WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume scattering applications

  1. Composed Scattering Model for Direct Volume Rendering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡文立; 石教英

    1996-01-01

    Based on the equation of transfer in transport theory of optical physics,a new volume rendering model,called composed scattering model(CSM),is presented.In calculating the scattering term of the equation,it is decomposed into volume scattering intensity and surface scattering intensity,and they are composed with the boundary detection operator as the weight function.This proposed model differs from the most current volume rendering models in the aspect that in CSM segmentation and illumination intensity calculation are taken as two coherent parts while in existing models they are regarded as two separate ones.This model has been applied to the direct volume rendering of 3D data sets obtained by CT and MRI.The resultant images show not only rich details but also clear boundary surfaces.CSM is demonstrated to be an accurate volume rendering model suitable for CT and MRI data sets.

  2. Account of Nuclear Scattering at Volume Reflection

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenco, M V

    2011-01-01

    For a particle traversing a bent crystal in the regime of volume reflection we evaluate the probability of interaction with atomic nuclei. Regardless of the continuous potential shape, this probability is found to differ from the corresponding value in an amorphous target by an amount proportional to the crystal bending radius, and the particle deflection angle. Based on this result, we evaluate the rate of inelastic nuclear interactions, and the final beam angular dispersion due to multiple Coulomb scattering. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experiments. The impact of multiple Coulomb scattering on the mean volume reflection angle is also discussed.

  3. Finite volume corrections to pi pi scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ikuro; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2006-01-13

    Lattice QCD studies of hadron-hadron interactions are performed by computing the energy levels of the system in a finite box. The shifts in energy levels proportional to inverse powers of the volume are related to scattering parameters in a model independent way. In addition, there are non-universal exponentially suppressed corrections that distort this relation. These terms are proportional to e-m{sub pi} L and become relevant as the chiral limit is approached. In this paper we report on a one-loop chiral perturbation theory calculation of the leading exponential corrections in the case of I=2 pi pi scattering near threshold.

  4. Radiative properties of materials with surface scattering or volume scattering: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qunzhi ZHU; Hyunjin LEE; Zhuomin M. ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Radiative properties of rough surfaces, parti-culate media and porous materials are important in thermal engineering and many other applications. These properties are often needed for calculating heat transfer between surfaces and volume elements in participating media, as well as for accurate radiometric temperature measure-ments. In this paper, recent research on scattering of thermal radiation by rough surfaces, fibrous insulation, soot, aerogel, biological materials, and polytetrafluor-oethylene (PTFE) is reviewed. Both theoretical modeling and experimental investigation are discussed. Rigorous solutions and approximation methods for surface scattering and volume scattering are described. The approach of using measured surface roughness statistics in Monte Carlo simulations to predict radiative properties of rough surfaces is emphasized. The effects of various parameters on the radiative properties of particulate media and porous materials are summarized.

  5. Electromagnetic scattering by spheroidal volumes of discrete random medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Dlugach, Janna M.

    2017-10-01

    We use the superposition T-matrix method to compare the far-field scattering matrices generated by spheroidal and spherical volumes of discrete random medium having the same volume and populated by identical spherical particles. Our results fully confirm the robustness of the previously identified coherent and diffuse scattering regimes and associated optical phenomena exhibited by spherical particulate volumes and support their explanation in terms of the interference phenomenon coupled with the order-of-scattering expansion of the far-field Foldy equations. We also show that increasing nonsphericity of particulate volumes causes discernible (albeit less pronounced) optical effects in forward and backscattering directions and explain them in terms of the same interference/multiple-scattering phenomenon.

  6. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm{sup 3}. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe{sub 2}.

  7. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Kamenev, K. V.

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm3. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe2.

  8. Efficient light propagation for multiple anisotropic volume scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Realistic rendering of participating media like clouds requires multiple anisotropic light scattering. This paper presents a propagation approximation for light scattered into M direction bins, which reduces the ``ray effect`` problem in the traditional ``discrete ordinates`` method. For a volume of n{sup 3} elements, it takes O(M n{sup 3} log n + M{sup 2} n{sup 3}) time and O(M n{sup 3}) space.

  9. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin; Liu, Yun; Sánchez-Diáz, Luis E; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Gregory S; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  10. Three-particle scattering amplitudes from a finite volume formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Briceno, Raul A

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantization condition for the spectrum of a system composed of three identical bosons in a finite volume with periodic boundary conditions. This condition gives a relation between the finite volume spectrum and infinite volume scattering amplitudes. The quantization condition presented is an integral equation that in general must be solved numerically. However, for systems with an attractive two-body force that supports a two-body bound-state, a diboson, and for energies below the diboson breakup, the quantization condition reduces to the well-known Luscher formula with exponential corrections in volume that scale with the diboson binding momentum. To accurately determine infinite volume phase shifts, it is necessary to extrapolate the phase shifts obtained from the Luscher formula for the boson-diboson system to the infinite volume limit. For energies above the breakup threshold, or for systems with no two-body bound-state (with only scattering states and resonances) the Luscher formula gets po...

  11. Neutron Scattering in Biology Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fitter, Jörg; Katsaras, John

    2006-01-01

    The advent of new neutron facilities and the improvement of existing sources and instruments world wide supply the biological community with many new opportunities in the areas of structural biology and biological physics. The present volume offers a clear description of the various neutron-scattering techniques currently being used to answer biologically relevant questions. Their utility is illustrated through examples by some of the leading researchers in the field of neutron scattering. This volume will be a reference for researchers and a step-by-step guide for young scientists entering the field and the advanced graduate student.

  12. Scattered Radiation Emission Imaging: Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging processes built on the Compton scattering effect have been under continuing investigation since it was first suggested in the 50s. However, despite many innovative contributions, there are still formidable theoretical and technical challenges to overcome. In this paper, we review the state-of-the-art principles of the so-called scattered radiation emission imaging. Basically, it consists of using the cleverly collected scattered radiation from a radiating object to reconstruct its inner structure. Image formation is based on the mathematical concept of compounded conical projection. It entails a Radon transform defined on circular cone surfaces in order to express the scattered radiation flux density on a detecting pixel. We discuss in particular invertible cases of such conical Radon transforms which form a mathematical basis for image reconstruction methods. Numerical simulations performed in two and three space dimensions speak in favor of the viability of this imaging principle and its potential applications in various fields.

  13. Measurements of the volume scattering function in a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Jean-François; Lee, Michael; Shybanov, Eugeny; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2007-04-01

    The Volume Scattering Function (VSF) is an essential variable in the context of marine radiative transfer modeling and of the inversion of ocean colour remote sensing data. However, an important lack of knowledge on the VSF natural variability affects the present models, in particular for the coastal environment. Measurements of the Volume Scattering Function between 0.6° and 177.3° with an angular resolution of 0.3° were performed in the northern coastal Adriatic Sea onboard an oceanographic platform in October 2004 using a prototype instrument. Observed differences with the commonly used Petzold's functions are significant, in particular for the "open ocean" and "coastal" types in the backward directions. The use of an empirical relationship for the derivation of b b(λ) from a unique measurement of β(ψ,λ) at ψ=140 for the Hydroscat-6 was validated for this coastal site at that season. Finally, the use of the Kopelevich VSF model together with a measurement of b p(λ) at λ=555 nm allowed the reconstruction of the VSF to within about 35%.

  14. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  15. Deorientation of PolSAR coherency matrix for volume scattering retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shashi; Garg, R. D.; Kushwaha, S. P. S.

    2016-05-01

    Polarimetric SAR data has proven its potential to extract scattering information for different features appearing in single resolution cell. Several decomposition modelling approaches have been developed to retrieve scattering information from PolSAR data. During scattering power decomposition based on physical scattering models it becomes very difficult to distinguish volume scattering as a result from randomly oriented vegetation from scattering nature of oblique structures which are responsible for double-bounce and volume scattering , because both are decomposed in same scattering mechanism. The polarization orientation angle (POA) of an electromagnetic wave is one of the most important character which gets changed due to scattering from geometrical structure of topographic slopes, oriented urban area and randomly oriented features like vegetation cover. The shift in POA affects the polarimetric radar signatures. So, for accurate estimation of scattering nature of feature compensation in polarization orientation shift becomes an essential procedure. The prime objective of this work was to investigate the effect of shift in POA in scattering information retrieval and to explore the effect of deorientation on regression between field-estimated aboveground biomass (AGB) and volume scattering. For this study Dudhwa National Park, U.P., India was selected as study area and fully polarimetric ALOS PALSAR data was used to retrieve scattering information from the forest area of Dudhwa National Park. Field data for DBH and tree height was collect for AGB estimation using stratified random sampling. AGB was estimated for 170 plots for different locations of the forest area. Yamaguchi four component decomposition modelling approach was utilized to retrieve surface, double-bounce, helix and volume scattering information. Shift in polarization orientation angle was estimated and deorientation of coherency matrix for compensation of POA shift was performed. Effect of

  16. Optical scattering methods applicable to drops and bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of optical scattering properties of drops and bubbles is presented. The properties lead to unconventional methods for optically monitoring the size or shape of a scatterer and are applicable to acoustically levitated objects. Several of the methods are applicable to the detection and measurement of small amplitude oscillations. Relevant optical phenomena include: (1) rainbows; (2) diffraction catastrophes from spheroids; (3) critical angle scattering; (4) effects of coatings; (5) glory scattering; and (6) optical levitation.

  17. Implications of changing scattering properties on Greenland ice sheet volume change from Cryosat-2 altimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg

    2017-01-01

    Long-term observations of surface elevation change of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is of utmost importance when assessing the state of the ice sheet. Satellite radar altimetry offers a long time series of data over the GrIS, starting with ERS-1 in 1991. ESA's Cryosat-2 mission, launched in 2010...... waveform parameters to be applicable for correcting for changes in volume scattering. The best results in the Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric mode area of the GrIS are found when applying only the backscatter correction, whereas the best result in the Low Resolution Mode area is obtained by only...... applying a leading edge width correction. Using this approach to correct for the scattering properties, a volume loss of −292±38 km3 yr −1 is found for the GrIS for the time span November 2010 until November 2014. The inclusion of waveform parameter corrections and improved relocation for the GrIS, helps...

  18. Evaluation of Influence of Multiple Scattering Effect in Light-Scattering-Based Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Sheng-Hua; SUN Zhi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    The extinction cross sections of a system containing two particles are calculated by the T-matrix method, and the results are compared with those of two single particles with single-scattering approximation. The necessity of the correction of the refractive indices of water and polystyrene for different incident wavelengths is particularly addressed in the calculation. By this means, the volume fractions allowed for certain accuracy requirements of single-scattering approximation in the light scattering experiment can be evaluated. The volume fractions calculated with corrected refractive indices are compared with those obtained with fixed refractive indices which have been rather commonly used, showing that fixed refractive indices may cause significant error in evaluating multiple scattering effect. The results also give a simple criterion for selecting the incident wavelength and particle size to avoid the 'blind zone' in the turbidity measurement, where the turbidity change is insensitive to aggregation of two particles.

  19. A Time Marching Scheme for Solving Volume Integral Equations on Nonlinear Scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Bagci, Hakan

    2015-01-07

    Transient electromagnetic field interactions on inhomogeneous penetrable scatterers can be analyzed by solving time domain volume integral equations (TDVIEs). TDVIEs are oftentimes solved using marchingon-in-time (MOT) schemes. Unlike finite difference and finite element schemes, MOT-TDVIE solvers require discretization of only the scatterers, do not call for artificial absorbing boundary conditions, and are more robust to numerical phase dispersion. On the other hand, their computational cost is high, they suffer from late-time instabilities, and their implicit nature makes incorporation of nonlinear constitutive relations more difficult. Development of plane-wave time-domain (PWTD) and FFT-based schemes has significantly reduced the computational cost of the MOT-TDVIE solvers. Additionally, latetime instability problem has been alleviated for all practical purposes with the development of accurate integration schemes and specially designed temporal basis functions. Addressing the third challenge is the topic of this presentation. I will talk about an explicit MOT scheme developed for solving the TDVIE on scatterers with nonlinear material properties. The proposed scheme separately discretizes the TDVIE and the nonlinear constitutive relation between electric field intensity and flux density. The unknown field intensity and flux density are expanded using half and full Schaubert-Wilton-Glisson (SWG) basis functions in space and polynomial temporal interpolators in time. The resulting coupled system of the discretized TDVIE and constitutive relation is integrated in time using an explicit P E(CE) m scheme to yield the unknown expansion coefficients. Explicitness of time marching allows for straightforward incorporation of the nonlinearity as a function evaluation on the right hand side of the coupled system of equations. Consequently, the resulting MOT scheme does not call for a Newton-like nonlinear solver. Numerical examples, which demonstrate the applicability

  20. Size, flexibility, and scattering functions of semiflexible polyelectrolytes with excluded volume effects: Monte Carlo simulations and neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannavacciuolo, L.; Sommer, C.; Pedersen, J.S.;

    2000-01-01

    We present a systematic Monte Carlo study of the scattering function S(q) of semiflexible polyelectrolytes at infinite dilution, in solutions with different concentrations of added salt. In the spirit of a theoretical description of polyelectrolytes in terms of the equivalent parameters, namely...... outlined in the Odijk-Skolnick-Fixman theory, in which the behavior of charged polymers is described only in terms of increasing local rigidity and excluded volume effects. Moreover, the Monte Carlo data are found to be in very good agreement with experimental scattering measurements with equilibrium...

  1. Inverse scattering: applications to nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mackintosh, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    In what follows we first set the context for inverse scattering in nuclear physics with a brief account of inverse problems in general. We then turn to inverse scattering which involves the S-matrix, which connects the interaction potential between two scattering particles with the measured scattering cross section. The term `inverse' is a reference to the fact that instead of determining the scattering S-matrix from the interaction potential between the scattering particles, we do the inverse. That is to say, we calculate the interaction potential from the S-matrix. This review explains how this can now be done reliably, but the emphasis will be upon reasons why one should wish to do this, with an account of some of the ways this can lead to understanding concerning nuclear interactions.

  2. Three-Component Power Decomposition for Polarimetric SAR Data Based on Adaptive Volume Scatter Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Eun Park

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the three-component power decomposition for polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data with an adaptive volume scattering model is proposed. The volume scattering model is assumed to be reflection-symmetric but parameterized. For each image pixel, the decomposition first starts with determining the adaptive parameter based on matrix similarity metric. Then, a respective scattering power component is retrieved with the established procedure. It has been shown that the proposed method leads to complete elimination of negative powers as the result of the adaptive volume scattering model. Experiments with the PolSAR data from both the NASA/JPL (National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Airborne SAR (AIRSAR and the JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency ALOS-PALSAR also demonstrate that the proposed method not only obtains similar/better results in vegetated areas as compared to the existing Freeman-Durden decomposition but helps to improve discrimination of the urban regions.

  3. TIME-DOMAIN VOLUME INTEGRAL EQUATION FOR TRANSIENT SCATTERING FROM INHOMOGENEOUS OBJECTS-2D TM CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianguo; Fan Ruyu

    2001-01-01

    This letter proposes a time-domain volume integral equation based method for analyzing the transient scattering from a 2D inhomogeneous cylinder by involking the volume equivalence principle for the transverse magnetic case. This integral equation is solved by using an MOT scheme. Numerical results obtained using this method agree very well with those obtained using the FDTD method.

  4. TIME-DOMAIN VOLUME INTEGRAL EQUATION FOR TRANSIENT SCATTERING FROM INHOMOGENEOUS OBJECTS-2D TE CASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jianguo; Fan Ruyu

    2001-01-01

    This letter proposes a time-domain volume integral equation based method for analyzing the transient scattering from a 2D inhomogeneous cylinder by involking the volume equivalence principle for the transverse electric case. This integral equation is solved by using an MOT scheme. Numerical results obtained using this method agree very well with those obtained using the FDTD method.

  5. Application of light scattering to coatings a user's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Diebold, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    The book begins with the fundamentals of light scattering, first by individual particles, then by small groups of particles, and finally by the trillions of particles present in a real-life paint film. From there, Dr. Diebold focuses on application of these fundamentals to paint formulation. The scope includes both theory and practice with an emphasis on application (from both performance and cost standpoints). The book gives a clear understanding of light scattering principles and application of these principles to paint formulation (with a focus on TiO2 - the strongest scattering material a

  6. Finite Volumes for Complex Applications VII

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlberger, Mario; Rohde, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The methods considered in the 7th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Berlin, June 2014) have properties which offer distinct advantages for a number of applications. The second volume of the proceedings covers reviewed contributions reporting successful applications in the fields of fluid dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, structural analysis, nuclear physics, semiconductor theory and other topics. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation. Recent decades have brought significant success in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including maximum principles, dissipativity, monotone decay of free energy, and asymptotic stability. Due to these properties, finite volume methods belong to the wider class of compatible discretization methods, which preserve qualitative propert...

  7. Finite volume effects in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Rokash, Alexander; Krebs, Hermann; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2013-01-01

    We present a lattice calculation of neutron-deuteron scattering at very low energies and investigate in detail the impact of the topological finite-volume corrections. Our calculations are carried out in the framework of pionless effective field theory at leading order in the low-energy expansion. Using lattice sizes and a lattice spacing comparable to those employed in nuclear lattice simulations, we find that the topological volume corrections must be taken into account in order to obtain correct results for the neutron-proton S-wave scattering lengths.

  8. Light Scattering by Optically Soft Particles Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Subodh K

    2006-01-01

    The present monograph deals with a particular class of approximation methods in the context of light scattering by small particles. This class of approximations has been termed as eikonal or soft particle approximations. The eikonal approximation was studied extensively in the potential scattering and then adopted in optical scattering problems. In this context, the eikonal and other soft particle approximations pertain to scatterers whose relative refractive index compared to surrounding medium is close to unity. The study of these approximations is very important because soft particles occur abundantly in nature. For example, the particles that occur in ocean optics, biomedical optics, atmospheric optics and in many industrial applications can be classified as soft particles. This book was written in recognition of the long-standing and current interest in the field of scattering approximations for soft particles. It should prove to be a useful addition for researchers in the field of light scattering.

  9. Generalized Levinson theorem: Applications to electron-atom scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Leonard; Spruch, Larry

    1996-12-01

    A recent formulation provides an absolute definition of the zero-energy phase shift δ for multiparticle single-channel scattering of a particle by a neutral compound target in a given partial wave l. This formulation, along with the minimum principle for the scattering length, leads to a determination of δ that represents a generalization of Levinson's theorem. In its original form that theorem is applicable only to potential scattering of a particle and relates δ/π to the number of bound states of that l. The generalized Levinson theorem relates δ/π for scattering in a state of given angular momentum to the number of composite bound states of that angular momentum plus a calculable number that, for a system described in the Hartree-Fock approximation, is the number of states of that angular momentum excluded by the Pauli principle. Thus, for example, for electron scattering by Na, with its (1s)2(2s)2(2p)63s configuration and with one L=0 singlet composite bound state, δ would be π+2π for s-wave singlet scattering, 0+3π for s-wave triplet scattering, and 0+π for both triplet and singlet p-wave scattering; the Pauli contribution has been listed first. The method is applicable to a number of e+/--atom and nucleon-nucleus scattering processes, but only applications of the former type are described here. We obtain the absolute zero-energy phase shifts for e--H and e--He scattering and, in the Hartree-Fock approximation for the target, for atoms that include the noble gases, the alkali-metal atoms, and, as examples, B, C, N, O, and F, which have one, two, three, four, and five p electrons, respectively, outside of closed shells. In all cases, the applications provide results in agreement with expectations.

  10. Electromagnetic scattering: applications to atmospheric sciences and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, P.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles (cloud droplets, ice crystals and aerosol particles) scatter and absorb solar radiation and thermal infrared emission, and play an important role in the radiation budget in the earth-atmosphere coupled system, and hence are essential to the earth's climate. In this talk I will briefly review electromagnetic scattering research with a focus on applications to atmospheric radiation parameterization and remote sensing. Specifically, I will review state-of-the-art modeling capabilities in computing the single-scattering properties of dielectric particles. Furthermore, I will illustrate some examples of relevant applications.

  11. Neutron scattering applications in hydrocarbon materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Min Y.; Peiffer, Dennis G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Annandale, NJ (United States); Zhang, Yimin; Rafailovich, Miriam [Dept. of Materials Sci. and Eng., State University of New York, NY (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Neutron scattering methods are a powerful probe to complex fluids, soft matters as well as solid materials of nano- and micro-structures and their related dynamic properties. They complement other microstructural probing tools, such as microscopes, x-ray and light scattering techniques. Because neutron does not carry charges, it interacts only with nuclei of the matter, therefore not only can it penetrate a longer length into matters, it can also see' many features other methods can't due to their lack of proper contrast or heavy absorption. One of the largest contrasts in neutron methods is from hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) difference. Therefore, hydrocarbons can be easily studied by neutrons when H/D isotope substitution is applied. Here at National Institute of Standards and Technology's Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, one of the USA's premier neutron scattering facilities, we have been using neutron scattering techniques to study microstructures of asphaltenes, waxes, gas hydrates, porous media, surfactant solutions, engine oils, polymers, nanocomposites, fuel cell element and other hydrocarbon materials. With the completion of a new Neutron Spin Echo instrument, we can also look at the dynamics of the above mentioned systems. (author)

  12. Scattering of unstable particles in a finite volume: the case of pi rho scattering and the a1(1260) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Roca, L

    2012-01-01

    We present a way to evaluate the scattering of unstable particles quantized in a finite volume with the aim of extracting physical observables for infinite volume from lattice data. We illustrate the method with the $\\pi\\rho$ scattering which generates dynamically the axial-vector $a_1(1260)$ resonance. Energy levels in a finite box are evaluated both considering the $\\rho$ as a stable and unstable resonance and we find significant differences between both cases. We discuss how to solve the problem to get the physical scattering amplitudes in the infinite volume, and hence phase shifts, from possible lattice results on energy levels quantized inside a finite box.

  13. A CO2 laser based two-volume collective scattering instrument for spatially localized turbulence measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Zoletnik, S.; Basse, Nils Plesner

    2001-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a two-volume collective scattering system for localized measurements of plasma turbulence. The finite crossfield correlation length of plasma turbulence combined with spatial variations in the magnetic field direction are used to obtain spatially localized turbulence...

