WorldWideScience

Sample records for voyage data recorders

  1. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  2. Voyager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO.

    This paper provides an overview of the Voyager Expanded Learning programs. Initially begun with hands-on, activity-based learning experiences centered around academic themes designed to pique children's interest and motivate them to learn, Voyager has expanded from elementary after- and summer-school programs to include K-8 programs designed for…

  3. Voyages

    OpenAIRE

    Che, Philippe; Cruveillé, Solange; DUTRAIT, Noël; Kaser, Pierre; Kim, Hye-Gyeong; Naudou, Elizabeth; Ngoc, Nguyen Phuong; Pichard-Bertaux, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Le premier numéro d’Impressions d’Extrême-Orient est un volume de traductions inédites de textes en provenance de Chine, de Thaïlande, du Vietnam, de Corée et d’Inde autour du thème du voyage sur lequel revient Noël Dutrait dans un bref avant-propos. Chaque auteur, membre de la jeune équipe « Littératures d’Extrême-Orient, texte et traduction » (JE 2423 – LEO2T, Université de Provence), assure à la fois l’édition scientifique et la traduction des textes présentés dont la version originale est...

  4. 46 CFR 4.05-15 - Voyage records, retention of.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., stowage plans, records of draft, aids to mariners, night order books, radiograms sent and received, radio logs, crew and passenger lists, articles of shipment, official logs and other material which might...

  5. Turbulence in the solar wind: spectra from Voyager 2 data at 5 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Fraternale, F; Iovieno, M; Opher, M; Richardson, J D; Tordella, D

    2015-01-01

    The solar wind spectral properties are far from uniformity and evolve with the increasing distance from the sun. Most of the available spectra of solar wind turbulence were computed at 1 astronomical unit, while accurate spectra on wide frequency ranges at larger distances are still few. In this paper we consider solar wind spectra derived from the data recorded by the Voyager 2 mission during 1979 at about 5 AU from the sun. Voyager 2 data are an incomplete time series with a voids/signal ratio that typically increases as the spacecraft moves away from the sun (45% missing data in 1979), making the analysis challenging. In order to estimate the uncertainty of the spectral slopes, different methods are tested on synthetic turbulence signals with the same gap distribution as V2 data. Spectra of all variables show a power law scaling with exponents between -2.1 and -1.1, depending on frequency subranges. PDFs and correlations indicate that the flow has a significant intermittency.

  6. SkyServer Voyages Website - Using Big Data to Explore Astronomy Concepts in Formal Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Kate K.; Masters, Karen; Raddick, Jordan; Lundgren, Britt

    2015-08-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) web interface “SkyServer” has long included online educational materials designed to help students and the public discover the fundamentals of modern astronomy using real observations from the SDSS database. The newly launched SDSS Voyages website updates and expands these activities to reflect new data from subsequent generations of the survey, advances in web technology, and evolving practices in science education. Voyages provides access to quality astronomy, astrophysics, and engineering materials to educators seeking an inquiry approach to fundamental concepts. During this session we will provide an overview of the design and development of Skyserver Voyages and discuss ways to apply this resource at K-12 and university levels.

  7. Voyager 2 solar plasma and magnetic field spectral analysis for intermediate data sparsity

    CERN Document Server

    Gallana, Luca; Iovieno, Michele; Fosson, Sophie M; Magli, Enrico; Opher, Merav; Richardson, John D; Tordella, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The Voyager probes are the furthest, still active, spacecraft ever launched from Earth. During their 38-year trip, they have collected data regarding solar wind properties (such as the plasma velocity and magnetic field intensity). Unfortunately, a complete time evolution of the measured physical quantities is not available. The time series contains many gaps which increase in frequency and duration at larger distances. The aim of this work is to perform a spectral and statistical analysis of the solar wind plasma velocity and magnetic field using Voyager 2 data measured in 1979, when the gaps/signal ratio is of order of unity. This analysis is achieved using four different data reconstruction techniques: averages on linearly interpolated subsets, correlation of linearly interpolated data, compressed sensing spectral estimation, and maximum likelihood data reconstruction. With five frequency decades, the spectra we obtained have the largest frequency range ever computed at 5 astronomical units from the Sun; s...

  8. Quantitative measurements of Jupiter, Saturn, their rings and satellites made from Voyager imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S. A.; Bunker, A. S.

    1983-01-01

    The Voyager spacecraft cameras use selenium-sulfur slow scan vidicons to convert focused optical images into sensible electrical signals. The vidicon-generated data thus obtained are the basis of measurements of much greater precision than was previously possible, in virtue of their superior linearity, geometric fidelity, and the use of in-flight calibration. Attention is given to positional, radiometric, and dynamical measurements conducted on the basis of vidicon data for the Saturn rings, the Saturn satellites, and the Jupiter atmosphere.

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Voyage numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyage numbers. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY VOYAGE DATA Sec. 2 Voyage numbers. (a... designation and voyage number, as NSA-1/ABC-1. (b) The continuity of NSA voyage numbers shall not change...

  10. Radiation Transport of Heliospheric Lyman-alpha from Combined Cassini and Voyager Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, W.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Sandel, B.; Forrester, T.; Quemerais, E.; Moebius, E.; Esposito, L.; Stewart, I.; McClintock, W.; Jouchoux, A.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Heliospheric neutral hydrogen scatters solar Lyman-alpha radiation from the Sun with '27-day' intensity modulations observed near Earth due to the Sun's rotation combined with Earth's orbital motion. These modulations are increasingly damped in amplitude at larger distances from the Sun due to multiple scattering in the heliosphere, providing a diagnostic of the interplanetary neutral hydrogen density independent of instrument calibration. This paper presents Cassini data from 2003-2004 obtained downwind near Saturn at approximately 10 AU that at times show undamped '27-day' waves in good agreement with the single-scattering models of Pryor et al., 1992. Simultaneous Voyager 1 data from 2003- 2004 obtained upwind at a distance of 88.8-92.6 AU from the Sun show waves damped by a factor of -0.21. The observed degree of damping is interpreted in terms of Monte Carlo multiple-scattering calculations (e.g., Keller et al., 1981) applied to two heliospheric hydrogen two-shock density distributions (discussed in Gangopadhyay et al., 2006) calculated in the frame of the Baranov-Malama model of the solar wind interaction with the two-component (neutral hydrogen and plasma) interstellar wind (Baranov and Malama 1993, Izmodenov et al., 2001, Baranov and Izmodenov, 2006). We conclude that multiple scattering is definitely occurring in the outer heliosphere. Both models compare favorably to the data, using heliospheric neutral H densities at the termination shock of 0.085 cm(exp -3) and 0.095 cm(exp -3). This work generally agrees with earlier discussions of Voyager data in Quemerais et al., 1996 showing the importance of multiple scattering but is based on Voyager data obtained at larger distances from the Sun (with larger damping) simultaneously with Cassini data obtained closer to the Sun.

  11. 46 CFR 185.220 - Records of a voyage resulting in a marine casualty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., records of draft, aids to mariners, night order books, radiograms sent and received, radio logs, crew and passenger lists and counts, articles of shipment, official logs, and other material that might be...

  12. Voyager cartography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, R. M.; Lee, E. M.; Mullins, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Jovian and Saturnian satellites are being mapped at several scales from Voyager 1 and 2 data. The maps are especially formatted color mosaics, controlled photomosaics, and airbrush maps. At 1:5,000,000 scale, mapping of Io, Europa, and Ganymede is complete. At 1:15,000,000 scale, mapping of Io and Europa is complete, and mapping of Ganymede is approximately complete. A controlled mosaic of Rhea has been compiled as a Digital Image Model (DIM) in the same format as is being used for Mars. The mosaic is being formatted for publication as a two-sheet set (Lambert Azimuthal Equal Area, Mercator, and Polar Stereographic projections). Magnetic tape copies of the DIM have been distributed to regional Planetary Image Facilities and other interested users. The DIM has a scale of 1/16 degree/pixel, corresponding to approximately 833 m/pixel on Rhea. Details of the status of the various map series are reported quarterly to Planetary Geology Principal Investigators.

  13. Voyager 1 'Blue Movie'

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This is the original Voyager 'Blue Movie' (so named because it was built from Blue filter images). It records the approach of Voyager 1 during a period of over 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storms shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  14. VOYAGE PLANNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz SKÓRA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A sea voyage can be divided into three parts with varying degrees of risk: - from the berth at the port of departure to the pilot disembarkation point - from the pilot disembarkation to another pilot embarkation point near the port of call/destination - from the pilot embarkation point to the berth Results of statistical research into ship accidents at sea point to an increased number of incidents and accidents, including groundings, especially in restricted areas. Such areas are often narrow and have limited depths, while their short straight sections require frequent course alterations, often in varying hydrometeorological conditions. Due to all these factors, the voyage has to be carefully planned and all watchkeeping officers have to be well prepared to conduct the ship safely. The article presents the objectives, scope, legal basis and stages in the process of voyage planning. The compliance with the outlined principles will reduce the level of risk in maritime transport.

  15. Explaining the 11-year periodicity in Neptune's atmosphere with Voyager 2 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen; Harrison, R. Giles

    2017-04-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths, made since the 1970s by Lockwood and co-workers [e.g. 1], give a disk-averaged estimate of variations in the planet's clouds and atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations have previously been associated with the 11-year solar cycle [1], through two solar-modulated mechanisms, firstly, ultraviolet-related colour changes [2], or galactic cosmic ray (GCR)-related nucleation effects on atmospheric particle formation. Over 40 years of brightness data (1972-2014) are used here to show, with physically realistic modelling, that ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination rather than as alternatives. Existence of the cosmic ray mechanism is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity during the mid-1980s. This occurred in GCR and, critically for its use in mechanism discrimination, not the solar ultraviolet. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, which was close to Neptune at that time. The similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet particle modulation mechanisms are expected to occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric transport processes.[2] [1] Lockwood, G. W. & Thompson, D. T. Photometric variability of Neptune, 1972-2000. Icarus 156, 37-51 (2002). [2] Aplin, K. L. & Harrison, R. G. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere. Nat. Commun. 7:11976 doi: 10.1038/ncomms11976 (2016)

  16. Particle sizes of the Uranus delta ring's inner diffuse companion through comparison of RSS and PPS Voyager occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, John; Horn, Linda J.; Lane, Arthur L.

    1991-01-01

    In January, 1976, Voyager 2's photopolarimeter and UV spectrometer observed Delta Sagitarii and Beta Persei during their occultation by the Uranian delta ring. An inner diffuse companion of this ring was detected and found to have an average width of 12 km. By comparing the widths and equivalent depths of the two sets of data, it is established that the particles making the greatest contribution to the integrated opacities of the companion are of greater-than-several-cm sizes. The particles appear to be located away from the photopolarimetry edges, where there may be particles smaller than those observed elsewhere.

  17. Estimation of a genetically viable population for multigenerational interstellar voyaging: Review and data for project Hyperion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cameron M.

    2014-04-01

    Designing interstellar starships for human migration to exoplanets requires establishing the starship population, which factors into many variables including closed-ecosystem design, architecture, mass and propulsion. I review the central issues of population genetics (effects of mutation, migration, selection and drift) for human populations on such voyages, specifically referencing a roughly 5-generation (c. 150-year) voyage currently in the realm of thought among Icarus Interstellar's Project Hyperion research group. I present several formulae as well as concrete numbers that can be used to help determine populations that could survive such journeys in good health. I find that previously proposed such populations, on the order of a few hundred individuals, are significantly too low to consider based on current understanding of vertebrate (including human) genetics and population dynamics. Population genetics theory, calculations and computer modeling determine that a properly screened and age- and sex-structured total founding population (Nc) of anywhere from roughly 14,000 to 44,000 people would be sufficient to survive such journeys in good health. A safe and well-considered Nc figure is 40,000, an Interstellar Migrant Population (IMP) composed of an Effective Population [Ne] of 23,400 reproductive males and females, the rest being pre- or post-reproductive individuals. This number would maintain good health over five generations despite (a) increased inbreeding resulting from a relatively small human population, (b) depressed genetic diversity due to the founder effect, (c) demographic change through time and (d) expectation of at least one severe population catastrophe over the 5-generation voyage.

  18. Observations of Low-Frequency Magnetic Waves due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Ions Using ACE, Ulysses, and Voyager Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Aggarwal, Poornima; Argall, Matthew R.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Bzowski, Maciej; Cannon, Bradford E.; Gary, S. Peter; Fisher, Meghan K.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Hollick, Sophia J.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.; Pine, Zackary B.; Richardson, John D.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Sokół, Justyna M.; Taylor, David K.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2017-09-01

    Wave excitation by newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) plays a significant role in theories that attempt to describe IBEX and Voyager observations in the solar wind and heliosheath. The same dynamic processes can be far-reaching and extend into the inner heliosphere to at least 1AU and likely to smaller heliocentric distances. While the high-resolution magnetic field measurements required to study these waves are not yet available in the heliosheath, we have studied a range of available observations and found evidence of waves due to interstellar PUIs using ACE (1998–2015 at 1 AU), Ulysses (1996–2006 at 2 to 5 AU, high and low latitudes) and Voyager (1978–1979 and 2 to 6 AU) observations. Efforts to extend the Voyager observations to 35 AU are ongoing. We have examined these data sets and report on observations of low-frequency waves that result from newborn interstellar pickup H+ and He+ ions. Although not as common as theory originally predicted, we presently have identified 524 independent occurrences. Our conclusion from studying these waves is that they are seen only when the ambient turbulence is sufficiently weak. The instability that generates these waves requires a slow accumulation of wave energy over several to tens of hours to achieve observable wave amplitudes. In regions where the turbulence is moderate to strong, the turbulence absorbs the wave energy before it can reach observable levels and transports the energy to the dissipation scales where it heats the background thermal particles. Only intervals with the weakest turbulence will permit energy accumulation over this time scale. These conditions are most often, but not exclusively, achieved in solar wind rarefaction regions.

  19. Net current measurements and secondary electron emission characteristics of the Voyager plasma science experiment and their impact on data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager Plasma Science (PLS) instrument is capable of returning integral (DC) current measurements, similar in some respects to measurements made with a Langmuir probe or a retarding potential analyzer, although there are significant differences. The integral measurements were made during a calibration sequence in the solar wind, during Cruise Science Maneuvers, and within the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn by Voyager 1. After the failure of the PLS experiment following the Saturn encounter, that instrument was placed in the DC return mode returning possibly usable data from early 1981 through early 1985. The DC return measurements are difficult to interpret and are above threshold values only for relatively large fluxes; the determination of the measured current level is dependent on the operating temperature of the preamplifiers which further complicates the interpretation. Nevertheless, these measurements can be used to determine the efficiency of the suppressor grid at preventing the loss of secondary electrons off the collector plate. Some DC return measurements have been invaluable in aiding in the interpretation of some electron plasma measurements not previously understood. It is found that electron spectra can be significantly modified by the presence of second generation secondary electrons produced by either first generation secondaries or photoelectrons on the support ring of the negative high voltage modulator grid within the instrument housing.

  20. A note on the ring current in Saturn’s magnetosphere: Comparison of magnetic data obtained during the Pioneer-11 and Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Bunce

    Full Text Available We examine the residual (measured minus internal magnetic field vectors observed in Saturn’s magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 fly-by in 1979, and compare them with those observed during the Voyager-1 and -2 fly-bys in 1980 and 1981. We show for the first time that a ring current system was present within the magnetosphere during the Pioneer-11 encounter, which was qualitatively similar to those present during the Voyager fly-bys. The analysis also shows, however, that the ring current was located closer to the planet during the Pioneer-11 encounter than during the comparable Voyager-1 fly-by, reflecting the more com-pressed nature of the magnetosphere at the time. The residual field vectors have been fit using an adaptation of the current system proposed for Jupiter by Connerney et al. (1981a. A model that provides a reasonably good fit to the Pioneer-11 Saturn data extends radially between 6.5 and 12.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance of 17 RS, has a north-south extent of 4 RS, and carries a total current of 9.6 MA. A corresponding model that provides a qualitatively similar fit to the Voyager data, determined previously by Connerney et al. (1983, extends radially between 8 and 15.5 RS (compared with a noon-sector magnetopause distance for Voyager-1 of 23–24 RS, has a north-south extent of 6 RS, and carries a total current of 11.5 MA.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems, magnetospheric configuration and dynamics, planetary magnetospheres

  1. Testing universality of cosmic-ray acceleration with proton/helium data from AMS and Voyager-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassetti, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS) has recently measured the proton and helium spectra in cosmic rays (CRs) in the GeV-TeV energy region. The spectra of proton and helium are found to progressively harden at rigidity R = pc / Ze ≳ 200 GV, while the proton-to-helium ratio as function of rigidity is found to fall off steadily as p/He ∝R-0.08 . The decrease of the p/He ratio is often interpreted in terms of particle-dependent acceleration, which is in contrast with the universal nature of diffusive-shock-acceleration mechanisms. A different explanation is that the p-He anomaly originates from a flux transition between two components: a sub-TeV flux component (L) provided by hydrogen-rich supernova remnants with soft acceleration spectra, and a multi-TeV component (G) injected by younger sources with amplified magnetic fields and hard spectra. In this scenario the universality of particle acceleration is not violated because both source components provide composition-blind injection spectra. The present work is aimed at testing the universality of CR acceleration using the low-energy part of the CR flux, which is expected to be dominated by the L-type component. However, at kinetic energy of ∼0.5-10 GeV, the CR fluxes are significantly affected by energy losses and solar modulation, hence a proper modeling of Galactic and heliospheric propagation is required. To set the key properties of the L-source component, I have used the Voyager-1 data collected in the interstellar space. To compare my calculations with the AMS data, I have performed a determination of the force-field modulation parameter using neutron monitor measurements. I will show that the recent p-He data reported by AMS and Voyager-1 are in good agreement with the predictions of such a scenario, supporting the hypothesis that CRs are released in the Galaxy by universal, composition-blind accelerators. At energies below ∼0.5 GeV/n, however

  2. The Subspace Voyager: Exploring High-Dimensional Data along a Continuum of Salient 3D Subspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Mueller, Klaus

    2017-02-23

    Analyzing high-dimensional data and finding hidden patterns is a difficult problem and has attracted numerous research efforts. Automated methods can be useful to some extent but bringing the data analyst into the loop via interactive visual tools can help the discovery process tremendously. An inherent problem in this effort is that humans lack the mental capacity to truly understand spaces exceeding three spatial dimensions. To keep within this limitation, we describe a framework that decomposes a high-dimensional data space into a continuum of generalized 3D subspaces. Analysts can then explore these 3D subspaces individually via the familiar trackball interface while using additional facilities to smoothly transition to adjacent subspaces for expanded space comprehension. Since the number of such subspaces suffers from combinatorial explosion, we provide a set of data-driven subspace selection and navigation tools which can guide users to interesting subspaces and views. A subspace trail map allows users to manage the explored subspaces, keep their bearings, and return to interesting subspaces and views. Both trackball and trail map are each embedded into a word cloud of attribute labels which aid in navigation. We demonstrate our system via several use cases in a diverse set of application areas - cluster analysis and refinement, information discovery, and supervised training of classifiers. We also report on a user study that evaluates the usability of the various interactions our system provides.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: H through Ni intensities in LISM from Voyager 1 (Cummings+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Since 2012 August Voyager 1 has been observing the local interstellar energy spectra of Galactic cosmic-ray nuclei down to 3MeV/nuc and electrons down to 2.7MeV. The H and He spectra have the same energy dependence between 3 and 346MeV/nuc, with a broad maximum in the 10-50MeV/nuc range and a H/He ratio of 12.2+/-0.9. The peak H intensity is ~15 times that observed at 1AU, and the observed local interstellar gradient of 3-346MeV H is -0.009+/-0.055%/AU, consistent with models having no local interstellar gradient. The energy spectrum of electrons (e-+e+) with 2.7-74MeV is consistent with E-1.30+/-0.05 and exceeds the H intensity at energies below ~50MeV. Propagation model fits to the observed spectra indicate that the energy density of cosmic-ray nuclei with >3MeV/nuc and electrons with >3MeV is 0.83-1.02eV/cm3 and the ionization rate of atomic H is in the range of 1.51-1.64x10-17s-1. This rate is a factor >10 lower than the ionization rate in diffuse interstellar clouds, suggesting significant spatial inhomogeneity in low-energy cosmic rays or the presence of a suprathermal tail on the energy spectrum at much lower energies. The propagation model fits also provide improved estimates of the elemental abundances in the source of Galactic cosmic rays. (4 data files).

  4. Voyage to Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David; Samz, Jane

    This publication illustrates the features of Jupiter and its family of satellites pictured by the Pioneer and the Voyager missions. Chapters included are: (1) "The Jovian System" (describing the history of astronomy); (2) "Pioneers to Jupiter" (outlining the Pioneer Mission); (3) "The Voyager Mission"; (4)…

  5. Barthes's Imaginary Voyages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn A. Higgins

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available Reading L 'Empire des signes and Alors la Chine as points of departure, the article explores a network of reciprocal images of the text as voyage and the voyage as text, with Barthes as a self-styled, disinherited ethnographer/traveler.

  6. Scatterometer Climate Record Pathfinder Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains mean normalized backscatter coefficient (sigma-naught); backscatter variance; and other associated data files from Seasat SASS carrying a...

  7. Artificial Intelligence Controls Tape-Recording Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Otamura, Roy M.; Zottarelli, Lawrence J.

    1989-01-01

    Developmental expert-system computer program intended to schedule recording of large amounts of data on limited amount of magnetic tape. Schedules recording using two sets of rules. First set incorporates knowledge of locations for recording of new data. Second set incorporates knowledge about issuing commands to recorder. Designed primarily for use on Voyager Spacecraft, also applicable to planning and sequencing in industry.

  8. Gravity Data for Indiana (300 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (300 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in February 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  9. Evidence from Voyager and ISEE-3 spacecraft. Data for the decay of secondary K-electron capture isotopes during the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutoul, A.; Legrain, R.; Lukasiak, A.; McDonald, F. B.; Webber, W. R.

    1998-08-01

    New data from the cosmic ray experiment on the Voyager spacecraft confirms and extends earlier data from a similar experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft which indicates the possibility of the decay of certain K-capture isotopes during the interstellar propagation of galactic cosmic rays. These cosmic ray measurements, along with the cross section measurements, indicate that ~ 25% of the K-capture isotopes (51Cr and (49V produced as secondaries have decayed at interstellar energy of ~ 400 MeV/nuc. This suggests a possible interstellar energy gain ~ 100 MeV/nuc out of the current interstellar energy ~ 500 MeV/nuc. This measurement suggests that the study of the K-capture isotopes may now have reached a level that will soon provide definitive information on the amount of re-acceleration that may occur during cosmic-ray propagation after an initial acceleration in the cosmic ray sources.

  10. Reconstruction of the Voyager 2 Neptune Encounter in the ICRF System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    The Neptunian system was visited by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in August of 1989. We have re-examined the Voyager mission taking advantage of improvements made in dynamical and observational modelling and data processing.

  11. NASA Facts, Voyager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This document is one of a series of publications of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on facts about the exploration of Jupiter and Saturn. This NASA mission consists of two unmanned Voyager spacecrafts launched in August and September of 1977, and due to arrive at Jupiter in 1979. An account of the scientific equipment…

  12. Voyager picture of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Voyager 1 took this picture of the planet Jupiter on Saturday, Jan. 6, the first in its three-month-long, close-up investigation of the largest planet. The spacecraft, flying toward a March 5 closest approach, was 35.8 million miles (57.6 million kilometers) from Jupiter and 371.7 million miles (598.2 million kilometers) from Earth when the picture was taken. As the Voyager cameras begin their meteorological surveillance of Jupiter, they reveal a dynamic atmosphere with more convective structure than had previously been thought. While the smallest atmospheric features seen in this picture are still as large as 600 miles (1,000 kilometers) across, Voyager will be able to detect individual storm systems as small as 3 miles (5 kilometers) at closest approach. The Great Red Spot can be seen near the limb at the far right. Most of the other features are too small to be seen in terrestrial telescopes. This picture was transmitted to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory through the Deep Space Network's tracking station at Madrid, Spain. The Voyager Project is managed for NASA by Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. Voyager Outreach Compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) video presents a collection of the best videos that have been published of the Voyager mission. Computer animation/simulations comprise the largest portion of the video and include outer planetary magnetic fields, outer planetary lunar surfaces, and the Voyager spacecraft trajectory. Voyager visited the four outer planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The video contains some live shots of Jupiter (actual), the Earth's moon (from orbit), Saturn (actual), Neptune (actual) and Uranus (actual), but is mainly comprised of computer animations of these planets and their moons. Some of the individual short videos that are compiled are entitled: The Solar System; Voyage to the Outer Planets; A Tour of the Solar System; and the Neptune Encounter. Computerized simulations of Viewing Neptune from Triton, Diving over Neptune to Meet Triton, and Catching Triton in its Retrograde Orbit are included. Several animations of Neptune's atmosphere, rotation and weather features as well as significant discussion of the planet's natural satellites are also presented.

  14. Constraints on dark photon dark matter using Voyager magnetometric survey

    CERN Document Server

    Pignol, G; Guigue, M; Rebreyend, D; Voirin, B

    2015-01-01

    The dark photon, an new hypothetical light spin 1 field, constitutes a well-motivated dark matter candidate. It manifests as an oscillating electric field with a fixed direction, which can be observed in magnetometric records. In this letter, we use magnetometer data from the Voyager probes to look for the dark photon in the 10^-24 eV to 10^-19 eV mass range, corresponding to frequencies between 10^-9 Hz and 10^-4 Hz. We also discuss the sensitivity of possible future SQUID magnetometry experiments.

  15. Ocean Color and Earth Science Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritorena, S.

    2014-12-01

    The development of consistent, high quality time series of biogeochemical products from a single ocean color sensor is a difficult task that involves many aspects related to pre- and post-launch instrument calibration and characterization, stability monitoring and the removal of the contribution of the atmosphere which represents most of the signal measured at the sensor. It is even more challenging to build Climate Data Records (CDRs) or Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs) from multiple sensors as design, technology and methodologies (bands, spectral/spatial resolution, Cal/Val, algorithms) differ from sensor to sensor. NASA MEaSUREs, ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) and IOCCG Virtual Constellation are some of the underway efforts that investigate or produce ocean color CDRs or ESDRs from the recent and current global missions (SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS). These studies look at key aspects of the development of unified data records from multiple sensors, e.g. the concatenation of the "best" individual records vs. the merging of multiple records or band homogenization vs. spectral diversity. The pros and cons of the different approaches are closely dependent upon the overall science purpose of the data record and its temporal resolution. While monthly data are generally adequate for biogeochemical modeling or to assess decadal trends, higher temporal resolution data records are required to look into changes in phenology or the dynamics of phytoplankton blooms. Similarly, short temporal resolution (daily to weekly) time series may benefit more from being built through the merging of data from multiple sensors while a simple concatenation of data from individual sensors might be better suited for longer temporal resolution (e.g. monthly time series). Several Ocean Color ESDRs were developed as part of the NASA MEaSUREs project. Some of these time series are built by merging the reflectance data from SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua and Envisat-MERIS in a semi-analytical ocean color

  16. A Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J. L.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M.; Lindholm, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new climate data record for total solar irradiance and solar spectral irradiance between 1610 and the present day with associated wavelength and time-dependent uncertainties and quarterly updates. The data record, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program, provides a robust, sustainable, and scientifically defensible record of solar irradiance that is of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity for use in studies of climate variability and climate change on multiple time scales and for user groups spanning climate modeling, remote sensing, and natural resource and renewable energy industries. The data record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes with respect to quiet sun conditions when facular brightening and sunspot darkening features are present on the solar disk where the magnitude of the changes in irradiance are determined from the linear regression of a proxy magnesium (Mg) II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). To promote long-term data usage and sharing for a broad range of users, the source code, the dataset itself, and supporting documentation are archived at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). In the future, the dataset will also be available through the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD) for user-specified time periods and spectral ranges of interest.

  17. Big data and the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Steve G; Buntrock, James D

    2014-01-01

    The electronic medical record has evolved from a digital representation of individual patient results and documents to information of large scale and complexity. Big Data refers to new technologies providing management and processing capabilities, targeting massive and disparate data sets. For an individual patient, techniques such as Natural Language Processing allow the integration and analysis of textual reports with structured results. For groups of patients, Big Data offers the promise of large-scale analysis of outcomes, patterns, temporal trends, and correlations. The evolution of Big Data analytics moves us from description and reporting to forecasting, predictive modeling, and decision optimization.

  18. Assessing vaccine data recording in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Lucio de Oliveira Novaes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Objectives: Vaccines represent an important advancement for improving the general health of a population. The effective recording of vaccine data is a factor for the definition of its supply chain. This study investigated vaccine data recording relatively to data collected from vaccination rooms and data obtained from a government-developed Internet platform. Methods: The monthly recorded total number of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine (alone or in combination with the Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine doses administered in a medium-sized city of the Southeast region of Brazil was collected for the period January/2006 through December/2010 from two sources: City level (directly from vaccination rooms, the study "gold standard", and Federal level (from an Internet platform developed by the country government. Data from these sources were compared using descriptive statistics and the Percentage error. Results: The data values made available by the Internet platform differed from those obtained from the vaccination rooms, with a Percentage error relatively to the actual values in the range [-0.48; 0.39]. Concordant values were observed only in one among the sixty analyzed months (1.66%. Conclusions: A frequent and large difference between the number of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine doses administered in the two levels was detected.

  19. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data.

  20. Identifying Outliers in Data from Patient Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberger, Dieter; Buergin, Reto

    2016-01-01

    It is important for health services to be able to identify potential outliers with minimal effort as part of their daily evaluation of care data from patient record. This study evaluates the suitability of three statistical methods for identifying nursing outliers. The results show that by using methods implemented in the nursing workload measurement system "LEP" with reference to real data, unusual LEP minute profiles (movement, nutrition and so on) can be identified with little effort and therefore seem promising for application to the health services' daily evaluation process. The lessons learned are used to create requirement criteria for the further development of software solutions. It is recommended that the methods for identifying outliers in the daily evaluation process should be standardized in order to increase the efficiency of secondary use of care data from patient record.

  1. Memory Technologies and Data Recorder Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Karl F

    2009-01-01

    Missions, both near Earth and deep space, are under consideration that will require data recorder capacities of such magnitude as to be unthinkable just a few years ago. Concepts requiring well over 16,000 GB of storage are being studied. To achieve this capacity via "normal means" was considered incredible as recently as 2004. This paper is presented in two parts. Part I describes the analysis of data recorder capacities for missions as far back as 35 years and provides a projection of data capacities required 20 years from now based upon missions either nearing launch, or in the planning stage. The paper presents a similar projection of memory device capacities as baselined in the ITRS - the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. Using known Total Ionizing Dose tolerance going back as far as a decade, a projection of total dose tolerance is made for two prime technologies out to the year 2028.

  2. Transition of SSMI Data to a Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semunegus, H.; Bates, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1993, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has served as the active archive of passive microwave satellite measurements from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) instrument. SSMI data measurements have been used extensively to generate climate data sets (including rain, snow, ice, cloud liquid water, and total precipitable water) in support of both national and international programs. A project by NCDC and NOAA's Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) is working towards the goal of regenerating a high quality SSMI Climate Data Record as defined by NOAA's Scientific Data Stewardship (SDS) program. As part of this effort, the SSMI Temperature Data Record (TDR) and Sensor Data Record (SDR) datasets have been reprocessed as value-added network Common Data Form (netCDF) orbit files. Data quality control flags embedded in netCDF orbit files preserve the original data, while warning users of erroneous geolocation, radiance and temporal values at the pixel level. These orbit files will also extend the period of record of SSMI data publicly available at NOAA's Comprehensive Large-Array Stewardship System (CLASS) by several years (August 1993-February 1997). Making earlier SSMI data available to customers and improving the quality of the SSMI dataset are important steps in attaining higher levels of dataset maturity in terms of scientific value and data preservation.

  3. Voyager 2 Jupiter Eruption Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie records an eruptive event in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter over a period of 8 Jupiter days. Prior to the event, an undistinguished oval cloud mass cruised through the turbulent atmosphere. The eruption occurs over avery short time at the very center of the cloud. The white eruptive material is swirled about by the internal wind patterns of the cloud. As a result of the eruption, the cloud then becomes a type of feature seen elsewhere on Jupiter known as 'spaghetti bowls'.As Voyager 2 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 8 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). These images were acquired in the Violet filter around May 6, 1979. The spacecraft was about 50 million kilometers from Jupiter at that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  4. Immunization Data Exchange With Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Melissa S; Natarajan, Karthik; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Holleran, Stephen; Forney, Kristen; Aponte, Angel; Vawdrey, David K

    2016-06-01

    To assess the impact of exchange of immunization information between an immunization information system (IIS) and an electronic health record on up-to-date rates, overimmunization, and immunization record completeness for low-income, urban children and adolescents. The New York City Department of Health maintains a population-based IIS, the Citywide Immunization Registry (CIR). Five community clinics in New York City implemented direct linkage of immunization data from the CIR to their local electronic health record. We compared immunization status and overimmunization in children and adolescents 19 to 35 month, 7 to 10 year, and 13 to 17 year-olds with provider visits in the 6-month period before data exchange implementation (2009; n = 6452) versus 6-months post-implementation (2010; n = 6124). We also assessed immunization record completeness with and without addition of CIR data for 8548 children and adolescents with visits in 2012-2013. Up-to-date status increased from before to after implementation from 75.0% to 81.6% (absolute difference, 6.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.2% to 8.1%) and was significant for all age groups. The percentage overimmunized decreased from 8.8% to 4.7% (absolute difference, -4.1%; 95% CI, -7.8% to -0.3%) and was significant for adolescents (16.4% vs 1.2%; absolute difference, -15.2%; 95% CI, -26.7 to -3.6). Up-to-date status for those seen in 2012 to 2013 was higher when IIS data were added (74.6% vs 59.5%). This study demonstrates that data exchange can improve child and adolescent immunization status. Development of the technology to support such exchange and continued focus on local, state, and federal policies to support such exchanges are needed. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Voyager Approaches Final Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    An artist's concept illustrates the positions of the Voyager spacecraft in relation to structures formed around our Sun by the solar wind. Also illustrated is the termination shock, a violent region the spacecraft must pass through before reaching the outer limits of the solar system. At the termination shock, the supersonic solar wind abruptly slows from an average speed of 400 kilometers per second to less than 100 kilometer per second (900,000 to less than 225,000 miles per hour). Beyond the termination shock is the solar system's final frontier, the heliosheath, a vast region where the turbulent and hot solar wind is compressed as it presses outward against the interstellar wind that is beyond the heliopause. A bow shock likely forms as the interstellar wind approaches and is deflected around the heliosphere, forcing it into a teardrop-shaped structure with a long, comet-like tail.The exact location of the termination shock is unknown, and it originally was thought to be closer to the Sun than Voyager 1 currently is. As Voyager 1 cruised ever farther from the Sun, it confirmed that all the planets are inside an immense bubble blown by the solar wind and the termination shock was much more distant.

  6. Accuracy of Sea Ice Data from Remote Sensing Methods, its Impact on Safe Speed Determination and Planning of Voyage in Ice-Covered Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Pastusiak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The data related to ice floe concentration and ice thickness were analysed. Sources of data have been verified by visual observation and by comparison in between information from different remote sensing sources. The results of this work exceeded initial expectations. The discrepancies of the information provided by various data sources result from the error of the measurement method, which can be as high as 15% of the concentration of ice floes. It should also be borne in mind that the more generalized information about the state of the ice cover, the lower probability of detection of ice floe patches of a high concentration and spatial extent. Each vessel that is planning voyage in ice should take into consideration inaccurate estimation of concentration and thickness of ice floes received by means of satellite remote sensing methods. The method of determining permissible speed of various ice class vessel in ice on basis of safe speed graph for the icebreaker was developed. A well-defined equation approximates relationship between speed of the icebreaker and the vessels of specified ice classes. Average distance of 24.1 Nm from sea ice extent line was related to all analysed lines representing 30-40% ice floe concentration (IUP product excluded and 30.6 Nm for analysed lines representing 70-81-91% ice floe concentration. The maximal average distance of the furthest analysed line (IUP product excluded was equal 37.2 Nm. The average standard deviation of that results was equal 8.3 Nm only. Average distances of analysed lines from sea ice extent line to maximal ice data values were found as follow: 8.4 Nm (23% for NSIDC-CCAR ice age, 12.3 Nm (33% for minimal distance of 30-40% ice concentration, 15.4 Nm (41% for OSISAF ice type “ambiguous” zone from Open Water side, 25 Nm (67% for minimal distance of 70-81-91% ice concentration, 26.6 Nm (72% for OSISAF ice type “ambiguous” zone from 1st year ice age side, 35.9 Nm (97% for maximal distance

  7. 14 CFR 29.1459 - Flight data recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... any crash impact; and (6) Whether the cockpit voice recorder and digital flight data recorder are... crash impact. (e) When both a cockpit voice recorder and a flight data recorder are required by the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight data recorders. 29.1459 Section...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1459 - Flight data recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... any crash impact; and (6) Whether the cockpit voice recorder and digital flight data recorder are... crash impact. (e) When both a cockpit voice recorder and a flight data recorder are required by the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight data recorders. 27.1459 Section...

  9. ORAL HEALTH DATA RECORDING FORM FOR COMPUTER PROCESSING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An oral health data recording form describing in detail the status of oral health of patients was developed. It was used to record information from...of record. A comparison of this record was made to one formed directly from an examination. More data was recorded and recovered from the oral health data

  10. Developing NOAA's Climate Data Records From AVHRR and Other Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privette, J. L.; Bates, J. J.; Kearns, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the provisional NOAA Climate Service, NOAA is providing leadership in the development of authoritative, measurement-based information on climate change and variability. NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) recently initiated a satellite Climate Data Record Program (CDRP) to provide sustained and objective climate information derived from meteorological satellite data that NOAA has collected over the past 30+ years - particularly from its Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) program. These are the longest sustained global measurement records in the world and represent billions of dollars of investment. NOAA is now applying advanced analysis methods -- which have improved remarkably over the last decade -- to the POES AVHRR and other instrument data. Data from other satellite programs, including NASA and international research programs and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), are also being used. This process will unravel the underlying climate trend and variability information and return new value from the records. In parallel, NCDC will extend these records by applying the same methods to present-day and future satellite measurements, including the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Jason-3. In this presentation, we will describe the AVHRR-related algorithm development activities that CDRP recently selected and funded through open competitions. We will particularly discuss some of the technical challenges related to adapting and using AVHRR algorithms with the VIIRS data that should become available with the launch of the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite in early 2012. We will also describe IT system development activities that will provide data processing and reprocessing, storage and management. We will also outline the maturing Program framework, including the strategies for coding and development standards, community reviews, independent program oversight, and research-to-operations algorithm

  11. NOAA Climate Data Records Access for Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachniewicz, J. S.; Cecil, D.; Hollingshead, A.; Newport, B. J.; Wunder, D.

    2015-12-01

    There are many potential uses of NOAA Climate Data Records (CDRs) for decision-making and catastrophic risk management assessment activities in the federal, state, and local government and private sectors, in addition to their traditional uses by the academic/scientific community. There is growing interest in using NOAA CDRs for such applications and straightforward access to the data is essential if these applications are to be successful. User engagement activities determine the types of data that users need, as well as the spatial and temporal subsets. This talk will present the access methods currently available and in development. Alternate representations and sources of some CDRs will also be discussed. Recent improvements include: 1. CDR information web page 2. Dataset types, sizes, growth, latency, grid/swath 3. Dataset discovery, data access, and sub-setting. 4. Knowing our users and their needs. 5. Known uses of some CDRs. 6. Migration to CLASS. 7. Other representations - GeoTIFF, Obs4MIPS 8. Cloud applications - Google, Microsoft

  12. Voyager: Exploratory Analysis via Faceted Browsing of Visualization Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsuphasawat, Kanit; Moritz, Dominik; Anand, Anushka; Mackinlay, Jock; Howe, Bill; Heer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    General visualization tools typically require manual specification of views: analysts must select data variables and then choose which transformations and visual encodings to apply. These decisions often involve both domain and visualization design expertise, and may impose a tedious specification process that impedes exploration. In this paper, we seek to complement manual chart construction with interactive navigation of a gallery of automatically-generated visualizations. We contribute Voyager, a mixed-initiative system that supports faceted browsing of recommended charts chosen according to statistical and perceptual measures. We describe Voyager's architecture, motivating design principles, and methods for generating and interacting with visualization recommendations. In a study comparing Voyager to a manual visualization specification tool, we find that Voyager facilitates exploration of previously unseen data and leads to increased data variable coverage. We then distill design implications for visualization tools, in particular the need to balance rapid exploration and targeted question-answering.

  13. Higher Energy Plasma Ions found near the Termination Shock: Analyses of Voyager 2 Data in the Heliosheath and in the Outer Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Intriligator, James; Miller, W. David; Webber, William R.; Decker, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We have found in the Voyager 2 (V2) plasma science data in the heliosheath (HS) near the termination shock (TS) high-energy ions (HEIs) in addition to the bulk plasma convective flow ions. The HEI detections temporally coincide with increased V2 plasma wave subsystem (PWS) activity in "event A"h of Gurnett and Kurth. Maxwellian fits to HEI detections indicate the HEIs are moving radially anti -Sunward with a proton speed of 600 km/s, a density of 10(exp -4) (exp -3), and a thermal speed of 10 km/s. The heliosheath bulk convective protons have a speed of 204 km/s, a density of 0.0029 cm(exp -3), and a thermal speed of 26.7 km/s. The HEI flux and ram pressure are approximately 10% and 30% of those of the bulk HS flow. Since the HEI speed is both close to twice the solar wind speed and independent of the heliosheath bulk plasma speed, the HEIs may be detections of pickup protons formed in the solar wind and convected through the TS. The HEIs also are reminiscent of the pickup protons upstream of the Mars bow shock where their energy also was independent of the bulk plasma speed and attributed to multiple reflections off the Mars bow shock. Gurnett and Kurth 's (2008) event A enhanced PWS activity may be generated by a two ]stream instability from the interaction of these HEIs with the heliosheath bulk plasma ions. We present our findings, discuss their implications, and also present alternative interpretations.

  14. Higher Energy Plasma Ions found near the Termination Shock: Analyses of Voyager 2 Data in the Heliosheath and in the Outer Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Intriligator, James; Miller, W. David; Webber, William R.; Decker, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    We have found in the Voyager 2 (V2) plasma science data in the heliosheath (HS) near the termination shock (TS) high-energy ions (HEIs) in addition to the bulk plasma convective flow ions. The HEI detections temporally coincide with increased V2 plasma wave subsystem (PWS) activity in "event A"h of Gurnett and Kurth. Maxwellian fits to HEI detections indicate the HEIs are moving radially anti -Sunward with a proton speed of 600 km/s, a density of 10(exp -4) (exp -3), and a thermal speed of 10 km/s. The heliosheath bulk convective protons have a speed of 204 km/s, a density of 0.0029 cm(exp -3), and a thermal speed of 26.7 km/s. The HEI flux and ram pressure are approximately 10% and 30% of those of the bulk HS flow. Since the HEI speed is both close to twice the solar wind speed and independent of the heliosheath bulk plasma speed, the HEIs may be detections of pickup protons formed in the solar wind and convected through the TS. The HEIs also are reminiscent of the pickup protons upstream of the Mars bow shock where their energy also was independent of the bulk plasma speed and attributed to multiple reflections off the Mars bow shock. Gurnett and Kurth 's (2008) event A enhanced PWS activity may be generated by a two ]stream instability from the interaction of these HEIs with the heliosheath bulk plasma ions. We present our findings, discuss their implications, and also present alternative interpretations.

  15. 14 CFR 91.609 - Flight data recorders and cockpit voice recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight data recorders and cockpit voice... recorders and cockpit voice recorders. (a) No holder of an air carrier operating certificate or an operating... applicable flight recorder and cockpit voice recorder requirements of the part under which its certificate...

  16. 46 CFR 80.15 - Ocean voyage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean voyage. 80.15 Section 80.15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS DISCLOSURE OF SAFETY STANDARDS AND COUNTRY OF REGISTRY § 80.15 Ocean voyage. An ocean voyage for the purposes of this part means: A voyage on any body...

  17. 46 CFR 122.503 - Voyage plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voyage plan. 122.503 Section 122.503 Shipping COAST... Emergencies § 122.503 Voyage plan. (a) The master of the following vessels shall prepare a voyage plan: (1) A... United States Great Lakes port from a Canadian Great Lakes port. (b) The voyage plan required...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1459 - Flight data recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to the recorder does not disable both the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder; and (8) It is in a separate container from the cockpit voice recorder when both are required. If used to... combination unit is installed as a cockpit voice recorder to comply with § 25.1457(e)(2), a combination...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1459 - Flight data recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the recorder does not disable both the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder; and (7) It is in a separate container from the cockpit voice recorder when both are required. If used to comply... unit is installed as a cockpit voice recorder to comply with § 23.1457(e)(2), a combination unit...

  20. Voyager to the Seventh Planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Presents recent findings obtained by the Voyager 2 mission on Uranus. Updates information on the planet's moons, rings, atmosphere, and magnetic field. Illustrations and diagrams of selected aspects of Uranus are included. (ML)

  1. Developing Climate Data Records (CDRs) From NPOESS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privette, J. L.; Bates, J. J.; Karl, T.; Markham, D.; Kearns, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    As part of its climate mandate, NOAA has a responsibility to provide the Nation with objective data and tools to help it characterize, understand, predict, mitigate and adapt to climate change and variability. To help fulfill that responsibility, NOAA has begun coordinating its Climate Data Record (CDR) activities with other agencies through the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP). The National Research Council (NRC, 2004) defines a CDR as "a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity to determine climate variability and change." Since NPOESS represents a critical CDR data source, new efforts are underway to ensure NPOESS data can be used efficiently and economically to achieve climate goals -- particularly product reprocessing. NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) initiated the Scientific Data Stewardship (SDS) Project to lead the Agency's CDR activities and to coordinate with the partner agencies. Given that early algorithm development is supported elsewhere, the SDS Project is focused on the generalization and application of mature algorithms to multiple satellites and sensors which together span climate-relevant time periods. It will also emphasize development and generation of Climate Information Records (CIRs), defined as time series, derived from CDRs and related long-term measurements, that provide specific information about environmental phenomena of particular importance to science and society (e.g., Tropical and Extra-Tropical Storm Intensity, Arctic Ozone Hole Area and Magnitude, Drought Severity). The SDS Project expects to execute its responsibilities in partnership with the larger scientific community through annual NOAA Announcements of Opportunity -- open to academic, commercial, non-profit and government proposers -- as well as through community reviews and working groups. This presentation will describe NOAA's climate product plans for NPOESS, initial SDS goals and objectives, and vision for the

  2. EOP TDRs (Temperature-Depth-Recordings) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature-depth-recorders (TDRs) were attached to commercial longline and research Cobb trawl gear to obtain absolute depth and temperature measurement during...

