.: durations Brittany within the field of view of the EMSO-Molene underwater observatory, at a water depth of 12 m. The camera images and the recordings reveal the presence of crabs, octopus and several species of fish. Other acoustic signals can be related to the presence of moving algae or the influence from bad weather. Tides produce characteristic curves in the noise recorded on the geophones. SDEs have been recorded on both instruments, that may well have been caused by gas expulsions from the seabed into the water. In order to verify this hypothesis, an aquarium was filled with water overlying an even grain-sized quartz sand layer. A constant air supply through a narrow tube produced gas bubbles in a regular manner and an immersed ocean bottom geophone recorded the resulting acoustic signals. The bubbles tend to have a uniform size and to produce a waveform very close to those found on the OBSs. By comparing the number of SDEs and the volume of escaped air, estimates can be made regarding the volume of gas escaping the seafloor in different environments.

  15. Common data elements for secondary use of electronic health record data for clinical trial execution and serious adverse event reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Bruland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data capture is one of the most expensive phases during the conduct of a clinical trial and the increasing use of electronic health records (EHR offers significant savings to clinical research. To facilitate these secondary uses of routinely collected patient data, it is beneficial to know what data elements are captured in clinical trials. Therefore our aim here is to determine the most commonly used data elements in clinical trials and their availability in hospital EHR systems. Methods Case report forms for 23 clinical trials in differing disease areas were analyzed. Through an iterative and consensus-based process of medical informatics professionals from academia and trial experts from the European pharmaceutical industry, data elements were compiled for all disease areas and with special focus on the reporting of adverse events. Afterwards, data elements were identified and statistics acquired from hospital sites providing data to the EHR4CR project. Results The analysis identified 133 unique data elements. Fifty elements were congruent with a published data inventory for patient recruitment and 83 new elements were identified for clinical trial execution, including adverse event reporting. Demographic and laboratory elements lead the list of available elements in hospitals EHR systems. For the reporting of serious adverse events only very few elements could be identified in the patient records. Conclusions Common data elements in clinical trials have been identified and their availability in hospital systems elucidated. Several elements, often those related to reimbursement, are frequently available whereas more specialized elements are ranked at the bottom of the data inventory list. Hospitals that want to obtain the benefits of reusing data for research from their EHR are now able to prioritize their efforts based on this common data element list.

  16. Common data elements for secondary use of electronic health record data for clinical trial execution and serious adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruland, Philipp; McGilchrist, Mark; Zapletal, Eric; Acosta, Dionisio; Proeve, Johann; Askin, Scott; Ganslandt, Thomas; Doods, Justin; Dugas, Martin

    2016-11-22

    Data capture is one of the most expensive phases during the conduct of a clinical trial and the increasing use of electronic health records (EHR) offers significant savings to clinical research. To facilitate these secondary uses of routinely collected patient data, it is beneficial to know what data elements are captured in clinical trials. Therefore our aim here is to determine the most commonly used data elements in clinical trials and their availability in hospital EHR systems. Case report forms for 23 clinical trials in differing disease areas were analyzed. Through an iterative and consensus-based process of medical informatics professionals from academia and trial experts from the European pharmaceutical industry, data elements were compiled for all disease areas and with special focus on the reporting of adverse events. Afterwards, data elements were identified and statistics acquired from hospital sites providing data to the EHR4CR project. The analysis identified 133 unique data elements. Fifty elements were congruent with a published data inventory for patient recruitment and 83 new elements were identified for clinical trial execution, including adverse event reporting. Demographic and laboratory elements lead the list of available elements in hospitals EHR systems. For the reporting of serious adverse events only very few elements could be identified in the patient records. Common data elements in clinical trials have been identified and their availability in hospital systems elucidated. Several elements, often those related to reimbursement, are frequently available whereas more specialized elements are ranked at the bottom of the data inventory list. Hospitals that want to obtain the benefits of reusing data for research from their EHR are now able to prioritize their efforts based on this common data element list.

  17. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Sakurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A video event data recorder (VEDR in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic seizure and he was diagnosed with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. The VEDR is useful not only for traffic accident evidence; it might also contribute to a driver's health care and road safety.

  18. Comparing cycling world hour records, 1967-1996: modeling with empirical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, D R; Kyle, C R; Passfield, L; Broker, J P; Burke, E R

    1999-11-01

    The world hour record in cycling has increased dramatically in recent years. The present study was designed to compare the performances of former/current record holders, after adjusting for differences in aerodynamic equipment and altitude. Additionally, we sought to determine the ideal elevation for future hour record attempts. The first step was constructing a mathematical model to predict power requirements of track cycling. The model was based on empirical data from wind-tunnel tests, the relationship of body size to frontal surface area, and field power measurements using a crank dynamometer (SRM). The model agreed reasonably well with actual measurements of power output on elite cyclists. Subsequently, the effects of altitude on maximal aerobic power were estimated from published research studies of elite athletes. This information was combined with the power requirement equation to predict what each cyclist's power output would have been at sea level. This allowed us to estimate the distance that each rider could have covered using state-of-the-art equipment at sea level. According to these calculations, when racing under equivalent conditions, Rominger would be first, Boardman second, Merckx third, and Indurain fourth. In addition, about 60% of the increase in hour record distances since Bracke's record (1967) have come from advances in technology and 40% from physiological improvements. To break the current world hour record, field measurements and the model indicate that a cyclist would have to deliver over 440 W for 1 h at sea level, or correspondingly less at altitude. The optimal elevation for future hour record attempts is predicted to be about 2500 m for acclimatized riders and 2000 m for unacclimatized riders.

  19. Work plan for ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation at Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water monitor wells and ground water elevation data recorders (data loggers) at the Gunnison, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The monitor wells and data loggers will be used to gather required time-dependent data to investigate the interaction between ground water and surface water in the area. Data collection objectives (DCO) identify reasons for collecting data. The following are DCOs for the Gunnison ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation project: long-term continuous ground water level data and periodic ground water samples will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site; water level and water quality data will eventually be used in future ground water modeling to more firmly establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Gunnison processing site; and modeling results will be used to demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing

  20. Getting data out of the electronic patient record: critical steps in building a data warehouse for decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebidia, A; Mulder, C; Tripp, B; Morgan, M W

    1999-01-01

    Health care has taken advantage of computers to streamline many clinical and administrative processes. However, the potential of health care information technology as a source of data for clinical and administrative decision support has not been fully explored. This paper describes the process of developing on-line analytical processing (OLAP) capacity from data generated in an on-line transaction processing (OLTP) system (the electronic patient record). We discuss the steps used to evaluate the EPR system, retrieve the data, and create an analytical data warehouse accessible for analysis. We also summarize studies based on the data (lab re-engineering, practice variation in diagnostic decision-making and evaluation of a clinical alert). Besides producing a useful data warehouse, the process also increased understanding of organizational and cost considerations in purchasing OLAP tools. We discuss the limitations of our approach and ways in which these limitations can be addressed.

  1. Developing a Data Record of Lower Troposphere Temperature Profiles for Diurnal Land-Atmosphere Coupling Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z.; Li, D.

    2017-12-01

    The lower troposphere, including the planetary boundary layer, is strongly influenced by the land surface at diurnal scales. However, investigations of diurnal land-atmosphere coupling are significantly hindered by the lack of profile measurements that resolve the diurnal cycle. This study aims to bridge this gap by developing a decade-long (from 2007 to 2016) data record of diurnal temperature profiles in the lower troposphere (from the surface to about 4 km above the surface), which is based on the Aircrafts Communications Addressing and Reporting System (ACARS) meteorological observations. We first identify the number of profiles within an hour for each airport over the CONUS. At each airport, only data that passed at least level-1 quality check are retained. 40 airports out of 275 are then selected, which have data for more than 12 hours per day. These selected airports are mainly located along the east and west coasts, as expected. Because the data are recorded at irregular heights, we resample each profile in the lowest 4 km or so to pre-defined vertical coordinates. These temperature profiles are further bias-corrected by comparing to collocated radiosonde observations. This consistent data record of diurnal temperature profiles in the lower troposphere can be also used for regional climatology research, short-term weather forecasts, and numerical model evaluation.

  2. Event Recording Data Acquisition System and Experiment Data Management System for Neutron Experiments at MLF, J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, T.; Inamura, Y.; Moriyama, K.; Ito, T.; Muto, S.; Otomo, T.

    Neutron scattering can be a powerful probe in the investigation of many phenomena in the materials and life sciences. The Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is a leading center of experimental neutron science and boasts one of the most intense pulsed neutron sources in the world. The MLF currently has 18 experimental instruments in operation that support a wide variety of users from across a range of research fields. The instruments include optical elements, sample environment apparatus and detector systems that are controlled and monitored electronically throughout an experiment. Signals from these components and those from the neutron source are converted into a digital format by the data acquisition (DAQ) electronics and recorded as time-tagged event data in the DAQ computers using "DAQ-Middleware". Operating in event mode, the DAQ system produces extremely large data files (˜GB) under various measurement conditions. Simultaneously, the measurement meta-data indicating each measurement condition is recorded in XML format by the MLF control software framework "IROHA". These measurement event data and meta-data are collected in the MLF common storage and cataloged by the MLF Experimental Database (MLF EXP-DB) based on a commercial XML database. The system provides a web interface for users to manage and remotely analyze experimental data.

  3. Data quality of seismic records from the Tohoku, Japan earthquake as recorded across the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, A.T.; Gee, L.S.; Marshall, B.; Hutt, C.R.; Storm, T.

    2012-01-01

    Great earthquakes recorded across modern digital seismographic networks, such as the recent Tohoku, Japan, earthquake on 11 March 2011 (Mw = 9.0), provide unique datasets that ultimately lead to a better understanding of the Earth's structure (e.g., Pesicek et al. 2008) and earthquake sources (e.g., Ammon et al. 2011). For network operators, such events provide the opportunity to look at the performance across their entire network using a single event, as the ground motion records from the event will be well above every station's noise floor.

  4. Concordance between maternal recall of birth complications and data from obstetrical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alison; McAloon, Rose; Hoffmann, Amy; Mohanty, Arpita; Magee, Kelsey

    2017-02-01

    Prenatal complications are associated with poor outcomes in the offspring. Access to medical records is limited in the United States and investigators often rely on maternal report of prenatal complications. We tested concordance between maternal recall and birth records in a community-based sample of mothers participating in a longitudinal study in order to determine the accuracy of maternal recall of perinatal complications. Participants were 151 biological mothers, who were interviewed about gestational age at birth, birthweight, and the most commonly occurring birth complications: nuchal cord and meconium aspiration when the female child was on average 6years old, and for whom birth records were obtained. Concordance between reports was assessed using one-way random intra-class coefficients for continuous measures and kappa coefficients for dichotomous outcomes. Associations between maternal demographic and psychological factors and discrepancies also were tested. Concordance was excellent for continuously measured birthweight (ICC=0.85, pbirth record and absence according to maternal recall. Receipt of public assistance was associated with a decrease in discrepancy in report of nuchal cord. Concordance between maternal retrospective report and medical birth records varies across different types of perinatal events. There was little evidence that demographic or psychological factors increased the risk of discrepancies. Maternal recall based on continuous measures of perinatal factors may yield more valid data than dichotomous outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combining Different Privacy-Preserving Record Linkage Methods for Hospital Admission Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Waldenburger, Andreas; Borgs, Christian; Schnell, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Record linkage (RL) is the process of identifying pairs of records that correspond to the same entity, for example the same patient. The basic approach assigns to each pair of records a similarity weight, and then determines a certain threshold, above which the two records are considered to be a match. Three different RL methods were applied under privacy-preserving conditions on hospital admission data: deterministic RL (DRL), probabilistic RL (PRL), and Bloom filters. The patient characteristics like names were one-way encrypted (DRL, PRL) or transformed to a cryptographic longterm key (Bloom filters). Based on one year of hospital admissions, the data set was split randomly in 30 thousand new and 1,5 million known patients. With the combination of the three RL-methods, a positive predictive value of 83 % (95 %-confidence interval 65 %-94 %) was attained. Thus, the application of the presented combination of RL-methods seem to be suited for other applications of population-based research.

  6. Voyager and the origin of the solar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, A.J.R. (Monash Univ., Clayton (Australia). Dept. of Mathematics)

    1983-03-01

    A theory for the origin of the solar system which is based on the original Laplacian nebular hypothesis is outlined. It uses ideas of supersonic convective turbulence and suggests that both planetary and regular satellite systems are formed through condensation from a concentric system of orbiting gas rings. These are shed by the primitive rotating clouds which contract gravitationally to form each central parent body. Predictions about the chemical compositions and masses of the satellite systems of Jupiter and Saturn have been confirmed by the Voyager missions.

  7. Voyager and the origin of the solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prentice, A.J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A theory for the origin of the solar system which is based on the original Laplacian nebular hypothesis is outlined. It uses ideas of supersonic convective turbulence and suggests that both planetary and regular satellite systems are formed through condensation from a concentric system of orbiting gas rings. These are shed by the primitive rotating clouds which contract gravitationally to form each central parent body. Predictions about the chemical compositions and masses of the satellite systems of Jupiter and Saturn have been confirmed by the Voyager missions

  8. The Jupiter system through the eyes of Voyager 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Johnson, T.V.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Collins, S.A.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Hunt, G.E.; Masursky, H.; Carr, M.H.; Davies, M.E.; Cook, A.F.; Boyce, J.; Danielson, G.E.; Owen, Timothy W.; Sagan, C.; Beebe, R.F.; Veverka, J.; Strom, R.G.; McCauley, J.F.; Morrison, D.; Briggs, G.A.; Suomi, V.E.

    1979-01-01

    The cameras aboard Voyager I have provided a closeup view of the Jupiter system, revealing heretofore unknown characteristics and phenomena associated with the planet's atmosphere and the surfaces of its five major satellites. On Jupiter itself, atmospheric motions-the interaction of cloud systems-display complex vorticity. On its dark side, lightning and auroras are observed. A ring was discovered surrounding Jupiter. The satellite surfaces display dramatic differences including extensive active volcanismn on Io, complex tectonism on Ganymnede and possibly Europa, and flattened remnants of enormous impact features on Callisto. Copyright ?? 1979 AAAS.

  9. The body voyage as visual representation and art performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Jan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at the notion of the body as an interior landscape that is made intelligible through visual representation. It discerns the key figure of the inner corporeal voyage, identifies its main elements and examines how contemporary artists working with performances and installations deal...... with it. A further aim with the paper is to discuss what kind of image of the body that is conveyed through medical visual technologies, such as endoscopy, and relate it to contemporary discussions on embodiment, embodied vision and bodily presence. The paper concludes with a recent exhibition...

  10. Applied nursing informatics research - state-of-the-art methodologies using electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung In; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Westra, Bonnie L; Delaney, Connie W

    2014-01-01

    With the pervasive implementation of electronic health records (EHR), new opportunities arise for nursing research through use of EHR data. Increasingly, comparative effectiveness research within and across health systems is conducted to identify the impact of nursing for improving health, health care, and lowering costs of care. Use of EHR data for this type of research requires use of national and internationally recognized nursing terminologies to normalize data. Research methods are evolving as large data sets become available through EHRs. Little is known about the types of research and analytic methods for applied to nursing research using EHR data normalized with nursing terminologies. The purpose of this paper is to report on a subset of a systematic review of peer reviewed studies related to applied nursing informatics research involving EHR data using standardized nursing terminologies.

  11. A Climate Data Record (CDR) for the global terrestrial water budget: 1984-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Pan, Ming; Sheffield, Justin; Siemann, Amanda L.; Fisher, Colby K.; Liang, Miaoling; Beck, Hylke E.; Wanders, Niko; MacCracken, Rosalyn F.; Houser, Paul R.; Zhou, Tian; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Pinker, Rachel T.; Bytheway, Janice; Kummerow, Christian D.; Wood, Eric F.

    2018-01-01

    Closing the terrestrial water budget is necessary to provide consistent estimates of budget components for understanding water resources and changes over time. Given the lack of in situ observations of budget components at anything but local scale, merging information from multiple data sources (e.g., in situ observation, satellite remote sensing, land surface model, and reanalysis) through data assimilation techniques that optimize the estimation of fluxes is a promising approach. Conditioned on the current limited data availability, a systematic method is developed to optimally combine multiple available data sources for precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (ET), runoff (R), and the total water storage change (TWSC) at 0.5° spatial resolution globally and to obtain water budget closure (i.e., to enforce P - ET - R - TWSC = 0) through a constrained Kalman filter (CKF) data assimilation technique under the assumption that the deviation from the ensemble mean of all data sources for the same budget variable is used as a proxy of the uncertainty in individual water budget variables. The resulting long-term (1984-2010), monthly 0.5° resolution global terrestrial water cycle Climate Data Record (CDR) data set is developed under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) program. This data set serves to bridge the gap between sparsely gauged regions and the regions with sufficient in situ observations in investigating the temporal and spatial variability in the terrestrial hydrology at multiple scales. The CDR created in this study is validated against in situ measurements like river discharge from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and ET from FLUXNET. The data set is shown to be reliable and can serve the scientific community in understanding historical climate variability in water cycle fluxes and stores, benchmarking the current climate, and

  12. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada. I. Aleocharinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Webster

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Forty-eight species of Aleocharinae are newly reported from New Brunswick, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 149. Two of these species, Ocyusa asperula Casey and Myllaena kaskaskia Klimaszewski, are newly recorded for Canada. Additional locality data are presented for nine species recently recorded from the province. Collection and bionomic data for all these species are presented and discussed. Colour habitus images are presented for all species included in this paper and genital images are presented for closely related Myllaena kaskaskia Klimaszewski, M. procidua Casey and M. vulpina Bernhauer. Photographs of the male genitalia of M. procidua are presented for the first time. The female spermatheca, tergite and sternite eight of Amarochara formicina Assing are illustrated for the first time.

  13. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  14. Publishing data from electronic health records while preserving privacy: a survey of algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Loukides, Grigorios; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) can be highly beneficial for a range of medical studies, spanning from clinical trials to epidemic control studies, but it must be performed in a way that preserves patients’ privacy. This is not straightforward, because the disseminated data need to be protected against several privacy threats, while remaining useful for subsequent analysis tasks. In this work, we present a survey of algorithms that have been proposed for publishing struc...

  15. Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr climate data record (CDR) of sea surface temperature (SST) has been produced with daily gap-free analysis fields for the North Sea and the Baltic Sea region from 1982 to 2012 by combining the Pathfinder AVHRR satellite data record with the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) Reprocessing...... for Climate (ARC) dataset and with in situ observations. A dynamical bias correction scheme adjusts the Pathfinder observations toward the ARC and in situ observations. Largest Pathfinder-ARC differences are found in the summer months, when the Pathfinder observations are up to 0.4 °C colder than the ARC...... observations on average. Validation against independent in situ observations shows a very stable performance of the data record, with a mean difference of -0.06 °C compared to moored buoys and a 0.46 °C standard deviation of the differences. The mean annual biases of the SST CDR are small for all years...

  16. Homogeneity testing of the global ESA CCI multi-satellite soil moisture climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preimesberger, Wolfgang; Su, Chun-Hsu; Gruber, Alexander; Dorigo, Wouter

    2017-04-01

    ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) creates a global, long-term data record by merging multiple available earth observation products with the goal to provide a product for climate studies, trend analysis, and risk assessments. The blending of soil moisture (SM) time series derived from different active and passive remote sensing instruments with varying sensor characteristics, such as microwave frequency, signal polarization or radiometric accuracy, could potentially lead to inhomogeneities in the merged long-term data series, undercutting the usefulness of the product. To detect the spatio-temporal extent of contiguous periods without inhomogeneities as well as subsequently minimizing their negative impact on the data records, different relative homogeneity tests (namely Fligner-Killeen test of homogeneity of variances and Wilcoxon rank-sums test) are implemented and tested on the combined active-passive ESA CCI SM data set. Inhomogeneities are detected by comparing the data against reference data from in-situ data from ISMN, and model-based estimates from GLDAS-Noah and MERRA-Land. Inhomogeneity testing is performed over the ESA CCI SM data time frame of 38 years (from 1978 to 2015), on a global quarter-degree grid and with regard to six alterations in the combination of observation systems used in the data blending process. This study describes and explains observed variations in the spatial and temporal patterns of inhomogeneities in the combined products. Besides we proposes methodologies for measuring and reducing the impact of inhomogeneities on trends derived from the ESA CCI SM data set, and suggest the use of inhomogeneity-corrected data for future trend studies. This study is supported by the European Union's FP7 EartH2Observe "Global Earth Observation for Integrated Water Resource Assessment" project (grant agreement number 331 603608).

  17. Using a data entry clerk to improve data quality in primary care electronic medical records: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiver, Michelle; Barnsley, Jan; Aliarzadeh, Babak; Krueger, Paul; Moineddin, Rahim; Butt, Debra A; Dolabchian, Edita; Jaakkimainen, Liisa; Keshavjee, Karim; White, David; Kaplan, David

    2011-01-01

    The quality of electronic medical record (EMR) data is known to be problematic; research on improving these data is needed. The primary objective was to explore the impact of using a data entry clerk to improve data quality in primary care EMRs. The secondary objective was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing this intervention. We used a before and after design for this pilot study. The participants were 13 community based family physicians and four allied health professionals in Toronto, Canada. Using queries programmed by a data manager, a data clerk was tasked with re-entering EMR information as coded or structured data for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), smoking, specialist designations and interprofessional encounter headers. We measured data quality before and three to six months after the intervention. We evaluated feasibility by measuring acceptability to clinicians and workload for the clerk. After the intervention, coded COPD entries increased by 38% (P = 0.0001, 95% CI 23 to 51%); identifiable data on smoking categories increased by 27% (P = 0.0001, 95% CI 26 to 29%); referrals with specialist designations increased by 20% (P = 0.0001, 95% CI 16 to 22%); and identifiable interprofessional headers increased by 10% (P = 0.45, 95 CI -3 to 23%). Overall, the intervention was rated as being at least moderately useful and moderately usable. The data entry clerk spent 127 hours restructuring data for 11 729 patients. Utilising a data manager for queries and a data clerk to re-enter data led to improvements in EMR data quality. Clinicians found this approach to be acceptable.

  18. Practice Facilitator Strategies for Addressing Electronic Health Record Data Challenges for Quality Improvement: EvidenceNOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemler, Jennifer R; Hall, Jennifer D; Cholan, Raja A; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Damschroder, Laura J; Solberg, Leif I; Ono, Sarah S; Cohen, Deborah J

    2018-01-01

    Practice facilitators ("facilitators") can play an important role in supporting primary care practices in performing quality improvement (QI), but they need complete and accurate clinical performance data from practices' electronic health records (EHR) to help them set improvement priorities, guide clinical change, and monitor progress. Here, we describe the strategies facilitators use to help practices perform QI when complete or accurate performance data are not available. Seven regional cooperatives enrolled approximately 1500 small-to-medium-sized primary care practices and 136 facilitators in EvidenceNOW, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's initiative to improve cardiovascular preventive services. The national evaluation team analyzed qualitative data from online diaries, site visit field notes, and interviews to discover how facilitators worked with practices on EHR data challenges to obtain and use data for QI. We found facilitators faced practice-level EHR data challenges, such as a lack of clinical performance data, partial or incomplete clinical performance data, and inaccurate clinical performance data. We found that facilitators responded to these challenges, respectively, by using other data sources or tools to fill in for missing data, approximating performance reports and generating patient lists, and teaching practices how to document care and confirm performance measures. In addition, facilitators helped practices communicate with EHR vendors or health systems in requesting data they needed. Overall, facilitators tailored strategies to fit the individual practice and helped build data skills and trust. Facilitators can use a range of strategies to help practices perform data-driven QI when performance data are inaccurate, incomplete, or missing. Support is necessary to help practices, particularly those with EHR data challenges, build their capacity for conducting data-driven QI that is required of them for participating in practice

  19. Toward best practice: leveraging the electronic patient record as a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledbetter, C S; Morgan, M W

    2001-01-01

    Automating clinical and administrative processes via an electronic patient record (EPR) gives clinicians the point-of-care tools they need to deliver better patient care. However, to improve clinical practice as a whole and then evaluate it, healthcare must go beyond basic automation and convert EPR data into aggregated, multidimensional information. Unfortunately, few EPR systems have the established, powerful analytical clinical data warehouses (CDWs) required for this conversion. This article describes how an organization can support best practice by leveraging a CDW that is fully integrated into its EPR and clinical decision support (CDS) system. The article (1) discusses the requirements for comprehensive CDS, including on-line analytical processing (OLAP) of data at both transactional and aggregate levels, (2) suggests that the transactional data acquired by an OLTP EPR system must be remodeled to support retrospective, population-based, aggregate analysis of those data, and (3) concludes that this aggregate analysis is best provided by a separate CDW system.