  14. The Effects of Sand Sediment Volume Heterogeneities on Sound Propagation and Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...Jones and D. R. Jackson, “Small perturbation method of high-frequency bistatic volume scattering from marine sediments,” Oceanic Engineering, IEEE J. of

  15. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  16. Dynamic light scattering with applications to chemistry, biology, and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, Bruce J

    2000-01-01

    Lasers play an increasingly important role in a variety of detection techniques, making inelastic light scattering a tool of growing value in the investigation of dynamic and structural problems in chemistry, biology, and physics. Until the initial publication of this work, however, no monograph treated the principles behind current developments in the field.This volume presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles underlying laser light scattering, focusing on the time dependence of fluctuations in fluid systems; it also serves as an introduction to the theory of time correlation f

  17. Finite-volume Hamiltonian method for $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Leinweber, Derek B; Thomas, A W; Young, Ross D

    2015-01-01

    Within a formulation of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering, we investigate the use of the finite-volume Hamiltonian approach to resolving scattering observables from lattice QCD spectra. We consider spectra in the centre-of-mass and moving frames for both S- and P-wave cases. Furthermore, we investigate the multi-channel case. Here we study the use of the Hamiltonian framework as a parametrization that can be fit directly to lattice spectra. Through this method, the hadron properties, such as mass, width and coupling, can be directly extracted from the lattice spectra.

  18. Elements of slow-neutron scattering basics, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, J M

    2015-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to the theory and applications of slow-neutron scattering, this detailed book equips readers with the fundamental principles of neutron studies, including the background and evolving development of neutron sources, facility design, neutron scattering instrumentation and techniques, and applications in materials phenomena. Drawing on the authors' extensive experience in this field, this text explores the implications of slow-neutron research in greater depth and breadth than ever before in an accessible yet rigorous manner suitable for both students and researchers in the fields of physics, biology, and materials engineering. Through pedagogical examples and in-depth discussion, readers will be able to grasp the full scope of the field of neutron scattering, from theoretical background through to practical, scientific applications.

  19. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.

    2013-08-01

    The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive index, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the absorption and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction index and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.

  20. Scattered radiation from applicators in clinical electron beams.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battum, L.J. van; Zee, W. van der; Huizenga, H.

    2003-01-01

    In radiotherapy with high-energy (4-25 MeV) electron beams, scattered radiation from the electron applicator influences the dose distribution in the patient. In most currently available treatment planning systems for radiotherapy this component is not explicitly included and handled only by a slight

  1. Application of numerical methods to planetary radiowave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard A.; Tyler, G. Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Existing numerical techniques for the solution of scattering problems were investigated to determine those which might be applicable to planetary surface studies, with the goal of improving the interpretation of radar data from Venus, Mars, the Moon, and icy satellites. The general characteristics of the models are described along with computational concerns. In particular, the Numerical Electrogmatics Code (NEC) developed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is discussed. Though not developed for random rough surfaces, the NEC contains elements which may be generalized and which could be valuable in the study of scattering by planetary surfaces.

  2. SPring-8 and application of nuclear scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harami, Taikan [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The SPring-8 has Linac synchrotron, incidence type facility and an accumulation ring. By preparing a beam line to take out light at the accumulation ring, the SPring-8 is supplied for common applications. Development of science adopting new method to study of properties and organisms by using high brightness source is expected. Construction of the SPring-8 accelerator was finished and adjusting test and commissioning of apparatuses are now in proceeding. At pre-use inspection of the accumulation ring on March, 1997, beam lines for R and D and crystalline structure analysis are applied to the Science and Technology Agency to inspect them simultaneously. And, by activating character of the SPring-8 radiation facility of high brightness and high energy X-ray generator, property study using Moessbauer nuclide to a probe can be conducted. (G.K.)

  3. Monte Carlo solution of the volume-integral equation of electromagnetic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Electromagnetic scattering is often the main physical process to be understood when interpreting the observations of asteroids, comets, and meteors. Modeling the scattering faces still many problems, and one needs to assess several different cases: multiple scattering and shadowing by the rough surface, multiple scattering inside a surface element, and single scattering by a small object. Our specific goal is to extend the electromagnetic techniques to larger and more complicated objects, and derive approximations taking into account the most important effects of waves. Here we experiment with Monte Carlo techniques: can they provide something new to solving the scattering problems? The electromagnetic wave equation in the presence of a scatterer of volume V and refractive index m, with an incident wave EE_0, including boundary conditions and the scattering condition at infinity, can be presented in the form of an integral equation EE(rr)(1+suski(rr) Q(ρ))-int_{V-V_ρ}ddrr' GG(rr-rr')suski(rr')EE(rr') =EE_0, where suski(rr)=m(rr)^2-1, Q(ρ)=-1/3+{cal O}(ρ^2)+{O'}(m^2ρ^2), {O}, and {O'} are some second- and higher-order corrections for the finite-size volume V_ρ of radius ρ around the singularity and GG is the dyadic Green's function of the form GG(RR)={exp(im kR)}/{4π R}[unittensor(1+{im}/{R}-{1}/{R^2})-RRRR(1+{3im}/{R}-{3}/{R^2})]. In general, this is solved by extending the internal field in terms of some simple basis functions, e.g., plane or spherical waves or a cubic grid, approximating the integrals in a clever way, and determining the goodness of the solution somehow, e.g., moments or least square. Whatever the choice, the solution usually converges nicely towards a correct enough solution when the scatterer is small and simple, and diverges when the scatterer becomes too complicated. With certain methods, one can reach larger scatterers faster, but the memory and CPU needs can be huge. Until today, all successful solutions are based on more or less

  4. Measurements and modeling of the volume scattering function in the coastal northern Adriatic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Jean-François; Shybanov, Eugeny; Lee, Michael E.-G.; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2007-08-01

    We performed measurements of the volume scattering function (VSF) between 0.5° and 179° with an angular resolution of 0.3° in the northern Adriatic Sea onboard an oceanographic platform during three different seasons, using the multispectral volume scattering meter (MVSM) instrument. We observed important differences with respect to Petzold's commonly used functions, whereas the Fournier-Forand's analytical formulation provided a rather good description of the measured VSF. The comparison of the derived scattering, bp(λ) and backscattering, bbp(λ) coefficients for particles with the measurements performed with the classical AC-9 and Hydroscat-6 showed agreement to within 20%. The use of an empirical relationship for the derivation of bb(λ) from β(ψ,λ) at ψ=140° was validated for this coastal site although ψ=118° was confirmed to be the most appropriate angle. The low value of the factor used to convert β(ψ,λ) into bb(λ) within the Hydroscat-6 processing partially contributed to the underestimation of bb(λ) with respect to the MVSM. Finally, use of the Kopelevich model together with a measurement of bp(λ) at λ=555 nm allowed us to reconstruct the VSF with average rms percent differences between 8 and 15%.

  5. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A.; Chikova, Elena D.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  6. Accurate measurement of volume and shape of resting and activated blood platelets from light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalensky, Alexander E; Yurkin, Maxim A; Konokhova, Anastasiya I; Strokotov, Dmitry I; Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Tsvetovskaya, Galina A; Chikova, Elena D; Maltsev, Valeri P

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach for determination of volume and shape of individual blood platelets modeled as an oblate spheroid from angle-resolved light scattering with flow-cytometric technique. The light-scattering profiles (LSPs) of individual platelets were measured with the scanning flow cytometer and the platelet characteristics were determined from the solution of the inverse light-scattering problem using the precomputed database of theoretical LSPs. We revealed a phenomenon of parameter compensation, which is partly explained in the framework of anomalous diffraction approximation. To overcome this problem, additional a priori information on the platelet refractive index was used. It allowed us to determine the size of each platelet with subdiffraction precision and independent of the particular value of the platelet aspect ratio. The shape (spheroidal aspect ratio) distributions of platelets showed substantial differences between native and activated by 10 μM adenosine diphosphate samples. We expect that the new approach may find use in hematological analyzers for accurate measurement of platelet volume distribution and for determination of the platelet activation efficiency.

  7. Finite volume treatment of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering in the $\\rho$ channel

    CERN Document Server

    Albaladejo, M; Oller, J A; Roca, L

    2013-01-01

    We make a theoretical study of $\\pi\\pi$ scattering with quantum numbers $J^{PC}=1^{--}$ in a finite box. To calculate physical observables for infinite volume from lattice QCD, the finite box dependence of the potentials is not usually considered. We quantify such effects by means of two different approaches for vector-isovector $\\pi\\pi$ scattering based on Unitarized Chiral Perturbation Theory results: the Inverse Amplitude Method and another one based on the $N/D$ method. We take into account finite box effects stemming from higher orders through loops in the crossed $t,u-$channels as well as from the renormalization of the coupling constants. The main conclusion is that for $\\pi\\pi$ phase shifts in the isovector channel one can safely apply L\\"uscher based methods for finite box sizes of $L$ greater than $2 m_\\pi^{-1}$.

  8. A novel optical scattering collection system for particulate monitoring applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nuspliger, R.J. [Environmental Systems Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Light collecting systems often require radically different optical surfaces than those commonly found in optical imaging systems. An optical particulate monitor must probe a volume in emission stacks to obtain a good statistical distribution of suspended particles. However, ideal imaging systems map object planes into conjugate image planes and can probe only small volumes. The authors describe the design, fabrication and performance of a novel optical scattering collection system that exploits precision-engineered reflective conical surfaces (axicons) in a telescopic arrangement that maps a line in object space onto the detector plane in image space. Such non-spherical surfaces are nearly impossible to fabricate using traditional methods, but can readily be made using the deterministic method of single-point diamond turning. In addition to complex optical surfaces, single-point diamond turning also makes possible the precision engineering of reference surfaces useful for built-in alignment of multiple surfaces and rapid assembly of the finished system.

  9. Transient analysis of scattering from ferromagnetic objects using Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert and volume integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Sadeed Bin

    2016-11-02

    An explicit marching on-in-time scheme for analyzing transient electromagnetic wave interactions on ferromagnetic scatterers is described. The proposed method solves a coupled system of time domain magnetic field volume integral and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations. The unknown fluxes and fields are discretized using full and half Schaubert-Wilton-Glisson functions in space and bandlimited temporal interpolation functions in time. The coupled system is cast in the form of an ordinary differential equation and integrated in time using a PE(CE)m type linear multistep method to obtain the unknown expansion coefficients. Numerical results demonstrating the stability and accuracy of the proposed scheme are presented.

  10. WEBSCAT: A web application for the analysis of electromagnetic scattering from small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Ankur; Rajkhowa, Pritom; P. Saikia, Gunjan; Ahmed, Gazi A.; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2014-10-01

    Development of an online web application to simulate and display plane wave scattering from small particles is presented. In particular, the computation of angular variation of the scattering properties (scattering matrix elements, scattering coefficients, single scattering albedo etc.) of particulate matter by using the Mie theory and the T-matrix method was incorporated in the application. Comparison of the results generated by using the web application with other reported benchmark results has shown that the web application is accurate and reliable for electromagnetic scattering computations.

  11. Study of light scattering from randomly oriented submicron TiO2 structures for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical catalysis applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shital, Shilpi; Dutta, Viresh

    2016-04-01

    The paper reports on the scattering properties of different submicron mesoporous TiO2 structures and their correlation with the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. Bruggeman's effective medium theory was used to calculate the effective refractive index. T-matrix and Mie theory were used to evaluate scattering parameters, such as scattering coefficient and asymmetry factor. The parameters presented here can be used either to understand the suitability of these TiO2 structures for photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications or as inputs for full optoelectronics simulation of devices. Scattering coefficients of the structures were found to mainly depend on their volume and porosity rather than shape. The dimensions and refractive index of scattering structures commonly used for photovoltaic and photocatalytic application are generally within a range of dimensions and refractive indices quite similar to that discussed in this paper, and hence, results discussed will also be indicative for other scattering structures for the same application. The effects of shape, size, and porosity on scattering parameters have also been discussed.

  12. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Physics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Almost 30 years after the first reports on surface-enhanced Raman signals, the phenomenon of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is now well established. Yet, explaining the enhancement of a spectroscopic signal by fouteen orders of magnitude continues to attract the attention of physicists and chemists alike. And, at the same time and rapidly growing, SERS is becoming a very useful spectroscopic tool with exciting applications in many fields. SERS gained particular interest after single-molecule Raman spectroscopy had been demonstrated. This bookl summarizes and discusses present theoretical approaches that explain the phenomenon of SERS and reports on new and exciting experiments and applications of the fascinating spectroscopic effect.

  13. Two-Particle Elastic Scattering in a Finite Volume Including QED

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Silas R

    2014-01-01

    The presence of long-range interactions violates a condition necessary to relate the energy of two particles in a finite volume to their S-matrix elements in the manner of Luscher. While in infinite volume, QED contributions to low-energy charged particle scattering must be resummed to all orders in perturbation theory (the Coulomb ladder diagrams), in a finite volume the momentum operator is gapped, allowing for a perturbative treatment. The leading QED corrections to the two-particle finite-volume energy quantization condition below the inelastic threshold, as well as approximate formulas for energy eigenvalues, are obtained. In particular, we focus on two spinless hadrons in the A1+ irreducible representation of the cubic group, and truncate the strong interactions to the s-wave. These results are necessary for the analysis of Lattice QCD+QED calculations of charged-hadron interactions, and can be straightforwardly generalized to other representations of the cubic group, to hadrons with spin, and to includ...

  14. Finite volume treatment of pi pi scattering and limits to phase shifts extraction from lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Albaladejo, M; Oset, E; Rios, G; Roca, L

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the effects of finite volume for pipi scattering in order to extract physical observables for infinite volume from lattice QCD. We compare three different approaches for pipi scattering (lowest order Bethe-Salpeter approach, N/D and inverse amplitude methods) with the aim to study the effects of the finite size of the box in the potential of the different theories, specially the left-hand cut contribution through loops in the crossed t,u-channels. We quantify the error made by neglecting these effects in usual extractions of physical observables from lattice QCD spectra. We conclude that for pipi phase-shifts in the scalar-isoscalar channel up to 800 MeV this effect is negligible for box sizes bigger than 2.5m_pi^-1 and of the order of 5% at around 1.5-2m_pi^-1. For isospin 2 the finite size effects can reach up to 10% for that energy. We also quantify the error made when using the standard Luscher method to extract physical observables from lattice QCD, which is widely used in the lite...

  15. Analysis of electromagnetic wave interactions on nonlinear scatterers using time domain volume integral equations

    KAUST Repository

    Ulku, Huseyin Arda

    2014-07-06

    Effects of material nonlinearities on electromagnetic field interactions become dominant as field amplitudes increase. A typical example is observed in plasmonics, where highly localized fields “activate” Kerr nonlinearities. Naturally, time domain solvers are the method of choice when it comes simulating these nonlinear effects. Oftentimes, finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used for this purpose. This is simply due to the fact that explicitness of the FDTD renders the implementation easier and the material nonlinearity can be easily accounted for using an auxiliary differential equation (J.H. Green and A. Taflove, Opt. Express, 14(18), 8305-8310, 2006). On the other hand, explicit marching on-in-time (MOT)-based time domain integral equation (TDIE) solvers have never been used for the same purpose even though they offer several advantages over FDTD (E. Michielssen, et al., ECCOMAS CFD, The Netherlands, Sep. 5-8, 2006). This is because explicit MOT solvers have never been stabilized until not so long ago. Recently an explicit but stable MOT scheme has been proposed for solving the time domain surface magnetic field integral equation (H.A. Ulku, et al., IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., 61(8), 4120-4131, 2013) and later it has been extended for the time domain volume electric field integral equation (TDVEFIE) (S. B. Sayed, et al., Pr. Electromagn. Res. S., 378, Stockholm, 2013). This explicit MOT scheme uses predictor-corrector updates together with successive over relaxation during time marching to stabilize the solution even when time step is as large as in the implicit counterpart. In this work, an explicit MOT-TDVEFIE solver is proposed for analyzing electromagnetic wave interactions on scatterers exhibiting Kerr nonlinearity. Nonlinearity is accounted for using the constitutive relation between the electric field intensity and flux density. Then, this relation and the TDVEFIE are discretized together by expanding the intensity and flux - sing half

  16. Multiple-scattering theory. New developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Arthur

    2007-12-04

    Multiple-scattering theory (MST) is a very efficient technique for calculating the electronic properties of an assembly of atoms. It provides explicitly the Green function, which can be used in many applications such as magnetism, transport and spectroscopy. This work gives an overview on recent developments of multiple-scattering theory. One of the important innovations is the multiple scattering implementation of the self-interaction correction approach, which enables realistic electronic structure calculations of systems with localized electrons. Combined with the coherent potential approximation (CPA), this method can be applied for studying the electronic structure of alloys and as well as pseudo-alloys representing charge and spin disorder. This formalism is extended to finite temperatures which allows to investigate phase transitions and thermal fluctuations in correlated materials. Another novel development is the implementation of the self-consistent non-local CPA approach, which takes into account charge correlations around the CPA average and chemical short range order. This formalism is generalized to the relativistic treatment of magnetically ordered systems. Furthermore, several improvements are implemented to optimize the computational performance and to increase the accuracy of the KKR Green function method. The versatility of the approach is illustrated in numerous applications. (orig.)

  17. Compton Scattering and Its Applications: The PLEIADES Femtosecond X-ray Source at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartemann, F V; Brown, W J; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P J; Betts, S M; Booth, R; Crane, J K; Cross, R R; Fittinghoff, D N; Gibson, D J; Kuba, J; Rupp, B; Tremaine, A M; Springer, P T

    2003-05-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small ({micro}m{sup 3}) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the {gamma}-{gamma} collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  18. Compton Scattering and its Applications:. the Pleiades Femtosecond X-Ray Source at LLNL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Brown, W. J.; Anderson, S. G.; Barty, C. P. J.; Betts, S. M.; Booth, R.; Crane, J. K.; Cross, R. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gibson, D. J.; Kuba, J.; Rupp, B.; Tremaine, A. M.; Springer, P. T.

    2004-10-01

    Remarkable developments in critical technologies including terawatt-class lasers using chirped-pulse amplification, high brightness photoinjectors, high-gradient accelerators, and superconducting linacs make it possible to design and operate compact, tunable, subpicosecond Compton scattering x-ray sources with a wide variety of applications. In such novel radiation sources, the collision between a femtosecond laser pulse and a low emittance relativistic electron bunch in a small (μm3) interaction volume produces Doppler-upshifted scattered photons with unique characteristics: the energy is tunable in the 5-500 keV range, the angular divergence of the beam is small (mrad), and the pulses are ultrashort (10 fs - 10 ps). Two main paths are currently being followed in laboratories worldwide: high peak brightness, using ultrahigh intensity femtosecond lasers at modest repetition rates, and high average brightness, using superconducting linac and high average power laser technology at MHz repetition rates. Targeted applications range from x-ray protein crystallography and high contrast medical imaging to femtosecond pump-probe and diffraction experiments. More exotic uses of such sources include the γ-γ collider, NIF backlighting, nonlinear Compton scattering, and high-field QED. Theoretical considerations and experimental results will be discussed within this context.

  19. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms of accu...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  20. Algorithms and computer codes for atomic and molecular quantum scattering theory. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, L. (ed.)

    1979-01-01

    The goals of this workshop are to identify which of the existing computer codes for solving the coupled equations of quantum molecular scattering theory perform most efficiently on a variety of test problems, and to make tested versions of those codes available to the chemistry community through the NRCC software library. To this end, many of the most active developers and users of these codes have been invited to discuss the methods and to solve a set of test problems using the LBL computers. The first volume of this workshop report is a collection of the manuscripts of the talks that were presented at the first meeting held at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois June 25-27, 1979. It is hoped that this will serve as an up-to-date reference to the most popular methods with their latest refinements and implementations.

  1. Parametric and scattering characterization of PDMS membranes for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Vazquez Montiel, S.; Munoz-Lopez, J.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Delgado Atencio, J. A.

    2009-08-01

    Today elastic membranes are being used more frequent as optical surfaces in the science or in the industry. This due to the advantages that they display in their handling and in their cost of production. These characteristics make them ideals to apply them in micro-optical components and Tunable Focus Liquid Filled Length Lens (TFLFLL). In order to know if a membrane of PDMS (PDMS Sylgard 184) is feasible for a specific application within the field of the optics, it is necessary to know its mechanical, optical and chemical properties. In this work the parametric membrane characterization is reported for an optical application. An important factor in the performance of these membranes is related with their scattering factor that is produced due to the roughness and impurities (micro-bubbles or dust particles). These membranes are used as refractive surface in TFLFLL. Experimental results of the characterization process and device performance are presented.

  2. Relationship between the Integrated Intensity of the Power Spectrum of Scattered Light and Tissue Blood Volume by the Dynamic Light Scattering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Susumu; Nishihara, Minoru; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Osawa, Toshihiko

    1990-09-01

    The laser scattering characteristics from tissue microvasculature have been made clear by means of theoretical and experimental approaches. Our results show that the integrated intensity of the power spectrum correlates linearly with the volume of red blood cells in a given tissue provided the average collision number (\\bar{m}) between photons and moving red blood cells is less than unity. Also, the integrated intensity of the power spectrum is proportional to tissue blood volume if the density of red blood cells in blood (hematocrit) is constant.

  3. Finite volume effects in pion-kaon scattering and reconstruction of the kappa(800) resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, M

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the kappa(800) on the lattice is a challenging task that starts to become feasible due to the rapid progress in recent-years lattice QCD calculations. As the resonance is broad, special attention to finite-volume effects has to be paid, because no sharp resonance signal as from avoided level crossing can be expected. In the present article, we investigate the finite volume effects in the framework of unitarized chiral perturbation theory using next-to-leading order terms. After a fit to meson-meson partial wave data, lattice levels for piK scattering are predicted. In addition, levels are shown for the quantum numbers in which the sigma(600), f_0(980), a_0(980), phi(1020), K*(892), and rho(770) appear, as well as the repulsive channels. Methods to extract the kappa(800) signal from the lattice spectrum are presented. Using pseudo-data, we estimate the precision that lattice data should have to allow for a clear-cut extraction of this resonance. To put the results into context, in particular the req...

  4. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  5. Kartini Research Reactor prospective studies for neutron scattering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widarto [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, BATAN (Indonesia)

    1999-10-01

    The Kartini Research Reactor (KRR) is located in Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, Yogyakarta - Indonesia. The reactor is operated for 100 kW thermal power used for research, experiments and training of nuclear technology. There are 4 beam ports and 1 column thermal are available at the reactor. Those beam ports have thermal neutron flux around 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}s each other and used for sub critical assembly, neutron radiography studies and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Design of neutron collimator has been done for piercing radial beam port and the calculation result of collimated neutron flux is around 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s. This paper describes experiment facilities and parameters of the Kartini research reactor, and further more the prospective studies for neutron scattering application. The purpose of this paper is to optimize in utilization of the beam ports facilities and enhance the manpower specialty. The special characteristic of the beam ports and preliminary studies, pre activities regarding with neutron scattering studies for KKR is presented. (author)

  6. Some applications of polarized inelastic neutron scattering in magnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Roessli; P Böni

    2004-07-01

    A brief account of applications of polarized inelastic neutron scattering in condensed matter research is given. We show that full polarization analysis is the only tool allowing to discriminate unambiguously between different magnetic modes in various magnetic materials. We show by means of recent results in the Heisenberg ferromagnet EuS that the effects of dipolar interactions can be studied on a microscopic scale. Moreover, we have found for the first time indications for the divergence of the longitudinal fluctuations below c. In the itinerant antiferromagnet chromium we demonstrate that the dynamics of the longitudinal and transverse excitations are very different, resolving a long standing puzzle concerning the slope of their dispersion. Finally, we show that a measurement of the polarization-dependent part of the cross section of non-centrosymmetric MnSi proves directly that the chirality of the magnetic fluctuations is left-handed.