  3. VA Personal Health Record Sample Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — My HealtheVet (www.myhealth.va.gov) is a Personal Health Record portal designed to improve the delivery of health care services to Veterans, to promote health and...

  4. The future of the perfusion record: automated data collection vs. manual recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottens, Jane; Baker, Robert A; Newland, Richard F; Mazzone, Annette

    2005-12-01

    The perfusion record, whether manually recorded or computer generated, is a legal representation of the procedure. The handwritten perfusion record has been the most common method of recording events that occur during cardiopulmonary bypass. This record is of significant contrast to the integrated data management systems available that provide continuous collection of data automatically or by means of a few keystrokes. Additionally, an increasing number of monitoring devices are available to assist in the management of patients on bypass. These devices are becoming more complex and provide more data for the perfusionist to monitor and record. Most of the data from these can be downloaded automatically into online data management systems, allowing more time for the perfusionist to concentrate on the patient while simultaneously producing a more accurate record. In this prospective report, we compared 17 cases that were recorded using both manual and electronic data collection techniques. The perfusionist in charge of the case recorded the perfusion using the manual technique while a second perfusionist entered relevant events on the electronic record generated by the Stockert S3 Data Management System/Data Bahn (Munich, Germany). Analysis of the two types of perfusion records showed significant variations in the recorded information. Areas that showed the most inconsistency included measurement of the perfusion pressures, flow, blood temperatures, cardioplegia delivery details, and the recording of events, with the electronic record superior in the integrity of the data. In addition, the limitations of the electronic system were also shown by the lack of electronic gas flow data in our hardware. Our results confirm the importance of accurate methods of recording of perfusion events. The use of an automated system provides the opportunity to minimize transcription error and bias. This study highlights the limitation of spot recording of perfusion events in the

  5. Solar System Voyage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunier, Serge

    2002-11-01

    In the last few decades, the exploration of our solar system has revealed fascinating details about the worlds that lie beyond our Earth. This lavishly illustrated book invites the reader on a journey through the solar system. After locating our planetary system in the Universe, Brunier describes the Sun and its planets, the large satellites, asteroids, and comets. Photographs and information taken from the latest space missions allow readers to experience spectacular scenes: the lunar plains scarred by asteroid impacts, the frozen deserts of Mars and Europa, the continuously erupting volcanoes of Io and the giant geysers of Triton, the rings of Saturn and the clouds of Venus and Titan, and the powerful crash of the comet Shoemaker-Levy into Jupiter. Inspired by the extraordinary photographs and incisive text, readers of Solar System Voyage will gain a greater appreciation of the hospitable planet we call home. Serge Brunier is chief editor of the journal Ciel et Espace, a photojournalist, and the author of many nonfiction books aimed at both specialists and the general public. His previous books include Space Odyssey (Cambridge, 2002), Glorious Eclipses with Jean-Pierre Luminet (Cambridge, 2000), and Majestic Universe (Cambridge, 1999).

  6. DataPlay's mobile recording technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Bernard W., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A small rotating memory device which utilizes optical prerecorded and writeable technology to provide a mobile recording technology solution for digital cameras, cell phones, music players, PDA's, and hybrid multipurpose devices have been developed. This solution encompasses writeable, read only, and encrypted storage media.

  7. Recording and submitting specimen history data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenstein, Barbara L.; Franson, J. Christian; Friend, Milton; Gibbs, Samantha E.J.; Wild, Margaret A.

    2016-06-14

    SummaryIn wildlife disease investigations, determining the history or background of a problem is the first significant step toward establishing a diagnosis and aiding agencies with management considerations. The diagnostic process and overall investigation is often greatly expedited by a chronological record accompanying specimens submitted for laboratory evaluation. Knowing where and when the outbreak is taking place, what the environmental conditions and species involved are, and clinical signs in sick animals, along with necropsy findings and diagnostic test results are important for understanding the natural history or epizootiology of disease outbreaks. It becomes increasingly difficult to retrospectively obtain all of the pertinent history as time passes. The most helpful information is that which is obtained at the time of the die-off event by perceptive field biologists and other observers. Significant events preceding morbidity and/or mortality also provide valuable information on which to base corrective actions. In this chapter, readers will find information regarding what type of information should be recorded, how it should be recorded and why it is relevant to a disease investigation. A thoughtful approach in providing as much information as possible surrounding the situation including about host species and the biotic and abiotic environment, greatly aids in determining the most likely causative agent(s).

  8. Performance model of the Argonne Voyager multimedia server

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disz, T.; Olson, R.; Stevens, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1997-07-01

    The Argonne Voyager Multimedia Server is being developed in the Futures Lab of the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. As a network-based service for recording and playing multimedia streams, it is important that the Voyager system be capable of sustaining certain minimal levels of performance in order for it to be a viable system. In this article, the authors examine the performance characteristics of the server. As they examine the architecture of the system, they try to determine where bottlenecks lie, show actual vs potential performance, and recommend areas for improvement through custom architectures and system tuning.

  9. 77 FR 47552 - Event Data Recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... that such data would provide information to enhance the agency's understanding of crash events and... capture of event data in crashes that: Involve side or side curtain/tube air bags such that EDR data would... Part 563 is an optional data element used to determine the driver's intent prior to a crash. In...

  10. Data Recording on Dental Prostheses for Personal Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Keiji; Takita, Akihiro; Nagao, Kan; Ichikawa, Tetsuo; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2008-09-01

    Data recording on a dental prosthesis for personal identification is proposed. Data recording was performed on a dental Au-Ag-Pd alloy with a complex surface shape by femtosecond laser processing with a surface detection function based on confocal optical detection. The processed morphology of a flat dental alloy sample was investigated over wide ranges of focus positions and laser fluences of the irradiating pulses. From the experimental results, appropriate recording conditions are discussed from the viewpoint of data recording. This is the first demonstration of two-dimensional data recording on such an object with a complex curved shape (an alloy crown).

  11. 76 FR 47478 - Event Data Recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... accuracy, collection, storage, survivability, and retrievability of onboard motor vehicle crash event data... acceleration data used for side crash events are the main scope of the final rule, and therefore that the range... reconstructing a crash. In response to the 2006 final rule, the Alliance stated that acceleration data could...

  12. Récits de voyage

    OpenAIRE

    Efthymiou, Loukia

    2011-01-01

    La présente recherche prend appui d’une part sur les textes viatiques d’un groupe de voyageuses françaises appartenant au milieu de l’enseignement secondaire féminin et d’autre part sur leurs dossiers personnels conservés aux Archives Nationales. Le profil socioprofessionnel de ces éducatrices commande le caractère spécifique de leur voyage (pays de destination, motif du voyage, contraintes temporelles et financières) et de son écriture (discours qui sous-tendent le récit). Par la publication...

  13. Cavity techniques for holographic data storage recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bo E; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2016-03-21

    Conventionally, reading and writing of data holograms utilizes a fraction of the light power because of a trade off in write and read efficiencies. This system constraint can be mitigated by applying a resonator cavity. Cavities enable more efficient use of the available light leading to enhanced read and write data rates with no additional energy cost. This enhancement is inversely related to diffraction efficiency, so these techniques work well for large capacity holographic data storage having low diffraction efficiency. The enhancement in write data transfer rate is evaluated by writing plane wave holograms and image bearing holograms in Fe:LiNbO3 with a 532 nm wavelength laser. We confirmed 1.2 times enhancement in write data rate, out of a 1.4 theoretical maximum for materials absorption of 16%.

  14. High data rate recording: Moving to 2 Gbit/s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taratorin, A.; Yuan, S.; Nikitin, V.

    2003-05-01

    High data rate recording can be achieved using fast write drivers and fast heads. Advanced short-yoke write heads and write drivers with 450 ps rise time and programmable current overshoot were used to study recording at data rates up to 2 Gbit/s. The head flux rise time causes shifts of recorded transitions. It is well known that current overshoot helps to overcome bandwidth limitations in the write driver, interconnects, and write head. However, excessive overshoot may cause pattern-dependent transition shifts and significant distortions of recorded transitions. We present the data rate performance of short-yoke recording heads, analysis of nonlinear pattern-dependent distortions, and optimization of the write current wave form in the 1-2 Gbit/s range. Simple dibit and tribit patterns were recorded at 2 Gbit/s. Low-distortion recording for arbitrary data patterns was demonstrated at 1.6 Gbit/s after optimization of write current overshoot.

  15. Information retrieval for nonstationary data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, M. Y.

    1971-01-01

    A review and a critical discussion are made on the existing methods for analysis of nonstationary time series, and a new algorithm for splitting nonstationary time series, is applied to the analysis of sunspot data.

  16. 77 FR 48492 - Event Data Recorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ..., and ] Involve non-reversible deployable restraints other than frontal, side or side/curtain air bags..., the regulation applies to passenger cars, multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks and buses with a...; Revised requirements for the capture of event data in crashes that Involve side or side curtain/tube air...

  17. "Voyager": An Educational Card Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Ryan

    2003-01-01

    "Voyager" is an educational card game involving scientific satellites, developed for use in schools with children aged 9 to 13 years. The idea of the game is to improve pupils' knowledge about the large number of scientific satellites there are in space in a fun way, while also practising numeracy skills. Several copies of the game were…

  18. Gravity Data for Indiana-over 10,000 records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity data (10,629 records) were compiled by Purdue University. This data base was received in December 1989. Principal gravity parameters include Free-air...

  19. Gravity Data for Southwestern Alaska (1294 records compiled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1294 records) were compiled by the Alaska Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California. This data base was...

  20. [Master documentation and records in the clinical data management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hua-long; Xu, Gang; Li, Wei; Wei, Zhao-hui; Ding, Li

    2015-11-01

    This list of clincal data management documentation is to ensure standardized and adequate archival of trial documents and records in clinical data management, which is applicable to all of phase I-IV clinical trials.

  1. Extraction of Flat and Nested Data Records from Web Pages

    CERN Document Server

    Hiremath, P S

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of identification and extraction of flat and nested data records from a given web page. With the explosive growth of information sources available on the World Wide Web, it has become increasingly difficult to identify the relevant pieces of information, since web pages are often cluttered with irrelevant content like advertisements, navigation-panels, copyright notices etc., surrounding the main content of the web page. Hence, it is useful to mine such data regions and data records in order to extract information from such web pages to provide value-added services. Currently available automatic techniques to mine data regions and data records from web pages are still unsatisfactory because of their poor performance. In this paper a novel method to identify and extract the flat and nested data records from the web pages automatically is proposed. It comprises of two steps : (1) Identification and Extraction of the data regions based on visual clues information. (2) Identificatio...

  2. Are you there, Planet X? It's me, Voyager 1

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use the navigation data of Voyager 1 collected during the latest three decades to put on the test the recently proposed hypothesis that one (or more) still unseen super-Earth(s) may lurk at about $200-250$ Astronomical Units. Such a hypothetical body would perturb the range of Voyager 1 up to several hundreds of km over 30 years. Even if two-way coherent range and Doppler tracking were discontinued for Voyager 1 after the planetary flybys era due to cost reasons, it does not seems unrealistic to assume a ranging accuracy still better than 1 km. It would be fully adequate to put new, severe constraints on the existence of a hypothetical perturber with the physical and orbital characteristic recently suggested in the literature.

  3. 75 FR 942 - Extension of the Compliance Date for Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... Compliance Date for Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations AGENCY: Federal..., the FAA published a final rule titled ``Revisions to Cockpit Voice Recorder and Digital Flight Data Recorder Regulations.'' The rule required certain upgrades of digital flight data recorder and...

  4. Tablet computers for recording tuberculosis data at a community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Don O’Mahony

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... those that may inform the design of an electronic health record. The aims of this ... Phase 2: Qualitative evaluation of the use of tablet computers to record data at a ... In a questionnaire survey on vaccinations conducted in US family practices .... interpreted by the researchers using content analysis. Patton25.

  5. Record transfer of data between CERN and California

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A data transfer record has been broken by transmitting at a rate of 2.38 gigabits per second for more than one hour between CERN and Sunnyvale in California, a distance of more than 10,000 km. This record-breaking performance was achieved in the framework of tests to develop a high-speed global network for the future computing grid.

  6. Data Mining of NASA Boeing 737 Flight Data: Frequency Analysis of In-Flight Recorded Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Ansel J.

    2001-01-01

    Data recorded during flights of the NASA Trailblazer Boeing 737 have been analyzed to ascertain the presence of aircraft structural responses from various excitations such as the engine, aerodynamic effects, wind gusts, and control system operations. The NASA Trailblazer Boeing 737 was chosen as a focus of the study because of a large quantity of its flight data records. The goal of this study was to determine if any aircraft structural characteristics could be identified from flight data collected for measuring non-structural phenomena. A number of such data were examined for spatial and frequency correlation as a means of discovering hidden knowledge of the dynamic behavior of the aircraft. Data recorded from on-board dynamic sensors over a range of flight conditions showed consistently appearing frequencies. Those frequencies were attributed to aircraft structural vibrations.

  7. Deux voyages d’hiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Barilier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La relation entre la vie et l’œuvre, chez un artiste, n’est jamais une simple relation de cause à effet. L’on peut trouver, à l’origine du Voyage d’hiver de Schubert, comme à celle de la Rhapsodie pour alto de Brahms (dont les paroles, tirées d’un poème de Goethe, racontent elles aussi un voyage hivernal, des douleurs amoureuses. Mais ces deux œuvres transcendent les événements biographiques dont elles sont issues. échappant au narcissisme du moi romantique, elles traduisent deux expériences du temps, cyclique ou progressif, racontent deux voyages spirituels. La douleur d’exister y devient pure présence de la vie, et récit purifié.For an artist, the link between life and work is never a simple cause-effect relationship. The loving pain can be considered as the source of Schubert's Winterreise and of the Brahms Alto Rhapsody as well (the latter being based also upon a poem by Goethe, which tells also a winter journey. But these works transcend the life events from which they arise. Beyond the narcissism of the romantic self, they reflect two experiences of time, cyclical or progressive, and they tell two spiritual journeys. The pain of existence becomes a pure presence of life, and a purified story.

  8. VOYAGER 1 NEAR THE HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovikov, S. N.; Pogorelov, N. V., E-mail: nikolai.pogorelov@uah.edu [Center for Space Physics and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Recent observations from the Voyager 1 spacecraft show that it is sampling the local interstellar medium (LISM). This is quite surprising because no realistic, steady-state model of the solar wind (SW) interaction with the LISM gives an inner heliosheath width as narrow as ∼30 AU. This includes models that assume a strong redistribution of the ion energy to the tails in the pickup ion distribution function. We show that the heliopause (HP), which separates the SW from the LISM, is not a smooth tangential discontinuity, but rather a surface subject to Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities which can result in LISM material penetration deep inside the SW. We also show that the HP flanks are always subject to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The instabilities are considerably suppressed near the HP nose by the heliospheric magnetic field in steady-state models, but reveal themselves in the presence of solar cycle effects. We argue that Voyager 1 may be in one such instability region and is therefore observing plasma densities much higher than those in the pristine SW. These results may explain the early penetration of Voyager 1 into the LISM. They also show that there is a possibility that the spacecraft may start sampling the SW again before it finally leaves the heliosphere.

  9. Health Data Recording, Reporting and Utilization Practices Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health Data Recording, Reporting and Utilization Practices Among Primary ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... The study took place at the selected primary health centers located in six Local Government Areas in Enugu State Nigeria.

  10. Usage reporting on recorded lectures using educational data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2012). Usage reporting on recorded lectures using educational data mining. International Journal of Learning Technology, 7, 23-40. doi:10.1504/IJLT.2012.046864

  11. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Science.gov (United States)

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  12. Physicists set new record for network data transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "An international team of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers joined forces to set new records for sustained data transfer between storage systems durint the SuperComputing 2006 (SC06) Bandwidth Challenge (BWC). (3 pages)

  13. Voyager, a journey into the unknown - an interview with Ed Stone (Caltech), Voyager project scientist

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video productions; Piotr Traczyk

    2012-01-01

    Voyager, a journey into the unknown - an interview with Ed Stone (Caltech), Voyager project scientist, interviewed on the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Cosmic Rays conference, Spaceparts, at CERN in November 2012.

  14. Enhanced Query Data Recorder - A Next Generation Flight Recorder Built Around the iNET Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    In accordance with current T&E operational scenarios and IRIG 106 standards, the telemetry stream transmitted from the test article to the ground is...activity, recorded data could be retrieved and sent to the ground for analysis to ensure test objectives have been met. The IRIG 106 Chapter 10... IRIG 106 Chapter 10–compliant recorder technology does not support any of these requirements. The EQDR has been developed to fill these T&E needs

  15. High-Speed Data Recorder for Space, Geodesy, and Other High-Speed Recording Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveniku, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    A high-speed data recorder and replay equipment has been developed for reliable high-data-rate recording to disk media. It solves problems with slow or faulty disks, multiple disk insertions, high-altitude operation, reliable performance using COTS hardware, and long-term maintenance and upgrade path challenges. The current generation data recor - ders used within the VLBI community are aging, special-purpose machines that are both slow (do not meet today's requirements) and are very expensive to maintain and operate. Furthermore, they are not easily upgraded to take advantage of commercial technology development, and are not scalable to multiple 10s of Gbit/s data rates required by new applications. The innovation provides a softwaredefined, high-speed data recorder that is scalable with technology advances in the commercial space. It maximally utilizes current technologies without being locked to a particular hardware platform. The innovation also provides a cost-effective way of streaming large amounts of data from sensors to disk, enabling many applications to store raw sensor data and perform post and signal processing offline. This recording system will be applicable to many applications needing realworld, high-speed data collection, including electronic warfare, softwaredefined radar, signal history storage of multispectral sensors, development of autonomous vehicles, and more.

  16. The predictability of the "Voyager" accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bertotti

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available On 14 February 2005 a severe mistral storm caused substantial damage to the passenger cruiser "Voyager" between Balearic Islands and Sardinia. The storm had been well predicted. However, the ship was hit by one or more, apparently unexpected, large waves. Our aim was to understand if this was a freak event or it was within the expectable probability. At this aim we use our best estimate of the local wave conditions, obtained combining modelling and measured data. Starting from these we derive the probability of large waves, considering both linear and non-linear cases. Notwithstanding a correction towards the worse of the, otherwise inconsistent, available reports, on the basis of the data at disposal we conclude that, given the local conditions, the event was within the range of the potentially expectable wave heights. This turns out to be even more the case on the basis of recent results based on theoretical and experimental data.

  17. B.C. lab sets data-transfer speed record

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Four Canadian researchers based at the TRIUMF particle physics research laboratory of British Columbia, last week moved one terabyte of research data to CERN in Geneva in about three hours, doubling the previous record for speed of data transfer (1/2 page).

  18. 40 CFR 1065.202 - Data updating, recording, and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data updating, recording, and control. 1065.202 Section 1065.202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments § 1065.202 Data updating,...

  19. Ciguri. Voyage(s au pays des Tarahumaras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carasco, Raymonde

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The author discusses the problems involved in ethnographic film-making, specifically in the making of a film discourse of one's own. She deems it necessary to construct an ideational «scenario» in which to capture the múltiple details of the reality that is to be filmed. The visual representation of Antonin Artaud's Voyage of 1936 to Tarahumara territory, in México, is a case in point: a unique project which combines literature and film-making, film-making and ethnology.El ensayo presenta la problemática que significa la realización de un film etnográfico y, específicamente, la construcción de un discurso fílmico propio, por lo que se propone que es necesaria la construcción de un «escenario» ideacional que permita captar los múltiples detalles de la realidad que se quiere filmar. El artículo se organiza a partir de un proyecto singular, a caballo entre la literatura y el cine, entre el cine y la etnología, que ha consistido en traducir en imágenes el Voyage que Antonin Artaud hizo a México en 1936, en concreto, al país de los Tarahumaras.

  20. Voyager imaging experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.A.; Briggs, G.A.; Danielson, G.E.; Cook, A.F.; Davies, M.E.; Hunt, G.E.; Masursky, H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Owen, T.C.; Sagan, C.; Suomi, V.E.

    1977-01-01

    The overall objective of this experiment is exploratory reconnaissance of Jupiter, Saturn, their satellites, and Saturn's rings. Such reconnaissance, at resolutions and phase angles unobtainable from Earth, can be expected to provide much new data relevant to the atmospheric and/or surface properties of these bodies. The experiment also has the following specific objectives: Observe and characterize the global circulation of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn; Determine the horizontal and vertical structure of the visible clouds and establish their relationship to the belted appearance and dynamical properties of the planetary atmospheres; Determine the vertical structure of high, optically-thin, scattering layers on Jupiter and Saturn; Determine the nature of anomalous features such as the Great Red Spot, South Equatorial Belt disturbances, etc.; Characterize the nature of the colored material in the clouds of Jupiter and Saturn, and identify the nature and sources of chromophores on Io and Titan; Perform comparative geologic studies of many satellites at less than 15-km resolution; Map and characterize the geologic structure of several satellites at high resolution (???1 km); Investigate the existence and nature of atmospheres on the satellites; Determine the mass, size, and shape of many of the satellites by direct measurement; Determine the direction of the spin axes and periods of rotation of several satellites, and establish coordinate systems for the larger satellites; Map the radial distribution of material in Saturn's rings at high resolution; Determine the optical scattering properties of the primaries, rings, and satellites at several wavelengths and phase angles; Search for novel physical phenomena, e.g., phenomena associated with the Io flux tube, meteors, aurorae, lightning, or satellite shadows. ?? 1977 D. Reidel Publishing Company.

  1. COMPARISON OF PIONEER 10, VOYAGER 1, AND VOYAGER 2 ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS WITH ANTI-SOLAR LYMAN-ALPHA BACKSCATTER SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayock, B.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: brian.fayock@gmail.com, E-mail: garyp.zank@gmail.com, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    Observations made by ultraviolet (UV) detectors on board Pioneer 10, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 can be used to analyze the distribution of neutral hydrogen throughout the heliosphere, including the interaction regions of the solar wind and local interstellar medium. Previous studies of the long-term trend of decreasing intensity with increasing heliocentric distance established the need for more sophisticated heliospheric models. Here we use state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) neutral models to simulate Lyman-alpha backscatter as would be seen by the three spacecrafts, exploiting a new 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code under solar minimum conditions. Both observations and simulations of the UV backscatter intensity are normalized for each spacecraft flight path at {approx}15 AU, and we focus on the slope of decreasing intensity over an increasing heliocentric distance. Comparisons of simulations with Voyager 1 Lyman-alpha data results in a very close match, while the Pioneer 10 comparison is similar due to normalization, but not considered to be in agreement. The deviations may be influenced by a low resolution of photoionization in the 3D MHD-neutral model, a lack of solar cycle activity in our simulations, and possibly issues with instrumental sensitivity. Comparing the slope of Voyager 2 and the simulated intensities yields an almost identical match. Our results predict a large increase in the Lyman-alpha intensity as the hydrogen wall is approached, which would signal an imminent crossing of the heliopause.

  2. Pioneer and Voyager observations of the solar wind at large heliocentric distances and latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazis, P. R.; Mihalov, J. D.; Barnes, A.; Lazarus, A. J.; Smith, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    Data obtained from the electrostatic analyzers aboard the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft and from the Faraday cup aboard Voyager 2 were used to study spatial gradients in the distant solar wind. Prior to mid-1985, both spacecraft observed nearly identical solar wind structures. After day 150 of 1985, the velocity structure at Voyager 2 became flatter, and the Voyager 2 velocities were smaller than those observed by Pioneer 11. It is suggested that these changes in the solar wind at low latitudes may be related to a change which occurred in the coronal hole structure in early 1985.

  3. The CM SAF CLAAS-2 cloud property data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benas, Nikos; Finkensieper, Stephan; Stengel, Martin; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Hanschmann, Timo; Hollmann, Rainer; Fokke Meirink, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A new cloud property data record was lately released by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF), based on measurements from geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) sensors, spanning the period 2004-2015. The CLAAS-2 (Cloud property dAtAset using SEVIRI, Edition 2) data record includes cloud fractional coverage, thermodynamic phase, cloud top height, water path and corresponding optical thickness and particle effective radius separately for liquid and ice clouds. These variables are available at high resolution 15-minute, daily and monthly basis. In this presentation the main improvements in the retrieval algorithms compared to the first edition of the data record (CLAAS-1) are highlighted along with their impact on the quality of the data record. Subsequently, the results of extensive validation and inter-comparison efforts against ground observations, as well as active and passive satellite sensors are summarized. Overall good agreement is found, with similar spatial and temporal characteristics, along with small biases caused mainly by differences in retrieval approaches, spatial/temporal samplings and viewing geometries.

  4. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health.

  5. Visualizing Research Data Records for their Better Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, Alexander; Darlington, Mansur; Howard, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    As academia in general, and research funders in particular, place ever greater importance on data as an output of research, so the value of good research data management practices becomes ever more apparent. In response to this, the Innovative Design and Manufacturing Research Centre (Id......MRC) at the University of Bath, UK, with funding from the JISC, ran a project to draw up a data management planning regime. In carrying out this task, the ERIM (Engineering Research Information Management) Project devised a visual method of mapping out the data records produced in the course of research, along...

  6. Automatic Provenance Recording for Scientific Data using Trident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmhan, Y.; Barga, R.; van Ingen, C.

    2008-12-01

    Provenance is increasingly recognized as being critical to the understanding and reuse of scientific datasets. Given the rapid generation of scientific data from sensors and computational model results, it is not practical to manually record provenance for data and automated techniques for provenance capture are essential. Scientific workflows provide a framework for representing computational models and complex transformations of scientific data, and present a means for tracking the operations performed to derive a dataset. The Trident Scientific Workbench is a workflow system that natively incorporates provenance capture of data derived as part of the workflow execution. The applications used as part of a Trident workflow can execute on a remote computational cluster, such as a supercomputing center on in the Cloud, or on the local desktop of the researcher, and provenance on data derived by the applications is seamlessly captured. Scientists also have the option to annotate the provenance metadata using domain specific tags such as, for example, GCMD keywords. The provenance records thus captured can be exported in the Open Provenance Model* XML format that is emerging as a provenance standard in the eScience community or visualized as a graph of data and applications. The Trident workflow system and provenance recorded by it has been successfully applied in the Neptune oceanography project and is presently being tested in the Pan-STARRS astronomy project. *http://twiki.ipaw.info/bin/view/Challenge/OPM

  7. Using the FAIMS Mobile App for field data recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballsun-Stanton, Brian; Klump, Jens; Ross, Shawn

    2016-04-01

    Multiple people creating data in the field poses a hard technical problem: our ``web 2.0'' environment presumes constant connectivity, data ``authority'' held by centralised servers, and sees mobile devices as tools for presentation rather than origination. A particular design challenge is the remoteness of the sampling locations, hundreds of kilometres away from network access. The alternative, however, is hand collection with a lengthy, error prone, and expensive digitisation process. This poster will present a field-tested open-source solution to field data recording. This solution, originally created by a community of archaeologists, needed to accommodate diverse recording methodologies. The community could not agree on standard vocabularies, workflows, attributes, or methodologies, but most agreed that at app to ``record data in the field'' was desirable. As a result, the app is generalised for field data collection; not only can it record a range of data types, but it is deeply customisable. The NeCTAR / ARC funded FAIMS Project, therefore, created an app which allows for arbitrary data collection in the field. In order to accomplish this ambitious goal, FAIMS relied heavily on OSS projects including: spatialite and gdal (for GIS support), sqlite (for a lightweight key-attribute-value datastore), Javarosa and Beanshell (for UI and scripting), Ruby, and Linux. Only by standing on the shoulders of giants, FAIMS was able to make a flexible and highly generalisable field data collection system that CSIRO geoscientists were able to customise to suit most of their completely unanticipated needs. While single-task apps (i.e. those commissioned by structural geologists to take strikes and dips) will excel in their domains, other geoscientists (palaeoecologists, palaeontologists, anyone taking samples) likely cannot afford to commission domain- and methodology-specific recording tools for their custom recording needs. FAIMS shows the utility of OSS software

  8. THE USE OF EVENT DATA RECORDER (EDR – BLACK BOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Nowacki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the registration of road events by a modern device called EDR – black box for all types of the motor vehicles. The device records data concerning vehicle’s technical condition, the way it was driven and RTS. The recorder may be used in private and commercial cars, taxies, buses and trucks. The recorder may serve the purpose of a neutral witness for the police, courts and insurance firms, for which it will facilitate making the reconstruction of the road accidents events and will provide a proof for those who caused them. The device will bring efficient driving, which will significantly contribute to decreasing the number of road accidents and limiting the environmental pollution. In the end in the last year German parliament backed a proposal to the European Commission to put black boxes, which gather information from vehicles involved in accidents, in all the new cars from 2015 on.

  9. Shared responsibility for electronic records: governance in perinatal data entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craswell, Alison; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research undertaken as part of a larger research project to examine the factors that influence midwives when entering perinatal data. A grounded theory methodology was used to undertake qualitative interviews with 15 participants from 12 different hospitals across Queensland, Australia using three different systems for perinatal data collection. The findings surrounding accountability are presented revealing that a shift in governance relating to responsibility and accountability is not occurring in midwifery units across Queensland. Without assignation of responsibility for entries and accountability for mistakes or omissions, perinatal data records can be left incomplete or inaccurate. Increasing use of electronic health records and creation of digital hospitals indicates these issues are highly relevant in planning for these services.

  10. Voyager 1 Red Spot Movie

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This movie shows the portion of Jupiter around the Great Red Spot as it swirls through more than 60 Jupiter days. Notice the difference in speed and direction of the various zones of the atmosphere. The interaction of the atmospheric clouds and storm shows how dynamic the Jovian atmosphere is.As Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in 1979, it took images of the planet at regular intervals. This sequence is made from 66 images taken once every Jupiter rotation period (about 10 hours). This time-lapse movie uses images taken every time Jupiter longitude 68W passed under the spacecraft. These images were acquired in the Blue filter from Jan. 6 to Feb. 3 1979. The spacecraft flew from 58 million kilometers to 31 million kilometers from Jupiter during that time.This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1979.

  11. Study of flight data recorder, underwater locator beacon, data logger and flarm collision avoidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timi, Purnota Hannan; Shermin, Saima; Rahman, Asifur

    2017-06-01

    Flight data recorder is one of the most important sources of flight data in event of aviation disaster which records a wide range of flight parameters including altitude, airspeed, heading etc. and also helps monitoring and analyzing aircraft performance. Cockpit voice recorder records radio microphone transmissions and sounds in the cockpit. These devices help to find out and understand the root causes of aircraft crashes and help building better aircraft systems and technical solutions to prevent similar type of crashes in future, which lead to improvement in safety of aircrafts and passengers. There are other devices also which enhance the aircraft safety and assists in emergency or catastrophic situations. This paper discusses the concept of Flight Data Recorder (FDR), Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR), Underwater Locator Beacon (ULB), Data logger and flarm-collision avoidance system for aircraft and their applications in aviation.

  12. Voyages Through Time: Everything Evolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tarter, J. C.; DeVore, E. K.; O'Sullivan, K. A.; Taylor, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    Evolutionary change is a powerful framework for studying our world and our place therein. It is a recurring theme in every realm of science: over time, the universe, the planet Earth, life, and human technologies all change, albeit on vastly different scales. Evolution offers scientific explanations for the age-old question, "Where did we come from?" In addition, historical perspectives of science show how our understanding has evolved over time. The complexities of all of these systems will never reveal a "finished" story. But it is a story of epic size, capable of inspiring awe and of expanding our sense of time and place, and eminently worthy of investigating. This story is the basis of Voyages Through Time. Voyages Through Time (VTT), provides teachers with not only background science content and pedagogy, but also with materials and resources for the teaching of evolution. The six modules, Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, Hominid Evolution, and Evolution of Technology, emphasize student inquiry, and promote the nature of science, as recommended in the NSES and BSL. The modules are unified by the overarching theme of evolution and the meta questions: "What is changing?" "What is the rate of change?" and "What is the mechanism of change?" Determination of student outcomes for the project required effective collaboration of scientists, teachers, students and media specialists. The broadest curricula students outcomes are 1) an enjoyment of science, 2) an understanding of the nature of science, especially the understanding of evidence and re-evaluation, and 3) key science content. The curriculum is being developed by the SETI Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, California Academy of Sciences, and San Francisco State University, and is funded by the NSF (IMD 9730693), with support form Hewlett-Packard Company, The Foundation for Microbiology, Combined Federated Charities, NASA Astrobiology Institute, and NASA Fundamental

  13. Record transfer of data between CERN and California

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    On 27 February 2003 the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), CERN, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) broke a data transfer record by transmitting 1 terabyte of data in less than an hour across the 10,000 kilometres between CERN and Sunnyvale in California. The team sustained a transmission rate of 2.38 gigabits per second for over an hour, which is equivalent to transferring 26 CDs per minute. The record-breaking performance was achieved in the framework of tests directly linked to the DataGrid project, which involves the creation of a network of distributed computers able to deliver the unprecedented computing power and data management capacity that will be needed by the data-intensive experiments at the LHC. CERN's participation in these high-speed data transfer tests is led by IT division's External Networking team in the framework of the CERN-led European DataTAG project. Pictured here are some of the members of the CERN DataTAG project te...

  14. Cooled CCDs for recording data from electron microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Faruqi, A R

    2000-01-01

    A cooled-CCD camera based on a low-noise scientific grade device is described in this paper used for recording images in a 120 kV electron microscope. The primary use of the camera is for recording electron diffraction patterns from two-dimensionally ordered arrays of proteins at liquid-nitrogen temperatures leading to structure determination at atomic or near-atomic resolution. The traditional method for recording data in the microscope is with electron sensitive film but electronic detection methods offer the following advantages over film methods: the data is immediately available in a digital format which can be displayed on a monitor screen for visual inspection whereas a film record needs to be developed and digitised, a lengthy process taking at least several hours, prior to inspection; the dynamic range of CCD detectors is about two orders of magnitude greater with better linearity. The accuracy of measurements is also higher for CCDs, particularly for weak signals due to inherent fog levels in film. ...

  15. Semantic models in medical record data-bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, S

    1980-01-01

    A great effort has been recently made in the area of data-base design in a number of application fields (banking, insurance, travel, etc.). Yet, it is the current experience of computer scientists in the medical field that medical record information-processing requires less rigid and more complete definition of data-base specifications for a much more heterogeneous set of data, for different users who have different aims. Hence, it is important to state that the data-base in the medical field ought to be a model of the environment for which it was created, rather than just a collection of data. New more powerful and more flexible data-base models are being now designed, particularly in the USA, where the current trend in medicine is to implement, in the same structure, the connection among more different and specific users and the data-base (for administrative aims, medical care control, treatments, statistical and epidemiological results, etc.). In such a way the single users are able to talk with the data-base without interfering with one another. The present paper outlines that this multi-purpose flexibility can be achieved by improving mainly the capabilities of the data-base model. This concept allows the creation of procedures of semantic integrity control which will certainly have in the future a dramatic impact on important management features, starting from data-quality checking and non-physiological state detections, as far as more medical-oriented procedures like drug interactions, record surveillance and medical care review. That is especially true when a large amount of data are to be processed and the classical hierarchical and network data models are no longer sufficient for developing satisfactory and reliable automatic procedures. In this regard, particular emphasis will be dedicated to the relational model and, at the highest level, to the same semantic data model.

  16. Diving into the analysis of time-depth recorder and behavioural data records: A workshop summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Jamie N.; Horning, Markus; Lea, Mary-Anne; Rehberg, Michael J.

    2013-04-01

    Directly observing the foraging behavior of animals in the marine environment can be extremely challenging, if not impossible, as such behavior often takes place beneath the surface of the ocean and in extremely remote areas. In lieu of directly observing foraging behavior, data from time-depth recorders and other types of behavioral data recording devices are commonly used to describe and quantify the behavior of fish, squid, seabirds, sea turtles, pinnipeds, and cetaceans. Often the definitions of actual behavioral units and analytical approaches may vary substantially which may influence results and limit our ability to compare behaviors of interest across taxonomic groups and geographic regions. A workshop was convened in association with the Fourth International Symposium on Bio-logging in Hobart, Tasmania on 8 March 2011, with the goal of providing a forum for the presentation, review, and discussion of various methods and approaches that are used to describe and analyze time-depth recorder and associated behavioral data records. The international meeting brought together 36 participants from 14 countries from a diversity of backgrounds including scientists from academia and government, graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, and developers of electronic tagging technology and analysis software. The specific objectives of the workshop were to host a series of invited presentations followed by discussion sessions focused on (1) identifying behavioral units and metrics that are suitable for empirical studies, (2) reviewing analytical approaches and techniques that can be used to objectively classify behavior, and (3) identifying cases when temporal autocorrelation structure is useful for identifying behaviors of interest. Outcomes of the workshop included highlighting the need to better define behavioral units and to devise more standardized processing and analytical techniques in order to ensure that results are comparable across studies and taxonomic groups.

  17. Charles Darwin's beagle voyage, fossil vertebrate succession, and "the gradual birth & death of species".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he collected and some of the extant fauna of South America before he returned to Britain. These comparisons, recorded in his correspondence, his diary and his notebooks during the voyage, were instances of a phenomenon that he later called the "law of the succession of types." Moreover, on the Beagle, he was following a geological research agenda outlined in the second volume of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology, which implies that paleontological data alone could provide an insight into the laws which govern the appearance of new species. Since Darwin claims in On the Origin of Species that fossil vertebrate succession was one of the key lines of evidence that led him to question the fixity of species, it seems certain that he was seriously contemplating transmutation during the Beagle voyage. If so, historians of science need to reconsider both the role of Britain's expert naturalists and the importance of the fossil vertebrate evidence in the development of Darwin's ideas on transmutation.

  18. Quality of Archived NDBC Data as Climate Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    The middle panel gives )(1 pfα . The bottom panel is )(1 pfr The phenomenon of climate change can be gleaned from 46042 records obtained at...spreading function at the peak of the spectrum )(1 pfr was least .8. This data culling produces heights and directions that appear reasonable and accurate...of storm activity is drifting slowly south at -.509°/yr. We suspect that the spreading function value )(1 pfr has declined .02/yr owing to underlying

  19. Small, Self-Contained Aircraft Fatigue Data Recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    lithuim chemistry batteries and are seeking your aid in defining a suitable battery system. At present we have no statistical estimations, of the...loads in remote locations such as the vertical tail, wing spar, landing gear, etc. However, there is presently no small, battery -operated data recorder...packaging, and the delivery of 3 units for lab evaluation and flight test by the Navy. A miniature, easily-installed, battery -operated structural

  20. The standard data model approach to patient record transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, K; Silva, M; Petrucci, K

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops an approach to electronic data exchange of patient records from Ambulatory Encounter Systems (AESs). This approach assumes that the AES is based upon a standard data model. The data modeling standard used here is IDEFIX for Entity/Relationship (E/R) modeling. Each site that uses a relational database implementation of this standard data model (or a subset of it) can exchange very detailed patient data with other such sites using industry standard tools and without excessive programming efforts. This design is detailed below for a demonstration project between the research-oriented geriatric clinic at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center (BVAMC) and the Laboratory for Healthcare Informatics (LHI) at the University of Maryland.

  1. Analyzing a 35-Year Hourly Data Record: Why So Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    At the Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center, we have recently added a 35-Year record of output data from the North American Land Assimilation System (NLDAS) to the Giovanni web-based analysis and visualization tool. Giovanni (Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure) offers a variety of data summarization and visualization to users that operate at the data center, obviating the need for users to download and read the data themselves for exploratory data analysis. However, the NLDAS data has proven surprisingly resistant to application of the summarization algorithms. Algorithms that were perfectly happy analyzing 15 years of daily satellite data encountered limitations both at the algorithm and system level for 35 years of hourly data. Failures arose, sometimes unexpectedly, from command line overflows, memory overflows, internal buffer overflows, and time-outs, among others. These serve as an early warning sign for the problems likely to be encountered by the general user community as they try to scale up to Big Data analytics. Indeed, it is likely that more users will seek to perform remote web-based analysis precisely to avoid the issues, or the need to reprogram around them. We will discuss approaches to mitigating the limitations and the implications for data systems serving the user communities that try to scale up their current techniques to analyze Big Data.

  2. Factors Affecting Accuracy of Data Abstracted from Medical Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith N Zozus

    Full Text Available Medical record abstraction (MRA is often cited as a significant source of error in research data, yet MRA methodology has rarely been the subject of investigation. Lack of a common framework has hindered application of the extant literature in practice, and, until now, there were no evidence-based guidelines for ensuring data quality in MRA. We aimed to identify the factors affecting the accuracy of data abstracted from medical records and to generate a framework for data quality assurance and control in MRA.Candidate factors were identified from published reports of MRA. Content validity of the top candidate factors was assessed via a four-round two-group Delphi process with expert abstractors with experience in clinical research, registries, and quality improvement. The resulting coded factors were categorized into a control theory-based framework of MRA. Coverage of the framework was evaluated using the recent published literature.Analysis of the identified articles yielded 292 unique factors that affect the accuracy of abstracted data. Delphi processes overall refuted three of the top factors identified from the literature based on importance and five based on reliability (six total factors refuted. Four new factors were identified by the Delphi. The generated framework demonstrated comprehensive coverage. Significant underreporting of MRA methodology in recent studies was discovered.The framework generated from this research provides a guide for planning data quality assurance and control for studies using MRA. The large number and variability of factors indicate that while prospective quality assurance likely increases the accuracy of abstracted data, monitoring the accuracy during the abstraction process is also required. Recent studies reporting research results based on MRA rarely reported data quality assurance or control measures, and even less frequently reported data quality metrics with research results. Given the demonstrated

  3. Low-cost automatic activity data recording system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes M.F.D.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a low-cost, high quality device capable of monitoring indirect activity by detecting touch-release events on a conducting surface, i.e., the animal's cage cover. In addition to the detecting sensor itself, the system includes an IBM PC interface for prompt data storage. The hardware/software design, while serving for other purposes, is used to record the circadian activity rhythm pattern of rats with time in an automated computerized fashion using minimal cost computer equipment (IBM PC XT. Once the sensor detects a touch-release action of the rat in the upper portion of the cage, the interface sends a command to the PC which records the time (hours-minutes-seconds when the activity occurred. As a result, the computer builds up several files (one per detector/sensor containing a time list of all recorded events. Data can be visualized in terms of actograms, indicating the number of detections per hour, and analyzed by mathematical tools such as Fast Fourier Transform (FFT or cosinor. In order to demonstrate method validation, an experiment was conducted on 8 Wistar rats under 12/12-h light/dark cycle conditions (lights on at 7:00 a.m.. Results show a biological validation of the method since it detected the presence of circadian activity rhythm patterns in the behavior of the rats

  4. Io plasma torus ion composition: Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerney, Edward G.; Bagenal, Fran; Steffl, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    The Io torus produces ultraviolet emissions diagnostic of plasma conditions. We revisit data sets obtained by the Voyager 1, Galileo, and Cassini missions at Jupiter. With the latest version (8.0) of the CHIANTI atomic database we analyze UV spectra to determine ion composition. We compare ion composition obtained from observations from these three missions with a theoretical model of the physical chemistry of the torus by Delamere et al. (2005). We find ion abundances from the Voyager data similar to the Cassini epoch, consistent with the dissociation and ionization of SO2, but with a slightly higher average ionization state for sulfur, consistent with the higher electron temperature measured by Voyager. This reanalysis of the Voyager data produces a much lower oxygen:sulfur ratio than earlier analysis by Shemansky (1988), which was also reported by Bagenal (1994). We derive fractional ion compositions in the center of the torus to be S+/Ne 5%, S++/Ne 20%, S+++/Ne 5%, O+/Ne 20%, O++/Ne 3%, and Σ(On+)/Σ(Sn+) 0.8, leaving about 10-15% of the charge as protons. The radial profile of ion composition indicates a slightly higher average ionization state, a modest loss of sulfur relative to oxygen, and Σ(On+)/Σ(Sn+) 1.2 at about 8 RJ, beyond which the composition is basically frozen in. The Galileo observations of UV emissions from the torus suggest that the composition in June 1996 may have comprised a lower abundance of oxygen than usual, consistent with observations made at the same time by the EUVE satellite.

  5. Towards a satellite-based sea ice climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, W. N.; Fetterer, F.; Stroeve, J.; Cavalieri, D.; Parkinson, C.; Comiso, J.; Weaver, R.

    2005-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the Earth's climate through its influence on the surface albedo, heat and moisture transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere, and the thermohaline circulation. Satellite data reveal that since 1979, summer Arctic sea ice has, overall, been declining at a rate of almost 8%/decade, with recent summers (beginning in 2002) being particularly low. The receding sea ice is having an effect on wildlife and indigenous peoples in the Arctic, and concern exists that these effects may become increasingly severe. Thus, a long-term, ongoing climate data record of sea ice is crucial for tracking the changes in sea ice and for assessing the significance of long-term trends. Since the advent of passive microwave satellite instruments in the early 1970s, sea ice has been one of the most consistently monitored climate parameters. There is now a 27+ year record of sea ice extent and concentration from multi-channel passive microwave radiometers that has undergone inter-sensor calibration and other quality controls to ensure consistency throughout the record. Several algorithms have been developed over the years to retrieve sea ice extent and concentration and two of the most commonly used algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap, have been applied to the entire SMMR-SSM/I record to obtain a consistent time series. These algorithms were developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and are archived at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. However, the complex surface properties of sea ice affect the microwave signature, and algorithms can yield ambiguous results; no single algorithm has been found to work uniformly well under all sea ice conditions. Thus there are ongoing efforts to further refine the algorithms and the time series. One approach is to develop data fusion methods to optimally combine sea ice fields from two or more algorithms. Another approach is to take advantage of the improved capabilities of JAXA's AMSR-E sensor on NASA's Aqua

  6. Satellite Climate Data Records: Development, Applications, and Societal Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenze Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review paper discusses how to develop, produce, sustain, and serve satellite climate data records (CDRs in the context of transitioning research to operation (R2O. Requirements and critical procedures of producing various CDRs, including Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs, Thematic CDRs (TCDRs, Interim CDRs (ICDRs, and climate information records (CIRs are discussed in detail, including radiance/reflectance and the essential climate variables (ECVs of land, ocean, and atmosphere. Major international CDR initiatives, programs, and projects are summarized. Societal benefits of CDRs in various user sectors, including Agriculture, Forestry, Fisheries, Energy, Heath, Water, Transportation, and Tourism are also briefly discussed. The challenges and opportunities for CDR development, production and service are also addressed. It is essential to maintain credible CDR products by allowing free access to products and keeping the production process transparent by making source code and documentation available with the dataset.