  20. Automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the electronic health record using consumer technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajiv B; Goren, Nira D; Stark, David E; Wall, Dennis P; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2016-05-01

    The diabetes healthcare provider plays a key role in interpreting blood glucose trends, but few institutions have successfully integrated patient home glucose data in the electronic health record (EHR). Published implementations to date have required custom interfaces, which limit wide-scale replication. We piloted automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the EHR using widely available consumer technology for 10 pediatric patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. Establishment of a passive data communication bridge via a patient's/parent's smartphone enabled automated integration and analytics of patient device data within the EHR between scheduled clinic visits. It is feasible to utilize available consumer technology to assess and triage home diabetes device data within the EHR, and to engage patients/parents and improve healthcare provider workflow. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  1. An Estimation Method of System Voltage Sag Profile using Recorded Sag Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Sakashita, Tadashi

    The influence of voltage sag to electric equipment has become big issues because of wider utilization of voltage sensitive devices. In order to reduce the influence of voltage sag appearing at each customer side, it is necessary to recognize the level of receiving voltage drop due to lightning faults for transmission line. However it is hard to measure directly those sag level at every load node. In this report, a new method of efficiently estimating system voltage sag profile is proposed based on symmetrical coordinate. In the proposed method, limited recorded sag data is used as the estimation condition which is recorded at each substation in power systems. From the point of view that the number of the recorded node is generally far less than those of the transmission route, a fast solution method is developed to calculate only recorder faulted voltage by applying reciprocity theorem for Y matrix. Furthermore, effective screening process is incorporated, in which the limited candidate of faulted transmission line can be chosen. Demonstrative results are presented using the IEEJ East10 standard system and actual 1700 bus system. The results show that estimation accuracy is sufficiently acceptable under less computation labor.

  2. Benchmarking dairy herd health status using routinely recorded herd summary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Cole, J B; Clay, J S; Maltecca, C

    2016-02-01

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health through the use of producer-recorded data has been determined to be feasible. Low estimated heritabilities indicate that genetic progress will be slow. Variation observed in lowly heritable traits can largely be attributed to nongenetic factors, such as the environment. More rapid improvement of dairy cattle health may be attainable if herd health programs incorporate environmental and managerial aspects. More than 1,100 herd characteristics are regularly recorded on farm test-days. We combined these data with producer-recorded health event data, and parametric and nonparametric models were used to benchmark herd and cow health status. Health events were grouped into 3 categories for analyses: mastitis, reproductive, and metabolic. Both herd incidence and individual incidence were used as dependent variables. Models implemented included stepwise logistic regression, support vector machines, and random forests. At both the herd and individual levels, random forest models attained the highest accuracy for predicting health status in all health event categories when evaluated with 10-fold cross-validation. Accuracy (SD) ranged from 0.61 (0.04) to 0.63 (0.04) when using random forest models at the herd level. Accuracy of prediction (SD) at the individual cow level ranged from 0.87 (0.06) to 0.93 (0.001) with random forest models. Highly significant variables and key words from logistic regression and random forest models were also investigated. All models identified several of the same key factors for each health event category, including movement out of the herd, size of the herd, and weather-related variables. We concluded that benchmarking health status using routinely collected herd data is feasible. Nonparametric models were better suited to handle this complex data with numerous variables. These data mining techniques were able to perform prediction of health status and could add evidence to personal experience in herd

  3. Data Processing and Text Mining Technologies on Electronic Medical Records: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, medical institutes generally use EMR to record patient’s condition, including diagnostic information, procedures performed, and treatment results. EMR has been recognized as a valuable resource for large-scale analysis. However, EMR has the characteristics of diversity, incompleteness, redundancy, and privacy, which make it difficult to carry out data mining and analysis directly. Therefore, it is necessary to preprocess the source data in order to improve data quality and improve the data mining results. Different types of data require different processing technologies. Most structured data commonly needs classic preprocessing technologies, including data cleansing, data integration, data transformation, and data reduction. For semistructured or unstructured data, such as medical text, containing more health information, it requires more complex and challenging processing methods. The task of information extraction for medical texts mainly includes NER (named-entity recognition and RE (relation extraction. This paper focuses on the process of EMR processing and emphatically analyzes the key techniques. In addition, we make an in-depth study on the applications developed based on text mining together with the open challenges and research issues for future work.

  4. The Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW): a platform for analytics using electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Andrew R; Kurc, Tahsin; Cholleti, Sharath; Gao, Jingjing; Lin, Xia; Bornstein, William; Cantrell, Dedra; Levine, David; Hohmann, Sam; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-06-01

    To create an analytics platform for specifying and detecting clinical phenotypes and other derived variables in electronic health record (EHR) data for quality improvement investigations. We have developed an architecture for an Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW). It supports transforming data represented in different physical schemas into a common data model, specifying derived variables in terms of the common model to enable their reuse, computing derived variables while enforcing invariants and ensuring correctness and consistency of data transformations, long-term curation of derived data, and export of derived data into standard analysis tools. It includes software that implements these features and a computing environment that enables secure high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. We have implemented and deployed the architecture in production locally. The software is available as open source. We have used it as part of hospital operations in a project to reduce rates of hospital readmission within 30days. The project examined the association of over 100 derived variables representing disease and co-morbidity phenotypes with readmissions in 5years of data from our institution's clinical data warehouse and the UHC Clinical Database (CDB). The CDB contains administrative data from over 200 hospitals that are in academic medical centers or affiliated with such centers. A widely available platform for managing and detecting phenotypes in EHR data could accelerate the use of such data in quality improvement and comparative effectiveness studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW): a Platform for Analytics using Electronic Health Record Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Andrew R.; Kurc, Tahsin; Cholleti, Sharath; Gao, Jingjing; Lin, Xia; Bornstein, William; Cantrell, Dedra; Levine, David; Hohmann, Sam; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To create an analytics platform for specifying and detecting clinical phenotypes and other derived variables in electronic health record (EHR) data for quality improvement investigations. Materials and Methods We have developed an architecture for an Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW). It supports transforming data represented in different physical schemas into a common data model, specifying derived variables in terms of the common model to enable their reuse, computing derived variables while enforcing invariants and ensuring correctness and consistency of data transformations, long-term curation of derived data, and export of derived data into standard analysis tools. It includes software that implements these features and a computing environment that enables secure high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. Results We have implemented and deployed the architecture in production locally. The software is available as open source. We have used it as part of hospital operations in a project to reduce rates of hospital readmission within 30 days. The project examined the association of over 100 derived variables representing disease and co-morbidity phenotypes with readmissions in five years of data from our institution’s clinical data warehouse and the UHC Clinical Database (CDB). The CDB contains administrative data from over 200 hospitals that are in academic medical centers or affiliated with such centers. Discussion and Conclusion A widely available platform for managing and detecting phenotypes in EHR data could accelerate the use of such data in quality improvement and comparative effectiveness studies. PMID:23402960

  6. Designing ETL Tools to Feed a Data Warehouse Based on Electronic Healthcare Record Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Fabrizio; Luzi, Daniela; Ricci, Fabrizio L

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to design Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) tools in a clinical data warehouse architecture based on the Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR). This approach takes advantages on the use of this infrastructure as one of the main source of information to feed the data warehouse, taking also into account that clinical documents produced by heterogeneous legacy systems are structured using the HL7 CDA standard. This paper describes the main activities to be performed to map the information collected in the different types of document with the dimensional model primitives.

  7. An iPad and Android-based Application for Digitally Recording Geologic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinconico, L. L.; Sunderlin, D.; Liew, C.; Ho, A. S.; Bekele, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Field experience is a significant component in most geology courses, especially sed/strat and structural geology. Increasingly, the spatial presentation, analysis and interpretation of geologic data is done using digital methodologies (GIS, Google Earth, stereonet and spreadsheet programs). However, students and professionals continue to collect field data manually on paper maps and in the traditional "orange field notebooks". Upon returning from the field, data are then manually transferred into digital formats for processing, mapping and interpretation. The transfer process is both cumbersome and prone to transcription error. In conjunction with the computer science department, we are in the process of developing an application (App) for iOS (the iPad) and Android platforms that can be used to digitally record data measured in the field. This is not a mapping program, but rather a way of bypassing the field book step to acquire digital data directly that can then be used in various analysis and display programs. Currently, the application allows the user to select from five different structural data situations: contact, bedding, fault, joints and "other". The user can define a folder for the collection and separation of data for each project. Observations are stored as individual records of field measurements in each folder. The exact information gathered depends on the nature of the observation, but common to all pages is the ability to log date, time, and lat/long directly from the tablet. Information like strike and dip are entered using scroll wheels and formation names are also entered using scroll wheels that access easy-to-modify lists of the area's stratigraphic units. This insures uniformity in the creation of the digital records from day-to-day and across field teams. Pictures can also be taken using the tablet's camera that are linked to each record. Once the field collection is complete the data (including images) can be easily exported to a .csv file

  8. Connectivity inference from neural recording data: Challenges, mathematical bases and research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrans de Abril, Ildefons; Yoshimoto, Junichiro; Doya, Kenji

    2018-06-01

    This article presents a review of computational methods for connectivity inference from neural activity data derived from multi-electrode recordings or fluorescence imaging. We first identify biophysical and technical challenges in connectivity inference along the data processing pipeline. We then review connectivity inference methods based on two major mathematical foundations, namely, descriptive model-free approaches and generative model-based approaches. We investigate representative studies in both categories and clarify which challenges have been addressed by which method. We further identify critical open issues and possible research directions. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of the heat/Na flux using lidar data recorded at ALO, Cerro Pachon, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, F.; Gardner, C. S.; Liu, A. Z.; Swenson, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this poster, lidar nigh-time data are used to estimate the vertical fluxes of heat and Na at the mesopause region due to dissipating gravity waves presenting periods from 5 min to 8 h, and vertical wavelengths > 2 km. About 60 hours of good quality data were recorded near the equinox during two observation campaigns held in Mar, 2012 and Apr, 2013 at the Andes Lidar Observatory (30.3S,70.7W). These first measurements of the heat/Na flux in the southern hemisphere will be discussed and compared with those from the northern hemisphere stations obtained at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, and Maui, HW.

  10. Vision and Voyages: Lessons Learned from the Planetary Decadal Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyres, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    The most recent planetary decadal survey, entitled Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022, provided a detailed set of priorities for solar system exploration. Those priorities drew on broad input from the U.S. and international planetary science community. Using white papers, town hall meetings, and open meetings of the decadal committees, community views were solicited and a consensus began to emerge. The final report summarized that consensus. Like many past decadal reports, the centerpiece of Vision and Voyages was a set of priorities for future space flight projects. Two things distinguished this report from some previous decadals. First, conservative and independent cost estimates were obtained for all of the projects that were considered. These independent cost estimates, rather than estimates generated by project advocates, were used to judge each project's expected science return per dollar. Second, rather than simply accepting NASA's ten-year projection of expected funding for planetary exploration, decision rules were provided to guide program adjustments if actual funding did not follow projections. To date, NASA has closely followed decadal recommendations. In particular, the two highest priority "flagship" missions, a Mars rover to collect samples for return to Earth and a mission to investigate a possible ocean on Europa, are both underway. The talk will describe the planetary decadal process in detail, and provide a more comprehensive assessment of NASA's response to it.

  11. Tramp ship routing and scheduling with voyage separation requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Charlotte; Lusby, Richard Martin; Larsen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we explore tramp ship routing and scheduling. Tramp ships operate much like taxies following the available demand. Tramp operators can determine some of their demand in advance by entering into long-term contracts and then try to maximise profits from optional voyages found in the s......In this paper we explore tramp ship routing and scheduling. Tramp ships operate much like taxies following the available demand. Tramp operators can determine some of their demand in advance by entering into long-term contracts and then try to maximise profits from optional voyages found...... that our algorithm in general finds optimal solutions very quickly and performs much faster compared to an earlier a priori path generation method. Finally, we compare our method to an earlier adaptive large neighbourhood search heuristic and find that on similar-sized instances our approach generally uses...... less time to find the optimal solution than the adaptive large neighbourhood search method uses to find a heuristic solution....

  12. Calibrated, Enhanced-Resolution Brightness Temperature Earth System Data Record: A New Era for Gridded Passive Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, M.; Brodzik, M. J.; Long, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Since 1978, the satellite passive microwave data record has been a mainstay of remote sensing of the cryosphere, providing twice-daily, near-global spatial coverage for monitoring changes in hydrologic and cryospheric parameters that include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. Up until recently, the available global gridded passive microwave data sets have not been produced consistently. Various projections (equal-area, polar stereographic), a number of different gridding techniques were used, along with various temporal sampling as well as a mix of Level 2 source data versions. In addition, not all data from all sensors have been processed completely and they have not been processed in any one consistent way. Furthermore, the original gridding techniques were relatively primitive and were produced on 25 km grids using the original EASE-Grid definition that is not easily accommodated in modern software packages. As part of NASA MEaSUREs, we have re-processed all data from SMMR, all SSM/I-SSMIS and AMSR-E instruments, using the most mature Level 2 data. The Calibrated, Enhanced-Resolution Brightness Temperature (CETB) Earth System Data Record (ESDR) gridded data are now available from the NSIDC DAAC. The data are distributed as netCDF files that comply with CF-1.6 and ACDD-1.3 conventions. The data have been produced on EASE 2.0 projections at smoothed, 25 kilometer resolution and spatially-enhanced resolutions, up to 3.125 km depending on channel frequency, using the radiometer version of the Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (rSIR) method. We expect this newly produced data set to enable scientists to better analyze trends in coastal regions, marginal ice zones and in mountainous terrain that were not possible with the previous gridded passive microwave data. The use of the EASE-Grid 2.0 definition and netCDF-CF formatting allows users to extract compliant geotiff images and

  13. Using Grounded Theory to Analyze Qualitative Observational Data that is Obtained by Video Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Griffiths

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the collection and analysis of qualitative data that is derived by observation and that may be used to generate a grounded theory. Video recordings were made of the verbal and non-verbal interactions of people with severe and complex disabilities and the staff who work with them. Three dyads composed of a student/teacher or carer and a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability were observed in a variety of different activities that took place in a school. Two of these recordings yielded 25 minutes of video, which was transcribed into narrative format. The nature of the qualitative micro data that was captured is described and the fit between such data and classic grounded theory is discussed. The strengths and weaknesses of the use of video as a tool to collect data that is amenable to analysis using grounded theory are considered. The paper concludes by suggesting that using classic grounded theory to analyze qualitative data that is collected using video offers a method that has the potential to uncover and explain patterns of non-verbal interactions that were not previously evident.

  14. Identifying patients with hypertension: a case for auditing electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Adam; Hendryx, Michael; Pollard, Cecil

    2012-01-01

    Problems in the structure, consistency, and completeness of electronic health record data are barriers to outcomes research, quality improvement, and practice redesign. This nonexperimental retrospective study examines the utility of importing de-identified electronic health record data into an external system to identify patients with and at risk for essential hypertension. We find a statistically significant increase in cases based on combined use of diagnostic and free-text coding (mean = 1,256.1, 95% CI 1,232.3-1,279.7) compared to diagnostic coding alone (mean = 1,174.5, 95% CI 1,150.5-1,198.3). While it is not surprising that significantly more patients are identified when broadening search criteria, the implications are critical for quality of care, the movement toward the National Committee for Quality Assurance's Patient-Centered Medical Home program, and meaningful use of electronic health records. Further, we find a statistically significant increase in potential cases based on the last two or more blood pressure readings greater than or equal to 140/90 mm Hg (mean = 1,353.9, 95% CI 1,329.9-1,377.9).

  15. Web application for recording learners’ mouse trajectories and retrieving their study logs for data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Miyazaki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available With the accelerated implementation of e-learning systems in educational institutions, it has become possible to record learners’ study logs in recent years. It must be admitted that little research has been conducted upon the analysis of the study logs that are obtained. In addition, there is no software that traces the mouse movements of learners during their learning processes, which the authors believe would enable teachers to better understand their students’ behaviors. The objective of this study is to develop a Web application that records students’ study logs, including their mouse trajectories, and to devise an IR tool that can summarize such diversified data. The results of an experiment are also scrutinized to provide an analysis of the relationship between learners’ activities and their study logs.

  16. Seismic fragility analyses of nuclear power plant structures based on the recorded earthquake data in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Gook; Joe, Yang Hee

    2005-01-01

    By nature, the seismic fragility analysis results will be considerably affected by the statistical data of design information and site-dependent ground motions. The engineering characteristics of small magnitude earthquake spectra recorded in the Korean peninsula during the last several years are analyzed in this paper. An improved method of seismic fragility analysis is evaluated by comparative analyses to verify its efficiency for practical application to nuclear power plant structures. The effects of the recorded earthquake on the seismic fragilities of Korean nuclear power plant structures are also evaluated from the comparative studies. Observing the obtained results, the proposed method is more efficient for the multi-modes structures. The case study results show that seismic fragility analysis based on the Newmark's spectra in Korea might over-estimate the seismic capacities of Korean facilities

  17. Seismic fragility analyses of nuclear power plant structures based on the recorded earthquake data in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Gook [Department of Civil and Environmental System Engineering, University of Incheon, 177 Dohwa-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: sgcho@incheon.ac.kr; Joe, Yang Hee [Department of Civil and Environmental System Engineering, University of Incheon, 177 Dohwa-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-08-01

    By nature, the seismic fragility analysis results will be considerably affected by the statistical data of design information and site-dependent ground motions. The engineering characteristics of small magnitude earthquake spectra recorded in the Korean peninsula during the last several years are analyzed in this paper. An improved method of seismic fragility analysis is evaluated by comparative analyses to verify its efficiency for practical application to nuclear power plant structures. The effects of the recorded earthquake on the seismic fragilities of Korean nuclear power plant structures are also evaluated from the comparative studies. Observing the obtained results, the proposed method is more efficient for the multi-modes structures. The case study results show that seismic fragility analysis based on the Newmark's spectra in Korea might over-estimate the seismic capacities of Korean facilities.

  18. Evaluación de actitudes hacia la incorporación de la Calculadora Voyage 200 en las aplicaciones de las ecuaciones diferenciales de primer orden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lucy Rincón-Leal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation had as purpose to evaluate the attitudes of the students of Engineering of both sexes of the subject Differential Equations of the University Francisco of Paula Santander, toward the incorporation of the Calculating Voyage 200. It was analyzed the actitudes of the students using this new technology in the class of Mathematics as an instrument facilitator toward the understanding and the learning of the applications of the Differential Equations of First Order where they could have a better graphic perspective of these creating the interaction of the students with the calculating Voyage 200 and analyzing the paper that this it can adopt in the process of Teaching-learning. The picked up data were analyzed using descriptive statistic. The discoveries of the study were: When introducing the Calculating Voyage 200 in the learning he/she ends producing a new attitude toward the mathematics, contributing to design new strategies to solve the applications of the Differential Equations of First Order. The calculating Voyage 200 are an instrument of mediation of the mathematics, where it supports the transmission of knowledge on the part of the professor and for other the acquisition of knowledge and the stimulation of the creativity of the students, helping this way to the interaction professor-student. The introduction of the new technologies in the teaching of the mathematics, he/she can help to a change in the curriculum, where it develops a transformation on the part of the teacher in the teaching and evaluation.

  19. Extracting Visual Evoked Potentials from EEG Data Recorded During fMRI-guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes. PMID:24893706

  20. Extracting visual evoked potentials from EEG data recorded during fMRI-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Boaz; Yovel, Galit

    2014-05-12

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an effective method for establishing a causal link between a cortical area and cognitive/neurophysiological effects. Specifically, by creating a transient interference with the normal activity of a target region and measuring changes in an electrophysiological signal, we can establish a causal link between the stimulated brain area or network and the electrophysiological signal that we record. If target brain areas are functionally defined with prior fMRI scan, TMS could be used to link the fMRI activations with evoked potentials recorded. However, conducting such experiments presents significant technical challenges given the high amplitude artifacts introduced into the EEG signal by the magnetic pulse, and the difficulty to successfully target areas that were functionally defined by fMRI. Here we describe a methodology for combining these three common tools: TMS, EEG, and fMRI. We explain how to guide the stimulator's coil to the desired target area using anatomical or functional MRI data, how to record EEG during concurrent TMS, how to design an ERP study suitable for EEG-TMS combination and how to extract reliable ERP from the recorded data. We will provide representative results from a previously published study, in which fMRI-guided TMS was used concurrently with EEG to show that the face-selective N1 and the body-selective N1 component of the ERP are associated with distinct neural networks in extrastriate cortex. This method allows us to combine the high spatial resolution of fMRI with the high temporal resolution of TMS and EEG and therefore obtain a comprehensive understanding of the neural basis of various cognitive processes.

  1. Rapid Development of Specialty Population Registries and Quality Measures from Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Vaishnavi; Fish, Jason S; Mutz, Jacqueline M; Carrington, Angela R; Lai, Ki; Davis, Lisa S; Youngblood, Josh E; Rauschuber, Mark R; Flores, Kathryn A; Sara, Evan J; Bhat, Deepa G; Willett, DuWayne L

    2017-01-01

    Creation of a new electronic health record (EHR)-based registry often can be a "one-off" complex endeavor: first developing new EHR data collection and clinical decision support tools, followed by developing registry-specific data extractions from the EHR for analysis. Each development phase typically has its own long development and testing time, leading to a prolonged overall cycle time for delivering one functioning registry with companion reporting into production. The next registry request then starts from scratch. Such an approach will not scale to meet the emerging demand for specialty registries to support population health and value-based care. To determine if the creation of EHR-based specialty registries could be markedly accelerated by employing (a) a finite core set of EHR data collection principles and methods, (b) concurrent engineering of data extraction and data warehouse design using a common dimensional data model for all registries, and (c) agile development methods commonly employed in new product development. We adopted as guiding principles to (a) capture data as a byproduct of care of the patient, (b) reinforce optimal EHR use by clinicians, (c) employ a finite but robust set of EHR data capture tool types, and (d) leverage our existing technology toolkit. Registries were defined by a shared condition (recorded on the Problem List) or a shared exposure to a procedure (recorded on the Surgical History) or to a medication (recorded on the Medication List). Any EHR fields needed - either to determine registry membership or to calculate a registry-associated clinical quality measure (CQM) - were included in the enterprise data warehouse (EDW) shared dimensional data model. Extract-transform-load (ETL) code was written to pull data at defined "grains" from the EHR into the EDW model. All calculated CQM values were stored in a single Fact table in the EDW crossing all registries. Registry-specific dashboards were created in the EHR to display both

  2. Data requirements and maintenance of records for spent fuel management: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Data collection and maintenance are an essential part of activities required in the lifetime management of spent fuel. Key data on spent fuel are required from the earliest phase of any project. To allow informed decisions for spent fuel management to be made, the data need to be maintained throughout the lifetime of spent fuel management including storage, transport, reprocessing or disposal. This publication is intended to provide a state-of-the-art review of spent fuel data management, including what data need to be gathered for the relevant activities in spent fuel management and how to maintain them by the responsible bodies at various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides some insights on a rational approach to spent fuel data management, considering the common requirements involved in spent fuel management for any Member State. In this regard, the information provided in these sections is mostly generic. After the introductory Section 1 and the Section 2 on data requirements for spent fuel management, Section 3 examines technical parameters that could specify spent fuel characteristics and associated conditions, followed by Section 4 on life cycle management of spent fuel data which includes the maintenance of records and other issues. Finally, some specific examples of the approaches already developed by a number of utilities and national organisations to characterise and track their spent-fuel data are presented in the Annex

  3. Overview of laboratory data tools available in a single electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Kudler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laboratory data account for the bulk of data stored in any given electronic medical record (EMR. To best serve the user, electronic laboratory data needs to be flexible and customizable. Our aim was to determine the various ways in which laboratory data get utilized by clinicians in our health system′s EMR. Method: All electronic menus, tabs, flowsheets, notes and subsections within the EMR (Millennium v2007.13, Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, MO, US were explored to determine how clinicians utilize discrete laboratory data. Results: Laboratory data in the EMR were utilized by clinicians in five distinct ways: within flowsheets, their personal inbox (EMR messaging, with decision support tools, in the health maintenance tool, and when incorporating laboratory data into their clinical notes and letters. Conclusions : Flexible electronic laboratory data in the EMR hava many advantages. Users can view, sort, pool, and appropriately route laboratory information to better support trend analyses, clinical decision making, and clinical charting. Laboratory data in the EMR can also be utilized to develop clinical decision support tools. Pathologists need to participate in the creation of these EMR tools in order to better support the appropriate utilization of laboratory information in the EMR.