  7. 2D Static Light Scattering for Dairy Based Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    Throughout this thesis we investigate a recently introduced optical technique denoted 2D static light scattering (2DSLS). The technique is remote sensing, non-invasive, highly flexible, and appears to be well suited for in-line process control. Moreover, the output signal contains contributions......, this specific process control can be highly beneficial. To provide suitable reference measures on the actual microstructure, we investigate how to quantify micrographs of yogurts objectively. We provide a comparative study, that includes a broad range of different image texture descriptors....... from several different optical phenomena, which can be utilised to provide information on chemical composition and underlying microstructure of an investigated sample. The main goal of this thesis is to provide an exploratory study of the 2DSLS technique in relation to dairy based applications...

  8. Microwave remote sensing: Active and passive. Volume 3 - From theory to applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of volume scattering and emission theory are discussed, taking into account a weakly scattering medium, the Born approximation, first-order renormalization, the radiative transfer method, and the matrix-doubling method. Other topics explored are related to scatterometers and probing systems, the passive microwave sensing of the atmosphere, the passive microwave sensing of the ocean, the passive microwave sensing of land, the active microwave sensing of land, and radar remote sensing applications. Attention is given to inversion techniques, atmospheric attenuation and emission, a temperature profile retrieval from ground-based observations, mapping rainfall rates, the apparent temperature of the sea, the emission behavior of bare soil surfaces, the emission behavior of vegetation canopies, the emission behavior of snow, wind-vector radar scatterometry, radar measurements of sea ice, and the back-scattering behavior of cultural vegetation canopies.

  9. Multiple Scattering Using Parallel Volume Integral Equation Method: Interaction of SH Waves with Multiple Multilayered Anisotropic Elliptical Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungki Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The parallel volume integral equation method (PVIEM is applied for the analysis of elastic wave scattering problems in an unbounded isotropic solid containing multiple multilayered anisotropic elliptical inclusions. This recently developed numerical method does not require the use of Green’s function for the multilayered anisotropic inclusions; only Green’s function for the unbounded isotropic matrix is needed. This method can also be applied to solve general two- and three-dimensional elastodynamic problems involving inhomogeneous and/or multilayered anisotropic inclusions whose shape and number are arbitrary. A detailed analysis of the SH wave scattering is presented for multiple triple-layered orthotropic elliptical inclusions. Numerical results are presented for the displacement fields at the interfaces for square and hexagonal packing arrays of triple-layered elliptical inclusions in a broad frequency range of practical interest. It is necessary to use standard parallel programming, such as MPI (message passing interface, to speed up computation in the volume integral equation method (VIEM. Parallel volume integral equation method as a pioneer of numerical analysis enables us to investigate the effects of single/multiple scattering, fiber packing type, fiber volume fraction, single/multiple layer(s, multilayer’s shape and geometry, isotropy/anisotropy, and softness/hardness of the multiple multilayered anisotropic elliptical inclusions on displacements at the interfaces of the inclusions.

  10. On the Use of Generalized Volume Scattering Models for the Improvement of General Polarimetric Model-Based Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a general polarimetric model-based decomposition framework was proposed by Chen et al., which addresses several well-known limitations in previous decomposition methods and implements a simultaneous full-parameter inversion by using complete polarimetric information. However, it only employs four typical models to characterize the volume scattering component, which limits the parameter inversion performance. To overcome this issue, this paper presents two general polarimetric model-based decomposition methods by incorporating the generalized volume scattering model (GVSM or simplified adaptive volume scattering model, (SAVSM proposed by Antropov et al. and Huang et al., respectively, into the general decomposition framework proposed by Chen et al. By doing so, the final volume coherency matrix structure is selected from a wide range of volume scattering models within a continuous interval according to the data itself without adding unknowns. Moreover, the new approaches rely on one nonlinear optimization stage instead of four as in the previous method proposed by Chen et al. In addition, the parameter inversion procedure adopts the modified algorithm proposed by Xie et al. which leads to higher accuracy and more physically reliable output parameters. A number of Monte Carlo simulations of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR data are carried out and show that the proposed method with GVSM yields an overall improvement in the final accuracy of estimated parameters and outperforms both the version using SAVSM and the original approach. In addition, C-band Radarsat-2 and L-band AIRSAR fully polarimetric images over the San Francisco region are also used for testing purposes. A detailed comparison and analysis of decomposition results over different land-cover types are conducted. According to this study, the use of general decomposition models leads to a more accurate quantitative retrieval of target parameters. However, there

  11. Neutron transport with anisotropic scattering: theory and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Eynde, Gert

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is a blend of neutron transport theory and numerical analysis. We start with the study of the problem of the Mika/Case eigenexpansion used in the solution process of the homogeneous one-speed Boltzmann neutron transport equation with anisotropic scattering for plane symmetry. The anisotropic scattering is expressed as a finite Legendre series in which the coefficients are the ``scattering coefficients'. This eigenexpansion consists of a discrete spectrum of eigenvalues with its co...

  12. Light scattering by nonspherical particles theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mishchenko, Michael I; Travis, Larry D

    1999-01-01

    There is hardly a field of science or engineering that does not have some interest in light scattering by small particles. For example, this subject is important to climatology because the energy budget for the Earth's atmosphere is strongly affected by scattering of solar radiation by cloud and aerosol particles, and the whole discipline of remote sensing relies largely on analyzing the parameters of radiation scattered by aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The scattering of light by spherical particles can be easily computed using the conventional Mie theory. However, most small solid part

  13. Transient analysis of electromagnetic wave interactions on high-contrast scatterers using volume electric field integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Sadeed Bin

    2014-07-01

    A marching on-in-time (MOT)-based time domain volume electric field integral equation (TD-VEFIE) solver is proposed for accurate and stable analysis of electromagnetic wave interactions on high-contrast scatterers. The stability is achieved using band-limited but two-sided (non-causal) temporal interpolation functions and an extrapolation scheme to cast the time marching into a causal form. The extrapolation scheme is designed to be highly accurate for oscillating and exponentially decaying fields, hence it accurately captures the physical behavior of the resonant modes that are excited inside the dielectric scatterer. Numerical results demonstrate that the resulting MOT scheme maintains its stability as the number of resonant modes increases with the contrast of the scatterer.

  14. Effects of subsurface volume scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keihm, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of volumetric scattering on the lunar microwave brightness temperature are examined for a broad range of feasible lunar rock population distributions. Mie-scattering phase functions and the radiative transfer method are utilized. Surveyor and Apollo data relevant to lunar rock size distributions are discussed, and parameters are chosen for nine scattering models which liberally cover the range of studied rock population distributions. Scattering model brightness temperature predictions are analyzed in terms of the lunar disk center emission averaged over a lunation for wavelengths of 3-30 cm. The effects of scattering on the amplitude of disk center brightness temperature variations and resultant deductions of regolith electrical loss are examined. Constraints on the global scale variability of subsurface scatterers imposed by microwave brightness temperature maps are considered.

  15. Refractive index effects on the scatter volume location and Doppler velocity estimates of ionospheric HF backscatter echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Ponomarenko

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric E×B plasma drift velocities derived from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN Doppler data exhibit systematically smaller (by 20–30% magnitudes than those measured by the Defence Meteorological Satellites Program (DMSP satellites. A part of the disagreement was previously attributed to the change in the E/B ratio due to the altitude difference between the satellite orbit and the location of the effective scatter volume for the radar signals. Another important factor arises from the free-space propagation assumption used in converting the measured Doppler frequency shift into the line-of-sight velocity. In this work, we have applied numerical ray-tracing to identify the location of the effective scattering volume of the ionosphere and to estimate the ionospheric refractive index. The simulations show that the major contribution to the radar echoes should be provided by the Pedersen and/or escaping rays that are scattered in the vicinity of the F-layer maximum. This conclusion is supported by a statistical analysis of the experimental elevation angle data, which have a signature consistent with scattering from the F-region peak. A detailed analysis of the simulations has allowed us to propose a simple velocity correction procedure, which we have successfully tested against the SuperDARN/DMSP comparison data set.

  16. Application of multiple scattering theory to lower-energy elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, C.R.; Elster, C.; Thaler, R.M.; Weppner, S.P. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States) Center for Computationally Intensive Physics, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States) Institute of Nuclear Particle Physics, and Department of Physics, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States) Physics Department, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States))

    1995-03-01

    The optical model potentials for nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering at 65 meV are calculated for [sup 12]C, [sup 16]O, [sup 28]Si, [sup 40]Ca, [sup 56]Fe, [sup 90]Zr, and [sup 208]Pb in first-order multiple scattering theory, following the prescription of the spectator expansion, where the only inputs are the free nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials, the nuclear densities, and the nuclear mean field as derived from microscopic nuclear structure calculations. These potentials are used to predict differential cross sections, analyzing powers, and spin rotation functions for neutron and proton scattering at 65 MeV projectile energy and compared with available experimental data. The theoretical curves are in very good agreement with the data. The modification of the propagator due to the coupling of the struck nucleon to the residual nucleus is seen to be significant at this energy and invariably improves the congruence of theoretical prediction and measurement.

  17. Application of multiple scattering theory to lower-energy elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, C. R.; Elster, Ch.; Thaler, R. M.; Weppner, S. P.

    1995-03-01

    The optical model potentials for nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering at 65 meV are calculated for 12C, 16O, 28Si, 40Ca, 56Fe, 90Zr, and 208Pb in first-order multiple scattering theory, following the prescription of the spectator expansion, where the only inputs are the free nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials, the nuclear densities, and the nuclear mean field as derived from microscopic nuclear structure calculations. These potentials are used to predict differential cross sections, analyzing powers, and spin rotation functions for neutron and proton scattering at 65 MeV projectile energy and compared with available experimental data. The theoretical curves are in very good agreement with the data. The modification of the propagator due to the coupling of the struck nucleon to the residual nucleus is seen to be significant at this energy and invariably improves the congruence of theoretical prediction and measurement.

  18. Neutron scattering applications in structural biology: now and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Neutrons have an important role to play in structural biology. Neutron crystallography, small-angle neutron scattering and inelastic neutron scattering techniques all contribute unique information on biomolecular structures. In particular, solution scattering techniques give critical information on the conformations and dispositions of the components of complex assemblies under a wide variety of relevant conditions. The power of these methods is demonstrated here by studies of protein/DNA complexes, and Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins complexed with their regulatory targets. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of a new structural approach using neutron resonance scattering. The impact of biological neutron scattering to date has been constrained principally by the available fluxes at neutron sources and the true potential of these approaches will only be realized with the development of new more powerful neutron sources. (author)

  19. Computer technology -- 1996: Applications and methodology. PVP-Volume 326

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, G.M. [ed.] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hsu, K.H. [ed.] [Babcock and Wilcox, Barberton, OH (United States); Lee, T.W. [ed.] [FMC Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States); Nicholas, T. [ed.] [USAF Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The primary objective of the Computer Technology Committee of the ASME Pressure Vessels and Piping Division is to promote interest and technical exchange in the field of computer technology, related to the design and analysis of pressure vessels and piping. The topics included in this volume are: analysis of bolted joints; nonlinear analysis, applications and methodology; finite element analysis and applications; and behavior of materials. Separate abstracts were prepared for 23 of the papers in this volume.

  20. Elastic scattering of positronium: Application of the confined variational method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Junyi

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that the phase shift in elastic positronium-atom scattering can be precisely determined by the confined variational method, in spite of the fact that the Hamiltonian includes an unphysical confining potential acting on the center of mass of the positron and one of the atomic electrons. As an example, we study the S-wave elastic scattering for the positronium-hydrogen scattering system, where the existing 4% discrepancy between the Kohn variational calculation and the R-matrix calculation is resolved. © Copyright EPLA, 2012.

  1. Pharmaceutical applications of separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenqi; Anderson, Carl A

    2010-12-01

    The number of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic applications in the pharmaceutical sciences has grown significantly in the last decade. Despite its widespread application, the fundamental interaction between NIR radiation and pharmaceutical materials is often not mechanistically well understood. Separation of absorption and scattering in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is intended to extract absorption and scattering spectra (i.e., absorption and reduced scattering coefficients) from reflectance/transmittance NIR measurements. The purpose of the separation is twofold: (1) to enhance the understanding of the individual roles played by absorption and scattering in NIRS and (2) to apply the separated absorption and scattering spectra for practical spectroscopic analyses. This review paper surveys the multiple techniques reported to date on the separation of NIR absorption and scattering within pharmaceutical applications, focusing on the instrumentations, mathematical approaches used to separate absorption and scattering and related pharmaceutical applications. This literature review is expected to enhance the understanding and thereby the utility of NIRS in pharmaceutical science. Further, the measurement and subsequent understanding of the separation of absorption and scattering is expected to increase not only the number of NIRS applications, but also their robustness.

  2. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  3. A Stable Marching on-in-time Scheme for Solving the Time Domain Electric Field Volume Integral Equation on High-contrast Scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Sayed, Sadeed Bin

    2015-05-05

    A time domain electric field volume integral equation (TD-EFVIE) solver is proposed for characterizing transient electromagnetic wave interactions on high-contrast dielectric scatterers. The TD-EFVIE is discretized using the Schaubert- Wilton-Glisson (SWG) and approximate prolate spherical wave (APSW) functions in space and time, respectively. The resulting system of equations can not be solved by a straightforward application of the marching on-in-time (MOT) scheme since the two-sided APSW interpolation functions require the knowledge of unknown “future” field samples during time marching. Causality of the MOT scheme is restored using an extrapolation technique that predicts the future samples from known “past” ones. Unlike the extrapolation techniques developed for MOT schemes that are used in solving time domain surface integral equations, this scheme trains the extrapolation coefficients using samples of exponentials with exponents on the complex frequency plane. This increases the stability of the MOT-TD-EFVIE solver significantly, since the temporal behavior of decaying and oscillating electromagnetic modes induced inside the scatterers is very accurately taken into account by this new extrapolation scheme. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed MOT solver maintains its stability even when applied to analyzing wave interactions on high-contrast scatterers.

  4. FDTD Application of Targets Electromagnetic Scattering in Layered Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yan-nan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD was used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering (EMS for targets in layered space. A new set of 1D modified Maxwell equations and auxiliary equations with incident angle was derived from 2D Maxwell equations and was used to compute the electromagnetic field in vertical boundary in 2D total field-scattered field (TF/SF, and thus incidence of uniform plane wave in time domain can be directly realized. In order to avoid complex Somerfield integration, the reciprocity theorem was used to simplify an extrapolation algorithm. Then the proposed algorithm and program in this paper were validated by applying them to compute the electromagnetic scattered field for targets in half-space and the radiation field for line current in layered lossy space. Finally this algorithm was used to characterize EMS for a tunnel in multi-layered space, for a tunnel open to vehicle, and for a tunnel and vehicle in lossless layered space. The results show the vehicle has a great impact on the scattering field, and the layered media surrounded the target can shield the scattering field.

  5. 8th conference on Finite Volumes for Complex Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Omnes, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    This first volume of the proceedings of the 8th conference on "Finite Volumes for Complex Applications" (Lille, June 2017) covers various topics including convergence and stability analysis, as well as investigations of these methods from the point of view of compatibility with physical principles. It collects together the focused invited papers comparing advanced numerical methods for Stokes and Navier–Stokes equations on a benchmark, as well as reviewed contributions from internationally leading researchers in the field of analysis of finite volume and related methods, offering a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in the field. The finite volume method in its various forms is a space discretization technique for partial differential equations based on the fundamental physical principle of conservation, and recent decades have brought significant advances in the theoretical understanding of the method. Many finite volume methods preserve further qualitative or asymptotic properties, including m...

  6. Highly sensitive and reproducible silicon-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors for real applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2016-08-15

    During the past few decades, thanks to silicon nanomaterials' outstanding electronic/optical/mechanical properties, large surface-to-volume ratio, abundant surface chemistry, facile tailorability and good compatibility with modern semiconductor industry, different dimensional silicon nanostructures have been widely employed for rationally designing and fabricating high-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors for the detection of various chemical and biological species. Among these, two-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-modified silicon wafers and three-dimensional silicon nanostructures made of metal nanoparticle-decorated SiNW arrays are of particular interest, and have been extensively exploited as promising silicon-based SERS-active substrates for the construction of high-performance SERS sensors. With an aim to retrospect these important and exciting achievements, we herein focus on reviewing recent representative studies on silicon-based SERS sensors for sensing applications from a broad perspective and possible future direction, promoting readers' awareness of these novel powerful silicon-based SERS sensing technologies. Firstly, we summarize the two unique merits of silicon-based SERS sensors, and those are high sensitivity and good reproducibility. Next, we present recent advances of two- and three-dimensional silicon-based SERS sensors, especially for real applications. Finally, we discuss the major challenges and prospects for the development of silicon-based SERS sensors.

  7. Scattering Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols over Lanzhou City and Applications Using an Integrating Nephelometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张武; 胡波; 陈长和; 杜萍; 张镭; 冯广泓

    2004-01-01

    The data, measured by a three-wavelength Integrating Nephelometer over Lanzhou City during the winters of 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 respectively, have been analyzed for investigating the scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols and exploring their relationship and the status of air pollution. The aerosol particle volume distribution is inverted with the measured spectral scattering coefficients. The results show that the daily variation of the aerosol scattering coefficients is in a tri-peak shape. The average ratio of backscattering coefficient to total scattering coefficient at 550 nm is 0.158; there exists an excellent correlation between the scattering coefficients and the concentration of PM10. The average ratio of the concentration of PM10 to the scattering coefficients is 0.37 g m-2, which is contingent on the optical parameters of aerosol particles such as the size distribution, etc.; an algorithm is developed for inverting the volume distribution of aerosol particles by using the histogram and Monte-Carlo techniques, and the test results show that the inversion is reasonable.

  8. Practical improvements on photon diffusion theory : application to isotropic scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, R; Rinzema, K

    2001-01-01

    Based on the analysis of an isotropic point source in an infinite, isotropically scattering turbid medium, we suggest several modifications to the well-known diffusion theory. Compared with standard diffusion theory these modifications, which require very little extra mathematics, lead to a substant

  9. Detection of fast flying nanoparticles by light scattering over a large volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettazzi, F.; Bäumer, S.M.B.; Donck, J.C.J. van der; Deutz, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of nanoparticles is of paramount importance for contamination control in ultra-clean systems. Light scattering is a well-known detection method which is applied in many different scientific and technology domains including atmospheric physics, environmental control, and biology. It allows

  10. Application of a scattered-light radiometric power meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, James N; DiComo, Gregory P; Ting, Antonio C; Fischer, Richard P

    2011-04-01

    The power measurement of high-power continuous-wave laser beams typically calls for the use of water-cooled thermopile power meters. Large thermopile meters have slow response times that can prove insufficient to conduct certain tests, such as determining the influence of atmospheric turbulence on transmitted beam power. To achieve faster response times, we calibrated a digital camera to measure the power level as the optical beam is projected onto a white surface. This scattered-light radiometric power meter saves the expense of purchasing a large area power meter and the required water cooling. In addition, the system can report the power distribution, changes in the position, and the spot size of the beam. This paper presents the theory of the scattered-light radiometric power meter and demonstrates its use during a field test at a 2.2 km optical range. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. The symmetries of image formation by scattering. II. Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schwander, Peter; Ourmazd, Abbas; Giannakis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    We show that the symmetries of image formation by scattering enable graph-theoretic manifold-embedding techniques to extract structural and timing information from simulated and experimental snapshots at extremely low signal. The approach constitutes a physically-based, computationally efficient, and noise-robust route to analyzing the large and varied datasets generated by existing and emerging methods for studying structure and dynamics by scattering. We demonstrate three-dimensional structure recovery from X-ray diffraction and cryo-electron microscope image snapshots of unknown orientation, the latter at 12 times lower dose than currently in use. We also show that ultra-low-signal, random sightings of dynamically evolving systems can be sequenced into high quality movies to reveal their evolution. Our approach offers a route to recovering timing information in time-resolved experiments, and extracting 3D movies from two-dimensional random sightings of dynamic systems.

  12. APPLICATION OF CORRELATION—POLARIZA TION POTENTIAL TO THE LOW—ENERGY ELECTRON SCATTERING WITH ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijie; JianminYuan

    1990-01-01

    Applicability of the correlation potential,which is currently used in the local density functional theory,to the low-energy electron-atom and molecule scattering is investigated with some examples of scattering processes.

  13. Transition probability functions for applications of inelastic electron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Stefan; Schattschneider, Peter

    2012-09-01

    In this work, the transition matrix elements for inelastic electron scattering are investigated which are the central quantity for interpreting experiments. The angular part is given by spherical harmonics. For the weighted radial wave function overlap, analytic expressions are derived in the Slater-type and the hydrogen-like orbital models. These expressions are shown to be composed of a finite sum of polynomials and elementary trigonometric functions. Hence, they are easy to use, require little computation time, and are significantly more accurate than commonly used approximations.

  14. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: application to Rayleigh scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Safari, L; Amaro, P; Jänkälä, K; Fratini, F

    2014-01-01

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wavefunctions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  15. Robert R. Wilson Prize III: Applications of Intrabeam Scattering Formulae to a Myriad of Accelerator Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtingwa, Sekazi K.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss our entree into accelerator physics and the problem of intrabeam scattering in particular. We focus on the historical importance of understanding intrabeam scattering for the successful operation of Fermilab's Accumulator and Tevatron and the subsequent hunt for the top quark, and its importance for successful operation of CERN's Large Hadron Collider that discovered the Higgs boson. We provide details on intrabeam scattering formalisms for hadron and electron beams at high energies, concluding with an Ansatz by Karl Bane that has applications to electron damping rings and synchrotron light sources.

  16. Padé approximants and their application to scattering from fluid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Max; Tsui, Jing; Thompson, Charles; Chandra, Kavitha

    2010-11-01

    In this work, a numerical method for modeling the scattered acoustic pressure from fluid occlusions is described. The method is based on the asymptotic series expansion of the pressure expressed in terms of sound speed contrast between the host medium and entrained fluid occlusions. Padé approximants are used to extend the applicability of the result for larger values of sound speed contrast. For scattering from a circular cylinder, an improvement in convergence between the exact and numerical solutions is demonstrated. In the case of scattering from an inhomogeneous medium, a numerical solution with reduced order of Padé approximants is presented.