  7. The EUMETSAT sea ice concentration climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonboe, Rasmus T.; Eastwood, Steinar; Lavergne, Thomas; Sørensen, Atle M.; Rathmann, Nicholas; Dybkjær, Gorm; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Høyer, Jacob L.; Kern, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    An Arctic and Antarctic sea ice area and extent dataset has been generated by EUMETSAT's Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSISAF) using the record of microwave radiometer data from NASA's Nimbus 7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave radiometer (SMMR) and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) satellite sensors. The dataset covers the period from October 1978 to April 2015 and updates and further developments are planned for the next phase of the project. The methodology for computing the sea ice concentration uses (1) numerical weather prediction (NWP) data input to a radiative transfer model for reduction of the impact of weather conditions on the measured brightness temperatures; (2) dynamical algorithm tie points to mitigate trends in residual atmospheric, sea ice, and water emission characteristics and inter-sensor differences/biases; and (3) a hybrid sea ice concentration algorithm using the Bristol algorithm over ice and the Bootstrap algorithm in frequency mode over open water. A new sea ice concentration uncertainty algorithm has been developed to estimate the spatial and temporal variability in sea ice concentration retrieval accuracy. A comparison to US National Ice Center sea ice charts from the Arctic and the Antarctic shows that ice concentrations are higher in the ice charts than estimated from the radiometer data at intermediate sea ice concentrations between open water and 100 % ice. The sea ice concentration climate data record is available for download at www.osi-saf.org, including documentation.

  8. Break and trend analysis of EUMETSAT Climate Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutriaux-Boucher, Marie; Zeder, Joel; Lattanzio, Alessio; Khlystova, Iryna; Graw, Kathrin

    2016-04-01

    EUMETSAT reprocessed imagery acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat 8-9. The data covers the period from 2004 to 2012. Climate Data Records (CDRs) of atmospheric parameters such as Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV) as well as Clear and All Sky Radiances (CSR and ASR) have been generated. Such CDRs are mainly ingested by ECMWF to produce a reanalysis data. In addition, EUMETSAT produced a long CDR (1982-2004) of land surface albedo exploiting imagery acquired by the Meteosat Visible and Infrared Imager (MVIRI) on board Meteosat 2-7. Such CDR is key information in climate analysis and climate models. Extensive validation has been performed for the surface albedo record and a first validation of the winds and clear sky radiances have been done. All validation results demonstrated that the time series of all parameter appear homogeneous at first sight. Statistical science offers a variety of analyses methods that have been applied to further analyse the homogeneity of the CDRs. Many breakpoint analysis techniques depend on the comparison of two time series which incorporates the issue that both may have breakpoints. This paper will present a quantitative and statistical analysis of eventual breakpoints found in the MVIRI and SEVIRI CDRs that includes attribution of breakpoints to changes of instruments and other events in the data series compared. The value of different methods applied will be discussed with suggestions how to further develop this type of analysis for quality evaluation of CDRs.

  9. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DATA AND THE RECORDING OF MATERIAL STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parenti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The “description” of a material structure requires a high degree of objectivity to serve the scientific interests of certain disciplines (archeological documentation, conservation and restoration, safeguarding of cultural assets and heritage. Geometric data and photographic documentation of surfaces are thus the best instruments for efficacious, clear and objective recording of architectural objects and other anthropic manifestations. In particular, the completeness and diachrony of photographic documentation has always proven essential in recording the material structure of historical buildings.The aim of our contribution is to show the results of several projects carried out with the aid of survey methodologies that utilize digital photographic images to generate RGB (ZScan point clouds of architectural monuments (urban standing buildings, monuments in archaeological areas, etc. and art objects. These technologies allow us to capture data using digital photogrammetric techniques; although not based on laser scanners, they can nonetheless create dense 3D point clouds, simply by using images that have been obtained via digital camera. The results are comparable to those achieved with laser scanner technology, although the procedures are simpler, faster and cheaper. We intend to try to adapt these technologies to the requirements and needs of scientific research and the conservation of cultural heritage. Furthermore, we will present protocols and procedures for data recording, processing and transfer in the cultural heritage field, especially with regard to historical buildings. Cooperation among experts from different disciplines (archaeology, engineering and photogrammetry will allow us to develop technologies and proposals for a widely adoptable workflow in the application of such technologies, in order to build an integrated system that can be used throughout the scientific community. Toward this end, open formats and integration will be

  10. Voyages Through Time: Everything Evolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jane; Tarter, Jill; Devore, Edna; Pendleton, Yvonne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Burke, Meg

    2004-06-01

    The SETI Institute, the California Academy of Sciences, NASA Ames Research Center, and San Francisco State University have developed standards-based curriculum materials for a one-year high school integrated science course centered on the unifying theme of evolution. Scientists, teachers, curriculum writers, and media specialists are currently finalizing six modules that integrate astronomical, geological, and biological sciences as well as the history of science and technology. The sequence of lessons in each module is designed to promote students' understanding and skills as defined by the National Science Education Standards and Benchmarks for Science Literacy. The modules cover: Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, Hominid Evolution, and the Evolution of Technology. The core lessons for all six modules are provided via CD-ROM, including instructional guidelines, science background information, and additional resources (print, audiovisual, software, WWW sites, and databases). These products will be published as a complete set for use as a yearlong science course and will also be available as individual modules for use in discipline-based courses. Evolutionary change is a powerful framework for studying our world and our place therein. It is a story of epic size, capable of inspiring awe and of expanding our sense of time and place. This story is the basis of Voyages Through Time.

  11. Multilevel optical data recording methods on phase-change media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖家曦; 齐国生; 佘鹏; 刘嵘; 徐端颐

    2003-01-01

    Multilevel data storage (ML) is a new method in the optical storage field, which is also a trend for improving the capability of future optical discs. This article introduces several ML methods based on phase-change media including pit depth modulation (PDM) and mark radial width modulation (MRWM). In addition, some disadvantages and advantages concerning the principle of these methods will be discussed. Finally, a new ML method will be advanced, through which the levels in one recording pit will be increased evidently.

  12. Physicists set new record for network data transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "An internatinal team of physicists, computer scientists, and network engineers led by the California Institute of Technology, CERN and the University of Michigan and partners at the University of Florida and Vanderbilt, as well as participants from Brazil (Rio de Janeiro State University, UERJ, and the State Universities of Sao Paulo, USP and UNESP) and Korea (Kyungpook National University, KISTI) joined forces to set new records for sustained data transfer between storage systems during the SuperComputing 2006 (SC06) Bandwidth Challenge (BWC)." (2 pages)

  13. Progress and Processes for Generating NOAA's Climate Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, S. S.; Glance, W. J.; Bates, J. J.; Kearns, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    NOAA established a satellite Climate Data Record Program (CDRP) at its National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) to provide a systematic reprocessing capability which will generate sustained and authoritative climate information from 30+ years of satellite data. CDRP implements a unique approach in archiving not only the data products themselves, but also the software, ancillary data, and enough documentation to allow any user with the processing power, to reproduce the data. Best practices, such as a common maturity matrix, software guidelines, and format standards, are employed to facilitate both the transition of research algorithms to operational software, and the long-term maintenance of the software. Throughout the implementation and execution of the program, CDRP seeks to adhere to production guidelines from Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and World Meteorological Organization's (WMO's) Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM activity. Elements of the CDR Adaptive Processing System (CAPS) are described, along with the system's implementation approach, performance expectations, and plans for growth to accommodate increased CDR processing. In addition, a cost model has been implemented to capture the cost of CDR generation and maintenance, considering variables such as CDR complexity, source, and maturity at the beginning of the process.

  14. Recording real case data of earth faults in distribution lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haenninen, S. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The most common fault type in the electrical distribution networks is the single phase to earth fault. According to the earlier studies, for instance in Nordic countries, about 80 % of all faults are of this type. To develop the protection and fault location systems, it is important to obtain real case data of disturbances and faults which occur in the networks. For example, the earth fault initial transients can be used for earth fault location. The aim of this project was to collect and analyze real case data of the earth fault disturbances in the medium voltage distribution networks (20 kV). Therefore, data of fault occurrences were recorded at two substations, of which one has an unearthed and the other a compensated neutral, measured as follows: (a) the phase currents and neutral current for each line in the case of low fault resistance (b) the phase voltages and neutral voltage from the voltage measuring bay in the case of low fault resistance (c) the neutral voltage and the components of 50 Hz at the substation in the case of high fault resistance. In addition, the basic data of the fault occurrences were collected (data of the line, fault location, cause and so on). The data will be used in the development work of fault location and earth fault protection systems

  15. Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrometers calibration and the heliosphere neutrals composition: reassessment

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi

    2016-01-01

    The Voyagers (V) 1 and 2 Ultraviolet Spectrometers (UVS) data harvest covers outer planets encounters, heliosphere sky-background measurements, and stellar spectrophotometry. Because their operation period overlaps with many ultraviolet missions, the V1 and V2 UVS calibration with other spectrometers are invaluable. Here we revisit the UVS calibration to assess the intriguing 243 % (V1) and 156 % (V2) sensitivity enhancements recently proposed. Using the Saturn Lyman-$\\alpha$ airglow, observed in-situ by both Voyagers, and remotely by IUE, we match the Voyager values to IUE, taking into account the shape of the Saturn Lyman-$\\alpha$ line observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. For all known ranges of the interplanetary hydrogen density, we show that the V1 and V2 UVS sensitivities cannot be enhanced by the amounts thus far proposed. The same diagnostic holds for distinct channels covering the diffuse HeI 58.4 nm emission. Our prescription is to keep the origi...

  16. Uncertainty information in climate data records from Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Christopher J.; Paul, Frank; Popp, Thomas; Ablain, Michael; Bontemps, Sophie; Defourny, Pierre; Hollmann, Rainer; Lavergne, Thomas; Laeng, Alexandra; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Mittaz, Jonathan; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam C.; Reuter, Max; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Sandven, Stein; Sofieva, Viktoria F.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The question of how to derive and present uncertainty information in climate data records (CDRs) has received sustained attention within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (CCI), a programme to generate CDRs addressing a range of essential climate variables (ECVs) from satellite data. Here, we review the nature, mathematics, practicalities, and communication of uncertainty information in CDRs from Earth observations. This review paper argues that CDRs derived from satellite-based Earth observation (EO) should include rigorous uncertainty information to support the application of the data in contexts such as policy, climate modelling, and numerical weather prediction reanalysis. Uncertainty, error, and quality are distinct concepts, and the case is made that CDR products should follow international metrological norms for presenting quantified uncertainty. As a baseline for good practice, total standard uncertainty should be quantified per datum in a CDR, meaning that uncertainty estimates should clearly discriminate more and less certain data. In this case, flags for data quality should not duplicate uncertainty information, but instead describe complementary information (such as the confidence in the uncertainty estimate provided or indicators of conditions violating the retrieval assumptions). The paper discusses the many sources of error in CDRs, noting that different errors may be correlated across a wide range of timescales and space scales. Error effects that contribute negligibly to the total uncertainty in a single-satellite measurement can be the dominant sources of uncertainty in a CDR on the large space scales and long timescales that are highly relevant for some climate applications. For this reason, identifying and characterizing the relevant sources of uncertainty for CDRs is particularly challenging. The characterization of uncertainty caused by a given error effect involves assessing the magnitude of the effect, the shape of the

  17. System and Method for High-Speed Data Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveniku, Mikael B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A system and method for high speed data recording includes a control computer and a disk pack unit. The disk pack is provided within a shell that provides handling and protection for the disk packs. The disk pack unit provides cooling of the disks and connection for power and disk signaling. A standard connection is provided between the control computer and the disk pack unit. The disk pack units are self sufficient and able to connect to any computer. Multiple disk packs are connected simultaneously to the system, so that one disk pack can be active while one or more disk packs are inactive. To control for power surges, the power to each disk pack is controlled programmatically for the group of disks in a disk pack.

  18. Characterizing Global Fire Return Intervals from the MODIS Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkova, M.; Boschetti, L.

    2016-12-01

    The term `fire regimes' was originally introduced in order to characterize spatial and temporal pattern and ecosystem impacts of fire on the landscape (Gill 1975). The availability of global, multiannual satellite fire data records has made it possible to investigate the spatial and temporal patterns of fire at the continental and global scale, yet there is no universal definition of fire regimes nor which fire characteristics to include, how to define them and what scale is considered appropriate for mapping fire characteristics (Morgan et al. 2001). There were several attempts to combine various fire characteristics to create a global map of fire regimes (Chuvieco et al. 2008, Archibald et al. 2013) conducting the analysis over fixed resolution cells (e.g. 0.5 degrees), but no explicit analysis of what scale is more appropriate to describe fire regimes has been conducted so far. This study focuses on fire return interval - one of the metrics commonly included in what constitutes a `fire regime' and conducts an analysis of the consistency of the results as a function of the scale of the aggregation. Fifteen years of MODIS data (2001-2015), the longest currently available, were used for this analysis. The analysis shows that regular, sub-degree cells are suitable for fire-prone areas like Africa and Australia where fire is likely to be observed within the cell during the study period, but not for forests with longer fire return intervals (e.g. > 100 years in boreal forests). Non-regular subdivisions, such as ecoregion maps, which have been previously used for sub-continental fire regime analysis (Malamud et al. 2005, Westerling et al. 2002) are able to characterize properly longer fire return intervals. The present analysis is the first step in a comprehensive, quantitative assessment of global fire activity trends with the MODIS fire record, and in the investigation of whether there is a relationship between fire pattern and changing climate.

  19. Data-Driven Information Extraction from Chinese Electronic Medical Records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xu

    Full Text Available This study aims to propose a data-driven framework that takes unstructured free text narratives in Chinese Electronic Medical Records (EMRs as input and converts them into structured time-event-description triples, where the description is either an elaboration or an outcome of the medical event.Our framework uses a hybrid approach. It consists of constructing cross-domain core medical lexica, an unsupervised, iterative algorithm to accrue more accurate terms into the lexica, rules to address Chinese writing conventions and temporal descriptors, and a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm that innovatively utilizes Normalized Google Distance (NGD to estimate the correlation between medical events and their descriptions.The effectiveness of the framework was demonstrated with a dataset of 24,817 de-identified Chinese EMRs. The cross-domain medical lexica were capable of recognizing terms with an F1-score of 0.896. 98.5% of recorded medical events were linked to temporal descriptors. The NGD SVM description-event matching achieved an F1-score of 0.874. The end-to-end time-event-description extraction of our framework achieved an F1-score of 0.846.In terms of named entity recognition, the proposed framework outperforms state-of-the-art supervised learning algorithms (F1-score: 0.896 vs. 0.886. In event-description association, the NGD SVM is superior to SVM using only local context and semantic features (F1-score: 0.874 vs. 0.838.The framework is data-driven, weakly supervised, and robust against the variations and noises that tend to occur in a large corpus. It addresses Chinese medical writing conventions and variations in writing styles through patterns used for discovering new terms and rules for updating the lexica.

  20. The fossil record of evolution: Data on diversification and extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepkoski, J. J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Understanding of the evolution of complex life, and of the roles that changing terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments played in life's history, is dependent upon synthetic knowledge of the fossil record. Paleontologists have been describing fossils for more that two centuries. However, much of this information is dispersed in monographs and journal articles published throughout the world. Over the past several years, this literature was surveyed, and a data base on times of origination and extinction of fossil genera was compiled. The data base, which now holds approximately 32,000 genera, covers all taxonomic groups of marine animals, incorporates the most recent taxonomic assignments, and uses a detailed global time framework that can resolve originations and extinctions to intervals averaging three million years in duration. These data can be used to compile patterns of global biodiversity, measure rates of taxic evolution, and test hypotheses concerning adaptive radiations, mass extinctions, etc. Thus far, considerable effort was devoted to using the data to test the hypothesis of periodicity of mass extinction. Rates of extinction measured from the data base have also been used to calibrate models of evolutionary radiations in marine environments. It was observed that new groups, or clades of animals (i.e., orders and classes) tend to reach appreciable diversity first in nearshore environments and then to radiate in more offshore environments; during decline, these clades may disappear from the nearshore while persisting in offshore, deep water habitats. These observations have led to suggestions that there is something special about stressful or perturbed environments that promotes the evolution of novel kinds of animals that can rapidly replace their predecessors. The numerical model that is being investigated to study this phenomenon treats environments along onshore-offshore gradients as if they were discrete habitats. Other aspects of this

  1. Jules Verne Voyager: A Web Interactive Tool for Comparative Planetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, L.; Pappalardo, R.; Meertens, C.

    2004-12-01

    A Web interactive map tool called "Jules Verne Voyager" was originally developed in 1999 by UNAVCO and continues to evolve. The Voyager tool can easily be used for comparative planetology studies by grades 8-14. Thematic mapping datasets, now totaling about 70 Gb, can be accessed by the tool and include global-scale maps of the inner solar system planets and moons, plus Jupiter and the Galilean moons. The map images are viewed on a Web browser created on demand by the server system. On the client-side, only a Java-enabled browser is required, and the Voyager Java applet runs well with common browsers like Netscape, Mozilla, Opera, and Internet Explorer. The applet sends a key-value pair URL to the http://jules.unavco.org server which queues incoming requests and sends them to a bank of computers dedicated to map image creation. The engine for map image creation makes use of the "Generic Mapping Tools" (GMT) software of Paul Wessel and Walter Smith, followed by image conversion of the GMT-created PostScript to GIF for raster image export and display back on the client browser. Because of the GMT-based engine on the server system, the student user can easily create the same type of images from real planetary data that researchers create. The tool also gives a student the ability to switch background datasets and overlay certain other thematic datasets, thus providing a minimal GIS capability. To our knowledge, the map tool has not yet formally been used in a 8-14 classroom environment, though informal use by students and teachers in these grades suggest that it would be well received. The server system is currently capable of handing a moderate level of requests that would result from classroom use; for example, as a system benchmark, over 800 Voyager images were created and served in about an hour during a DLESE 2003 annual meeting workshop. The Voyager map tool is being used by instructors in earth science and comparative planetology as a means to create customized

  2. 78 FR 39968 - Flight Data Recorder Airplane Parameter Specification Omissions and Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 91, 121 and 125 RIN 2120-AK27 Flight Data Recorder... for flight data recorders by correcting errors in recording rates in three different appendices. These... when the applicable flight data recorder parameter requirements were adopted, but which have...

  3. Advanced Big Data Analytics for -Omic Data and Electronic Health Records: Toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yen; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Kaddi, Chanchala; Venugopalan, Janani; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, May D

    2016-10-10

    Rapid advances of high-throughput technologies and wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have led to fast accumulation of -omic and EHR data. These voluminous complex data contain abundant information for precision medicine, and big data analytics can extract such knowledge to improve the quality of health care. In this article, we present -omic and EHR data characteristics, associated challenges, and data analytics including data pre-processing, mining, and modeling. To demonstrate how big data analytics enables precision medicine, we provide two case studies, including identifying disease biomarkers from multi-omic data and incorporating -omic information into EHR. Big data analytics is able to address -omic and EHR data challenges for paradigm shift towards precision medicine. Big data analytics makes sense of -omic and EHR data to improve healthcare outcome. It has long lasting societal impact.

  4. OMI total column ozone: extending the long term data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Frith, S.; Labow, G. J.

    2015-07-01

    The ozone data record from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the NASA EOS-Aura satellite has proven to be very stable over the ten plus years of operation. The OMI total column ozone processed through the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm (version 8.5) has been compared with ground based measurements and with ozone from a series of SBUV/2 instruments. Comparison with an ensemble of Brewer and Dobson sites shows an absolute offset of about 1.5 % but stability over the ten years to better than half a percent. Comparison with a merged ozone (MOD) data set created by combining data from a series of SBUV/2 instruments again shows an offset, of about 1 %, and a relative trend of less than half a percent over ten years. The offset is mostly due to the use of the old Bass and Paur ozone cross sections in the OMI retrievals rather than the Brion/Daumont/Malicet cross sections that are now recommended. The bias in the Southern Hemisphere is smaller than that in the Northern Hemisphere, 1 vs. 1.5 %, for reasons that are not completely understood. When OMI was compared with the European realization of a multi-instrument ozone time series, the GTO (GOME type ozone) dataset, there was a small trend of about -0.85 % decade-1. Since all the comparisons of OMI relative to other ozone measuring systems show relative trends that are less than 1 % decade-1, we conclude that the OMI total column ozone data are sufficiently stable that they can be used in studies of ozone trends.

  5. OMI total column ozone: extending the long term data record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. McPeters

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ozone data record from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI onboard the NASA EOS-Aura satellite has proven to be very stable over the ten plus years of operation. The OMI total column ozone processed through the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm (version 8.5 has been compared with ground based measurements and with ozone from a series of SBUV/2 instruments. Comparison with an ensemble of Brewer and Dobson sites shows an absolute offset of about 1.5 % but stability over the ten years to better than half a percent. Comparison with a merged ozone (MOD data set created by combining data from a series of SBUV/2 instruments again shows an offset, of about 1 %, and a relative trend of less than half a percent over ten years. The offset is mostly due to the use of the old Bass and Paur ozone cross sections in the OMI retrievals rather than the Brion/Daumont/Malicet cross sections that are now recommended. The bias in the Southern Hemisphere is smaller than that in the Northern Hemisphere, 1 vs. 1.5 %, for reasons that are not completely understood. When OMI was compared with the European realization of a multi-instrument ozone time series, the GTO (GOME type ozone dataset, there was a small trend of about −0.85 % decade−1. Since all the comparisons of OMI relative to other ozone measuring systems show relative trends that are less than 1 % decade−1, we conclude that the OMI total column ozone data are sufficiently stable that they can be used in studies of ozone trends.

  6. Evaluating and Extending the Ocean Wind Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardulli, Lucrezia; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Stiles, Bryan W.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Long, David G.; Hoffman, Ross N.; Stoffelen, Ad; Verhoef, Anton; O'Neill, Larry W.; Farrar, J. Tomas; Vandemark, Douglas; Fore, Alexander G.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Turk, F. Joseph; Gaston, Robert; Tyler, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Satellite microwave sensors, both active scatterometers and passive radiometers, have been systematically measuring near-surface ocean winds for nearly 40 years, establishing an important legacy in studying and monitoring weather and climate variability. As an aid to such activities, the various wind datasets are being intercalibrated and merged into consistent climate data records (CDRs). The ocean wind CDRs (OW-CDRs) are evaluated by comparisons with ocean buoys and intercomparisons among the different satellite sensors and among the different data providers. Extending the OW-CDR into the future requires exploiting all available datasets, such as OSCAT-2 scheduled to launch in July 2016. Three planned methods of calibrating the OSCAT-2 σo measurements include 1) direct Ku-band σo intercalibration to QuikSCAT and RapidScat; 2) multisensor wind speed intercalibration; and 3) calibration to stable rainforest targets. Unfortunately, RapidScat failed in August 2016 and cannot be used to directly calibrate OSCAT-2. A particular future continuity concern is the absence of scheduled new or continuation radiometer missions capable of measuring wind speed. Specialized model assimilations provide 30-year long high temporal/spatial resolution wind vector grids that composite the satellite wind information from OW-CDRs of multiple satellites viewing the Earth at different local times. PMID:28824741

  7. Enhancing Resilience in Youth through a 10-Day Developmental Voyage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, Jill; Hunter, John A.; Kafka, Sarah; Boyes, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the potential for resilience to be enhanced in a group of youth participating in a developmental voyage, and to identify the factors that contribute to increased resilience following the voyage. Two studies are reported. Study 1 revealed that voyage participants experienced increased resilience over the course…

  8. Enhancing Resilience in Youth through a 10-Day Developmental Voyage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayhurst, Jill; Hunter, John A.; Kafka, Sarah; Boyes, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the potential for resilience to be enhanced in a group of youth participating in a developmental voyage, and to identify the factors that contribute to increased resilience following the voyage. Two studies are reported. Study 1 revealed that voyage participants experienced increased resilience over the course…

  9. Voyager Reading Programs. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Voyager Passport"[TM] is a supplemental reading intervention system for students in grades K-5. "Voyager Passport Reading Journeys"[TM] is a reading intervention program designed for adolescents who struggle with reading. The "Voyager Universal Literacy System"[R] is a K-3 reading program that includes a core reading…

  10. Archetype-based data warehouse environment to enable the reuse of electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Moner, David; Maldonado, José A; Kolstrup, Nils; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-09-01

    The reuse of data captured during health care delivery is essential to satisfy the demands of clinical research and clinical decision support systems. A main barrier for the reuse is the existence of legacy formats of data and the high granularity of it when stored in an electronic health record (EHR) system. Thus, we need mechanisms to standardize, aggregate, and query data concealed in the EHRs, to allow their reuse whenever they are needed. To create a data warehouse infrastructure using archetype-based technologies, standards and query languages to enable the interoperability needed for data reuse. The work presented makes use of best of breed archetype-based data transformation and storage technologies to create a workflow for the modeling, extraction, transformation and load of EHR proprietary data into standardized data repositories. We converted legacy data and performed patient-centered aggregations via archetype-based transformations. Later, specific purpose aggregations were performed at a query level for particular use cases. Laboratory test results of a population of 230,000 patients belonging to Troms and Finnmark counties in Norway requested between January 2013 and November 2014 have been standardized. Test records normalization has been performed by defining transformation and aggregation functions between the laboratory records and an archetype. These mappings were used to automatically generate open EHR compliant data. These data were loaded into an archetype-based data warehouse. Once loaded, we defined indicators linked to the data in the warehouse to monitor test activity of Salmonella and Pertussis using the archetype query language. Archetype-based standards and technologies can be used to create a data warehouse environment that enables data from EHR systems to be reused in clinical research and decision support systems. With this approach, existing EHR data becomes available in a standardized and interoperable format, thus opening a world

  11. Developing climate data records and essential climate variables from landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, John; Dinardo, Thomas P.; Muchoney, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    The series of Landsat missions has compiled the longest record of satellite observation of the Earth’s land surface, extending for more than 38 years for most areas of the globe. Landsat data are particularly important as long term climate data records because the scale of observation is sufficient to differentiate between natural and human drivers of land cover change. The USGS has established consistent radiometric calibration across the Landsat TM and ETM+ sensors, and have extended the calibration back to the earlier MSS sensors. The USGS is developing capabilities to create fundamental climate data records (FCDRs), thematic climate data records (TCDRs), and essential climate variables (ECVs) from the Landsat data archive. Two high priority TCDRs were identified: surface reflectance and land surface temperature because they have direct application or are required as input to the generation of ECVs. We will focus development on a few of the terrestrial ECVs that have a high potential for being derived from Landsat data, that include land cover, albedo, fire disturbance, surface water, snow and ice, and leaf area index (LAI). We are collaborating with scientists who have demonstrated successful algorithm development and application of these science products to develop a framework of processing capabilities to support research projects and land management applications, along with an independent strategy for product validation. Our goal is to scale the creation and validation of these products from specific sites in the conterminous U.S. and Alaska, for extension to continental and global scales.

  12. Magnetic Reconnection in the Heliospheric Current Sheet: The Implications of the Different Environments Seen by the VoyagerSpacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisdak, M. M.; Drake, J. F.; Opher, M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic field abutting the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is primarily in the azimuthal direction, either east-to-west or west-to-east. Mis-alignment of the solar rotational and magnetic axesleads to the characteristic ballerina-skirt shape of the HCS and during the solar cycle there can be large excursions in the sheet's latitudinal extent. Voyager 2's observations of energetic electrondropouts are related to its crossing of this boundary. Magnetic reconnection is also thought to occur as the HCS compresses and narrows between the termination shock and the heliopause. Near theequator the two HCS field alignments are present in roughly equal amounts, while near the edges the distribution can be considerably skewed. This will lead to substantial differences in the environmentsof the two Voyager spacecraft since Voyager 1 is north of the equator, but firmly in the sector region, while Voyager 2 is south of the equator and skirting the edges of the sector region. We presentparticle-in-cell simulations demonstrating the consequences of the reconnection of asymmetric amounts of flux. In particular, we will discuss Voyager 2's remaining time in the heliosphere -- including theimplications for the solar wind velocity, energetic particle transport, and the expected structure of Voyager 2's heliopause crossing -- and compare it with the data collected from Voyager 1.

  13. Reprocessing VIIRS sensor data records from the early SNPP mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, Slawomir; Cao, Changyong

    2016-10-01

    The Visible-Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite began acquiring Earth observations in November 2011. VIIRS data from all spectral bands became available three months after launch when all infrared-band detectors were cooled down to operational temperature. Before that, VIIRS sensor data record (SDR) products were successfully generated for the visible and near infrared (VNIR) bands. Although VIIRS calibration has been significantly improved through the four years of the SNPP mission, SDR reprocessing for this early mission phase has yet to be performed. Despite a rapid decrease in the telescope throughput that occurred during the first few months on orbit, calibration coefficients for the VNIR bands were recently successfully generated using an automated procedure that is currently deployed in the operational SDR production system. The reanalyzed coefficients were derived from measurements collected during solar calibration events that occur on every SNPP orbit since the beginning of the mission. The new coefficients can be further used to reprocess the VIIRS SDR products. In this study, they are applied to reprocess VIIRS data acquired over pseudo-invariant calibration sites Libya 4 and Sudan 1 in Sahara between November 2011 and February 2012. Comparison of the reprocessed SDR products with the original ones demonstrates improvements in the VIIRS calibration provided by the reprocessing. Since SNPP is the first satellite in a series that will form the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), calibration methods developed for the SNPP VIIRS will also apply to the future JPSS measurements.

  14. Voyager Interactive Web Interface to EarthScope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Meertens, C. M.; Estey, L.; Weingroff, M.; Hamburger, M. W.; Holt, W. E.; Richard, G. A.

    2004-12-01

    Visualization of data is essential in helping scientists and students develop a conceptual understanding of relationships among many complex types of data and keep track of large amounts of information. Developed initially by UNAVCO for study of global-scale geodynamic processes, the Voyager map visualization tools have evolved into interactive, web-based map utilities that can make scientific results accessible to a large number and variety of educators and students as well as the originally targeted scientists. A portal to these map tools can be found at: http://jules.unavco.org. The Voyager tools provide on-line interactive data visualization through pre-determined map regions via a simple HTML/JavaScript interface (for large numbers of students using the tools simultaneously) or through student-selectable areas using a Java interface to a Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) engine. Students can access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales for the earth and other planets of the solar system. Students can also choose from a variety of base maps (satellite mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others) and can then add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays, for example coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, and observed and model plate motion, as well as deformation velocity vectors representing a compilation of over 5000 geodetic measurements from around the world. The related educational website, "Exploring our Dynamic Planet", (http://www.dpc.ucar.edu/VoyagerJr/jvvjrtool.html) incorporates background materials and curricular activities that encourage students to explore Earth processes. One of the present curricular modules is designed for high school students or introductory-level undergraduate non-science majors. The purpose of the module is for students to examine real data to investigate how plate

  15. The Voyager Journey to Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E. C.

    Launched in 1977 to explore Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, the two Voyager spacecraft continued their journeys beyond the planets as they searched for the heliopause, the boundary between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. After traveling more than 23 billion kilometers, Voyager 1 left the heliosphere on August 25, 2012, and began returning the first in-situ observations of local interstellar space. Voyager 1 found a wall of interstellar plasma beyond the heliopause with a density forty times greater than inside and an interstellar magnetic field that is compressed and wrapped around the outside. Voyager 1 also observed the energy spectrum of low energy galactic cosmic ray protons that are excluded from the heliosphere by solar modulation, finding a peak intensity at ˜30 MeV. that is ten times the maximum intensity at 1 AU that occurs at ˜300 MeV. An overview of the journey and the new aspects of the interaction of the sun and the nearby region of the Milky Way will be discussed.

  16. Climate windows for Polynesian voyaging to New Zealand and Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Ian D; Browning, Stuart A; Anderson, Atholl J

    2014-10-14

    Debate about initial human migration across the immense area of East Polynesia has focused upon seafaring technology, both of navigation and canoe capabilities, while temporal variation in sailing conditions, notably through climate change, has received less attention. One model of Polynesian voyaging observes that as tradewind easterlies are currently dominant in the central Pacific, prehistoric colonization canoes voyaging eastward to and through central East Polynesia (CEP: Society, Tuamotu, Marquesas, Gambier, Southern Cook, and Austral Islands) and to Easter Island probably had a windward capacity. Similar arguments have been applied to voyaging from CEP to New Zealand against prevailing westerlies. An alternative view is that migration required reliable off-wind sailing routes. We investigate the marine climate and potential voyaging routes during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), A.D. 800-1300, when the initial colonization of CEP and New Zealand occurred. Paleoclimate data assimilation is used to reconstruct Pacific sea level pressure and wind field patterns at bidecadal resolution during the MCA. We argue here that changing wind field patterns associated with the MCA provided conditions in which voyaging to and from the most isolated East Polynesian islands, New Zealand, and Easter Island was readily possible by off-wind sailing. The intensification and poleward expansion of the Pacific subtropical anticyclone culminating in A.D. 1140-1260 opened an anomalous climate window for off-wind sailing routes to New Zealand from the Southern Austral Islands, the Southern Cook Islands, and Tonga/Fiji Islands.

  17. VIIRS Climate Raw Data Record (C-RDR) from Suomi NPP, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Suomi NPP Climate Raw Data Record (C-RDR) developed at the NOAA NCDC is an intermediate product processing level (NOAA Level 1b) between a Raw Data Record (RDR)...

  18. Oregon: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    This sample file contains 346 records for Oregon. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occasionally available. (ACR)

  19. Combining Satellite and in Situ Data with Models to Support Climate Data Records in Ocean Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson

    2011-01-01

    The satellite ocean color data record spans multiple decades and, like most long-term satellite observations of the Earth, comes from many sensors. Unfortunately, global and regional chlorophyll estimates from the overlapping missions show substantial biases, limiting their use in combination to construct consistent data records. SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua differed by 13% globally in overlapping time segments, 2003-2007. For perspective, the maximum change in annual means over the entire Sea WiFS mission era was about 3%, and this included an El NinoLa Nina transition. These discrepancies lead to different estimates of trends depending upon whether one uses SeaWiFS alone for the 1998-2007 (no significant change), or whether MODIS is substituted for the 2003-2007 period (18% decline, P less than 0.05). Understanding the effects of climate change on the global oceans is difficult if different satellite data sets cannot be brought into conformity. The differences arise from two causes: 1) different sensors see chlorophyll differently, and 2) different sensors see different chlorophyll. In the first case, differences in sensor band locations, bandwidths, sensitivity, and time of observation lead to different estimates of chlorophyll even from the same location and day. In the second, differences in orbit and sensitivities to aerosols lead to sampling differences. A new approach to ocean color using in situ data from the public archives forces different satellite data to agree to within interannual variability. The global difference between Sea WiFS and MODIS is 0.6% for 2003-2007 using this approach. It also produces a trend using the combination of SeaWiFS and MODIS that agrees with SeaWiFS alone for 1998-2007. This is a major step to reducing errors produced by the first cause, sensor-related discrepancies. For differences that arise from sampling, data assimilation is applied. The underlying geographically complete fields derived from a free-running model is unaffected

  20. [ELGA--the electronic health record in the light of data protection and data security].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströher, Alexander; Honekamp, Wilfried

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of an electronic health record (ELGA) is a subject discussed for a long time in Austria. Another big step toward ELGA is made at the end of 2010 on the pilot project e-medication in three model regions; other projects should follow. In addition, projects of the ELGA structure are sped up on the part of the ELGA GmbH to install the base of a functioning electronic health record. Unfortunately, many of these initiatives take place, so to speak, secretly, so that in the consciousness of the general public - and that includes not only patients but also physicians and other healthcare providers - always concerns about protection and security of such a storage of health data arouse. In this article the bases of the planned act are discussed taking into account the data protection and data security.

  1. Electronic Health Records Data and Metadata: Challenges for Big Data in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren E; Moulaison, Heather Lea

    2013-12-01

    This article, written by researchers studying metadata and standards, represents a fresh perspective on the challenges of electronic health records (EHRs) and serves as a primer for big data researchers new to health-related issues. Primarily, we argue for the importance of the systematic adoption of standards in EHR data and metadata as a way of promoting big data research and benefiting patients. EHRs have the potential to include a vast amount of longitudinal health data, and metadata provides the formal structures to govern that data. In the United States, electronic medical records (EMRs) are part of the larger EHR. EHR data is submitted by a variety of clinical data providers and potentially by the patients themselves. Because data input practices are not necessarily standardized, and because of the multiplicity of current standards, basic interoperability in EHRs is hindered. Some of the issues with EHR interoperability stem from the complexities of the data they include, which can be both structured and unstructured. A number of controlled vocabularies are available to data providers. The continuity of care document standard will provide interoperability in the United States between the EMR and the larger EHR, potentially making data input by providers directly available to other providers. The data involved is nonetheless messy. In particular, the use of competing vocabularies such as the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms, MEDCIN, and locally created vocabularies inhibits large-scale interoperability for structured portions of the records, and unstructured portions, although potentially not machine readable, remain essential. Once EMRs for patients are brought together as EHRs, the EHRs must be managed and stored. Adequate documentation should be created and maintained to assure the secure and accurate use of EHR data. There are currently a few notable international standards initiatives for EHRs. Organizations such as Health Level Seven

  2. Video Recording in Ethnographic SLA Research: Some Issues of Validity in Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFon, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews visual anthropology, educational anthropology, and ethnographic filmmaking literature on questions concerning collection of valid video recorded data in the second language context. Examines h an interaction should be video recorded, who should be video recorded, and who should do the recording. Examples illustrate the kinds of research…

  3. Video Recording in Ethnographic SLA Research: Some Issues of Validity in Data Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFon, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews visual anthropology, educational anthropology, and ethnographic filmmaking literature on questions concerning collection of valid video recorded data in the second language context. Examines h an interaction should be video recorded, who should be video recorded, and who should do the recording. Examples illustrate the kinds of research…

  4. Template-based data entry for general description in medical records and data transfer to data warehouse for analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Kuwata, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Izumi, Kazunori; Okada, Yasushi; Hazumi, Michihiro; Yoshimoto, Sachiko; Mineno, Takahiro; Nagahama, Munetoshi; Fujii, Ayumi; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    General descriptions in medical records are so diverse that they are usually entered as free text into an electronic medical record, and the resulting data analysis is often difficult. We developed and implemented a template-based data entry module and data analyzing system for general descriptions. We developed a template with tree structure, whose content master and entered patient's data are simultaneously expressed by XML. The entered structured data is converted to narrative form for easy reading. This module was implemented in the EMR system, and is used in 35 hospitals as of October, 2006. So far, 3725 templates (3242 concepts) have been produced. The data in XML and narrative text data are stored in the EMR database. The XML data are retrieved, and then patient's data are extracted, to be stored in the data ware-house (DWH). We developed a search assisting system that enables users to find objective data from the DWH without requiring complicated SQL. By using this method, general descriptions in medical records can be structured and made available for clinical research.

  5. Solid-State Recorders Enhance Scientific Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Goddard Space Flight Center, SEAKR Engineering Inc., of Centennial, Colorado, crafted a solid-state recorder (SSR) to replace the tape recorder onboard a Spartan satellite carrying NASA's Inflatable Antenna Experiment. Work for that mission and others has helped SEAKR become the world leader in SSR technology for spacecraft. The company has delivered more than 100 systems, more than 85 of which have launched onboard NASA, military, and commercial spacecraft including imaging satellites that provide much of the high-resolution imagery for online mapping services like Google Earth.

  6. On whether or not voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G., E-mail: lafisk@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft is currently in the vicinity of the heliopause, which separates the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium. There has been a precipitous decrease in particles accelerated in the heliosphere, and a substantial increase in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), suggesting easy escape of the former across the heliopause, and entry of the latter. The question is, has Voyager 1 actually crossed the heliopause and is it now in the interstellar medium? We contend that the evidence is inconclusive. The direction of the magnetic field observed by Voyager 1 is unchanged from the direction of the heliospheric magnetic field, and different from the expected direction of the interstellar magnetic field. However, the plasma density, which is measured from observations of plasma waves, is similar to the expected interstellar density and much larger than the solar wind plasma density observed by Voyager 2 (which has a working plasma detector) at smaller heliocentric distances than Voyager 1. In this paper, an analytic model is presented that is based upon and is consistent with all Voyager observations, and in which the higher plasma densities measured by Voyager 1 are due simply to compressed solar wind. Thus both the magnetic field and the plasma density observations are consistent with Voyager 1 still remaining well within the heliosheath. The model has a simple test: Voyager 1 should encounter a magnetic sector boundary crossing, where the behavior of particles accelerated in the heliosphere and the GCRs will be different from what Voyager 1 is now observing.

  7. Io Plasma Torus Ion Composition: Voyager, Galileo, Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Nerney, Edward; Steffl, Andrew Joseph

    2016-10-01

    With JAXA's Hisaki spacecraft in orbit around Earth gathering information on the Io plasma torus and NASA's Juno mission measuring plasma conditions in the jovian magnetosphere, the time is ripe for a re-evaluation of earlier observations of the plasma torus to assess evidence for temporal variations. In particular, we are interested in exploring the ion composition of the torus and whether there is evidence of the ultimate source – the volcanic gases from Io – have deviated from SO2. We use the latest CHIANTI 8.0 atomic database to analyze UV spectra of the torus from Voyager, Galileo and Cassini as well as with the physical chemistry model of Delamere, Steffl and Bagenal (2005). We find that contrary to earlier analyses of Voyager data (e.g. Shemansky 1987; 1988) that produced a composition requiring a neutral source of O/S~4, we find an ion composition that is consistent with the Cassini UVIS data (Steffl et al. 2004) and a neutral O/S~2, consistent with SO2.

  8. Growing up MODIS: Towards a mature aerosol climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert C.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosols are major players within the Earth's climate system, affecting the radiation budget, clouds and the hydrological cycle. In high concentrations near the surface, aerosols (or particulate matter, PM) affect visibility, impact air quality, and can contribute to poor health. Among others, Yoram Kaufman recognized the importance of aerosols to climate, and helped to design new instrumentation and algorithms to retrieve and quantify global aerosol properties. One instrument, known as the Moderate Imaging Resolution Spectro-radiometer (MODIS), was deployed on the AM-1 satellite (later known as Terra), part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). In 1998, armed with an M.S. and job experience in neither aerosols nor satellites, I was looking for a new job. I somehow found my way to the MODIS Aerosol team. It was only a year before Terra launch, and most major decisions about the MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithms had been finalized. Since then, we worked through launch, initial evaluation of the product with AERONET and field deployments, and continued efforts to understand the product and refine retrieval algorithms. I have had opportunities to participate in field experiments, write papers, and earn my PhD. The "second generation" algorithm for aerosol retrieval over land has been hugely successful. We have collected nearly a half-million collocations with AERONET and other dataseis, made new discoveries, and have contributed to research and operational projects globally. Due to the dedication of the entire team, the MODIS aerosol product now is one of the highlights of NASA's EOS program. It is used for climate research and air quality forecasting, as well for applications not even considered before the MODIS era. More recently, a focus is on stitching the MODIS aerosol product into the "climate data record" (CDR) for global aerosol, determining whether the product has sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change

  9. The Plasma Depletion Layer Beyond the Heliopause: Evidence, Implications, and Predictions for Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, I. H.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    A plasma depletion layer (PDL) is predicted beyond the heliopause, analogous to the PDLs observed sunwards of the magnetopauses of Earth, Mercury, Jupiter, and Saturn. The physics is that draping of interstellar (ISM) magnetic field lines over the heliopause should increase the magnetic field strength (and so the perpendicular ion temperature), cause density depletions by allowing plasma ions (and electrons) with large parallel temperatures to escape along the field, and increase the perpendicular to parallel temperature anisotropy until limited by wave instabilities. It is argued that published Voyager 1 magnetometer and plasma wave data beyond the heliopause provide strong evidence for the magnetic field amplification (by ≈ 30%) and density depletion (by ≈ 50%) expected for the PDL. The predicted reduction in parallel temperature is ≈ 50%. Using the ISM magnetic field direction obtained from the centroid of the IBEX Ribbon, the orientation of the PDL and the associated locations on the heliopause of the points of maximum magnetic field draping and maximum total pressure are predicted. It is observed that the IBEX Ribbon overlies the former while the latter lies within the ridge of maximum non-Ribbon ENA flux. The PDL should be strongest along the ISM field line passing through these points and the nominal Sun-ISM velocity vector. It is predicted that Voyager 2 lies within 5 degrees (≈ 10 AU) of the strong PDL region while Voyager 1 is over 15 degrees (≈ 35 AU) away. Thus Voyager 2 should observe a much stronger PDL (stronger magnetic field amplification, density depletions, and reductions in parallel temperature) than Voyager 1. Finally, the reduced cosmic ray fluxes observed near 90 degree pitchangle by Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause may be explained qualitatively in terms of magnetic focusing as cosmic rays propagate away from the stronger field regions of the PDL and magnetic draping region on the heliopause, assuming isotropic cosmic rays at the

  10. Design of Secured Ground Vehicle Event Data Recorder for Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Love Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Event Data Recorder (EDR is now one of the important components installed in the vehicles by the automakers since it is helping in calculating an independent measurement of crash severity which is far better than the traditional systems used. There is limited research is done on the domain. In this paper we are going to propose an EDR which is based on ARM controller and will sense the alcohol, brake pressed, Speed, Location, Humidity, and Temperature. The data collected from the sensors is aggregated using a threshold-based technique, then the data is encrypted using RC6 and finally, the data is mined for knowledge using top k rules.

  11. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) is a record for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE) spanning from October 4, 1966 to present, updated monthly...

  12. Audio Recording Device Data for Assessing Avian Detectability, Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2013-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains information from recording devices that were set to record regularly during summer breeding seasons. A single observer listened to 2692...

  13. On radial heliospheric magnetic fields: Voyager 2 observation and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2003-05-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) direction, on average, conforms well to the Parker spiral. However, numerous examples of events where the HMF is oriented in near-radial directions for many hours have been reported on the basis of observations inside 5 AU from spacecraft such as ISEE-3 and Ulysses. The magnetic field data observed by Voyager 2 from launch in 1977 through the end of 1982 (i.e., between 1 and ˜10 AU) were searched for all instances of radial fields with durations of 6 hours or more. Radial fields of significant durations at large distances are unusual as the Parker spiral is very tightly wound. The radial HMF events in the inner heliosphere typically occur at times when the solar wind speed is declining gradually, while they tend to be associated with steady wind speeds at distances beyond ˜6 AU. The durations of these events appear to be independent of distance and solar cycle, with an average duration of ˜11 hours. They generally are not associated with interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). Possible generation mechanisms of the radial field events related to speed variations near the Sun are investigated by use of a MHD model. We find that a noticeable low-speed plateau of limited duration in solar wind speed near the Sun can produce radial field events having durations of the order of 10 hours in the heliosphere as observed by Voyager 2.