  4. Online Remote Recording and Monitoring of Sensor Data Using DTMF Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Sekhar TRIPATHY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Different wireless application platforms are available for remote monitoring and control of systems. In the present paper a system has been described for online remote recording and monitoring of sensor data using DTMF (Dual Tone Multi Frequency technology where acoustic communication has been implemented. One DTMF transceiver in the sensing system has been used to generate and decode the DTMF tone corresponding to the sensor output which in turn is received from the mobile phone in the user side. A separate DTMF decoder has been used in the user side to decode the received DTMF tone corresponding to the sensor output from the sensor side. Microcontroller has been used to store the decoded data from the sensor and to control the whole operation sequentially. Thus online remote recording and monitoring of the sensor data have been possible at any where in the coverage area of the mobile network. Experimental result shows good linearity between data output taken directly from the sensor side and that remotely from user side.

  5. A EUROPEAN FRAMEWORK FOR RECORDING AND SHARING DISASTER DAMAGE AND LOSS DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Corbane

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The recently adopted ‘Sendai Framework for Action on Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030’ sets the goals to reduce loss of life, livelihood and critical infrastructure through enhanced national planning and international cooperation. The new Framework is expected to enhance global, regional and national efforts for building resilience to disasters, across the entire disaster management cycle (prevention, preparedness, response and early recovery. Improved monitoring and accountability frameworks, relying on harmonized disaster loss data will be required for meeting the targets and for capturing the levels of progress across different scales of governance. To overcome the problems of heterogeneous disaster data and terminologies, guidelines for reporting disaster damage and losses in a structured manner will be necessary to help national and regional bodies compile this information. In the European Union, the Member States and the European Commission worked together on the establishment of guidelines for recording and sharing disaster damage and loss data as a first step towards the development of operational indicators to translate the Sendai Framework into action. This paper describes the progress to date in setting a common framework for recording disaster damage and loss data in the European Union and identifies the challenges ahead.

  6. The MSG-SEVIRI-based cloud property data record CLAAS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Benas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play a central role in the Earth's atmosphere, and satellite observations are crucial for monitoring clouds and understanding their impact on the energy budget and water cycle. Within the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF, a new cloud property data record was derived from geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI measurements for the time frame 2004–2015. The resulting CLAAS-2 (CLoud property dAtAset using SEVIRI, Edition 2 data record is publicly available via the CM SAF website (https://doi.org/10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLAAS/V002. In this paper we present an extensive evaluation of the CLAAS-2 cloud products, which include cloud fractional coverage, thermodynamic phase, cloud top properties, liquid/ice cloud water path and corresponding optical thickness and particle effective radius. Data validation and comparisons were performed on both level 2 (native SEVIRI grid and repeat cycle and level 3 (daily and monthly averages and histograms with reference datasets derived from lidar, microwave and passive imager measurements. The evaluation results show very good overall agreement with matching spatial distributions and temporal variability and small biases attributed mainly to differences in sensor characteristics, retrieval approaches, spatial and temporal samplings and viewing geometries. No major discrepancies were found. Underpinned by the good evaluation results, CLAAS-2 demonstrates that it is fit for the envisaged applications, such as process studies of the diurnal cycle of clouds and the evaluation of regional climate models. The data record is planned to be extended and updated in the future.

  7. Big data from electronic health records for early and late translational cardiovascular research: challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Harry; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Danesh, John; Dobson, Richard; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Maggioni, Aldo; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M; Cronin, Maureen; Brobert, Gunnar; Vardas, Panos; Anker, Stefan D; Grobbee, Diederick E; Denaxas, Spiros

    2018-04-21

    Cohorts of millions of people's health records, whole genome sequencing, imaging, sensor, societal and publicly available data present a rapidly expanding digital trace of health. We aimed to critically review, for the first time, the challenges and potential of big data across early and late stages of translational cardiovascular disease research. We sought exemplars based on literature reviews and expertise across the BigData@Heart Consortium. We identified formidable challenges including: data quality, knowing what data exist, the legal and ethical framework for their use, data sharing, building and maintaining public trust, developing standards for defining disease, developing tools for scalable, replicable science and equipping the clinical and scientific work force with new inter-disciplinary skills. Opportunities claimed for big health record data include: richer profiles of health and disease from birth to death and from the molecular to the societal scale; accelerated understanding of disease causation and progression, discovery of new mechanisms and treatment-relevant disease sub-phenotypes, understanding health and diseases in whole populations and whole health systems and returning actionable feedback loops to improve (and potentially disrupt) existing models of research and care, with greater efficiency. In early translational research we identified exemplars including: discovery of fundamental biological processes e.g. linking exome sequences to lifelong electronic health records (EHR) (e.g. human knockout experiments); drug development: genomic approaches to drug target validation; precision medicine: e.g. DNA integrated into hospital EHR for pre-emptive pharmacogenomics. In late translational research we identified exemplars including: learning health systems with outcome trials integrated into clinical care; citizen driven health with 24/7 multi-parameter patient monitoring to improve outcomes and population-based linkages of multiple EHR sources

  8. The present state of the medical record data base for the A-bomb survivors in Nagasaki University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroyuki; Mine, Mariko; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Okumura, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    It has been 13 years since the operation of medical record data base for A-bomb survivors was started in the Scientific Data Center for Atomic Bomb Disaster at the Nagasaki University. This paper presents the basic data in handling the data base. The present data base consists of the following 6 items: (1) 'fundamental data' for approximately 120,000 A-bomb survivors having an A-bomb survivors' handbook who have been living in Nagasaki City; (2) 'Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital's data', covering admission medical records in the ward of internal medicine; (3) 'pathological data', covering autopsy records in Nagasaki City; (4) 'household data reconstructed by the survey data'; (5) 'second generation A-bomb survivors data', including the results of mass screening since 1979, and (6) 'address data'. Based on the data, the number of A-bomb survivors, diagnosis records at the time of death, the number of A-bomb survivors' participants in health examination, tumor registration, records of admission to the internal ward in Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Hospital, autopsy records, and household records are tabulated in relation to annual changes, age at the time of A-bombing, distance from the hypocenter, or sex. (N.K.)

  9. The atmosphere of Uranus - Results of radio occultation measurements with Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindal, G. F.; Lyons, J. R.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Eshleman, V. R.; Hinson, D. P.

    1987-01-01

    The Uranian atmosphere is investigated on the basis of S-band and X-band occultation observations (including measurements of Doppler frequency perturbations) obtained during the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus in January 1986. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. The atmosphere is assumed to have an H2/He abundance ratio of about 85/15, but also to contain small amounts of CH4 at above-cloud relative humidity 30 percent, cloud-base relative humidity 78 percent, and below-cloud mixing ratio 2.3 percent by number density. Other parameters estimated include magnetic-field rotation period 17.24 h, 1-bar equatorial radius 25,559 + or - 4 km, polar radius 24,973 + or - 20 km, equatorial acceleration of gravity 8.69 + or - 0.01 m/sec sq, and atmospheric temperature 76 + or - 2 K (assuming 85 + or - 3 percent H2).

  10. The atmosphere of Neptune - Results of radio occultation measurements with the Voyager 2 spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindal, G. F.; Lyons, J. R.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Eshleman, V. R.; Hinson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the vertical temperature and composition profiles of Neptune's troposphere and stratosphere, covering an altitude of 250 km, obtained from radio tracking data that were acquired during Voyager-2's occultation by Neptune, which began near 62 deg N planetographic latitude and ended near 45 deg S latitude. In the computations, the He/H2 abundance ratio 15/85 was adapted, which is consistent with solar abundance estimates and with recent results from Uranus. It was assumed that aerosols and heavier gases such as CH4, NH3, H2S, and H2O have a negligible effect on the microwave refractivity above the 0.5 bar pressure level.

  11. REAL AND SIMULATED WAVEFORM RECORDING LIDAR DATA IN BOREAL JUVENILE FOREST VEGETATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hovi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Airborne small-footprint LiDAR is replacing field measurements in regional-level forest inventories, but auxiliary field work is still required for the optimal management of young stands. Waveform (WF recording sensors can provide a more detailed description of the vegetation compared to discrete return (DR systems. Furthermore, knowing the shape of the signal facilitates comparisons between real data and those obtained with simulation tools. We performed a quantitative validation of a Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT -based LiDAR simulator against real data and used simulations and empirical data to study the WF recording LiDAR for the classification of boreal juvenile forest vegetation. Geometric-optical models of three common species were used as input for the MCRT model. Simulated radiometric and geometric WF features were in good agreement with the real data, and interspecies differences were preserved. We used the simulator to study the effects of sensor parameters on species classification performance. An increase in footprint size improved the classification accuracy up to a certain footprint size, while the emitted pulse width and the WF sampling rate had minor effects. Analyses on empirical data showed small improvement in performance compared to existing studies, when classifying seedling stand vegetation to four operational classes. The results on simulator validation serve as a basis for the future use of simulation models e.g. in LiDAR survey planning or in the simulation of synthetic training data, while the empirical findings clarify the potential of WF LiDAR data in the inventory chain for the operational forest management planning in Finland.

  12. Multi-Institutional Sharing of Electronic Health Record Data to Assess Childhood Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Charles Bailey

    Full Text Available To evaluate the validity of multi-institutional electronic health record (EHR data sharing for surveillance and study of childhood obesity.We conducted a non-concurrent cohort study of 528,340 children with outpatient visits to six pediatric academic medical centers during 2007-08, with sufficient data in the EHR for body mass index (BMI assessment. EHR data were compared with data from the 2007-08 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES.Among children 2-17 years, BMI was evaluable for 1,398,655 visits (56%. The EHR dataset contained over 6,000 BMI measurements per month of age up to 16 years, yielding precise estimates of BMI. In the EHR dataset, 18% of children were obese versus 18% in NHANES, while 35% were obese or overweight versus 34% in NHANES. BMI for an individual was highly reliable over time (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.90 for obese children and 0.97 for all children. Only 14% of visits with measured obesity (BMI ≥95% had a diagnosis of obesity recorded, and only 20% of children with measured obesity had the diagnosis documented during the study period. Obese children had higher primary care (4.8 versus 4.0 visits, p<0.001 and specialty care (3.7 versus 2.7 visits, p<0.001 utilization than non-obese counterparts, and higher prevalence of diverse co-morbidities. The cohort size in the EHR dataset permitted detection of associations with rare diagnoses. Data sharing did not require investment of extensive institutional resources, yet yielded high data quality.Multi-institutional EHR data sharing is a promising, feasible, and valid approach for population health surveillance. It provides a valuable complement to more resource-intensive national surveys, particularly for iterative surveillance and quality improvement. Low rates of obesity diagnosis present a significant obstacle to surveillance and quality improvement for care of children with obesity.

  13. Facilitating biomedical researchers' interrogation of electronic health record data: Ideas from outside of biomedical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Gregory W; Matsoukas, Konstantina; Cimino, James J; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a vital data resource for research uses, including cohort identification, phenotyping, pharmacovigilance, and public health surveillance. To realize the promise of EHR data for accelerating clinical research, it is imperative to enable efficient and autonomous EHR data interrogation by end users such as biomedical researchers. This paper surveys state-of-art approaches and key methodological considerations to this purpose. We adapted a previously published conceptual framework for interactive information retrieval, which defines three entities: user, channel, and source, by elaborating on channels for query formulation in the context of facilitating end users to interrogate EHR data. We show the current progress in biomedical informatics mainly lies in support for query execution and information modeling, primarily due to emphases on infrastructure development for data integration and data access via self-service query tools, but has neglected user support needed during iteratively query formulation processes, which can be costly and error-prone. In contrast, the information science literature has offered elaborate theories and methods for user modeling and query formulation support. The two bodies of literature are complementary, implying opportunities for cross-disciplinary idea exchange. On this basis, we outline the directions for future informatics research to improve our understanding of user needs and requirements for facilitating autonomous interrogation of EHR data by biomedical researchers. We suggest that cross-disciplinary translational research between biomedical informatics and information science can benefit our research in facilitating efficient data access in life sciences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and use of climatological data banks, with emphasis on the preparation and homogenization of surface monthly records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palutikof, J P; Goodess, C M

    1986-01-01

    The procedures involved in constructing data banks for use in climatological research are described. Such data banks will normally have two component parts: the meteorological records themselves, and the accompanying documentary and information systems. As a first step, meteorological records appropriate for the intended application of the data bank must be collected and stored, commonly in a computer. Individual records must then be merged into a form convenient for the user. Procedures for quality control of the data are discussed. The authors emphasize the need to ensure that records are homogeneous, i.e., that they do not contain spurious jumps or trends caused by non-climatic factor such as site change or urbanization. Some techniques to correct inhomogeneities in meteorological records are described. The documentation accompanying the meteorological records has three components: first, information on the individual records, second, a list of data sources, third, station histories. The station histories will be added to as work progresses on the data bank, to describe any attempts to homogenize records, and ultimately to give the compiler's assessment of the reliability of each record. User needs must be considered at all stages of data bank design and construction.

  15. Capturing structured, pulmonary disease-specific data elements in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronkiewicz, Cynthia; Diamond, Edward J; French, Kim D; Christodouleas, John; Gabriel, Peter E

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to improve health-care quality by allowing providers to make better decisions at the point of care based on electronically aggregated data and by facilitating clinical research. These goals are easier to achieve when key, disease-specific clinical information is documented as structured data elements (SDEs) that computers can understand and process, rather than as free-text/natural-language narrative. This article reviews the benefits of capturing disease-specific SDEs. It highlights several design and implementation considerations, including the impact on efficiency and expressivity of clinical documentation and the importance of adhering to data standards when available. Pulmonary disease-specific examples of collection instruments are provided from two commonly used commercial EHRs. Future developments that can leverage SDEs to improve clinical quality and research are discussed.

  16. Data Acquisition and Digital Filtering for Infrasonic Records on Active Volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Chilo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a digital data acquisition system for volcanic infrasound records. The system includes four electret condenser element microphones, a QF4A512 programmable signal converter from Quickfilter Technologies and a MSP430 microcontroller from Texas Instruments. The signal output of every microphone is converted to digital via a 16-bit Analog to Digital Converter (ADC. To prevent errors in the conversion process, Anti-Aliasing Filters are employed prior to the ADC. Digital filtering is performed after the ADC using a Digital Signal Processor, which is implemented on the QF4A512. The four digital signals are summed to get only one signal. Data storing and digital wireless data transmission will be described in a future paper.

  17. From ecological records to big data: the invention of global biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devictor, Vincent; Bensaude-Vincent, Bernadette

    2016-12-01

    This paper is a critical assessment of the epistemological impact of the systematic quantification of nature with the accumulation of big datasets on the practice and orientation of ecological science. We examine the contents of big databases and argue that it is not just accumulated information; records are translated into digital data in a process that changes their meanings. In order to better understand what is at stake in the 'datafication' process, we explore the context for the emergence and quantification of biodiversity in the 1980s, along with the concept of the global environment. In tracing the origin and development of the global biodiversity information facility (GBIF) we describe big data biodiversity projects as a techno-political construction dedicated to monitoring a new object: the global diversity. We argue that, biodiversity big data became a powerful driver behind the invention of the concept of the global environment, and a way to embed ecological science in the political agenda.

  18. Thermal protection from a finite period of heat exposure – Heat survival of flight data recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Ruhul Amin; Li, Ri

    2015-01-01

    This work relates to developing thermal protection for a finite period of exposure to a high temperature environment. This type of transient heat transfer problem starts with a heating period, which is then followed by a cooling period once the high temperature environment disappears. The study is particularly relevant to the thermal protection of flight data recorders from high temperature flame. In this work, transient heat conduction through a three-concentric-layer configuration is numerically studied, which includes a metal housing, a thermal insulation, and a phase change material. The thermal performance is evaluated using the center temperature changing with time. It is found that the center temperature reaches a peak during cooling period rather than heating period. Time taken to reach the peak and the peak value depend on the sizes and properties of the layers. The properties include latent heat of fusion, melting temperature, heat capacities, and thermal conductivities. Parametric study is conducted to analyze and distinguish the influence of these parameters. The study provides general guidance for determining sizes and selecting materials for the thermal design of flight data recorders. Additionally, the study is also useful for other similar applications, for which thermal management and protection over a period of time is needed. In this paper, analysis starts with a baseline configuration composed of specific materials and sizes. Finite changes are applied to sizes, properties of the materials, and the results are compared to understand the roles of the varied parameters in affecting the thermal protection performance. - Highlights: • We study the thermal design of flight data recorders for heat survival. • Consecutive heating and cooling of 3-layer configuration is investigated. • Influences of sizes and material properties on thermal protection are explored

  19. Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  20. Acquiring, recording, and analyzing pathology data from experimental mice: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudamore, Cheryl L

    2014-03-21

    Pathology is often underutilized as an end point in mouse studies in academic research because of a lack of experience and expertise. The use of traditional pathology techniques including necropsy and microscopic analysis can be useful in identifying the basic processes underlying a phenotype and facilitating comparison with equivalent human diseases. This overview aims to provide a guide and reference to the acquisition, recording, and analysis of high-quality pathology data from experimental mice in an academic research setting. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. Under-ascertainment of Aboriginality in records of cardiovascular disease in hospital morbidity and mortality data in Western Australia: a record linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judy M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring the real burden of cardiovascular disease in Australian Aboriginals is complicated by under-identification of Aboriginality in administrative health data collections. Accurate data is essential to measure Australia's progress in its efforts to intervene to improve health outcomes of Australian Aboriginals. We estimated the under-ascertainment of Aboriginal status in linked morbidity and mortality databases in patients hospitalised with cardiovascular disease. Methods Persons with public hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease in Western Australia during 2000-2005 (and their 20-year admission history or who subsequently died were identified from linkage data. The Aboriginal status flag in all records for a given individual was variously used to determine their ethnicity (index positive, and in all records both majority positive or ever positive and stratified by region, age and gender. The index admission was the baseline comparator. Results Index cases comprised 62,692 individuals who shared a total of 778,714 hospital admissions over 20 years, of which 19,809 subsequently died. There were 3,060 (4.9% persons identified as Aboriginal on index admission. An additional 83 (2.7% Aboriginal cases were identified through death records, increasing to 3.7% when cases with a positive Aboriginal identifier in the majority (≥50% of previous hospital admissions over twenty years were added and by 20.8% when those with a positive flag in any record over 20 years were incorporated. These results equated to underestimating Aboriginal status in unlinked index admission by 2.6%, 3.5% and 17.2%, respectively. Deaths classified as Aboriginal in official records would underestimate total Aboriginal deaths by 26.8% (95% Confidence Interval 24.1 to 29.6%. Conclusions Combining Aboriginal determinations in morbidity and official death records increases ascertainment of unlinked cardiovascular morbidity in Western Australian

  2. Leveraging electronic health records to support chronic disease management: the need for temporal data views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Lipika; Wright, Adam; Wong, Bang T; Linder, Jeffrey A; Bates, David W

    2011-01-01

    The ageing population worldwide is increasingly acquiring multiple chronic diseases. The complex management of chronic diseases could be improved with electronic health records (EHRs) tailored to chronic disease care, but most EHRs in use today do not adequately support longitudinal data management. A key aspect of chronic disease management is that it takes place over long periods, but the way that most EHRs display longitudinal data makes it difficult to trend changes over time and slows providers as they review each patient's unique course. We present five clinical scenarios illustrating longitudinal data needs in complex chronic disease management. These scenarios may function as example cases for software development. For each scenario, we describe and illustrate improvements in temporal data views. Two potential solutions are visualisation for numerical data and disease-oriented text summaries for non-numerical data. We believe that development and widespread implementation of improved temporal data views in EHRs will improve the efficiency and quality of chronic disease management in primary care.

  3. Privacy-preserving data cube for electronic medical records: An experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohyung; Lee, Hyukki; Chung, Yon Dohn

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of privacy-preserving data cubes of electronic medical records (EMRs). An EMR data cube is a complex of EMR statistics that are summarized or aggregated by all possible combinations of attributes. Data cubes are widely utilized for efficient big data analysis and also have great potential for EMR analysis. For safe data analysis without privacy breaches, we must consider the privacy preservation characteristics of the EMR data cube. In this paper, we introduce a design for a privacy-preserving EMR data cube and the anonymization methods needed to achieve data privacy. We further focus on changes in efficiency and effectiveness that are caused by the anonymization process for privacy preservation. Thus, we experimentally evaluate various types of privacy-preserving EMR data cubes using several practical metrics and discuss the applicability of each anonymization method with consideration for the EMR analysis environment. We construct privacy-preserving EMR data cubes from anonymized EMR datasets. A real EMR dataset and demographic dataset are used for the evaluation. There are a large number of anonymization methods to preserve EMR privacy, and the methods are classified into three categories (i.e., global generalization, local generalization, and bucketization) by anonymization rules. According to this classification, three types of privacy-preserving EMR data cubes were constructed for the evaluation. We perform a comparative analysis by measuring the data size, cell overlap, and information loss of the EMR data cubes. Global generalization considerably reduced the size of the EMR data cube and did not cause the data cube cells to overlap, but incurred a large amount of information loss. Local generalization maintained the data size and generated only moderate information loss, but there were cell overlaps that could decrease the search performance. Bucketization did not cause cells to overlap

  4. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Nighttime Cloud Optical Microphysical Properties (NCOMP) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of nighttime cloud optical and microphysical properties (NCOMP) from the Visible Infrared...

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-A Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) for Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) brightness temperature in "window channels". The data cover a time period from...

  6. The Dialogical Traveler: A Reading of Semprun's Le grand voyage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally M. Silk

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available In light of discourse theory influenced by Bakhtin's concept of dialogism, the notion of voice has changed significantly so that we are invited to read discourse in a way that represents a departure from Bakhtin. The theories of François Flahault, Michel Pêchetut, and John Frow, who inquire into the importance of conditions of production of language, are used to explore the vain search for a subject-centered voice in Jorge Semprun's Le Grand voyage . The narrating subject Gerard experiences "homelessness" in discourse because he fails to find a voice of his own. His relationship to music and literature depends on an other; in invasion of self by the other occurs so that Gerard speaks only through alien voices that confront him throughout the narrative. In discourse a decentering occurs that is not present at the thematic level: the protagonist arrives at a destination, but discourse does not.

  7. Feasibility of extracting data from electronic medical records for research: an international comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Mastellos, Nikolaos; Majeed, Azeem; O'Donoghue, John; Car, Josip

    2016-07-13

    Electronic medical records (EMR) offer a major potential for secondary use of data for research which can improve the safety, quality and efficiency of healthcare. They also enable the measurement of disease burden at the population level. However, the extent to which this is feasible in different countries is not well known. This study aimed to: 1) assess information governance procedures for extracting data from EMR in 16 countries; and 2) explore the extent of EMR adoption and the quality and consistency of EMR data in 7 countries, using management of diabetes type 2 patients as an exemplar. We included 16 countries from Australia, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe to the Americas. We undertook a multi-method approach including both an online literature review and structured interviews with 59 stakeholders, including 25 physicians, 23 academics, 7 EMR providers, and 4 information commissioners. Data were analysed and synthesised thematically considering the most relevant issues. We found that procedures for information governance, levels of adoption and data quality varied across the countries studied. The required time and ease of obtaining approval also varies widely. While some countries seem ready for secondary uses of data from EMR, in other countries several barriers were found, including limited experience with using EMR data for research, lack of standard policies and procedures, bureaucracy, confidentiality, data security concerns, technical issues and costs. This is the first international comparative study to shed light on the feasibility of extracting EMR data across a number of countries. The study will inform future discussions and development of policies that aim to accelerate the adoption of EMR systems in high and middle income countries and seize the rich potential for secondary use of data arising from the use of EMR solutions.