  17. A proposed application programming interface for a physical volume repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Merritt; Williams, Joel; Wrenn, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The IEEE Storage System Standards Working Group (SSSWG) has developed the Reference Model for Open Storage Systems Interconnection, Mass Storage System Reference Model Version 5. This document, provides the framework for a series of standards for application and user interfaces to open storage systems. More recently, the SSSWG has been developing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for the individual components defined by the model. The API for the Physical Volume Repository is the most fully developed, but work is being done on APIs for the Physical Volume Library and for the Mover also. The SSSWG meets every other month, and meetings are open to all interested parties. The Physical Volume Repository (PVR) is responsible for managing the storage of removable media cartridges and for mounting and dismounting these cartridges onto drives. This document describes a model which defines a Physical Volume Repository, and gives a brief summary of the Application Programming Interface (API) which the IEEE Storage Systems Standards Working Group (SSSWG) is proposing as the standard interface for the PVR.

  18. Nearly non-scattering electromagnetic wave set and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yuliang; Zhong, Shuhui

    2017-04-01

    For any inhomogeneous compactly supported electromagnetic (EM) medium, it is shown that there exists an infinite set of linearly independent EM waves which generate nearly vanishing scattered wave fields. If the inhomogeneous medium is coated with a layer of properly chosen conducting medium, then the wave set is generated from the Maxwell-Herglotz approximation to the interior perfectly electric conducting or perfectly magnetic conducting eigenfunctions and depends only on the shape of the inhomogeneous medium. If no such a conducting coating is used, then the wave set is generated from the Maxwell-Herglotz approximation to the generalised interior transmission eigenfunctions and depends on both the content and shape of the inhomogeneous medium. We characterise the nearly non-scattering wave sets in both cases with sharp estimates. The results can be used to give a conceptual design of a novel shadowless lamp. The crucial ingredient is to properly choose the source of the lamp so that nearly no shadow will be produced by surgeons operating under the lamp.

  19. Neutrophil volume, conductivity and scatter parameters with effective modeling of molecular activity statistical program gives better results in neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, I H; Demirel, G; Sukhachev, D; Erdeve, O; Dilmen, U

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains an important clinical syndrome despite advances in neonatology. Current hematology analyzers can determine cell volume (V), conductivity for internal composition of cell (C) and light scatter for cytoplasmic granularity and nuclear structure (S), and standard deviations which are effective in the diagnosis of sepsis. Statistical models can be used to strengthen the diagnosis. Effective modeling of molecular activity (EMMA) uses combinatorial algorithm of the selection parameters for regression equation based on modified stepwise procedure. It allows obtaining different regression models with different combinations of parameters. We investigated these parameters in screening of neonatal sepsis. We used LH780 hematological analyzer (Beckman Coulter, Fullerton, CA, USA). We combined these parameters with interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) and developed models by EMMA. A total of 304 newborns, 76 proven sepsis, 130 clinical sepsis and 98 controls, were enrolled in the study. Mean neutrophil volume (MNV) and volume distribution width (VDW) were higher in both proven and clinical sepsis groups. We developed three models using MNV, VDW, IL-6, and CRP. These models gave more sensitivity and specificity than the usage of each marker alone. We suggest to use the combination of MNV and VDW with markers such as CRP and IL-6, and use diagnostic models created by EMMA. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Application of Incoherent Inelastic Neutron Scattering in Pharmaceutical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordallo, Heloisa N.; A. Zakharov, Boris; Boidyreva, E.V.

    2012-01-01

    This study centers on the use of inelastic neutron scattering as an alternative tool for physical characterization of solid pharmaceutical drugs. On the basis of such approach, relaxation processes in the pharmaceutical compound phenacetin (p-ethoxyacetanilide, C(10)H(13)NO(2)) were evidenced...... on heating between 2 and 300 K. By evaluating the mean-square displacement obtained from the elastic fixed window approach, using the neutron backscattering technique, a crossover of the molecular fluctuations between harmonic and nonharmonic dynamical regimes around 75 K was observed. From the temperature...... dependence of the quasi-elastic line-width, summed over the total Q range explored by the time-of-flight technique, it was possible to attribute the onset of this anharmonicity to methyl group rotations. Finally, using density functional theory-based methods, we were able to calculate the lattice vibrations...

  1. Inelastic scattering of neutrons and possible biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P A

    1976-05-01

    The field of neutron inelastic scattering has probably been developed to the stage where it can begin to help the biologist. Because essentially no experimental data have been obtained, it is difficult either to draw conclusions or to make forecasts except on the basis of general hypotheses. It seems likely, however, that the next stage is up to biologists. After reviewing those biological problems in which molecular dynamics might play an important role, they should suggest specimens of interest which can give inelastic peaks with existing spectrometers operating with 5 to 10-A neutrons at angles greater than 5degrees and with resolutions of approximately 50 mueV. These specimens may involve molecules slightly smaller and more mobile than some biologists would like, but a successful outcome might lead to the development of spectrometers capable of working in a more satisfactory range. In this event the return may well prove rewarding to the biologists.

  2. Time-Domain Volume Integral Equation for TM-Case Scattering from Nonlinear Penetrable Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jianguo; Eric Michielssen

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the time-domainvolume integral equation (TDVIE) method to analyzescattering from nonlinear penetrable objects, whichare illuminated by the transverse magnetic (TM) in-cident pulse. The time-domain volume integral equa-tion is formulated in terms of two-dimensional (2D)Green's function, and solved by using the march-on-in time (MOT) technique. Some numerical results aregiven to validate this method, and comparisons aremade with the results obtained by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method.

  3. The Nanofabrication and Application of Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS was discovered in 1974 and impacted Raman spectroscopy and surface science. Although SERS has not been developed to be an applicable detection tool so far, nanotechnology has promoted its development in recent decades. The traditional SERS substrates, such as silver electrode, metal island film, and silver colloid, cannot be applied because of their enhancement factor or stability, but newly developed substrates, such as electrochemical deposition surface, Ag porous film, and surface-confined colloids, have better sensitivity and stability. Surface enhanced Raman scattering is applied in other fields such as detection of chemical pollutant, biomolecules, DNA, bacteria, and so forth. In this paper, the development of nanofabrication and application of surface-enhanced Ramans scattering substrate are discussed.

  4. Complete blood count using VCS (volume, conductivity, light scatter) technology is affected by hyperlipidemia in a child with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcebay, D G; Azik, F M; Isik, P; Bozkaya, I O; Kara, A; Tavil, E B; Yarali, N; Tunc, B

    2011-12-01

    Asparaginase, an effective drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has become an important component of most childhood ALL regimens during the remission induction or intensification phases of treatment. The incidence range of asparaginase-associated lipid abnormalities that are seen in children is 67-72%. Lipemia causes erroneous results, which uses photometric methods to analyze blood samples. We describe a case of l-asparaginase-associated severe hyperlipidemia with complete blood count abnormalities. Complete blood count analysis was performed with Beckman COULTER(®) GEN·S™ system, which uses the Coulter Volume, Conductivity, Scatter technology to probe hydrodynamically focused cells. Although an expected significant inaccuracy in hemoglobin determination occurred starting from a lipid value of 3450 mg/dl, we observed that triglyceride level was 1466 mg/dl. Complete blood count analysis revealed that exceptionally high hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration levels vs. discordant with red blood cell count, mean corpuscular volume, and hematocrit levels. Total leukocyte count altered spontaneously in a wide range, and was checked with blood smear. Platelet count was in expected range (Table 1). Thus, we thought it was a laboratory error, and the patient's follow-up especially for red cell parameters was made by red blood cell and hematocrit values.

  5. Design and Implementation of an Application. Programming Interface for Volume Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Selldin, Håkan

    2002-01-01

    To efficiently examine volumetric data sets from CT or MRI scans good volume rendering applications are needed. This thesis describes the design and implementation of an application programming interface (API) to be used when developing volume-rendering applications. A complete application programming interface has been designed. The interface is designed so that it makes writing application programs containing volume rendering fast and easy. The interface also makes created application progr...

  6. The Application of Improved Periodic Method for Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAWei; WUXianliang; CHENMingsheng; SUNYufa

    2005-01-01

    Periodic Wavelets have found some applications to Method of moments (MoM) for Computational Electromagnetics. An improved method based on Fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm and Physical optics (PO) theory is presented in this paper. Through eliminating some superfluous periodic wavelet-basis functions,the dimensions and condition number of impedance matrix are reduced remarkably, thus makes fast and stable computation. Besides, speedy matrix filling and efficient matrix inversion also get desirable numerical results.

  7. Surface wave scattering theory : with applications to forward and inverse problems in seismology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snieder, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Scattering of surface waves in a three dimensional layered elastic medium with embedded heterogeneities is described in this thesis with the Born approximation. The dyadic decomposition of the surface wave Green's function provides the crucial element for an efficient application of Born theory to s

  8. Application of complex-scaling method for few-body scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-01

    Formalism based on complex-scaling method is developed for solving the few particle scattering problem by employing only trivial boundary conditions. Several applications are presented proving efficiency of the method in describing elastic and three-body break-up reactions for Hamiltonians which may include both short and long-range interaction.

  9. Total scattering investigation of materials for clean energy applications: the importance of the local structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Lorenzo

    2011-04-21

    In this Perspective article we give an account of the application of total scattering methods and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis to the investigation of materials for clean energy applications such as materials for solid oxide fuel cells and lithium batteries, in order to show the power of this technique in providing new insights into the structure-property correlation in this class of materials.

  10. Fibre optic distributed scattering sensing system: perspectives and challenges for high performance applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc Niklès

    2007-01-01

    As fiber optic distributed scattering sensing systems are providing innovative solutions for the monitoring of large structures, the comparison of different techniques and solutions is difficult because of the lack of standardized specifications and the difficulty associated to the characterization of such systems. The article presents a tentative definition of performance specifications and qualification procedures applicable to fiber optic distributed sensing systems aiming at providing clear guidelines for their design, specifications, qualification, application and selection.

  11. Light scattering in a medium with fluctuating gyrotropy: Application to spin-noise spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, G. G.; Ryzhov, I. I.; Zapasskii, V. S.

    2017-04-01

    The spin-noise signal in the Faraday-rotation-based detection technique can be considered equally correctly either as a manifestation of the spin-flip Raman effect or as a result of light scattering in the medium with fluctuating gyrotropy. In this paper, we present rigorous description of the signal formation process upon heterodyning of the field scattered due to fluctuating gyrotropy. Along with conventional single-beam experimental arrangement, we consider here a more complicated, but more informative, two-beam configuration that implies the use of an auxiliary light beam passing through the same scattering volume and delivering additional scattered light to the detector. We show that the signal in the spin-noise spectroscopy (SNS) arising due to heterodyning of the scattered field is formed only by the scattered field components the wave vectors of which coincide with those of the probe field. Therefore, in principle, the detected signal in SNS can be increased by increasing overlap of the two fields in the momentum space. We also show that, in the two-beam geometry of SNS, contribution of the auxiliary (tilted) beam to the detected signal is produced only by the region of overlap between the two beams in real space and can be expressed analytically as the Fourier transform of the spatial correlation function of the gyrotropy at the difference of their wave vectors. These features of the two-beam geometry can be used for tomographic measurements in spin systems (a more sophisticated version of three-dimensional tomography proposed earlier) and for studying spatial spin correlations by means of noise spectroscopy.

  12. Scattering from a random layer embedded with dielectric needles. [for applications to coniferous vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, H. J.; Fung, A. K.

    1986-01-01

    Intensity scattering from a random layer imbedded with small dielectric needles is studied for applications to coniferous vegetation. The phase matrix of a thin needle whose length may be appreciable compared to the incident wavelength is presented. The effects of needle orientation on scattering is taken into account by averaging the phase function over angles of orientation. The backscattering coefficient from the layer is computed by solving the radiative transfer equation. The effects of operating frequency, orientation and size of a needle on like- and cross-backscattering are demonstrated. It was found that in backscattering angular trends are mainly controlled by the orientation of the needles.

  13. Holographic Recording and Applications of Multiplexed Volume Bragg Gratings in Photo-Thermo-Refractive Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-06

    applications of multiplexed volume bragg gratings in photo- thermo -refractive glass Volume Bragg grating (VBG) structures are capable of diffracting...research in the holographic recording of volume Bragg gratings in photo- thermo -refractive (PTR) glass has shown that these gratings are extremely...ABSTRACT Holographic recording and applications of multiplexed volume bragg gratings in photo- thermo -refractive glass Report Title Volume Bragg grating (VBG

  14. Generalized functions, volume 4 applications of harmonic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gel′fand, I M; Vilenkin, N Ya

    2016-01-01

    The first systematic theory of generalized functions (also known as distributions) was created in the early 1950s, although some aspects were developed much earlier, most notably in the definition of the Green's function in mathematics and in the work of Paul Dirac on quantum electrodynamics in physics. The six-volume collection, Generalized Functions, written by I. M. Gel′fand and co-authors and published in Russian between 1958 and 1966, gives an introduction to generalized functions and presents various applications to analysis, PDE, stochastic processes, and representation theory. The main

  15. Remote volume rendering pipeline for mHealth applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhao, Xin; Park, Ji Hwan; Kaufman, Arie; Cha, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel remote volume rendering pipeline for medical visualization targeted for mHealth (mobile health) applications. The necessity of such a pipeline stems from the large size of the medical imaging data produced by current CT and MRI scanners with respect to the complexity of the volumetric rendering algorithms. For example, the resolution of typical CT Angiography (CTA) data easily reaches 512^3 voxels and can exceed 6 gigabytes in size by spanning over the time domain while capturing a beating heart. This explosion in data size makes data transfers to mobile devices challenging, and even when the transfer problem is resolved the rendering performance of the device still remains a bottleneck. To deal with this issue, we propose a thin-client architecture, where the entirety of the data resides on a remote server where the image is rendered and then streamed to the client mobile device. We utilize the display and interaction capabilities of the mobile device, while performing interactive volume rendering on a server capable of handling large datasets. Specifically, upon user interaction the volume is rendered on the server and encoded into an H.264 video stream. H.264 is ubiquitously hardware accelerated, resulting in faster compression and lower power requirements. The choice of low-latency CPU- and GPU-based encoders is particularly important in enabling the interactive nature of our system. We demonstrate a prototype of our framework using various medical datasets on commodity tablet devices.

  16. Applications of Optical Sensors to the Detection of Light Scattered from Gelling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulone, Donatella; Manno, Mauro; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Martorana, Vincenzo

    Visible light, scattered within an angle of few degrees, (Small Angle Light Scattering, SALS) yields information on the spatial correlations and dynamical properties on the scale of the micrometers. In this way a quick and non-invasive characterization of a variety of samples is feasible. Lately the SALS instruments have been built around multielement optical sensors (CCD, CMOS), allowing the simultaneous measurement of the complete structure factor even during fast kinetics. An assessment of some sensor matrices of different technology will be presented. The omolecular assemblies produced by polysaccharides or proteins can be functional or dysfunctional, their properties being either desirable or detrimental. Anyhow, their morphology often depends, in a very delicate way, on the presence of cosolutes, on the thermal history, on the biopolymer concentration etc. We present some applications of low angle dynamic and static light scattering to the study of gelling systems (agarose, pectin, insulin).

  17. Comparison of Canopy Volume Measurements of Scattered Eucalypt Farm Trees Derived from High Spatial Resolution Imagery and LiDAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niva Kiran Verma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies estimating canopy volume are mostly based on laborious and time-consuming field measurements; hence, there is a need for easier and convenient means of estimation. Accordingly, this study investigated the use of remotely sensed data (WorldView-2 and LiDAR for estimating tree height, canopy height and crown diameter, which were then used to infer the canopy volume of remnant eucalypt trees at the Newholme/Kirby ‘SMART’ farm in north-east New South Wales. A regression model was developed with field measurements, which was then applied to remote-sensing-based measurements. LiDAR estimates of tree dimensions were generally lower than the field measurements (e.g., 6.5% for tree height although some of the parameters (such as tree height may also be overestimated by the clinometer/rangefinder protocols used. The WorldView-2 results showed both crown projected area and crown diameter to be strongly correlated to canopy volume, and that crown diameter yielded better results (Root Mean Square Error RMSE 31% than crown projected area (RMSE 42%. Although the better performance of LiDAR in the vertical dimension cannot be dismissed, as suggested by results obtained from this study and also similar studies conducted with LiDAR data for tree parameter measurements, the high price and complexity associated with the acquisition and processing of LiDAR datasets mean that the technology is beyond the reach of many applications. Therefore, given the need for easier and convenient means of tree parameters estimation, this study filled a gap and successfully used 2D multispectral WorldView-2 data for 3D canopy volume estimation with satisfactory results compared to LiDAR-based estimation. The result obtained from this study highlights the usefulness of high resolution data for canopy volume estimations at different locations as a possible alternative to existing methods.

  18. Optical fibre probes in the measurement of scattered light: Application for sensing turbidity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Sheno

    2014-01-01

    Optical fibre probes or optrodes often form the heart of multimode fibre-based measurements and sensors. An optrode usually comprises a bundle of multimode fibres, out of which one or more fibres are used for irradiating the sample, and the remaining fibres are used to collect the light reflected/scattered/fluoresced from the sample containing the measurand(s). The so-collected light carries the characteristic signature of the measurand. Here we present our work on the design and realization of optrodes for the measurement of scattered light from liquid samples. Optical properties of a solution are usually characterized by the parameters absorption coefficient $_a$, scattering coefficient $_s$, and anisotropy factor . We have developed a simple method to determine $_a$, $_s$, and , of a turbid medium, and a Monte–Carlo model was used to simulate the light scattering from the turbid medium. As an application, we describe the development of a turbidity sensor that has been designed and realized by employing an optrode in conjunction with a concave mirror. The estimation of turbidity is done on the basis of total interaction, by considering scattering and absorption of light from the sample solution. Details of the experiments and results are presented here.

  19. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study of weak scattering from inhomogeneous media or interface roughness has long been of interest in sonar applications. In an acoustic backscattering model of a stationary field of volume inhomogeneities, a stochastic description of the field is more useful than a deterministic description...... due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  20. Applications of synchrotron light to scattering and diffraction in materials and life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezquerra, T.A.; Garcia-Gutierrez, MariCruz; Nogales, Aurora [CSIC Madrid (Spain). Inst. Estructura de la Materia; Gomez, Marian (eds.) [CSIC Madrid (Spain). Inst. Ciencia y Technologia de Polimeros

    2009-07-01

    The present set of lecture notes originates from the deeply felt need in the community to bridge the gap between beamline manuals and advanced graduate textbooks. The volume is a collection of tutorials, surveys and reviews. They cover most cases of relevance and interest where the combination of synchrotron light with various scattering and diffraction techniques is a very helpful approach to obtaining essential information about the structure of large molecular assemblies in low-ordered environments. Soft condensed matter and biomaterials, as well as complex fluids, are typical of the materials considered here. Contributions to this volume have been selected on the basis of their close relevance to advanced synchrotron radiation sources and state-of-the art beamline work. (orig.)

  1. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS): Instrumentation and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djaker, Nadia [Institut Fresnel, Mosaic team, CNRS UMR 6133, Universite Paul Cezanne (Aix-Marseille III), F-1397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Lenne, Pierre-Francois [Institut Fresnel, Mosaic team, CNRS UMR 6133, Universite Paul Cezanne (Aix-Marseille III), F-1397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Marguet, Didier [Centre d' Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, Universite de la Mediterranee, Case 906, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); INSERM, UMR631, Marseille (France); CNRS, UMR6102, Marseille (France); Colonna, Anne [L' Oreal Recherche, Aulnay Sous bois (France); Hadjur, Christophe [L' Oreal Recherche, Aulnay Sous bois (France); Rigneault, Herve [Institut Fresnel, Mosaic team, CNRS UMR 6133, Universite Paul Cezanne (Aix-Marseille III), F-1397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)]. E-mail: herve.rigneault@fresnel.fr

    2007-02-01

    Recent advances in laser physics have permitted the development of a new kind of microscopy based on stimulated Raman scattering. This new technique known as Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. We review recent advances in CARS microscopy, with applications to chemical and biological systems. We also present an application of CARS microscopy with high optical resolution and spectral selectivity, in resolving structures in surface ex vivo stratum corneum by looking at the CH{sub 2} stretching vibrational band. A strong CARS signal is backscattered from an intense forward generated CARS signal in thick samples. This makes noninvasive imaging of deep structures possible, without labeling or chemical treatments.

  2. Using Ray Tracing to Evaluate the Performance of Several Methods for Determining the Ground Range and Refractive Index of Ionospheric Scattering Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, R. A.; Frissell, N. A.; de Larquier, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of three methods used by HF radars in the SuperDARN network for determining the ground ranges to ionospheric scattering volumes. Each method uses somewhat different approaches, but the same equivalent-path analysis. We also show that Snell's Law can be added to this analysis to determine the refractive index of each scattering volume and thereby correct Doppler velocity measurements for ionospheric refraction. Two of these methods make their predictions using the group range to the scattering volume and a virtual height model, while the third method uses the group range and the elevation angle each backscattered return. The effectiveness of each of these methods is evaluated using ray tracing analyses through the International Reference Ionosphere. Ray tracings analysis provides determinations of the initial elevation angle, group range, group range, and refractive index of each ionospheric volume that backscatters signals to the radar. The initial or final elevation angle and the group range are used as inputs to the geolocation methods and the ground range and refractive index serve as reference data against which the predictions of the geolocation methods can be evaluated. We find that the methods using virtual height models actually change the initial elevation angle determined from ray tracing to a different elevation angle that is consistent with the virtual height model. Due to this change, predictions of the ground range and refractive index of scattering volumes located with virtual-height models are rarely consistent with the predictions obtained from ray tracing. In contrast, the geolocation method that uses the group range and initial or final elevation angle yields predictions that are in good agreement with ray tracing. Modifications to the equivalent-path analysis are required to obtain consistent predictions of the ground range and refractive index of backscatter from the topside F-layer.

  3. High resolution measurements of the electron scattering for applications in electron microscopy and Monte-Carlo simulations of electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, D

    2000-01-01

    scanning electron microscope is examined. By means of the scattering at mono-crystalline samples the influence of channeling (anomalous absorption and transmission) on backscattered electron spectra is shown. Captions are given in English language. This work presents high resolution measurements of the energy and complete angular distribution of the scattering of 20 keV electrons (energy resolution 0.55%). The examinations include take-off angles close to the target surface and non-perpendicular incidences of electrons partly for the first time. The results are of interest for the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, the interpretation of signals and new detector systems in electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy. Furthermore, they are used for the verification of electron scattering models and simulations. The applied compact electrostatic spectrometers with spherical and toroidal geometries are characterized and compared. High resolution spectra are obtained by deconvolution of the measu...