  14. MULTIFRACTAL STRUCTURES DETECTED BY VOYAGER 1 AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macek, W. M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Cardinal Stefan Wyszyński University, Wóycickiego 1/3, 01-938 Warsaw (Poland); Wawrzaszek, A. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18 A, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); Burlaga, L. F., E-mail: macek@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: anna.wawrzaszek@cbk.waw.pl, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence.

  15. A Galactic Cosmic Ray Electron Spectrum from 2 MeV to 2 TeV That Fits Voyager 5-60 MeV Data at Low Energies and PAMELA and AMS-2 Data at 10 GeV Using an Electron Source Spectrum E^-2.25 A Calculation Using a Monte Carlo Diffusion Model

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we fit the observed galactic cosmic ray electron spectrum from a few MeV to 1 TeV. New data from Voyager from 5-60 MeV beyond the heliopause is used along with high energy data from the PAMELA, FERMI and AMS-2 instruments in Earth orbit. Using a Monte Carlo diffusion model for galactic propagation we obtain a source rigidity spectrum with a spectral index =-2.25 independent of energy below 10 GeV, possibly steepening above 10 GeV to 2.40 at the highest energies. This spectrum will fit the electron data over 5 orders of magnitude to within + 10% at both low and high energies. This steepening of the electron source spectrum could be an important feature of the acceleration process, e.g., synchrotron loss during acceleration could steepen the source spectrum. This fit requires only a single break in the rigidity dependence of the diffusion coefficient by ~1.0 power in the exponent at about 1.0 GV. The calculations also predict the distribution of electrons perpendicular to the galactic disk. The ga...

  16. Telling data: The accountancy record of a Chinese farmer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Ploeg, van der J.D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents and analyses the notebook of a Chinese farmer. The notebook contains a wealth of farm accountancy data. The data and the many interrelations contained in them, are used to describe the structure and dynamics of farming in NW China. The availability of former notebooks that played

  17. Using Electronic Health Records to Build an Ophthalmologic Data Warehouse and Visualize Patients' Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, Karsten U; Müller, Michael; Kern, Christoph; Babenko, Alexander; Mayer, Wolfgang J; Kampik, Anselm; Kreutzer, Thomas C; Priglinger, Siegfried; Hirneiss, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    To develop a near-real-time data warehouse (DW) in an academic ophthalmologic center to gain scientific use of increasing digital data from electronic medical records (EMR) and diagnostic devices. Database development. Specific macular clinic user interfaces within the institutional hospital information system were created. Orders for imaging modalities were sent by an EMR-linked picture-archiving and communications system to the respective devices. All data of 325 767 patients since 2002 were gathered in a DW running on an SQL database. A data discovery tool was developed. An exemplary search for patients with age-related macular degeneration, performed cataract surgery, and at least 10 intravitreal (excluding bevacizumab) injections was conducted. Data related to those patients (3 142 204 diagnoses [including diagnoses from other fields of medicine], 720 721 procedures [eg, surgery], and 45 416 intravitreal injections) were stored, including 81 274 optical coherence tomography measurements. A web-based browsing tool was successfully developed for data visualization and filtering data by several linked criteria, for example, minimum number of intravitreal injections of a specific drug and visual acuity interval. The exemplary search identified 450 patients with 516 eyes meeting all criteria. A DW was successfully implemented in an ophthalmologic academic environment to support and facilitate research by using increasing EMR and measurement data. The identification of eligible patients for studies was simplified. In future, software for decision support can be developed based on the DW and its structured data. The improved classification of diseases and semiautomatic validation of data via machine learning are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. NOAA/NSIDC Climate Data Record of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set provides a Climate Data Record (CDR) of sea ice concentration from passive microwave data. It provides a consistent, daily and monthly time series of...

  19. Visualizing Research Data Records for their Better Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ball, Alexander; Darlington, Mansur; Howard, Thomas J.;

    2014-01-01

    As academia in general, and research funders in particular, place ever greater importance on data as an output of research, so the value of good research data management practices becomes ever more apparent. In response to this, the Innovative Design and Manufacturing Research Centre (Id...... with the associations between them. This method, called Research Activity Information Development (RAID) Modelling, is based on the Unified Modelling Language (UML) for portability. It is offered to the wider research community as an intuitive way for researchers both to keep track of their own data and to communicate...

  20. From record to data. Linked data and information seeking in the OPAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Iacono

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available L’applicazione dei linked data ai dati catalografici apre nuove prospettive di sviluppo per i cataloghi elettronici delle biblioteche. Le relazioni tra dati bibliografici e di altra natura consentiranno di produrre cataloghi profondamente integrati con il resto del Web, imprimendo una svolta decisiva alla struttura dei record catalografici, alle modalità di accesso al catalogo e alle funzioni che esso potrà svolgere all’interno del più ampio spazio globale dell’informazione. In questo contributo, che si ricollega a quello pubblicato in precedenza in questa rivista, si esplora la possibilità che il nuovo record decostruito e ‘collegato’ agli altri dati sul Web sia in grado di facilitare la creazione di conoscenza nell’utilizzo del catalogo. Si analizzano così le potenzialità di applicazione dei linked data ai cataloghi per quanto riguarda le funzionalità per la ricerca, le nuove possibilità della ricerca semantica e le nuove modalità di accesso ai dati bibliografici. 

  1. Consistency of denominator data in electronic health records in Australian primary healthcare services: enhancing data quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, Ross; Bailie, Jodie; Chakraborty, Amal; Swift, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The quality of data derived from primary healthcare electronic systems has been subjected to little critical systematic analysis, especially in relation to the purported benefits and substantial investment in electronic information systems in primary care. Many indicators of quality of care are based on numbers of certain types of patients as denominators. Consistency of denominator data is vital for comparison of indicators over time and between services. This paper examines the consistency of denominator data extracted from electronic health records (EHRs) for monitoring of access and quality of primary health care. Data collection and analysis were conducted as part of a prospective mixed-methods formative evaluation of the Commonwealth Government's Indigenous Chronic Disease Package. Twenty-six general practices and 14 Aboriginal Health Services (AHSs) located in all Australian States and Territories and in urban, regional and remote locations were purposively selected within geographically defined locations. Percentage change in reported number of regular patients in general practices ranged between -50% and 453% (average 37%). The corresponding figure for AHSs was 1% to 217% (average 31%). In approximately half of general practices and AHSs, the change was ≥ 20%. There were similarly large changes in reported numbers of patients with a diagnosis of diabetes or coronary heart disease (CHD), and Indigenous patients. Inconsistencies in reported numbers were due primarily to limited capability of staff in many general practices and AHSs to accurately enter, manage, and extract data from EHRs. The inconsistencies in data required for the calculation of many key indicators of access and quality of care places serious constraints on the meaningful use of data extracted from EHRs. There is a need for greater attention to quality of denominator data in order to realise the potential benefits of EHRs for patient care, service planning, improvement, and policy. We

  2. A Fundamental Climate Data Record of Intercalibrated Brightness Temperature Data from SSM/I and SSMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiano, M. R. P.; Berg, W. K.; McKague, D.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2012-04-01

    The first Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) was launched in June 1987 on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) F08 spacecraft and started what is now a nearly continuous 24-year record of passive microwave imager data that can be used to monitor the climate system. This includes such fields as precipitation (over both land and ocean), the extent of sea ice and snow, sea ice concentration, total precipitable water, cloud liquid water, and surface wind speed over oceans. A total of nine window channel radiometers have been launched to date in the DMSP series including the SSM/I instrument on board F08, F10, F11, F13, F14, and F15 followed by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) on board F16, F17, and F18, which is expected to operate for at least the next decade. As a result, this data record provides the best available source of long-term global observations of several hydrological variables for climate applications. Although the DMSP sensors provide a long-term record, because the sensors were developed for operational use there are a number of issues that must be addressed to produce a dataset suitable for use in climate applications. There are a several quality control and calibration issues including, but not limited to, quality control of the original antenna temperatures, geolocation, cross-track bias corrections, solar and lunar intrusion issues and emissive antennas. The goal of producing an FCDR of brightness temperature data involves not only addressing many of these instrument issues, but also developing a well-documented, transparent approach that allows for subsequent improvements as well as a framework for incorporating future sensors. Once the data have been quality controlled and various calibration corrections have been applied, the goal is to adjust the calibration of the various sensors so that they are physically consistent. Such intercalibration does not correct for changes due to local observing time, which

  3. Part Twelve: The Voyages of John Matthias

    OpenAIRE

    Printz-Påhlson, Göran

    2013-01-01

    In August 1974, when the Watergate scandal was moving into its last phase, the American poet John Matthias returned to his home, in South Bend, Indiana, after a year’s stay in England, traveling on the Polish ocean-liner Stefan Bathory. In June of 1976 he set out to sea again, this time on a Russian ship, the Mikhail Lermontov, in order to spend another year in England, as a Visiting Fellow in Poetry in Clare Hall, Cambridge. The voyages took approximately nine days each, and on both ships he...

  4. An integrated methodology for recording uncertainties about environmental data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, J.; Heuvelink, G.B.M.; Refsgaard, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the limitations of environmental data is essential both for managing environmenta systems effectively and for encouraging the responsible use of scientific research when knowledge is limited and priorities are varied. Using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques for a

  5. New local interstellar spectra for protons, helium and carbon derived from PAMELA and Voyager 1 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisschoff, D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    With the cosmic ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere, the comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental data at lower energies is finally possible. Spectra for specifically protons, helium and carbon nuclei, computed by galactic propagation models, can now be compared with observations at low energies from Voyager 1 and at high energies from the PAMELA space detector at Earth. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 observations in the energy range of 6 MeV/nuc to 60 MeV/nuc, and the PAMELA spectrum above 50 GeV/nuc, using the GALPROP code, similarly to our previous study for Voyager 1 electrons. By varying the galactic diffusion parameters in the GALPROP plain diffusion model, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, and then including reacceleration, we compute spectra simultaneously for galactic protons, helium and carbon. We present new local interstellar spectra, with expressions for the energy range of 3 MeV/nuc to 100 GeV/nuc, which should be of value for solar modulation modeling.

  6. New local interstellar spectra for protons, Helium and Carbon derived from PAMELA and Voyager 1 observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bisschoff, Driaan

    2015-01-01

    With the cosmic ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere, the comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental data at lower energies is finally possible. Spectra for specifically protons, Helium and Carbon nuclei, computed by galactic propagation models, can now be compared with observations at low energies from Voyager 1 and at high energies from the PAMELA space detector at Earth. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 observations in the energy range of 6 MeV/nuc to 60 MeV/nuc, and the PAMELA spectrum above 50 GeV/nuc, using the GALPROP code, similarly to our previous study for Voyager 1 electrons. By varying the galactic diffusion parameters in the GALPROP plain diffusion model, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, and then including reacceleration, we compute spectra simultaneously for galactic protons, Helium and Carbon.We present new local interstellar spectra, with expressions for the energy range of 3...

  7. 33 CFR 164.80 - Tests, inspections, and voyage planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... planning. 164.80 Section 164.80 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., and voyage planning. (a) The owner, master, or operator of each towing vessel of less than 1,600 GT... applicable; of chafing gear; and of the winch brake, if installed. (c)(1) The voyage-planning requirements...

  8. 46 CFR 188.10-35 - International voyage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, i.e., International voyage means a voyage from a country to which the present convention applies to a port outside such country, or conversely.” (c) The International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, does not apply to vessels “solely navigating the...

  9. The body voyage as visual representation and art performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Jan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at the notion of the body as an interior landscape that is made intelligible through visual representation. It discerns the key figure of the inner corporeal voyage, identifies its main elements and examines how contemporary artists working with performances and installations deal...... by the French artist Christian Boltanski, which gives a somewhat different meaning to the idea of the body voyage....

  10. Utah: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    This GEOTHERM sample file contains 643 records for Utah. Records may be present which are duplicates for the same analyses. A record may contain data on location, sample description, analysis type (water, condensate, or gas), collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotopic data are occasionally available. Some records may contain only location and temperature. This compilation should contain all the chemical data for geothermal fluids in Utah available as of December, 1981. 7 refs. (ACR)

  11. Quality of record linkage in a highly automated cancer registry that relies on encrypted identity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidtmann, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the absence of unique ID numbers, cancer and other registries in Germany and elsewhere rely on identity data to link records pertaining to the same patient. These data are often encrypted to ensure privacy. Some record linkage errors unavoidably occur. These errors were quantified for the cancer registry of North Rhine Westphalia which uses encrypted identity data. Methods: A sample of records was drawn from the registry, record linkage information was included. In parallel, plain text data for these records were retrieved to generate a gold standard. Record linkage error frequencies in the cancer registry were determined by comparison of the results of the routine linkage with the gold standard. Error rates were projected to larger registries.Results: In the sample studied, the homonym error rate was 0.015%; the synonym error rate was 0.2%. The F-measure was 0.9921. Projection to larger databases indicated that for a realistic development the homonym error rate will be around 1%, the synonym error rate around 2%.Conclusion: Observed error rates are low. This shows that effective methods to standardize and improve the quality of the input data have been implemented. This is crucial to keep error rates low when the registry’s database grows. The planned inclusion of unique health insurance numbers is likely to further improve record linkage quality. Cancer registration entirely based on electronic notification of records can process large amounts of data with high quality of record linkage.

  12. BASE Temperature Data Record (TDR) from the SSM/I and SSMIS Sensors, CSU Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The BASE Temperature Data Record (TDR) dataset from Colorado State University (CSU) is a collection of the raw unprocessed antenna temperature data that has been...

  13. NOAA Climate Data Record Normalized Difference Vegetation Index: 1981-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Data Records (CDR) provide historical climate information using data from weather satellites. This...

  14. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Upper Atmospheric Temperature 4 Layer Microwave, Version 3.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 4 Layer Upper Atmosphere Temperature (UAT) Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is a monthly analysis of the tropospheric and stratospheric data using temperature...

  15. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR RECORDING DATA COLLECTION FORMS (SOP-2.22)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP describes the method for recording information onto the data collection forms. The data collection forms are organized into 10 modules: Recruitment Survey; House/Building Characteristics Observation Survey; Day Care Center/Building Characteristics Observation Survey; Par...

  16. NOAA Climate Data Record Normalized Difference Vegetation Index: 1981-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Data Records (CDR) provide historical climate information using data from weather satellites. This...

  17. Has the Sun Significantly Impacted Recent Voyager Observations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Sun, W.; Detman, T. R.; Dryer, Ph. D., M.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.; Webber, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Using our models HAFSS (HAF Source Surface) and HHMS-PI (Hybrid Heliospheric Modeling System with Pickup Protons) we have been analyzing some of the recent (e.g., July 2012, etc.) solar events to determine if the effects of the events might be seen in the outer heliosphere, heliosheath, etc. Our analyses provide insights into the phenomena in these regions. Both models are three-dimensional (3D) time dependent simulations that use solar observations as input. HAFSS is a kinematic model. HHMS-PI is a numerical magnetohydrodynamic solar wind (SW) simulation model. Both HHMS-PI and HAFSS are ideally suited for these analyses since starting from the Sun they model the slowly evolving background SW and the impulsive, time-dependent events associated with solar activity (e.g., coronal mass ejections (CMEs). HHMS-PI/HAFSS make it possible to track interplanetary shocks as they propagate, interact, and evolve en route to various spacecraft (s/c) where they are observed. Our models have been used to reproduce s/c data from ACE to Ulysses, Cassini, and Voyagers 1 and 2. Our published results in refereed scientific journals showed that: a.) Our models naturally reproduce dynamic 3D spatially asymmetric effects observed throughout the heliosphere. b.) Pre-existing SW background conditions have a strong influence on the propagation of shock waves from solar events. c.) Time-dependence is a crucial aspect of interpreting s/c data. d.) Shock interactions resulting from multiple solar events lead to complicated time-series observations at individual s/c. We believe the answer to the question in the title of this abstract is: Yes, we do think the Sun has significantly impacted recent Voyager observations.

  18. Organizational needs for managing and preserving geospatial data and related electronic records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Downs

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Government agencies and other organizations are required to manage and preserve records that they create and use to facilitate future access and reuse. The increasing use of geospatial data and related electronic records presents new challenges for these organizations, which have relied on traditional practices for managing and preserving records in printed form. This article reports on an investigation of current and future needs for managing and preserving geospatial electronic records on the part of localand state-level organizations in the New York City metropolitan region. It introduces the study and describes organizational needs observed, including needs for organizational coordination and interorganizational cooperation throughout the entire data lifecycle.

  19. Barriers to retrieving patient information from electronic health record data: failure analysis from the TREC Medical Records Track.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Tracy; Cohen, Aaron M; Bedrick, Steven; Ambert, Kyle; Hersh, William

    2012-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health record (EHR) data relies on the ability to retrieve accurate and complete information about desired patient populations. The Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) 2011 Medical Records Track was a challenge evaluation allowing comparison of systems and algorithms to retrieve patients eligible for clinical studies from a corpus of de-identified medical records, grouped by patient visit. Participants retrieved cohorts of patients relevant to 35 different clinical topics, and visits were judged for relevance to each topic. This study identified the most common barriers to identifying specific clinic populations in the test collection. Using the runs from track participants and judged visits, we analyzed the five non-relevant visits most often retrieved and the five relevant visits most often overlooked. Categories were developed iteratively to group the reasons for incorrect retrieval for each of the 35 topics. Reasons fell into nine categories for non-relevant visits and five categories for relevant visits. Non-relevant visits were most often retrieved because they contained a non-relevant reference to the topic terms. Relevant visits were most often infrequently retrieved because they used a synonym for a topic term. This failure analysis provides insight into areas for future improvement in EHR-based retrieval with techniques such as more widespread and complete use of standardized terminology in retrieval and data entry systems.

  20. Integrating phenotypic data from electronic patient records with molecular level systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Electronic patient records remain a rather unexplored, but potentially rich data source for discovering correlations between diseases. We describe a general approach for gathering phenotypic descriptions of patients from medical records in a systematic and non-cohort dependent manner. By extracti...... Classification of Disease ontology and is therefore in principle language independent. As a use case we show how records from a Danish psychiatric hospital lead to the identification of disease correlations, which subsequently are mapped to systems biology frameworks....

  1. Voyager 2 observations of plasmas and flows out to 104 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Decker, R. B., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: robert.decker@apljhu.edu [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Voyager 2 has crossed through 20 AU of the heliosheath; assuming the same heliosheath thickness as at Voyager 1, it is now two-thirds of the way to the heliopause. The plasma data are generally of good quality, although the increasing flow angle of the plasma makes analysis more difficult. The average plasma speed has remained constant but the flow angles have increased to almost 60° in the RT plane and to almost 30° in the RN plane. The average density and thermal speed have been constant since a density increase observed in 2011. Comparison of V2 plasma flows derived from plasma science experiment (PLS) data and Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) proton anisotropies give good agreement except when heavy ion contributions or non-convective proton anisotropies are observed in the LECP data.

  2. Improving the quality of EHR recording in primary care: a data quality feedback tool.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bij, S. van der; Khan, N.; Veen, P. ten; Bakker, D.H. de; Verheij, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electronic health record (EHR) data are used to exchange information among health care providers. For this purpose, the quality of the data is essential. We developed a data quality feedback tool that evaluates differences in EHR data quality among practices and software packages as part o

  3. Data Monitoring Recorder for Mechanical Properties of Release Coil in Circuit Breaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jianyuan; YANG Zhuangzhuang; LIN Xiangbin; LI Bin; LIU Yang

    2013-01-01

    A design of data monitoring recorder is introduced to ensure the stable work of circuit breakers.The recorder is mainly adopted to collect data of different mechanical properties of circuit breakers for real-time online working in power-industrial labs,and to set up a database including both correct information and fault information for assessing and diagnosing power systems.The recorder uses the master-slave detection core design which adopts both digital signal processor (DSP) and peripheral interface controller (PIC).Not-AND (NAND) flash memory is adopted as a mass storage unit,and the designed clock is used to identify the data being accessed.Access to data and communications between the upper computer and the lower computer are achieved through a universal serial bus (USB) communication.Results of an experiment further illustrate the accuracy and reliability of the data obtained by the proposed recorder.

  4. Variability and trends of surface solar radiation in Europe based on CM SAF satellite data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) generates satellite-based high-quality climate data records, with a focus on the global energy and water cycle. Here, the latest releases of the CM SAF's data records of surface solar radiation, Surface Solar Radiation Data Set - Heliosat (SARAH), and CM SAF cLouds, Albedo and Radiation dataset from AVHRR data (CLARA), are analyzed and validated with reference to ground-based measurements, e.g., provided by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN), the World Radiation Data Center (WRDC) and the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). Focus is given to the trends and the variability of the surface irradiance in Europe as derived from the surface and the satellite-based data records. Both data sources show an overall increase (i.e., brightening) after the 1980s, and indicate substantial decadal variability with periods of reduced increase (or even a decrease) and periods with a comparable high increase. Also the increase shows a pronounced spatial pattern, which is also found to be consistent between the two data sources. The good correspondence between the satellite-based data records and the surface measurements highlight the potential of the satellite data to represent the variability and changes in the surface irradiance and document the dominant role of clouds over aerosol to explain its variations. Reasons for remaining differences between the satellite- and the surface-based data records (e.g., in Southern Europe) will be discussed. To test the consistency of the CM SAF solar radiation data records we also assess the decadal variability of the solar reflected radiation at the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) from the CM SAF climate data record based on the MVIRI / SEVIRI measurements from 1983 to 2015. This data record complements the SARAH data record in its temporal and spatial coverage; fewer and different assumptions are used in the retrieval to generate the TOA reflected solar

  5. A portable, low-cost flight-data measurement and recording system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The design of and the experience with an inexpensive, hand-portable, onboard data system used to record four parameters in the final portion of the landing approach and touchdown of an airplane are described. The system utilized a high-quality audio tape recorder and amateur photographic equipment with accessory circuitry rather than specialized instrumentation to given satisfactory results.

  6. 40 CFR 792.190 - Storage and retrieval of records and data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Storage and retrieval of records and data. 792.190 Section 792.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Records and Reports § 792...

  7. Manual editing of automatically recorded data in an anesthesia information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, David B; Beilin, Yaakov; Hossain, Sabera; Lin, Hung-Mo; Reich, David L

    2008-11-01

    Anesthesia information management systems allow automatic recording of physiologic and anesthetic data. The authors investigated the prevalence of such data modification in an academic medical center. The authors queried their anesthesia information management system database of anesthetics performed in 2006 and tabulated the counts of data points for automatically recorded physiologic and anesthetic parameters as well as the subset of those data that were manually invalidated by clinicians (both with and without alternate values manually appended). Patient, practitioner, data source, and timing characteristics of recorded values were also extracted to determine their associations with editing of various parameters in the anesthesia information management system record. A total of 29,491 cases were analyzed, 19% of which had one or more data points manually invalidated. Among 58 attending anesthesiologists, each invalidated data in a median of 7% of their cases when working as a sole practitioner. A minority of invalidated values were manually appended with alternate values. Pulse rate, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry were the most commonly invalidated parameters. Data invalidation usually resulted in a decrease in parameter variance. Factors independently associated with invalidation included extreme physiologic values, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification, emergency status, timing (phase of the procedure/anesthetic), presence of an intraarterial catheter, resident or certified registered nurse anesthetist involvement, and procedure duration. Editing of physiologic data automatically recorded in an anesthesia information management system is a common practice and results in decreased variability of intraoperative data. Further investigation may clarify the reasons for and consequences of this behavior.

  8. An Open Architecture Scaleable Maintainable Software Defined Commodity Based Data Recorder And Correlator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses the need for higher data rate recording capability, increased correlation speed and flexibility needed for next generation VLBI systems. The...

  9. Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-07-01

    All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)

  10. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for May, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002365)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  11. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for December, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of December 01, 1985 to December 31, 1985....

  12. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for March 1986 (NODC Accession 0002544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of March 01, 1986 to March 31, 1986....

  13. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for November, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of November 01, 1985 to November 30, 1985....

  14. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for May, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002546)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of May 01, 1986 to May 31, 1986....

  15. NESDIS-Unique CrIS-ATMS Product System (NUCAPS) Environmental Data Record (EDR) Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of numerous retrieved estimates of hydrological variables and trace gases as Environmental Data Record (EDR) products from the NOAA-Unique...

  16. Geosat Exact Repeat Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) (NODC Accession 0061150)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains waveform data records (WDRs) from the US Navy Geodetic Satellite (GEOSAT) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of November 08,...

  17. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for June, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of June 01, 1985 to June 30, 1985....

  18. Nevada: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Nevada available as of December 1981 are maintained on GEOTHERM, a computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Nevada. 7 refs. (ACR)

  19. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) product. APP is a fundamental CDR comprised of calibrated and navigated AVHRR channel...

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Heat Fluxes, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  1. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for June, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  2. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for April, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of April 01, 1985 to April 30, 1985....

  3. Unified Sea Ice Thickness Climate Data Record Collection Spanning 1947-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Unified Sea Ice Thickness Climate Data Record is the result of a concerted effort to collect as many observations as possible of Arctic sea-ice draft, freeboard,...

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Near Surface Atmospheric Properties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  5. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for April, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  6. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Monthly Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 2.2-1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) of monthly mean High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) flux at the top of the atmosphere...

  7. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for July, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of July 01, 1986 to July 31, 1986....

  8. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains gridded daily Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from the NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Very High Resolution...

  9. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for September, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of September 01, 1986 to Setpember 30,...

  10. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for August, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002549)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of August 01, 1986 to August 31, 1986....

  11. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for September, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of September 01, 1985 to September 30,...

  12. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for August, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  13. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for January, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  14. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for May, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002351)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of May 01, 1985 to May 31, 1985. Parameters...

  15. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Extended (APP-X) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of the extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) cryosphere contains 19 geophysical variables over the Arctic and Antarctic for the...

  16. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for October, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  17. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for September, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  18. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for November, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  19. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for August, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — his accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  20. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for July, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  1. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for April, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  2. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for February, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002559)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  3. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for October, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of October 01, 1985 to October 31, 1985....

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature -WHOI, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  5. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Daily Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the daily mean Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) time series in global 1 degree x 1 degree equal-angle gridded maps spanning...

  6. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for July, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of July 01, 1985 to July 31, 1985....

  7. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for July, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  8. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), NRLTSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains total solar irradiance (TSI) as a function of time created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for spectral and total...

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), NRLSSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains solar spectral irradiance (SSI) as a function of time and wavelength created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for...

  10. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is generated using daily gridded brightness temperatures from the Defense...

  11. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for August, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002537)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of August 01, 1985 to August 31, 1985....

  12. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for March, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002363)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  13. Geosat Geodetic Mission Sensor Data Records (SDR) for January, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of sensor data records (SDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) for the time period of January 01, 1986 to January 31, 1986....

  14. How good is New South Wales admitted patient data collection in recording births?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mary K

    2011-01-01

    This record linkage study aims to examine the coding concordance of delivery outcome and discharge status between the New South Wales (NSW) Midwives Data Collection (MDC) and Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC) as well as factors that contribute to hospital births not being recorded in the APDC. Births recorded in the APDC and MDC datasets for the calendar year 2005 were used for analysis. Births registered in the NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages for the same period were used as validation. Descriptive analysis was used to examine coding concordance between the APDC and MDC datasets for matched records, and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with hospital births not being included in the APDC. A total of 90,585 unique births were recorded in the MDC for the calendar year 2005. A total of 79,173 confirmed hospital births were matched to corresponding records in the APDC; 2,249 (3%) confirmed hospital births were not found in the APDC. For unmatched records, logistic regression analyses showed that the level of obstetric hospital in which babies were born was a significant factor associated with information not being recorded in the APDC. As compared with local, small isolated, and small metropolitan hospitals (Levels 1 to 3 hospitals), larger tertiary hospitals (Levels 4 to 6) and private hospitals had decreased odds of hospital births not being recorded in the APDC. For matched records, 95% and 99% of records were found to be coded consistently between the APDC and MDC datasets for outcome of delivery and discharge status respectively. With a high level of coding concordance between the APDC and MDC datasets and only a small percentage of hospital births not being recorded in the APDC, the obstetrics subset of the APDC dataset was found to be of good quality.

  15. Surface ozone observations during voyages to the Arctic and Antarctic regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Surface ozone concentration and UV-B data between 75°N and 70°S were obtained aboard the Chinese polar scientific vessel "Xue-long" (Snow-Dragon) during the first voyage to the Arctic and the 16th to the Antarctic in 1999-2000. Analysis of these data presents that variations of the surface ozone concentration have small amplitude during voyages except the mid-latitude in the Northern Hemisphere. As a whole, average surface ozone concentration in the Northern Hemisphere is higher than that in the Southern, and high value occurred when the ship sailed close to the continents. The average diurnal variations of the surface ozone in the Northern Hemisphere are also higher compared to the southern counterparts, and high diurnal variations were found at low latitudes, and relative low level in the polar region.

  16. Fehlende Daten beim Record Linkage von Prozess- und Befragungsdaten : ein empirischer Vergleich ausgewählter Missing Data Techniken (Missing data in the record linkage of process and survey data : An empirical comparison of selected missing data techniques)

    OpenAIRE

    Krug, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    "To compare different missing data techniques, in this paper I use a survey where participants were among other things asked permission for combining the survey with administrative data (record linkage). For those who refuse their permission I set their survey answers to missing, creating pseudo-missing data due to an empirical relevant but unknown mechanism (compared to the statistical simulation of a missing data process). OLS Regression is performed using Complete Case Analysis (CCA), Mult...

  17. Foreign technology alert-bibliography: Photography and recording devices. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, G.

    1982-11-01

    A systematically organized collection of abstracts from a bibliographic data base is provided on reports relating to photographic, imaging and recording systems originating from countries outside the USA. A tailored search of the data base was performed and the output carefully categorized, edited and indexed. Subjects covered include: photographic devices and imaging systems (cameras, image carriers, holography and applications); audiovisual recording (digital, magnetic and video); date encoding, recording and storage; and satellite equipment. Each of the sections in the book is cross-referenced and there is also an author index and useful subject index based on major descriptors.

  18. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely-collected health Data (RECORD statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric I Benchimol

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Routinely collected health data, obtained for administrative and clinical purposes without specific a priori research goals, are increasingly used for research. The rapid evolution and availability of these data have revealed issues not addressed by existing reporting guidelines, such as Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely collected health Data (RECORD statement was created to fill these gaps. RECORD was created as an extension to the STROBE statement to address reporting items specific to observational studies using routinely collected health data. RECORD consists of a checklist of 13 items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion section of articles, and other information required for inclusion in such research reports. This document contains the checklist and explanatory and elaboration information to enhance the use of the checklist. Examples of good reporting for each RECORD checklist item are also included herein. This document, as well as the accompanying website and message board (http://www.record-statement.org, will enhance the implementation and understanding of RECORD. Through implementation of RECORD, authors, journals editors, and peer reviewers can encourage transparency of research reporting.

  19. U.S. Arctic Voyage Planning Guide (AVPG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Arctic Voyage Planning Guide is a compilation of official U.S. Government information and references to sources of information that may be consulted by mariners...

  20. Reconnection at the Heliopause: Predictions for Voyager 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Cairns, I. H.

    2017-09-01

    Predicted and observed properties of the inner and outer heliosheath were recently used to assess whether magnetic reconnection was occurring at the Voyager 1 crossing of the heliopause. It was concluded that reconnection may not have been occurring locally, but may have been occurring at a location remote from Voyager 1. Here observations of 37 to 70 keV electrons measured by the LECP instrument on Voyager 1 are interpreted as possible evidence for remote reconnection and the study is extended to the heliopause near the projected crossing location of Voyager 2, where the plasma depletion layer (PDL) should be significantly stronger. The predicted plasma properties are used to determine if local reconnection is possible at this projected heliopause crossing.

  1. IS VOYAGER 1 INSIDE AN INTERSTELLAR FLUX TRANSFER EVENT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwadron, N. A. [University of New Hampshire, 105 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); McComas, D. J., E-mail: n.schwadron@unh.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238-5166 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Plasma wave observations from Voyager 1 have recently shown large increases in plasma density, to about 0.1 cm{sup –3}, consistent with the density of the local interstellar medium. However, corresponding magnetic field observations continue to show the spiral magnetic field direction observed throughout the inner heliosheath. These apparently contradictory observations may be reconciled if Voyager 1 is inside an interstellar flux transfer event—similar to flux transfer events routinely seen at the Earth's magnetopause. If this were the case, Voyager 1 remains inside the heliopause and based on the Voyager 1 observations we can determine the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field for the first time.

  2. C-smithing of Voyager 2 non-imaging instrument pointing information at Uranus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tseng-Chan; Acton, Charles H.; Underwood, Ian M.; Synnott, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The development of a family of techniques, collectively called C-smithing, for improving spacecraft nonimaging instrument pointing knowledge is discussed. C-smithing studies using data from the Voyager 2 Uranus Encounter show that significant improvements in pointing knowledge for nonimaging instruments can be achieved with these techniques. This improved pointing information can be used to regenerate instrument viewing geometry parameters for the encounter, which can then be made available to science investigators.

  3. The maiden voyage of enterprise systems and micro foundational institutionalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    This short paper presents an in-progress research work aimed at establishing a theoretical lens for describing, understanding and explaining the period from going live with an enterprise system and until this system is stabilized and normal organizational performance is achieved - this period is ...... is metaphorically labeled the maiden voyage. The paper presents a short overview of institutional theory, and proposes methodologically guidelines for investigating the maiden voyage by institutional theory....

  4. Geometric data perturbation-based personal health record transactions in cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, S; Kavitha, V

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud.

  5. Data Matching Concepts and Techniques for Record Linkage, Entity Resolution, and Duplicate Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Christen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Data matching (also known as record or data linkage, entity resolution, object identification, or field matching) is the task of identifying, matching and merging records that correspond to the same entities from several databases or even within one database. Based on research in various domains including applied statistics, health informatics, data mining, machine learning, artificial intelligence, database management, and digital libraries, significant advances have been achieved over the last decade in all aspects of the data matching process, especially on how to improve the accuracy of da

  6. Common data elements for secondary use of electronic health record data for clinical trial execution and serious adverse event reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Bruland, P; McGilchrist, M.; Zapletal, E.; Acosta, D.; Proeve, J.; Askin, S.; Ganslandt, T.; Doods, J.; Dugas, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data capture is one of the most expensive phases during the conduct of a clinical trial and the increasing use of electronic health records (EHR) offers significant savings to clinical research. To facilitate these secondary uses of routinely collected patient data, it is beneficial to know what data elements are captured in clinical trials. Therefore our aim here is to determine the most commonly used data elements in clinical trials and their availability in hospital EHR systems...

  7. Using data from ambient assisted living and smart homes in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, P; Schöpe, L

    2014-01-01

    This editorial is part of the Focus Theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Using Data from Ambient Assisted Living and Smart Homes in Electronic Health Records". To increase efficiency in the health care of the future, data from innovative technology like it is used for ambient assisted living (AAL) or smart homes should be available for individual health decisions. Integrating and aggregating data from different medical devices and health records enables a comprehensive view on health data. The objective of this paper is to present examples of the state of the art in research on information management that leads to a sustainable use and long-term storage of health data provided by innovative assistive technologies in daily living. Current research deals with the perceived usefulness of sensor data, the participatory design of visual displays for presenting monitoring data, and communication architectures for integrating sensor data from home health care environments with health care providers either via a regional health record bank or via a telemedical center. Integrating data from AAL systems and smart homes with data from electronic patient or health records is still in an early stage. Several projects are in an advanced conceptual phase, some of them exploring feasibility with the help of prototypes. General comprehensive solutions are hardly available and should become a major issue of medical informatics research in the near future.

  8. Achievement of 2011 European low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals of either VOYAGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Björn W; Nicholls, Stephen J; Lundman, Pia; Palmer, Mike K; Barter, Philip J

    2013-05-01

    Guidelines published in 2011 by the European Atherosclerosis Society and the European Society of Cardiology recommend a goal of either low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) VOYAGER individual patient data meta-analysis treated with rosuvastatin 10-40 mg, atorvastatin 10-80 mg or simvastatin 10-80 mg who achieved this goal. We analysed 25,075 patient exposures from high-risk patients. Paired comparisons were made between each rosuvastatin dose and an equal or higher dose of either atorvastatin or simvastatin, with a series of meta-analyses that included only randomised studies that directly compared rosuvastatin and its comparator treatments. As statin dose increased, higher percentages of patients achieved LDL-C VOYAGER highlight the importance of an effective statin at an appropriate dose to achieve treatment goals for LDL-C in patients with very high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying FRBR Work-Level Data in MARC Bibliographic Records for Manifestations of Moving Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Bisko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The library metadata community is dealing with the challenge of implementing the conceptual model, Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR. In response, the Online Audiovisual Catalogers (OLAC created a task force to study the issues related to creating and using FRBR-based work-level records for moving images. This article presents one part of the task force's work: it looks at the feasibility of creating provisional FRBR work-level records for moving images by extracting data from existing manifestation-level bibliographic records. Using a sample of 941 MARC records, a subgroup of the task force conducted a pilot project to look at five characteristics of moving image works. Here they discuss their methodology; analysis; selected results for two elements, original date (year and director name; and conclude with some suggested changes to MARC coding and current cataloging policy.

  10. The tip of the iceberg: challenges of accessing hospital electronic health record data for biological data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaxas, Spiros C; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Modern cohort studies include self-reported measures on disease, behavior and lifestyle, sensor-based observations from mobile phones and wearables, and rich -omics data. Follow-up is often achieved through electronic health record (EHR) linkages across primary and secondary healthcare providers. Historically however, researchers typically only get to see the tip of the iceberg: coded administrative data relating to healthcare claims which mainly record billable diagnoses and procedures. The rich data generated during the clinical pathway remain submerged and inaccessible. While some institutions and initiatives have made good progress in unlocking such deep phenotypic data within their institutional realms, access at scale still remains challenging. Here we outline and discuss the main technical and social challenges associated with accessing these data for data mining and hauling the entire iceberg.

  11. Using image reconstruction methods to enhance gridded resolutionfor a newly calibrated passive microwave climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, A. C.; Brodzik, M. J.; Gotberg, J.; Hardman, M.; Long, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Spanning over 35 years of Earth observations, satellite passive microwave sensors have generated a near-daily, multi-channel brightness temperature record of observations. Critical to describing and understanding Earth system hydrologic and cryospheric parameters, data products derived from the passive microwave record include precipitation, soil moisture, surface water, vegetation, snow water equivalent, sea ice concentration and sea ice motion. While swath data are valuable to oceanographers due to the temporal scales of ocean phenomena, gridded data are more valuable to researchers interested in derived parameters at fixed locations through time and are widely used in climate studies. We are applying recent developments in image reconstruction methods to produce a systematically reprocessed historical time series NASA MEaSUREs Earth System Data Record, at higher spatial resolutions than have previously been available, for the entire SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS and AMSR-E record. We take advantage of recently released, recalibrated SSM/I-SSMIS swath format Fundamental Climate Data Records. Our presentation will compare and contrast the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we are evaluating: Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and a radiometer version of Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (SIR). Both BG and SIR use regularization to trade off noise and resolution. We discuss our rationale for the respective algorithm parameters we have selected, compare results and computational costs, and include prototype SSM/I images at enhanced resolutions of up to 3 km. We include a sensitivity analysis for estimating sensor measurement response functions critical to both methods.

  12. Standardization of Data Elements of Audiology Records: A Suitable Model for Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahmoud Latifi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Providing high quality health care is not possible without information related to the past and current condition of the patient. Records show which services, where, when and by whom was delivered. Documentation is referred to the process of precisely recording the information regarding patient care and treatment. The purpose of this study is to determine the essential data set required in audiology record keeping and designing a model for Iran.Methods: In an applied research of a descriptive-comparative type which was carried out in 2010, data elements of audiology records of domestic and foreign patient notes were used to compile a check list which was subjected to debate by Iranian audiologists in Delphi method. 110 audiologists and 17 faculty members responded to the opinion poll.Results: From 51 elements which were subjected to discussion, 37 elements by more than 75 percent of the participants, nine elements by 50 to 75 percent of the participants and five elements by less than 50 percent of the participants, were agreed upon. The only element to be considered more important by faculty members than audiologists was "Gender" (p=0.018. Seventy percent of the participants valued the effectiveness of information in patient records very high.Conclusion: The minimum data set for audiology records must include demographic information, past medical history, patient assessment and treatment plan. With reference to record design principles this information was used to develop amodel for patient audiology record which also included the necessary instructions for completing it.

  13. -Omic and Electronic Health Record Big Data Analytics for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Yen; Cheng, Chih-Wen; Kaddi, Chanchala D; Venugopalan, Janani; Hoffman, Ryan; Wang, May D

    2017-02-01

    Rapid advances of high-throughput technologies and wide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) have led to fast accumulation of -omic and EHR data. These voluminous complex data contain abundant information for precision medicine, and big data analytics can extract such knowledge to improve the quality of healthcare. In this paper, we present -omic and EHR data characteristics, associated challenges, and data analytics including data preprocessing, mining, and modeling. To demonstrate how big data analytics enables precision medicine, we provide two case studies, including identifying disease biomarkers from multi-omic data and incorporating -omic information into EHR. Big data analytics is able to address -omic and EHR data challenges for paradigm shift toward precision medicine. Big data analytics makes sense of -omic and EHR data to improve healthcare outcome. It has long lasting societal impact.

  14. The new climate data record of total and spectral solar irradiance: Current progress and future steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Odele; Lean, Judith; Rottman, Gary; Pilewskie, Peter; Snow, Martin; Lindholm, Doug

    2016-04-01

    We present a climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. TSI and SSI are constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), and SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). We show that TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales and we assume that SSI measurements are reliable on solar rotational time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss ongoing work to assess the sensitivity of the modeled irradiances to model assumptions, namely, the scaling of solar variability from rotational-to-cycle time scales and the representation of the sunspot darkening index.

  15. An inflight recorder prototype for the inflight physiological data acquisition system 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, R. E.

    1982-02-01

    A prototype for the Inflight Recorder component of the Inflight Physiological Data Acquisition System was built. The Inflight Recorder is a remote data acquisition computer for sampling physiological data. Characteristics of the recorder's design were solid-state, microprocessor controlled, expandability, 16 sensor inputs, and 122 samples per second. Demonstration of battery operation for four hours and unobstructive size characteristics awaits further testing. Following a hardware requirements analysis, the prototype was built using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. Components featured in the design were a CMOS microprocessor; Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memories (EEPROM); a monolithic, 16 channel, analog to digital converter; and Magnetic Bubble Memories (MBM). In addition to building the IR prototype, several development tools have been constructed. One was a EEPROM Programmer. Another was an MBM Interactive Development System. A third was a hardware front panel for debugging IR software. User's manuals for these tools appear in appendices to the thesis.

  16. Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr climate data record (CDR) of sea surface temperature (SST) has been produced with daily gap-free analysis fields for the North Sea and the Baltic Sea region from 1982 to 2012 by combining the Pathfinder AVHRR satellite data record with the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) Reprocessing...... observations on average. Validation against independent in situ observations shows a very stable performance of the data record, with a mean difference of -0.06 °C compared to moored buoys and a 0.46 °C standard deviation of the differences. The mean annual biases of the SST CDR are small for all years......, with a negligible temporal trend when compared against drifting and moored buoys. Analysis of the SST CDR reveals that the monthly anomalies for the North Sea, the Danish straits, and the central Baltic Sea regions show a high degree of correlation for interannual and decadal time scales, whereas the monthly...

  17. New local interstellar spectra for protons, Helium and Carbon computed from Voyager 1 and PAMELA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisschoff, Driaan; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    The comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental, in situ data at lower energies is finally possible with the cosmic ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere. Galactic spectra computed by galactic propagation models and considered to be local interstellar spectra (LIS), for specifically protons, Helium and Carbon nuclei, can now be compared with observations at low energies (less than 100 MeV/nuc) from Voyager 1 and at high energies (above 30 GeV/nuc) from the PAMELA space detector at the Earth. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 observations beyond the heliopause using the GALPROP code and the PAMELA spectra at the Earth via a comprehensive solar modulation model. By varying the galactic diffusion parameters in the GALPROP plain diffusion model, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, and then including reacceleration in Galactic space, we compute spectra simultaneously for galactic protons, Helium and Carbon. These LIS are then used as input to a full 3D solar modulation model to test the spectra against the PAMELA measurements. We present new LIS, with expressions for the energy range of 3 MeV/nuc to 100 GeV/nuc, which should be most valuable for further solar modulation modelling.

  18. Supporting Private Sector Decision-Making with NOAA's Interim Climate Data Records (ICDRs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privette, J. L.; Glance, W. J.; Cecil, D.; Bates, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA initiated its Climate Data Record Program (CDRP) in 2009 to operationally provide authoritative satellite Climate Data Records (CDRs) to the government and the private sector. The CDRs are based primarily on 35+ years of meteorological satellite and in situ data collected by NOAA and the Department of Defense. To date, the Program has transitioned 14 CDRs from research to initial operations. In the past year, the CDRP developed and implemented a framework to continuously extend historical CDRs using Interim Climate Data Records (ICDRs). ICDRs are "first batch" CDRs generated within several days of observation using official CDR algorithms and processes. ICDRs are required by decision support systems and other near-term applications which need current data that are fully consistent with homogeneous historical records. For example, an electrical power utility may need temperature and precipitation ICDRs to optimally identify, in both time and space, the "nearest" historical analog period to recent weather. The utility could then use the contemporaneous business data from that period to inform current decision-making. In addition to their homogeneity and consistency, ICDRs are more complete than operational weather products since ICDR processing can await upstream data delays that can negate data value for weather forecasting. However, the operational nature of ICDRs means their uncertainties typically can be improved through reprocessing once better sensor calibration and characterization data become available. Therefore, ICDRs may be considered valuable but temporary placeholders. However, the "trigger" for electing to update a given record involves many considerations, including cost, latency, downstream dependencies and scientific significance. This presentation provides an update on NOAA's CDR Program, focusing on the new CDRs transitioned to operations in 2012 and the ICDR framework -- including update decision criteria -- used to extend CDRs and meet the

  19. Gridded sunshine duration climate data record for Germany based on combined satellite and in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walawender, Jakub; Kothe, Steffen; Trentmann, Jörg; Pfeifroth, Uwe; Cremer, Roswitha

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to create a 1 km2 gridded daily sunshine duration data record for Germany covering the period from 1983 to 2015 (33 years) based on satellite estimates of direct normalised surface solar radiation and in situ sunshine duration observations using a geostatistical approach. The CM SAF SARAH direct normalized irradiance (DNI) satellite climate data record and in situ observations of sunshine duration from 121 weather stations operated by DWD are used as input datasets. The selected period of 33 years is associated with the availability of satellite data. The number of ground stations is limited to 121 as there are only time series with less than 10% of missing observations over the selected period included to keep the long-term consistency of the output sunshine duration data record. In the first step, DNI data record is used to derive sunshine hours by applying WMO threshold of 120 W/m2 (SDU = DNI ≥ 120 W/m2) and weighting of sunny slots to correct the sunshine length between two instantaneous image data due to cloud movement. In the second step, linear regression between SDU and in situ sunshine duration is calculated to adjust the satellite product to the ground observations and the output regression coefficients are applied to create a regression grid. In the last step regression residuals are interpolated with ordinary kriging and added to the regression grid. A comprehensive accuracy assessment of the gridded sunshine duration data record is performed by calculating prediction errors (cross-validation routine). "R" is used for data processing. A short analysis of the spatial distribution and temporal variability of sunshine duration over Germany based on the created dataset will be presented. The gridded sunshine duration data are useful for applications in various climate-related studies, agriculture and solar energy potential calculations.