  8. Customization of a Severity of Illness Score Using Local Electronic Medical Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Maslove, David M

    2017-01-01

    Severity of illness (SOI) scores are traditionally based on archival data collected from a wide range of clinical settings. Mortality prediction using SOI scores tends to underperform when applied to contemporary cases or those that differ from the case-mix of the original derivation cohorts. We investigated the use of local clinical data captured from hospital electronic medical records (EMRs) to improve the predictive performance of traditional severity of illness scoring. We conducted a retrospective analysis using data from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database, which contains clinical data from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. A total of 17 490 intensive care unit (ICU) admissions with complete data were included, from 4 different service types: medical ICU, surgical ICU, coronary care unit, and cardiac surgery recovery unit. We developed customized SOI scores trained on data from each service type, using the clinical variables employed in the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). In-hospital, 30-day, and 2-year mortality predictions were compared with those obtained from using the original SAPS using the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUROC) as well as the area under the precision-recall curve (AUPRC). Test performance in different cohorts stratified by severity of organ injury was also evaluated. Most customized scores (30 of 39) significantly outperformed SAPS with respect to both AUROC and AUPRC. Enhancements over SAPS were greatest for patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery and for prediction of 2-year mortality. Custom models based on ICU-specific data provided better mortality prediction than traditional SAPS scoring using the same predictor variables. Our local data approach demonstrates the value of electronic data capture in the ICU, of secondary uses of EMR data, and of local customization of SOI scoring. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Stellar observations with the Voyager EUV objective grating spectrograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holberg, J.B.; Polidan, R.S.; Barry, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    During the periods of interplanetary cruise the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometers are used to provide unique and otherwise unobtainable observations in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV, 500 to 1200) and the far ultraviolet (FUV, 912 to 1220 A). These observations include the spectra of hot stellar sources as well as emission from the interplanetary medium. Recent results of note include: (1) extensive spectrophotometric coverage of a superoutburst of the dwarf nova VW Hydri, which showed a clear 1/2 day delay in the outburst at 1000 A relative to that observed in the optical and a curious dip in the FUV light curve near maximum light. The Voyager observations were part of a comprehensive and highly successful campaign involving EXOSAT, IUE and ground based observations of this dwarf nova; (2) a comprehensive study of Be star spectra and variability. These results show the critical importance of FUV observations in the study of the effects of stellar rotation in hot stars; (3) the detection of a strong O VI absorption feature in the spectrum of the PG 1159-like object H1504+65. This detection along with the optical identification of weak O IV lines was a key to the interpretation of this object; which is of extremely high (>150,000K) temperature and appears to be a unique example of a stellar atmosphere devoid of H and He; (4) an analysis of an extremely long duration spectrum of the EUV and FUV sky background, which establishes important new upper limits on both continuum and line emission. This result also provide the first detection of interplanetary Lyman gamma

  10. Performance of automated and manual coding systems for occupational data: a case study of historical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mehul D; Rose, Kathryn M; Owens, Cindy R; Bang, Heejung; Kaufman, Jay S

    2012-03-01

    Occupational data are a common source of workplace exposure and socioeconomic information in epidemiologic research. We compared the performance of two occupation coding methods, an automated software and a manual coder, using occupation and industry titles from U.S. historical records. We collected parental occupational data from 1920-40s birth certificates, Census records, and city directories on 3,135 deceased individuals in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Unique occupation-industry narratives were assigned codes by a manual coder and the Standardized Occupation and Industry Coding software program. We calculated agreement between coding methods of classification into major Census occupational groups. Automated coding software assigned codes to 71% of occupations and 76% of industries. Of this subset coded by software, 73% of occupation codes and 69% of industry codes matched between automated and manual coding. For major occupational groups, agreement improved to 89% (kappa = 0.86). Automated occupational coding is a cost-efficient alternative to manual coding. However, some manual coding is required to code incomplete information. We found substantial variability between coders in the assignment of occupations although not as large for major groups.

  11. The Interaction Between Schema Matching and Record Matching in Data Integration

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin

    2016-09-20

    Schema Matching (SM) and Record Matching (RM) are two necessary steps in integrating multiple relational tables of different schemas, where SM unifies the schemas and RM detects records referring to the same real-world entity. The two processes have been thoroughly studied separately, but few attention has been paid to the interaction of SM and RM. In this work, we find that, even alternating them in a simple manner, SM and RM can benefit from each other to reach a better integration performance (i.e., in terms of precision and recall). Therefore, combining SM and RM is a promising solution for improving data integration. To this end, we define novel matching rules for SM and RM, respectively, that is, every SM decision is made based on intermediate RM results, and vice versa, such that SM and RM can be performed alternately. The quality of integration is guaranteed by a Matching Likelihood Estimation model and the control of semantic drift, which prevent the effect of mismatch magnification. To reduce the computational cost, we design an index structure based on q-grams and a greedy search algorithm that can reduce around 90 percent overhead of the interaction. Extensive experiments on three data collections show that the combination and interaction between SM and RM significantly outperforms previous works that conduct SM and RM separately.

  12. Defining asthma and assessing asthma outcomes using electronic health record data: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sallakh, Mohammad A; Vasileiou, Eleftheria; Rodgers, Sarah E; Lyons, Ronan A; Sheikh, Aziz; Davies, Gwyneth A

    2017-06-01

    There is currently no consensus on approaches to defining asthma or assessing asthma outcomes using electronic health record-derived data. We explored these approaches in the recent literature and examined the clarity of reporting.We systematically searched for asthma-related articles published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015, extracted the algorithms used to identify asthma patients and assess severity, control and exacerbations, and examined how the validity of these outcomes was justified.From 113 eligible articles, we found significant heterogeneity in the algorithms used to define asthma (n=66 different algorithms), severity (n=18), control (n=9) and exacerbations (n=24). For the majority of algorithms (n=106), validity was not justified. In the remaining cases, approaches ranged from using algorithms validated in the same databases to using nonvalidated algorithms that were based on clinical judgement or clinical guidelines. The implementation of these algorithms was suboptimally described overall.Although electronic health record-derived data are now widely used to study asthma, the approaches being used are significantly varied and are often underdescribed, rendering it difficult to assess the validity of studies and compare their findings. Given the substantial growth in this body of literature, it is crucial that scientific consensus is reached on the underlying definitions and algorithms. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  13. Long-term record of top-of-atmosphere albedo generated from AVHRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) albedo is a fundamental component of Earth's energy budget. Previously, long-term accurate TOA albedo products did not exist due to the lack of stable broadband observations. With a new albedo estimation methodology based on multispectral observations, TOA albedo since 1981 has been retrieved using data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), which provides the longest record of satellite observations across the globe. To develop the long-term TOA albedo record, the instantaneous TOA albedo was calculated by the direct estimation method, which was built on training data pairs from coincident AVHRR TOA reflectance and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) TOA albedo. The instantaneous TOA albedo was then converted to daily mean and monthly mean albedo based on the diurnal curves from geostationary satellites. The TOA albedo results (AVHRR-TAL) were compared with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) flux products for 2007. The monthly mean AVHRR-TAL agreed well with the CERES products, with a root mean square difference (RMSD) of 0.032 and a bias of 0.013. In addition, AVHRR-TAL showed similar seasonal variations to those seen in the CERES products. Further analysis on long-term time series showed good consistency between the two datasets (R2 > 0.95 and relative RMSD < 4%) from 2000 to 2015. Although some calibration issues remain to be solved, our datasets show the potential ability to observe the global TOA albedo from 1981 to the present.

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 1 OBSERVATIONS DURING 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ''microscale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or 'pink noise' spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f(α) with 0.57 ≤ α ≤ 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + τ) – SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with α' = 0.88 ± 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 ± 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The 'turbulence' observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of 'turbulence' in the heliosheath.

  15. From ISIS to CouchDB: Databases and Data Models for Bibliographic Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ramalho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For decades bibliographic data has been stored in non-relational databases, and thousands of libraries in developing countries still use ISIS databases to run their OPACs. Fast forward to 2010 and the NoSQL movement has shown that non-relational databases are good enough for Google, Amazon.com and Facebook. Meanwhile, several Open Source NoSQL systems have appeared. This paper discusses the data model of one class of NoSQL products, semistructured, document-oriented databases exemplified by Apache CouchDB and MongoDB, and why they are well-suited to collective cataloging applications. Also shown are the methods, tools, and scripts used to convert, from ISIS to CouchDB, bibliographic records of LILACS, a key Latin American and Caribbean health sciences index operated by the Pan-American Health Organization.

  16. Publishing data from electronic health records while preserving privacy: a survey of algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Loukides, Grigorios; Sun, Jimeng

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) can be highly beneficial for a range of medical studies, spanning from clinical trials to epidemic control studies, but it must be performed in a way that preserves patients' privacy. This is not straightforward, because the disseminated data need to be protected against several privacy threats, while remaining useful for subsequent analysis tasks. In this work, we present a survey of algorithms that have been proposed for publishing structured patient data, in a privacy-preserving way. We review more than 45 algorithms, derive insights on their operation, and highlight their advantages and disadvantages. We also provide a discussion of some promising directions for future research in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mining Electronic Health Records Data: Domestic Violence and Adverse Health Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, Gunnur; Patel, Vishal; Whiting, Kathleen; Koyutürk, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) often culminates in acute physical injury, sexual assault, and mental health issues. It is crucial to understand the healthcare habits of victims to develop interventions that can drastically improve a victim's quality of life and prevent future abuse. The objective of this study is to mine de-identified and aggregated Electronic Health Record data to identify women's health issues that are potentially associated with IPV. In this study we compared health issues of female domestic abuse victims to female non-domestic abuse victims. The Domestic abuse population contained 5870 patients, while the Non-Domestic Abuse population contained 14,315,140 patients. Explorys provides National Big Data from the entire USA. Statistical analysis identified 2429 terms as significantly more prevalent among victims of domestic abuse, compared to the general population. These terms were classified into broad categories, including acute injury, chronic conditions, substance abuse, mental health, disorders, gynecological and pregnancy related problems.

  18. EMRlog method for computer security for electronic medical records with logic and data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Monterrubio, Sergio Mauricio; Frausto Solis, Juan; Monroy Borja, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  19. EMRlog Method for Computer Security for Electronic Medical Records with Logic and Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mauricio Martínez Monterrubio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  20. Sessile serrated lesion and its borderline variant - Variables with impact on recorded data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Mahin; Garbyal, Rajendra S; Kristensen, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Sessile serrated lesion (SSL), belonging to non-dysplastic serrated polyps (SP), has lately received much focus. Its role in the serrated neoplasia pathway(s) seems well established. Data on prevalence rate, demography, and some polyp characteristics remain, however, to be firmly established. Nor...... has its relation to SPs with subtle aberrant features, falling short of definite SSL-histology, been sufficiently addressed. The aim of this study was to highlight variables that may influence recorded data on SSL and to further discuss the appropriate place of SPs that possess histological attributes...... intermediate between traditional hyperplastic polyp (HP) and SSL, termed borderline SSL (BSSL). Upon review of 8.324 consecutive colorectal polyps signed-out as HP, 219 SSLs and 206 BSSLs were segregated, using strict predetermined criteria. Predominant left-sidedness and equal gender distribution...

  1. Technical note: The US Dobson station network data record prior to 2015, re-evaluation of NDACC and WOUDC archived records with WinDobson processing software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert D.; Petropavlovskikh, Irina; McClure-Begley, Audra; McConville, Glen; Quincy, Dorothy; Miyagawa, Koji

    2017-10-01

    The United States government has operated Dobson ozone spectrophotometers at various sites, starting during the International Geophysical Year (1 July 1957 to 31 December 1958). A network of stations for long-term monitoring of the total column content (thickness of the ozone layer) of the atmosphere was established in the early 1960s and eventually grew to 16 stations, 14 of which are still operational and submit data to the United States of America's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Seven of these sites are also part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), an organization that maintains its own data archive. Due to recent changes in data processing software the entire dataset was re-evaluated for possible changes. To evaluate and minimize potential changes caused by the new processing software, the reprocessed data record was compared to the original data record archived in the World Ozone and UV Data Center (WOUDC) in Toronto, Canada. The history of the observations at the individual stations, the instruments used for the NOAA network monitoring at the station, the method for reducing zenith-sky observations to total ozone, and calibration procedures were re-evaluated using data quality control tools built into the new software. At the completion of the evaluation, the new datasets are to be published as an update to the WOUDC and NDACC archives, and the entire dataset is to be made available to the scientific community. The procedure for reprocessing Dobson data and the results of the reanalysis on the archived record are presented in this paper. A summary of historical changes to 14 station records is also provided.

  2. Technical note: The US Dobson station network data record prior to 2015, re-evaluation of NDACC and WOUDC archived records with WinDobson processing software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Evans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The United States government has operated Dobson ozone spectrophotometers at various sites, starting during the International Geophysical Year (1 July 1957 to 31 December 1958. A network of stations for long-term monitoring of the total column content (thickness of the ozone layer of the atmosphere was established in the early 1960s and eventually grew to 16 stations, 14 of which are still operational and submit data to the United States of America's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA. Seven of these sites are also part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, an organization that maintains its own data archive. Due to recent changes in data processing software the entire dataset was re-evaluated for possible changes. To evaluate and minimize potential changes caused by the new processing software, the reprocessed data record was compared to the original data record archived in the World Ozone and UV Data Center (WOUDC in Toronto, Canada. The history of the observations at the individual stations, the instruments used for the NOAA network monitoring at the station, the method for reducing zenith-sky observations to total ozone, and calibration procedures were re-evaluated using data quality control tools built into the new software. At the completion of the evaluation, the new datasets are to be published as an update to the WOUDC and NDACC archives, and the entire dataset is to be made available to the scientific community. The procedure for reprocessing Dobson data and the results of the reanalysis on the archived record are presented in this paper. A summary of historical changes to 14 station records is also provided.

  3. Multivariate time series clustering on geophysical data recorded at Mt. Etna from 1996 to 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Roberto; Montalto, Placido; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Neri, Marco; Puglisi, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    Time series clustering is an important task in data analysis issues in order to extract implicit, previously unknown, and potentially useful information from a large collection of data. Finding useful similar trends in multivariate time series represents a challenge in several areas including geophysics environment research. While traditional time series analysis methods deal only with univariate time series, multivariate time series analysis is a more suitable approach in the field of research where different kinds of data are available. Moreover, the conventional time series clustering techniques do not provide desired results for geophysical datasets due to the huge amount of data whose sampling rate is different according to the nature of signal. In this paper, a novel approach concerning geophysical multivariate time series clustering is proposed using dynamic time series segmentation and Self Organizing Maps techniques. This method allows finding coupling among trends of different geophysical data recorded from monitoring networks at Mt. Etna spanning from 1996 to 2003, when the transition from summit eruptions to flank eruptions occurred. This information can be used to carry out a more careful evaluation of the state of volcano and to define potential hazard assessment at Mt. Etna.

  4. [Electronic data records in primary health care and aspects of their development in Bosnia and Herzegovina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Ahmed; Masić, Izet; Toromanović, Selim; Karić, Mediha; Zunić, Lejla

    2004-01-01

    In Medical Informatics medical documentation and evidention are most probably the key areas. Also, in primary health care it is very important and part of daily activity of medical staff. Bosnia and Herzegovina is trying to be close to developed countries and to modernize and computerize current systems of documentation and to cross over from manual and semi manual methods to computerized medical data analysis. The most of European countries have developed standards and classification systems in primary health care for collecting, examination, analysis and interpretation of medical data assessed. One of possibilities as well as dilemma, which data carrier should be used for storage and manipulation of patient data in primary health care, is use of electronic medical record. Most of the South East European countries use chip or smart card and some of countries in neighborhood (Italy) choose laser card as patient data carrier. Both technologies have the advantages and disadvantages what was comprehensively colaborated by the authors in this paper, with intention to help experts who make decisions in this segment to create and to correctly influence on improvement of quality, correctness and accuracy of medical documentation in primary health care.

  5. Integration of Transport-relevant Data within Image Record of the Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stančić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Integration of the collected information on the road within the image recorded by the surveillance system forms a unified source of transport-relevant data about the supervised situation. The basic assumption is that the procedure of integration changes the image to the extent that is invisible to the human eye, and the integrated data keep identical content. This assumption has been proven by studying the statistical properties of the image and integrated data using mathematical model modelled in the programming language Python using the combinations of the functions of additional libraries (OpenCV, NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib. The model has been used to compare the input methods of meta-data and methods of steganographic integration by correcting the coefficients of Discrete Cosine Transform JPEG compressed image. For the procedures of steganographic data processing the steganographic algorithm F5 was used. The review paper analyses the advantages and drawbacks of the integration methods and present the examples of situations in traffic in which the formed unified sources of transport-relevant information could be used.

  6. Development of Software for dose Records Data Base Access; Programacion para la consulta del Banco de Datos Dosimetricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, M

    1990-07-01

    The CIEMAT personal dose records are computerized in a Dosimetric Data Base whose primary purpose was the individual dose follow-up control and the data handling for epidemiological studies. Within the Data Base management scheme, software development to allow searching of individual dose records by external authorised users was undertaken. The report describes the software developed to allow authorised persons to visualize on screen a summary of the individual dose records from workers included in the Data Base. The report includes the User Guide for the authorised list of users and listings of codes and subroutines developed. (Author) 2 refs.

  7. How long do satellites need to overlap? Evaluation of climate data stability from overlapping satellite records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherhead, Elizabeth C.; Harder, Jerald; Araujo-Pradere, Eduardo A.; Bodeker, Greg; English, Jason M.; Flynn, Lawrence E.; Frith, Stacey M.; Lazo, Jeffrey K.; Pilewskie, Peter; Weber, Mark; Woods, Thomas N.

    2017-12-01

    Sensors on satellites provide unprecedented understanding of the Earth's climate system by measuring incoming solar radiation, as well as both passive and active observations of the entire Earth with outstanding spatial and temporal coverage. A common challenge with satellite observations is to quantify their ability to provide well-calibrated, long-term, stable records of the parameters they measure. Ground-based intercomparisons offer some insight, while reference observations and internal calibrations give further assistance for understanding long-term stability. A valuable tool for evaluating and developing long-term records from satellites is the examination of data from overlapping satellite missions. This paper addresses how the length of overlap affects the ability to identify an offset or a drift in the overlap of data between two sensors. Ozone and temperature data sets are used as examples showing that overlap data can differ by latitude and can change over time. New results are presented for the general case of sensor overlap by using Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) and Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) solar irradiance data as an example. To achieve a 1 % uncertainty in estimating the offset for these two instruments' measurement of the Mg II core (280 nm) requires approximately 5 months of overlap. For relative drift to be identified within 0.1 % yr-1 uncertainty (0.00008 W m-2 nm-1 yr-1), the overlap for these two satellites would need to be 2.5 years. Additional overlap of satellite measurements is needed if, as is the case for solar monitoring, unexpected jumps occur adding uncertainty to both offsets and drifts; the additional length of time needed to account for a single jump in the overlap data may be as large as 50 % of the original overlap period in order to achieve the same desired confidence in the stability of the merged data set. Results presented here are directly

  8. Historic American engineering record. Nevada national security site, Bren Tower Complex. Written historical and descriptive data and field records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Susan R. [Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Goldenberg, Nancy [Carey & Co Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower Complex is significant for its role in the history of nuclear testing, radiation dosimetry studies, and early field testing of the Strategic Missile Defense System designs. At the time it was built in 1962, the 1,527 ft (465 m) BREN Tower was the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River and exceeded the height of the Empire State Building by 55 ft (17 m). It remains the tallest ever erected specifically for scientific purposes and was designed and built to facilitate the experimental dosimetry studies necessary for the development of accurate radiation dose rates for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The tower was a key component of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission’s (ABCC) mission to predict the health effects of radiation exposure. Moved to its current location in 1966, the crucial dosimetry studies continued with Operation HENRE (High Energy Neutron Reactions Experiment). These experiments and the data they generated became the basis for a dosimetry system called the Tentative 1965 Dose or more commonly the T65D model. Used to estimate radiation doses received by individuals, the T65D model was applied until the mid-1980s when it was replaced by a new dosimetry system known as DS86 based on the Monte Carlo method of dose rate calculation. However, the BREN Tower data are still used for verification of the validity of the DS86 model. In addition to its importance in radiation heath effects research, the BREN Tower Complex is also significant for its role in the Brilliant Pebbles research project, a major component of the Strategic Defense Initiative popularly known as the “Star Wars” Initiative. Instigated under the Reagan Administration, the program’s purpose was to develop a system to shield the United States and allies from a ballistic missile attack. The centerpiece of the Strategic Defense System was space-based, kinetic-kill vehicles. In 1991, BREN Tower was used for the tether tests

  9. Using gamification to drive patient’s personal data validation in a Personal Health Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Giunti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gamification is a term used to describe using game elements in non-game environments to enhance user experience. It has been incorporated with commercial success into several platforms (Linkedin, Badgeville, Facebook this has made some researchers theorize that it could also be used in education as a tool to increase student engagement and to drive desirable learning behaviors on them. While in the past years some game elements have been incorporated to healthcare there is still little evidence on how effective they are. Game elements provide engagement consistent with various theories of motivation, positive psychology (e.g., flow, and also provide instant feedback. Feedback is more effective when it provides sufficient and specific information for goal achievement and is presented relatively close in time to the event being evaluated. Feedback can reference individual progress, can make social comparisons, or can refer to task criteria. Electronic personal health record systems (PHRs support patient centered healthcare by making medical records and other relevant information accessible to patients, thus assisting patients in health self-management. A particularly difficult data set that is often difficult to capture are those regarding social and cultural background information. This data set is not only useful to help better healthcare system management, it is also relevant as it is used for epidemiological and preventive purposes. We used gamified mechanics that involve instant feedback to test if they would increase patient’s personal data validation and completion in our PHR as well as overall PHR use. On our presentation we will describe our results and the story behind them.

  10. Identifying Risk of Future Asthma Attacks Using UK Medical Record Data: A Respiratory Effectiveness Group Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, John D; Price, David B; Pizzichini, Emilio; Popov, Todor A; Dimitrov, Borislav D; Postma, Dirkje S; Josephs, Lynn K; Kaplan, Alan; Papi, Alberto; Kerkhof, Marjan; Hillyer, Elizabeth V; Chisholm, Alison; Thomas, Mike

    Asthma attacks are common, serious, and costly. Individual factors associated with attacks, such as poor symptom control, are not robust predictors. We investigated whether the rich data available in UK electronic medical records could identify patients at risk of recurrent attacks. We analyzed anonymized, longitudinal medical records of 118,981 patients with actively treated asthma (ages 12-80 years) and 3 or more years of data. Potential risk factors during 1 baseline year were evaluated using univariable (simple) logistic regression for outcomes of 2 or more and 4 or more attacks during the following 2-year period. Predictors with significant univariable association (P attacks included baseline-year markers of attacks (acute oral corticosteroid courses, emergency visits), more frequent reliever use and health care utilization, worse lung function, current smoking, blood eosinophilia, rhinitis, nasal polyps, eczema, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity, older age, and being female. The number of oral corticosteroid courses had the strongest association. The final cross-validated models incorporated 19 and 16 risk factors for 2 or more and 4 or more attacks over 2 years, respectively, with areas under the curve of 0.785 (95% CI, 0.780-0.789) and 0.867 (95% CI, 0.860-0.873), respectively. Routinely collected data could be used proactively via automated searches to identify individuals at risk of recurrent asthma attacks. Further research is needed to assess the impact of such knowledge on clinical prognosis. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. FACET - a "Flexible Artifact Correction and Evaluation Toolbox" for concurrently recorded EEG/fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Johann; Beisteiner, Roland; Bauer, Herbert; Fischmeister, Florian Ph S

    2013-11-09

    In concurrent EEG/fMRI recordings, EEG data are impaired by the fMRI gradient artifacts which exceed the EEG signal by several orders of magnitude. While several algorithms exist to correct the EEG data, these algorithms lack the flexibility to either leave out or add new steps. The here presented open-source MATLAB toolbox FACET is a modular toolbox for the fast and flexible correction and evaluation of imaging artifacts from concurrently recorded EEG datasets. It consists of an Analysis, a Correction and an Evaluation framework allowing the user to choose from different artifact correction methods with various pre- and post-processing steps to form flexible combinations. The quality of the chosen correction approach can then be evaluated and compared to different settings. FACET was evaluated on a dataset provided with the FMRIB plugin for EEGLAB using two different correction approaches: Averaged Artifact Subtraction (AAS, Allen et al., NeuroImage 12(2):230-239, 2000) and the FMRI Artifact Slice Template Removal (FASTR, Niazy et al., NeuroImage 28(3):720-737, 2005). Evaluation of the obtained results were compared to the FASTR algorithm implemented in the EEGLAB plugin FMRIB. No differences were found between the FACET implementation of FASTR and the original algorithm across all gradient artifact relevant performance indices. The FACET toolbox not only provides facilities for all three modalities: data analysis, artifact correction as well as evaluation and documentation of the results but it also offers an easily extendable framework for development and evaluation of new approaches.