  4. Transfer line scattering model of therapeutic hadron beams and applications to nozzle and gantry optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, M.; Benedikt, M.; Dorda, U.

    2013-01-01

    The field of hadron therapy is growing rapidly with several facilities currently being planned, under construction or in commissioning worldwide. In the “active scanning” irradiation technique, the target is irradiated using a narrow pencil beam that is scanned transversally over the target while the penetration depth is altered with the beam energy. Together, the target dose can thereby be conformed in all three dimensions to the shape of the tumor. For applications where a sharp lateral beam penumbra is required in order to spare critical organs from unwanted dose, beam size blowup due to scattering in on-line beam diagnostic monitors, air gaps and passive elements like the ripple filter must be minimized. This paper presents a model for transverse scattering of therapeutic hadron beams along arbitrary multislab geometries. The conventional scattering formulation, which is only applicable to a drift space, is extended to not only take beam optics into account, but also non-Gaussian transverse beam profiles which are typically obtained from the slow resonant extraction from a synchrotron. This work has been carried out during the design phase of the beam delivery system for MedAustron, an Austrian hadron therapy facility with first patient treatment planned for the end of 2015. Irradiation will be performed using active scanning with proton and carbon ion beams. As a direct application of the scattering model, design choices for the MedAustron proton gantry and treatment nozzles are evaluated with respect to the transverse beam profile at the focal point; in air and at the Bragg peak.

  5. Deflection of high-energy negative particles in a bent crystal through axial channeling and multiple volume reflection stimulated by doughnut scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Taratin, AM; Chesnokov, Yu A; Denisov, A S; Dalpiaz, P; Bagli, E; Taratin, A M; Lapina, L P; Vavilov, S A; Fiorini, M; Vallazza, E; Afonin, A G; Guidi, V; Baricordi, S; Prest, M; Kovalenko, A D; Skorobogatov, V V; Scandale, W; Golovatyukh, V M; Suvorov, V M; Maisheev, V A; Vincenzi, D; Ivanov, Yu M; Hasan, S; Bolognini, D; Yazynin, I A; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Mazzolari, A; Gavrikov, Yu A; Vomiero, A; Milan, R

    2010-01-01

    Different kinds of deflection in a silicon crystal bent along the (111) axis was observed for 150 GeV/c negative particles. mainly pi(-) mesons, at one of the secondary beams of the CERN SPS. The whole beam was deflected to one side in quasi-bound states of doughnut scattering (DSB) by atomic strings with the efficiency (95.4 +/- 0.2)\\% and with the peak position close to the bend crystal angle, alpha = 185 mu rad. It was observed volume capture of pi(-) mesons into the DSB states with a probability higher than 7\\%. A beam deflection opposite to the crystal bend was observed for some orientations of the crystal axis due to doughnut scattering and subsequent multiple volume reflections of pi(-) mesons by different bent planes crossing the axis. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Compton Scattering Cross Sections in Strong Magnetic Fields: Advances for Neutron Star Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    2014-08-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 ~ 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be a leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Generated by electrons possessing ultra-relativistic energies, this leads to attractive simplifications of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov (ST) basis states, focusing specifically on ground state-to-ground state scattering. Such scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly-relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may well involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly-relativistic pairs. These situations necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, where the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron, and the intermediate state can be excited to arbitrary Landau levels. Here, we highlight results from such a generalization using ST formalism. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is illustrated and compared with the non-relativistic Thompson cross section with classical widths. Results will find application to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.We express our gratitude for the generous support of Michigan Space Grant Consortium, the National Science Foundation (grants AST-0607651, AST-1009725, AST-1009731 and PHY/DMR-1004811), and the

  7. Scattering from Model Nonspherical Particles Theory and Applications to Environmental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Borghese, Ferdinando; Saija, Rosalba

    2007-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by nonspherical particles has become an increasingly important research topic over the past 20 years. Instead of handling anisotropic particles of arbitrary shape, the authors consider the more amenable problem of aggregates of spherical particles. This is often a very satisfactory approach as the optical response of nonspherical particles depends more on their general symmetry and the quantity of refractive material than on the precise details of their shape. The book addresses a wide spectrum of applications, ranging from scattering properties of water droplets containing pollutants, atmospheric aerosols and ice crystals to the modeling of cosmic dust grains as aggregates. In this extended second edition the authors have encompassed all the new topics arising from their recent studies of cosmic dust grains. Thus many chapters were deeply revised and new chapters were added. The new material spans The description of the state of polarization of electromagnetic wave...

  8. Feature Extraction of Localized Scattering Centers Using the Modified TLS-Prony Algorithm and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an all-parametric model of radar target in optic region, in which the localized scattering center's frequency and aspect angle dependent scattering level, distance and azimuth locations are modeled as the feature vectors. And the traditional TLS-Prony algorithm is modified to extract these feature vectors. The analysis of CramerRao bound shows that the modified algorithm not only improves the restriction of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)threshold of traditional TLS-Prony algorithm, but also is suitable to the extraction of big damped coefficients and highresolution estimation of near separation poles. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to verify its practicability in the applications. The experimental results show that the method developed can not only recognize two airplane-like targets with similar shape at low SNR, but also compress the original radar data with high fidelity.

  9. Turbine design and application volumes 1, 2, and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA has an interest in turbines related primarily to aeronautics and space applications. Airbreathing turbine engines provide jet and turboshaft propulsion, as well as auxiliary power for aircraft. Propellant-driven turbines provide rocket propulsion and auxiliary power for spacecraft. Closed-cycle turbine engines using inert gases, organic fluids, and metal fluids have been studied for providing long-duration electric power for spacecraft. Other applications of interest for turbine engines include land-vehicle (cars, trucks, buses, trains, etc.) propulsion power and ground-based electrical power. In view of the turbine-system interest and efforts at Lewis Research Center, a course entitled 'Turbine Design and Application' was presented during 1968-69 as part of the In-house Graduate Study Program. The course was somewhat revised and again presented in 1972-73. Various aspects of turbine technology were covered including thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, fundamental turbine concepts, velocity diagrams, losses, blade aerodynamic design, blade cooling, mechanical design, operation, and performance. The notes written and used for the course have been revised and edited for publication. Such a publication can serve as a foundation for an introductory turbine course, a means for self-study, or a reference for selected topics. Any consistent set of units will satisfy the equations presented. Two commonly used consistent sets of units and constant values are given after the symbol definitions. These are the SI units and the U.S. customary units. A single set of equations covers both sets of units by including all constants required for the U.S. customary units and defining as unity those not required for the SI units. Three volumes are compiled into one.

  10. Measurement of the location of a particle in three dimensions using Mie scattering theory and wave optics: Application to flow in a microscopic field of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kamal Kanti

    In this research, we have sought to develop a technique for measuring three-dimensional flow fields in small fluid volumes seeded with small spherical particles using a high numerical aperture (NA) microscope. The technique relies upon the knowledge of how the light is scattered from the particles to accurately determine their three dimensional position. We have combined Mie scattering theory and wave optics to predict the scattered field from spherical particles in a fluid medium using high NA collection optics. The model uses Mie scattering theory to calculate the optical field distribution on the intermediate planar interface between glass and air and then adopts a ray approach to propagate the field to the entrance pupil of an imaging system. We do not use a paraxial (parabolic wavefront) approximation and, therefore, our approach is applicable to the modeling of imaging systems with high aperture objectives. We have verified our theoretical model by measuring the scattering from polystyrene spheres illuminated with partially coherent, Koehler illumination in a transmitted light microscope with a 0.5 NA objective. Good agreement between our model and the experiment was achieved. We also developed a non-paraxial transformation for the lens and a vectorial model for the electromagnetic fields collected by a high NA objective. The model was also to determine the three-dimensional microscale based upon the motion of small particles in a seeded fluid. Application to laminar flow in a sub-millimeter channel and a thin liquid film demonstrate the utility of the technique. Preliminary results show that a wavelet based denoising technique may be used to process the data without loss of resolution.

  11. Neutron scattering from fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Freltoft, T.; Richter, D.

    1986-01-01

    The scattering formalism for fractal structures is presented. Volume fractals are exemplified by silica particle clusters formed either from colloidal suspensions or by flame hydrolysis. The determination of the fractional dimensionality through scattering experiments is reviewed, and recent small...

  12. Application and development of the Schwinger multichannel scattering theory and the partial differential equation theory of electron-molecule scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    One version of the multichannel theory for electron-target scattering based on the Schwinger variational principle, the SMC method, requires the introduction of a projection parameter. The role of the projection parameter a is investigated and it is shown that the principal-value operator in the SMC equation is Hermitian regardless of the value of a as long as it is real and nonzero. In a basis that is properly orthonormalizable, the matrix representation of this operator is also Hermitian. The use of such basis is consistent with the Schwinger variational principle because the Lippmann-Schwinger equation automatically builds in the correct boundary conditions. Otherwise, an auxiliary condition needs to be introduced, and Takatsuka and McKoy's original value of a is one of the three possible ways to achieve Hermiticity. In all cases but one, a can be uncoupled from the Hermiticity condition and becomes a free parameter. An equation for a based on the variational stability of the scattering amplitude is derived; its solution has an interesting property that the scattering amplitude from a converged SMC calculation is independent of the choice of a even though the SMC operator itself is a-dependent. This property provides a sensitive test of the convergence of the calculation. For a static-exchange calculation, the convergence requirement only depends on the completeness of the one-electron basis, but for a general multichannel case, the a-invariance in the scattering amplitude requires both the one-electron basis and the N plus 1-electron basis to be complete. The role of a in the SMC equation and the convergence property are illustrated using two examples: e-CO elastic scattering in the static-exchange approximation, and a two-state treatment of the e-H2 Chi(sup 1)Sigma(sub g)(+) yields b(sup 3)Sigma(sub u)(+) excitation.

  13. Stimulated Brillouin scattering gain bandwidth reduction and applications in microwave photonics and optical signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preussler, Stefan; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is one of the most dominant nonlinear effects in standard single-mode fibers and its unique spectral characteristics, especially the narrow bandwidth, enable many different applications. Most of the applications would benefit from a narrower bandwidth. Different methods for the bandwidth reduction of SBS in optical fibers are presented and discussed. A bandwidth reduction down to 17% of the natural gain can be achieved by the superposition of the gain with two losses or the utilization of a multistage system. Furthermore, applications in the field of microwave photonics and optical signal processing like high-resolution spectroscopy of communication signals, the storage of optical data packets as well as the processing of frequency combs including generation of millimeter waves and ideal sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses are presented.

  14. An Application Programming Interface for Synthetic Snowflake Particle Structure and Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Matthew; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2017-01-01

    The work by Kuo and colleagues on growing synthetic snowflakes and calculating their single-scattering properties has demonstrated great potential to improve the retrievals of snowfall. To grant colleagues flexible and targeted access to their large collection of sizes and shapes at fifteen (15) microwave frequencies, we have developed a web-based Application Programming Interface (API) integrated with NASA Goddard's Precipitation Processing System (PPS) Group. It is our hope that the API will enable convenient programmatic utilization of the database. To help users better understand the API's capabilities, we have developed an interactive web interface called the OpenSSP API Query Builder, which implements an intuitive system of mechanisms for selecting shapes, sizes, and frequencies to generate queries, with which the API can then extract and return data from the database. The Query Builder also allows for the specification of normalized particle size distributions by setting pertinent parameters, with which the API can also return mean geometric and scattering properties for each size bin. Additionally, the Query Builder interface enables downloading of raw scattering and particle structure data packages. This presentation will describe some of the challenges and successes associated with developing such an API. Examples of its usage will be shown both through downloading output and pulling it into a spreadsheet, as well as querying the API programmatically and working with the output in code.

  15. Improved properties of phosphor-filled luminescent down-shifting layers: reduced scattering, optical model, and optimization for PV application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodovnyk, Anastasiia; Lipovšek, Benjamin; Forberich, Karen; Stern, Edda; Krč, Janez; Batentschuk, Miroslaw; Topič, Marko; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-12-01

    We studied the optical properties of polymer layers filled with phosphor particles in two aspects. First, we used two different polymer binders with refractive indices n = 1.46 and n = 1.61 (λ = 600 nm) to decrease Δn with the phosphor particles (n = 1.81). Second, we prepared two particle size distributions D50 = 12 μm and D50 = 19 μm. The particles were dispersed in both polymer binders in several volume concentrations and coated onto glass with thicknesses of 150 - 600 μm. We present further a newly developed optical model for simulation and optimization of such luminescent down-shifting (LDS) layers. The model is developed within the ray tracing framework of the existing optical simulator CROWM (Combined Ray Optics / Wave Optics Model), which enables simulation of standalone LDS layers as well as complete solar cells (including thick and thin layers) enhanced by the LDS layers for an improved solar spectrum harvesting. Experimental results and numerical simulations show that the layers of the higher refractive index binder with larger particles result in the highest optical transmittance in the visible light spectrum. Finally we proved that scattering of the phosphor particles in the LDS layers may increase the overall light harvesting in the solar cell. We used numerical simulations to determine optimal layer composition for application in realistic thin-film photovoltaic devices. Surprisingly LDS layers with lower measured optical transmittance are more efficient when applied onto the solar cells due to graded refractive index and efficient light scattering. Therefore, our phosphor-filled LDS layers could possibly complement other light-coupling techniques in photovoltaics.

  16. Electron scattering by biomass molecular fragments: useful data for plasma applications?*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenti, Marco A.; Amorim Filho, Jayr; Brunger, Michael J.; da Costa, Romarly F.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Lima, Marco A. P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent data obtained for electron scattering by biomass molecular fragments, indicated that low-energy resonances may have an important role in the de-lignification of biomass through a plasma pre-treatment. To support these findings, we present new experimental evidence of the predicted dissociation pathways on plasma treatment of biomass. An important question is how accurate must the experimental and/or the theoretical data be in order to indicate that plasma modelings can be really useful in understanding plasma applications? In this paper, we initiate a discussion on the role of data accuracy of experimental and theoretical electron-molecule scattering cross sections in plasma modeling. First we review technological motivations for carrying out electron-molecule scattering studies. Then we point out the theoretical and experimental limitations that prevent us from obtaining more accurate cross sections. We present a few examples involving biomass molecular fragments, to illustrate theoretical inaccuracies on: resonances positions and widths, electronic excitation, superelastic cross sections from metastable states and due to multichannel effects on the momentum transfer cross sections. On the experimental side we briefly describe challenges in making absolute cross sections measurements with biomass species and radicals. And finally, through a simulation of a N2 plasma, we illustrate the impact on the simulation due to inaccuracies on the resonance positions and widths and due to multichannel effects on the momentum transfer cross sections. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf and two mp4 files available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2016-70272-8

  17. Second-order Scattering and Frequency Doubling Scattering Spectra of Thallium(III)-Methotrexate System and Its Analytical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Cun-Xian; LIU Zhong-Fang; HU Xiao-Li; LIU Shao-Pu; DUAN Hui

    2008-01-01

    In pH 4.9 Britton-Robinson buffer solution,methotrexate (MTX) reacted with thallium(III) to form a 3:1 che late.This resulted in great enhancement of second-order scattering (SOS) spectra and frequency doubling scattering (FDS) spectra and appearance of new SOS and FDS spectra.Their maximum wavelengths were located at 520 and 390 nm,respectively.The increments of scattering intensities (ΔI) were directly proportional to the concentrations of MTX in the ranges of 0.022--2.0 μg·mL-1 (SOS method) and 0.008--2.5μg·mL-1 (FDS method).The methods exhibited high sensitivities.The detection limits for MTX were 7.4 ng·mL-1 (SOS method) and 2.3 ng.mL-1 (FDS method),respectively.The optimum conditions of the reaction,the influencing factors and the effects of coexisting substances were investigated.A highly sensitive,simple and fast method for the determination of MTX has been developed.The method can be applied satisfactorily to the determination of MTX in human serum samples.In this work,the charge distribution of MTX was calculated by a CNDO quantum chemistry method.In addition,the reaction mechanism was discussed.

  18. Resonances in Coupled-Channel Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, David J

    2016-01-01

    Excited hadrons are seen as resonances in the scattering of lighter stable hadrons like $\\pi$, $K$ and $\\eta$. Many decay into multiple final states necessitating coupled-channel analyses. Recently it has become possible to obtain coupled-channel scattering amplitudes from lattice QCD. Using large diverse bases of operators it is possible to obtain reliable finite volume spectra at energies where multiple channels are open. Utilising the finite volume formalism proposed by L\\"uscher and extended by several others, scattering amplitudes can be extracted from the finite volume spectra. Recent applications will be discussed where the energy dependence of scattering amplitudes is mapped out in several quantum numbers. These are then continued to complex energies to extract resonance poles and couplings.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  20. Ellipsometric light scattering to probe the interface of colloids - current applications and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigel R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ellipsometric light scattering (ELS has been developed into a technique which can be used to characterise the interface between spherical colloidal particles and their surrounding medium. Here, we give an overview over previous successful applications of the technique, and its current limits. The successful applications include the characterisation of temperature-dependent swelling of a thermo-sensitive polymer coating on a latex particle, the measurement of birefringence and molecular orientation in a vescile shell, and the characterisation of the ion distribution around electrostatically stabilised latex particles. As a result of the characterisation of the ion distribution, disagreement with the Poisson-Boltzmann description has been reported before. Here, a few more experimental results on latex particles in the presence of CsBr are discussed.

  1. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Dietzek, Benjamin; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    A tutorial article is presented for the use of linear and nonlinear Raman microspectroscopies in biomedical diagnostics. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is the most frequently applied nonlinear variant of Raman spectroscopy. The basic concepts of Raman and CARS are introduced first, and subsequent biomedical applications of Raman and CARS are described. Raman microspectroscopy is applied to both in-vivo and in-vitro tissue diagnostics, and the characterization and identification of individual mammalian cells. These applications benefit from the fact that Raman spectra provide specific information on the chemical composition and molecular structure in a label-free and nondestructive manner. Combining the chemical specificity of Raman spectroscopy with the spatial resolution of an optical microscope allows recording hyperspectral images with molecular contrast. We also elaborate on interfacing Raman spectroscopic tools with other technologies such as optical tweezing, microfluidics and fiber optic probes. Thereby, we aim at presenting a guide into one exciting branch of modern biophotonics research.

  2. ScattAR: a Mobile Augmented Reality Application that uses Scattering Delay Networks for Room Acoustic Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldwin, Alex Dempster; Serafin, Stefania; Erkut, Cumhur

    2017-01-01

    We present an augmented reality (AR) audio application where scattering delay networks efficiently generate and organize a reverberator, based on room geometry scanned by an AR device. The application allows for real-time processing and updating of reflection path geometry. It provides a proof...

  3. Application of Convolution Perfectly Matched Layer in MRTD scattering model for non-spherical aerosol particles and its performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuai; Gao, Taichang; Li, Hao; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Zidong; Liu, Lei; Chen, Ming

    2017-10-01

    The performance of absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is an important factor influencing the simulation accuracy of MRTD (Multi-Resolution Time-Domain) scattering model for non-spherical aerosol particles. To this end, the Convolution Perfectly Matched Layer (CPML), an excellent ABC in FDTD scheme, is generalized and applied to the MRTD scattering model developed by our team. In this model, the time domain is discretized by exponential differential scheme, and the discretization of space domain is implemented by Galerkin principle. To evaluate the performance of CPML, its simulation results are compared with those of BPML (Berenger's Perfectly Matched Layer) and ADE-PML (Perfectly Matched Layer with Auxiliary Differential Equation) for spherical and non-spherical particles, and their simulation errors are analyzed as well. The simulation results show that, for scattering phase matrices, the performance of CPML is better than that of BPML; the computational accuracy of CPML is comparable to that of ADE-PML on the whole, but at scattering angles where phase matrix elements fluctuate sharply, the performance of CPML is slightly better than that of ADE-PML. After orientation averaging process, the differences among the results of different ABCs are reduced to some extent. It also can be found that ABCs have a much weaker influence on integral scattering parameters (such as extinction and absorption efficiencies) than scattering phase matrices, this phenomenon can be explained by the error averaging process in the numerical volume integration.

  4. Neutron scattering treatise on materials science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kostorz, G

    1979-01-01

    Treatise on Materials Science and Technology, Volume 15: Neutron Scattering shows how neutron scattering methods can be used to obtain important information on materials. The book discusses the general principles of neutron scattering; the techniques used in neutron crystallography; and the applications of nuclear and magnetic scattering. The text also describes the measurement of phonons, their role in phase transformations, and their behavior in the presence of crystal defects; and quasi-elastic scattering, with its special merits in the study of microscopic dynamical phenomena in solids and

  5. Multiple scattering of ultrasound in weakly inhomogeneous media: application to human soft tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Aubry, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Waves scattered by a weakly inhomogeneous random medium contain a predominant single scattering contribution as well as a multiple scattering contribution which is usually neglected, especially for imaging purposes. We propose a method, based on random matrix theory, in order to separate the single and multiple scattering contributions. The experimental set up uses an array of programmable sources/receivers placed in front of the medium. The impulse responses between every couple of transducers are measured and form a matrix. Single-scattering contributions are shown to exhibit a deterministic coherence along the antidiagonals of the array response matrix, whatever the distribution of inhomogeneities. This property is taken advantage of to discriminate single from multiple-scattered waves. This allows one to evaluate the absorption losses and the scattering losses separately, by comparing the multiple scattering intensity with a radiative transfer model. Moreover, the relative contribution of multiple scatter...

  6. Estimation of Moisture Content of Forest Canopy and Floor from SAR Data Part I: Volume Scattering Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S.

    1996-01-01

    To understand and predict the functioning of forest biomes, their interaction with the atmosphere, and their growth rates, the knowledge of moisture content of their canopy and the floor soil is essential. The synthetic aperture radar on airborne and spaceborne platforms has proven to be a flexible tool for measuring electromagnetic back- scattering properties of vegetation related to their moisture content.

  7. Unitarized diffractive scattering in QCD and its application to virtual photon total cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Rim; Khoury, Justin; Lam, C. S.

    1999-08-01

    The problem of restoring the Froissart bound to the Balitskiıˇ-Fadín-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) Pomeron is studied in an extended leading-log approximation of QCD. We consider the parton-parton scattering amplitude and show that the sum of all Feynman-diagram contributions can be written in an eikonal form. In this form, dynamics is determined by the phase shift, and subleading-logs of all orders needed to restore the Froissart bound are automatically provided. The main technical difficulty is to find a way to extract these subleading contributions without having to compute each Feynman diagram beyond the leading order. We solve that problem by using non-Abelian cut diagrams introduced elsewhere. They can be considered as color filters used to isolate the multi-Reggeon contributions that supply these subleading-log terms. An illustration of the formalism is given for amplitudes and phase shifts up to three loops. For diffractive scattering, only phase shifts governed by one and two Reggeon exchanges are needed. They can be computed from the leading-log-Reggeon and the BFKL Pomeron amplitudes. In applications, we argue that the dependence of the energy-growth exponent on virtuality Q2 for γ*P total cross section observed at DESY HERA can be interpreted as the first sign of a slowdown of energy growth towards satisfying the Froissart bound. An attempt to understand these exponents with the present formalism is discussed.