  20. Smart-card-based automatic meal record system intervention tool for analysis using data mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, Satoko; Nishiuchi, Hiromu; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2010-04-01

    The Smart-card-based Automatic Meal Record system for company cafeterias (AutoMealRecord system) was recently developed and used to monitor employee eating habits. The system could be a unique nutrition assessment tool for automatically monitoring the meal purchases of all employees, although it only focuses on company cafeterias and has never been validated. Before starting an interventional study, we tested the reliability of the data collected by the system using the data mining approach. The AutoMealRecord data were examined to determine if it could predict current obesity. All data used in this study (n = 899) were collected by a major electric company based in Tokyo, which has been operating the AutoMealRecord system for several years. We analyzed dietary patterns by principal component analysis using data from the system and extracted 5 major dietary patterns: healthy, traditional Japanese, Chinese, Japanese noodles, and pasta. The ability to predict current body mass index (BMI) with dietary preference was assessed with multiple linear regression analyses, and in the current study, BMI was positively correlated with male gender, preference for "Japanese noodles," mean energy intake, protein content, and frequency of body measurement at a body measurement booth in the cafeteria. There was a negative correlation with age, dietary fiber, and lunchtime cafeteria use (R(2) = 0.22). This regression model predicted "would-be obese" participants (BMI >or= 23) with 68.8% accuracy by leave-one-out cross validation. This shows that there was sufficient predictability of BMI based on data from the AutoMealRecord System. We conclude that the AutoMealRecord system is valuable for further consideration as a health care intervention tool.

  1. Implementation of a Big Data Accessing and Processing Platform for Medical Records in Cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Tung; Liu, Jung-Chun; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lu, Hsin-Wen

    2017-08-18

    Big Data analysis has become a key factor of being innovative and competitive. Along with population growth worldwide and the trend aging of population in developed countries, the rate of the national medical care usage has been increasing. Due to the fact that individual medical data are usually scattered in different institutions and their data formats are varied, to integrate those data that continue increasing is challenging. In order to have scalable load capacity for these data platforms, we must build them in good platform architecture. Some issues must be considered in order to use the cloud computing to quickly integrate big medical data into database for easy analyzing, searching, and filtering big data to obtain valuable information.This work builds a cloud storage system with HBase of Hadoop for storing and analyzing big data of medical records and improves the performance of importing data into database. The data of medical records are stored in HBase database platform for big data analysis. This system performs distributed computing on medical records data processing through Hadoop MapReduce programming, and to provide functions, including keyword search, data filtering, and basic statistics for HBase database. This system uses the Put with the single-threaded method and the CompleteBulkload mechanism to import medical data. From the experimental results, we find that when the file size is less than 300MB, the Put with single-threaded method is used and when the file size is larger than 300MB, the CompleteBulkload mechanism is used to improve the performance of data import into database. This system provides a web interface that allows users to search data, filter out meaningful information through the web, and analyze and convert data in suitable forms that will be helpful for medical staff and institutions.

  2. Dal record al dato. Linked data e ricerca dell’informazione nell’OPAC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Iacono

    2013-12-01

    In this paper the author explores the possibility the new record deconstructed and connected with the other data on the Web is able to facilitate the creation of knowledge in the use of the catalogue. The author then analyzes the potential of application of linked data to the catalogue with regards to the capabilities for research, the new possibilities of semantic search and the ways to access bibliographic data.

  3. Accuracy of Laboratory Data Communication on ICU Daily Rounds Using an Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artis, Kathryn A; Dyer, Edward; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A

    2017-02-01

    Accurately communicating patient data during daily ICU rounds is critically important since data provide the basis for clinical decision making. Despite its importance, high fidelity data communication during interprofessional ICU rounds is assumed, yet unproven. We created a robust but simple methodology to measure the prevalence of inaccurately communicated (misrepresented) data and to characterize data communication failures by type. We also assessed how commonly the rounding team detected data misrepresentation and whether data communication was impacted by environmental, human, and workflow factors. Direct observation of verbalized laboratory data during daily ICU rounds compared with data within the electronic health record and on presenters' paper prerounding notes. Twenty-six-bed academic medical ICU with a well-established electronic health record. ICU rounds presenter (medical student or resident physician), interprofessional rounding team. None. During 301 observed patient presentations including 4,945 audited laboratory results, presenters used a paper prerounding tool for 94.3% of presentations but tools contained only 78% of available electronic health record laboratory data. Ninty-six percent of patient presentations included at least one laboratory misrepresentation (mean, 6.3 per patient) and 38.9% of all audited laboratory data were inaccurately communicated. Most misrepresentation events were omissions. Only 7.8% of all laboratory misrepresentations were detected. Despite a structured interprofessional rounding script and a well-established electronic health record, clinician laboratory data retrieval and communication during ICU rounds at our institution was poor, prone to omissions and inaccuracies, yet largely unrecognized by the rounding team. This highlights an important patient safety issue that is likely widely prevalent, yet underrecognized.

  4. The ESA climate change initiative: Satellite data records for essential climate variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, R.; Merchant, C.J.; Saunders, R.

    2013-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has launched the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) to provide satellite-based climate data records (CDRs) that meet the challenging requirements of the climate community. The aim is to realize the full potential of the long-term Earth observation (EO) archives...... that both ESA and third parties have established. This includes aspects of producing a CDR, which involve data acquisition, calibration, algorithm development, validation, maintenance, and provision of the data to the climate research community. The CCI is consistent with several international efforts...... targeting the generation of satellite derived climate data records. One focus of the CCI is to provide products for climate modelers who increasingly use satellite data to initialize, constrain, and validate models on a wide range of space and time scales....

  5. New Long-term Historical Data Recording and Failure Analysis System for the CERN Cryoplants

    CERN Document Server

    Barbeau, H; Baud, R; Dauvergne, J P; Delikaris, D

    1999-01-01

    CERN uses several liquid helium cryoplants (total of 21) for cooling large variety of superconducting devices namely: accelerating cavities, magnets for accelerators and particle detectors. The cryoplants are remotely operated from several control rooms using industrial standard supervision systems, which allows the instant display of all plant data and the trends, over several days, for the most important signals. The monitoring of the cryoplant performance during transient conditions and normal operation over several months asks for a long-term recording of all plant parameters. An historical data recording system has been developed, which collects data from all cryoplants, stores them in a centralized database over a period of one year and allows an user-friendly graphical visualization. In particular, a novel tool was developed for debugging causes of plant failures by comparing selected reference data with the simultaneous evolution of all plant data. The paper describes the new system, already in operat...

  6. Tramp ship routing and scheduling with voyage separation requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Charlotte; Lusby, Richard Martin; Larsen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we explore tramp ship routing and scheduling. Tramp ships operate much like taxies following the available demand. Tramp operators can determine some of their demand in advance by entering into long-term contracts and then try to maximise profits from optional voyages found in the s......In this paper we explore tramp ship routing and scheduling. Tramp ships operate much like taxies following the available demand. Tramp operators can determine some of their demand in advance by entering into long-term contracts and then try to maximise profits from optional voyages found...... in the spot market. Routing and scheduling a tramp fleet to best utilise fleet capacity according to current demand is therefore an ongoing and complicated problem. Here we add further complexity to the routing and scheduling problem by incorporating voyage separation requirements that enforce a minimum time...... spread between some voyages. The incorporation of these separation requirements helps balance the conflicting objectives of maximising profit for the tramp operator and minimising inventory costs for the charterer, since these costs increase if similar voyages are not performed with some separation...

  7. Multibeam collection for CV06_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2006-05-24 to 2006-05-29, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for CV08_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2008-09-23 to 2008-10-08, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for CV14_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2014-08-29 to 2014-09-17, departing from Cork, Ireland and returning to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for CV03_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2003-11-05 to 2003-12-03, departing from Dublin Port, Ireland and returning to Dublin Port, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for CV08_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2008-05-20 to 2008-06-13, departing from Killybegs, Ireland and returning to Killybegs, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for CV13_NEPHROPS_CELTIC_SEA: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-09-01 to 2013-09-05, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for CV07_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2007-09-06 to 2007-10-17, departing from Cork, Ireland and returning to Rosslare, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for CV05_04: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2005-10-11 to 2005-10-16, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for CV09_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-03-18 to 2009-03-31, departing from Foynes, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. Multibeam collection for CV11_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-09-27 to 2011-10-13, departing from Howth, Ireland and returning to Rosslare, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  17. Multibeam collection for cv11_seai: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-04-21 to 2011-04-29, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  18. Multibeam collection for CV09_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-07-28 to 2009-08-18, departing from Cork, Ireland and returning to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  19. Multibeam collection for Galway_Bay_2001: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2001-08-28 to 2001-09-10, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  20. Multibeam collection for CV09_05: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-11-26 to 2009-12-04, departing from Galway Harbour, Ireland and returning to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  1. Multibeam collection for JIBS: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2007-11-01 to 2007-11-29, departing from Lisahalley, Ireland and returning to Killybegs, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  2. Multibeam collection for CV14_SEAI_1: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2014-04-15 to 2014-05-03, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for IMAGIN: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2005-07-01 to 2005-09-30, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Multibeam collection for CV13_SEAI_1: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-03-12 to 2013-03-14, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Multibeam collection for CV08_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2008-11-19 to 2008-12-02, departing from Lisahalley, Ireland and returning to Killybegs, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  6. Multibeam collection for CV11_INIS_Hydro: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-09-02 to 2011-09-15, departing from Clogherhead, Ireland and returning to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  7. Multibeam collection for CV10_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2010-09-27 to 2010-10-04, departing from Cork, Ireland and returning to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for CV09_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-04-14 to 2009-06-11, departing from Galway Harbour, Ireland and returning to Galway Harbour, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for CV10_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2010-07-12 to 2010-07-26, departing from Cork, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for CV12_SEAI: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-03-11 to 2012-03-22, departing from Cobh, Ireland and returning to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for CV10_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2010-05-14 to 2010-05-31, departing from Howth, Ireland and returning to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for Cork_Harbour: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2000-08-20 to 2000-08-21, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Multibeam collection for CV14_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2014-05-25 to 2014-06-07, departing from Killybegs, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  14. Multibeam collection for cv12_03: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-08-30 to 2012-09-21, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  15. Multibeam collection for CV11_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-05-10 to 2011-05-19, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Cork, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. Multibeam collection for CV04_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2004-10-29 to 2004-11-24, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  17. Multibeam collection for CV11_MESH: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-01-01 to 2011-01-31, departing from Fenit, Ireland and returning to Castletownbere, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  18. Multibeam collection for CV10_SEI: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2010-03-05 to 2010-03-15, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  19. Multibeam collection for CV07_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2007-07-03 to 2007-08-14, departing from Howth, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  20. Multibeam collection for CV13_SEAI_2: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-04-07 to 2013-04-20, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  1. Multibeam collection for CV11_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2011-07-25 to 2011-08-01, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  2. Multibeam collection for Donegal_Bay: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2002-08-20 to 2002-10-19, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  3. Multibeam collection for CV14_02: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2014-07-23 to 2014-08-17, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Galway, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  4. Multibeam collection for CV13_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-04-22 to 2013-05-31, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  5. Multibeam collection for CV12_Gateways: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-04-22 to 2012-04-30, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  6. Multibeam collection for CV13_ULSTER_NORTH_COAST: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-09-27 to 2013-10-01, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  7. Multibeam collection for CV13_SEAI_3: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2013-06-01 to 2013-06-03, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  8. Multibeam collection for CV09_UCC_GAEL: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2009-09-28 to 2009-10-09, departing from Howth, Ireland and returning to Howth, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  9. Multibeam collection for CV05_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2005-05-09 to 2005-05-22, departing from Galway, Ireland and returning to Killybegs, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  10. Multibeam collection for CV07_SFI_GWB: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2007-02-09 to 2007-02-13, departing from Unknown Port and returning to Unknown Port

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  11. Multibeam collection for CV04_01: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2004-10-17 to 2004-10-26, departing from Dublin Port, Ireland and returning to Dublin Port, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  12. Multibeam collection for CV1202: Multibeam data collected aboard Celtic Voyager from 2012-02-01 to 2012-02-28, departing from Cork, Ireland and returning to D?n Laoghaire, Ireland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  13. Completeness of maternal smoking status recording during pregnancy in United Kingdom primary care data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafeesa N Dhalwani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the health impacts of smoking during pregnancy and the opportunity for primary healthcare teams to encourage pregnant smokers to quit, our primary aim was to assess the completeness of gestational smoking status recording in primary care data and investigate whether completeness varied with women's characteristics. As a secondary aim we assessed whether completeness of recording varied before and after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF. METHODS: In The Health Improvement Network (THIN database we calculated the proportion of pregnancies ending in live births or stillbirths where there was a recording of maternal smoking status for each year from 2000 to 2009. Logistic regression was used to assess variation in the completeness of maternal smoking recording by maternal characteristics, before and after the introduction of QOF. RESULTS: Women had a record of smoking status during the gestational period in 28% of the 277,552 pregnancies identified. In 2000, smoking status was recorded in 9% of pregnancies, rising to 43% in 2009. Pregnant women from the most deprived group were 17% more likely to have their smoking status recorded than pregnant women from the least deprived group before QOF implementation (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.25 and 42% more likely afterwards (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.37-1.47. A diagnosis of asthma was related to recording of smoking status during pregnancy in both the pre-QOF (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.53-1.74 and post-QOF periods (OR 2.08, 95% CI 2.02-2.15. There was no association between having a diagnosis of diabetes and recording of smoking status during pregnancy pre-QOF however, post-QOF diagnosis of diabetes was associated with a 12% increase in recording of smoking status (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19. CONCLUSION: Recording of smoking status during pregnancy in primary care data is incomplete though has improved over time, especially after the implementation of the QOF, and varies by maternal

  14. Ontology-Based Data Integration of Open Source Electronic Medical Record and Data Capture Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Alicia F.

    2013-01-01

    In low-resource settings, the prioritization of clinical care funding is often determined by immediate health priorities. As a result, investment directed towards the development of standards for clinical data representation and exchange are rare and accordingly, data management systems are often redundant. Open-source systems such as OpenMRS and…

  15. Ontology-Based Data Integration of Open Source Electronic Medical Record and Data Capture Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Alicia F.

    2013-01-01

    In low-resource settings, the prioritization of clinical care funding is often determined by immediate health priorities. As a result, investment directed towards the development of standards for clinical data representation and exchange are rare and accordingly, data management systems are often redundant. Open-source systems such as OpenMRS and…

  16. Recent advances in recording electrophysiological data simultaneously with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laufs, H. [Univ Frankfurt, Zentrum Neurol and Neurochirurg, Neurol Klin, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Laufs, H. [Univ Frankfurt, Dept Neurol, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Laufs, H. [Univ Frankfurt, Brain Imaging Ctr, D-60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Laufs, H.; Carmichael, D.W. [UCL, Inst Neurol, Dept Clin and Expt Epilepsy, London (United Kingdom); Daunizeau, J. [Wellcome Trust Ctr Neuroimaging, London (United Kingdom); Kleinschmidt, A. [INSERM, Unite 562, F-91191 Gif SurYvette (France); Kleinschmidt, A. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, NeuroSpin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Kleinschmidt, A. [Univ Paris 11, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2008-07-01

    Simultaneous recording of brain activity by different neuro-physiological modalities can yield insights that reach beyond those obtained by each technique individually, even when compared to those from the post-hoc integration of results from each technique recorded sequentially. Success in the endeavour of real-time multimodal experiments requires special hardware and software as well as purpose-tailored experimental design and analysis strategies. Here,we review the key methodological issues in recording electrophysiological data in humans simultaneously with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), focusing on recent technical and analytical advances in the field. Examples are derived from simultaneous electro-encephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) during functional MRI in cognitive and systems neuroscience as well as in clinical neurology, in particular in epilepsy and movement disorders. We conclude with an outlook on current and future efforts to achieve true integration of electrical and haemodynamic measures of neuronal activity using data fusion models. (authors)

  17. Current Sheets in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    We identified all of the current sheets for which we have relatively complete and accurate magnetic field (B) data from Voyager 1 (V1) from days of year (DOYs) 1 to 331, 2009, which were obtained deep in the heliosheath between 108.5 and 111.8 AU. Three types of current sheets were found: (1) 15 proton boundary layers (PBLs), (2) 10 and 3 magnetic holes and magnetic humps, respectively, and (3) 3 sector boundaries. The magnetic field strength changes across PBL, and the profile B(t) is linearly related to the hyperbolic tangent function, but the direction of B does not change. For each of the three sector boundaries, B rotated in a plane normal to the minimum variance direction, and the component of B along the minimum variance direction was zero within the uncertainties, indicating that the sector boundaries were tangential discontinuities. The structure of the sector boundaries was not as simple as that for PBLs. The average thickness of magnetic holes and humps (approx.30 RL) was twice that of the PBLs (approx.15 RL). The average thickness of the current sheets associated with sector boundaries was close to the thickness of the PBLs. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that magnetic holes and humps are solitons, which are initiated by the mirror mode instability, and evolve by nonlinear kinetic plasma processes to pressure balanced structures maintained by magnetization currents and proton drift currents in the gradients of B.

  18. Top of Atmosphere Radiation MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record within the Climate Monitoring SAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, Manon; Clerbaux, Nicolas; Ipe, Alessandro; Tornow, Florian; Hollmann, Rainer; Baudrez, Edward; Velazquez Blazquez, Almudena; Moreels, Johan; Trentmann, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    The CM SAF Top of Atmosphere (TOA) Radiation MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record provides a homogeneous satellite-based climatology of the TOA Reflected Solar (TRS) and Emitted Thermal (TET) radiation in all-sky conditions. The continuous monitoring of these two components of the Earth Radiation Budget is of prime importance to study climate variability and change. The Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI - from 1983 until 2004) and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI - from 2004 onward) on board the Meteosat First and Second Generation satellites are combined to generate a long Thematic Climate Data Record (TCDR). Combining MVIRI and SEVIRI allows an unprecedented temporal (30 minutes / 15 minutes) and spatial (2.5 km / 3 km) resolution compared to the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. This is a step forward as it helps to increase the knowledge of the diurnal cycle and the small-scale spatial variations of radiation. The MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record covers a 32 years time period from 1 February 1983 to 30 April 2015. The TOA radiation products are provided as daily mean, monthly mean and monthly averages of the hourly integrated values (diurnal cycle). To ensure consistency with other CM SAF products, the data is provided on a regular grid at a spatial resolution of 0.05 degrees (i.e. about 5.5 km) and covers the region between +/- 70° longitude and +/- 70° latitude. Validation of the MVIRI/SEVIRI Data Record has been performed by intercomparison with several references such as the CERES products (EBAF, SYN1deg-Day and SYN1deg-M3Hour), the HIRS OLR Climate Data Record (Daily and Monthly), the reconstructed ERBS WFOV-CERES (or DEEP-C) dataset and the ISCCP FD products. CERES is considered as the best reference from March 2000 onward. The quality of the early part of the Data Record is verified against the other references. In general, the stability of all the TOA radiation products is estimated to be better than 4 W.m-2

  19. Record completeness and data concordance in an anesthesia information management system using context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avidan, Alexander; Weissman, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Use of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) does not insure record completeness and data accuracy. Mandatory data-entry fields can be used to assure data completeness. However, they are not suited for data that is mandatory depending on the clinical situation (context sensitive). For example, information on equal breath sounds should be mandatory with tracheal intubation, but not with mask ventilation. It was hypothesized that employing context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields can insure high data-completeness and accuracy while maintaining usability. A commercial off-the-shelf AIMS was enhanced using its built-in VBScript programming tool to build event-driven forms with context-sensitive mandatory data-entry fields. One year after introduction of the system, all anesthesia records were reviewed for data completeness. Data concordance, used as a proxy for accuracy, was evaluated using verifiable age-related data. Additionally, an anonymous satisfaction survey on general acceptance and usability of the AIMS was performed. During the initial 12 months of AIMS use, 12,241 (99.6%) of 12,290 anesthesia records had complete data. Concordances of entered data (weight, size of tracheal tubes, laryngoscopy blades and intravenous catheters) with patients' ages were 98.7-99.9%. The AIMS implementation was deemed successful by 98% of the anesthesiologists. Users rated the AIMS usability in general as very good and the data-entry forms in particular as comfortable. Due to the complexity and the high costs of implementation of an anesthesia information management system it was not possible to compare various system designs (for example with or without context-sensitive mandatory data entry-fields). Therefore, it is possible that a different or simpler design would have yielded the same or even better results. This refers also to the evaluation of usability, since users did not have the opportunity to work with different design approaches or even different

  20. Preparation of name and address data for record linkage using hidden Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Kim

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Record linkage refers to the process of joining records that relate to the same entity or event in one or more data collections. In the absence of a shared, unique key, record linkage involves the comparison of ensembles of partially-identifying, non-unique data items between pairs of records. Data items with variable formats, such as names and addresses, need to be transformed and normalised in order to validly carry out these comparisons. Traditionally, deterministic rule-based data processing systems have been used to carry out this pre-processing, which is commonly referred to as "standardisation". This paper describes an alternative approach to standardisation, using a combination of lexicon-based tokenisation and probabilistic hidden Markov models (HMMs. Methods HMMs were trained to standardise typical Australian name and address data drawn from a range of health data collections. The accuracy of the results was compared to that produced by rule-based systems. Results Training of HMMs was found to be quick and did not require any specialised skills. For addresses, HMMs produced equal or better standardisation accuracy than a widely-used rule-based system. However, acccuracy was worse when used with simpler name data. Possible reasons for this poorer performance are discussed. Conclusion Lexicon-based tokenisation and HMMs provide a viable and effort-effective alternative to rule-based systems for pre-processing more complex variably formatted data such as addresses. Further work is required to improve the performance of this approach with simpler data such as names. Software which implements the methods described in this paper is freely available under an open source license for other researchers to use and improve.

  1. Methods and dimensions of electronic health record data quality assessment: enabling reuse for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Nicole Gray; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    To review the methods and dimensions of data quality assessment in the context of electronic health record (EHR) data reuse for research. A review of the clinical research literature discussing data quality assessment methodology for EHR data was performed. Using an iterative process, the aspects of data quality being measured were abstracted and categorized, as well as the methods of assessment used. Five dimensions of data quality were identified, which are completeness, correctness, concordance, plausibility, and currency, and seven broad categories of data quality assessment methods: comparison with gold standards, data element agreement, data source agreement, distribution comparison, validity checks, log review, and element presence. Examination of the methods by which clinical researchers have investigated the quality and suitability of EHR data for research shows that there are fundamental features of data quality, which may be difficult to measure, as well as proxy dimensions. Researchers interested in the reuse of EHR data for clinical research are recommended to consider the adoption of a consistent taxonomy of EHR data quality, to remain aware of the task-dependence of data quality, to integrate work on data quality assessment from other fields, and to adopt systematic, empirically driven, statistically based methods of data quality assessment. There is currently little consistency or potential generalizability in the methods used to assess EHR data quality. If the reuse of EHR data for clinical research is to become accepted, researchers should adopt validated, systematic methods of EHR data quality assessment.

  2. Experiments on the data recording of optical waveguide multilayer storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongcheng; Ding, Dongyan; Xie, Haiyan; Gu, Minfen; Chen, Jiabi; Zhuang, Songlin

    2005-12-01

    The basic principles of optical waveguide multilayer storage (WMS) device include recording data in the form of waveguide defects, reading data by collecting the scatter light from the waveguide defects, and restraining the cross talk between layers by taking the benefit of the waveguide structure. In this paper, we give some experimental results obtained by three different approaches of data recording. They are laser direct writing, photolithography and hot embossing. In the first method, a laser beam is focused on the top of a polymer film. The thermal effect alters the medium property locally at the focus point, which acts as the defect in the waveguide structure. The second method resorts to the processes of photolithography to record pits on the photoresist layer. The process of hot embossing is similar to the fabrication of CD-ROM, however, the data pits deeper than the wavelength are embossed on the polymer surface to increase the scattering efficiency. WMS devices based on different data writing methods are presented and the data scattering patterns are observed. The comparison between the different data writing approaches is made and discussed as well.

  3. [Sun Simiao's voyage to Chu and Shu regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenmin

    2014-07-01

    During the 4(th)-11(th) years of Zhenguan reign of the Tang Dynasty, Sun Simiao paid a voyage to the regions of Chu (now mostly the Hubei Province) and Shu (now Sichuan Province) for a total of 14 years. In the 4(th) year of Zhenguan, he went to treat the "hydropsy" of Li Gui, the King of Hanyang, hence, the record given as the 9(th) year of Zhenguan by Bei ji qian jin yao fang (Essential Prescriptions for Emergency Worth a Thousand Gold) is not correct. Later, he went to Jiangzhou (now Jiujiang city of Jiangxi Province) to treat Chen Shuping's, the King of Chenxiangdong beriberi due to wind-poisoning. In the 15(th) of July, the 5(th) year of Zhenguan, he himself suffered a swelling pain in his finger when travelling in Shu region, due to a poisonous sting, which was cured by rubbing with the juice from the root and stem of dendelion. In the 7(th) year of Zhenguan, he suffered a facial erysipelas due to over drinking when he was in Neijiang County which was treated by the mayor, Master Li, with various medications to no avail, which was eventually cured by himself. In the 10(th) year of Zhenguan, he treated the Governor of Zizhou Li Wenbo's consuming thirst. He also got a large amount of copper salts in the Counties of Xuanwu and Feiwu nearby. In the 17(th) year of Zhenguan or later, he processed the "Tai yi spiritual powder" in Wei's family of Shu County. After finishing the processing, he returned to Guanzhong (now Shaanxi) at certain period of "August of 17(th) year of Zhenguan", "January of 18(th) year of Zhenguan", or "January of 19(th) year of Zhenguan".

  4. ALICE Data Acquisition: how to record (more than) a DVD every second

    CERN Multimedia

    Divia, R

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN requires a system capable to record the equivalent of a DVD every second during several consecutive weeks. The ALICE Data Acquisition system amply supports this requirement while providing several indispensable run-time features for control, monitoring, configuration, alarms etc...

  5. Using State Student Unit Record Data to Increase Community College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewell, Peter; Jenkins, Davis

    2008-01-01

    This chapter examines lessons learned by states that are using student unit record (SUR) data to improve outcomes for community college students and recommends steps states can take to strengthen their use of SUR databases to benefit students and communities. (Contains 1 exhibit.)

  6. Using routinely recorded herd data to predict and benchmark herd and cow health status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health using producer-recorded data is feasible. Estimates of heritability are low, indicating that genetic progress will be slow. Improvement of health traits may also be possible with the incorporation of environmental and managerial aspects into herd health pro...

  7. Tsunami data assimilation of Cascadia seafloor pressure gauge records from the 2012 Haida Gwaii earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusman, Aditya Riadi; Sheehan, Anne F.; Satake, Kenji; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Mulia, Iyan Eka; Maeda, Takuto

    2016-05-01

    We use tsunami waveforms recorded on a dense array of seafloor pressure gauges offshore Oregon and California from the 2012 Haida Gwaii, Canada, earthquake to simulate the performance of two different real-time tsunami-forecasting methods. In the first method, the tsunami source is first estimated by inversion of recorded tsunami waveforms. In the second method, the array data are assimilated to reproduce tsunami wavefields. These estimates can be used for forecasting tsunami on the coast. The dense seafloor array provides critical data for both methods to produce timeliness (>30 min lead time) and accuracy in both timing and amplitude (>94% confidence) tsunami forecasts. Real-time tsunami data on dense arrays and data assimilation can be tested as a possible new generation tsunami warning system.

  8. Conflict Detection Performance Analysis for Function Allocation Using Time-Shifted Recorded Traffic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Butler, Ricky W.; Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Hagen, George E.; Lewis, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the conflict detection function in a separation assurance system is dependent on the content and quality of the data available to perform that function. Specifically, data quality and data content available to the conflict detection function have a direct impact on the accuracy of the prediction of an aircraft's future state or trajectory, which, in turn, impacts the ability to successfully anticipate potential losses of separation (detect future conflicts). Consequently, other separation assurance functions that rely on the conflict detection function - namely, conflict resolution - are prone to negative performance impacts. The many possible allocations and implementations of the conflict detection function between centralized and distributed systems drive the need to understand the key relationships that impact conflict detection performance, with respect to differences in data available. This paper presents the preliminary results of an analysis technique developed to investigate the impacts of data quality and data content on conflict detection performance. Flight track data recorded from a day of the National Airspace System is time-shifted to create conflicts not present in the un-shifted data. A methodology is used to smooth and filter the recorded data to eliminate sensor fusion noise, data drop-outs and other anomalies in the data. The metrics used to characterize conflict detection performance are presented and a set of preliminary results is discussed.

  9. 'Big Data' Collaboration: Exploring, Recording and Sharing Enterprise Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Ferrell, Regina Kay [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    As data sources and data size proliferate, knowledge discovery from "Big Data" is starting to pose several challenges. In this paper, we address a specific challenge in the practice of enterprise knowledge management while extracting actionable nuggets from diverse data sources of seemingly-related information. In particular, we address the challenge of archiving knowledge gained through collaboration, dissemination and visualization as part of the data analysis, inference and decision-making lifecycle. We motivate the implementation of an enterprise data-discovery and knowledge recorder tool, called SEEKER based on real world case-study. We demonstrate SEEKER capturing schema and data-element relationships, tracking the data elements of value based on the queries and the analytical artifacts that are being created by analysts as they use the data. We show how the tool serves as digital record of institutional domain knowledge and a documentation for the evolution of data elements, queries and schemas over time. As a knowledge management service, a tool like SEEKER saves enterprise resources and time by avoiding analytic silos, expediting the process of multi-source data integration and intelligently documenting discoveries from fellow analysts.

  10. In situ observations of interstellar plasma with Voyager 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F

    2013-09-27

    Launched over 35 years ago, Voyagers 1 and 2 are on an epic journey outward from the Sun to reach the boundary between the solar plasma and the much cooler interstellar medium. The boundary, called the heliopause, is expected to be marked by a large increase in plasma density, from about 0.002 per cubic centimeter (cm(-3)) in the outer heliosphere, to about 0.1 cm(-3) in the interstellar medium. On 9 April 2013, the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument began detecting locally generated electron plasma oscillations at a frequency of about 2.6 kilohertz. This oscillation frequency corresponds to an electron density of about 0.08 cm(-3), very close to the value expected in the interstellar medium. These and other observations provide strong evidence that Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma.

  11. Identifying risk factors for healthcare-associated infections from electronic medical record home address data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenman Marc B

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential address is a common element in patient electronic medical records. Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention specify that residence in a nursing home, skilled nursing facility, or hospice within a year prior to a positive culture date is among the criteria for differentiating healthcare-acquired from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections. Residential addresses may be useful for identifying patients residing in healthcare-associated settings, but methods for categorizing residence type based on electronic medical records have not been widely documented. The aim of this study was to develop a process to assist in differentiating healthcare-associated from community-associated MRSA infections by analyzing patient addresses to determine if residence reported at the time of positive culture was associated with a healthcare facility or other institutional location. Results We identified 1,232 of the patients (8.24% of the sample with positive cultures as probable cases of healthcare-associated MRSA based on residential addresses contained in electronic medical records. Combining manual review with linking to institutional address databases improved geocoding rates from 11,870 records (79.37% to 12,549 records (83.91%. Standardization of patient home address through geocoding increased the number of matches to institutional facilities from 545 (3.64% to 1,379 (9.22%. Conclusions Linking patient home address data from electronic medical records to institutional residential databases provides useful information for epidemiologic researchers, infection control practitioners, and clinicians. This information, coupled with other clinical and laboratory data, can be used to inform differentiation of healthcare-acquired from community-acquired infections. The process presented should be extensible with little or no added data costs.

  12. A Satellite-Based Surface Radiation Climatology Derived by Combining Climate Data Records and Near-Real-Time Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo Ahrens

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a method for adjusting long-term climate data records (CDRs for the integrated use with near-real-time data using the example of surface incoming solar irradiance (SIS. Recently, a 23-year long (1983–2005 continuous SIS CDR has been generated based on the visible channel (0.45–1 μm of the MVIRI radiometers onboard the geostationary Meteosat First Generation Platform. The CDR is available from the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF. Here, it is assessed whether a homogeneous extension of the SIS CDR to the present is possible with operationally generated surface radiation data provided by CM SAF using the SEVIRI and GERB instruments onboard the Meteosat Second Generation satellites. Three extended CM SAF SIS CDR versions consisting of MVIRI-derived SIS (1983–2005 and three different SIS products derived from the SEVIRI and GERB instruments onboard the MSG satellites (2006 onwards were tested. A procedure to detect shift inhomogeneities in the extended data record (1983–present was applied that combines the Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT and a penalized maximal T-test with visual inspection. Shift detection was done by comparing the SIS time series with the ground stations mean, in accordance with statistical significance. Several stations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN and about 50 stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA over Europe were used as the ground-based reference. The analysis indicates several breaks in the data record between 1987 and 1994 probably due to artefacts in the raw data and instrument failures. After 2005 the MVIRI radiometer was replaced by the narrow-band SEVIRI and the broadband GERB radiometers and a new retrieval algorithm was applied. This induces significant challenges for the homogenisation across the satellite generations. Homogenisation is performed by applying a mean-shift correction depending on the shift size of

  13. The interaction between schema matching and record matching in data integration (extended abstract)

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin

    2017-05-18

    Schema Matching (SM) and Record Matching (RM) are two necessary steps in integrating multiple relational tables of different schemas, where SM unifies the schemas and RM detects records referring to the same real-world entity. The two processes have been thoroughly studied separately, but few attention has been paid to the interaction of SM and RM. In this work we find that, even alternating them in a simple manner, SM and RM can benefit from each other to reach a better integration performance (i.e., in terms of precision and recall). Therefore, combining SM and RM is a promising solution for improving data integration.

  14. Data base of array characteristics instrument response and data, recorded at NNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushueva, E.A.; Ermolenko, E.A.; Efremova, N.A. [and others

    1996-12-01

    A northern and east-northern parts of Kazakstan Republic are utterly favorable for a placing of seismic stations. There is a very low level of natural and industrial seismic noise. Rocks of Kazakh epi-Hercynian platform have a very good transmissive properties. Geophysical observatories (GOs), now belonging to the Institute of Geophysical Researches of National Nuclear Center of Kazakstan Republic (IGR NNC RK), were established in especially selected low-noise places of Northern Kazakstan, in accordance with Soviet program for nuclear weapons test monitoring. In 1994, these GOs were transferred by Russian Federation into the possession of Kazakstan. A location of GOs is shown on the Fig. 1. According to the studying of seismic noises, jointly implemented by scientists from IGR and IRIS, places, where a `Borovoye` and `Kurchatov` seismic stations are located, are among the best places for seismic observations in the world. A seismic arrays exist in `Borovoye` and `Kurchatov` observatories - in two observatories out four (`Aktiubinsk`, `Borovoye`, `Kurchatov` and `Makanchi`). These two observatories are described in this report. A history of geophysical observatories, conditions of equipment operations (climatic, geological and so on) are presented in this report, as well as it is described the equipment of GOs and seismic arrays, and samples of digital seismograms, recorded on the equipment of various types, are presented in this report. GO `Borovoye` is described in the 2nd chart, GO `Kurchatov` is described in the 3rd chart of the report. The main results of work are presented in the conclusion. A list of used papers, a list of tables and figures is given in the end of the report. 14 refs., 95 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Jules Verne Voyager, Jr: An Interactive Map Tool for Teaching Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, M. W.; Meertens, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present an interactive, web-based map utility that can make new geological and geophysical results accessible to a large number and variety of users. The tool provides a user-friendly interface that allows users to access a variety of maps, satellite images, and geophysical data at a range of spatial scales. The map tool, dubbed 'Jules Verne Voyager, Jr.', allows users to interactively create maps of a variety of study areas around the world. The utility was developed in collaboration with the UNAVCO Consortium for study of global-scale tectonic processes. Users can choose from a variety of base maps (including "Face of the Earth" and "Earth at Night" satellite imagery mosaics, global topography, geoid, sea-floor age, strain rate and seismic hazard maps, and others), add a number of geographic and geophysical overlays (coastlines, political boundaries, rivers and lakes, earthquake and volcano locations, stress axes, etc.), and then superimpose both observed and model velocity vectors representing a compilation of 2933 GPS geodetic measurements from around the world. A remarkable characteristic of the geodetic compilation is that users can select from some 21 plates' frames of reference, allowing a visual representation of both 'absolute' plate motion (in a no-net rotation reference frame) and relative motion along all of the world's plate boundaries. The tool allows users to zoom among at least three map scales. The map tool can be viewed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/Earth. A more detailed version of the map utility, developed in conjunction with the EarthScope initiative, focuses on North America geodynamics, and provides more detailed geophysical and geographic information for the United States, Canada, and Mexico. The ‘EarthScope Voyager’ can be accessed at http://jules.unavco.org/VoyagerJr/EarthScope. Because the system uses pre-constructed gif images and overlays, the system can rapidly create and display maps to a large number of users

  16. High capacity implantable data recorders: system design and experience in canines and Denning black bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Timothy G; Harlow, Henry J; Werder, Jon C; Marshall, Mark T; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2005-11-01

    Implantable medical devices have increasingly large capacities for storing patient data as a diagnostic aid and to allow patient monitoring. Although these devices can store a significant amount of data, an increased ability for data storage was required for chronic monitoring in recent physiological studies. Novel high capacity implantable data recorders were designed for use in advanced physiological studies of canines and free-ranging black bears. These hermitically sealed titanium encased recorders were chronically implanted and programmed to record intrabody broadband electrical activity to monitor electrocardiograms and electromyograms, and single-axis acceleration to document relative activities. Changes in cardiac T-wave morphology were characterized in the canines over a 6 month period, providing new physiological data for the design of algorithms and filtering schemes that could be employed to avoid inappropriate implantable defibrillator shocks. Unique characteristics of bear hibernation physiology were successfully identified in the black bears, including: heart rate, respiratory rate, gross body movement, and shiver An unanticipated high rejection rate of these devices occurred in the bears, with five of six being externalized during the overwintering period, including two devices implanted in the peritoneal cavity. High capacity implantable data recorders were designed and utilized for the collection of long-term physiological data in both laboratory and extreme field environments. The devices described were programmable to accommodate the diverse research protocols. Additionally, we have described substantial differences in the response of two species to a common device. Variations in the foreign body response of different mammals must be identified and taken into consideration when choosing tissue-contacting materials in the application of biomedical technology to physiologic research.

  17. The body voyage as visual representation and art performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Jan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    with it. A further aim with the paper is to discuss what kind of image of the body that is conveyed through medical visual technologies, such as endoscopy, and relate it to contemporary discussions on embodiment, embodied vision and bodily presence. The paper concludes with a recent exhibition......This paper looks at the notion of the body as an interior landscape that is made intelligible through visual representation. It discerns the key figure of the inner corporeal voyage, identifies its main elements and examines how contemporary artists working with performances and installations deal...... by the French artist Christian Boltanski, which gives a somewhat different meaning to the idea of the body voyage....

  18. Voyages et utopie scientifique dans La Nouvelle Atlantide de Bacon

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Parce qu’il s’agit d’une fiction issue du genre utopique, la Nouvelle Atlantide est sans doute l’une des œuvres les plus originales du corpus baconien. Cet article s’efforce de montrer que ce récit de voyage et la philosophie du chancelier forment pourtant un tout cohérent, et que la Nouvelle Atlantide peut se lire comme une illustration fictionnelle de l’épistémologie baconienne. Pour Bacon, le voyage est à la fois la métaphore et l’instrument de la découverte scientifique. En effet la conna...

  19. The body voyage as visual representation and art performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsén, Jan Eric

    2011-01-01

    This paper looks at the notion of the body as an interior landscape that is made intelligible through visual representation. It discerns the key figure of the inner corporeal voyage, identifies its main elements and examines how contemporary artists working with performances and installations deal with it. A further aim with the paper is to discuss what kind of image of the body that is conveyed through medical visual technologies, such as endoscopy, and relate it to contemporary discussions on embodiment, embodied vision and bodily presence. The paper concludes with a recent exhibition by the French artist Christian Boltanski, which gives a somewhat different meaning to the idea of the body voyage.

  20. Linking CALIOP and Historical Solar Occultation Data Records to Investigate Long-Term PSC Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michael; Gonzalez, Ryan; Poole, Lamont

    2017-04-01

    Data from spaceborne solar occultation instruments such as Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II (1978-1993) and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) II/III (1996-2006) provided important baseline information on polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) such as their link to very cold stratospheric temperatures and their spatial distribution and seasonal variability in both polar regions. More recently, the PSC observational database has been greatly expanded by the more than 11-year record of measurements by the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument on the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. In this study, we investigate the long-term (multi-decadal) variability of PSC occurrence by linking the CALIOP record with the solar occultation PSC record from SAM II (spanning the years 1978-1989; Poole and Pitts, 1994) and the unified database from Fromm et al. (2003), which extended the SAM II record using solar occultation data from the SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II) and POAM II/III instruments. To facilitate these comparisons, we have (1) subsampled the CALIOP data to match the solar occultation sampling pattern where measurement latitude varies slowly over the season; (2) degraded the resolution of the CALIOP PSC products to mimic that of solar occultation data, typically 0.5-1.0 km in the vertical and several hundred kilometers in the horizontal; and (3) developed techniques for using the CALIOP backscatter signals at 532-nm wavelength to calculate equivalent extinction coefficients at/near 1-μm wavelength that would be measured by the solar occultation devices. We then examine this combined record to quantify multi-decadal variability/trends in PSC occurrence.

  1. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Sakurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A video event data recorder (VEDR in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic seizure and he was diagnosed with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. The VEDR is useful not only for traffic accident evidence; it might also contribute to a driver's health care and road safety.

  2. Video event data recording of a taxi driver used for diagnosis of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Junko; Kurita, Tsugiko; Takeda, Youji; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    A video event data recorder (VEDR) in a motor vehicle records images before and after a traffic accident. This report describes a taxi driver whose seizures were recorded by VEDR, which was extremely useful for the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patient was a 63-year-old right-handed Japanese male taxi driver. He collided with a streetlight. Two years prior to this incident, he raced an engine for a long time while parked. The VEDR enabled confirmation that the accidents depended on an epileptic seizure and he was diagnosed with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy. The VEDR is useful not only for traffic accident evidence; it might also contribute to a driver's health care and road safety.

  3. Epoxy-photopolymer composites: thick recording media for holographic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentler, Timothy J.; Boyd, Joel E.; Colvin, Vicki L.

    2001-06-01

    Archival data-storage based on holographic methods requires high performance recording materials. Here, we describe an epoxy-photopolymer composite material which is sensitive to visible light and can be fabricated as thick films. These materials are prepared by combining photopolymerizable vinyl monomers with a liquid epoxy resin and an amine hardener. As the epoxy cures at room temperature, a solid matrix is formed which surrounds the unreacted photopolymer. These vinyl monomers are subsequently photopolymerized during hologram recording. Typically the material consists of a low index matrix, composed of diethylenetriamine and 1,4- butanediol diglycidyl ether, and a high index photopolymer mixture of N-vinylcarbazole and N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone. Because the polymers can be prepared in thick formats, narrow angular bandwidth holograms with high diffraction efficiency can be recorded. A dynamic range up to 13 has been measured in these materials.

  4. Getting data out of the electronic patient record: critical steps in building a data warehouse for decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebidia, A; Mulder, C; Tripp, B; Morgan, M W

    1999-01-01

    Health care has taken advantage of computers to streamline many clinical and administrative processes. However, the potential of health care information technology as a source of data for clinical and administrative decision support has not been fully explored. This paper describes the process of developing on-line analytical processing (OLAP) capacity from data generated in an on-line transaction processing (OLTP) system (the electronic patient record). We discuss the steps used to evaluate the EPR system, retrieve the data, and create an analytical data warehouse accessible for analysis. We also summarize studies based on the data (lab re-engineering, practice variation in diagnostic decision-making and evaluation of a clinical alert). Besides producing a useful data warehouse, the process also increased understanding of organizational and cost considerations in purchasing OLAP tools. We discuss the limitations of our approach and ways in which these limitations can be addressed.

  5. Feasibility of integrating research data collection into routine clinical practice using the electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, David J; Deakyne, Sara J; Payan, Marisa L; Torok, Michelle R; Kahn, Michael G; Vemulakonda, Vijaya M

    2014-10-01

    The electronic health record is becoming central to routine medical practice and has the potential to facilitate large scale clinical research. We evaluated the completeness and accuracy of data collection using designated research fields integrated into a semistructured clinical note. We hypothesized that prospective research data collection as part of routine clinical charting is feasible, with a high rate of utilization (greater than 80%) and accuracy (kappa greater than 0.80). Infants with congenital hydronephrosis were followed prospectively at a single institution. Existing functionality in the electronic health record was used for data collection by creation of 28 different data elements captured from a hydronephrosis note or phrase template. Completeness (percent utilization) was calculated and accuracy was assessed by comparing the structured data to manual chart review. Comparisons were conducted using the chi-square test, with 2-tailed p values <0.05 considered statistically significant. A total of 80 patients were eligible for manual chart review. Data were recorded through template use in 64 patients for an overall completeness of 80.0%. Of 28 elements 17 (60%) demonstrated "almost perfect" agreement (kappa greater than 0.80), and all variables reached at least "moderate" agreement (greater than 0.40). Integrating research fields into routine clinical practice is feasible by using semistructured clinical templates within an electronic health record. High completion and accuracy rates were captured from a variety of fields within a hydronephrosis template. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 66950 - Privacy Act; Notice of Revision of System of Records, the Single Family Housing Enterprise Data...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Single Family data. It is an integrated data warehouse that contains critical Single Family business data... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act; Notice of Revision of System of Records, the Single Family Housing... Federal Register about one of its record systems, the Single Family Housing Enterprise Data...