  12. A prototype for automation of land-cover products from Landsat Surface Reflectance Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rover, J.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Steinwand, D.; Nelson, K.; Coan, M.; Wylie, B. K.; Dahal, D.; Wika, S.; Quenzer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landsat data records of surface reflectance provide a three-decade history of land surface processes. Due to the vast number of these archived records, development of innovative approaches for automated data mining and information retrieval were necessary. Recently, we created a prototype utilizing open source software libraries for automatically generating annual Anderson Level 1 land cover maps and information products from data acquired by the Landsat Mission for the years 1984 to 2013. The automated prototype was applied to two target areas in northwestern and east-central North Dakota, USA. The approach required the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and two user-input target acquisition year-days. The Landsat archive was mined for scenes acquired within a 100-day window surrounding these target dates, and then cloud-free pixels where chosen closest to the specified target acquisition dates. The selected pixels were then composited before completing an unsupervised classification using the NLCD. Pixels unchanged in pairs of the NLCD were used for training decision tree models in an iterative process refined with model confidence measures. The decision tree models were applied to the Landsat composites to generate a yearly land cover map and related information products. Results for the target areas captured changes associated with the recent expansion of oil shale production and agriculture driven by economics and policy, such as the increase in biofuel production and reduction in Conservation Reserve Program. Changes in agriculture, grasslands, and surface water reflect the local hydrological conditions that occurred during the 29-year span. Future enhancements considered for this prototype include a web-based client, ancillary spatial datasets, trends and clustering algorithms, and the forecasting of future land cover.

  13. A New Revision of the Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record Incorporates Recent Research into Proxies of Sunspot Darkening and the Sunspot Number Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Baranyi, T.; Snow, M. A.; Kopp, G.; Richard, E. C.; Lindholm, C.

    2017-12-01

    An operational climate data record (CDR) of total and spectral solar irradiance became available in November 2015 as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Centers for Environmental Information Climate Data Record Program. The data record, which is updated quarterly, is available from 1610 to the present as yearly-average values and from 1882 to the present as monthly- and daily-averages, with associated time and wavelength-dependent uncertainties. It was developed jointly by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and the Naval Research Laboratory, and, together with the source code and supporting documentation, is available at https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/. In the Solar Irradiance CDR, total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are estimated from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk. The models are constructed using linear regression of proxies of solar sunspot and facular features with the approximately decade-long irradiance observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment. A new revision of this data record was recently released in an ongoing effort to reduce solar irradiance uncertainties in two ways. First, the sunspot darkening proxy was revised using a new cross calibration of the current sunspot region observations made by the Solar Observing Optical Network with the historical records of the Royal Greenwich Observatory. This implementation affects modeled irradiances from 1882 - 1978. Second, the impact of a revised record of sunspot number by the Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations center on modeled irradiances was assessed. This implementation provides two different reconstructions of historical, yearly-averaged irradiances from 1610-1881. Additionally, we show new, preliminary results that demonstrate improvements in modeled TSI by using

  14. Using clinician text notes in electronic medical record data to validate transgender-related diagnosis codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John R; Cashy, John; Gordon, Adam J; Shipherd, Jillian C; Kauth, Michael R; Brown, George R; Fine, Michael J

    2018-04-04

    Transgender individuals are vulnerable to negative health risks and outcomes, but research remains limited because data sources, such as electronic medical records (EMRs), lack standardized collection of gender identity information. Most EMR do not include the gold standard of self-identified gender identity, but International Classification of Diseases (ICDs) includes diagnostic codes indicating transgender-related clinical services. However, it is unclear if these codes can indicate transgender status. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which patients' clinician notes in EMR contained transgender-related terms that could corroborate ICD-coded transgender identity. Data are from the US Department of Veterans Affairs Corporate Data Warehouse. Transgender patients were defined by the presence of ICD9 and ICD10 codes associated with transgender-related clinical services, and a 3:1 comparison group of nontransgender patients was drawn. Patients' clinician text notes were extracted and searched for transgender-related words and phrases. Among 7560 patients defined as transgender based on ICD codes, the search algorithm identified 6753 (89.3%) with transgender-related terms. Among 22 072 patients defined as nontransgender without ICD codes, 246 (1.1%) had transgender-related terms; after review, 11 patients were identified as transgender, suggesting a 0.05% false negative rate. Using ICD-defined transgender status can facilitate health services research when self-identified gender identity data are not available in EMR.

  15. Data collection and record keeping for the management of nuclear power plant ageing: A safety practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Safety Practice is the first in a series of reports under the programme on the management of nuclear power plant ageing. The purpose of the programme is to facilitate the exchange of information and to promote co-operation among Member States towards understanding and managing the ageing degradation of components, with the aim of maintaining safe and reliable plant operation. The availability and evaluation of appropriate data on nuclear power plant components are essential to safety and constitute a key factor in plant life extension considerations. The present publication provides guidance on data requirements and an effective and practical system for data collection and record keeping in relation to the evaluation and management of ageing and service life. This guidance is based on current practices. It is envisaged that the application of the guidance will contribute to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants and will facilitate international information exchange on ageing related component failures, malfunctions and degradation, since data collected using the same ground rules would be easier to exchange and compare. The guidance is intended primarily for the management, maintenance and technical staff of nuclear power plants, on whom the ultimate success of the recommended system and its associated benefits depend. Intended secondary audiences include utility management and central technical support organizations, regulatory bodies, standards organizations, design companies, and research and development institutes. 8 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Data mining in bone marrow transplant records to identify patients with high odds of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taati, Babak; Snoek, Jasper; Aleman, Dionne; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing a bone marrow stem cell transplant (BMT) face various risk factors. Analyzing data from past transplants could enhance the understanding of the factors influencing success. Records up to 120 measurements per transplant procedure from 1751 patients undergoing BMT were collected (Shariati Hospital). Collaborative filtering techniques allowed the processing of highly sparse records with 22.3% missing values. Ten-fold cross-validation was used to evaluate the performance of various classification algorithms trained on predicting the survival status. Modest accuracy levels were obtained in predicting the survival status (AUC = 0.69). More importantly, however, operations that had the highest chances of success were shown to be identifiable with high accuracy, e.g., 92% or 97% when identifying 74 or 31 recipients, respectively. Identifying the patients with the highest chances of survival has direct application in the prioritization of resources and in donor matching. For patients where high-confidence prediction is not achieved, assigning a probability to their survival odds has potential applications in probabilistic decision support systems and in combination with other sources of information.

  17. Study about geomagnetic variations from data recorded at Surlari Geomagnetic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimopolos, Laurentiu; Asimopolos, Natalia-Silvia; Sandulescu, Agata Monica; Niculici, Eugen

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents statistical and spectral analysis of data from Surlari Geomagnetic Observatory that contributing to study of geomagnetic variations. Thus were highlighted, for long series of records over several solar cycles, periodicities of 22 years and 11 years. Following the same procedures for medium recording series (multi-annual) have highlighted annual, seasonal and monthly periodicities. For shorter data series, we highlighted diurnal, semidiurnal, 8 hours and even lower periodicities. For very short series with a high sample rate and for few magnetotellurics records, we highlight different types of pulsations (Pc2 - Pc5 and Pi 2). Geomagnetic signals are the convolution product of the atomic stationary signals mono-frequential of different amplitudes associated to phenomena with a very broad band of periodicities and nondeterministic signals associated with geomagnetic disturbances and non-periodic phenomena. Among analysis processes used for discrete series of geomagnetic data with different lengths and sampling rates, can conclude the following: Moving average works as a low pass filter in frequency or high pass in time. By eliminating high frequency components (depending on mobile window size used) can be studied preferential periodicities greater than a given value. Signal linearization (using least squares) provides information on linear trend of the entire series analyzed. Thus, for the very long data series (several decades) we extracted the secular variation slope for each geomagnetic component, separately. The numeric derivative of signal versus time proved to be a very reliable indicator for geomagnetic disturbed periods. Thus, the derivative value may be increased by several orders of magnitude during periods of agitation in comparisons to calm periods. The correlation factor shows significant increases when between two time series a causal relationship exists. Variation of the correlation factor, calculated for a mobile window containing k

  18. Measures Earth System Data Records (ESDR) of Ice Motion in Antarctica: Status, Impact and Future Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuchl, B.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.

    2014-12-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data is an extremely useful tool for providing relevant information about the ice sheet ECV: ice vector velocity, grounding line position, and ice front location. Here, we provide an overview of the SAR Earth System Data Records (ESDR) for Antarctica part of MEaSUREs that includes: the first complete map of surface ice vector velocity in Antarctica, a map of grounding line positions around Antarctica, ice velocity time series for selected regions: Ross and Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelves and associated drainage basins, the Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica which is the largest contributor to sea level rise from Antarctica and the focus of rapid ice sheet retreat, and Larsen-B and -C ice shelves which is the second largest contribution to sea level rise from Antarctica. Other products include a database of ice shelf boundaries and drainage basins based on ice motion mapping and digital elevation models generated independently. Data continuity is a crucial aspect of this work and a fundamental challenge for the continuation of these products due to the lack of a dedicated interferometric mission on the cryosphere until the SAR mission under consideration between NASA and ISRO is approved. Four SAR missions ceased operations since IPY. CSA's RADARSAT-2 has provided important bridging data between these missions in Greenland and Antarctica. In 2014, ESA launched Sentinel-1a and JAXA launched ALOS-2 PALSAR, for which we will have limited data access. The Polar Space Task Group (PSTG) created by WMO has established a mandate to support cryospheric products from scientific research using international SARs which continues to play an active role in securing key data acquisitions over ice sheets. We will provide an overview of current efforts. This work was conducted at UC Irvine, Department of Earth System Science under a contract with NASA's MEaSUREs program.

  19. A service for the application of data quality information to NASA earth science satellite records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Xing, Z.; Fry, C.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Huang, T.; Chen, G.; Chin, T. M.; Alarcon, C.

    2016-12-01

    A recurring demand in working with satellite-based earth science data records is the need to apply data quality information. Such quality information is often contained within the data files as an array of "flags", but can also be represented by more complex quality descriptions such as combinations of bit flags, or even other ancillary variables that can be applied as thresholds to the geophysical variable of interest. For example, with Level 2 granules from the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) project up to 6 independent variables could be used to screen the sea surface temperature measurements on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Quality screening of Level 3 data from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) instrument can be become even more complex, involving 161 unique bit states or conditions a user can screen for. The application of quality information is often a laborious process for the user until they understand the implications of all the flags and bit conditions, and requires iterative approaches using custom software. The Virtual Quality Screening Service, a NASA ACCESS project, is addressing these issues and concerns. The project has developed an infrastructure to expose, apply, and extract quality screening information building off known and proven NASA components for data extraction and subset-by-value, data discovery, and exposure to the user of granule-based quality information. Further sharing of results through well-defined URLs and web service specifications has also been implemented. The presentation will focus on overall description of the technologies and informatics principals employed by the project. Examples of implementations of the end-to-end web service for quality screening with GHRSST and SMAP granules will be demonstrated.

  20. Enhancing Breast Cancer Recurrence Algorithms Through Selective Use of Medical Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, Candyce H; Chubak, Jessica; Johnson, Lisa; Castillo, Adrienne; Weltzien, Erin; Caan, Bette J

    2016-03-01

    The utility of data-based algorithms in research has been questioned because of errors in identification of cancer recurrences. We adapted previously published breast cancer recurrence algorithms, selectively using medical record (MR) data to improve classification. We evaluated second breast cancer event (SBCE) and recurrence-specific algorithms previously published by Chubak and colleagues in 1535 women from the Life After Cancer Epidemiology (LACE) and 225 women from the Women's Health Initiative cohorts and compared classification statistics to published values. We also sought to improve classification with minimal MR examination. We selected pairs of algorithms-one with high sensitivity/high positive predictive value (PPV) and another with high specificity/high PPV-using MR information to resolve discrepancies between algorithms, properly classifying events based on review; we called this "triangulation." Finally, in LACE, we compared associations between breast cancer survival risk factors and recurrence using MR data, single Chubak algorithms, and triangulation. The SBCE algorithms performed well in identifying SBCE and recurrences. Recurrence-specific algorithms performed more poorly than published except for the high-specificity/high-PPV algorithm, which performed well. The triangulation method (sensitivity = 81.3%, specificity = 99.7%, PPV = 98.1%, NPV = 96.5%) improved recurrence classification over two single algorithms (sensitivity = 57.1%, specificity = 95.5%, PPV = 71.3%, NPV = 91.9%; and sensitivity = 74.6%, specificity = 97.3%, PPV = 84.7%, NPV = 95.1%), with 10.6% MR review. Triangulation performed well in survival risk factor analyses vs analyses using MR-identified recurrences. Use of multiple recurrence algorithms in administrative data, in combination with selective examination of MR data, may improve recurrence data quality and reduce research costs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  1. The Sun Recorded Through History Scientific Data Extracted from Historical Documents

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, M

    2009-01-01

    The Sun Recorded Through History is a text that reconstructs past solar activity based on information from historical documents, complementing studies using other techniques. Historical accounts describing phenomena related to solar activity, such as aurorae, sunspots, and corona observed during solar eclipses can be used as a proxy of solar activity in the past. These descriptions are reviewed, on the one hand providing primary material for the history of astronomy and, on the other, verifying or refuting current ideas concerning the time variability of the Sun on the scale of centuries. Documents predating the discovery of photography (around 1840) that contain information on these topics are highlighted, but modern drawings are also included. The lower temporal limit of study is set by the archaeoastronomy of prehistoric sources. In addition, the necessary background on the Sun is provided, with special emphasis on observing techniques and the influences of telescopes and the Earth's atmosphere on the data...

  2. Utilizing Dental Electronic Health Records Data to Predict Risk for Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Padman, Rema; Vyawahare, Karnali; Darade, Pratiksha; Paranjape, Rhucha

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause for tooth loss and adversely affects individuals' oral health and quality of life. Research shows its potential association with systemic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and social habits such as smoking. This study explores mining potential risk factors from dental electronic health records to predict and display patients' contextualized risk for periodontal disease. We retrieved relevant risk factors from structured and unstructured data on 2,370 patients who underwent comprehensive oral examinations at the Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Predicting overall risk and displaying relationships between risk factors and their influence on the patient's oral and general health can be a powerful educational and disease management tool for patients and clinicians at the point of care.

  3. Merging Electronic Health Record Data and Genomics for Cardiovascular Research: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer L; Ryan, John J; Bray, Bruce E; Brown, Candice; Lanfear, David; Newby, L Kristin; Relling, Mary V; Risch, Neil J; Roden, Dan M; Shaw, Stanley Y; Tcheng, James E; Tenenbaum, Jessica; Wang, Thomas N; Weintraub, William S

    2016-04-01

    The process of scientific discovery is rapidly evolving. The funding climate has influenced a favorable shift in scientific discovery toward the use of existing resources such as the electronic health record. The electronic health record enables long-term outlooks on human health and disease, in conjunction with multidimensional phenotypes that include laboratory data, images, vital signs, and other clinical information. Initial work has confirmed the utility of the electronic health record for understanding mechanisms and patterns of variability in disease susceptibility, disease evolution, and drug responses. The addition of biobanks and genomic data to the information contained in the electronic health record has been demonstrated. The purpose of this statement is to discuss the current challenges in and the potential for merging electronic health record data and genomics for cardiovascular research. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. The Interaction Between Schema Matching and Record Matching in Data Integration

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin; Li, Zhixu; Zhang, Xiangliang; Liu, An; Liu, Guanfeng; Zheng, Kai; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Xiaofang

    2016-01-01

    Schema Matching (SM) and Record Matching (RM) are two necessary steps in integrating multiple relational tables of different schemas, where SM unifies the schemas and RM detects records referring to the same real-world entity. The two processes have

  5. QUALITY OF DATA IN PREGNANCY HEALTH RECORD: THE IMPORTANCE FOR THE NEONATOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Espírito Santo

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The majority of records were considered correct, however a greater completeness and uniformity of pregnancy records is still necessary, so that the paediatrician can have accurate pregnancy clinical information for the first observation of the newborn.

  6. Data mining of audiology patient records: factors influencing the choice of hearing aid type

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper describes the analysis of a database of over 180,000 patient records, collected from over 23,000 patients, by the hearing aid clinic at James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough, UK. These records consist of audiograms (graphs of the faintest sounds audible to the patient at six different pitches), categorical data (such as age, gender, diagnosis and hearing aid type) and brief free text notes made by the technicians. This data is mined to determine which factors contribute to the decision to fit a BTE (worn behind the ear) hearing aid as opposed to an ITE (worn in the ear) hearing aid. Methods From PCA (principal component analysis) four main audiogram types are determined, and are related to the type of hearing aid chosen. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, masker, mould and individual audiogram frequencies are combined into a single model by means of logistic regression. Some significant keywords are also discovered in the free text fields by using the chi-squared (χ2) test, which can also be used in the model. The final model can act a decision support tool to help decide whether an individual patient should be offered a BTE or an ITE hearing aid. Results The final model was tested using 5-fold cross validation, and was able to replicate the decisions of audiologists whether to fit an ITE or a BTE hearing aid with precision in the range 0.79 to 0.87. Conclusions A decision support system was produced to predict the type of hearing aid which should be prescribed, with an explanation facility explaining how that decision was arrived at. This system should prove useful in providing a "second opinion" for audiologists. PMID:22595091

  7. California: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-07-01

    This GEOTHERM sample file contains 1535 records for California. Three computer-generated indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. 7 refs. (ACR)

  8. Data-driven approach for assessing utility of medical tests using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrøvseth, Stein Olav; Augestad, Knut Magne; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2015-02-01

    To precisely define the utility of tests in a clinical pathway through data-driven analysis of the electronic medical record (EMR). The information content was defined in terms of the entropy of the expected value of the test related to a given outcome. A kernel density classifier was used to estimate the necessary distributions. To validate the method, we used data from the EMR of the gastrointestinal department at a university hospital. Blood tests from patients undergoing surgery for gastrointestinal surgery were analyzed with respect to second surgery within 30 days of the index surgery. The information content is clearly reflected in the patient pathway for certain combinations of tests and outcomes. C-reactive protein tests coupled to anastomosis leakage, a severe complication show a clear pattern of information gain through the patient trajectory, where the greatest gain from the test is 3-4 days post index surgery. We have defined the information content in a data-driven and information theoretic way such that the utility of a test can be precisely defined. The results reflect clinical knowledge. In the case we used the tests carry little negative impact. The general approach can be expanded to cases that carry a substantial negative impact, such as in certain radiological techniques. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An Open Hardware seismic data recorder - a solid basis for citizen science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertl, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    "Ruwai" is a 24-Bit Open Hardware seismic data recorder. It is built up of four stackable printed circuit boards fitting the Arduino Mega 2560 microcontroller prototyping platform. An interface to the BeagleBone Black single-board computer enables extensive data storage, -processing and networking capabilities. The four printed circuit boards provide a uBlox Lea-6T GPS module and real-time clock (GPS Timing shield), an Texas Instruments ADS1274 24-Bit analog to digital converter (ADC main shield), an analog input section with a Texas Instruments PGA281 programmable gain amplifier and an analog anti-aliasing filter (ADC analog interface pga) and the power conditioning based on 9-36V DC input (power supply shield). The Arduino Mega 2560 is used for controlling the hardware components, timestamping sampled data using the GPS timing information and transmitting the data to the BeagleBone Black single-board computer. The BeagleBone Black provides local data storage, wireless mesh networking using the optimized link state routing daemon and differential GNSS positioning using the RTKLIB software. The complete hardware and software is published under free software - or open hardware licenses and only free software (e.g. KiCad) was used for the development to facilitate the reusability of the design and increases the sustainability of the project. "Ruwai" was developed within the framework of the "Community Environmental Observation Network (CEON)" (http://www.mertl-research.at/ceon/) which was supported by the Internet Foundation Austria (IPA) within the NetIdee 2013 call.

  10. The Reliability of Electronic Health Record Data Used for Obstetrical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Molly R; Colorafi, Karen; Daratha, Kenn B

    2018-01-01

    Hospital electronic health record (EHR) data are increasingly being called upon for research purposes, yet only recently has it been tested to examine its reliability. Studies that have examined reliability of EHR data for research purposes have varied widely in methods used and field of inquiry, with little reporting of the reliability of perinatal and obstetric variables in the current literature. To assess the reliability of data extracted from a commercially available inpatient EHR as compared with manually abstracted data for common attributes used in obstetrical research. Data extracted through automated EHR reports for 3,250 women who delivered a live infant at a large hospital in the Pacific Northwest were compared with manual chart abstraction for the following perinatal measures: delivery method, labor induction, labor augmentation, cervical ripening, vertex presentation, and postpartum hemorrhage. Almost perfect agreement was observed for all four modes of delivery (vacuum assisted: kappa = 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.88-0.95, forceps assisted: kappa = 0.90; 95%CI = 0.76-1.00, cesarean delivery: kappa = 0.91; 95%CI = 0.90-0.93, and spontaneous vaginal delivery: kappa = 0.91; 95%CI = 0.90-0.93). Cervical ripening demonstrated substantial agreement (kappa = 0.77; 95%CI = 0.73-0.80); labor induction (kappa = 0.65; 95%CI = 0.62-0.68) and augmentation (kappa = 0.54; 95%CI = 0.49-0.58) demonstrated moderate agreement between the two data sources. Vertex presentation (kappa = 0.35; 95%CI = 0.31-0.40) and post-partum hemorrhage (kappa = 0.21; 95%CI = 0.13-0.28) demonstrated fair agreement. Our study demonstrates variability in the reliability of obstetrical data collected and reported through the EHR. While delivery method was satisfactorily reliable in our sample, other examined perinatal measures were less so when compared with manual chart abstraction. The use of multiple

  11. New Topographic Maps of Io Using Voyager and Galileo Stereo Imaging and Photoclinometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, O. L.; Schenk, P. M.; Hoogenboom, T.

    2012-03-01

    Stereo and photoclinometry processing have been applied to Voyager and Galileo images of Io in order to derive regional- and local-scale topographic maps of 20% of the moon’s surface to date. We present initial mapping results.

  12. voyage in italy: roberto rossellini's non–dualistic view of the world ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Rossellini adopted in his film, Voyage in Italy (1954)1 to show that. Rossellini .... French when nine out of twelve writers for the Italian film journal ...... Roberto Esposito wrote that Italian philosophy has been traditionally open to the conflicts.

  13. Academy of Program/Project & Engineering Leadership: Shared Voyage: Learning and Unlearning from Remarkable Projects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shared Voyage is about four remarkable projects:the Advanced Composition Explorer (NASA), the Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (U.S. Air Force), the Pathfinder...