  8. Application of Fast Multipole Methods to the NASA Fast Scattering Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Mark H.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Fast Scattering Code (FSC) is a versatile noise prediction program designed to conduct aeroacoustic noise reduction studies. The equivalent source method is used to solve an exterior Helmholtz boundary value problem with an impedance type boundary condition. The solution process in FSC v2.0 requires direct manipulation of a large, dense system of linear equations, limiting the applicability of the code to small scales and/or moderate excitation frequencies. Recent advances in the use of Fast Multipole Methods (FMM) for solving scattering problems, coupled with sparse linear algebra techniques, suggest that a substantial reduction in computer resource utilization over conventional solution approaches can be obtained. Implementation of the single level FMM (SLFMM) and a variant of the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM) into the FSC is discussed in this paper. The culmination of this effort, FSC v3.0, was used to generate solutions for three configurations of interest. Benchmarking against previously obtained simulations indicate that a twenty-fold reduction in computational memory and up to a four-fold reduction in computer time have been achieved on a single processor.

  9. Material derivatives of boundary integral operators in electromagnetism and application to inverse scattering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanyshyn Yaman, Olha; Le Louër, Frédérique

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the material derivative analysis of the boundary integral operators arising from the scattering theory of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves and its application to inverse problems. We present new results using the Piola transform of the boundary parametrisation to transport the integral operators on a fixed reference boundary. The transported integral operators are infinitely differentiable with respect to the parametrisations and simplified expressions of the material derivatives are obtained. Using these results, we extend a nonlinear integral equations approach developed for solving acoustic inverse obstacle scattering problems to electromagnetism. The inverse problem is formulated as a pair of nonlinear and ill-posed integral equations for the unknown boundary representing the boundary condition and the measurements, for which the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton method can be applied. The algorithm has the interesting feature that it avoids the numerous numerical solution of boundary value problems at each iteration step. Numerical experiments are presented in the special case of star-shaped obstacles.

  10. SPEC application for achieving inelastic X-ray scattering experiment in the SSRF

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Xuying; Liang, Dongxu; Yan, Shuai; Mao, Chengwen; Li, Aiguo; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In order to carry out inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiment at BL15U1 beamline of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), the data acquisition and control system based on SPEC software has been developed. The IXS experimental method needs linkage control of monochromator, silicon drift detector (SDD) and ionization chamber on continuous segment-scan mode with variable step size, and gains the data of energy, spectrum and light intensity synchronously. A method is presented for achieving this function which was not realized only by using SSCAN of Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). This paper shows work details including control system description, SPEC configurations for EPICS devices, macro definitions and applications in the BL15U1. An IXS experiment was executed by using the SPEC control system, its results prove that the method is feasible to perform the experiment.

  11. Applications of Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Scattering to Problems in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, F. Bary

    1995-01-01

    The general status of a grant to investigate the applications of quantum theory in atomic and molecular scattering problems in hypersonic flow is summarized. Abstracts of five articles and eleven full-length articles published or submitted for publication are included as attachments. The following topics are addressed in these articles: fragmentation of heavy ions (HZE particles); parameterization of absorption cross sections; light ion transport; emission of light fragments as an indicator of equilibrated populations; quantum mechanical, optical model methods for calculating cross sections for particle fragmentation by hydrogen; evaluation of NUCFRG2, the semi-empirical nuclear fragmentation database; investigation of the single- and double-ionization of He by proton and anti-proton collisions; Bose-Einstein condensation of nuclei; and a liquid drop model in HZE particle fragmentation by hydrogen.

  12. Interfacial electron and phonon scattering processes in high-powered nanoscale applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2011-10-01

    The overarching goal of this Truman LDRD project was to explore mechanisms of thermal transport at interfaces of nanomaterials, specifically linking the thermal conductivity and thermal boundary conductance to the structures and geometries of interfaces and boundaries. Deposition, fabrication, and post possessing procedures of nanocomposites and devices can give rise to interatomic mixing around interfaces of materials leading to stresses and imperfections that could affect heat transfer. An understanding of the physics of energy carrier scattering processes and their response to interfacial disorder will elucidate the potentials of applying these novel materials to next-generation high powered nanodevices and energy conversion applications. An additional goal of this project was to use the knowledge gained from linking interfacial structure to thermal transport in order to develop avenues to control, or 'tune' the thermal transport in nanosystems.

  13. Calculation of the nonlinear relativistic Thomson scattering fields and Its application to electron distribution function diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasp, J.; Pastor, I.; Álvarez-Estrada, R. F.; Castejón, F.

    2015-02-01

    Analytical results obtained recently of the ab-initio classical incoherent Thomson Scattering (TS) spectrum from a single-electron (Alvarez-Estrada et al 2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 062302) have been numerically implemented in a paralelized code to efficiently compute the TS emission from a given electron distribution function, irrespective of its characteristics and/or the intensity of the incoming radiation. These analytical results display certain differences, when compared with other authors, in the general case of incoming linearly and circularly polarized radiation and electrons with arbitrary initial directions. We regard such discrepancies and the ubiquitous interest in TS as motivations for this work. Here, we implement some analytical advances (like generalized Bessel functions for incoming linearly polarized radiation) in TS. The bulk of this work reports on the efficient computation of TS spectra (based upon our analytical approach), for an electron population having an essentially arbitrary distribution function and for both incoming linearly and circularly polarized radiation. A detailed comparison between the present approach and a previous Monte Carlo one (Pastor et al 2011 Nuclear Fusion 51 043011), dealing with the ab-initio computation of TS spectra, is reported. Both approaches are shown to fully agree with each other. As key computational improvements, the analytical technique yields a × 30 to × 100 gain in computation time and is a very flexible tool to compute the scattered spectrum and eventually the scattered electromagnetic fields in the time domain. The latter are computed explicitly here for the first time, as far as we know. Scaling laws for the power integrated over frequency versus initial kinetic energy are studied for the case of isotropic and monoenergetic electron distribution functions and their potential application as diagnostic tools for high-energy populations is briefly discussed. Finally, we discuss the application of these

  14. Applications of Self-Assembled Monolayers in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles K. Klutse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS has led to the development of various SERS-active platforms (SERS substrates for SERS measurement. This work reviews the current optimization techniques available for improving the performance of some of these SERS substrates. The work particularly identifies self-assembled-monolayer- (SAM- based substrate modification for optimum SERS activity and wider applications. An overview of SERS, SAM, and studies involving SAM-modified substrates is highlighted. The focus of the paper then shifts to the use of SAMs to improve analytical applications of SERS substrates by addressing issues including long-term stability, selectivity, reproducibility, and functionalization, and so forth. The paper elaborates on the use of SAMs to achieve optimum SERS enhancement. Specific examples are based on novel multilayered SERS substrates developed in the author’s laboratory where SAMs have been demonstrated as excellent dielectric spacers for improving SERS enhancement more than 20-fold relative to conventional single layer SERS substrates. Such substrate optimization can significantly improve the sensitivity of the SERS method for analyte detection.

  15. A Highly Stable Marching-on-in-Time Volume Integral Equation Solver for Analyzing Transient Wave Interactions on High-Contrast Scatterers

    KAUST Repository

    Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-06

    Time domain integral equation (TDIE) solvers represent an attractive alternative to finite difference (FDTD) and finite element (FEM) schemes for analyzing transient electromagnetic interactions on composite scatterers. Current induced on a scatterer, in response to a transient incident field, generates a scattered field. First, the scattered field is expressed as a spatio-temporal convolution of the current and the Green function of the background medium. Then, a TDIE is obtained by enforcing boundary conditions and/or fundamental field relations. TDIEs are often solved for the unknown current using marching on-in-time (MOT) schemes. MOT-TDIE solvers expand the current using local spatio-temporal basis functions. Inserting this expansion into the TDIE and testing the resulting equation in space and time yields a lower triangular system of equations (termed MOT system), which can be solved by marching in time for the coefficients of the current expansion. Stability of the MOT scheme often depends on how accurately the spatio-temporal convolution of the current and the Green function is discretized. In this work, band-limited prolate-based interpolation functions are used as temporal bases in expanding the current and discretizing the spatio-temporal convolution. Unfortunately, these functions are two sided, i.e., they require ”future” current samples for interpolation, resulting in a non-causal MOT system. To alleviate the effect of non-causality and restore the ability to march in time, an extrapolation scheme can be used to estimate the future values of the currents from their past values. Here, an accurate, stable and band-limited extrapolation scheme is developed for this purpose. This extrapolation scheme uses complex exponents, rather than commonly used harmonics, so that propagating and decaying mode fields inside the dielectric scatterers are accurately modeled. The resulting MOT scheme is applied to solving the time domain volume integral equation (VIE

  16. The complex coordinate scattering theory and the Kohn variational method: A general formulation and application to long range potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Uri; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    1992-11-01

    The complex coordinate scattering theory for the calculation of T-matrix elements, as was introduced by Engdahl, Moiseyev, and Maniv [J. Chem. Phys. 94, 1636 (1991)] and by Peskin and Moiseyev [J. Chem. Phys. 96, 2347 (1992)], is shown to satisfy the complex version of the Kohn variational principle introduced by Nuttall and Cohen [Phys. Rev. 188, 1542 (1969)]. This theory and the related S-matrix version of the Kohn variational principle, developed by Zhang, Chu, and Miller [J. Chem. Phys. 88, 6233, (1988)] are combined to formulate a generalized variational basis set approach for quantum scattering calculations. In this approach the Kohn variational procedure to optimize the linear parameters in the T matrix is followed by an optimization of the complex nonlinear parameters. This enables the application of the complex coordinate analytical continuation of the T matrix to the calculation of scattering probability amplitudes for long range potentials. Illustrating numerical applications to short and long range potentials are given.

  17. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, symmetry of crystals, diffraction, nanostructures investigated by small-angle neutron scattering, the structure of macromolecules, spin dependent and magnetic scattering, structural analysis, neutron reflectometry, magnetic nanostructures, inelastic scattering, strongly correlated electrons, dynamics of macromolecules, applications of neutron scattering. (HSI)

  18. Applications of texture mapping to volume and flow visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe six visualization methods which take advantage of hardware polygon scan conversion, texture mapping, and compositing, to give interactive viewing of 3D scalar fields, and motion for 3D flows. For volume rendering, these are splatting of an optimized 3D reconstruction filter, and tetrahedral cell projection using a texture map to provide the exponential per pixel necessary for accurate opacity calculation. For flows, these are the above tetrahedral projection method for rendering the ``flow volume`` dyed after passing through a dye releasing polygon, ``splatting`` of cycled anisotropic textures to provide flow direction and motion visualization, splatting motion blurred particles to indicate flow velocity, and advecting a texture directly to show the flow motion. All these techniques are tailored to take advantage of existing graphics pipelines to produce interactive visualization tools.

  19. Applications of texture mapping to volume and flow visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe six visualization methods which take advantage of hardware polygon scan conversion, texture mapping, and compositing, to give interactive viewing of 3D scalar fields, and motion for 3D flows. For volume rendering, these are splatting of an optimized 3D reconstruction filter, and tetrahedral cell projection using a texture map to provide the exponential per pixel necessary for accurate opacity calculation. For flows, these are the above tetrahedral projection method for rendering the ``flow volume`` dyed after passing through a dye releasing polygon, ``splatting`` of cycled anisotropic textures to provide flow direction and motion visualization, splatting motion blurred particles to indicate flow velocity, and advecting a texture directly to show the flow motion. All these techniques are tailored to take advantage of existing graphics pipelines to produce interactive visualization tools.

  20. Anisotropic 3D texture synthesis with application to volume rendering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lasse Farnung; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel approach to improving volume rendering by using synthesized textures in combination with a custom transfer function. First, we use existing knowledge to synthesize anisotropic solid textures to fit our volumetric data. As input to the synthesis method, we acquire high quality....... This method is applied to a high quality visualization of a pig carcass, where samples of meat, bone, and fat have been used to produce the anisotropic 3D textures....

  1. Nanostructured powders and their industrial application. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings Volume 520

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, G.; Mark, J.E.; Burns, G.T.; Hua, D.W. [eds.

    1998-07-01

    This new volume from the MRS brings together industrial and academic researchers involved in the synthesis and use of nanostructured powders such as fumed silica, pyrolytic titania and precipitated silica, as well as less conventional nanostructured powders such as exfoliated clays. Similarities and differences among these various fields of study and application are featured. In some ways, the volume is a continuation of the ``Better Ceramics Through Chemistry'' series. One main difference, however, is that this volume focused on the industrial use of these materials. Topics include: overview of nanopowder technology; physical aspects of nanostructured powders; synthesis of nanostructured powders; and applications of nanostructured powders.

  2. Estimation and application of 2-D scattering matrices for sparse array imaging of simulated damage in composite panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2017-02-01

    Reliable detection of damage in composites is critically important for failure prevention in the aerospace industry since these materials are more frequently being used in high stress applications. Structural health monitoring (SHM) via guided wave sensors mounted on or embedded within a composite structure can help detect and localize damage in real-time while potentially reducing overall maintenance costs. One approach to guided wave SHM is sparse array imaging via the minimum variance algorithm, and it has been shown in prior work that incorporating expected scattering from defects of interest can improve the quality of damage localization and characterization. For this study, simulated damage in the form of attached magnets was used for estimating scattering from recorded wavefield data. Data were recorded on a circle centered at the damage location from multiple incident directions before and after the magnets were attached. Baseline subtraction is used to estimate scattering patterns for each incident direction, and these patterns are combined and interpolated to form a full 2-D scattering matrix. This matrix is then incorporated into the minimum variance imaging algorithm, and the efficacy of this scattering estimation methodology is evaluated by comparing the resulting sparse array images to those generated using simpler scattering assumptions.

  3. Applications of Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to the Analysis of Eukaryotic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Franziska; Joseph, Virginia; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    In this chapter, we discuss Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis of cellular samples of plant and animal origin which are several tens to hundreds of microns in size. As was shown in the past several years, the favorable properties of noble metal nanostructures can be used to generate SERS signals in very complex biological samples such as cells, and result in an improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. Pollen grains, the physiological containers that produce the male gametes of seed plants, consist of a few vegetative cells and one generative cell, surrounded by a biopolymer shell. Their chemical composition has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists [1, 2], and lately even materials scientists [3, 4] for various reasons. In spite of a multitude of applied analytical approaches it could not be elucidated in its entirety yet. Animal cells from cell cultures have been a subject of intense studies due to their application in virtually all fields of biomedical research, ranging from studies of basic biological mechanisms to models for pharmaceutical and diagnostic research. Many aspects of all kinds of cellular processes including signalling, transport, and gene regulation have been elucidated, but many more facts about cell biology will need to be understood in order to efficiently address issues such as cancer, viral infection or genetic disorder. Using the information from spectroscopic methods, in particular combining normal Raman spectroscopy and SERS may open up new perspectives on cellular biochemistry. New sensitive Raman-based tools are being developed for the biochemical analysis of cellular processes [5-8].

  4. Electron scattering mechanisms in Cu-Mn films for interconnect applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misják, F.; Nagy, K. H.; Radnóczi, G. [Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49, Hungary, (Hungary); Lobotka, P. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-08-28

    Electrical properties and corresponding structural features of Cu-Mn alloy films with potential application as barrier and interconnect layers were studied. Cu-Mn films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature on SiO{sub 2} substrates. Electrical resistivity measurements were made as a function of film composition and temperature. The specific resistivity varies linearly with the Mn content showing a maximum of 205 μΩcm at 80 at. % Mn. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of all alloy films is low, showing non-metallic conductivity for most compositions. Also a minimum TCR has been observed in the 40–80 at. % Mn range which was attributed to a magnetic transformation around 200–300 K. Electrical resistivity measurements are correlated with the film structure revealed by transmission electron microscopy to clarify the phase regions throughout the composition range. In the 20–40 at. % and 70–80 at. % Mn ranges, two-phase structures were identified, where Cu- or Mn-rich solid solution grains were surrounded by a thin amorphous covering layer. Based on the revealed phase regions and morphologies electron scattering mechanisms in the system were evaluated by combining the Matthiessen's rule and the Mayadas-Schatzkes theory. Grain boundary reflectivity coefficients (r = 0.6–0.8) were calculated from fitting the model to the measurements. The proposed model indicates that, in a binary system, the special arrangement of the two phases results in new scattering mechanisms. The results are of value in optimizing the various parameters needed to produce a suitable barrier layer.

  5. Pitfalls and novel applications of particle sizing by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Karl; Schmidt, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    After briefly introducing the theoretical equations for DLS based particle size analysis, the need for angular dependent DLS investigations is emphasized to obtain correct particle sizes. Practical examples are given that demonstrate the possible magnitudes of errors in particle size if DLS is measured at one large scattering angle, only, as done by essentially all, most frequently utilized commercial "single angle" particle sizers. The second part is focused on a novel DLS application to sensitively trace (nano)particle interactions with concentrated blood serum or plasma that leads to the formation of large aggregates in a size regime of ≫100 nm. Most likely, such aggregates originate from protein induced bridging of nanoparticles, since it is well known that serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of essentially all nanoparticles utilized in medical applications. Thus, the protein corona around nanoparticles does not only change their biological identity but to a large extend also their size, thus possibly affecting biodistribution and in vivo circulation time.

  6. Scattered emission from a relativistic outflow and its application to gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, R.-F.; Barniol Duran, R.; Kumar, P.

    2008-03-01

    We investigate a scenario of photon scattering by electrons within a relativistic outflow. The outflow is composed of discrete shells with different speeds. One shell emits radiation for a short duration. Some of this radiation is scattered by the shell(s) behind. We calculate in a simple two-shell model the observed scattered flux density as a function of the observed primary flux density, the normalized arrival time delay between the two emission components, the Lorentz factor ratio of the two shells and the scattering shell's optical depth. Thomson scattering in a cold shell and inverse Compton scattering in a hot shell are both considered. The results of our calculations are applied to the gamma-ray bursts and the afterglows. We find that the scattered flux from a cold slower shell is small and likely to be detected only for those bursts with very weak afterglows. A hot scattering shell could give rise to a scattered emission as bright as the X-ray shallow decay component detected in many bursts, on a condition that the isotropically equivalent total energy carried by the hot electrons is large, ~1052-1056 erg. The scattered emission from a faster shell could appear as a late short γ-ray/MeV flash or become part of the prompt emission depending on the delay of the ejection of the shell.

  7. The Mathematical Theory of the Multiple Scattering of an Acoustic Pulse from a Random Collection of Volume Scatterers with Application to Scattering from Fish Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-08-31

    can write Eq 12 as -•> -> -^ -’? |~> n(q1)n(q2| <h) pCq ^qV - p(qi)p(q2’ <L> = —ZT^T\\ • ᝾> Here the conditional number density n(q2|qi...have p(q\\,-.-»qN) - p(q\\) pCq ^)--- v(%) * ( 18) that is, the joint probability density function is expressible as the product of the individual...r<?,«)+ y J*. . ./T(q^) t (^«-Iq^iq^,. . . .q^ pCq ^,. . . ,q\\j)dq\\. . .dq^ m=l N = f (r»+ ][ /• • .jT(q^) ^E(r,U)| qmt q\\, . . . ,q»N) m=l

  8. Application of vector finite volume method for electromagnetic flow simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, T.; Murashige, R.; Matsumoto, T.; Yamaguchi, A. [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    A vector finite volume method (VFVM) has been developed for an electromagnetic flow analysis. In the VFVM, the governing equations of magnetic flux density and electric field intensity are solved separately so as to reduce the computational cost caused by an iterative procedure that is required to satisfy the solenoidal condition. In the present paper, a suppression of temperature fluctuation of liquid sodium after a T-junction has also been investigated with a simplified two dimensional numerical analysis by adding an obstacle (turbulence promoter) or a magnetic field after the junction. (author)

  9. On applicability of the far-field approximation to the analysis of light scattering by particulate media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkovets, Victor P.; Petrova, Elena V.

    2016-10-01

    Problems of the theory of light scattering by densely packed discrete random media are analyzed with the model, considering such medium as a semi-infinite layer composed of randomly oriented clusters. Each of the clusters is assumed to be in the far zones of all other clusters. Under this approach, the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation and the equation for weak localization of waves yields the characteristics of radiation reflected by the medium. Since in these equations an elementary volume of the medium is assumed to be represented by randomly oriented clusters, the near-field effects, as well as the irregular shape and heterogeneity of the scatterers, are partially taken into account. The model results are compared to the currently available laboratory measurements of the intensity and the degree of linear polarization of nonabsorbing samples (MgO, Al2O3, and SiO2) composed the scatterers smaller than the wavelength in size. The scattering characteristics of the samples with different (though not very high) packing densities are considered. In the frames of the applied model, some of the calculated phase profiles of polarization well agree with the measured ones. This allowed us to estimate the relative concentration of scatterers in the media and their sizes. At the same time, the measured phase dependences of intensity are poorly fitted with the models. This suggests that some scattering mechanisms remained beyond the frames the considered model; these mechanisms noticeably influence the intensity of radiation reflected by the medium, while their effect on the linear polarization is negligible.

  10. Temperature performance of Raman scattering in data fiber and its application in distributed temperature fiber-optic sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deming LIU; Shuang LIU; Hairong LIU

    2009-01-01

    A wavelength division multiplexer (WDM) was used to extract the Raman scattering signal from a data fiber. The temperature performance of Raman scattering spectrum was studied theoretically and experimentally. On the base of this study, a distributed fiber-optic temperature sensor (DFTS) system was developed. The sensing distance was 4 km. The temperature accuracy and the distance resolution reached to ±1℃ and ±1 m, respec-tively. The system is stable and adequate for commercial usage, such as the power industry, the underground tunnel, the subway, and the pipe laying, and also for the mission applications, such as the warship and the airplane.

  11. Implementation and Applications of the Method of Auxiliary Sources for Analysis of Smooth Scatterers and Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Vesterdal

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the implementation of Method of Auxiliary Sources techniques developed for smooth scatterers and wire scatterers. The work was done in the course of the PhD project "Electronically Steerable Antennas for Satellite Communication" where the techniques were employed to investig......This report documents the implementation of Method of Auxiliary Sources techniques developed for smooth scatterers and wire scatterers. The work was done in the course of the PhD project "Electronically Steerable Antennas for Satellite Communication" where the techniques were employed...