  7. Gas expulsions and biological activity recorded offshore Molene Island, Brittany (France): video supervised recording of OBS data and analogue modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhoefer, F.; Géli, L.; Dellong, D.; Evangelia, B.; Tary, J. B.; Bayrakci, G.; Lantéri, N.; Lin, J. Y.; Chen, Y. F.; Chang, E. T. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) commonly record signals from Short Duration Events (SDEs), having characteristics that are very different from those produced by tectonic earthquakes, e.g.: durations trains, with no identified P- nor S-wave arrivals. SDES were first reported by Burkisk et al (1981) who proposed biological activity as a possible cause. Since then, SDEs have been disregarded or discarded as noise by scientists interested in earthquake studies. Interest in SDEs came back recently, when it was realized that SDEs are commonly found and could be due to gas expulsions from the seafloor. To discriminate between the 2 hypotheses (biological activity vs gas emissions), different tests have been made, including seismic recordings combined with video surveillance and analogue experiments. In May 2016, two OBS (4.5 Hz) were deployed offshore Molene Island, Brittany within the field of view of the EMSO-Molene underwater observatory, at a water depth of 12 m. The camera images and the recordings reveal the presence of crabs, octopus and several species of fish. Other acoustic signals can be related to the presence of moving algae or the influence from bad weather. Tides produce characteristic curves in the noise recorded on the geophones. SDEs have been recorded on both instruments, that may well have been caused by gas expulsions from the seabed into the water. In order to verify this hypothesis, an aquarium was filled with water overlying an even grain-sized quartz sand layer. A constant air supply through a narrow tube produced gas bubbles in a regular manner and an immersed ocean bottom geophone recorded the resulting acoustic signals. The bubbles tend to have a uniform size and to produce a waveform very close to those found on the OBSs. By comparing the number of SDEs and the volume of escaped air, estimates can be made regarding the volume of gas escaping the seafloor in different environments.

  8. Representation of Uncertainty in GPS data product Earth System Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, M. B.; Bock, Y.; Crowell, B. W.; Dong, D.; Fang, P.; Kedar, S.; Liu, Z.; Melgar-Moctezuma, D.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Ratzesberger, L.; Webb, F.

    2011-12-01

    SOPAC and JPL have collaborated through the MEaSUREs SESES program to provide Level 1A ESDR's of automated weekly-updated, long-term (from 1995 to the present) raw geodetic position time series of over 1000 stations in the Western U.S. (including all PBO sites) and global stations. In addition, JPL and SOPAC provide Level 1B ESDR's of automated weekly updates of calibrated, validated, and filtered time series for stations in the Western U.S. based on the combined solutions of independent JPL and SOPAC analyses. We also provide Level 2 ESDR's consisting of velocity field and velocity field histories in various geodetic reference frames. Strain and strain rate fields, Level 3 ESDR's, will also shortly be in production. All products are available to the public through NASA's GPS Explorer gridsphere-based data portal. A new set of geodeticML schemas and a downloadable metadata viewer are being developed which allow the inclusion of processing metadata and versioning information in addition to other data quality information, such as outliers and chi-squared and rms values of the overall combination process. The incremental chi-squared fit of each subnetwork, adjustment value and sigma for each site are calculated and used to tag as anomalous those sites with 3 times the formal uncertainty. Another set of files generated weekly as part of our recursive processing and evaluation of the time series, detects signals such as postseismic decays, outliers and trends still apparent in the adjustment residuals.

  9. Data quality of seismic records from the Tohoku, Japan earthquake as recorded across the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, A.T.; Gee, L.S.; Marshall, B.; Hutt, C.R.; Storm, T.

    2012-01-01

    Great earthquakes recorded across modern digital seismographic networks, such as the recent Tohoku, Japan, earthquake on 11 March 2011 (Mw = 9.0), provide unique datasets that ultimately lead to a better understanding of the Earth's structure (e.g., Pesicek et al. 2008) and earthquake sources (e.g., Ammon et al. 2011). For network operators, such events provide the opportunity to look at the performance across their entire network using a single event, as the ground motion records from the event will be well above every station's noise floor.

  10. Readout fidelity of coaxial holographic digital data page recording in nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Kohta; Hata, Eiji; Tomita, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of nanoparticle-concentration and thiol-to-ene stoichiometric ratio dependences of symbol error rates (SERs) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of digital data pages recorded at a wavelength of 532 nm in thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite (NPC) films by using a coaxial holographic digital data storage method. We show that SERs and SNRs at the optimized material condition can be lower than 1 × 10-4 and higher than 10, respectively, without error correction coding. These results show the usefulness of thiol-ene based NPCs as coaxial holographic data storage media.

  11. Reconstructions of biomass burning from sediment-charcoal records to improve data-model comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlon, Jennifer R.; Kelly, Ryan; Daniau, Anne-Laure; Vannière, Boris; Power, Mitchell J.; Bartlein, Patrick; Higuera, Philip; Blarquez, Olivier; Brewer, Simon; Brücher, Tim; Feurdean, Angelica; Gil Romera, Graciela; Iglesias, Virginia; Yoshi Maezumi, S.; Magi, Brian; Mustaphi, Colin J. Courtney; Zhihai, Tonishtan

    2016-06-01

    The location, timing, spatial extent, and frequency of wildfires are changing rapidly in many parts of the world, producing substantial impacts on ecosystems, people, and potentially climate. Paleofire records based on charcoal accumulation in sediments enable modern changes in biomass burning to be considered in their long-term context. Paleofire records also provide insights into the causes and impacts of past wildfires and emissions when analyzed in conjunction with other paleoenvironmental data and with fire models. Here we present new 1000-year and 22 000-year trends and gridded biomass burning reconstructions based on the Global Charcoal Database version 3 (GCDv3), which includes 736 charcoal records (57 more than in version 2). The new gridded reconstructions reveal the spatial patterns underlying the temporal trends in the data, allowing insights into likely controls on biomass burning at regional to global scales. In the most recent few decades, biomass burning has sharply increased in both hemispheres but especially in the north, where charcoal fluxes are now higher than at any other time during the past 22 000 years. We also discuss methodological issues relevant to data-model comparisons and identify areas for future research. Spatially gridded versions of the global data set from GCDv3 are provided to facilitate comparison with and validation of global fire simulations.

  12. What is an Appropriate Temporal Sampling Rate to Record Floating Car Data with a GPS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ranacher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Floating car data (FCD recorded with the Global Positioning System (GPS are an important data source for traffic research. However, FCD are subject to error, which can relate either to the accuracy of the recordings (measurement error or to the temporal rate at which the data are sampled (interpolation error. Both errors affect movement parameters derived from the FCD, such as speed or direction, and consequently influence conclusions drawn about the movement. In this paper we combined recent findings about the autocorrelation of GPS measurement error and well-established findings from random walk theory to analyse a set of real-world FCD. First, we showed that the measurement error in the FCD was affected by positive autocorrelation. We explained why this is a quality measure of the data. Second, we evaluated four metrics to assess the influence of interpolation error. We found that interpolation error strongly affects the correct interpretation of the car’s dynamics (speed, direction, whereas its impact on the path (travelled distance, spatial location was moderate. Based on these results we gave recommendations for recording of FCD using the GPS. Our recommendations only concern time-based sampling, change-based, location-based or event-based sampling are not discussed. The sampling approach minimizes the effects of error on movement parameters while avoiding the collection of redundant information. This is crucial for obtaining reliable results from FCD.

  13. An Inter-calibrated Passive Microwave Brightness Temperature Data Record and Ocean Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, K. A.; Wentz, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inter-calibration of passive microwave sensors has been the subject of on-going activity at Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) since 1974. RSS has produced a brightness temperature TB data record that spans the last 28 years (1987-2014) from inter-calibrated passive microwave sensors on 14 satellites: AMSR-E, AMSR2, GMI, SSMI F08-F15, SSMIS F16-F18, TMI, WindSat. Accompanying the TB record are a suite of ocean products derived from the TBs that provide a 28-year record of wind speed, water vapor, cloud liquid, and rain rate; and 18 years (1997-2014) of sea surface temperatures, corresponding to the period for which 6 and/or 10 GHz measurements are available. Crucial to the inter-calibration and ocean product retrieval are a highly accurate radiative transfer model RTM. The RSS RTM has been continually refined for over 30 years and is arguably the most accurate model in the 1-100 GHz spectrum. The current generation of TB and ocean products, produced using the latest version of the RTM, is called Version-7. The accuracy of the Version-7 inter-calibration is estimated to be 0.1 K, based on inter-satellite comparisons and validation of the ocean products against in situ measurements. The data record produced by RSS has had a significant scientific impact. Over just the last 14 years (2000-2013) RSS data have been used in 743 peer-reviewed journal articles. This is an average of 4.5 peer-reviewed papers published every month made possible with RSS data. Some of the most important scientific contributions made by RSS data have been to the study of the climate. The AR5 Report "Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis" by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the internationally accepted authority on climate change, references 20 peer-reviewed journal papers from RSS scientists. The report makes direct use of RSS water vapor data, RSS atmospheric temperatures from MSU/AMSU, and 9 other datasets that are derived from RSS data. The RSS TB data record is

  14. The impact of a growing minority population on identification of duplicate records in an enterprise data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Scott L; Fraser, Alison M; Kerber, Richard A; Mineau, Geraldine P; Thomas, Alun

    2010-01-01

    Patient medical records are often fragmented across disparate healthcare databases, potentially resulting in duplicate records that may be detrimental to health care services. These duplicate records can be found through a process called record linkage. This paper describes a set of duplicate records in a medical data warehouse found by linking to an external resource containing family history and vital records. Our objective was to investigate the impact database characteristics and linkage methods have on identifying duplicate records using an external resource. Frequency counts were made for demographic field values and compared between the set of duplicate records, the data warehouse, and the external resource. Considerations for understanding the relationship that records labeled as duplicates have with dataset characteristics and linkage methods were identified. Several noticeable patterns were identified where frequency counts between sets deviated from what was expected including how the growth of a minority population affected which records were identified as duplicates. Record linkage is a complex process where results can be affected by subtleties in data characteristics, changes in data trends, and reliance on external data sources. These changes should be taken into account to ensure any anomalies in results describe real effects and are not artifacts caused by datasets or linkage methods. This paper describes how frequency count analysis can be an effective way to detect and resolve anomalies in linkage results and how external resources that provide additional contextual information can prove useful in discovering duplicate records.

  15. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  16. New Staphylinidae (Coleoptera records with new collection data from New Brunswick, Canada. I. Aleocharinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginald Webster

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Forty-eight species of Aleocharinae are newly reported from New Brunswick, bringing the total number of species known from the province to 149. Two of these species, Ocyusa asperula Casey and Myllaena kaskaskia Klimaszewski, are newly recorded for Canada. Additional locality data are presented for nine species recently recorded from the province. Collection and bionomic data for all these species are presented and discussed. Colour habitus images are presented for all species included in this paper and genital images are presented for closely related Myllaena kaskaskia Klimaszewski, M. procidua Casey and M. vulpina Bernhauer. Photographs of the male genitalia of M. procidua are presented for the first time. The female spermatheca, tergite and sternite eight of Amarochara formicina Assing are illustrated for the first time.

  17. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients' medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients) are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed. PMID:28280506

  18. EVIDENCE FOR A SHOCK IN INTERSTELLAR PLASMA: VOYAGER 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com, E-mail: donald-gurnett@uiowa.edu, E-mail: william-kurth@uiowa.edu [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    Voyager 1 (V1) observed electron plasma oscillations preceding a jump by a factor of 1.4 in the magnetic field intensity B near the end of 2012. The frequency of the electron plasma oscillations gives an electron density n{sub e}  = 0.05 cm{sup –3}, which implies that V1 was immersed in plasma from the interstellar medium. The last day on which plasma oscillations were observed is day 332, 2012, and the jump in the B was centered on day 335, 2012 after a data gap in the wave data. The close association between the electron plasma oscillations and the jump in B suggests a causal connection, such as that frequently observed between electron plasma oscillations and interplanetary shocks at 1 AU. Based on the observed parameters and the smooth profile of B(t), the jump in B appears to be associated with a weak, subcritical, laminar, low beta, quasi-perpendicular, resistive, collisionless shock. However, the width of the jump is of the order of 10{sup 4} times that expected for such a stationary shock at 1 AU. The large width of the jump in B might be the result of differences between the structure of shocks in the interstellar medium and the plasma near 1 AU. Alternatively, the subcritical resistive shock might have decayed during a few days after producing the plasma waves, leaving a broad profile in B(t) without significantly changing ambient parameters. Another possibility is that the jump in B is a pressure wave.

  19. A lossless data reduction technique for wireless EEG recorders and its use in selective data filtering for seizure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengliang Dai; Bailey, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a time-domain based lossless data reduction technique called Log2 Sub-band encoding, which is designed for reducing the size of data recorded on a wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) recorder. A data reduction unit can help to save power from the wireless transceiver and from the storage medium since it allows lower data transmission and read/write rates, and then extends the life time of the battery on the device. Our compression ratio(CR) results show that Log2 Sub-band encoding is comparable and even superior to Huffman coding, a well known entropy encoding method, whilst requiring minimal hardware resource, and it can also be used to extract features from EEG to achieve seizure detection during the compression process. The power consumption when compressing the EEG data is presented to evaluate the system0s overall improvement on its power performance, and our results indicate that a noticeable power saving can be achieved with our technique. The possibility of applying this method to other biomedical signals will also be noted.

  20. Record Layouts for Criterion and Predictor Data Scores for the Joint-Service Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    JANUARY 1993 RECORD LAYOUTS FOR CRITERION AND PREDICTOR DATA SCORES FOR THE JOINT-SERVICE VALIDITY STUDY Thomas M. Brantner Wynne J. Yeager Eugene R... Eugene R. Agee, Michelle A. Buerkle, Darlene R. Cole, Michele H. May, Lisa M. Rupp, David Ward, Ann K. Zultner 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...variation and equivalents, encoders and decoders, flip- flops, clocks and counters, registers, multiplexers and demul ti pl exers, simulator NIDA 210

  1. Introducing Students to Darwin via the Voyage of HMS "Beagle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swab, Janice C.

    2010-01-01

    I use the diary that Darwin wrote during the voyage of HMS Beagle and recent images of a few of the places he visited to illustrate some comparisons between Darwin's world and ours. For today's students, increasingly committed to environmental issues, this may be an especially promising way to introduce Darwin.

  2. Voyages Through Time: Integrated science for high schools, Pamela Harman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Pamela; Devore, Edna

    Investigating the origin and evolution of the universe and life is a compelling theme for teaching science. It engages students in the key questions about change and the evidence for change over time, and offers a unifying theme for integrated science. "Voyages Through Time" is a high school integrated science curriculum on the theme of evolution. Six modules comprise the year-long course: Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, and Evolution of Technology. A brief overview of the curriculum is presented. Participants conduct one or two activities representative of the six modules. Each workshop participant receives a sampler CD-ROM with a comprehensive overview of the curriculum, standards, and resources including complete lessons for use in the classroom. "Voyages Through Time" is being developed by a US team of scientists, educators, writers, and classroom teachers and students led by the SETI Institute partnered with NASA Ames Research Center, California Academy of Sciences and San Francisco State University. In 2000-2001 school year, "Voyages Through Time" was pilot tested (trialed) in high school classrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. Following revisions, the curriculum was field tested (trialed) in 28 US states in more than 90 schools August 2001-June 2002. The final version is expected to be ready for publication by the beginning of 2003. "Voyages Through Time" is funded by the National Science Foundation (IMD # 9730693), NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Fundamental Biology, The Foundation for Microbiology, Educate America, and the Hewlett-Packard Company.

  3. Introducing Students to Darwin via the Voyage of HMS "Beagle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swab, Janice C.

    2010-01-01

    I use the diary that Darwin wrote during the voyage of HMS Beagle and recent images of a few of the places he visited to illustrate some comparisons between Darwin's world and ours. For today's students, increasingly committed to environmental issues, this may be an especially promising way to introduce Darwin.

  4. Voyager: The grandest tour. The mission to the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    A history and general accomplishments of the Voyager 1 and 2 missions to the outer planets are presented. Over the course of 12 years, these spacecraft drew back the curtain on nearly half the solar system. They brought into sharp focus the faces of the four giant outer planets - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - and their families of disparate moons. The Voyagers showed us unimagined worlds: frozen beauty in the rings of Saturn, and molten violence in the explosive sulfur volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io. They brought us close-ups of the florid and intricate storms of Jupiter itself. Voyager 2 went on to reveal the peculiarities of cockeyed Uranus and its equally skewed rings and moons. Then finally, Neptune, nearly invisible from earth, was unveiled in all its big, blue splendor, circled by shadowy rings and a bright pastel moon called Triton. Both Voyagers are headed toward the outer boundary of the solar system in search of the heliopause, the region where the sun's influence wanes and the beginning of interstellar space can be sensed.

  5. Supporting health insurance expansion: do electronic health records have valid insurance verification and enrollment data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzman, John; Marino, Miguel; Hoopes, Megan; Bailey, Steffani R; Gold, Rachel; O'Malley, Jean; Angier, Heather; Nelson, Christine; Cottrell, Erika; Devoe, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    To validate electronic health record (EHR) insurance information for low-income pediatric patients at Oregon community health centers (CHCs), compared to reimbursement data and Medicaid coverage data. Subjects Children visiting any of 96 CHCs (N = 69 189) from 2011 to 2012. Analysis The authors measured correspondence (whether or not the visit was covered by Medicaid) between EHR coverage data and (i) reimbursement data and (ii) coverage data from Medicaid. Compared to reimbursement data and Medicaid coverage data, EHR coverage data had high agreement (87% and 95%, respectively), sensitivity (0.97 and 0.96), positive predictive value (0.88 and 0.98), but lower kappa statistics (0.32 and 0.49), specificity (0.27 and 0.60), and negative predictive value (0.66 and 0.45). These varied among clinics. EHR coverage data for children had a high overall correspondence with Medicaid data and reimbursement data, suggesting that in some systems EHR data could be utilized to promote insurance stability in their patients. Future work should attempt to replicate these analyses in other settings. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Reconstructions of biomass burning from sediment charcoal records to improve data-model comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlon, J. R.; Kelly, R.; Daniau, A.-L.; Vannière, B.; Power, M. J.; Bartlein, P.; Higuera, P.; Blarquez, O.; Brewer, S.; Brücher, T.; Feurdean, A.; Gil-Romera, G.; Iglesias, V.; Maezumi, S. Y.; Magi, B.; Mustaphi, C. J. C.; Zhihai, T.

    2015-11-01

    The location, timing, spatial extent, and frequency of wildfires are changing rapidly in many parts of the world, producing substantial impacts on ecosystems, people, and potentially climate. Paleofire records based on charcoal accumulation in sediments enable modern changes in biomass burning to be considered in their long-term context. Paleofire records also provide insights into the causes and impacts of past wildfires and emissions when analyzed in conjunction with other paleoenvironmental data and with fire models. Here we present new 1000 year and 22 000 year trends and gridded biomass burning reconstructions based on the Global Charcoal Database version 3, which includes 736 charcoal records (57 more than in version 2). The new gridded reconstructions reveal the spatial patterns underlying the temporal trends in the data, allowing insights into likely controls on biomass burning at regional to global scales. In the most recent few decades, biomass burning has sharply increased in both hemispheres, but especially in the north, where charcoal fluxes are now higher than at any other time during the past 22 000 {years}. We also discuss methodological issues relevant to data-model comparisons, and identify areas for future research. Spatially gridded versions of the global dataset from GCDv3 are provided to facilitate comparison with and validation of global fire simulations.

  7. Electronic Records, Registries, and the Development of "Big Data": Crowd-Sourcing Quality toward Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewdney, Summer B; Lachance, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Despite many perceived advances in treatment over the past few decades, cancer continues to present a significant health burden, particularly to the aging US population. Forces including shrinking funding mechanisms, cost and quality concerns, as well as disappointing clinical outcomes have driven a surge of recent efforts into utilizing the technological innovation that has permeated other industries by leveraging large and complex data sets, so called "big data." In this review, we will review some of the history of oncology data collection, including the earliest data registries, as well as explore the future directions of this new brand of research while highlighting some of the more recent and promising efforts to harness the power of the electronic health record and the multitude of data co-located there, in an effort to improve individualized cancer-related outcomes in rapid real time.

  8. Using linked data for mining drug-drug interactions in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard C; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    By nature, healthcare data is highly complex and voluminous. While on one hand, it provides unprecedented opportunities to identify hidden and unknown relationships between patients and treatment outcomes, or drugs and allergic reactions for given individuals, representing and querying large network datasets poses significant technical challenges. In this research, we study the use of Semantic Web and Linked Data technologies for identifying drug-drug interaction (DDI) information from publicly available resources, and determining if such interactions were observed using real patient data. Specifically, we apply Linked Data principles and technologies for representing patient data from electronic health records (EHRs) at Mayo Clinic as Resource Description Framework (RDF), and identify potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) for widely prescribed cardiovascular and gastroenterology drugs. Our results from the proof-of-concept study demonstrate the potential of applying such a methodology to study patient health outcomes as well as enabling genome-guided drug therapies and treatment interventions.

  9. Benchmarking dairy herd health status using routinely recorded herd summary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Cole, J B; Clay, J S; Maltecca, C

    2016-02-01

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health through the use of producer-recorded data has been determined to be feasible. Low estimated heritabilities indicate that genetic progress will be slow. Variation observed in lowly heritable traits can largely be attributed to nongenetic factors, such as the environment. More rapid improvement of dairy cattle health may be attainable if herd health programs incorporate environmental and managerial aspects. More than 1,100 herd characteristics are regularly recorded on farm test-days. We combined these data with producer-recorded health event data, and parametric and nonparametric models were used to benchmark herd and cow health status. Health events were grouped into 3 categories for analyses: mastitis, reproductive, and metabolic. Both herd incidence and individual incidence were used as dependent variables. Models implemented included stepwise logistic regression, support vector machines, and random forests. At both the herd and individual levels, random forest models attained the highest accuracy for predicting health status in all health event categories when evaluated with 10-fold cross-validation. Accuracy (SD) ranged from 0.61 (0.04) to 0.63 (0.04) when using random forest models at the herd level. Accuracy of prediction (SD) at the individual cow level ranged from 0.87 (0.06) to 0.93 (0.001) with random forest models. Highly significant variables and key words from logistic regression and random forest models were also investigated. All models identified several of the same key factors for each health event category, including movement out of the herd, size of the herd, and weather-related variables. We concluded that benchmarking health status using routinely collected herd data is feasible. Nonparametric models were better suited to handle this complex data with numerous variables. These data mining techniques were able to perform prediction of health status and could add evidence to personal experience in herd

  10. Electrophysiological recording of deep tendon reflexes: normative data in children and in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péréon, Yann; Nguyen The Tich, Sylvie; Fournier, Emmanuel; Genet, Robert; Guihéneuc, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    Latency measurement of myoelectric deep tendon (T) reflex responses is not usually performed in EMG laboratories. We investigated the optimal conditions of reliable recording of T reflex in children and adults. Two hundred and sixty-eight normal subjects (139 males, 129 females, age rank 2 days-80 years) were studied. T reflexes were recorded from soleus and rectus femoris muscles (children and adults) and from triceps brachialis, biceps brachialis and flexor carpi radialis (adults). Specially devised hammers were used. They were fitted with a spring switch system in order to trigger the trace display on the EMG machine. Distinct technical options for the synchronisation delay assessment were tested. The nerve conduction velocities along reflex pathways were computed by referring the T wave latencies to subject's height. Reliable recordings could be obtained in all cases, with a strong linear correlation of the response latency with height. T reflex conduction velocities increased as the log value of subject age. Normative data from birth to 80 years are provided. T reflex recording represents a painless and easily performed technique. It may be helpful for the assessment of proximal conduction velocities, especially in children during maturation of the peripheral nervous system.

  11. The Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW): a platform for analytics using electronic health record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Andrew R; Kurc, Tahsin; Cholleti, Sharath; Gao, Jingjing; Lin, Xia; Bornstein, William; Cantrell, Dedra; Levine, David; Hohmann, Sam; Saltz, Joel H

    2013-06-01

    To create an analytics platform for specifying and detecting clinical phenotypes and other derived variables in electronic health record (EHR) data for quality improvement investigations. We have developed an architecture for an Analytic Information Warehouse (AIW). It supports transforming data represented in different physical schemas into a common data model, specifying derived variables in terms of the common model to enable their reuse, computing derived variables while enforcing invariants and ensuring correctness and consistency of data transformations, long-term curation of derived data, and export of derived data into standard analysis tools. It includes software that implements these features and a computing environment that enables secure high-performance access to and processing of large datasets extracted from EHRs. We have implemented and deployed the architecture in production locally. The software is available as open source. We have used it as part of hospital operations in a project to reduce rates of hospital readmission within 30days. The project examined the association of over 100 derived variables representing disease and co-morbidity phenotypes with readmissions in 5years of data from our institution's clinical data warehouse and the UHC Clinical Database (CDB). The CDB contains administrative data from over 200 hospitals that are in academic medical centers or affiliated with such centers. A widely available platform for managing and detecting phenotypes in EHR data could accelerate the use of such data in quality improvement and comparative effectiveness studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cloudwave: distributed processing of "big data" from electrophysiological recordings for epilepsy clinical research using Hadoop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapandian, Catherine P; Chen, Chien-Hung; Bozorgi, Alireza; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Sahoo, Satya S

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common serious neurological disorder affecting 50-60 million persons worldwide. Multi-modal electrophysiological data, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and electrocardiography (EKG), are central to effective patient care and clinical research in epilepsy. Electrophysiological data is an example of clinical "big data" consisting of more than 100 multi-channel signals with recordings from each patient generating 5-10GB of data. Current approaches to store and analyze signal data using standalone tools, such as Nihon Kohden neurology software, are inadequate to meet the growing volume of data and the need for supporting multi-center collaborative studies with real time and interactive access. We introduce the Cloudwave platform in this paper that features a Web-based intuitive signal analysis interface integrated with a Hadoop-based data processing module implemented on clinical data stored in a "private cloud". Cloudwave has been developed as part of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Strokes (NINDS) funded multi-center Prevention and Risk Identification of SUDEP Mortality (PRISM) project. The Cloudwave visualization interface provides real-time rendering of multi-modal signals with "montages" for EEG feature characterization over 2TB of patient data generated at the Case University Hospital Epilepsy Monitoring Unit. Results from performance evaluation of the Cloudwave Hadoop data processing module demonstrate one order of magnitude improvement in performance over 77GB of patient data. (Cloudwave project: http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/Cloudwave).

  13. Building a diabetes screening population data repository using electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, Wen-Jan; Sheehy, Ann M; Smith, Maureen A

    2011-05-01

    There has been a rapid advancement of information technology in the area of clinical and population health data management since 2000. However, with the fast growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) and the increasing complexity of information systems, it has become challenging for researchers to effectively access, locate, extract, and analyze information critical to their research. This article introduces an outpatient encounter data framework designed to construct an EMR-based population data repository for diabetes screening research. The outpatient encounter data framework is developed on a hybrid data structure of entity-attribute-value models, dimensional models, and relational models. This design preserves a small number of subject-specific tables essential to key clinical constructs in the data repository. It enables atomic information to be maintained in a transparent and meaningful way to researchers and health care practitioners who need to access data and still achieve the same performance level as conventional data warehouse models. A six-layer information processing strategy is developed to extract and transform EMRs to the research data repository. The data structure also complies with both Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations and the institutional review board's requirements. Although developed for diabetes screening research, the design of the outpatient encounter data framework is suitable for other types of health service research. It may also provide organizations a tool to improve health care quality and efficiency, consistent with the "meaningful use" objectives of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act.

  14. Data Stewardship: Managing Personally Identifiable Information in Electronic Student Education Records. SLDS Technical Brief 2. NCES 2011-602

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The growth of electronic student data in America's education system has focused attention on the ways these data are collected, processed, stored, and used. The use of records in Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems to follow the progress of individual students over time requires maintaining student education records that include information that…

  15. Wearable Technology Surveillance Data for the Personal Health Record Using the Omaha System: Noise Exposure, Cardiovascular and Stress Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Madeleine J; Chin, Dal Lae; Monsen, Karen A; Hong, OiSaeng

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes a method to prepare noise and health data from wearable technology for standardized representation in the electronic personal health record thus enabling individuals to identify noise-related health risks. Using a case study approach, the authors demonstrate transformation of data to the Omaha System standardized terminology in order to depict the data graphically in a personal health record.

  16. Designing ETL Tools to Feed a Data Warehouse Based on Electronic Healthcare Record Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Fabrizio; Luzi, Daniela; Ricci, Fabrizio L

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to propose a methodology to design Extract, Transform and Load (ETL) tools in a clinical data warehouse architecture based on the Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR). This approach takes advantages on the use of this infrastructure as one of the main source of information to feed the data warehouse, taking also into account that clinical documents produced by heterogeneous legacy systems are structured using the HL7 CDA standard. This paper describes the main activities to be performed to map the information collected in the different types of document with the dimensional model primitives.

  17. Integrated interpretation of helicopter and ground-based geophysical data recorded within the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgorski, Joel E.; Green, Alan G.; Kalscheuer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ) data recorded across most of the delta, (ii) 2D models and images derived from ground-based electrical resistance tomographic, transient electromagnetic, and high resolution seismic reflection/refraction tomographic data acquired at four selected sites in western and north-central regions of the delta...... resistivities and very low to low P-wave velocities. Except for images of several buried abandoned river channels, it is non-reflective. The laterally extensive underlying unit of low resistivities, low P-wave velocity, and subhorizontal reflectors very likely contains saline-water-saturated sands and clays...... reflectivity. The interface between the POM unit and basement is a prominent seismic reflector....

  18. High-performance data and video recorder with real-time lossless compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, Jeffrey A.; Aceto, Steven C.; Conerty, Michelle D.; Nordhauser, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Over the last decade, the video camera has become a common diagnostic/tool for many scientific, industrial and medical applications. The amount of data collected by video capture systems can be enormous. For example, standard NTSC video requires 5 MBytes/sec, with many groups wanting higher resolution either in bit-depth, spatial resolution and/or frame speed. Despite great advances in video capture systems developed for the mass media and teleconferencing markets, the smaller markets of scientific and industrial applications have been ignored. This is primarily due to their need to maintain the independent nature of each camera system and to maintain the high quality of the video data. Many of the commercial systems are capable of digitizing a single camera (B/W or color) or multiple synchronized B/W cameras using an RGB color video capture chip set. In addition, most manufacturers utilize lossy compression to reduce the bandwidth before storing the data to disk. To address the needs of the scientific community, a high- performance data and video recorder has been developed. This system utilizes field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to control the analog and digital signals and to perform real- time lossless compression on the incoming data streams. Due to the flexibility inherent in the system, it is able to be configured for a variety of camera resolutions, frame rates and compression algorithms. In addition, alternative general purpose data acquisition modules are also being incorporated into the design. The modular design of the video/data recorder allows the carrier components to be easily adapted to new bus technology as it becomes available or the data acquisition components to be tailored to a specific application. Details of the recorder architecture are presented along with examples applied to thermonuclear fusion experiments. A lossless compression ratio of 3:1 has been obtained on fusion plasma images, with further reductions expected, allowing the

  19. Data Quality and Reliability Analysis of U.S. Marine Corps Ground Vehicle Maintenance Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    order fulfillment. GCSS-MC reduces ordered parts status updates from six days to several minutes (Stone, 2009). This thesis focuses on the data...Corps inventory. Our study, however, focuses only on the MTVR data. The numbers of MTVR records provided by year are shown in Table 4 and Table 5...SUSP SUSPENSION SYSTEM 71 RPR REPAIR F SUSP N 260 F SUSP SUSPENSION SYSTEM NOT GIVEN G02 TRAC N 67 G TRAC TRACK  CRAWLER  SYSTEM 2 BRK BRAKE SYSTEMS

  20. An iPad and Android-based Application for Digitally Recording Geologic Field Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinconico, L. L.; Sunderlin, D.; Liew, C.; Ho, A. S.; Bekele, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Field experience is a significant component in most geology courses, especially sed/strat and structural geology. Increasingly, the spatial presentation, analysis and interpretation of geologic data is done using digital methodologies (GIS, Google Earth, stereonet and spreadsheet programs). However, students and professionals continue to collect field data manually on paper maps and in the traditional "orange field notebooks". Upon returning from the field, data are then manually transferred into digital formats for processing, mapping and interpretation. The transfer process is both cumbersome and prone to transcription error. In conjunction with the computer science department, we are in the process of developing an application (App) for iOS (the iPad) and Android platforms that can be used to digitally record data measured in the field. This is not a mapping program, but rather a way of bypassing the field book step to acquire digital data directly that can then be used in various analysis and display programs. Currently, the application allows the user to select from five different structural data situations: contact, bedding, fault, joints and "other". The user can define a folder for the collection and separation of data for each project. Observations are stored as individual records of field measurements in each folder. The exact information gathered depends on the nature of the observation, but common to all pages is the ability to log date, time, and lat/long directly from the tablet. Information like strike and dip are entered using scroll wheels and formation names are also entered using scroll wheels that access easy-to-modify lists of the area's stratigraphic units. This insures uniformity in the creation of the digital records from day-to-day and across field teams. Pictures can also be taken using the tablet's camera that are linked to each record. Once the field collection is complete the data (including images) can be easily exported to a .csv file

  1. Pioneer and Voyager observations of Forbush decreases between 6 and 24 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Trainor, J. H.; Webber, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed phenomenological description of deep space Forbush decreases is given, using Voyager and Pioneer data. The transient reduction in cosmic ray intensity can be produced by (1) reflection at the shock front; (2) increased modulation associated with the disturbed region behind the shock; (3) a barrier mechanism involving large-scale tangential discontinuities; or (4) particle drifts in the enhanced magnetic field by the post-shock region. The presence of a well-defined precursor peak clearly indicates that particle reflection is important. Forbush decreases appear to be an important component in the long-term modulation.

  2. Using Grounded Theory to Analyze Qualitative Observational Data that is Obtained by Video Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Griffiths

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for the collection and analysis of qualitative data that is derived by observation and that may be used to generate a grounded theory. Video recordings were made of the verbal and non-verbal interactions of people with severe and complex disabilities and the staff who work with them. Three dyads composed of a student/teacher or carer and a person with a severe or profound intellectual disability were observed in a variety of different activities that took place in a school. Two of these recordings yielded 25 minutes of video, which was transcribed into narrative format. The nature of the qualitative micro data that was captured is described and the fit between such data and classic grounded theory is discussed. The strengths and weaknesses of the use of video as a tool to collect data that is amenable to analysis using grounded theory are considered. The paper concludes by suggesting that using classic grounded theory to analyze qualitative data that is collected using video offers a method that has the potential to uncover and explain patterns of non-verbal interactions that were not previously evident.

  3. Genetic data and electronic health records: a discussion of ethical, logistical and technological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoenbill, Kimberly; Fost, Norman; Tachinardi, Umberto; Mendonca, Eneida A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The completion of sequencing the human genome in 2003 has spurred the production and collection of genetic data at ever increasing rates. Genetic data obtained for clinical purposes, as is true for all results of clinical tests, are expected to be included in patients’ medical records. With this explosion of information, questions of what, when, where and how to incorporate genetic data into electronic health records (EHRs) have reached a critical point. In order to answer these questions fully, this paper addresses the ethical, logistical and technological issues involved in incorporating these data into EHRs. Materials and methods This paper reviews journal articles, government documents and websites relevant to the ethics, genetics and informatics domains as they pertain to EHRs. Results and discussion The authors explore concerns and tasks facing health information technology (HIT) developers at the intersection of ethics, genetics, and technology as applied to EHR development. Conclusions By ensuring the efficient and effective incorporation of genetic data into EHRs, HIT developers will play a key role in facilitating the delivery of personalized medicine. PMID:23771953

  4. Expert systems, security and quality assurance: implications of patient records as data-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, E H

    2001-01-01

    The concept of data-space is fruitful in trying to understand the ethical rights and duties that surround the treatment of patient records. However, it also provides a solution to three apparently unconnected problems: the construction of expert diagnostic systems, the development of an internal security element within the sphere of permitted data-access for health care professionals, and the development of a professional quality assurance mechanism. This paper presents a model of how these diverse aims may be achieved. It does so by developing the notion of the logical form of data within a data-space and by showing how the path taken by a health care professional through a profession-relative data-space can provide checks for the security, quality and appropriateness of the path itself. The result is important in that it provides an integrated method for information specialists to meet their fiduciary obligations towards the patients whose records are in their care, and towards the institutions that employ them.

  5. Interconnection of electronic medical record with clinical data management system by CDISC ODM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Atsushi; Manabe, Shiro; Takeda, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Daiyo; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Murata, Taizo; Mihara, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    EDC system has been used in the field of clinical research. The current EDC system does not connect with electronic medical record system (EMR), thus a medical staff has to transcribe the data in EMR to EDC system manually. This redundant process causes not only inefficiency but also human error. We developed an EDC system cooperating with EMR, in which the data required for a clinical research form (CRF) is transcribed automatically from EMR to electronic CRF (eCRF) and is sent via network. We call this system as "eCRF reporter". The interface module of eCRF reporter can retrieves the data in EMR database including patient biography data, laboratory test data, prescription data and data entered by template in progress notes. The eCRF reporter also enables users to enter data directly to eCRF. The eCRF reporter generates CDISC ODM file and PDF which is a translated form of Clinical data in ODM. After storing eCRF in EMR, it is transferred via VPN to a clinical data management system (CDMS) which can receive the eCRF files and parse ODM. We started some clinical research by using this system. This system is expected to promote clinical research efficiency and strictness.

  6. The GAC-SAL: A new 27-year surface albedo data record from AVHRR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, A.; Manninen, T.; Andersson, K.; Laine, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on the Earth's climate require knowledge on the interactions between solar radiation and the Earth's atmosphere-surface system. One of the key variables that govern those interactions is the surface albedo, the ratio of reflected to incoming solar radiation at Earth's surface. Recent studies (Holland et al, 2010, Fletcher et al., 2009) point to surface albedo and its variations being especially important for the climate of the Arctic. Against this background, there is a clear and growing need for robust long-term timeseries of surface albedo on a global scale. The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF), a project of EUMETSAT, answers this need by releasing the first edition of the GAC-SAL surface albedo data record. The GAC-SAL describes the directional-hemispherical reflectance (or black-sky albedo) of the Earth's surface. The data record covers 27 years (1982-2009), is fully global with 0.25 degree spatial resolution, and implements published algorithms for the calculation of surface albedo over land, snow, sea ice and water. The product also incorporates a correction for topography-induced effects on image geolocation and radiometric accuracy. The data is available for all interested users, free of charge. Of special interest is the Arctic sea ice area, for which this is the first long time series reaching present day. We present an overall description of the albedo retrieval scheme and present some results from an extensive validation effort, where GAC-SAL data was compared against in situ observations of surface albedo at 10 different Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) sites, each validation period spanning ~15 years. We have also performed comparisons between GAC-SAL, CERES FSW, and MODIS 43C3 products. Some results of these comparisons are presented. The achieved mean accuracy over all validation results was ~10% (in relative terms). Stability of the data record will also be

  7. A pathway to generating Climate Data Records of sea-surface temperature from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, Peter J.; Corlett, Gary K.

    2012-11-01

    In addition to having known uncertainty characteristics, Climate Data Records (CDRs) of geophysical variables derived from satellite measurements must be of sufficient length to resolve signals that might reveal the signatures of climate change against a background of larger, unrelated variability. The length of the record requires using satellite measurements from many instruments over several decades, and the uncertainty requirement implies that a consistent approach be used to establish the errors in the satellite retrievals over the entire period. Retrieving sea-surface temperature (SST) from satellite is a relatively mature topic, and the uncertainties of satellite retrievals are determined by comparison with collocated independent measurements. To avoid the complicating effects of near-surface temperature gradients in the upper ocean, the best validating measurements are from ship-board radiometers that measure, at source, the surface emission that is measured in space, after modification by its propagation through the atmosphere. To attain sufficient accuracy, such ship-based radiometers must use internal blackbody calibration targets, but to determine the uncertainties in these radiometric measurements, i.e. to confirm that the internal calibration is effective, it is necessary to conduct verification of the field calibration using independent blackbodies with accurately known emissivity and at very accurately measured temperatures. This is a well-justifiable approach to providing the necessary underpinning of a Climate Data Record of SST.

  8. Data Mining and Electronic Health Records: Selecting Optimal Clinical Treatments in Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Casey

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR's) are only a first step in capturing and utilizing health-related data - the problem is turning that data into useful information. Models produced via data mining and predictive analysis profile inherited risks and environmental/behavioral factors associated with patient disorders, which can be utilized to generate predictions about treatment outcomes. This can form the backbone of clinical decision support systems driven by live data based on the actual population. The advantage of such an approach based on the actual population is that it is "adaptive". Here, we evaluate the predictive capacity of a clinical EHR of a large mental healthcare provider (~75,000 distinct clients a year) to provide decision support information in a real-world clinical setting. Initial research has achieved a 70% success rate in predicting treatment outcomes using these methods.

  9. Biologically relevant environmental data: macros to make the most of microclimate recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, B J

    2001-01-01

    The increased availability and use of automatic data loggers has made collection of microclimatic data cheap and easy. I present macros for the quantitative analysis and comparison of microclimatic (particularly temperature) data in the spreadsheet package Microsoft Excel. The macros presented will (1) collate maximum and minimum values of temperature (or other) cycles, (2) provide a count of the number of times a temperature recording crosses a given threshold, (3) measure the period of time spent above or below a given threshold, and (4) measure the rate of change of a data set as it approaches a threshold. A case study of the freeze tolerant grasshopper Sigaus australis (Orthoptera: Acrididae) and winter temperatures from its alpine habitat is used to demonstrate the macros.

  10. Utilizing Electronic Health Record Information to Optimize Medication Infusion Devices: A Manual Data Integration Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuk, Amanda; Maloney, Robert; Gawron, Joyce; Skinner, Colin

    Health information technology is increasingly utilized within healthcare delivery systems today. Two examples of this type of technology include the capture of patient-specific information within an electronic health record and intravenous medication infusion devices equipped with dose error reduction software known as drug libraries. Automatic integration of these systems, termed intravenous (IV) interoperability, should serve as the goal toward which all healthcare systems work to maximize patient safety. For institutions lacking IV interoperability, we describe a manual approach of querying the electronic health record to incorporate medication administration information with data from infusion device software to optimize drug library settings. This approach serves to maximize utilization of available information to optimize medication safety provided by drug library software.

  11. Hole burning, Stark effect, and data storage: 2: holographic recording and detection of spectral holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, C D; Renn, A; Wild, U P

    1991-07-10

    The properties of holographic recording and detection of spectral holes in the frequency and electric-field dimension are investigated. To optimize the storage properties of optical memory devices, based on spectral hole burning and holography, cross-talk effects between adjacent holograms have to be minimized. These interactions depend on the relative phases of the holograms chosen during the recording stage. Using free-base chlorin (2,3-dihydroporphyrin) in polyvinyl butyral as host at a temperature of 1.7 K, the influence of the relative phase difference between holograms is demonstrated in both the frequency and the electric-field dimension. Experimental results are presented for rows and columns of holograms stored either in the laser frequency or the electric-field dimension and compared to transmission data. Using both dimensions a 10 x 10 matrix of holograms has been stored within the range of a single wave number.

  12. Phase-change recording medium that enables ultrahigh-density electron-beam data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G. A.; Chaiken, A.; Nauka, K.; Yang, C. C.; Davidson, R.; Holden, A.; Bicknell, R.; Yeh, B. S.; Chen, J.; Liao, H.; Subramanian, S.; Schut, D.; Jasinski, J.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2005-01-01

    An ultrahigh-density electron-beam-based data storage medium is described that consists of a diode formed by growing an InSe/GaSe phase-change bilayer film epitaxially on silicon. Bits are recorded as amorphous regions in the InSe layer and are detected via the current induced in the diode by a scanned electron beam. This signal current is modulated by differences in the electrical properties of the amorphous and crystalline states. The success of this recording scheme results from the remarkable ability of layered III-VI materials, such as InSe, to maintain useful electrical properties at their surfaces after repeated cycles of amorphization and recrystallization.

  13. Reusable science tools for analog exploration missions: xGDS Web Tools, VERVE, and Gigapan Voyage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Cohen, Tamar; Allan, Mark; Deans, Matthew; Morse, Theodore; Park, Eric; Smith, Trey

    2013-10-01

    The Exploration Ground Data Systems (xGDS) project led by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center creates software tools to support multiple NASA-led planetary analog field experiments. The two primary tools that fall under the xGDS umbrella are the xGDS Web Tools (xGDS-WT) and Visual Environment for Remote Virtual Exploration (VERVE). IRG has also developed a hardware and software system that is closely integrated with our xGDS tools and is used in multiple field experiments called Gigapan Voyage. xGDS-WT, VERVE, and Gigapan Voyage are examples of IRG projects that improve the ratio of science return versus development effort by creating generic and reusable tools that leverage existing technologies in both hardware and software. xGDS Web Tools provides software for gathering and organizing mission data for science and engineering operations, including tools for planning traverses, monitoring autonomous or piloted vehicles, visualization, documentation, analysis, and search. VERVE provides high performance three dimensional (3D) user interfaces used by scientists, robot operators, and mission planners to visualize robot data in real time. Gigapan Voyage is a gigapixel image capturing and processing tool that improves situational awareness and scientific exploration in human and robotic analog missions. All of these technologies emphasize software reuse and leverage open source and/or commercial-off-the-shelf tools to greatly improve the utility and reduce the development and operational cost of future similar technologies. Over the past several years these technologies have been used in many NASA-led robotic field campaigns including the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS), the Pavilion Lake Research Project (PLRP), the K10 Robotic Follow-Up tests, and most recently we have become involved in the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) field experiments. A major objective of these joint robot and crew experiments is

  14. Online Remote Recording and Monitoring of Sensor Data Using DTMF Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niladri Sekhar TRIPATHY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Different wireless application platforms are available for remote monitoring and control of systems. In the present paper a system has been described for online remote recording and monitoring of sensor data using DTMF (Dual Tone Multi Frequency technology where acoustic communication has been implemented. One DTMF transceiver in the sensing system has been used to generate and decode the DTMF tone corresponding to the sensor output which in turn is received from the mobile phone in the user side. A separate DTMF decoder has been used in the user side to decode the received DTMF tone corresponding to the sensor output from the sensor side. Microcontroller has been used to store the decoded data from the sensor and to control the whole operation sequentially. Thus online remote recording and monitoring of the sensor data have been possible at any where in the coverage area of the mobile network. Experimental result shows good linearity between data output taken directly from the sensor side and that remotely from user side.