  14. Synthetic Micro/Nanomachines and Their Applications: Towards 'Fantastic Voyage'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei

    The 1966 movie Fantastic Voyage captured the world's imagination, portraying a tiny submarine navigating through the human bloodstream and treating life-threatening medical conditions. My PhD research focuses on the synthetic nano/microscale machines to realize the Fantastic Voyage vision. Various biomedical and environmental areas would benefit from the developments of efficient fuel-free and fuel-driven nano/microscale machines. The polymer-based catalytic tubular microengine is synthesized using a template based electrodeposition method. The oxygen bubble propelled microengine harvests the energy from chemical fuels (such as H2O2) and displays very efficient propulsion. It can serve as an ideal platform for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. For example, lectin modified polyaniline based microengines can be used for selective bacteria (E. Coli) isolation from food, clinical and environmental samples; poly(3-aminophenylboronic acid)/Ni/Pt microengine itself provides the 'built in' glucose recognition capability for 'on-the-fly' capture, transport and release of yeast cells. A series of micromotors which can be self-propelled in natural environments without additional chemical fuels are developed, holding great promise for in vivo biomedical applications: the polyaniline/zinc microrockets display effective autonomous motion in extreme acidic environments (such as human stomach); the Al-Ga/Ti based Janus micromotor can be propelled by the hydrogen bubbles generated from the rapid aluminum and water reaction; alkanethiols modified seawater-driven Mg Janus micromotors, which utilize macrogalvanic corrosion and chloride pitting corrosion processes, can be used for environmental oil remediation. Magnetically powered nanoswimmers have attracted considerable attention due to their great biocompatibility. A high-speed magnetically-propelled nanowire swimmer which mimics swimming microorganisms by exploiting the flexible nanowire as artificial flagella

  15. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Near Constant Contrast (NCC) Imagery Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  16. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Base Height (CBH) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Base Heights (CBH) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  17. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Type and Phase Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud type and phase from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  18. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Land Surface Temperature (LST) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  19. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Cover Layer (CCL) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Cover Layers (CCL) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  20. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  1. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Thickness and Age Environmental Data Records (EDRs) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Ice Thickness and Age from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  2. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Surface Temperature (IST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  3. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Height (CTH) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  4. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of SSM/I and SSMIS Microwave Brightness Temperatures, CSU Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) from Colorado State University (CSU) contains brightness temperatures that have been improved and quality-controlled over the...

  6. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of MSU and AMSU-A Mean Layer Temperatures, UAH Version 5.4 (Superseded)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Please note: this dataset has been superseded by a newer version (see below). This version is archived offline by NOAA NCEI. This Climate Data Record (CDR) includes...

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Cloud Properties from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of cloud products was produced by the University of Wisconsin using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-X)...

  8. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Effective Particle Size (CEPS) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Effective Particle Size (CEPS) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer...

  9. The microcomputer scientific software series 7: data recorder program for storing plant lists and calculating synecological coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Nimerfro; Gary Brand

    1993-01-01

    Describes a computer program designed for data recorders that stores plant lists and computes synecological coordinates from the stored list. The method of synecological coordinates uses plant species present on a site to quantify the site`s environmental factors.

  10. VIIRS Ocean Color Reprocessed Science Quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) Level 2 products from 2012-01 to the present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains VIIRS Ocean Color Reprocessed Environmental Data Record (EDR) Level 2 products produced by the NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and...

  11. JPSS NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  12. VIIRS Ocean Color Reprocessed Science Quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) Level 3 products from 2012-01 to the present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains VIIRS Ocean Color Reprocessed Environmental Data Record (EDR) Level 3 products produced by the NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and...

  13. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  14. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Height (Top and Base) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud height (top and base) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  15. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ocean Color/Chlorophyll (OCC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Ocean Color/Chlorophyll (OCC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  16. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Zonal Mean Ozone Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP), version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Zonal Mean Ozone Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP) dataset is a vertically resolved, global, gap-free and zonal mean dataset...

  17. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Volcanic Ash Detection and Height Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of volcanic ash from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) instrument...

  18. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Concentration and Ice Surface Temperature Environmental Data Records (EDRs) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Sea Ice Concentration (SIC) and Ice Surface Temperature (IST) from the Visible...

  19. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Imagery (not Near Constant Contrast) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  20. Automation of Field Operations and Services (AFOS) National Weather Service (NWS) Service Records and Retention System (SRRS) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Service Records and Retention System (SRRS) is historical digital data set DSI-9949, a collection of products created by the U.S. National Weather Service (NWS) and...

  1. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of SSM/I and SSMIS Microwave Brightness Temperatures, RSS Version 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Version 7 NOAA Fundamental Climate Data Record (CDR) from Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) contains brightness temperatures that have been inter-calibrated and...

  2. Genome-wide association study for ketosis in US Jerseys using producer-recorded data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Megonigal, J H; Clay, J S; Wolfe, C W

    2018-01-01

    Ketosis is one of the most frequently reported metabolic health events in dairy herds. Several genetic analyses of ketosis in dairy cattle have been conducted; however, few have focused specifically on Jersey cattle. The objectives of this research included estimating variance components for susceptibility to ketosis and identification of genomic regions associated with ketosis in Jersey cattle. Voluntary producer-recorded health event data related to ketosis were available from Dairy Records Management Systems (Raleigh, NC). Standardization was implemented to account for the various acronyms used by producers to designate an incidence of ketosis. Events were restricted to the first reported incidence within 60 d after calving in first through fifth parities. After editing, there were a total of 42,233 records from 23,865 cows. A total of 1,750 genotyped animals were used for genomic analyses using 60,671 markers. Because of the binary nature of the trait, a threshold animal model was fitted using THRGIBBS1F90 (version 2.110) using only pedigree information, and genomic information was incorporated using a single-step genomic BLUP approach. Individual single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects and the proportion of variance explained by 10-SNP windows were calculated using postGSf90 (version 1.38). Heritability of susceptibility to ketosis was 0.083 [standard deviation (SD) = 0.021] and 0.078 (SD = 0.018) in pedigree-based and genomic analyses, respectively. The marker with the largest associated effect was located on chromosome 10 at 66.3 Mbp. The 10-SNP window explaining the largest proportion of variance (0.70%) was located on chromosome 6 beginning at 56.1 Mbp. Gene Ontology (GO) and Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) enrichment analyses identified several overrepresented processes and terms related to immune function. Our results indicate that there is a genetic component related to ketosis susceptibility in Jersey cattle and, as such, genetic selection for

  3. A Shared Decision-Making System for Diabetes Medication Choice Utilizing Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Peng-Fei; Tian, Yu; Ren, Jing-Jing; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-09-01

    The use of a shared decision-making (SDM) process in antihyperglycemic medication strategy decisions is necessary due to the complexity of the conditions of diabetes patients. Knowledge of guidelines is used as decision aids in clinical situations, and during this process, no patient health conditions are considered. In this paper, we propose an SDM system framework for type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients that not only contains knowledge abstracted from guidelines but also employs a multilabel classification model that uses class-imbalanced electronic health record (EHR) data and that aims to provide a recommended list of available antihyperglycemic medications to help physicians and patients have an SDM conversation. The use of EHR data to serve as a decision-support component in decision aids helps physicians and patients to reach a more intuitive understanding of current health conditions and allows the tailoring of the available knowledge to each patient, leading to a more effective SDM. Real-world data from 2542 T2DM inpatient EHRs were substituted by 77 features and eight output labels, i.e., eight antihyperglycemic medications, and these data were utilized to build and validate the recommendation model. The multilabel recommendation model exhibited stable performance in every single-label classification and showed the ability to predict minority positive cases in which the average recall value of the eight classes was 0.9898. As a whole multilabel classifier, the recommendation model demonstrated outstanding performance, with scores of 0.0941 for Hamming Loss, 0.7611 for Accuracy exam , 0.9664 for Recall exam , and 0.8269 for F exam .

  4. Survival analysis using primary care electronic health record data: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkins, Adam Jose; Bonney, Andrew; Mullan, Judy; Mayne, Darren John; Barnett, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    An emerging body of research involves observational studies in which survival analysis is applied to data obtained from primary care electronic health records (EHRs). This systematic review of these studies examined the utility of using this approach. An electronic literature search of the Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases was conducted. Search terms and exclusion criteria were chosen to select studies where survival analysis was applied to the data extracted wholly from EHRs used in primary care medical practice. A total of 46 studies that met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review were examined. All were published within the past decade (2005-2014) with a majority ( n = 26, 57%) being published between 2012 and 2014. Even though citation rates varied from nil to 628, over half ( n = 27, 59%) of the studies were cited 10 times or more. The median number of subjects was 18,042 with five studies including over 1,000,000 patients. Of the included studies, 35 (76%) were published in specialty journals and 11 (24%) in general medical journals. The many conditions studied largely corresponded well with conditions important to general practice. Survival analysis applied to primary care electronic medical data is a research approach that has been frequently used in recent times. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by the ability to produce research with large numbers of subjects, across a wide range of conditions and with the potential of a high impact. Importantly, primary care data were thus available to inform primary care practice.

  5. Open source electronic health record and patient data management system for intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaut, Jacques; Reper, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    In Intensive Care Units, the amount of data to be processed for patients care, the turn over of the patients, the necessity for reliability and for review processes indicate the use of Patient Data Management Systems (PDMS) and electronic health records (EHR). To respond to the needs of an Intensive Care Unit and not to be locked with proprietary software, we developed a PDMS and EHR based on open source software and components. The software was designed as a client-server architecture running on the Linux operating system and powered by the PostgreSQL data base system. The client software was developed in C using GTK interface library. The application offers to the users the following functions: medical notes captures, observations and treatments, nursing charts with administration of medications, scoring systems for classification, and possibilities to encode medical activities for billing processes. Since his deployment in February 2004, the PDMS was used to care more than three thousands patients with the expected software reliability and facilitated data management and review processes. Communications with other medical software were not developed from the start, and are realized by the use of the Mirth HL7 communication engine. Further upgrade of the system will include multi-platform support, use of typed language with static analysis, and configurable interface. The developed system based on open source software components was able to respond to the medical needs of the local ICU environment. The use of OSS for development allowed us to customize the software to the preexisting organization and contributed to the acceptability of the whole system.

  6. Generating Vegetation Leaf Area Index Earth System Data Record from Multiple Sensors. Part 1; Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sangram; Schull, Mitchell A.; Samanta, Arindam; Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Milesi, Cristina; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    The generation of multi-decade long Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) from remote sensing measurements of multiple sensors is key to monitoring long-term changes in vegetation due to natural and anthropogenic influences. Challenges in developing such ESDRs include problems in remote sensing science (modeling of variability in global vegetation, scaling, atmospheric correction) and sensor hardware (differences in spatial resolution, spectral bands, calibration, and information content). In this paper, we develop a physically based approach for deriving LAI and FPAR products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data that are of comparable quality to the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI and FPAR products, thus realizing the objective of producing a long (multi-decadal) time series of these products. The approach is based on the radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants which facilitates parameterization of the canopy spectral bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). The methodology permits decoupling of the structural and radiometric components and obeys the energy conservation law. The approach is applicable to any optical sensor, however, it requires selection of sensor-specific values of configurable parameters, namely, the single scattering albedo and data uncertainty. According to the theory of spectral invariants, the single scattering albedo is a function of the spatial scale, and thus, accounts for the variation in BRF with sensor spatial resolution. Likewise, the single scattering albedo accounts for the variation in spectral BRF with sensor bandwidths. The second adjustable parameter is data uncertainty, which accounts for varying information content of the remote sensing measurements, i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, low information content), vs. spectral BRF (higher

  7. Use of Electronic Health Records and Administrative Data for Public Health Surveillance of Eye Health and Vision-Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Amanda; Davidson, Arthur; Lum, Flora; Chiang, Michael; Saaddine, Jinan B; Zhang, Xinzhi; Crews, John E.; Chou, Chiu-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To discuss the current trend toward greater use of electronic health records and how these records could enhance public health surveillance of eye health and vision-related conditions. Methods We describe three currently available sources of electronic health data (Kaiser Permanente, the Veterans Health Administration, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) and how these sources can contribute to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Results Each of the three sources of electronic health data can contribute meaningfully to a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system, but none currently provide all the information required. The use of electronic health records for vision and eye health surveillance has both advantages and disadvantages. Conclusions Electronic health records may provide additional information needed to create a comprehensive vision and eye health surveillance system. Recommendations for incorporating electronic health records into such a system are presented. PMID:23158225

  8. Automated Detection of Sepsis Using Electronic Medical Record Data: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despins, Laurel A

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are global issues with high mortality rates. Early recognition and intervention are essential to optimize patient outcomes. Automated detection using electronic medical record (EMR) data can assist this process. This review describes automated sepsis detection using EMR data. PubMed retrieved publications between January 1, 2005 and January 31, 2015. Thirteen studies met study criteria: described an automated detection approach with the potential to detect sepsis or sepsis-related deterioration in real or near-real time; focused on emergency department and hospitalized neonatal, pediatric, or adult patients; and provided performance measures or results indicating the impact of automated sepsis detection. Detection algorithms incorporated systemic inflammatory response and organ dysfunction criteria. Systems in nine studies generated study or care team alerts. Care team alerts did not consistently lead to earlier interventions. Earlier interventions did not consistently translate to improved patient outcomes. Performance measures were inconsistent. Automated sepsis detection is potentially a means to enable early sepsis-related therapy but current performance variability highlights the need for further research.

  9. A 30+ Year AVHRR LAI and FAPAR Climate Data Record: Algorithm Description, Validation, and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Martin; Matthews, Jessica L.; Vermote, Eric F.; Justice, Christopher O.

    2016-01-01

    In- land surface models, which are used to evaluate the role of vegetation in the context ofglobal climate change and variability, LAI and FAPAR play a key role, specifically with respect to thecarbon and water cycles. The AVHRR-based LAIFAPAR dataset offers daily temporal resolution,an improvement over previous products. This climate data record is based on a carefully calibratedand corrected land surface reflectance dataset to provide a high-quality, consistent time-series suitablefor climate studies. It spans from mid-1981 to the present. Further, this operational dataset is availablein near real-time allowing use for monitoring purposes. The algorithm relies on artificial neuralnetworks calibrated using the MODIS LAI/FAPAR dataset. Evaluation based on cross-comparisonwith MODIS products and in situ data show the dataset is consistent and reliable with overalluncertainties of 1.03 and 0.15 for LAI and FAPAR, respectively. However, a clear saturation effect isobserved in the broadleaf forest biomes with high LAI (greater than 4.5) and FAPAR (greater than 0.8) values.

  10. CCR+: Metadata Based Extended Personal Health Record Data Model Interoperable with the ASTM CCR Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Jang, Tae Hun; Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-01-01

    Extension of the standard model while retaining compliance with it is a challenging issue because there is currently no method for semantically or syntactically verifying an extended data model. A metadata-based extended model, named CCR+, was designed and implemented to achieve interoperability between standard and extended models. Furthermore, a multilayered validation method was devised to validate the standard and extended models. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Community Care Record (CCR) standard was selected to evaluate the CCR+ model; two CCR and one CCR+ XML files were evaluated. In total, 188 metadata were extracted from the ASTM CCR standard; these metadata are semantically interconnected and registered in the metadata registry. An extended-data-model-specific validation file was generated from these metadata. This file can be used in a smartphone application (Health Avatar CCR+) as a part of a multilayered validation. The new CCR+ model was successfully evaluated via a patient-centric exchange scenario involving multiple hospitals, with the results supporting both syntactic and semantic interoperability between the standard CCR and extended, CCR+, model. A feasible method for delivering an extended model that complies with the standard model is presented herein. There is a great need to extend static standard models such as the ASTM CCR in various domains: the methods presented here represent an important reference for achieving interoperability between standard and extended models.

  11. Early Evaluation of the VIIRS Calibration, Cloud Mask and Surface Reflectance Earth Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermote, Eric; Justice, Chris; Csiszar, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Surface reflectance is one of the key products fromVIIRS and as withMODIS, is used in developing several higherorder land products. The VIIRS Surface Reflectance (SR) Intermediate Product (IP) is based on the heritageMODIS Collection 5 product (Vermote, El Saleous, & Justice, 2002). The quality and character of surface reflectance depend on the accuracy of the VIIRS Cloud Mask (VCM), the aerosol algorithms and the adequate calibration of the sensor. The focus of this paper is the early evaluation of the VIIRS SR product in the context of the maturity of the operational processing system, the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS). After a brief introduction, the paper presents the calibration performance and the role of the surface reflectance in calibration monitoring. The analysis of the performance of the cloud mask with a focus on vegetation monitoring (no snow conditions) shows typical problems over bright surfaces and high elevation sites. Also discussed is the performance of the aerosol input used in the atmospheric correction and in particular the artifacts generated by the use of the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System. Early quantitative results of the performance of the SR product over the AERONET sites showthatwith the fewadjustments recommended, the accuracy iswithin the threshold specifications. The analysis of the adequacy of the SR product (Land PEATE adjusted version) in applications of societal benefits is then presented. We conclude with a set of recommendations to ensure consistency and continuity of the JPSS mission with the MODIS Land Climate Data Record.

  12. Primary Care Practices’ Abilities And Challenges In Using Electronic Health Record Data For Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah J.; Dorr, David A.; Knierim, Kyle; DuBard, C. Annette; Hemler, Jennifer R.; Hall, Jennifer D.; Marino, Miguel; Solberg, Leif I.; McConnell, K. John; Nichols, Len M.; Nease, Donald E.; Edwards, Samuel T.; Wu, Winfred Y.; Pham-Singer, Hang; Kho, Abel N.; Phillips, Robert L.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Duffy, F. Daniel; Balasubramanian, Bijal A.

    2018-01-01

    Federal value-based payment programs require primary care practices to conduct quality improvement activities, informed by the electronic reports on clinical quality measures that their electronic health records (EHRs) generate. To determine whether EHRs produce reports adequate to the task, we examined survey responses from 1,492 practices across twelve states, supplemented with qualitative data. Meaningful-use participation, which requires the use of a federally certified EHR, was associated with the ability to generate reports—but the reports did not necessarily support quality improvement initiatives. Practices reported numerous challenges in generating adequate reports, such as difficulty manipulating and aligning measurement time frames with quality improvement needs, lack of functionality for generating reports on electronic clinical quality measures at different levels, discordance between clinical guidelines and measures available in reports, questionable data quality, and vendors that were unreceptive to changing EHR configuration beyond federal requirements. The current state of EHR measurement functionality may be insufficient to support federal initiatives that tie payment to clinical quality measures. PMID:29608365

  13. Primary Care Practices' Abilities And Challenges In Using Electronic Health Record Data For Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah J; Dorr, David A; Knierim, Kyle; DuBard, C Annette; Hemler, Jennifer R; Hall, Jennifer D; Marino, Miguel; Solberg, Leif I; McConnell, K John; Nichols, Len M; Nease, Donald E; Edwards, Samuel T; Wu, Winfred Y; Pham-Singer, Hang; Kho, Abel N; Phillips, Robert L; Rasmussen, Luke V; Duffy, F Daniel; Balasubramanian, Bijal A

    2018-04-01

    Federal value-based payment programs require primary care practices to conduct quality improvement activities, informed by the electronic reports on clinical quality measures that their electronic health records (EHRs) generate. To determine whether EHRs produce reports adequate to the task, we examined survey responses from 1,492 practices across twelve states, supplemented with qualitative data. Meaningful-use participation, which requires the use of a federally certified EHR, was associated with the ability to generate reports-but the reports did not necessarily support quality improvement initiatives. Practices reported numerous challenges in generating adequate reports, such as difficulty manipulating and aligning measurement time frames with quality improvement needs, lack of functionality for generating reports on electronic clinical quality measures at different levels, discordance between clinical guidelines and measures available in reports, questionable data quality, and vendors that were unreceptive to changing EHR configuration beyond federal requirements. The current state of EHR measurement functionality may be insufficient to support federal initiatives that tie payment to clinical quality measures.

  14. Standard Guide for Recording Mechanical Test Data of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials in Databases

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides a common format for mechanical test data for composite materials for two purposes: (1) to establish data reporting requirements for test methods and ( 2) to provide information for the design of material property databases. This guide should be used in combination with Guide E 1309 which provides similar information to identify the composite material tested. 1.2 These guidelines are specific to mechanical tests of high-modulus fiber-reinforced composite materials. Types of tests considered in this guide include tension, compression, shear, flexure, open/filled hole, bearing, fracture toughness, and fatigue. The ASTM standards for which this guide was developed are listed in . The guidelines may also be useful for additional tests or materials. 1.3 This guide is the second part of a modular approach for which the first part is Guide E 1309. Guide E 1309 serves to identify the material, and this guide serves to describe mechanical testing procedures and variables and to record results....

  15. Results of the power-up test of the nuclear-powered ship MUTSU and test programs of her experimental voyages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Masa-aki; Ishida, Toshihisa; Itagaki, Masafumi; Sakamoto, Yukio; Kyouya, Masahiko

    1991-01-01

    The power-up test of N.S. MUTSU was performed successfully almost on schedule in spite of minor troubles resolved in a short time, and the results of various areas were satisfactory. The official sea trial was well carried out. Then, the ship was officially designated the first nuclear ship in Japan. Experimental voyages are to be performed to yield profitable data for further research on nuclear ships in the future. (author)

  16. Design and reliability analysis of high-speed and continuous data recording system based on disk array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changlong; Ma, Cheng; He, Ning; Zhang, Xugang; Wang, Chongyang; Jia, Huibo

    2002-12-01

    In many real-time fields the sustained high-speed data recording system is required. This paper proposes a high-speed and sustained data recording system based on the complex-RAID 3+0. The system consists of Array Controller Module (ACM), String Controller Module (SCM) and Main Controller Module (MCM). ACM implemented by an FPGA chip is used to split the high-speed incoming data stream into several lower-speed streams and generate one parity code stream synchronously. It also can inversely recover the original data stream while reading. SCMs record lower-speed streams from the ACM into the SCSI disk drivers. In the SCM, the dual-page buffer technology is adopted to implement speed-matching function and satisfy the need of sustainable recording. MCM monitors the whole system, controls ACM and SCMs to realize the data stripping, reconstruction, and recovery functions. The method of how to determine the system scale is presented. At the end, two new ways Floating Parity Group (FPG) and full 2D-Parity Group (full 2D-PG) are proposed to improve the system reliability and compared with the Traditional Parity Group (TPG). This recording system can be used conveniently in many areas of data recording, storing, playback and remote backup with its high-reliability.

  17. Voyager microwave scintillation measurements of solar wind plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the solar conjunctions of Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in August 1979, September 1980, and November 1982, temporal variations of intensity and frequency of the dual-wavelength (3.6 and 13 cm) radio transmissions from the spacecraft were observed and subsequently analyzed to infer characteristics of the solar wind plasma flow. Measurements of the temporal wave structure function were used to estimate the spectral index of the power law spatial spectrum of irregularities. Theoretical-intensity scintillation spectra were compared with measured intensity spectra to obtain least-squares estimates of (1) mean velocity, (2) random velocity, (3) axial ratio, and (4) electron density standard deviation. Uncertainties in parameter estimates were calculated by standard propagation of errors techniques. Mean velocity and electron density standard deviations in 1979-1980 show little dependence on solar latitude. Density standard deviation estimates were 3-10% of the background mean density and mean velocity estimates ranged from approx.200 km/s inside 17 solar radii to approx.300 km/s at 25 solar radii. 1982 density standard deviation estimates increased rapidly with latitude near 45 0 N, then sharply decreased north of that latitude, indicating the existence of a polar region of reduced fluctuations surrounded by a thin cone of strong density irregularities

  18. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Measure Care Quality for Individuals with Multiple Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Elizabeth A; McQuillan, Deanna B; Ellis, Jennifer L; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Zeng, Chan; Barton, Mary B; Boyd, Cynthia M; Fortin, Martin; Ling, Shari M; Tai-Seale, Ming; Ralston, James D; Ritchie, Christine S; Zulman, Donna M

    2016-09-01

    To inform the development of a data-driven measure of quality care for individuals with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs) derived from an electronic health record (EHR). Qualitative study using focus groups, interactive webinars, and a modified Delphi process. Research department within an integrated delivery system. The webinars and Delphi process included 17 experts in clinical geriatrics and primary care, health policy, quality assessment, health technology, and health system operations. The focus group included 10 individuals aged 70-87 with three to six chronic conditions selected from a random sample of individuals aged 65 and older with three or more chronic medical conditions. Through webinars and the focus group, input was solicited on constructs representing high-quality care for individuals with MCCs. A working list was created of potential measures representing these constructs. Using a modified Delphi process, experts rated the importance of each possible measure and the feasibility of implementing each measure using EHR data. High-priority constructs reflected processes rather than outcomes of care. High-priority constructs that were potentially feasible to measure included assessing physical function, depression screening, medication reconciliation, annual influenza vaccination, outreach after hospital admission, and documented advance directives. High-priority constructs that were less feasible to measure included goal setting and shared decision-making, identifying drug-drug interactions, assessing social support, timely communication with patients, and other aspects of good customer service. Lower-priority domains included pain assessment, continuity of care, and overuse of screening or laboratory testing. High-quality MCC care should be measured using meaningful process measures rather than outcomes. Although some care processes are currently extractable from electronic data, capturing others will require adapting and applying technology to

  19. An analysis of flight Quick Access Recorder (QAR) data and its applications in preventing landing incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Wu, Changxu; Sun, Ruishan

    2014-01-01

    A long landing is one type of flight incident that will multiply the risk of a runway excursion. It occurs frequently but receives little attention in research due to difficulty in obtaining the real flight data. The aim of this paper is to discover key flight parameter features of long landing incidents by analyzing Quick Access Recorder (QAR) data and put forward prevention measures from the perspective of pilot operation at the same time. First, 73 flight performance parameter variables and 4 operation parameter variables were defined, covering major landing stages from 1500 ft to touchdown. Then 128 cases of selected QAR data were divided into two groups according to the threshold of identifying normal and long landing. Second, each flight parameter variable of these 128 flights was compared between groups and then the logistic and linear regression models were developed respectively to further examine the links between touchdown distance and these flight parameter variables. Third, potential flight operation causing performance difference of long landing incidents was also analyzed. Finally results indicate that the period of 200 ft to touchdown is the key stage of landing and flare is the most critical operation affecting touchdown distance. It is suggested that the pilot should inspect the ratio of descent rate and groundspeed carefully at the height of 50 ft and pilot's faster and steady pulling up columns is probably helpful for an excellent flare and landing. The findings are expected to be applied into flight operation practice for further preventing long landing incidents and even the runway excursion accidents

  20. Modeling Shocks Detected by Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. K.; Pogorelov, N. V. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    The magnetometer (MAG) on Voyager 1 ( V1 ) has been sampling the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) since 2012 August. The V1 MAG observations have shown draped ISMF in the very local interstellar medium disturbed occasionally by significant enhancements in magnetic field strength. Using a three-dimensional, data-driven, multi-fluid model, we investigated these magnetic field enhancements beyond the heliopause that are supposedly associated with solar transients. To introduce time-dependent effects at the inner boundary at 1 au, we used daily averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set. The model ISMF strength, direction, and proton number density are compared with V1 data beyond the heliopause. The model reproduced the large-scale fluctuations between 2012.652 and 2016.652, including major events around 2012.9 and 2014.6. The model also predicts shocks arriving at V1 around 2017.395 and 2019.502. Another model driven by OMNI data with interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) removed at the inner boundary suggests that ICMEs may play a significant role in the propagation of shocks into the interstellar medium.