  12. A dynamical formulation of one-dimensional scattering theory and its applications in optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali, E-mail: amostafazadeh@ku.edu.tr

    2014-02-15

    We develop a dynamical formulation of one-dimensional scattering theory where the reflection and transmission amplitudes for a general, possibly complex and energy-dependent, scattering potential are given as solutions of a set of dynamical equations. By decoupling and partially integrating these equations, we reduce the scattering problem to a second order linear differential equation with universal initial conditions that is equivalent to an initial-value time-independent Schrödinger equation. We give explicit formulas for the reflection and transmission amplitudes in terms of the solution of either of these equations and employ them to outline an inverse-scattering method for constructing finite-range potentials with desirable scattering properties at any prescribed wavelength. In particular, we construct optical potentials displaying threshold lasing, antilasing, and unidirectional invisibility. -- Highlights: • Proposes a dynamical theory of scattering in one dimension. • Derives and solves dynamical equations for scattering data. • Gives a new inverse scattering prescription. • Constructs optical potentials with desired scattering properties.

  13. Scattered Emission from A Relativistic Outflow and Its Application to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, R -F; Kumar, P

    2007-01-01

    We investigate a scenario of photons scattering by electrons within a relativistic outflow. The outflow is composed of discrete shells with different speeds. One shell emits radiation for a short duration. Some of this radiation is scattered by the shell(s) behind. We calculate in a simple two-shell model the observed scattered flux density as a function of: the observed primary flux density, the normalized arrival time delay between the two emission components, the Lorentz factor ratio of the two shells and the scattering shell's optical depth. Thomson scattering in a cold shell and Inverse Compton scattering in a hot shell are both considered. The results of our calculations are applied to the Gamma-Ray Bursts and the afterglows. We find that the scattered flux from a cold slower shell is small and likely to be detected only for those bursts with very weak afterglows. A hot scattering shell could give rise to a scattered emission as bright as the X-ray shallow decay component detected in many bursts, on a c...

  14. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  15. The ν -cleus experiment: a gram-scale fiducial-volume cryogenic detector for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, R.; Rothe, J.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Kluck, H.; Mancuso, M.; Oberauer, L.; Petricca, F.; Pröbst, F.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.

    2017-08-01

    We discuss a small-scale experiment, called ν -cleus, for the first detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering by probing nuclear-recoil energies down to the 10 eV regime. The detector consists of low-threshold CaWO_4 and Al_2O_3 calorimeter arrays with a total mass of about 10 g and several cryogenic veto detectors operated at millikelvin temperatures. Realizing a fiducial volume and a multi-element target, the detector enables active discrimination of γ , neutron and surface backgrounds. A first prototype Al_2O_3 device, operated above ground in a setup without shielding, has achieved an energy threshold of {˜ }20 eV and further improvements are in reach. A sensitivity study for the detection of coherent neutrino scattering at nuclear power plants shows a unique discovery potential (5σ ) within a measuring time of {\\lesssim }2 weeks. Furthermore, a site at a thermal research reactor and the use of a radioactive neutrino source are investigated. With this technology, real-time monitoring of nuclear power plants is feasible.

  16. A novel transport based model for wire media and its application to scattering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forati, Ebrahim

    Artificially engineered materials, known as metamaterials, have attracted the interest of researchers because of the potential for novel applications. Effective modeling of metamaterials is a crucial step for analyzing and synthesizing devices. In this thesis, we focus on wire medium (both isotropic and uniaxial) and validate a novel transport based model for them. Scattering problems involving wire media are computationally intensive due to the spatially dispersive nature of homogenized wire media. However, it will be shown that using the new model to solve scattering problems can simplify the calculations a great deal. For scattering problems, an integro-differential equation based on a transport formulation is proposed instead of the convolution-form integral equation that directly comes from spatial dispersion. The integro-differential equation is much faster to solve than the convolution equation form, and its effectiveness is confirmed by solving several examples in one-, two-, and three-dimensions. Both the integro-differential equation formulation and the homogenized wire medium parameters are experimentaly confirmed. To do so, several isotropic connected wire medium spheres have been fabricated using a rapid-prototyping machine, and their measured extinction cross sections are compared with simulation results. Wire parameters (period and diameter) are varied to the point where homogenization theory breaks down, which is observed in the measurements. The same process is done for three-dimensional cubical objects made of a uniaxail wire medium, and their measured results are compared with the numerical results based on the new model. The new method is extremely fast compared to brute-force numerical methods such as FDTD, and provides more physical insight (within the limits of homogenization), including the idea of a Debye length for wire media. The limits of homogenization are examined by comparing homogenization results and measurement. Then, a novel

  17. Electron-enhanced Raman scattering: a history of its discovery and spectroscopic applications to solution and interfacial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Hiroharu

    2010-06-01

    Raman scattering spectroscopy can be used to distinguish highly similar molecules and obtain useful information on local physical and chemical environments at their functional group levels. However, obtaining a high-quality Raman spectrum requires high-power excitation and a long acquisition time owing to the inherently small Raman scattering cross section, which is problematic in the analyses of living cells and real-time environmental monitoring. Herein, a new Raman enhancement technique, electron-enhanced Raman scattering (EERS), is described in which artificially generated electrons affect the polarizability of target molecular systems and enhance their inherent Raman cross sections. The EERS technique stands in contrast to the well-known SERS technique, which requires roughened metal surfaces. The history of EERS and its spectroscopic applications to aqueous solutions are presented.

  18. SU-E-T-90: Concrete Forward-Scatter Fractions for Radiotherapy Shielding Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanny, S; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is little instruction within the primary shielding guidance document NCRP 151 for vault designs where the primary beam intercepts the maze. We have conducted a Monte-Carlo study to characterize forward-scattered radiation from concrete barriers with the intent of quantifying what amount of additional shielding outside the primary beam is needed in this situation. Methods: We reproduced our vault in MCNP 5 and simulated spectra obtained from the literature and from our treatment planning system for 10 and 18 MV beams. Neutron and gamma-capture contributions were not simulated. Energy deposited was scored at isocenter in a water phantom, within various cells that comprised the maze, and within cells that comprised the vault door. Tracks were flagged that scattered from within the maze to the door and their contributions were tallied separately. Three different concrete mixtures found in the literature were simulated. An empirically derived analytic equation was used for comparison, utilizing patient scatter fractions to approximate the scatter from concrete. Results: Our simulated data confirms that maze-scattered radiation is a significant contribution to total photon dose at the door. It contributes between 20-35% of the photon shielding workload. Forward-scatter fractions for concrete were somewhat dependent on concrete composition and the relative abundance of higher-Z elements. Scatter fractions were relatively insensitive to changes in the primary photon spectrum. Analytic results were of the same magnitude as simulated results. Conclusions: Forward-scattered radiation from the maze barrier needs to be included in the photon workload for shielding calculations in non-standard vault designs. Scatter fractions will vary with concrete composition, but should be insensitive to spectral changes between machine manufacturers. Further plans for investigation include refined scatter fractions for various concrete compositions, scatter fraction

  19. Proceedings of the 1990 Antenna Applications Symposium. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    Steered Phased Arrays," by Dean A. Paschen 153 8. "Array Thinning Using the Image Element Antenna," by Joe Kobus, 172 Robert Shillingburg and Ron...THE 1990 SYMPOSIUM ON ANTENNA APPLICATIONS ROBERT ALLERTON PARK, ILLINOIS by JOE KOBUS ROBERT SHILLINGBURG and RON KIELMEYER MOTOROLA INC. TACTICAL

  20. Proceedings of the 2009 Antenna Applications Symposium, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-12

    Jaggard [10,11], Lakhtakia et al. [12,13], Werner et al. [14]). Fractals exhibit self similarity and scaling and for GPS antenna applications, Mandelbrot ...Magazine, Vol. 41, No. 5, October I999, 37-59. [15] B. B. Mandelbrot , The Fractal Geometry of Nature, New York, W. H. Freeman, 1983. [16] Vinoy

  1. CFD Applications in Energy and Environment Sectors: Volume 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi and Hashim R. Abdol Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: Simulation and Modelling of Oxygen Coal Combustion with Flue Gas Recirculation. Chaouki Ghenai Chapter 2: The Choice of the Best Air Distribution Concept in Air-Conditioned Auditorium by Means of CFD Numerical Prediction. Barbara Lipska, Piotr Koper Chapter 3: CFD Applications in Natural Ventilation of Buildings and Air Quality Dispersion. N. Nikolopoulos, A. Nikolopoulos, I. Papadakis, K.-S. P. Nikas Chapter 4: CFD Modeling of Air Pollutant Transport and Dispersion. Labovský Juraj, Jelemenský Ľudovít Chapter 5: CFD Modeling of Multiphase Flow in Environmental Engineering. Masroor Mohajerani, Mehrab Mehrvar, Farhad Ein-Mozaffari Chapter 6: CFD Study on the Roles of Trees on Airflow and Pollutant Dispersion within Urban Street Canyons. Salim Mohamed Salim, Andrew Chan, Riccardo Buccolieri, Silvana Di Sabatino Chapter 7: Energy Efficiency and Air Quality in Hospitals Design. Essam E. Khalil Chapter 8: Application of CFD in Pulverized Fuel Combustion. M. Tayyeb Javed, Tahira Sultana Chapter 9: A Heat Transfer Model For Fluids Based on Cellular Automaton Application to an Air Conditioning of A Building. Andrés Saiz Martínez Chapter 10: CFD Application in Power Plants. Essam E. Khalil Chapter 11: Analysis and Computation of the Heat Charge/Discharge Behavior in Packed Bed Thermal Storage Systems. Pei-Wen Li, Jon Van Lew, Wafaa Karaki, Cho Lik Chan, Jake Stephens

  2. Intensity fluctuation analysis of cell scattering/imaging with clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Raji; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P. S.; Holden, T.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.; Garcia, F.; Bewry, N.; Pennie, N.

    2007-06-01

    Cell scattering produces a speckle pattern, while imaging produces a contrast pattern. This family of fluctuation signals can be studied by analysis techniques such as correlation and fractal dimension. Human breast cell (normal and cancerous) samples were investigated using laser speckle and imaging microscopy. Image data from tetraploid human cell motion and quorum sensing biofilm growth were studied as well, and we found that the signal fluctuations could be interpreted as gene expression fluctuations occurring during inter-cell communication. We have mapped nucleotide sequences as images and studied the fluctuation. We showed that the fractal dimension and correlation can be used for the description of bio-information from the DNA (nanometer) scale to the tissue (millimeter) level. Fluctuations of the HAR1 nucleotide sequence and IRF-6 single-mutation cases in the van der Woude syndrome were discussed. Sub-cell structures such as the 40S ribosome, GroEL, and lysozyme, were shown to carry texture fractal dimension information in their images consistent with their biological states. Clinical applications to X-ray mammography and Parkinson disease MRI data were discussed.

  3. Transparent free-standing metamaterials and their applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xinglin; Li, Guangyuan; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Qing; Peng, Bo; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shijie; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-01-07

    Integration of metamaterials onto a flexible substrate can provide many advantages such as transparency, deformability, light weight and biocompatibility. Here we demonstrate a simple and convenient nickel sacrificial layer-assisted transfer method to fabricate visible-near infrared (IR) metamaterials embedded into a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film. Both the structures and the optical properties are maintained after transferring into the PDMS film from a rigid substrate. This PDMS-based metamaterial can behave as a high performance surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) device with tunable plasmonic bands, which decouple the preparation of SERS structure and the linkage of targeted molecules to the plasmonic structures. By simply covering the PDMS metamaterials device on the surface with molecules of interest, we demonstrate the application of 2-naphthalenethiol molecules self-assembled on a Au film, highlighting the considerable potential of these PDMS metamaterials as a SERS stamp onto any other substrate. What's more, the PDMS-based nanostructures offer a representative model to investigate the interaction between the plasmonic nanostructure and the substrate consisting of different materials by placing PDMS on the surface of the substrate.

  4. Near-infrared active metamaterials and their applications in tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xinglin; Zhang, Qing; Chai, Jianwei; Wong, Lai Mun; Wang, Shijie; Xiong, Qihua

    2014-02-10

    By utilizing the phase change properties of vanadium dioxide (VO2), we have demonstrated the tuning of the electric and magnetic modes of split ring resonators (SRRs) simultaneously within the near IR range. The electric resonance wavelength is blue-shift about 73 nm while the magnetic resonance mode is red-shifted about 126 nm during the phase transition from insulating to metallic phases. Due to the hysteresis phenomenon of VO2 phase transition, both the electric and magnetic modes shifts are hysteretic. In addition to the frequency shift, the magnetic mode has a trend to vanish due to the fact that the metallic phase VO2 has the tendency to short the gap of SRR. We have also demonstrated the application of this active metamaterials in tunable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), for a fixed excitation laser wavelength, the Raman intensity can be altered significantly by tuning the electric mode frequency of SRR, which is accomplished by controlling the phase of VO2 with an accurate temperature control.

  5. Tapered Optical Fiber Probe Assembled with Plasmonic Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhulin; Lei, Xing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Zhaoming; Mao, Qinghe; Meng, Guowen

    2015-08-12

    Optical fiber-Raman devices integrated with plasmonic nanostructures have promising potentials for in situ probing remote liquid samples and biological samples. In this system, the fiber probe is required to simultaneously demonstrate stable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals and high sensitivity toward the target species. Here we demonstrate a generic approach to integrate presynthesized plasmonic nanostructures with tapered fiber probes that are prepared by a dipping-etching method, through reversed electrostatic attraction between the silane couple agent modified silica fiber probe and the nanostructures. Using this approach, both negatively and positively charged plasmonic nanostructures with various morphologies (such as Au nanosphere, Ag nanocube, Au nanorod, Au@Ag core-shell nanorod) can be stably assembled on the tapered silica fiber probes. Attributed to the electrostatic force between the plasmonic units and the fiber surface, the nanostructures do not disperse in liquid samples easily, making the relative standard deviation of SERS signals as low as 2% in analyte solution. Importantly, the detection sensitivity of the system can be optimized by adjusting the cone angle (from 3.6° to 22°) and the morphology of nanostructures assembled on the fiber. Thus, the nanostructures-sensitized optical fiber-Raman probes show great potentials in the applications of SERS-based environmental detection of liquid samples.

  6. Application of a diode array spectroradiometer to measuring the spectral scattering properties of cloud types in a laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Smedley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years diode array spectroradiometers have become useful complements to traditional scanning instruments when measuring visible and ultraviolet solar radiation incident on the ground. This study describes the application of such an instrument to the problem of measuring the radiation scattered by different cloud-types in a laboratory environment. Details of how the instrument is incorporated into the experimental set-up are given together with the development of the system as a whole. The capability to measure a full spectrum for each scattering angle is an undoubted advantage, although the limited sensitivity impacts on the usefulness for optically thin clouds. Nevertheless example results are presented: (1 scattering phase functions at a range of wavelengths recorded simultaneously for water clouds, showing spectral deviation at the rainbow angle and verification of Mie theory; (2 likewise for mixed phase clouds, with evidence of both halo and rainbow features in a single scattering function; and, (3 detail of the forward scattering region in a glaciated cloud showing a barely perceptible halo feature, with implications for the small-scale structure of the ice crystals produced.

  7. Application of a diode array spectroradiometer to measuring the spectral scattering properties of cloud types in a laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. D. Smedley

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years diode array spectroradiometers have become useful complements to traditional scanning instruments when measuring visible and ultraviolet solar radiation incident on the ground. This study describes the application of such an instrument to the problem of measuring the radiation scattered by different cloud types in a laboratory environment. Details of how the instrument is incorporated into the experimental set-up are given together with the development of the system as a whole. The capability to measure a full spectrum for each scattering angle is an undoubted advantage, although the limited dynamic range impacts on the usefulness for optically thin clouds. Nevertheless example results are presented: (1 scattering phase functions at a range of wavelengths recorded simultaneously for water clouds, showing spectral deviation at the rainbow angle and verification of Mie theory; (2 likewise for mixed phase clouds, with evidence of both halo and rainbow features in a single scattering function; and, (3 detail of the forward scattering region in a glaciated cloud showing a barely perceptible halo feature, with implications for the small-scale structure of the ice crystals produced.

  8. Application of the Method of Auxiliary Sources for the Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering by Impedance Spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2002-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is applied to 3D scattering problems involving spherical impedance scatterers. The MAS results are compared with the reference spherical wave expansion (SWE) solution. It is demonstrated that good agreement is achieved between the MAS and SWE results....

  9. Evaluation of Jacobian determinants by Monte Carlo methods - Application to the quasiclassical approximation in molecular scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Budde, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Sampling techniques have been used previously to evaluate Jacobian determinants that occur in classical mechanical descriptions of molecular scattering. These determinants also occur in the quasiclassical approximation. A new technique is described which can be used to evaluate Jacobian determinants which occur in either description. This method is expected to be valuable in the study of reactive scattering using the quasiclassical approximation.

  10. A Dynamical Formulation of One-Dimensional Scattering Theory and Its Applications in Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2013-01-01

    We develop a dynamical formulation of one-dimensional scattering theory where the reflection and transmission amplitudes for a general, possibly complex and energy-dependent, scattering potential are given as solutions of a set of dynamical equations. By decoupling and partially integrating these equations, we reduce the scattering problem to a second order linear differential equation with universal initial conditions that is equivalent to an initial-value time-independent Schrodinger equation. We give explicit formulas for the reflection and transmission amplitudes in terms of the solution of either of these equations and employ them to outline an inverse-scattering method for constructing finite-range potentials with desirable scattering properties at any prescribed wavelength. In particular, we construct optical potentials displaying threshold lasing, anti-lasing, and unidirectional invisibility.

  11. Development of {sup 121}Sb nuclear forward scattering and high pressure applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelzer, Ulrich

    2013-07-01

    The present work deals with the development of Nuclear Resonance Scattering of Synchrotron Radiation at the resonance of {sup 121}Sb (37.13 keV) and its application to high pressure studies. A new high energy resolution monochromator has been designed and tested in combination with a multielement detector in order to perform Nuclear Forward Scattering (NFS) experiments at very high pressure. Tests of the performance of the monochromator reveal an energy resolution of about 13 meV and a spectral efficiency of about 35% at the resonance energy (37.13 keV) of {sup 121}Sb. High pressure experiments were performed on the ferromagnetic metallic compound MnSb (hexagonal NiAs-type structure), which exhibits a high Curie-temperature (T{sub C}∝580 K) and a large magnetic moment (μ{sub Mn}∝3.5 μ{sub B}) aligned along the c-axis. It undergoes a spin reorientation below 520K, where the direction of the Mn moments changes from the c (easy)-axis to the a-axis. High pressure {sup 121}Sb NFS and x-ray diffraction measurements have been performed on MnSb up to about 30 GPa. The analysis of the experimental results reveals that the ferromagnetic state becomes unstable with increasing pressure up to 3 GPa. For 3 GPa

  12. Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-Ray Scattering: Technique and Application to Discontinuous Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joanne Rachel

    1990-01-01

    During the early stages of thin film growth in many thin film-substrate systems, adsorbate atoms form discrete three-dimensional islands, typically 10 A to 150 A in size. In order to study these islands, surface sensitive small angle x-ray scattering has been done for the first time by using a grazing incidence geometry (GISAXS). In this method, the substrate is aligned for total external reflection and the islands produce small angle scattering from the refracted beam crossing the substrate surface. The motivation for developing the GISAXS technique is the advantages GISAXS offers. First, because GISAXS works in reflection, there are no substrate thickness restrictions. Second, there is no sample conductivity requirement. Third, there are no x-ray beam induced sample changes. Finally, the x-ray beam samples all of the islands in the beam path simultaneously. In order to examine thin films in situ with GISAXS, an ultra-high vacuum chamber has been built which can be attached to a rotating anode or synchrotron x-ray source. This chamber is equipped with a pair of beryllium windows, a metal evaporator, a sample heater, and a precision rotary sample holder feedthrough. The GISAXS technique was applied to a model system of gold islands on glass substrates. The glass provides high reflectivity and gold provides strong atomic number contrast. For as-deposited films from 5 A to 15 A in average thickness, average island sizes, heights, and preferred island spacings, and the island surface roughness were determined. From the results of low temperature (< 375^circK) post-deposition annealing experiments, a model was developed which explains the observed slow time-dependence of post-deposition island growth in terms of overlapping diffusion fields and mass transfer by island mobility. The activation energy for this process was determined to be 0.49 eV. These GISAXS results were supplemented with transmission electron micrographs of and grazing incidence wide angle x

  13. Multiagent Systems and Applications Volume 1Practice and Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the book is on completed implementations of agent-based software systems. Here, agent technology is considered broadly, starting from development of agent platforms, all the way through systems actually implemented. The covered topics also include lessons learned during implementation of agent platforms and the reflection on the process of development and application of agent-based systems.   The book includes 10 chapters where interested reader can find discussion of important issues encountered during development of well-known agent platforms such as JADE and Jadex as well as some interesting experiences in developing a new platform that combines software agent and Web Services. Furthermore, the book shows readers several valuable examples of applications based on multi-agent systems including simulations, agents in autonomous negotiations and agents in public administration modelling. We believe that the book will prove useful to the researchers, professors and the practitioners in all discip...

  14. Data Mining Foundations and Intelligent Paradigms Volume 3 Medical, Health, Social, Biological and other Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi

    2012-01-01

    Data mining is one of the most rapidly growing research areas in computer science and statistics. In Volume 3 of this three volume series, we have brought together contributions from some of the most prestigious researchers in applied data mining. Areas of application covered are diverse and include healthcare and finance. Each of the chapters is self contained. Statisticians, applied scientists/ engineers and researchers in bioinformatics will find this volume valuable. Additionally, it provides a sourcebook for graduate students interested in the current direction of research in applied data mining.