  15. The MSG-SEVIRI-based cloud property data record CLAAS-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benas, Nikos; Finkensieper, Stephan; Stengel, Martin; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Hanschmann, Timo; Hollmann, Rainer; Fokke Meirink, Jan

    2017-07-01

    Clouds play a central role in the Earth's atmosphere, and satellite observations are crucial for monitoring clouds and understanding their impact on the energy budget and water cycle. Within the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF), a new cloud property data record was derived from geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) measurements for the time frame 2004-2015. The resulting CLAAS-2 (CLoud property dAtAset using SEVIRI, Edition 2) data record is publicly available via the CM SAF website (https://doi.org/10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLAAS/V002). In this paper we present an extensive evaluation of the CLAAS-2 cloud products, which include cloud fractional coverage, thermodynamic phase, cloud top properties, liquid/ice cloud water path and corresponding optical thickness and particle effective radius. Data validation and comparisons were performed on both level 2 (native SEVIRI grid and repeat cycle) and level 3 (daily and monthly averages and histograms) with reference datasets derived from lidar, microwave and passive imager measurements. The evaluation results show very good overall agreement with matching spatial distributions and temporal variability and small biases attributed mainly to differences in sensor characteristics, retrieval approaches, spatial and temporal samplings and viewing geometries. No major discrepancies were found. Underpinned by the good evaluation results, CLAAS-2 demonstrates that it is fit for the envisaged applications, such as process studies of the diurnal cycle of clouds and the evaluation of regional climate models. The data record is planned to be extended and updated in the future.

  16. The MSG-SEVIRI-based cloud property data record CLAAS-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Benas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clouds play a central role in the Earth's atmosphere, and satellite observations are crucial for monitoring clouds and understanding their impact on the energy budget and water cycle. Within the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF, a new cloud property data record was derived from geostationary Meteosat Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI measurements for the time frame 2004–2015. The resulting CLAAS-2 (CLoud property dAtAset using SEVIRI, Edition 2 data record is publicly available via the CM SAF website (https://doi.org/10.5676/EUM_SAF_CM/CLAAS/V002. In this paper we present an extensive evaluation of the CLAAS-2 cloud products, which include cloud fractional coverage, thermodynamic phase, cloud top properties, liquid/ice cloud water path and corresponding optical thickness and particle effective radius. Data validation and comparisons were performed on both level 2 (native SEVIRI grid and repeat cycle and level 3 (daily and monthly averages and histograms with reference datasets derived from lidar, microwave and passive imager measurements. The evaluation results show very good overall agreement with matching spatial distributions and temporal variability and small biases attributed mainly to differences in sensor characteristics, retrieval approaches, spatial and temporal samplings and viewing geometries. No major discrepancies were found. Underpinned by the good evaluation results, CLAAS-2 demonstrates that it is fit for the envisaged applications, such as process studies of the diurnal cycle of clouds and the evaluation of regional climate models. The data record is planned to be extended and updated in the future.

  17. Data Collection and Recording on the Wisconsin/GSFC X-ray Quantum Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Laura; X-ray Astrophysics Group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin/GSFC X-ray Quantum Calorimeter (XQC) is an astronomical X-ray sounding rocket payload which uses a micro-calorimeter array to detect low (less than1keV) X-rays. Three different devices were evaluated to upgrade XQC's data collection and recording system. The system takes incoming data from XQC's pixel sensors and stores it to a memory card. The upgrade is a much smaller board and much more compact storage device. The Terasic DE0-Nano, Terasic DE0-Nano SoC, and the BeagleBone Black were tested to determine which would suit the needs of XQC best. The device needed to take incoming data, store it to an SD card, and be able to output it through a USB connection. The Terasic DE0-Nano is a simple FPGA, but needed some peripheral additions for an SD card slot and USB readout. The Terasic DE0-Nano SoC was a powerful FPGA and hard processor running Linux combined. It was able to do what was needed, but pulled too much power in the process. The BeagleBone Black had a microcontroller and also ran Linux. This last device ended up being the best choice, as it did not require too much power and had a very easy system already in place for USB readout. The only difficulty to deal with was programming the microcontroller in assembly language. This device is necessary due to the telemetry on XQC not being able to send all of the data down during the flight. It records valuable data about low energy X-rays so that the X-ray Astrophysics Groups at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Goddard Space Flight Center can analyze and resolve the spectrum of the soft X-ray background.Later, using the digital logic on a Terasic DE0-Nano FPGA, a data simulator for the BeagleBone Black data collection and recording device was created. Programmed with Quartus II, the simulator uses basic digital logic components to fabricate trackable data signals and related timing signals to send to the data management device, as well as other timing signals that are asynchronous to the rest of

  18. Real and Simulated Waveform Recording LIDAR Data in Boreal Juvenile Forest Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, A.; Korpela, I.

    2013-05-01

    Airborne small-footprint LiDAR is replacing field measurements in regional-level forest inventories, but auxiliary field work is still required for the optimal management of young stands. Waveform (WF) recording sensors can provide a more detailed description of the vegetation compared to discrete return (DR) systems. Furthermore, knowing the shape of the signal facilitates comparisons between real data and those obtained with simulation tools. We performed a quantitative validation of a Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) -based LiDAR simulator against real data and used simulations and empirical data to study the WF recording LiDAR for the classification of boreal juvenile forest vegetation. Geometric-optical models of three common species were used as input for the MCRT model. Simulated radiometric and geometric WF features were in good agreement with the real data, and interspecies differences were preserved. We used the simulator to study the effects of sensor parameters on species classification performance. An increase in footprint size improved the classification accuracy up to a certain footprint size, while the emitted pulse width and the WF sampling rate had minor effects. Analyses on empirical data showed small improvement in performance compared to existing studies, when classifying seedling stand vegetation to four operational classes. The results on simulator validation serve as a basis for the future use of simulation models e.g. in LiDAR survey planning or in the simulation of synthetic training data, while the empirical findings clarify the potential of WF LiDAR data in the inventory chain for the operational forest management planning in Finland.

  19. Multi-Institutional Sharing of Electronic Health Record Data to Assess Childhood Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Charles Bailey

    Full Text Available To evaluate the validity of multi-institutional electronic health record (EHR data sharing for surveillance and study of childhood obesity.We conducted a non-concurrent cohort study of 528,340 children with outpatient visits to six pediatric academic medical centers during 2007-08, with sufficient data in the EHR for body mass index (BMI assessment. EHR data were compared with data from the 2007-08 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES.Among children 2-17 years, BMI was evaluable for 1,398,655 visits (56%. The EHR dataset contained over 6,000 BMI measurements per month of age up to 16 years, yielding precise estimates of BMI. In the EHR dataset, 18% of children were obese versus 18% in NHANES, while 35% were obese or overweight versus 34% in NHANES. BMI for an individual was highly reliable over time (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.90 for obese children and 0.97 for all children. Only 14% of visits with measured obesity (BMI ≥95% had a diagnosis of obesity recorded, and only 20% of children with measured obesity had the diagnosis documented during the study period. Obese children had higher primary care (4.8 versus 4.0 visits, p<0.001 and specialty care (3.7 versus 2.7 visits, p<0.001 utilization than non-obese counterparts, and higher prevalence of diverse co-morbidities. The cohort size in the EHR dataset permitted detection of associations with rare diagnoses. Data sharing did not require investment of extensive institutional resources, yet yielded high data quality.Multi-institutional EHR data sharing is a promising, feasible, and valid approach for population health surveillance. It provides a valuable complement to more resource-intensive national surveys, particularly for iterative surveillance and quality improvement. Low rates of obesity diagnosis present a significant obstacle to surveillance and quality improvement for care of children with obesity.

  20. The AVHRR component of a long-term global active fire data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, I. A.; Giglio, L.; Schroeder, W.; Justice, C. O.

    2010-12-01

    The increased thermal signal in the 3.7 µm channel, together with radiometric measurements in the longwave and shortwave channels, enable the detection of thermal anomalies from AVHRR for a wide range of environmental and observing conditions. The AVHRR has been used worldwide for operational fire monitoring and for research purposes since at least the early 1990s. The long data record of AVHRR makes it an essential part of a long-term, multisensor record of fire activity. Fire Disturbance is an Essential Climate Variable (ECV) defined by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). Within the Fire Disturbance ECV, active fire occurrence is one of the supplementary variables. General requirements for long-term satellite-based data records for ECVs are articulated in the GCOS Climate Monitoring Principles for satellite measurements, which specify requirements both for observing systems and for product generation and distribution. In this paper we provide an overview of the history of fire monitoring from AVHRR, and the potential and limitations for establishing a long-term data record in the context of the GCOS Climate Monitoring Principles. Major sensor-related challenges include the relatively low saturation level of the 3.7 µm channel, the orbital drift of the early NOAA satellites and pixel geolocation inaccuracies. Additionally, fire detection requires full resolution observations and therefore the globally and systematically available Global Area Coverage (GAC) data are inadequate for global active fire monitoring. The need for the compilation and reprocessing of full resolution measurements from on-board Local Area Coverage (LAC) data and direct-readout High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) receiving stations is articulated by the Fire Mapping and Monitoring Implementation Team of the Global Observation of Forest and Landcover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) program, in collaboration with the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites. As fire detection

  1. Satellite Remote Sensing of Inundated Wetlands: Global Data Record Assembly and Planned Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. C.; Chapman, B. D.; Podest, E.; Schröder, R.; Hess, L. L.; Jones, L. A.; Kimball, J. S.; Moghaddam, M.; Whitcomb, J.

    2011-12-01

    Wetlands cover less than 5% of Earth's ice-free land surface but exert major impacts on global biogeochemistry, hydrology, and biological diversity. Despite the importance of these environments in the global cycling of carbon and water, there is a scarcity of suitable regional-to-global remote-sensing data for characterizing their distribution and dynamics. We are assembling a global-scale Earth System Data Record (ESDR) of natural Inundated Wetlands to facilitate investigations on their role in climate, biogeochemistry, hydrology, and biodiversity. The ESDR comprises (1) Fine-resolution (100 meter) maps, delineating wetland extent, vegetation type, and seasonal inundation dynamics for regional to continental-scale areas covering crucial wetland regions, and (2) global coarse-resolution (~25 km), multi-temporal mappings of inundated area fraction (Fw) across multiple years. The fine-scale ESDR component is constructed from L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The global maps of inundated area fraction are obtained by combining coarse-resolution (~25 km) remote sensing observations from passive and active microwave instruments. We present details of ESDR assembly and a comparative analysis of the high-resolution SAR-based data sets with the coarse resolution inundation data sets for wetlands ecosystems. We compare information content and accuracy of the coarse resolution data sets relative to the SAR-based data sets. We discuss issues which contribute to uncertainty in the ESDR data sets. Error sources include radiometric inconsistency of the remote sensing data sources, paucity of ground validation datasets available for implementation of classification algorithms, temporal undersampling relative to hydrologic variability, and ambiguities associated with implementation of coarse-resolution mixture models. We discuss plans for conducting systematic analyses of error sources related to aspects of ESDR assembly, including uncertainties associated with remote

  2. Facilitating biomedical researchers' interrogation of electronic health record data: Ideas from outside of biomedical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Gregory W; Matsoukas, Konstantina; Cimino, James J; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a vital data resource for research uses, including cohort identification, phenotyping, pharmacovigilance, and public health surveillance. To realize the promise of EHR data for accelerating clinical research, it is imperative to enable efficient and autonomous EHR data interrogation by end users such as biomedical researchers. This paper surveys state-of-art approaches and key methodological considerations to this purpose. We adapted a previously published conceptual framework for interactive information retrieval, which defines three entities: user, channel, and source, by elaborating on channels for query formulation in the context of facilitating end users to interrogate EHR data. We show the current progress in biomedical informatics mainly lies in support for query execution and information modeling, primarily due to emphases on infrastructure development for data integration and data access via self-service query tools, but has neglected user support needed during iteratively query formulation processes, which can be costly and error-prone. In contrast, the information science literature has offered elaborate theories and methods for user modeling and query formulation support. The two bodies of literature are complementary, implying opportunities for cross-disciplinary idea exchange. On this basis, we outline the directions for future informatics research to improve our understanding of user needs and requirements for facilitating autonomous interrogation of EHR data by biomedical researchers. We suggest that cross-disciplinary translational research between biomedical informatics and information science can benefit our research in facilitating efficient data access in life sciences.

  3. From ecological records to big data: the invention of global biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devictor, Vincent; Bensaude-Vincent, Bernadette

    2016-12-01

    This paper is a critical assessment of the epistemological impact of the systematic quantification of nature with the accumulation of big datasets on the practice and orientation of ecological science. We examine the contents of big databases and argue that it is not just accumulated information; records are translated into digital data in a process that changes their meanings. In order to better understand what is at stake in the 'datafication' process, we explore the context for the emergence and quantification of biodiversity in the 1980s, along with the concept of the global environment. In tracing the origin and development of the global biodiversity information facility (GBIF) we describe big data biodiversity projects as a techno-political construction dedicated to monitoring a new object: the global diversity. We argue that, biodiversity big data became a powerful driver behind the invention of the concept of the global environment, and a way to embed ecological science in the political agenda.

  4. Stationarity and Redundancy of Multichannel EEG Data Recorded During Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Zöldi, S M; Greenside, H S; Zoldi, Scott M.; Krystal, Andrew; Greenside, Henry S.

    1999-01-01

    A prerequisite for applying some signal analysis methods to electroencephalographic (EEG) data is that the data be statistically stationary. We have investigated the stationarity of 21-electrode multivariate EEG data recorded from ten patients during generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures elicited by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Stationarity was examined by calculating probability density functions (pdfs) and power spectra over small equal-length non-overlapping time windows and then by studying visually and quantitatively the evolution of these quantities over the duration of the seizures. Our analysis shows that most of the seizures had time intervals of at least a few seconds that were statistically stationary by several criteria and simultaneously for different electrodes, and that some leads were delayed in manifesting the statistical changes associated with seizure onset evident in other leads. The stationarity across electrodes was further examined by studying redundancy of the EEG leads and how t...

  5. Data Acquisition and Digital Filtering for Infrasonic Records on Active Volcanoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Chilo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a digital data acquisition system for volcanic infrasound records. The system includes four electret condenser element microphones, a QF4A512 programmable signal converter from Quickfilter Technologies and a MSP430 microcontroller from Texas Instruments. The signal output of every microphone is converted to digital via a 16-bit Analog to Digital Converter (ADC. To prevent errors in the conversion process, Anti-Aliasing Filters are employed prior to the ADC. Digital filtering is performed after the ADC using a Digital Signal Processor, which is implemented on the QF4A512. The four digital signals are summed to get only one signal. Data storing and digital wireless data transmission will be described in a future paper.

  6. Assessing Community Participation: Comparing Self-Reported Participation Data with Organizational Attendance Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christens, Brian D; Speer, Paul W; Peterson, N Andrew

    2016-06-01

    How well do self-reported levels of community and organizational participation align with recorded acts of community and organizational participation? This study explores this question among participants in social action community organizing initiatives by comparing responses on a community participation scale designed to retrospectively assess community participation (T1, n = 482; T2, n = 220) with individual participants' attendance records in various social action organizing activities over two 1-year periods. By testing the self-reported measure's overall and item-by-item association with documented participation in various types of organizing activities, we find that the self-report measure is positively, but weakly correlated with actual participation levels in community organizing activities. Moreover, associations between self-report and recorded acts of participation differ by types of activity. Examining this unique source of data raises important questions about how community participation is conceptualized and measured in our field. Implications are explored for theory and measurement of participation in community and organizational contexts.

  7. An Agent Based System Framework for Mining Data Record Extraction from Search Engine Result Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.K.L Shunmuganathan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the huge amount of information distributed through the Web motivates studying techniques to be adopted in order to extract relevant data in an efficient and reliable way. Information extraction (IE from semistructured Web documents plays an important role for a variety of information agents. In this paper, a framework of WebIE system with the help of the JADE platform is proposed to solve problems by non-visual automatic wrapper to extract data records from search engine results pages which contain important information for Meta search engine and computer users. It gives the idea about different agents used in WebIE and how the communication occurred between them and how to manage different agents. Multi Agent System (MAS provides an efficient way for communicating agents and it is decentralized. Prototype model is developed for the study purpose and how it is used to solve the complex problems arise into the WebIE. Our wrapper consists of a series of agent filter to detect and remove irrelevant data region from the web page. In this paper, we propose a highly effective and efficient algorithm for automatically mining result records from search engine responsepages.

  8. A new on-line electrocardiographic records database and computer routines for data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos A; Severeyn, Erika; Perpiñán, Gilberto; Altuve, Miguel; Wong, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Gathering experimental data to test computer methods developed during a research is a hard work. Nowadays, some databases have been stored online that can be freely downloaded, however there is not a wide range of databases yet and not all pathologies are covered. Researchers with low resources are in need of more data they can consult for free. To cope with this we present an on-line portal containing a compilation of ECG databases recorded over the last two decades for research purposes. The first version of this portal contains four databases of ECG records: ischemic cardiopathy (72 patients, 3-lead ECG each), ischemic preconditioning (20 patients, 3-lead ECG each), diabetes (51 patients, 8-lead ECG each) and metabolic syndrome (25 subjects, 12-lead ECG each). In addition, one computer program and three routines are provided in order to correctly read the signals, and two digital filters along with two ECG waves detectors are provided for further processing. This portal will be constantly growing, other ECG databases and signal processing software will be uploaded. With this project, we give the scientific community a resource to avoid hours of data collection and to develop free software.

  9. Correcting raw diagnostic data for oscilloscope recording system distortions at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebman, Judith, E-mail: Liebman1@LLNL.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, Steve; Williams, Wade [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Miller, Kirk [NSTec Special Technologies Laboratory (United States); Bettenhausen, Rita; Clowdus, Lisa; Marsh, Amber; Chakicherla, Anu; Hutton, Matthew; Casey, Allan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-speed shot data from NIF oscilloscope waveforms are often distorted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe specialized corrections for two example NIF diagnostic systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Dante, non-uniform time-base corrections for the scopes are applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mach-Zehnder optical demodulation and 'stitching' are applied to GRH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A multi-node analysis engine performs scope corrections automatically. - Abstract: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is now producing experimental results for the study of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). These results are captured by complex diagnostic systems and are key to achieving NIF's goal to demonstrate thermonuclear burn of deuterium and tritium fuel in a laboratory setting. High bandwidth gamma-ray fusion-burn measurements and soft X-ray indirect and direct drive energetic measurements are both captured with oscilloscope recording systems that distort or modulate the raw data. The Shot Data Analysis team has developed signal processing corrections for these oscilloscope recording systems through an automated engine. Once these corrections are applied, accurate fundamental quantities can be discerned.

  10. Detecting drought trends with expanded meteorological records based on Reanalysis data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, F. J.; Morales, D.

    2013-12-01

    In Mediterranean regions, droughts are a recurrent phenomenon that cause significant economic losses and affect ecosystem functioning. The need to better monitor drought and study changes in their main properties is important for disaster risk management. An objective identification of drought and dry spell sequences depends on consistent, reliable and readily derived indicators. The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) corresponds to one of these indicators as it is based in a water balance approach, facilitating drought analysis and monitoring since it allows the user to examine wet and dry periods over different time scales. SPEI has been used to characterize recent drought in the arid regions that experienced significant warming over the last century. Thus it becomes an effective tool to assess whether trends in drought events are present. The main objective of this work is to apply the SPEI and study trends of droughts of different magnitude as well as to describe their association with El Niño phenomenon in the Maipo Region (Central Chile). To circumvent problems of insufficient record length we applied a novel method for record expansion based on Reanalysis data. This method was used for data filling as well as to produce a regionally consistent database that started in 1950. Data shows that the occurrence of dry conditions of different magnitude has increased over the last decades, and the duration of extreme climatic events has slightly increased as well. These results are consistent with future climatic projections and represent a major challenge for water resources management.

  11. Structured Data Entry in the Electronic Medical Record: Perspectives of Pediatric Specialty Physicians and Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Ruth A; Kuelbs, Cynthia; Ryu, Julie; Jiang, Wen; Chiang, George

    2017-05-01

    The Epic electronic health record (EHR) platform supports structured data entry systems (SDES), which allow developers, with input from users, to create highly customized patient-record templates in order to maximize data completeness and to standardize structure. There are many potential advantages of using discrete data fields in the EHR to capture data for secondary analysis and epidemiological research, but direct data acquisition from clinicians remains one of the largest obstacles to leveraging the EHR for secondary use. Physician resistance to SDES is multifactorial. A 35-item questionnaire based on Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology, was used to measure attitudes, facilitation, and potential incentives for adopting SDES for clinical documentation among 25 pediatric specialty physicians and surgeons. Statistical analysis included chi-square for categorical data as well as independent sample t-tests and analysis of variance for continuous variables. Mean scores of the nine constructs demonstrated primarily positive physician attitudes toward SDES, while the surgeons were neutral. Those under 40 were more likely to respond that facilitating conditions for structured entry existed as compared to the two older age groups (p = .02). Pediatric surgeons were significantly less positive than specialty physicians about SDES effects on Performance (p = .01) and the effect of Social Influence (p = .02); but in more agreement that use of forms was voluntary (p = .02). Attitudinal differences likely reflect medical training, clinical practice workflows, and division specific practices. Identified resistance indicate efforts to increase SDES adoption should be discipline-targeted rather than a uniform approach.

  12. Sessile serrated lesion and its borderline variant - Variables with impact on recorded data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadi, Mahin; Garbyal, Rajendra S; Kristensen, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    has its relation to SPs with subtle aberrant features, falling short of definite SSL-histology, been sufficiently addressed. The aim of this study was to highlight variables that may influence recorded data on SSL and to further discuss the appropriate place of SPs that possess histological attributes...... characterized the present series, though right-sided SSLs occurred significantly more often in older subjects with a trend toward more females. The lower age of patients with SSL/BSSL in the last part of the study reflects the increased focus on hereditary neoplasm. BSSL differed from SSL only by a smaller...

  13. Standard Practice for Recording Data from Atmospheric Corrosion Tests of Metallic-Coated Steel Specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for recording data of atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic-coated steel specimens. Its objective is the assurance of (1) complete identification of materials before testing, (2) objective reporting of material appearance during visual inspections, and (3) adequate photographic, micrographic, and chemical laboratory examinations at specific stages of deterioration, and at the end of the tests. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  14. Sources of Divergence in Remote Sensing of Vegetation Phenology From Multiple Long Term Satellite Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, A.; Didan, K.; Miura, T.

    2008-12-01

    Changes in vegetation phenology depict an integrated response to change in environmental factors and provide valuable information to global change research. Typically, remote sensing of vegetation phenology is based on the analysis of vegetation index temporal profiles, because of their simplicity, stability, and inherent resistant to noise. Most phenology estimates are, however, limited to using one sensor owing to the inter-sensor continuity challenges. Although, phenology is used for a variety of research and application topics, the central premise remains the study of vegetation dynamics change in response to change in climate and other factors. Consequently, the consistency and length of data records are key requirements. With satellite missions lasting few years only, long term phenology measures will have to be based on a mixture of satellite data records. In this study we compared phenology parameters from the AVHRR-GIMMS and MODIS NDVI records (1982- 2007). We analyzed both records globally using a cluster approach to abate noise and focus on the landscape level vegetation dynamic. The cluster approach, assumes that phenology is controlled by a complex set of factors that could be encapsulated by homogeneous climate, soil, elevational gradient, sun- shade exposure, and biophysical capacity. We applied this method to each of the sensors and examined three fundamental phenology parameters: the start and end of the growing season and the cumulative seasonal signal. These parameters are sensitive to, and are capable of capturing changes in the underlying environmental factors. Our results indicate that a large divergence exist over the dense forest of the tropics. This divergence was attributed to MODIS saturation rather than NDVI saturation. Boreal forests exhibited also large disagreement owing to snow cover and related differences in data processing. Furthermore, agricultural areas showed the most irregular phenological signals. This noise resulted from the

  15. Published data and new records to the fauna of Eupelmidae (Insecta: Hymenoptera in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIROSLAV ANTOV

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study presents information about published data on eupelmid fauna of Bulgaria and new records of 16 species distributed in the country. Some of them are reared from Cynipidae (Hymenoptera galls on Quercus, Rosa, Hypecoum, as well as from Cecidomyiidae (Diptera developing in stems of Eryngium campestre L. Other species are reared from pods of Astragalus glycyphyllos L. and seeds of Dianthus giganteus dʼUrv. New host associations are established. As a result of the study 4 species and 1 genus are new to the fauna of Bulgaria.

  16. From MODIS to VIIRS: Steps toward continuing the dark-target aerosol climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Liu, H.; Munchak, L. A.; Laszlo, I.; Cronk, H.

    2012-12-01

    By this fall-2012 AGU meeting, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) has been flying on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites for 13 years and 10.5 years, respectively. During this time, the MODIS Aerosol Science Team has fine-tuned the aerosol retrieval algorithms and data processing protocols, resulting in a highly robust, stable and usable aerosol product. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) product has been validated extensively, and the MODIS-retrieved environmental data record (EDR) is becoming a strong foundation for creating an aerosol climate data record (CDR). With last year's launch of the Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP, the VIIRS-derived aerosol product has been designed to continue that provided by MODIS. VIIRS and MODIS have similar orbital mechanics and provide similar spectral resolution with similar spatial resolution. At the same time, the VIIRS and MODIS aerosol algorithms have similar physical assumptions. In fact, the initial validation exercises suggest that, in general, the VIIRS aerosol product is performing well, and that the expected error for the VIIRS-derived AOD is similar to that reported by MODIS. Although VIIRS should be able to derive an aerosol product similar in quality to MODIS, can the VIIRS aerosol record be "stitched" together with the MODIS record? To answer this question, instead of qualifying how similar they are, we need to quantify how their differences can and do impact the resulting aerosol products. There are instrumental differences, such as orbit altitude (805km versus 705km), spatial resolution (375m/750m versus 250m/500m/1000m), spectral differences, and sampling differences). There are pre-processing differences (cloud masking, gas correction assumptions, pixel selection protocols). There are retrieval algorithm differences, and of course final processing and quality control differences. Although we expect that most of differences have little or no impact, some may be

  17. Under-ascertainment of Aboriginality in records of cardiovascular disease in hospital morbidity and mortality data in Western Australia: a record linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judy M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring the real burden of cardiovascular disease in Australian Aboriginals is complicated by under-identification of Aboriginality in administrative health data collections. Accurate data is essential to measure Australia's progress in its efforts to intervene to improve health outcomes of Australian Aboriginals. We estimated the under-ascertainment of Aboriginal status in linked morbidity and mortality databases in patients hospitalised with cardiovascular disease. Methods Persons with public hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease in Western Australia during 2000-2005 (and their 20-year admission history or who subsequently died were identified from linkage data. The Aboriginal status flag in all records for a given individual was variously used to determine their ethnicity (index positive, and in all records both majority positive or ever positive and stratified by region, age and gender. The index admission was the baseline comparator. Results Index cases comprised 62,692 individuals who shared a total of 778,714 hospital admissions over 20 years, of which 19,809 subsequently died. There were 3,060 (4.9% persons identified as Aboriginal on index admission. An additional 83 (2.7% Aboriginal cases were identified through death records, increasing to 3.7% when cases with a positive Aboriginal identifier in the majority (≥50% of previous hospital admissions over twenty years were added and by 20.8% when those with a positive flag in any record over 20 years were incorporated. These results equated to underestimating Aboriginal status in unlinked index admission by 2.6%, 3.5% and 17.2%, respectively. Deaths classified as Aboriginal in official records would underestimate total Aboriginal deaths by 26.8% (95% Confidence Interval 24.1 to 29.6%. Conclusions Combining Aboriginal determinations in morbidity and official death records increases ascertainment of unlinked cardiovascular morbidity in Western Australian

  18. Modeling the Solar Wind at the Ulysses, Voyager, and New Horizons Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, T K; Zank, G P; Elliott, H A; McComas, D J

    2016-01-01

    The outer heliosphere is a dynamic region shaped largely by the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. While interplanetary magnetic field and plasma observations by the Voyager spacecraft have significantly improved our understanding of this vast region, modeling the outer heliosphere still remains a challenge. We simulate the three-dimensional, time-dependent solar wind flow from 1 to 80 astronomical units (AU), where the solar wind is assumed to be supersonic, using a two-fluid model in which protons and interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as separate fluids. We use 1-day averages of the solar wind parameters from the OMNI data set as inner boundary conditions to reproduce time-dependent effects in a simplified manner which involves interpolation in both space and time. Our model generally agrees with Ulysses data in the inner heliosphere and Voyager data in the outer heliosphere. Ultimately, we present the model solar wind parameters extracted along the trajectory of N...

  19. Identification of preseizure states in epilepsy: A data-driven approach for multichannel EEG recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinnerk eFeldwisch-Drentrup

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The retrospective identification of preseizure states usually bases on a time-resolved characterization of dynamical aspects of multichannel neurophysiologic recordings that can be assessed with measures from linear or nonlinear time series analysis. This approach renders time profiles of a characterizing measure – so-called measure profiles – for different recording sites or combinations thereof. Various downstream evaluation techniques have been proposed to single out measure profiles that carry potential information about preseizure states. These techniques, however, rely on assumptions about seizure precursor dynamics that might not be generally valid or face the statistical problem of multiple testing. Addressing these issues, we have developed a method to preselect measure profiles that carry potential information about preseizure states, and to identify brain regions associated with seizure precursor dynamics. Our data-driven method is based on the ratio S of the global to local temporal variance of measure profiles. We evaluated its suitability by retrospectively analyzing long-lasting multichannel intracranial EEG recordings from 18 patients that included 133 focal onset seizures, using a bivariate measure for the strength of interactions. In 17/18 patients, we observed S to be significantly correlated with the predictive performance of measure profiles assessed retrospectively by means of receiver-operating-characteristic statistics. Predictive performance was higher for measure profiles preselected with S than for a manual selection using information about onset and spread of seizures. Across patients, highest predictive performance was not restricted to recordings from focal areas, thus supporting the notion of an extended epileptic network in which even distant brain regions contribute to seizure generation. We expect our method to provide further insight into the complex spatial and temporal aspects of the seizure generating

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-A Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) for Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) brightness temperature in "window channels". The data cover a time period from...

  1. NODC Standard Product: US Navy Geosat altimeter geophysical data records (GDRs) for the Geodetic Mission (NODC Accession 0053782)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains a complete copy of an NODC four CD-ROM product set containing all of NOAA's geophysical data records (GDRs) for the Geosat altimeter data...

  2. Data Distribution and Documenting Uncertainty Information for the Earth System Data Record: The Global Terrestrial Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCracken, R. F.; Wood, E. F.; Sheffield, J.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Houser, P.; Pinker, R. T.; Kummerow, C.; Pan, M.; Gao, H.; Sahoo, A. K.; Bytheway, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    A new balanced global terrestrial water cycle dataset is being created for the NASAs' Making Earth Science Data Records for use in Research Environments (MEaSURE) project. This dataset will be comprised of multiple remotely-sensed datasets and model generated data, and will be merged into a single unified multi-decade, high spatial resolution, climate consistent Earth Science Data Record (ESDR). In addition to the final unified ESDR, the seven remotely-sensed and model generated input datasets will also be available as ESDRs. These input datasets are: (1) VIC model derived water cycle variables, (3 hourly, from 1948 - 2010, on a 0.25 degree grid); (2) Satellite derived precipitation data from two separate sources: (a) GPCC data, (monthly, from 1983 - 1998, on a 0.5 degree grid), and (b) TRMM TMPA data, (3 hourly, from 1998 - 2010, on a 0.25 degree grid); (3) Satellite derived evapotranspiration data, based on the SRB/ISCCP radiation forcings, ( 3 hourly, from 1983 - 2007, on a 0.5 degree spatial resolution; (4) Satellite based soil moisture is derived from multiple satellite sensors, but, primarily the TRMM TMI and AMSR-E, (daily, from 1998 - 2011, on a 0.25 degree grid); (5) Satellite derived water management variables (monthly, from 1992 - 2010, on a variable degree grid); (6) Satellite derived surface radiations, based on ISCCP-DX data, (3 hourly, from 1983 - 2007, on a 0.5 degree grid) (7) Model derived Surface Meteorological Forcing Fields (3 hourly, from 1948 - 2010, on a 0.25 degree grid). Along with these ESDRs, it is also necessary to distribute uncertainty information about the data. Including this information will assist the data users with how much error there is in the estimations in the data, the limitations in the data, as well as knowing how the final merged components of the water balance equation was weighted in order to obtain a balanced equation. This uncertainty information was generated from either the producers of the individual datatsets and

  3. Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Environmental Data Records: Algorithm Status and Product Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, I. A.; Feeley, J.; Zhou, L.; Gottshall, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System's (JPSS) Data Processing Segment generates a number of environmental data products from measurements by sensors on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched on October 28, 2011. The JPSS Environmental Data Record (EDR) Algorithm Development and Validation teams have been carrying out detailed evaluation of the products. This work is stabilizing the EDR products and proposing the implementation of product improvements and major algorithm changes. Building on validation stages established by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for their Earth Observing System program and adapted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Working Group on Calibration and Validation, the JPSS program defined program-specific algorithm maturity stages. The JPSS definitions provide the rigor and comprehensiveness necessary for algorithm validation while serving the compliance needs for product requirements verification. Based on specific algorithm readiness levels, the JPSS EDR product teams established a schedule of anticipated dates for the algorithms to achieve Beta, Provisional and Validated Stage 1, 2 and 3 statuses. These schedules account for the products' dependencies on the maturity of input Sensor Data Records (SDRs), Intermediate Products, and upstream EDRs. Declaring EDR product maturity is the result of a specific review of artifacts that document that the products meet a series of criteria defined for each maturity stage. During 2012, after the SDR products achieved Beta maturity, a number of fundamental EDRs also achieved Beta status. They are now or will shortly become available to the public through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). In the presentation, we will provide an overview of the latest EDR algorithm updates and the maturity schedule going forward.

  4. Satellite Ocean Color Data Merging Using a Bio-optical model: A Path for Earth Science Data Records ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritorena, S.; Siegel, D. A.; Hembise Fanton D'Andon, O.; Mangin, A.; Frew, J.; Nelson, N.

    2009-12-01

    The characteristics and benefits of ocean color merged data sets created using a semi-analytical model and the normalized water-leaving radiance observations from the SeaWiFS, MODIS-AQUA and MERIS ocean color missions are presented. Merged data products are coalesced from multiple mission observations into a single data product with better spatial and temporal coverage than the individual missions. Using the data from SeaWiFS, MODIS-AQUA and MERIS for the 2002-2009 time period, the average daily coverage of a merged product is ~25% of the world ocean which is nearly twice that of any single mission’s observations. The frequency at which a particular area is sampled from space is also greatly improved in merged data as some areas can be sampled as frequently as 64% of the time (in days). The merged data are validated through matchup analyses and by comparing them to the data sets obtained from individual missions. Further, a complete error budget was developed which accounts for uncertainty associated with input water-leaving radiances, the bio-optical model and uncertainty estimates for the output products (i.e. the chlorophyll concentration, the combined dissolved and detrital absorption coefficient and the particulate backscattering coefficient). These merged products and their uncertainties at each pixel were developed within the NASA MEASURES (http://wiki.icess.ucsb.edu/measures/index.php/Main_Page) and ESA GlobColour (http://www.globcolour.info/) projects and are available to the scientific community. The merging approach has many potential benefits for the creation of Earth Science Data Records from satellite ocean color observations.

  5. Feasibility of extracting data from electronic medical records for research: an international comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Mastellos, Nikolaos; Majeed, Azeem; O'Donoghue, John; Car, Josip

    2016-07-13

    Electronic medical records (EMR) offer a major potential for secondary use of data for research which can improve the safety, quality and efficiency of healthcare. They also enable the measurement of disease burden at the population level. However, the extent to which this is feasible in different countries is not well known. This study aimed to: 1) assess information governance procedures for extracting data from EMR in 16 countries; and 2) explore the extent of EMR adoption and the quality and consistency of EMR data in 7 countries, using management of diabetes type 2 patients as an exemplar. We included 16 countries from Australia, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe to the Americas. We undertook a multi-method approach including both an online literature review and structured interviews with 59 stakeholders, including 25 physicians, 23 academics, 7 EMR providers, and 4 information commissioners. Data were analysed and synthesised thematically considering the most relevant issues. We found that procedures for information governance, levels of adoption and data quality varied across the countries studied. The required time and ease of obtaining approval also varies widely. While some countries seem ready for secondary uses of data from EMR, in other countries several barriers were found, including limited experience with using EMR data for research, lack of standard policies and procedures, bureaucracy, confidentiality, data security concerns, technical issues and costs. This is the first international comparative study to shed light on the feasibility of extracting EMR data across a number of countries. The study will inform future discussions and development of policies that aim to accelerate the adoption of EMR systems in high and middle income countries and seize the rich potential for secondary use of data arising from the use of EMR solutions.

  6. Implications of Voyager 1 observations beyond the heliopause for the local interstellar electron spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisschoff, D.; Potgieter, M. S., E-mail: 20056950@nwu.ac.za [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2014-10-20

    Cosmic-ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere finally allow the comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental data at lower energies. These computed spectra, based on galactic propagation models, can now be compared with observations at low energies by Voyager 1 and at high energies by the PAMELA space detector at Earth. This improves understanding of basic propagation effects and also provides solar modulation studies with reliable input spectra from 1 MeV to 100 GeV. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 electron observations in the energy range of 6-60 MeV, as well as the PAMELA electron spectrum above 10 GeV, using the GALPROP code. By varying the source spectrum and galactic diffusion parameters, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, we find local interstellar spectra that agree with both power-law spectra observed by Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause. The local interstellar spectrum between ∼1 MeV and 100 GeV indicates that it is the combination of two power laws, with E {sup –(1.45} {sup ±} {sup 0.15)} below ∼100 MeV and E {sup –(3.15} {sup ±} {sup 0.05)} above ∼100 MeV. A gradual turn in the spectral shape matching the power laws is found, between 2.0 ± 0.5) GeV and (100 ± 10) MeV. According to our simplified modeling, this transition is caused primarily by galactic propagation effects. We find that the intensity beyond the heliopause at 10 MeV is (350 ± 50) electrons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} MeV{sup –1}, decreasing to (50 ± 5) electrons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} MeV{sup –1} at 100 MeV.

  7. Use of KLV to combine metadata, camera sync, and data acquisition into a single video record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Paul

    2015-05-01

    SMPTE has designed in significant data spaces in each frame that may be used to store time stamps and other time sensitive data. There are metadata spaces in both the analog equivalent of the horizontal blanking referred to as the Horizontal Ancillary (HANC) space and in the analog equivalent of the vertical interval blanking lines referred to as the Vertical Ancillary (VANC) space. The HANC space is very crowded with many data types including information about frame rate and format, 16 channels of audio sound bites, copyright controls, billing information and more than 2,000 more elements. The VANC space is relatively unused by cinema and broadcasters which makes it a prime target for use in test, surveillance and other specialized applications. Taking advantage of the SMPTE structures, one can design and implement custom data gathering and recording systems while maintaining full interoperability with standard equipment. The VANC data space can be used to capture image relevant data and can be used to overcome transport latency and diminished image quality introduced by the use of compression.

  8. Genetic parameters for producer-recorded health data in Canadian Holstein cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, T F-O; Miglior, F; Jamrozik, J; Berke, O; Kelton, D F; Schaeffer, L R

    2012-04-01

    Health traits are of paramount importance for economic dairy production. Improvement in liability to diseases has been made with better management practices, but genetic aspects of health traits have received less attention. Dairy producers in Canada have been recording eight health traits (mastitis (MAST), lameness (LAME), cystic ovarian disease (COD), left displaced abomasum (LDA), ketosis (KET), metritis (MET), milk fever (MF) and retained placenta (RP)) since April 2007. Genetic analyses of these traits were carried out in this study for the Holstein breed. Edits on herd distributions of recorded diseases were applied to the data to ensure a sufficient quality of recording. Traits were analysed either individually (MAST, LAME, COD) or were grouped according to biological similarities (LDA and KET, and MET, MF and RP) and analysed with multiple-trait models. Data included 46 104 cases of any of the above diseases. Incidence ranged from 2.3% for MF to 9.7% for MAST. MET and KET also had an incidence below 4.0%. Variance components were estimated using four different sire threshold models. The differences between models resulted from the inclusion of days at risk (DAR) and a cow effect, in addition to herd, parity and sire effects. Models were compared using mean squared error statistic. Mean squared error favoured, in general, the sire and cow within sire model with regression on DAR included. Heritabilities on the liability scale were between 0.02 (MET) and 0.21 (LDA). There was a moderate, positive genetic correlation between LDA and KET (0.58), and between MET and RP (0.79).

  9. The Interaction Between Schema Matching and Record Matching in Data Integration

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Binbin

    2016-09-20

    Schema Matching (SM) and Record Matching (RM) are two necessary steps in integrating multiple relational tables of different schemas, where SM unifies the schemas and RM detects records referring to the same real-world entity. The two processes have been thoroughly studied separately, but few attention has been paid to the interaction of SM and RM. In this work, we find that, even alternating them in a simple manner, SM and RM can benefit from each other to reach a better integration performance (i.e., in terms of precision and recall). Therefore, combining SM and RM is a promising solution for improving data integration. To this end, we define novel matching rules for SM and RM, respectively, that is, every SM decision is made based on intermediate RM results, and vice versa, such that SM and RM can be performed alternately. The quality of integration is guaranteed by a Matching Likelihood Estimation model and the control of semantic drift, which prevent the effect of mismatch magnification. To reduce the computational cost, we design an index structure based on q-grams and a greedy search algorithm that can reduce around 90 percent overhead of the interaction. Extensive experiments on three data collections show that the combination and interaction between SM and RM significantly outperforms previous works that conduct SM and RM separately.

  10. EMRlog method for computer security for electronic medical records with logic and data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Monterrubio, Sergio Mauricio; Frausto Solis, Juan; Monroy Borja, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  11. From ISIS to CouchDB: Databases and Data Models for Bibliographic Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ramalho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available For decades bibliographic data has been stored in non-relational databases, and thousands of libraries in developing countries still use ISIS databases to run their OPACs. Fast forward to 2010 and the NoSQL movement has shown that non-relational databases are good enough for Google, Amazon.com and Facebook. Meanwhile, several Open Source NoSQL systems have appeared. This paper discusses the data model of one class of NoSQL products, semistructured, document-oriented databases exemplified by Apache CouchDB and MongoDB, and why they are well-suited to collective cataloging applications. Also shown are the methods, tools, and scripts used to convert, from ISIS to CouchDB, bibliographic records of LILACS, a key Latin American and Caribbean health sciences index operated by the Pan-American Health Organization.

  12. EMRlog Method for Computer Security for Electronic Medical Records with Logic and Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Mauricio Martínez Monterrubio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system.

  13. EMRlog Method for Computer Security for Electronic Medical Records with Logic and Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausto Solis, Juan; Monroy Borja, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of a hospital computer system is an arduous work for managers and staff. However, inconsistent policies are frequent and can produce enormous problems, such as stolen information, frequent failures, and loss of the entire or part of the hospital data. This paper presents a new method named EMRlog for computer security systems in hospitals. EMRlog is focused on two kinds of security policies: directive and implemented policies. Security policies are applied to computer systems that handle huge amounts of information such as databases, applications, and medical records. Firstly, a syntactic verification step is applied by using predicate logic. Then data mining techniques are used to detect which security policies have really been implemented by the computer systems staff. Subsequently, consistency is verified in both kinds of policies; in addition these subsets are contrasted and validated. This is performed by an automatic theorem prover. Thus, many kinds of vulnerabilities can be removed for achieving a safer computer system. PMID:26495300

  14. A Harmonized Data Quality Assessment Terminology and Framework for the Secondary Use of Electronic Health Record Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michael G.; Callahan, Tiffany J.; Barnard, Juliana; Bauck, Alan E.; Brown, Jeff; Davidson, Bruce N.; Estiri, Hossein; Goerg, Carsten; Holve, Erin; Johnson, Steven G.; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Hamilton-Lopez, Marianne; Meeker, Daniella; Ong, Toan C.; Ryan, Patrick; Shang, Ning; Weiskopf, Nicole G.; Weng, Chunhua; Zozus, Meredith N.; Schilling, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Harmonized data quality (DQ) assessment terms, methods, and reporting practices can establish a common understanding of the strengths and limitations of electronic health record (EHR) data for operational analytics, quality improvement, and research. Existing published DQ terms were harmonized to a comprehensive unified terminology with definitions and examples and organized into a conceptual framework to support a common approach to defining whether EHR data is ‘fit’ for specific uses. Materials and Methods: DQ publications, informatics and analytics experts, managers of established DQ programs, and operational manuals from several mature EHR-based research networks were reviewed to identify potential DQ terms and categories. Two face-to-face stakeholder meetings were used to vet an initial set of DQ terms and definitions that were grouped into an overall conceptual framework. Feedback received from data producers and users was used to construct a draft set of harmonized DQ terms and categories. Multiple rounds of iterative refinement resulted in a set of terms and organizing framework consisting of DQ categories, subcategories, terms, definitions, and examples. The harmonized terminology and logical framework’s inclusiveness was evaluated against ten published DQ terminologies. Results: Existing DQ terms were harmonized and organized into a framework by defining three DQ categories: (1) Conformance (2) Completeness and (3) Plausibility and two DQ assessment contexts: (1) Verification and (2) Validation. Conformance and Plausibility categories were further divided into subcategories. Each category and subcategory was defined with respect to whether the data may be verified with organizational data, or validated against an accepted gold standard, depending on proposed context and uses. The coverage of the harmonized DQ terminology was validated by successfully aligning to multiple published DQ terminologies. Discussion: Existing DQ concepts

  15. rEHR: An R package for manipulating and analysing Electronic Health Record data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springate, David A.; Parisi, Rosa; Olier, Ivan; Reeves, David

    2017-01-01

    Research with structured Electronic Health Records (EHRs) is expanding as data becomes more accessible; analytic methods advance; and the scientific validity of such studies is increasingly accepted. However, data science methodology to enable the rapid searching/extraction, cleaning and analysis of these large, often complex, datasets is less well developed. In addition, commonly used software is inadequate, resulting in bottlenecks in research workflows and in obstacles to increased transparency and reproducibility of the research. Preparing a research-ready dataset from EHRs is a complex and time consuming task requiring substantial data science skills, even for simple designs. In addition, certain aspects of the workflow are computationally intensive, for example extraction of longitudinal data and matching controls to a large cohort, which may take days or even weeks to run using standard software. The rEHR package simplifies and accelerates the process of extracting ready-for-analysis datasets from EHR databases. It has a simple import function to a database backend that greatly accelerates data access times. A set of generic query functions allow users to extract data efficiently without needing detailed knowledge of SQL queries. Longitudinal data extractions can also be made in a single command, making use of parallel processing. The package also contains functions for cutting data by time-varying covariates, matching controls to cases, unit conversion and construction of clinical code lists. There are also functions to synthesise dummy EHR. The package has been tested with one for the largest primary care EHRs, the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), but allows for a common interface to other EHRs. This simplified and accelerated work flow for EHR data extraction results in simpler, cleaner scripts that are more easily debugged, shared and reproduced. PMID:28231289

  16. rEHR: An R package for manipulating and analysing Electronic Health Record data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springate, David A; Parisi, Rosa; Olier, Ivan; Reeves, David; Kontopantelis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Research with structured Electronic Health Records (EHRs) is expanding as data becomes more accessible; analytic methods advance; and the scientific validity of such studies is increasingly accepted. However, data science methodology to enable the rapid searching/extraction, cleaning and analysis of these large, often complex, datasets is less well developed. In addition, commonly used software is inadequate, resulting in bottlenecks in research workflows and in obstacles to increased transparency and reproducibility of the research. Preparing a research-ready dataset from EHRs is a complex and time consuming task requiring substantial data science skills, even for simple designs. In addition, certain aspects of the workflow are computationally intensive, for example extraction of longitudinal data and matching controls to a large cohort, which may take days or even weeks to run using standard software. The rEHR package simplifies and accelerates the process of extracting ready-for-analysis datasets from EHR databases. It has a simple import function to a database backend that greatly accelerates data access times. A set of generic query functions allow users to extract data efficiently without needing detailed knowledge of SQL queries. Longitudinal data extractions can also be made in a single command, making use of parallel processing. The package also contains functions for cutting data by time-varying covariates, matching controls to cases, unit conversion and construction of clinical code lists. There are also functions to synthesise dummy EHR. The package has been tested with one for the largest primary care EHRs, the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), but allows for a common interface to other EHRs. This simplified and accelerated work flow for EHR data extraction results in simpler, cleaner scripts that are more easily debugged, shared and reproduced.