  1. Middle Range Sea Ice Prediction System of Voyage Environmental Information System in Arctic Sea Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    Due to global warming, the sea ice in the Arctic Ocean is melting dramatically in summer, which is providing a new opportunity to exploit the Northern Sea Route (NSR) connecting Asia and Europe ship route. Recent increases in logistics transportation through NSR and resource development reveal the possible threats of marine pollution and marine transportation accidents without real-time navigation system. To develop a safe Voyage Environmental Information System (VEIS) for vessels operating, the Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) which is supported by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea has initiated the development of short-term and middle range prediction system for the sea ice concentration (SIC) and sea ice thickness (SIT) in NSR since 2014. The sea ice prediction system of VEIS consists of AMSR2 satellite composite images (a day), short-term (a week) prediction system, and middle range (a month) prediction system using a statistical method with re-analysis data (TOPAZ) and short-term predicted model data. In this study, the middle range prediction system for the SIC and SIT in NSR is calibrated with another middle range predicted atmospheric and oceanic data (NOAA CFSv2). The system predicts one month SIC and SIT on a daily basis, as validated with dynamic composite SIC data extracted from AMSR2 L2 satellite images.

  2. Water resources data, Idaho, 2004; Volume 1. Surface water records for Great Basin and Snake River basin above King Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, T.S.; Lehmann, A.K.; O'Dell, I.

    2005-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2004 water year for Idaho consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; discharge of irrigation diversions; and water levels and water quality of groundwater. The three volumes of this report contain discharge records for 209 stream-gaging stations and 8 irrigation diversions; stage only records for 6 stream-gaging stations; stage only for 6 lakes and reservoirs; contents only for 13 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality for 39 stream-gaging stations and partial record sites, 3 lakes sites, and 395 groundwater wells; and water levels for 425 observation network wells and 900 special project wells. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Volumes 1 & 2 contain the surface-water and surface-water-quality records. Volume 3 contains the ground-water and ground-water-quality records. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Idaho, adjacent States, and Canada.

  3. Water resources data, Idaho, 2003; Volume 1. Surface water records for Great Basin and Snake River basin above King Hill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, T.S.; Lehmann, A.K.; O'Dell, I.

    2004-01-01

    Water resources data for the 2003 water year for Idaho consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; discharge of irrigation diversions; and water levels and water quality of groundwater. The three volumes of this report contain discharge records for 208 stream-gaging stations and 14 irrigation diversions; stage only records for 6 stream-gaging stations; stage only for 6 lakes and reservoirs; contents only for 13 lakes and reservoirs; water-quality for 50 stream-gaging stations and partial record sites, 3 lakes sites, and 398 groundwater wells; and water levels for 427 observation network wells and 900 special project wells. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements. Volumes 1 & 2 contain the surface-water and surface-water-quality records. Volume 3 contains the ground-water and ground-water-quality records. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Idaho, adjacent States, and Canada.

  4. Cancer recording in patients with and without type 2 diabetes in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink primary care data and linked hospital admission data: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Rachael; van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Gallagher, Arlene M; Hammad, Tarek; Leufkens, Hubert G M; de Vries, Frank

    2018-05-26

    Conflicting results from studies using electronic health records to evaluate the associations between type 2 diabetes and cancer fuel concerns regarding potential biases. This study aimed to describe completeness of cancer recording in UK primary care data linked to hospital admissions records. Patients aged 40+ years with insulin or oral antidiabetic prescriptions in Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) primary care without type 1 diabetes were matched by age, sex and general practitioner practice to non-diabetics. Those eligible for linkage to Hospital Episode Statistics Admitted Patient Care (HES APC), and with follow-up during April 1997-December 2006 were included. Cancer recording and date of first record of cancer were compared. Characteristics of patients with cancer most likely to have the diagnosis recorded only in a single data source were assessed. Relative rates of cancer estimated from the two datasets were compared. 53 585 patients with type 2 diabetes matched to 47 435 patients without diabetes were included. Of all cancers (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) recorded in CPRD, 83% were recorded in HES APC. 94% of cases in HES APC were recorded in CPRD. Concordance was lower when restricted to same-site cancer records, and was negatively associated with increasing age. Relative rates for cancer were similar in both datasets. Good concordance in cancer recording was found between CPRD and HES APC among type 2 diabetics and matched controls. Linked data may reduce misclassification and increase case ascertainment when analysis focuses on site-specific cancers. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. How to limit the burden of data collection for Quality Indicators based on medical records? The COMPAQH experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grenier Catherine

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to limit the burden of data collection for Quality Indicators (QIs based on medical records. Methods The study was supervised by the COMPAQH project. Four QIs based on medical records were tested: medical record conformity; traceability of pain assessment; screening for nutritional disorders; time elapsed before sending copy of discharge letter to the general practitioner. Data were collected by 6 Clinical Research Assistants (CRAs in a panel of 36 volunteer hospitals and analyzed by COMPAQH. To limit the burden of data collection, we used the same sample of medical records for all 4 QIs, limited sample size to 80 medical records, and built a composite score of only 10 items to assess medical record completeness. We assessed QI feasibility by completing a grid of 19 potential problems and evaluating time spent. We assessed reliability (κ coefficient as well as internal consistency (Cronbach α coefficient in an inter-observer study, and discriminatory power by analysing QI variability among hospitals. Results Overall, 23 115 data items were collected for the 4 QIs and analyzed. The average time spent on data collection was 8.5 days per hospital. The most common feasibility problem was misunderstanding of the item by hospital staff. QI reliability was good (κ: 0.59–0.97 according to QI. The hospitals differed widely in their ability to meet the quality criteria (mean value: 19–85%. Conclusion These 4 QIs based on medical records can be used to compare the quality of record keeping among hospitals while limiting the burden of data collection, and can therefore be used for benchmarking purposes. The French National Health Directorate has included them in the new 2009 version of the accreditation procedure for healthcare organizations.

  6. EVALUATING RISK-PREDICTION MODELS USING DATA FROM ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L E; Shaw, Pamela A; Mathelier, Hansie M; Kimmel, Stephen E; French, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    The availability of data from electronic health records facilitates the development and evaluation of risk-prediction models, but estimation of prediction accuracy could be limited by outcome misclassification, which can arise if events are not captured. We evaluate the robustness of prediction accuracy summaries, obtained from receiver operating characteristic curves and risk-reclassification methods, if events are not captured (i.e., "false negatives"). We derive estimators for sensitivity and specificity if misclassification is independent of marker values. In simulation studies, we quantify the potential for bias in prediction accuracy summaries if misclassification depends on marker values. We compare the accuracy of alternative prognostic models for 30-day all-cause hospital readmission among 4548 patients discharged from the University of Pennsylvania Health System with a primary diagnosis of heart failure. Simulation studies indicate that if misclassification depends on marker values, then the estimated accuracy improvement is also biased, but the direction of the bias depends on the direction of the association between markers and the probability of misclassification. In our application, 29% of the 1143 readmitted patients were readmitted to a hospital elsewhere in Pennsylvania, which reduced prediction accuracy. Outcome misclassification can result in erroneous conclusions regarding the accuracy of risk-prediction models.

  7. A 60-year ocean colour data set from the continuous plankton recorder

    KAUST Repository

    Raitsos, Dionysios E.

    2012-11-20

    The phytoplankton colour index (PCI) of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey is an in situ measure of ocean colour, which is considered a proxy of the phytoplankton biomass. PCI has been extensively used to describe the major spatiotemporal patterns of phytoplankton in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Sea since 1931. Regardless of its wide application, the lack of an adequate evaluation to test the PCI\\'s quantitative nature is an important limitation. To address this concern, a field trial over the main production season has been undertaken to assess the numerical values assigned by previous investigations for each category of the greenness of the PCI. CPRs were towed across the English Channel from Roscoff to Plymouth consecutively for each of 8 months producing 76 standard CPR samples, each representing 10 nautical miles of tow. The results of this experiment test and update the PCI methodology, and confirm the validity of this long-term in situ ocean colour data set. In addition, using a 60-year time series of the PCI of the western English Channel, a comparison is made between the previous and the current revised experimental calculations of PCI. © 2012 The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  8. Multitemporal Snow Cover Mapping in Mountainous Terrain for Landsat Climate Data Record Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Christopher J.; Manson, Steven M.; Bauer, Marvin E.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2013-01-01

    A multitemporal method to map snow cover in mountainous terrain is proposed to guide Landsat climate data record (CDR) development. The Landsat image archive including MSS, TM, and ETM+ imagery was used to construct a prototype Landsat snow cover CDR for the interior northwestern United States. Landsat snow cover CDRs are designed to capture snow-covered area (SCA) variability at discrete bi-monthly intervals that correspond to ground-based snow telemetry (SNOTEL) snow-water-equivalent (SWE) measurements. The June 1 bi-monthly interval was selected for initial CDR development, and was based on peak snowmelt timing for this mountainous region. Fifty-four Landsat images from 1975 to 2011 were preprocessed that included image registration, top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance conversion, cloud and shadow masking, and topographic normalization. Snow covered pixels were retrieved using the normalized difference snow index (NDSI) and unsupervised classification, and pixels having greater (less) than 50% snow cover were classified presence (absence). A normalized SCA equation was derived to independently estimate SCA given missing image coverage and cloud-shadow contamination. Relative frequency maps of missing pixels were assembled to assess whether systematic biases were embedded within this Landsat CDR. Our results suggest that it is possible to confidently estimate historical bi-monthly SCA from partially cloudy Landsat images. This multitemporal method is intended to guide Landsat CDR development for freshwaterscarce regions of the western US to monitor climate-driven changes in mountain snowpack extent.

  9. Does electronic health record use improve hospital financial performance? Evidence from panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collum, Taleah H; Menachemi, Nir; Sen, Bisakha

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of electronic health record (EHR) adoption on hospital financial performance. We constructed a longitudinal panel using data from the three secondary sources: (a) the 2007-2010 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, (b) the 2007-2010 AHA Annual Survey Information Technology Supplement, and (c) the 2007-2011 Medicare Cost Reports from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Because potential financial benefits attributable to EHR adoption may take some time to accrue, we ran regressions with lags of 1 and 2 years that included hospital and year fixed effects to examine the relationship between the level of EHR adoption and three hospital financial performance measures. A change in the level of EHR adoption was not associated with changes in operating margin or return on assets within hospitals. However, total margin was significantly improved, after 2 years, in hospitals that moved from no EHR to having a comprehensive EHR in all areas of their hospital (β = 0.030, p financial performance measures examined. The improvements in total margin, as opposed to operating margin, are likely due to hospital incentive payments under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act that are reflected in nonpatient revenues and therefore show up in total margin calculations. Thus, after 2 years of EHR adoption, hospital financial performance is observed to improve based only on meaningful use incentive payments. More research will be needed to determine whether EHR adoption impacts financial performance on a longer time horizon.

  10. A 60-year ocean colour data set from the continuous plankton recorder

    KAUST Repository

    Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Walne, Anthony W.; Lavender, Sam; Licandro, Priscilla; Reid, Philip Chris; Edwards, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The phytoplankton colour index (PCI) of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) survey is an in situ measure of ocean colour, which is considered a proxy of the phytoplankton biomass. PCI has been extensively used to describe the major spatiotemporal patterns of phytoplankton in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Sea since 1931. Regardless of its wide application, the lack of an adequate evaluation to test the PCI's quantitative nature is an important limitation. To address this concern, a field trial over the main production season has been undertaken to assess the numerical values assigned by previous investigations for each category of the greenness of the PCI. CPRs were towed across the English Channel from Roscoff to Plymouth consecutively for each of 8 months producing 76 standard CPR samples, each representing 10 nautical miles of tow. The results of this experiment test and update the PCI methodology, and confirm the validity of this long-term in situ ocean colour data set. In addition, using a 60-year time series of the PCI of the western English Channel, a comparison is made between the previous and the current revised experimental calculations of PCI. © 2012 The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  11. Transient Structures and Possible Limits of Data Recording in Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianbo; Vanacore, Giovanni M; Yang, Zhe; Miao, Xiangshui; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2015-07-28

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) represent the leading candidates for universal data storage devices, which exploit the large difference in the physical properties of their transitional lattice structures. On a nanoscale, it is fundamental to determine their performance, which is ultimately controlled by the speed limit of transformation among the different structures involved. Here, we report observation with atomic-scale resolution of transient structures of nanofilms of crystalline germanium telluride, a prototypical PCM, using ultrafast electron crystallography. A nonthermal transformation from the initial rhombohedral phase to the cubic structure was found to occur in 12 ps. On a much longer time scale, hundreds of picoseconds, equilibrium heating of the nanofilm is reached, driving the system toward amorphization, provided that high excitation energy is invoked. These results elucidate the elementary steps defining the structural pathway in the transformation of crystalline-to-amorphous phase transitions and describe the essential atomic motions involved when driven by an ultrafast excitation. The establishment of the time scales of the different transient structures, as reported here, permits determination of the possible limit of performance, which is crucial for high-speed recording applications of PCMs.

  12. Seasonality Effects on Nonlinear Properties of Hydrometeorological Records: A New Method of Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livina, V. N.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Bunde, A.; Havlin, S.

    2007-12-01

    Climatic time series in general, and hydrological time series in particular, exhibit pronounced annual periodicity. This periodicity and its corresponding harmonics affect the nonlinear properties of the relevant time series (i.e., the long-range volatility correlations and width of multifractal spectrum) and thus have to be filtered out before studying fractal and volatility properties. We compare several filtering techniques (one of them proposed here) and find that in order to eliminate the periodicity effect on the nonlinear properties of the time series (i.e., the volatility and multifractal properties) it is necessary to filter out the seasonal standard deviation in addition to the filtering of the seasonal mean. The obtained results indicate weak volatility correlations (weak nonlinearity) in the river data, and this can be seen using different filterings approaches. [1] Livina~V.~N., Y.~Ashkenazy, A.~Bunde, and S.~Havlin, Seasonality effects on nonlinear properties of hydrometeorological records, in Extremes, Trends, and Correlations in Hydrology and Climate (ed. by J.P.Kropp & H.-J.Schellnhuber), Springer, Berlin, submitted.

  13. A Role for Semantic Web Technologies in Patient Record Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuji, Chimezie

    Business Process Management Systems (BPMS) are a component of the stack of Web standards that comprise Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Such systems are representative of the architectural framework of modern information systems built in an enterprise intranet and are in contrast to systems built for deployment on the larger World Wide Web. The REST architectural style is an emerging style for building loosely coupled systems based purely on the native HTTP protocol. It is a coordinated set of architectural constraints with a goal to minimize latency, maximize the independence and scalability of distributed components, and facilitate the use of intermediary processors.Within the development community for distributed, Web-based systems, there has been a debate regarding themerits of both approaches. In some cases, there are legitimate concerns about the differences in both architectural styles. In other cases, the contention seems to be based on concerns that are marginal at best. In this chapter, we will attempt to contribute to this debate by focusing on a specific, deployed use case that emphasizes the role of the Semantic Web, a simple Web application architecture that leverages the use of declarative XML processing, and the needs of a workflow system. The use case involves orchestrating a work process associated with the data entry of structured patient record content into a research registry at the Cleveland Clinic's Clinical Investigation department in the Heart and Vascular Institute.

  14. Preliminary Results from Initial Investigations of Ceres' Cratering Record from Dawn Imaging Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedemann, Nico; Michael, Gregory; Ivanov, Boris A.; Kneissl, Thomas; Neesemann, Adrian; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2015-04-01

    The highly successful Dawn mission [1] finished data collection at Vesta in 2012 and is now on its way to the dwarf planet Ceres. According to the current Ceres approach timeline of the Dawn mission, the ground resolution of the Dawn FC camera [2] will be about 10 times better than Hubble data [3] at the time of the presentation of this work. This may allow for identification of craters about 15 km in diameter. Initial mapping of sample areas may provide enough information of the cratering record in order to compare it with the theoretical Ceres crater production function we present at the 46th LPSC conference (March 16-20, 2015, The Woodlands, Texas) [4]. Our preliminary crater production function for Ceres is derived from the assumption of an icy crust just below a thin surface layer of dust [5], and a projectile population that is very similar to the one that impacted the Moon [6]. In order to scale the lunar cratering record to Ceres we use the Ivanov scaling laws [7], which allow for crater scaling based on parameters that can be derived from observations. The lunar-like approach gave reasonable good results for the crater production function on the asteroids Vesta, Ida, Lutetia and Gaspra [8]. Since the lunar surface is of basaltic composition, the correct scaling between the different materials is challenging. One crucial parameter is the transition diameter from simple to complex craters. Based on the simple to complex transition diameter on Iapetus, an icy satellite of Saturn, we expect this transition at about 12 km crater size at Ceres. This value may be slightly different due to the different temperatures at Ceres and Iapetus. If the simple to complex transition is observed at much larger diameters, the reason could be a substantial fraction of rock in the shallow subsurface of Ceres. In an ice-rich surface material high relaxation rates may also be expected that could change the shape of the crater production function. A thorough geological mapping

  15. Managing the security of nursing data in the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadbeik, Mahnaz; Gorzin, Zahra; Khoshkam, Masomeh; Roudbari, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    The Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a patient care information resource for clinicians and nursing documentation is an essential part of comprehensive patient care. Ensuring privacy and the security of health information is a key component to building the trust required to realize the potential benefits of electronic health information exchange. This study was aimed to manage nursing data security in the EHR and also discover the viewpoints of hospital information system vendors (computer companies) and hospital information technology specialists about nursing data security. This research is a cross sectional analytic-descriptive study. The study populations were IT experts at the academic hospitals and computer companies of Tehran city in Iran. Data was collected by a self-developed questionnaire whose validity and reliability were confirmed using the experts' opinions and Cronbach's alpha coefficient respectively. Data was analyzed through Spss Version 18 and by descriptive and analytic statistics. The findings of the study revealed that user name and password were the most important methods to authenticate the nurses, with mean percent of 95% and 80%, respectively, and also the most significant level of information security protection were assigned to administrative and logical controls. There was no significant difference between opinions of both groups studied about the levels of information security protection and security requirements (p>0.05). Moreover the access to servers by authorized people, periodic security update, and the application of authentication and authorization were defined as the most basic security requirements from the viewpoint of more than 88 percent of recently-mentioned participants. Computer companies as system designers and hospitals information technology specialists as systems users and stakeholders present many important views about security requirements for EHR systems and nursing electronic documentation systems. Prioritizing

  16. Using primary care electronic health record data for comparative effectiveness research : experience of data quality assessment and preprocessing in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yunyu; Voorham, Jaco; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.

    Aim: Details of data quality and how quality issues were solved have not been reported in published comparative effectiveness studies using electronic health record data. Methods: We developed a conceptual framework of data quality assessment and preprocessing and apply it to a study comparing

  17. The value of structured data elements from electronic health records for identifying subjects for primary care clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateya, Mohammad B; Delaney, Brendan C; Speedie, Stuart M

    2016-01-11

    An increasing number of clinical trials are conducted in primary care settings. Making better use of existing data in the electronic health records to identify eligible subjects can improve efficiency of such studies. Our study aims to quantify the proportion of eligibility criteria that can be addressed with data in electronic health records and to compare the content of eligibility criteria in primary care with previous work. Eligibility criteria were extracted from primary care studies downloaded from the UK Clinical Research Network Study Portfolio. Criteria were broken into elemental statements. Two expert independent raters classified each statement based on whether or not structured data items in the electronic health record can be used to determine if the statement was true for a specific patient. Disagreements in classification were discussed until 100 % agreement was reached. Statements were also classified based on content and the percentages of each category were compared to two similar studies reported in the literature. Eligibility criteria were retrieved from 228 studies and decomposed into 2619 criteria elemental statements. 74 % of the criteria elemental statements were considered likely associated with structured data in an electronic health record. 79 % of the studies had at least 60 % of their criteria statements addressable with structured data likely to be present in an electronic health record. Based on clinical content, most frequent categories were: "disease, symptom, and sign", "therapy or surgery", and "medication" (36 %, 13 %, and 10 % of total criteria statements respectively). We also identified new criteria categories related to provider and caregiver attributes (2.6 % and 1 % of total criteria statements respectively). Electronic health records readily contain much of the data needed to assess patients' eligibility for clinical trials enrollment. Eligibility criteria content categories identified by our study can be

  18. Establishment of data base of regional seismic recordings from earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions in the Former Soviet Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolenko, N.A.; Kopnichev, Yu.F.; Kunakov, V.G.; Kunakova, O.K.; Rakhmatullin, M.Kh.; Sokolova, I.N.; Vybornyy, Zh.I. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Fiziki Zemli

    1995-06-01

    In this report results of work on establishment of a data base of regional seismic recordings from earthquakes, chemical explosions and nuclear explosions in the former Soviet Union are described. This work was carried out in the Complex Seismological Expedition (CSE) of the Joint Institute of Physics of the Earth of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The recording system, methods of investigations and primary data processing are described in detail. The largest number of digital records was received by the permanent seismic station Talgar, situated in the northern Tien Shan, 20 km to the east of Almaty city. More than half of the records are seismograms of underground nuclear explosions and chemical explosions. The nuclear explosions were recorded mainly from the Semipalatinsk test site. In addition, records of the explosions from the Chinese test site Lop Nor and industrial nuclear explosions from the West Siberia region were obtained. Four records of strong chemical explosions were picked out (two of them have been produced at the Semipalatinsk test site and two -- in Uzbekistan). We also obtained 16 records of crustal earthquakes, mainly from the Altai region, close to the Semipalatinsk test site, and also from the West China region, close to the Lop Nor test site. In addition, a small number of records of earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions, received by arrays of temporary stations, that have been working in the southern Kazakhstan region are included in this report. Parameters of the digital seismograms and file structure are described. Possible directions of future work on the digitizing of unique data archive are discussed.