  17. Un voyage révélateur

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓倩

    2011-01-01

    @@ En première année universitaire, j'ai eu la chance de partir en France.J'avais gagné un voyage lors d'un concours.Cette première expérienceà l'étranger est restée gravée à jamais dans ma mémoire comme un merveilleux souvenir.

  18. Development of Software for dose Records Data Base Access; Programacion para la consulta del Banco de Datos Dosimetricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaro, M.

    1990-07-01

    The CIEMAT personal dose records are computerized in a Dosimetric Data Base whose primary purpose was the individual dose follow-up control and the data handling for epidemiological studies. Within the Data Base management scheme, software development to allow searching of individual dose records by external authorised users was undertaken. The report describes the software developed to allow authorised persons to visualize on screen a summary of the individual dose records from workers included in the Data Base. The report includes the User Guide for the authorised list of users and listings of codes and subroutines developed. (Author) 2 refs.

  19. Generating a Long-Term Land Data Record from the AVHRR and MODIS Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedelty, Jeffrey; Devadiga, Sadashiva; Masuoka, Edward; Brown, Molly; Pinzon, Jorge; Tucker, Compton; Vermote, Eric; Prince, Stephen; Nagol, Jyotheshwar; Justice, Christopher; Roy, David; Ju, Junchang; Schaaf, Crystal; Liu, Jicheng; Privette, Jeffrey; Pincheiro, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The goal of NASA's Land Long Term Iiata Record (LTDR) project is to produce a consistent long term data set from the AVHRR and MODIS instruments for land climate studies. The project will create daily surface reflectance and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) products at a resolution of 0.05 deg., which is identical to the Climate Modeling Grid (CMG) used for MODIS products from EOS Terra and Aqua. Higher order products such as burned area, land surface temperature, albedo, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) correction, leaf area index (LAI), and fraction of photosyntheticalIy active radiation absorbed by vegetation (fPAR), will be created. The LTDR project will reprocess Global Area Coverage (GAC) data from AVHRR sensors onboard NOAA satellites by applying the preprocessing improvements identified in the AVHRR Pathfinder Il project and atmospheric and BRDF corrections used in MODIS processing. The preprocessing improvements include radiometric in-flight vicarious calibration for the visible and near infrared channels and inverse navigation to relate an Earth location to each sensor instantaneous field of view (IFOV). Atmospheric corrections for Rayleigh scattering, ozone, and water vapor are undertaken, with aerosol correction being implemented. The LTDR also produces a surface reflectance product for channel 3 (3.75 micrometers). Quality assessment (QA) is an integral part of the LTDR production system, which is monitoring temporal trands in the AVHRR products using time-series approaches developed for MODIS land product quality assessment. The land surface reflectance products have been evaluated at AERONET sites. The AVHRR data record from LTDR is also being compared to products from the PAL (Pathfinder AVHRR Land) and GIMMS (Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies) systems to assess the relative merits of this reprocessing vis-a-vis these existing data products. The LTDR products and associated information can be found at

  20. Integration of Transport-relevant Data within Image Record of the Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stančić

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Integration of the collected information on the road within the image recorded by the surveillance system forms a unified source of transport-relevant data about the supervised situation. The basic assumption is that the procedure of integration changes the image to the extent that is invisible to the human eye, and the integrated data keep identical content. This assumption has been proven by studying the statistical properties of the image and integrated data using mathematical model modelled in the programming language Python using the combinations of the functions of additional libraries (OpenCV, NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib. The model has been used to compare the input methods of meta-data and methods of steganographic integration by correcting the coefficients of Discrete Cosine Transform JPEG compressed image. For the procedures of steganographic data processing the steganographic algorithm F5 was used. The review paper analyses the advantages and drawbacks of the integration methods and present the examples of situations in traffic in which the formed unified sources of transport-relevant information could be used.

  1. MORE EVIDENCE THAT VOYAGER 1 IS STILL IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeckler, G.; Fisk, L. A., E-mail: gglo@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    The investigators of the Voyager mission currently exploring the heliosheath have concluded and announced that Voyager 1 (V1) has crossed the heliopause and is now in the interstellar medium. This conclusion is based primarily on the plasma wave observations of Gurnett et al., which reveal a plasma electron density that resembles the density expected in the local interstellar medium. Fisk and Gloeckler have disputed the conclusion that V1 has crossed the heliopause, pointing out that to account for all the V1 observations, particularly the magnetic field direction together with the density, it is necessary to conclude that the higher densities observed by Gurnett et al. are due to compressed solar wind. In this Letter it is shown that the model of Fisk and Gloeckler for the nose region of the heliosheath can account in detail for the intensity and spectral shape of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in the directions of V1 and Voyager 2 (V2). A key feature of the Fisk and Gloeckler model is the existence of a region in the heliosheath where the solar wind is compressed and heated, followed by a region where the solar wind is compressed but cold. The region of cold compressed solar wind provides a unique explanation for the low-energy IBEX observations, and since this is the region where V1 must now reside, the low-energy IBEX observations provide strong evidence that V1 is still in the heliosphere.

  2. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  3. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  4. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons From Voyager and Cassini

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Conor A; Romani, Paul N; Allen, Mark; Zhang, Xi; Teanby, Nicholas A; Irwin, Patrick G J; Flasar, F Michael; 10.1016/j.pss2010.05.08

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes. We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on the other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibi...

  5. Population physiology: leveraging electronic health record data to understand human endocrine dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D J Albers

    Full Text Available Studying physiology and pathophysiology over a broad population for long periods of time is difficult primarily because collecting human physiologic data can be intrusive, dangerous, and expensive. One solution is to use data that have been collected for a different purpose. Electronic health record (EHR data promise to support the development and testing of mechanistic physiologic models on diverse populations and allow correlation with clinical outcomes, but limitations in the data have thus far thwarted such use. For example, using uncontrolled population-scale EHR data to verify the outcome of time dependent behavior of mechanistic, constructive models can be difficult because: (i aggregation of the population can obscure or generate a signal, (ii there is often no control population with a well understood health state, and (iii diversity in how the population is measured can make the data difficult to fit into conventional analysis techniques. This paper shows that it is possible to use EHR data to test a physiological model for a population and over long time scales. Specifically, a methodology is developed and demonstrated for testing a mechanistic, time-dependent, physiological model of serum glucose dynamics with uncontrolled, population-scale, physiological patient data extracted from an EHR repository. It is shown that there is no observable daily variation the normalized mean glucose for any EHR subpopulations. In contrast, a derived value, daily variation in nonlinear correlation quantified by the time-delayed mutual information (TDMI, did reveal the intuitively expected diurnal variation in glucose levels amongst a random population of humans. Moreover, in a population of continuously (tube fed patients, there was no observable TDMI-based diurnal signal. These TDMI-based signals, via a glucose insulin model, were then connected with human feeding patterns. In particular, a constructive physiological model was shown to correctly

  6. Development of the Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit Extravehicular Activity Data Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Craig; Hill, Terry R.; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Rosenbush, David

    2012-01-01

    The Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Data Recorder (SPEEDR) is a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based device designed to collect high-rate EMU Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) data for download at a later time. During EVA, the existing EMU PLSS data downlink capability is one data packet every 2 minutes and is subject to bad packets or loss of signal. Higher-rate PLSS data is generated by the Enhanced Caution and Warning System but is not normally captured or distributed. Access to higher-rate data will increase the capability of EMU anomaly resolution team to pinpoint issues remotely, saving crew time by reducing required call-down Q&A and on-orbit diagnostic activities. With no Space Shuttle flights post Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11), and potentially limited down-mass capability, the ISS crew and ground support personnel will have to be capable of on-orbit operations to maintain, diagnose, repair, and return to service EMU hardware, possibly through 2028. Collecting high-rate EMU PLSS data during both intravehicular activity (IVA) and EVA operations will provide trending analysis for life extension and/or predictive performance. The SPEEDR concept has generated interest as a tool/technology that could be used for other International Space Station subsystems or future exploration-class space suits where hardware reliability/availability is critical and low/variable bandwidth may require store then forward methodology. Preliminary work in FY11 produced a functional prototype consisting of an FPGA evaluation board, custom memory/interface circuit board, and custom software. The SPEEDR concept includes a stand-alone battery that is recharged by a computer Universal Serial Bus (USB) port while data are being downloaded.

  7. Evaluation of NPP VIIRS Vegetation Index EDR performance using MODIS and AVHRR data records

    Science.gov (United States)

    vargas, M.; Shabanov, N.; Miura, T.

    2012-12-01

    Vegetation Index (VI) is one key parameter to specify the boundary condition in global climate models, weather forecasting models and numerous remote sensing applications for monitoring environmental state and its change. The VI Environmental Data Record (EDR), which includes the Top of Atmosphere Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (TOA NDVI) and the Top of Canopy Enhanced Vegetation Index (TOC EVI), is currently operationally generated from data delivered by the Visible Infrared Imaging radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) platform launched in October 2011. The VI EDR was implemented to provide continuity for 30+ years of historical VI records provided by MODIS and AVHRR sensors. This presentation reports on the results of the analysis performed by the JPSS VI group at NOAA-NESDIS-STAR on two major aspects of performance of the VI EDR in the early phase of the NPP mission: (1) assessment of accuracy of the VIIRS VI EDR product with respect to input data including Surface Reflectances, Cloud and Aerosol masks as function of vegetation (biome) types; (2) temporal and spatial consistency of VIIRS VI EDR with respect to heritage MODIS and AVHRR VI products. This analysis is based on data from VIIRS (daily TOA NDVI and TOC EVI, and daily surface reflectances), Terra MODIS (16 days composites of TOC EVI and TOC NDVI, and daily TOA radiances) and NOAA-18 AVHRR (7-days composites of TOA NDVI). MODIS 8-biome landcover mask was used to quantify variations in VI product performance as function of vegetation type. Best overall agreement is achieved between VIIRS and MODIS data (TOC EVI and TOC NDVI) in terms of minimum systematic discrepancy (minimum bias and STD) and highest correlation of spatial patterns (highest r^2). The agreement is highest for biomes with low vegetation cover, but degrades with increased foliage density. VIIRS cloud mask provides a fair screening of daily data over the globe. While performance of

  8. Comparison of the effects of different statins and doses on lipid levels in patients with diabetes: results from VOYAGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, B W; Barter, P J; Palmer, M K; Lundman, P; Nicholls, S J

    2012-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and brings an increased risk of vascular events and a higher mortality rate. Treatment guidelines recommend statins in patients with diabetes, with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) targets of 100 mg dl(-1) (∼2.5 mmol l(-1)), and 80 (∼2.0 mmol l(-1)) or 70 mg dl(-1) (∼1.8 mmol l(-1)) in especially high-risk patients. The current study used the VOYAGER (an indiVidual patient data-meta-analysis Of statin therapY in At risk Groups: Effects of Rosuvastatin, atorvastatin, and simvastatin) database to characterise effects of rosuvastatin, atorvastatin and simvastatin in different doses on lipid levels in diabetes patients. The VOYAGER database included individual patient data from 37 studies involving comparisons of rosuvastatin with either atorvastatin or simvastatin. Of the 32 258 patients included, 8859 (27.5%) had diabetes. Rosuvastatin appeared to be the most efficacious of the three statins, both for lowering LDL-C and for reaching a target level of VOYAGER results. This meta-analysis of 8859 patients with diabetes mellitus shows favourable effects on lipids with the three statins studied, in line with results for the overall VOYAGER population. The importance of using an effective statin at an effective dose to reach treatment goals for such high-risk patients is evident. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of the 23 June 2001 Southern Peru Earthquake Using Locally Recorded Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera, H.; Comte, D.; Boroschek, R.; Dorbath, L.; Portugal, D.; Haessler, H.; Montes, H.; Bernal, I.; Antayhua, Y.; Salas, H.; Inza, A.; Rodriguez, S.; Glass, B.; Correa, E.; Balmaceda, I.; Meneses, C.

    2001-12-01

    The 23 June 2001, Mw=8.4 southern Peru earthquake ruptured the northern and central part of the previous large earthquake occurred on 13 August 1868, Mw ~9. A detailed analysis of the aftershock sequence was possible due to the deployment of a temporary seismic network along the coast in the Arequipa and Moquegua districts, complementing the Peruvian permanent stations. The deployed temporary network included 10 short period three component stations from the U. of Chile-IRD-France and 7 broad-band seismic stations from the Instituto Geofísico del Perú. This network operated during the first weeks after the mainshock and recorded the major aftershocks like the larger one occurred on 7 July 2001, Mw=7.5, this event defines the southern limit of the rupture area of the 2001 Peruvian earthquake. The majority of the aftershocks shows a thrusting fault focal mechanisms according with the average convergence direction of the subducting Nazca plate, however, normal faulting events are also present in the aftershock sequence like the 5 July 2001, Mw=6.6 one. The depth distribution of the events permitted a detailed definition of the Wadati-Benioff zone in the region. The segment between Ilo and Tacna did not participated in the rupture process of the 2001 southern Peru earthquake. Seismicity located near the political Peruvian-Chilean boundary was reliable determined using the data recorded by the northern Chile permanent network. Analysis of the mainshock and aftershock acelerograms recorded in Arica, northern Chile are also included. The occurrence of the 1995 Antofagasta (Mw=8.0) and the 2001 southern Peru earthquakes suggests that the probability of having a major earthquake in the northern Chile region increased, considering that the previous large earthquake in this region happened in 1877 (Mw ~9), and since that time no earthquake with magnitude Mw>8 had occurred inside of the 1877 estimated rupture area (between Arica and Antofagasta).

  10. Using data to attribute episodes of warming and cooling in instrumental records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Ka-Kit; Zhou, Jiansong

    2013-02-05

    The observed global-warming rate has been nonuniform, and the cause of each episode of slowing in the expected warming rate is the subject of intense debate. To explain this, nonrecurrent events have commonly been invoked for each episode separately. After reviewing evidence in both the latest global data (HadCRUT4) and the longest instrumental record, Central England Temperature, a revised picture is emerging that gives a consistent attribution for each multidecadal episode of warming and cooling in recent history, and suggests that the anthropogenic global warming trends might have been overestimated by a factor of two in the second half of the 20th century. A recurrent multidecadal oscillation is found to extend to the preindustrial era in the 353-y Central England Temperature and is likely an internal variability related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), possibly caused by the thermohaline circulation variability. The perspective of a long record helps in quantifying the contribution from internal variability, especially one with a period so long that it is often confused with secular trends in shorter records. Solar contribution is found to be minimal for the second half of the 20th century and less than 10% for the first half. The underlying net anthropogenic warming rate in the industrial era is found to have been steady since 1910 at 0.07-0.08 °C/decade, with superimposed AMO-related ups and downs that included the early 20th century warming, the cooling of the 1960s and 1970s, the accelerated warming of the 1980s and 1990s, and the recent slowing of the warming rates. Quantitatively, the recurrent multidecadal internal variability, often underestimated in attribution studies, accounts for 40% of the observed recent 50-y warming trend.

  11. Reality and language in The Voyage Out, by Virginia Woolf = Realidade e linguagem em The Voyage Out, de Virginia Woolf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter James Harris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses one of Virginia Woolf’s greatest literary concerns: the difficulty of expressing human experience through language. The focus is on The Voyage Out, her first novel, published in 1915, particularly the conflicts and contrasts present not only in the trajectory of Rachel Vinrace, the main character, but also in the structure of the novel itself, which establish a constant tension between reality and language. Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir uma das maiores preocupações literárias de Virginia Woolf: a dificuldade de expressar a experiência humana por meio da linguagem. Focalizamos The Voyage Out, seu primeiro romance, publicado em 1915, com atenção especial para osconflitos e contrastes presentes tanto na trajetória de Rachel Vinrace, a personagem principal, como na própria estruturação do romance, que instauram a tensão constante entre realidade e linguagem.

  12. A prototype for automation of land-cover products from Landsat Surface Reflectance Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rover, J.; Goldhaber, M. B.; Steinwand, D.; Nelson, K.; Coan, M.; Wylie, B. K.; Dahal, D.; Wika, S.; Quenzer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Landsat data records of surface reflectance provide a three-decade history of land surface processes. Due to the vast number of these archived records, development of innovative approaches for automated data mining and information retrieval were necessary. Recently, we created a prototype utilizing open source software libraries for automatically generating annual Anderson Level 1 land cover maps and information products from data acquired by the Landsat Mission for the years 1984 to 2013. The automated prototype was applied to two target areas in northwestern and east-central North Dakota, USA. The approach required the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and two user-input target acquisition year-days. The Landsat archive was mined for scenes acquired within a 100-day window surrounding these target dates, and then cloud-free pixels where chosen closest to the specified target acquisition dates. The selected pixels were then composited before completing an unsupervised classification using the NLCD. Pixels unchanged in pairs of the NLCD were used for training decision tree models in an iterative process refined with model confidence measures. The decision tree models were applied to the Landsat composites to generate a yearly land cover map and related information products. Results for the target areas captured changes associated with the recent expansion of oil shale production and agriculture driven by economics and policy, such as the increase in biofuel production and reduction in Conservation Reserve Program. Changes in agriculture, grasslands, and surface water reflect the local hydrological conditions that occurred during the 29-year span. Future enhancements considered for this prototype include a web-based client, ancillary spatial datasets, trends and clustering algorithms, and the forecasting of future land cover.

  13. Using gamification to drive patient’s personal data validation in a Personal Health Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Giunti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gamification is a term used to describe using game elements in non-game environments to enhance user experience. It has been incorporated with commercial success into several platforms (Linkedin, Badgeville, Facebook this has made some researchers theorize that it could also be used in education as a tool to increase student engagement and to drive desirable learning behaviors on them. While in the past years some game elements have been incorporated to healthcare there is still little evidence on how effective they are. Game elements provide engagement consistent with various theories of motivation, positive psychology (e.g., flow, and also provide instant feedback. Feedback is more effective when it provides sufficient and specific information for goal achievement and is presented relatively close in time to the event being evaluated. Feedback can reference individual progress, can make social comparisons, or can refer to task criteria. Electronic personal health record systems (PHRs support patient centered healthcare by making medical records and other relevant information accessible to patients, thus assisting patients in health self-management. A particularly difficult data set that is often difficult to capture are those regarding social and cultural background information. This data set is not only useful to help better healthcare system management, it is also relevant as it is used for epidemiological and preventive purposes. We used gamified mechanics that involve instant feedback to test if they would increase patient’s personal data validation and completion in our PHR as well as overall PHR use. On our presentation we will describe our results and the story behind them.

  14. SIGMATA: Storage Integrity Guaranteeing Mechanism against Tampering Attempts for Video Event Data Recorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuckmin Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The usage and market size of video event data recorders (VEDRs, also known as car black boxes, are rapidly increasing. Since VEDRs can provide more visual information about car accident situations than any other device that is currently used for accident investigations (e.g., closed-circuit television, the integrity of the VEDR contents is important to any meaningful investigation. Researchers have focused on the file system integrity or photographic approaches to integrity verification. However, unlike other general data, the video data in VEDRs exhibit a unique I/O behavior in that the videos are stored chronologically. In addition, the owners of VEDRs can manipulate unfavorable scenes after accidents to conceal their recorded behavior. Since prior arts do not consider the time relationship between the frames and fail to discover frame-wise forgery, a more detailed integrity assurance is required. In this paper, we focus on the development of a frame-wise forgery detection mechanism that resolves the limitations of previous mechanisms. We introduce SIGMATA, a novel storage integrity guaranteeing mechanism against tampering attempts for VEDRs. We describe its operation, demonstrate its effectiveness for detecting possible frame-wise forgery, and compare it with existing mechanisms. The result shows that the existing mechanisms fail to detect any frame-wise forgery, while our mechanism thoroughly detects every frame-wise forgery. We also evaluate its computational overhead using real VEDR videos. The results show that SIGMATA indeed discovers frame-wise forgery attacks effectively and efficiently, with the encoding overhead less than 1.5 milliseconds per frame.

  15. Maturity Matrices for Quality of Model- and Observation-Based Climate Data Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höck, Heinke; Kaiser-Weiss, Andrea; Kaspar, Frank; Stockhause, Martina; Toussaint, Frank; Lautenschlager, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In the field of Software Engineering the Capability Maturity Model is used to evaluate and improve software development processes. The application of a Maturity Matrix is a method to assess the degree of software maturity. This method was adapted to the maturity of Earth System data in scientific archives. The application of such an approach to Climate Data Records was first proposed in the context of satellite-based climate products and applied by NOAA and NASA. The European FP7 project CORE-CLIMAX suggested and tested extensions of the approach in order to allow the applicability to additional climate datasets, e.g. based on in-situ observations as well as model-based reanalysis. Within that project the concept was applied to products of satellite- and in-situ based datasets. Examples are national ground-based data from Germany as an example for typical products of a national meteorological service, the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility Network, the ESA Climate Change Initiative, European Reanalysis activities (ERA-CLIM) and international in situ-based climatologies such as GPCC, ECA&D, BSRN, HadSST. Climate models and their related output have some additional characteristics that need specific consideration in such an approach. Here we use examples from the World Data Centre for Climate (WDCC) to discuss the applicability. The WDCC focuses on climate data products, specifically those resulting from climate simulations. Based on these already existing Maturity Matrix models, WDCC developed a generic Quality Assessment System for Earth System data. A self-assessment is performed using a maturity matrix evaluating the data quality for five maturity levels with respect to the criteria data and metadata consistency, completeness, accessibility and accuracy. The classical goals of a quality assessment system in a data processing workflow are: (1) to encourage data creators to improve quality to reach the next quality level, (2) enable data consumers to decide

  16. A Modular Data Acquisition System using the 10 GSa/s PSEC4 Waveform Recording Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdan, M; Frisch, H J; Wetstein, M

    2016-01-01

    We describe a modular multi-channel data acquisition system based on the 5-15 Gigasample-per-second waveform-recording PSEC4 chip. The system architecture incorporates two levels of hardware with FPGA-embedded system control and in-line data processing. The front-end unit is a 30-channel circuit board that holds five PSEC4 ASICs, a clock jitter cleaner, and a control FPGA. The analog bandwidth of the front-end signal path is 1.5 GHz. Each channel has an on-chip threshold-level discriminator that is monitored in the FPGA, from which a flexible on-board trigger decision can be formed. To instrument larger channel counts, a `back-end' 6U VME32 control card has been designed. Called the 'Central Card', it incorporates an Altera Arria-V FPGA that manages up to 8 front-end cards using one or two CAT5 network cables per board, which transmits the clock and communicates data packets over a custom serial protocol. Data can be read from the Central Card via USB, Ethernet, or dual SFP links, in addition to the VME inter...

  17. Data collection in a live mass casualty incident simulation: automated RFID technology versus manually recorded system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Carenzo, Luca; Barra, Federico Lorenzo; Colombo, Davide; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Prato, Federico; Geddo, Alessandro; Della Corte, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    To demonstrate the applicability and the reliability of a radio frequency identification (RFID) system to collect data during a live exercise. A rooftop collapse of a crowded building was simulated. Fifty-three volunteers were trained to perform as smart victims, simulating clinical conditions, using dynamic data cards, and capturing delay times and triage codes. Every victim was also equipped with a RFID tag. RFID antenna was placed at the entrance of the advanced medical post (AMP) and emergency department (ED) and recorded casualties entering the hospital. A total of 12 victims entered AMP and 31 victims were directly transferred to the ED. 100% (12 of 12 and 31 of 31) of the time cards reported a manually written hospital admission time. No failures occurred in tag reading or data transfers. A correlation analysis was performed between the two methods plotting the paired RFID and manual times and resulted in a r=0.977 for the AMP and r=0.986 for the ED with a P value of less than 0.001. We confirmed the applicability of RFID system to the collection of time delays. Its use should be investigated in every aspect of data collection (triage, treatments) during a disaster exercise.

  18. Ice Sheet Temperature Records - Satellite and In Situ Data from Antarctica and Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, C. A.; Comiso, J. C.

    2001-12-01

    Recently completed decadal-length surface temperature records from Antarctica and Greenland are providing insights into the challenge of detecting climate change. Ice and snow cover at high latitudes influence the global climate system by reflecting much of the incoming solar energy back to space. An expected consequence of global warming is a decrease in area covered by snow and ice and an increase in Earth's absorption of solar radiation. Models have predicted that the effects of climate warming may be amplified at high latitudes; thinning of the Greenland ice sheet margins and the breakup of Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves suggest this process may have begun. Satellite data provide an excellent means of observing climate parameters across both long temporal and remote spatial domains but calibration and validation of their data remains a challenge. Infrared sensors can provide excellent temperature information but cloud cover and calibration remain as problems. Passive-microwave sensors can obtain data during the long polar night and through clouds but have calibration issues and a much lower spatial resolution. Automatic weather stations are generally spatially- and temporally-restricted and may have long gaps due to equipment failure. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen from ice sheet locations provide another means of determining temperature variations with time but are challenging to calibrate to observed temperatures and also represent restricted areas. This presentation will discuss these issues and elaborate on the development and limitations of composite satellite, automatic weather station, and proxy temperature data from selected sites in Antarctica and Greenland.

  19. Voyage of discovery? A comment on Koch et al. "A voyage to Terra Australis: human-mediated dispersal of cats".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rose L; Smith, Deane; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Janes, Jasmine K

    2016-12-07

    The origins of feral cats in Australia may be understood with the help of molecular studies, but it is important that hypotheses be tested with appropriate sampling and methodology. We point out several shortcomings in the analysis by Koch et al. (BMC Evol Biol 15:262, 2015; A voyage to Terra Australis: human-mediated dispersal of cats. Dryad Digital Repository, 2015), present a reanalysis of part of the study and discuss the challenges of elucidating the early history of feral cats.

  20. Historic American engineering record. Nevada national security site, Bren Tower Complex. Written historical and descriptive data and field records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Susan R. [Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Goldenberg, Nancy [Carey & Co Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower Complex is significant for its role in the history of nuclear testing, radiation dosimetry studies, and early field testing of the Strategic Missile Defense System designs. At the time it was built in 1962, the 1,527 ft (465 m) BREN Tower was the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River and exceeded the height of the Empire State Building by 55 ft (17 m). It remains the tallest ever erected specifically for scientific purposes and was designed and built to facilitate the experimental dosimetry studies necessary for the development of accurate radiation dose rates for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The tower was a key component of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission’s (ABCC) mission to predict the health effects of radiation exposure. Moved to its current location in 1966, the crucial dosimetry studies continued with Operation HENRE (High Energy Neutron Reactions Experiment). These experiments and the data they generated became the basis for a dosimetry system called the Tentative 1965 Dose or more commonly the T65D model. Used to estimate radiation doses received by individuals, the T65D model was applied until the mid-1980s when it was replaced by a new dosimetry system known as DS86 based on the Monte Carlo method of dose rate calculation. However, the BREN Tower data are still used for verification of the validity of the DS86 model. In addition to its importance in radiation heath effects research, the BREN Tower Complex is also significant for its role in the Brilliant Pebbles research project, a major component of the Strategic Defense Initiative popularly known as the “Star Wars” Initiative. Instigated under the Reagan Administration, the program’s purpose was to develop a system to shield the United States and allies from a ballistic missile attack. The centerpiece of the Strategic Defense System was space-based, kinetic-kill vehicles. In 1991, BREN Tower was used for the tether tests

  1. Merging Electronic Health Record Data and Genomics for Cardiovascular Research: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer L; Ryan, John J; Bray, Bruce E; Brown, Candice; Lanfear, David; Newby, L Kristin; Relling, Mary V; Risch, Neil J; Roden, Dan M; Shaw, Stanley Y; Tcheng, James E; Tenenbaum, Jessica; Wang, Thomas N; Weintraub, William S

    2016-04-01

    The process of scientific discovery is rapidly evolving. The funding climate has influenced a favorable shift in scientific discovery toward the use of existing resources such as the electronic health record. The electronic health record enables long-term outlooks on human health and disease, in conjunction with multidimensional phenotypes that include laboratory data, images, vital signs, and other clinical information. Initial work has confirmed the utility of the electronic health record for understanding mechanisms and patterns of variability in disease susceptibility, disease evolution, and drug responses. The addition of biobanks and genomic data to the information contained in the electronic health record has been demonstrated. The purpose of this statement is to discuss the current challenges in and the potential for merging electronic health record data and genomics for cardiovascular research.

  2. Voyager 1 in the Local Interstellar Medium: Cosmic-ray Energy Density and Ionization Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Heikkila, B. C.; Lal, N.; Webber, W. R.; Johannesson, G.; Moskalenko, I.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the energy spectra of cosmic ay nuclei and electrons in the local interstellar medium (LISM) from the Cosmic Ray Subsystem on Voyager 1 (V1). We use four models of the local interstellar spectra of nuclei and one of electrons that are constrained by the observations to compute the energy density and ionization rate of atomic H in the LISM above 3 MeV for electrons and protons and above 3 MeV/nuc for nuclei with Z > 1. We find that the total cosmic-ray energy density is in the range 0.82-0.97 eV/cm3, which includes a contribution of 0.023 eV/cm3 from electrons. We find the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic H to be in the range 1.45-1.58 x 10-17 s-1, which is a factor of more than 10 below the cosmic-ray ionization rate in diffuse interstellar clouds based on astrochemistry methods. We discuss possible reasons for this difference. Voyager data analysis is supported by NASA Grant NNN12AA012. GALPROP development is supported by NASA Grants NNX13AC47G and NNX10AE78G.

  3. Solar Modulation of the Local Interstellar Spectrum with Voyager 1, AMS-02, PAMELA, and BESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, C.; Bindi, V.; Consolandi, C.; Whitman, K.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing precision of direct cosmic rays measurements opened the door to high-sensitivity indirect searches of dark matter and to more accurate predictions for radiation doses received by astronauts and electronics in space. The key ingredients in the study of these phenomena are the knowledge of the local interstellar spectrum (LIS) of galactic cosmic rays and the understanding of how the solar modulation affects the LIS inside the heliosphere. Voyager 1, AMS-02, PAMELA, and BESS measurements of proton and helium fluxes provide valuable information, allowing us to shed light on the shape of the LIS and the details of the solar modulation during solar cycles 22-24. A new parametrization of the LIS is presented, based on the latest data from Voyager 1 and AMS-02. Using the framework of the force-field approximation, the solar modulation parameter is extracted from the time-dependent fluxes measured by PAMELA and BESS. A modified version of the force-field approximation with a rigidity-dependent modulation parameter is introduced, yielding better fits than the force-field approximation. The results are compared with the modulation parameter inferred by neutron monitors.

  4. Determining Ship’s Safe Speed and Best Possible Speed for Sea Voyage Legs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Rutkowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose and scope of this paper is to describe factors to consider when determining the ship’s safe speed as well as the best speed for the sea voyage legs including directions related to vessel speed that are given in ColRegs, voyage orders and charter parties. Author also tried to describe the definition for the following notions: ship maneuvering, ship handling, safe speed, best possible speed for sea voyage legs.

  5. A service for the application of data quality information to NASA earth science satellite records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Xing, Z.; Fry, C.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Huang, T.; Chen, G.; Chin, T. M.; Alarcon, C.

    2016-12-01

    A recurring demand in working with satellite-based earth science data records is the need to apply data quality information. Such quality information is often contained within the data files as an array of "flags", but can also be represented by more complex quality descriptions such as combinations of bit flags, or even other ancillary variables that can be applied as thresholds to the geophysical variable of interest. For example, with Level 2 granules from the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) project up to 6 independent variables could be used to screen the sea surface temperature measurements on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Quality screening of Level 3 data from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) instrument can be become even more complex, involving 161 unique bit states or conditions a user can screen for. The application of quality information is often a laborious process for the user until they understand the implications of all the flags and bit conditions, and requires iterative approaches using custom software. The Virtual Quality Screening Service, a NASA ACCESS project, is addressing these issues and concerns. The project has developed an infrastructure to expose, apply, and extract quality screening information building off known and proven NASA components for data extraction and subset-by-value, data discovery, and exposure to the user of granule-based quality information. Further sharing of results through well-defined URLs and web service specifications has also been implemented. The presentation will focus on overall description of the technologies and informatics principals employed by the project. Examples of implementations of the end-to-end web service for quality screening with GHRSST and SMAP granules will be demonstrated.

  6. 77 FR 72368 - Privacy Act of 1974; Notice of a New System of Records, Enterprise Wide Operations Data Store

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... activities, pooling, reporting and risk management efforts. DATES: Effective Date: This proposal shall become... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Privacy Act of 1974; Notice of a New System of Records, Enterprise Wide Operations... System of Records, Enterprise Wide Operations Data Store. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provision of...

  7. Accelerating Chart Review Using Automated Methods on Electronic Health Record Data for Postoperative Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B.; Moeller, Nathan D.; Arsoniadis, Elliot G.; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R.; Jensen, Eric H.; Simon, Gyorgy J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual Chart Review (MCR) is an important but labor-intensive task for clinical research and quality improvement. In this study, aiming to accelerate the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts, we developed an automated postoperative complications detection application by using structured electronic health record (EHR) data. We applied several machine learning methods to the detection of commonly occurring complications, including three subtypes of surgical site infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, and septic shock. Particularly, we applied one single-task and five multi-task learning methods and compared their detection performance. The models demonstrated high detection performance, which ensures the feasibility of accelerating MCR. Specifically, one of the multi-task learning methods, propensity weighted observations (PWO) demonstrated the highest detection performance, with single-task learning being a close second.

  8. Power system disturbance identification from recorded dynamic data at the Northfield substation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykhovsky, A. [ISO-New England, Holyoke, MA (United States); Chow, J.H. [Rensssselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2003-12-01

    For a power industry undergoing deregulation, the growing number of power marketers and independent power generators increases the variability of power flow patterns in an interconnected power system, thereby making the prediction of critical operating conditions and limits more demanding. Consequently, transmission system operators need new tools to understand the effects of disturbances. Among these needs are tools to classify and identify disturbances as they occur on the power system. In this paper, power system disturbance data from the Northfield substation dynamic recording device in the US New England power system are analyzed and their features extracted. Then a classification method is used to identify the disturbance. Events with multiple disturbances are also addressed. A MATLAB-based software, called 'Event Analyzer', has been developed for the disturbance identification. (author)

  9. Comparison of individual follow-up and computerized record linkage using the Canadian Mortality Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, H S; Jamieson, E; Walsh, C; Julian, J A; Fair, M E; Buffet, A

    1989-01-01

    We compared two methods of ascertaining mortality in a historical prospective mortality study. Computerized Record Linkage (CRL) with the centralized historical Canadian Mortality Data Base (CMDB) was carried out on 2469 men and an attempt was also made to trace the subjects by individual follow-up (IFU). All but 88 were traced and 60 were reported to be dead. CRL was able to locate the deaths of three men who had been untraced by IFU. Contradictory information on vital status was obtained on 5 subjects--in 4 of them, the discrepancy was resolved in favour of CRL. Overall, CRL using the CMDB performed very well. We also consider factors that affect the relative costs of the two methods, which should be balanced against the accuracy of information obtained.

  10. The Sun Recorded Through History Scientific Data Extracted from Historical Documents

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, M

    2009-01-01

    The Sun Recorded Through History is a text that reconstructs past solar activity based on information from historical documents, complementing studies using other techniques. Historical accounts describing phenomena related to solar activity, such as aurorae, sunspots, and corona observed during solar eclipses can be used as a proxy of solar activity in the past. These descriptions are reviewed, on the one hand providing primary material for the history of astronomy and, on the other, verifying or refuting current ideas concerning the time variability of the Sun on the scale of centuries. Documents predating the discovery of photography (around 1840) that contain information on these topics are highlighted, but modern drawings are also included. The lower temporal limit of study is set by the archaeoastronomy of prehistoric sources. In addition, the necessary background on the Sun is provided, with special emphasis on observing techniques and the influences of telescopes and the Earth's atmosphere on the data...

  11. QUALITY OF DATA IN PREGNANCY HEALTH RECORD: THE IMPORTANCE FOR THE NEONATOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Espírito Santo

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The majority of records were considered correct, however a greater completeness and uniformity of pregnancy records is still necessary, so that the paediatrician can have accurate pregnancy clinical information for the first observation of the newborn.

  12. Long-Term High-Latitude Sea and Ice Surface Temperature Record from AVHRR GAC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, C. S.; Dybkjær, G.; Eastwood, S.; Tonboe, R. T.; Høyer, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 μm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  13. Syndromic surveillance in companion animals utilizing electronic medical records data: development and proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Kass

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to recognize and address communicable and point-source epidemics in dog and cat populations, this project created a near real-time syndromic surveillance system devoted to companion animal health in the United States. With over 150 million owned pets in the US, the development of such a system is timely in light of previous epidemics due to various causes that were only recognized in retrospect. The goal of this study was to develop epidemiologic and statistical methods for veterinary hospital-based surveillance, and to demonstrate its efficacy by detection of simulated foodborne outbreaks using a database of over 700 hospitals. Data transfer protocols were established via a secure file transfer protocol site, and a data repository was constructed predominantly utilizing open-source software. The daily proportion of patients with a given clinical or laboratory finding was contrasted with an equivalent average proportion from a historical comparison period, allowing construction of the proportionate diagnostic outcome ratio and its confidence interval for recognizing aberrant heath events. A five-tiered alert system was used to facilitate daily assessment of almost 2,000 statistical analyses. Two simulated outbreak scenarios were created by independent experts, blinded to study investigators, and embedded in the 2010 medical records. Both outbreaks were detected almost immediately by the alert system, accurately detecting species affected using relevant clinical and laboratory findings, and ages involved. Besides demonstrating proof-in-concept of using veterinary hospital databases to detect aberrant events in space and time, this research can be extended to conducting post-detection etiologic investigations utilizing exposure information in the medical record.

  14. Data mining of audiology patient records: factors influencing the choice of hearing aid type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Muhammad N; Oakes, Michael P

    2012-04-30

    This paper describes the analysis of a database of over 180,000 patient records, collected from over 23,000 patients, by the hearing aid clinic at James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough, UK. These records consist of audiograms (graphs of the faintest sounds audible to the patient at six different pitches), categorical data (such as age, gender, diagnosis and hearing aid type) and brief free text notes made by the technicians. This data is mined to determine which factors contribute to the decision to fit a BTE (worn behind the ear) hearing aid as opposed to an ITE (worn in the ear) hearing aid. From PCA (principal component analysis) four main audiogram types are determined, and are related to the type of hearing aid chosen. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, masker, mould and individual audiogram frequencies are combined into a single model by means of logistic regression. Some significant keywords are also discovered in the free text fields by using the chi-squared (χ(2)) test, which can also be used in the model. The final model can act a decision support tool to help decide whether an individual patient should be offered a BTE or an ITE hearing aid. The final model was tested using 5-fold cross validation, and was able to replicate the decisions of audiologists whether to fit an ITE or a BTE hearing aid with precision in the range 0.79 to 0.87. A decision support system was produced to predict the type of hearing aid which should be prescribed, with an explanation facility explaining how that decision was arrived at. This system should prove useful in providing a "second opinion" for audiologists.

  15. Describing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Hanauer

    Full Text Available Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation.

  16. Data mining of audiology patient records: factors influencing the choice of hearing aid type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Muhammad N

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the analysis of a database of over 180,000 patient records, collected from over 23,000 patients, by the hearing aid clinic at James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough, UK. These records consist of audiograms (graphs of the faintest sounds audible to the patient at six different pitches, categorical data (such as age, gender, diagnosis and hearing aid type and brief free text notes made by the technicians. This data is mined to determine which factors contribute to the decision to fit a BTE (worn behind the ear hearing aid as opposed to an ITE (worn in the ear hearing aid. Methods From PCA (principal component analysis four main audiogram types are determined, and are related to the type of hearing aid chosen. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, masker, mould and individual audiogram frequencies are combined into a single model by means of logistic regression. Some significant keywords are also discovered in the free text fields by using the chi-squared (χ2 test, which can also be used in the model. The final model can act a decision support tool to help decide whether an individual patient should be offered a BTE or an ITE hearing aid. Results The final model was tested using 5-fold cross validation, and was able to replicate the decisions of audiologists whether to fit an ITE or a BTE hearing aid with precision in the range 0.79 to 0.87. Conclusions A decision support system was produced to predict the type of hearing aid which should be prescribed, with an explanation facility explaining how that decision was arrived at. This system should prove useful in providing a "second opinion" for audiologists.

  17. Physician assessment of disease activity in JIA subtypes. Analysis of data extracted from electronic medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Deli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Although electronic medical records (EMRs have facilitated care for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, analyses of treatment outcomes have required paper based or manually re-entered data. We have started EMR discrete data entry for JIA patient visits, including joint examination and global assessment, by physician and patient. In this preliminary study, we extracted data from the EMR to Xenobase™ (TransMed Systems, Inc., Cupertino, CA, an application permitting cohort analyses of the relationship between global assessment to joint examination and subtype. Methods During clinic visits, data were entered into discrete fields in ambulatory visit forms in the EMR (EpicCare™, Epic Systems, Verona, WI. Data were extracted using Clarity Reports, then de-identified and uploaded for analyses to Xenobase™. Parameters included joint examination, ILAR diagnostic classification, physician global assessment, patient global assessment, and patient pain score. Data for a single visit for each of 160 patients over a 2 month period, beginning March, 2010, were analyzed. Results In systemic JIA patients, strong correlations for physician global assessment were found with pain score, joint count and patient assessment. In contrast, physician assessment for patients with persistent oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor negative patients showed strong correlation with joint counts, but only moderate correlation with pain scores and patient global assessment. Conversely, for enthesitis patients, physician assessment correlated strongly with pain scores, and moderately with joint count and patient global assessment. Rheumatoid factor positive patients, the smallest group studied, showed moderate correlation for all three measures. Patient global assessment for systemic patients showed strong correlations with pain scores and joint count, similar to data for physician assessment. For polyarticular and enthesitis patients

  18. A weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data record from merged CryoSat-2 and SMOS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Robert; Hendricks, Stefan; Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; King, Jennifer; Haas, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Sea-ice thickness on a global scale is derived from different satellite sensors using independent retrieval methods. Due to the sensor and orbit characteristics, such satellite retrievals differ in spatial and temporal resolution as well as in the sensitivity to certain sea-ice types and thickness ranges. Satellite altimeters, such as CryoSat-2 (CS2), sense the height of the ice surface above the sea level, which can be converted into sea-ice thickness. Relative uncertainties associated with this method are large over thin ice regimes. Another retrieval method is based on the evaluation of surface brightness temperature (TB) in L-band microwave frequencies (1.4 GHz) with a thickness-dependent emission model, as measured by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. While the radiometer-based method looses sensitivity for thick sea ice (> 1 m), relative uncertainties over thin ice are significantly smaller than for the altimetry-based retrievals. In addition, the SMOS product provides global sea-ice coverage on a daily basis unlike the altimeter data. This study presents the first merged product of complementary weekly Arctic sea-ice thickness data records from the CS2 altimeter and SMOS radiometer. We use two merging approaches: a weighted mean (WM) and an optimal interpolation (OI) scheme. While the weighted mean leaves gaps between CS2 orbits, OI is used to produce weekly Arctic-wide sea-ice thickness fields. The benefit of the data merging is shown by a comparison with airborne electromagnetic (AEM) induction sounding measurements. When compared to airborne thickness data in the Barents Sea, the merged product has a root mean square deviation (RMSD) of about 0.7 m less than the CS2 product and therefore demonstrates the capability to enhance the CS2 product in thin ice regimes. However, in mixed first-year (FYI) and multiyear (MYI) ice regimes as in the Beaufort Sea, the CS2 retrieval shows the lowest bias.

  19. Helping everyone do better: a call for validation studies of routinely recorded health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenstein V

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vera Ehrenstein,1 Irene Petersen,1,2 Liam Smeeth,3 Susan S Jick,4 Eric I Benchimol,5,6 Jonas F Ludvigsson,7,8 Henrik Toft Sørensen11Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, London, UK; 3Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 4Boston Collaborative Drug Surveillance Program, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 5Department of Pediatrics and School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 6Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada; 7Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 8Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital of Örebro, SwedenThere has been a surge of availability and use for research of routinely collected electronic health data, such as electronic health records, health administrative data, and disease registries. Symptomatic of this surge, in 2012, Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety (PDS published a supplemental issue containing several reviews of validated methods for identifying health outcomes using routine health data,1 focusing on databases feeding the US Mini-Sentinel Program.2

  20. Exploring the brain, looking for thoughts: on Asimov's second Fantastic Voyage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassou-Noguès, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate various concerns which appear in Isaac Asimov's Fantastic Voyage II: Destination Brain. I will disregard his first voyage inside a human body in Fantastic Voyage I, which the author disavows as not being his own work. In contrast, the second voyage is intricate, suggesting problems drawn from a variety of sources. In a nutshell, Asimov's explorers enter the body of a comatose man in order to read his thoughts. The story can be related both to philosophical thought-experiments, such as those of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and of Herbert Feigl, as well as to personal anxieties peculiar to Asimov.