  19. Work plan for ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation at the New Rifle Site, Rifle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water monitor wells and ground water elevation data recorders (data loggers) at the New Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, Rifle, Colorado. The monitor wells and data loggers will be used to gather required time-dependent data to investigate the interaction between the shallow aquifer and the Colorado River

  20. Work plan for ground water elevation data recorder/monitor well installation at Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work that will be performed and the procedures that will be followed during installation of ground water monitor wells and ground water elevation data recorders (data loggers) at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. The monitor wells and data loggers will be used to gather required time-dependent data to investigate the interaction between the shallow aquifer and the Colorado River

  1. Analysis of Driver Evasive Maneuvering Prior to Intersection Crashes Using Event Data Recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, John M; Kusano, Kristofer D; Gabler, Hampton C

    2015-01-01

    Intersection crashes account for over 4,500 fatalities in the United States each year. Intersection Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (I-ADAS) are emerging vehicle-based active safety systems that have the potential to help drivers safely navigate across intersections and prevent intersection crashes and injuries. The performance of an I-ADAS is expected to be highly dependent upon driver evasive maneuvering prior to an intersection crash. Little has been published, however, on the detailed evasive kinematics followed by drivers prior to real-world intersection crashes. The objective of this study was to characterize the frequency, timing, and kinematics of driver evasive maneuvers prior to intersection crashes. Event data recorders (EDRs) downloaded from vehicles involved in intersection crashes were investigated as part of NASS-CDS years 2001 to 2013. A total of 135 EDRs with precrash vehicle speed and braking application were downloaded to investigate evasive braking. A smaller subset of 59 EDRs that collected vehicle yaw rate was additionally analyzed to investigate evasive steering. Each vehicle was assigned to one of 3 precrash movement classifiers (traveling through the intersection, completely stopped, or rolling stop) based on the vehicle's calculated acceleration and observed velocity profile. To ensure that any significant steering input observed was an attempted evasive maneuver, the analysis excluded vehicles at intersections that were turning, driving on a curved road, or performing a lane change. Braking application at the last EDR-recorded time point was assumed to indicate evasive braking. A vehicle yaw rate greater than 4° per second was assumed to indicate an evasive steering maneuver. Drivers executed crash avoidance maneuvers in four-fifths of intersection crashes. A more detailed analysis of evasive braking frequency by precrash maneuver revealed that drivers performing complete or rolling stops (61.3%) braked less often than drivers

  2. The comparison of cardiovascular risk scores using two methods of substituting missing risk factor data in patient medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dalton

    2011-07-01

    Conclusions A simple method of substituting missing risk factor data can produce reliable estimates of CVD risk scores. Targeted screening for high CVD risk, using pre-existing electronic medical record data, does not require multiple imputation methods in risk estimation.

  3. Reusability of coded data in the primary care electronic medical record : A dynamic cohort study concerning cancer diagnoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, Annet; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Helsper, Charles W.; Numans, Mattijs E.

    Objectives: To assess quality and reusability of coded cancer diagnoses in routine primary care data. To identify factors that influence data quality and areas for improvement. Methods: A dynamic cohort study in a Dutch network database containing 250,000 anonymized electronic medical records (EMRs)

  4. Voyager 1 in the foreshock, termination shock, and heliosheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R B; Krimigis, S M; Roelof, E C; Hill, M E; Armstrong, T P; Gloeckler, G; Hamilton, D C; Lanzerotti, L J

    2005-09-23

    Voyager 1 (V1) began measuring precursor energetic ions and electrons from the heliospheric termination shock (TS) in July 2002. During the ensuing 2.5 years, average particle intensities rose as V1 penetrated deeper into the energetic particle foreshock of the TS. Throughout 2004, V1 observed even larger, fluctuating intensities of ions from 40 kiloelectron volts (keV) to >/=50 megaelectron volts per nucleon and of electrons from >26 keV to >/=350 keV. On day 350 of 2004 (2004/350), V1 observed an intensity spike of ions and electrons that was followed by a sustained factor of 10 increase at the lowest energies and lesser increases at higher energies, larger than any intensities since V1 was at 15 astronomical units in 1982. The estimated solar wind radial flow speed was positive (outward) at approximately +100 kilometers per second (km s(-1)) from 2004/352 until 2005/018, when the radial flows became predominantly negative (sunward) and fluctuated between approximately -50 and 0 km s(-1) until about 2005/110; they then became more positive, with recent values (2005/179) of approximately +50 km s(-1). The energetic proton spectrum averaged over the postshock period is apparently dominated by strongly heated interstellar pickup ions. We interpret these observations as evidence that V1 was crossed by the TS on 2004/351 (during a tracking gap) at 94.0 astronomical units, evidently as the shock was moving radially inward in response to decreasing solar wind ram pressure, and that V1 has remained in the heliosheath until at least mid-2005.

  5. COMPRESSIBLE 'TURBULENCE' OBSERVED IN THE HELIOSHEATH BY VOYAGER 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the multiscale structure of the compressible 'turbulence' observed in the high-resolution (48 s) observations of the magnetic field strength B made by Voyager 2 (V2) in the heliosheath behind the termination shock from 2007 DOY 245.0-300.8 and in a unipolar region from 2008 DOY 2.9-75.6. The magnetic field strength is highly variable on scales from 48 s to several hours in both intervals. The distributions of daily averages and 48 s averages of B are lognormal in the post-termination shock (TS) region and Gaussian in the unipolar region, respectively. The amplitudes of the fluctuations were greater in the post-TS region than in the unipolar region, at scales less than several hours. The multiscale structure of the increments of B is described by the q-Gaussian distribution of nonextensive statistical mechanics on all scales from 48 s to 3.4 hr in the unipolar region and from 48 s to 6.8 hr in the post-TS region, respectively. The amplitudes of the fluctuations of increments of B are larger in the post-TS region than in the unipolar region at all scales. The probability density functions of the increments of B are non-Gaussian at all scales in the unipolar region, but they are Gaussian at the largest scales in the post-TS region. Time series of the magnitude and direction of B show that the fluctuations are highly compressive. The small-scale fluctuations are a mixture of coherent structures (semi-deterministic structures) and random structures, which vary significantly from day to day. Several types of coherent structures were identified in both regions.

  6. Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro Key, Joey; Yunes, Nico; Grimberg, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Einstein's Symphony: A Gravitational Wave Voyage Through Space and Time is a gravitational wave astronomy planetarium show in production by a collaboration of scientists, filmmakers, and artisits from the Center for Gravitational Wave Astonomy (CGWA) at the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) and Montana State University (MSU). The project builds on the success of the interdisciplinary Celebrating Einstein collaboration. The artists and scientists who created the A Shout Across Time original film and the Black (W)hole immersive art installation for Celebrating Einstein are teaming with the Museum of the Rockies Taylor Planetarium staff and students to create a new full dome Digistar planetarium show that will be freely and widely distributed to planetaria in the US and abroad. The show uses images and animations filmed and collected for A Shout Across Time and for Black (W)hole as well as new images and animations and a new soundtrack composed and produced by the MSU School of Music to use the full capability of planetarium sound systems. The planetarium show will be narrated with ideas drawn from the Celebrating Einstein danced lecture on gravitational waves that the collaboration produced. The combination of products, resources, and team members assembled for this project allows us to create an original planetarium show for a fraction of the cost of a typical show. In addition, STEM education materials for G6-12 students and teachers will be provided to complement and support the show. This project is supported by the Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC), Montana Space Grant Consortium (MSGC), and the American Physical Society (APS).

  7. Validation of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Ice Surface Temperature Environmental Data Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghui Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Continuous monitoring of the surface temperature is critical to understanding and forecasting Arctic climate change; as surface temperature integrates changes in the surface energy budget. The sea-ice surface temperature (IST has been measured with optical and thermal infrared sensors for many years. With the IST Environmental Data Record (EDR available from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites; we can continue to monitor and investigate Arctic climate change. This work examines the quality of the VIIRS IST EDR. Validation is performed through comparisons with multiple datasets; including NASA IceBridge measurements; air temperature from Arctic drifting ice buoys; Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS IST; MODIS IST simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO; and surface air temperature from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Results show biases of −0.34; −0.12; 0.16; −3.20; and −3.41 K compared to an aircraft-mounted downward-looking pyrometer; MODIS; MODIS SNO; drifting buoy; and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis; respectively; root-mean-square errors of 0.98; 1.02; 0.95; 4.89; and 6.94 K; and root-mean-square errors with the bias removed of 0.92; 1.01; 0.94; 3.70; and 6.04 K. Based on the IceBridge and MODIS results; the VIIRS IST uncertainty (RMSE meets or exceeds the JPSS system requirement of 1.0 K. The product can therefore be considered useful for meteorological and climatological applications.

  8. Investigating Global Ion and Neutral Atom Populations with IBEX and Voyager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinski, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this project was to investigate pickup ion (PUI) production in the solar wind and heliosheath (the region between the termination shock and the heliopause) and compute the distributed energetic neutral atom fluxes throughout the helioshpere. The simulations were constrained by comparing the model output against observations from Ulysses, New Horizons, Voyager 1 and 2, and IBEX space probes. As evidenced by the number of peer reviewed journal publications resulting from the project (13 plus three submitted) and their citation rate (156 citations over three years), the project has made a lasting contribution to the field. The outcome is a significant improvement of our understanding of the pickup ion production and distribution in the distant heliosphere. The team has accomplished the entire set of tasks A-H set forth in the proposal. Namely, the transport modeling framework has been augmented with two populations of pickup ions (PUIs), the boundary conditions for the plasma and interstellar neutral hydrogen were verified against Ulysses and New Horizons PUI and an optimal set of velocity diffusion parameters established. The multi-component fluxes of PUIs were computed and isotropic velocity distributions generated for each cell in the computer simulation that covered the heliosphere from 1.5 AU to the heliopause. The distributions were carefully compared with in situ measurements at 3 AU (Ulysses), 12 AU (New Horizons), and 80-90 AU (Voyager 1 and 2) as well as those inferred from ENA fluxes measured by Cassini and IBEX (Wu et al., 2016). Some examples of modeldata comparison are shown in Figure 1. We have used coupled MHD-plasma and kinetic-neutral code to investigate the likely range of plasma and magnetic field parameters in the local interstellar medium (LISM), based on the assumption that the shape of the IBEX ribbon could be used to determine the orientation of the interstellar magnetic field. While the magnetic field is believed to be

  9. Estimation of real-time runway surface contamination using flight data recorder parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Donovan

    Within this research effort, the development of an analytic process for friction coefficient estimation is presented. Under static equilibrium, the sum of forces and moments acting on the aircraft, in the aircraft body coordinate system, while on the ground at any instant is equal to zero. Under this premise the longitudinal, lateral and normal forces due to landing are calculated along with the individual deceleration components existent when an aircraft comes to a rest during ground roll. In order to validate this hypothesis a six degree of freedom aircraft model had to be created and landing tests had to be simulated on different surfaces. The simulated aircraft model includes a high fidelity aerodynamic model, thrust model, landing gear model, friction model and antiskid model. Three main surfaces were defined in the friction model; dry, wet and snow/ice. Only the parameters recorded by an FDR are used directly from the aircraft model all others are estimated or known a priori. The estimation of unknown parameters is also presented in the research effort. With all needed parameters a comparison and validation with simulated and estimated data, under different runway conditions, is performed. Finally, this report presents results of a sensitivity analysis in order to provide a measure of reliability of the analytic estimation process. Linear and non-linear sensitivity analysis has been performed in order to quantify the level of uncertainty implicit in modeling estimated parameters and how they can affect the calculation of the instantaneous coefficient of friction. Using the approach of force and moment equilibrium about the CG at landing to reconstruct the instantaneous coefficient of friction appears to be a reasonably accurate estimate when compared to the simulated friction coefficient. This is also true when the FDR and estimated parameters are introduced to white noise and when crosswind is introduced to the simulation. After the linear analysis the

  10. Testicular hypertrophy as a predictor for contralateral monorchism: Retrospective review of prospectively recorded data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodhod, A; Capolicchio, J P; Jednak, R; El-Sherbiny, M

    2016-02-01

    Testicular hypertrophy has previously been evaluated as a predictor of monorchism. However, its implication in clinical practice is not well evaluated. The aim of the present study was to examine its value in planning the operative time. Medical charts of prospectively recorded data of 76 consecutive patients with unilateral impalpable testis from 2011 to 2014 were reviewed at the present institute. Inclusion criteria included prepubertal patients with non-palpable testes by examination under anesthesia. Contralateral testes were prospectively measured using a Takihara orchidometer. Orchiectomy or orchiopexy was performed according to the viability of the undescended testis (UDT). Collected data included age of surgery, contralateral testicular size, surgical time and laparoscopic findings. A ROC curve was used to define the best cut-off volume of the contralateral testis that can predict ipsilateral testicular viability. The Student's t-test was used to examine if this cut-off volume would be useful in allocating the operative time. Of 76 patients, four palpable testes by examination under anesthesia were excluded. The remaining 72 patients were included in the study. Ipsilateral normal viable testes were found in 26 (36.1%) patients, while 46 (63.9%) had non-viable testes (testicular nubbins or vanishing testes) (Figure). A contralateral testicular volume > 2 ml was significantly predictive for monorchism with 71.7% sensitivity and 100% specificity (P 2 ml was 50 min, which was significantly shorter than that for UDT with a contralateral size ≤ 2 ml, which was 88 min (P value for testicular hypertrophy that predicts monorchism greatly varied. This is likely due to the different methods used for testicular measurements that make it impractical to make a direct comparison. The usefulness of predicting monorchism before surgery has not previously been used as a guide for allocating operative time in the management of a unilateral non-palpable testicle. This study

  11. Data records of biophysical products in the Copernicus Global Land Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydekerke, L.; Smets, B.; Swinnen, E.; Lacaze, R. N.; Calvet, J. C.; Baret, F.; camacho De Coca, F.; Roujean, J. L.; Tansey, K.; Coelho, S.; Jann, A.; Paulik, C.; Verger, A.

    2014-12-01

    From 1stJanuary 2013, the Copernicus Global Land service provides continuously a set of bio-geophysical variables describing, over the whole globe, the vegetation dynamic, the energy budget at the continental surface and some components of the water cycle. These generic products serve numerous applications such as agriculture and food security monitoring, weather forecast, climate change impact studies, water, forest and natural resources management. The portfolio contains Essential Climate Variables like Leaf Area Index (LAI), the Fraction of PAR absorbed by the vegetation (FAPAR), surface albedo, Land Surface Temperature, soil moisture, burnt areas, areas of water bodies, and additional vegetation indices. They are generated daily on a reliable and automatic basis from Earth Observation satellite data. Beside this timely production, the available historical archives, up to 16 years for SPOT-VEGETATION, have been processed using the same innovative algorithms. For a number of ECVs, the algorithms are adapted to work with NOAA-AVHRR as input to extend the time series up to 1982. The service continuity is provided in two parallel paths. On one hand, the existing retrieval methodologies are adapted to use the new PROBA-V sensor, fully consistent with SPOT-VEGETATION, and as such extends the time-series at 1km spatial resolution. On the other hand, the operation is moving to the finer resolution of PROBA-V (300m), while maintaining consistency with the 1km series. The data records are documented in terms of the physical methodologies, the technical properties, and the results of validation exercises. The service performs a continuous quality monitoring on three levels: technical, scientific and cross-cutting, following where possible the rules of CEOS/LPV and comparing with both in-situ and other datasets, e.g. MODIS. The service is improved through feedback from an independent expert team performing regular independent reviews and providing user feedback. All

  12. A Long-Term and Reproducible Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Data Record for Climate Studies and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, G.; Meier, W. N.; Scott, D. J.; Savoie, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    A long-term, consistent, and reproducible satellite-based passive microwave sea ice concentration climate data record (CDR) is available for climate studies, monitoring, and model validation with an initial operation capability (IOC). The daily and monthly sea ice concentration data are on the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) polar stereographic grid with nominal 25 km × 25 km grid cells in both the Southern and Northern Hemisphere polar regions from 9 July 1987 to 31 December 2007. The data files are available in the NetCDF data format at http://nsidc.org/data/g02202.html and archived by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) under the satellite climate data record program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/operationalcdrs.html). The description and basic characteristics of the NOAA/NSIDC passive microwave sea ice concentration CDR are presented here. The CDR provides similar spatial and temporal variability as the heritage products to the user communities with the additional documentation, traceability, and reproducibility that meet current standards and guidelines for climate data records. The data set, along with detailed data processing steps and error source information, can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.7265/N5B56GN3.

  13. Development of Hospital-based Data Sets as a Vehicle for Implementation of a National Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keikha, Leila; Farajollah, Seyede Sedigheh Seied; Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar

    2018-01-01

    In developing countries such as Iran, international standards offer good sources to survey and use for appropriate planning in the domain of electronic health records (EHRs). Therefore, in this study, HL7 and ASTM standards were considered as the main sources from which to extract EHR data. The objective of this study was to propose a hospital data set for a national EHR consisting of data classes and data elements by adjusting data sets extracted from the standards and paper-based records. This comparative study was carried out in 2017 by studying the contents of the paper-based records approved by the health ministry in Iran and the international ASTM and HL7 standards in order to extract a minimum hospital data set for a national EHR. As a result of studying the standards and paper-based records, a total of 526 data elements in 174 classes were extracted. An examination of the data indicated that the highest number of extracted data came from the free text elements, both in the paper-based records and in the standards related to the administrative data. The major sources of data extracted from ASTM and HL7 were the E1384 and Hl7V.x standards, respectively. In the paper-based records, data were extracted from 19 forms sporadically. By declaring the confidentiality of information, the ASTM standards acknowledge the issue of confidentiality of information as one of the main challenges of EHR development, and propose new types of admission, such as teleconference, tele-video, and home visit, which are inevitable with the advent of new technology for providing healthcare and treating diseases. Data related to finance and insurance, which were scattered in different categories by three organizations, emerged as the financial category. Documenting the role and responsibility of the provider by adding the authenticator/signature data element was deemed essential. Not only using well-defined and standardized data, but also adapting EHR systems to the local facilities and

  14. Statistical methods to enhance reporting of Aboriginal Australians in routine hospital records using data linkage affect estimates of health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Deborah A; Lujic, Sanja; Leyland, Alastair H; Jorm, Louisa R

    2013-10-01

    To investigate under-recording of Aboriginal people in hospital data from New South Wales (NSW), Australia, define algorithms for enhanced reporting, and examine the impact of these algorithms on estimated disparities in cardiovascular and injury outcomes. NSW Admitted Patient Data were linked with NSW mortality data (2001-2007). Associations with recording of Aboriginal status were investigated using multilevel logistic regression. The number of admissions reported as Aboriginal according to six algorithms was compared with the original (unenhanced) Aboriginal status variable. Age-standardised admission, and 30- and 365-day mortality ratios were estimated for cardiovascular disease and injury. Sixty per cent of the variation in recording of Aboriginal status was due to the hospital of admission, with poorer recording in private and major city hospitals. All enhancement algorithms increased the number of admissions reported as Aboriginal, from between 4.1% and 37.8%. Admission and mortality ratios varied markedly between algorithms, with less strict algorithms resulting in higher admission rate ratios, but generally lower mortality rate ratios, particularly for cardiovascular disease. The choice of enhancement algorithm has an impact on the number of people reported as Aboriginal and on estimated outcome ratios. The influence of the hospital on recording of Aboriginal status highlights the importance of continued efforts to improve data collection. Estimates of Aboriginal health disparity can change depending on how Aboriginal status is reported. Sensitivity analyses using a number of algorithms are recommended. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  15. mvp - an open-source preprocessor for cleaning duplicate records and missing values in mass spectrometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geunho; Lee, Hyun Beom; Jung, Byung Hwa; Nam, Hojung

    2017-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) data are used to analyze biological phenomena based on chemical species. However, these data often contain unexpected duplicate records and missing values due to technical or biological factors. These 'dirty data' problems increase the difficulty of performing MS analyses because they lead to performance degradation when statistical or machine-learning tests are applied to the data. Thus, we have developed missing values preprocessor (mvp), an open-source software for preprocessing data that might include duplicate records and missing values. mvp uses the property of MS data in which identical chemical species present the same or similar values for key identifiers, such as the mass-to-charge ratio and intensity signal, and forms cliques via graph theory to process dirty data. We evaluated the validity of the mvp process via quantitative and qualitative analyses and compared the results from a statistical test that analyzed the original and mvp-applied data. This analysis showed that using mvp reduces problems associated with duplicate records and missing values. We also examined the effects of using unprocessed data in statistical tests and examined the improved statistical test results obtained with data preprocessed using mvp.

  16. [Who decides what data should be recorded in the medical history in relation to the biological origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Riestra, Sergio; Riaño Galán, Isolina

    2018-02-01

    There is an increasing request by patients or their representatives not to have some data registered in their clinical history or if such data exists to be deleted. Without doubt, this is so because such clinical data is accessed by various professionals who in most cases are not directly involved in caring for such patients. On the other hand, such data is copied and iteratively and unnecessary reproduced in various discharge reports and others forms. The problem arises when such controversial data refer to particularly sensitive clinical aspects such as assisted reproduction techniques, which invades personal and family privacy. Therefore, the question is who determines what data should be recorded in the medical records and according to what criteria should be taken that decision? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Issues using linkage of hospital records and death certificate data to determine the size of a potential palliative care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brameld, Kate; Spilsbury, Katrina; Rosenwax, Lorna; Murray, Kevin; Semmens, James

    2017-06-01

    Studies aiming to identify palliative care populations have used data from death certificates and in some cases hospital records. The size and characteristics of the identified populations can show considerable variation depending on the data sources used. It is important that service planners and researchers are aware of this. To illustrate the differences in the size and characteristics of a potential palliative care population depending on the differential use of linked hospital records and death certificate data. Retrospective cohort study. The cohort consisted of 23,852 people aged 20 years and over who died in Western Australia between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010 after excluding deaths related to pregnancy or trauma. Within this cohort, the number, proportion and characteristics of people who died from one or more of 10 medical conditions considered amenable to palliative care were identified using linked hospital records and death certificate data. Depending on the information source(s) used, between 43% and 73% of the 23,852 people who died had a condition potentially amenable to palliative care identified. The median age at death and the sex distribution of the decedents by condition also varied with the information source. Health service planners and researchers need to be aware of the limitations when using hospital records and death certificate data to determine a potential palliative care population. The use of Emergency Department and other administrative data sources could further exacerbate this variation.

  18. Factors influencing the development of primary care data collection projects from electronic health records: a systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Gentil, Marie-Line; Cuggia, Marc; Fiquet, Laure; Hagenbourger, Camille; Le Berre, Thomas; Banâtre, Agnès; Renault, Eric; Bouzille, Guillaume; Chapron, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary care data gathered from Electronic Health Records are of the utmost interest considering the essential role of general practitioners (GPs) as coordinators of patient care. These data represent the synthesis of the patient history and also give a comprehensive picture of the population health status. Nevertheless, discrepancies between countries exist concerning routine data collection projects. Therefore, we wanted to identify elements that influence the development and dur...

  19. Design and development of X Y data logger for on-line recording of ion-beam spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandi, T.K.; Pandey, H.K.; Basak, S.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2008-01-01

    A microcontroller based beam current spectrum analyzing setup has been developed to measure various heavy ion beam current vs. corresponding magnetic field of dipole magnet. This system permits recording of beam current with respect to magnetic field and send data to personal computer to enable the computer processing of such data. The detail design and development of a 8051 (8-bit) microcontroller based X Y-data logger as well as front end software programming are reported in this paper. (author)

  20. UK National Data Centre archive of seismic recordings of (presumed) underground nuclear tests 1964-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Peacock, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    The year 1996 has particular significance for forensic seismologists. This was the year when the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was signed in September at the United Nations, setting an international norm against nuclear testing. Blacknest, as a long time seismic centre for research into detecting and identifying underground explosions using seismology, provided significant technical advice during the CTBT negotiations. Since 1962 seismic recordings of both presumed nuclear explosions and earthquakes from the four seismometer arrays Eskdalemuir, Scotland (EKA), Yellowknife, Canada (YKA), Gauribidanur, India (GBA), and Warramunga, Australia (WRA) have been copied, digitised, and saved. There was a possibility this archive would be lost. It was decided to process the records and catalogue them for distribution to other groups and institutions. This work continues at Blacknest but the archive is no longer under threat. In addition much of the archive of analogue tape recordings has been re-digitised with modern equipment, allowing sampling rates of 100 rather than 20 Hz.