  15. Multi-Rate Digital Control Systems with Simulation Applications. Volume II. Computer Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    34 ~AFWAL-TR-80-31 01 • • Volume II L IL MULTI-RATE DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS WITH SIMULATiON APPLICATIONS Volume II: Computer Algorithms DENNIS G. J...29 Ma -8 - Volume II. Computer Algorithms ~ / ’+ 44MWLxkQT N Uwe ~~ 4 ~jjskYIF336l5-79-C-369~ 9. PER~rORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IPROG AMEL...additional options. The analytical basis for the computer algorithms is discussed in Ref. 12. However, to provide a complete description of the program, some

  16. Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics: Volume 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: CFD Modeling of Methane Reforming in Compact Reformers. Meng Ni Chapter 2: FEM Based Solution of Thermo Fluid Dynamic Phenomena in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCS. F. Arpino, A. Carotenuto, N. Massarotti, A. Mauro Chapter 3: Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Development of a 3D Simulator for Testing Pollution Monitoring Robotic Fishes. John Oyekan, Bowen Lu, Huosheng Hu Chapter 4: CFD Applications in Electronic Packaging. C.Y. Khor, Chun-Sean Lau, M.Z. Abdullah Chapter 5: CFD Simulation of Savonius Wind Turbine Operation. Jo?o Vicente Akwa, Adriane Prisco Petry Chapter 6: Intermittency Modelling of Transitional Boundary Layer Flows on Steam and Gas Turbine Blades. Erik Dick, Slawomir Kubacki, Koen Lodefier, Witold Elsner Chapter 7: Numerical Analysis of the Flow through Fitting in Air Conditioning Systems. N.C. Uz?rraga-Rodriguez, A. Gallegos-Mu?oz, J.M. Belman-Flores, J.C. Rubio-Arana Chapter 8: Design and Optimization of Food Processing Equipments using Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling. N. Chhanwal and C. Anandharamakrishnan Chapter 9: Fuel and Intake Systems Optimization of a Converted LPG Engine: Steady and Unsteady in-Cylinder Flow CFD Investigations and Experiments Validation. M. A. Jemni, G. Kantchev, Z. Driss, M. S. Abid Chapter 10: Computational Fluid Dynamics Application for Thermal Management in Underground Mines. Agus P. Sasmito, Jundika C. Kurnia, Guan Mengzhao, Erik Birgersson, Arun S. Mujumdar Chapter 11: Computational Fluid Dynamics and its Applications. R.Parthiban, C.Muthuraj, A.Rajakumar

  17. Accurate monitoring of intravascular fluid volume: A novel application of intrathoracic impedance measures for the guidance of volume reduction therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A. Lara

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Impedance vectors derived from a multivector monitoring system reflect changes in intravascular plasma volume. Two of these vectors most closely track changes in plasma volume and may be used to more accurately guide and optimize volume reduction therapy.

  18. ON SOURCE ANALYSIS BY WAVE SPLITTING WITH APPLICATIONS IN INVERSE SCATTERING OF MULTIPLE OBSTACLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi ben Hassen; Jijun Liu; Roland Potthast

    2007-01-01

    We study wave splitting procedures for acoustic or electromagnetic scattering problems. The idea of these procedures is to split some scattered field into a sum of fields coming from different spatial regions such that this information can be used either for inversion algorithms or for active noise control. Splitting algorithms can be based on general boundary layer potential representation or Green's representation formula. We will prove the unique decomposition of scattered wave outside the specified reference domain G and the unique decomposition of far-field pattern with respect to different reference domain G. Further, we employ the splitting technique for field reconstruction for a scatterer with two or more separate components, by combining it with the point source method for wave recovery. Using the decomposition of scattered wave as well as its far-field pattern, the wave splitting procedure proposed in this paper gives an efficient way to the computation of scattered wave near the obstacle, from which the multiple obstacles which cause the far-field pattern can be reconstructed separately. This considerably extends the range of the decomposition methods in the area of inverse scattering. Finally, we will provide numerical examples to demonstrate the feasibility of the splitting method.

  19. Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Carlson, Blair; Carsley, John; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Eisenmenger, Mark

    2014-02-04

    A Design of Experiment based approach is used to systematically investigate relationships between 8 different welding factors (4 related to tool geometry, 4 related to weld process control) and resulting weld properties including strength, elongation and formability in 1.2mm-2mm thick friction stir welding of AA5182-O for TWB application. The factors that result in most significant effects are elucidated. The interactions between several key factors like plunge depth, tool tilt, pin feature and pin length on the overall weld quality is discussed. Appropriate levels of factors that lead to excellent weld properties are also identified.

  20. VHF volume-imaging radar observation of aspect-sensitive scatterers tilted in mountain waves above a convective boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin stable atmospheric layers cause VHF radars to receive increased echo power from near zenith. Layers can be tilted from horizontal, for instance by gravity waves, and the direction of VHF "glinting" is measurable by spatial domain interferometry or many-beam Doppler beam swinging (DBS. This paper uses the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, Shigaraki, Japan as a volume-imaging radar with 64-beam DBS, to show tilting of layers and air flow in mountain waves. Tilt of aspect-sensitive echo power from horizontal is nearly parallel to air flow, as assumed in earlier measurements of mountain-wave alignment. Vertical-wind measurements are self-consistent from different beam zenith angles, despite the combined effects of aspect sensitivity and horizontal-wind gradients.

  1. Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics: Volume 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: Filtered Density Function as a Modern CFD Tool. N. Ansari, F.A. Jaberi, M.R.H. Sheikhi, P. Givi Chapter 2: CFD Applications in Steam Boilers. N. Nikolopoulos, A. Nikolopoulos, E. Karambinis, M. Agraniotis, P. Grammelis, E. Kakaras Chapter 3: CFD Simulation on Human-Environment System. Shengwei Zhu Chapter 4: CFD Applications in Membrane Technology by Finite Element Analysis. José M. Gozálvez-Zafrilla, Asunción Santafé-Moros Chapter 5: CFD Modelling of Stirred Tanks. Z. Driss, M. Ammar, W. Chtourou, M.S. Abid Chapter 6: CFD Modeling and Simulations: Horizontal Deep Drilling Process and Filter Cake Formation. Mohd A. Kabir, Isaac K. Gamwo Chapter 7: CFD Simulation of Phase Particle Entrapment. Peymani F. Y., Ganbari S. A., Liu Y., Hayatdavoudi A. Chapter 8: Simulation of Low-Btu Syngas Combustion in Trapped Vortex Combustor. Khaled Zbeeb, Chaouki Ghenai Chapter 9: Experimental, Analytical and Numerical Investigation of a Swirling Submerged Jet Flow. H. Alighanbari, M. R. Amiralaei, S. Savtchenko Chapter 10: CFD Simulations of Two-Phase Flow. Yu Zhang Chapter 11: CFD Simulation of Syntrophic Anaerobic Digestion of Volatile Fatty Acids in a Continuous Stirred Reactor. T. Amani, S.M. Mousavi, M. Nosrati

  2. Collaborative volume visualization with applications to underwater acoustic signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Susan; Shane, Richard T.

    2000-08-01

    Distributed collaborative visualization systems represent a technology whose time has come. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics have been working in the areas of collaborative environments and high-end visualization systems for several years. The medical application. TeleInVivo, is an example of a system which marries visualization and collaboration. With TeleInvivo, users can exchange and collaboratively interact with volumetric data sets in geographically distributed locations. Since examination of many physical phenomena produce data that are naturally volumetric, the visualization frameworks used by TeleInVivo have been extended for non-medical applications. The system can now be made compatible with almost any dataset that can be expressed in terms of magnitudes within a 3D grid. Coupled with advances in telecommunications, telecollaborative visualization is now possible virtually anywhere. Expert data quality assurance and analysis can occur remotely and interactively without having to send all the experts into the field. Building upon this point-to-point concept of collaborative visualization, one can envision a larger pooling of resources to form a large overview of a region of interest from contributions of numerous distributed members.

  3. Efficient method for scattering problems in open billiards: Theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akguc, Gursoy B.; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2006-12-01

    We present an efficient method to solve scattering problems in two-dimensional open billiards with two leads and a complicated scattering region. The basic idea is to transform the scattering region to a rectangle, which will lead to complicated dynamics in the interior, but simple boundary conditions. The method can be specialized to closed billiards, and it allows the treatment of interacting particles in the billiard. We apply this method to quantum echoes measured recently in a microwave cavity, and indicate how it can be used for interacting particles.

  4. An efficient method for scattering problems in open billiards: Theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Akguc, G B; Akguc, Gursoy B.; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    We present an efficient method to solve scattering problems in two-dimensional open billiards with two leads and a complicated scattering region. The basic idea is to transform the scattering region to a rectangle, which will lead to complicated dynamics in the interior, but simple boundary conditions. The method can be specialized to closed billiards, and it allows the treatment of interacting particles in the billiard. We apply this method to quantum echoes measured recently in a microwave cavity, and indicate, how it can be used for interacting particles.

  5. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, S. H.; Bentley, P. M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N. L.; Al-Shammary, H. A. O.; Wood, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q-4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100Å scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth.

  6. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  7. Spin-lattice interactions studied by polarised and unpolarised inelastic scattering application to the invar problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.J. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-11-01

    A semi-quantitative analysis is given of some of the ways in which spin-lattice interactions can modify the cross-sections observable in neutron scattering experiments. This analysis is applied to the scattering from the invar alloy Fe{sub 65}Ni{sub 35} using a model in which the magnetic moment is a function of the near neighbour separation. This model has been applied to clarify the results of inelastic scattering experiments carried out on Fe{sub 65}Ni{sub 35} using both polarised and unpolarised neutrons. The extra information obtainable using polarised neutrons as well as the difficulties and limitations of the technique for inelastic scattering are discussed. (author) 8 figs., 14 refs.

  8. High-speed scattering medium characterization with application to focusing light through turbid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkey, Donald B; Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M; Piestun, Rafael

    2012-01-16

    We introduce a phase-control holographic technique to characterize scattering media with the purpose of focusing light through it. The system generates computer-generated holograms implemented via a deformable mirror device (DMD) based on micro-electro-mechanical technology. The DMD can be updated at high data rates, enabling high speed wavefront measurements using the transmission matrix method. The transmission matrix of a scattering material determines the hologram required for focusing through the scatterer. We demonstrate this technique measuring a transmission matrix with 256 input modes and a single output mode in 33.8 ms and creating a focus with a signal to background ratio of 160. We also demonstrate focusing through a temporally dynamic, strongly scattering sample with short speckle decorrelation times.

  9. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  10. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hye-Young Park

    2005-12-17

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  11. Application of Multiple Scattering Theory to Lower Energy Elastic Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chinn, C. R.; Elster, Ch.; Thaler, R. M.; Weppner, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The optical model potentials for nucleon-nucleus elastic scattering at $65$~MeV are calculated for $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, $^{28}$Si, $^{40}$Ca, $^{56}$Fe, $^{90}$Zr and $^{208}$Pb in first order multiple scattering theory, following the prescription of the spectator expansion, where the only inputs are the free NN potentials, the nuclear densities and the nuclear mean field as derived from microscopic nuclear structure calculations. These potentials are used to predict differential cross section...

  12. Fast, accurate and stable scattering calculation method with application to finite sized photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a multipole solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in inhomogeneous geometries. The method is illustrated by calculating the Green’s function for a finite sized two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide.......We present a multipole solution to the Lippmann-Schwinger equation for electromagnetic scattering in inhomogeneous geometries. The method is illustrated by calculating the Green’s function for a finite sized two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide....

  13. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Cano, Roberto J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Czabaj, Michael; Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Reported nanoscale mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suggest that their use may enable the fabrication of significantly lighter structures for use in space applications. To be useful in the fabrication of large structures, however, their attractive nanoscale properties must be retained as they are scaled up to bulk materials and converted into practically useful forms. Advances in CNT production have significantly increased the quantities available for use in manufacturing processes, but challenges remain with the retention of nanoscale properties in larger assemblies of CNTs. This work summarizes recent progress in producing carbon nanotube composites with tensile properties approaching those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. These advances were achieved in nanocomposites with CNT content of 70% by weight. The processing methods explored to yield these CNT composite properties will be discussed, as will the characterization and test methods that were developed to provide insight into the factors that contribute to the enhanced tensile properties. Technology maturation was guided by parallel advancements in computational modeling tools that aided in the interpretation of experimental data.

  14. The Meshfree Finite Volume Method with application to multi-phase porous media models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Brody H.; Perré, Patrick; Turner, Ian

    2017-03-01

    Numerical methods form a cornerstone of the analysis and investigation of mathematical models for physical processes. Many classical numerical schemes rely on the application of strict meshing structures to generate accurate solutions, which in some applications are an infeasible constraint. Within this paper we outline a new meshfree numerical scheme, which we call the Meshfree Finite Volume Method (MFVM). The MFVM uses interpolants to approximate fluxes in a disjoint finite volume scheme, allowing for the accurate solution of strong-form PDEs. We present a derivation of the MFVM, and give error bounds on the spatial and temporal approximations used within the scheme. We present a wide variety of applications of the method, showing key features, and advantages over traditional meshed techniques. We close with an application of the method to a non-linear multi-phase wood drying model, showing the potential for solving numerically challenging problems.

  15. High-energy molecular lasers self-controlled volume-discharge lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, V V

    2016-01-01

    This book displays the physics and design of high-power molecular lasers. The lasers described are self-controlled volume-discharge lasers. The book explains self-sustained discharge lasers, self-initiated discharge lasers and technical approaches to laser design. Important topics discussed are laser efficiency, laser beam quality and electric field homogeneity. The book contains many new innovative applications.

  16. Composite materials. Volume 3 - Engineering applications of composites. Volume 4 - Metallic matrix composites. Volume 8 - Structural design and analysis, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noton, B. R. (Editor); Kreider, K. G.; Chamis, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    This volume discusses a vaety of applications of both low- and high-cost composite materials in a number of selected engineering fields. The text stresses the use of fiber-reinforced composites, along with interesting material systems used in the electrical and nuclear industries. As to technology transfer, a similarity is noted between many of the reasons responsible for the utilization of composites and those problems requiring urgent solution, such as mechanized fabrication processes and design for production. Features topics include road transportation, rail transportation, civil aircraft, space vehicles, builing industry, chemical plants, and appliances and equipment. The laminate orientation code devised by Air Force materials laboratory is included. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  17. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  18. Study of relationship between volume of distribution and body weight application to amikacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughoo, L; Bourguignon, L; Maire, P; Ducher, M

    2014-06-01

    Amikacin use is difficult because of its narrow therapeutic and its pharmacokinetic variability. This variability of amikacin is not well known. To adapt amikacin the physician assumes that there is a linear and continuous relation between the volume of distribution and the body weight. The objective of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the volume of distribution (Vd) and the body weight (BW) using a non parametric statistical analysis of dependence so called Z method. Retrospective pharmacokinetic population study and statistic analysis. 872 patients receiving intravenous amikacin. The volume of distribution was modelled using the Non Parametric Adaptive Grid algorithm (NPAG) for a two-compartment model with intravenous infusion. Z coefficient was performed to evaluate the relationships between Vd and BW. For the 872 patients (mean age of 73 ± 17 years) dispatched as follow 53 % female and 47 % male, the analysis of the statistical relationships by the non parametric Z analysis showed a scattered linkage between Vd and BW. For the whole population, the relationship between Vd and BW was not linear (regression analysis). Z analysis demonstrated that only for 80 % of patients there is a relationship between Vd and BW. For these patients, regression analysis give a significant adjustment of a linear model (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). In the whole studied population there is not a continuous and linear relationship between Vd estimated by NPAG and the BW. These results underline the difficulties to adapt doses of amikacin with only BW information.

  19. Single-Network Wide-Area Persistent Scatterer Interferometry: Algorithms with Application to Sentinel-1 InSAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, K.; Shau, R.; Adam, N.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced InSAR techniques, for example, Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI), allow long term deformation time series analysis with millimeter accuracy. ESA's Sentinel-1 SAR mission employs the TOPS mode as the standard mode for acquiring InSAR data. It provides a continuous and large coverage at conventional resolution. The idea is to have a wide-area PSI for mapping countries and continents. Although PSI has been successfully demonstrated and validated in the past for various applications, there are some limitations for processing a large-scale dataset. First, PSI is most effective in urban areas which have a large number of stable scatterers. For large-scale PSI, even non-urban areas need to be processed; and this requires robust algorithms for scatterer selection, network construction and inversion, and atmospheric phase removal. Second, the computational load can be very high, due to which, the processing is usually divided into overlapping blocks and merged later. This can however lead to spatial error propagation. This paper presents algorithms which have been developed for a robust PSI reference network estimation, while mitigating error propagation. Instead of dividing the scene into overlapping blocks, a single network (i.e. arcs connecting the scatterers) is created for the full scene. The relative deformation and residual DEM are estimated for the arcs using the LAMBDA estimator. The relative measurements of the network are finally integrated via least-squares inversion. Here, the sparsity of the system of linear equations is exploited to deal with big data (e.g. 10,000,000 arcs for 500,000 scatterers is a typical configuration for Sentinel-1). A QR or LU parallelizable solver is used for fast inversion. Also, variances of the estimates are calculated using a selected parallel inversion method based on LDL decomposition. Demonstration of the algorithms for large-scale deformation monitoring is provided using available Sentinel-1 data for Germany.

  20. Time—dependent Theory of Raman Scattering with Pulses—Application to Continuum Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo-Y.Lee

    1995-01-01

    A theory of real-time dependence of Raman scattering for a pulse-mode laser is developed within second-order perturbation theory and using the wavepacket terminology.We apply the theory to continuum Raman scattering for short and long pulses and varying pulse carrier frequency,For an initial ground virational state,it is shown that the rate of Raman emission as a funcition of time and pulse carrier frequency is structureless for all pulses,and for pulses that are longer than the dissociation time the rate also decays with the pulses.This is contrary to recently reported resonance fluorescence type structures at long times (M.Shapiro,J.Chem.Phys.99,2453(1993),We explain why such structures are unphysical for continuum Raman scattering.

  1. Compton scattered imaging based on the V-line radon transform and its medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M K; Regniery, R; Truong, T T; Zaidi, H

    2010-01-01

    The Radon transform (RT) on straight lines deals as mathematical foundation for many tomographic modalities (e.g. Xray scanner, Positron Emission Tomography), using only primary radiation. In this paper, we consider a new RT defined on a pair of half-lines forming a letter V, arising from the modeling a two-dimensional emission imaging process by Compton scattered gamma rays. We establish its analytic inverse, which is shown to support the feasibility of the reconstruction of a two-dimensional image from scattered radiation collected on a one-dimensional collimated camera. Moreover, a filtered back-projection inversion method is also constructed. Its main advantages are algorithmic efficiency and computational rapidity. We present numerical simulations to illustrate the working. To sum up, the V-line RT leads not only to a new imaging principle, but also to a new concept of detector with high energetic resolution capable to collect the scattered radiation.

  2. Frequency domain analysis of lamb wave scattering and application to film bulk acoustic wave resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmayr, Florian; Hashimoto, Ken-Ya; Omori, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Masatsune

    2010-07-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel frequency domain analysis (FDA) to evaluate the scattering behavior of a waveguide mode at arbitrary scattering geometries by a time harmonic simulation based on the finite element method (FEM). To this end, we add an injection-damping mechanism (IDM) to avoid interference at the acoustic input port. The IDM can be easily constructed by a numerical operation. Our approach offers improved time consumption and calculation power necessary over the established method in the time domain. After checking the validity of the proposed method, we discuss the importance of considering wave scattering phenomena in film bulk acoustic wave resonator (FBAR) devices by applying the proposed method to two simplified models of an FBAR device.

  3. Application of the complex scaling method in solving three-body Coulomb scattering problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazauskas, R.

    2017-03-01

    The three-body scattering problem in Coulombic systems is a widespread, yet unresolved problem using the mathematically rigorous methods. In this work this long-term challenge has been undertaken by combining distorted waves and Faddeev–Merkuriev equation formalisms in conjunction with the complex scaling technique to overcome the difficulties related with the boundary conditions. Unlike the common belief, it is demonstrated that the smooth complex scaling method can be applied to solve the three-body Coulomb scattering problem in a wide energy region, including the fully elastic domain and extending to the energies well beyond the atom ionization threshold. A newly developed method is used to study electron scattering on the ground states of hydrogen and positronium atoms as well as a {e}++{{H}}({n}=1)\\rightleftarrows {{p}}+{Ps}({n}=1) reaction. Where available, obtained results are compared with the experimental data and theoretical predictions, proving the accuracy and efficiency of the newly developed method.

  4. Application of small-angle X-ray scattering for differentiation among breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changizi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS is an X-ray diffraction-based technique where a narrow collimated beam of X-rays is focused onto a sample and the scattered X-rays recorded by a detector. The pattern of the scattered X-rays carries information on the molecular structure of the material. As breast cancer is the most widespread cancer in women and differentiation among its tumors is important, this project compared the results of coherent X-ray scattering measurements obtained from benign and malignant breast tissues. The energy-dispersive method with a setup including X-ray tube, primary collimator, sample holder, secondary collimator and high-purity germanium (HpGe detector was used. One hundred thirty-one breast-tissue samples, including normal, fibrocystic changes and carcinoma, were studied at the 6° scattering angle. Diffraction profiles (corrected scattered intensity versus momentum transfer of normal, fibrocystic changes and carcinoma were obtained. These profiles showed a few peak positions for adipose (1.15 ± 0.06 nm -1 , mixed normal (1.15 ± 0.06 nm -1 and 1.4 ± 0.04 nm -1 , fibrocystic changes (1.46 ± 0.05 nm -1 and 1.74 ± 0.04 nm -1 and carcinoma (1.55 ± 0.04 nm -1 , 1.73 ± 0.06 nm -1 , 1.85 ± 0.05 nm -1 . We were able to differentiate between normal, fibrocystic changes (benign and carcinoma (malignant breast tissues by SAXS. However, we were unable to differentiate between different types of carcinoma.

  5. Electromagnetic Wave Scattering by Small Impedance Particles of an Arbitrary Shape and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Ramm

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The proposal deals with electromagnetic (EM wave scattering by one and many small impedance particles of an arbitrary shape. Analytic formula is derived for EM wave scattering by one small impedance particle of an arbitrary shape and an integral equation for the effective field in the medium where many such particles are embedded. These results are applied for creating a medium with a desired refraction coefficient. The proposed theory has no analogs in the literature. (Mathematical Subject Classiffication: 35J05, 35J25, 65N12, 78A25, 78A48.

  6. A simple nonbinary scattering model applicable to atomic collisions is crystals at 1ow energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Sigmund, Peter

    1966-01-01

    the elliptic to the spherical potential are investigated. Special attention is paid to proper definitions of collision time and collision length which are important in collisions in crystals. Limitations to classical scattering arising from the uncertainty principle prove to be more serious than assumed......Presents the solution of a special scattering problem which may be important in the theory of slowing-down of atomic particles in crystals. A projectile moves along the centre axis of a regular ring of n equal atoms which are free and do not interact with each other. The interaction between...

  7. Scattering of hydrogen, nitrogen and water ions from micro pore optic plates for application in spaceborne plasma instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stude, Joan; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas

    2016-10-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometers for upcoming space missions into enhanced radiation environments need to be small, light weight and energy efficient. Time-of-flight systems using surface interactions as start-event generation can be smaller than foil-type instruments. Start surfaces for such applications need to provide narrow angular scattering, high ionization yields and high secondary electron emissions to be effective. We measured the angular scattering, energy distribution and positive ionization yield of micro pore optics for incident hydrogen, nitrogen and water ions at 2 keV. Positive ionization yields of 2% for H+ , 0.5% for N+ and 0.2% for H2O+ were detected.

  8. Light propagation through weakly scattering media: a study of Monte Carlo vs. diffusion theory with application to neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancora, Daniele; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-07-01

    One of the major challenges within Optical Imaging, photon propagation through clear layers embedded between scattering tissues, can be now efficiently modelled in real-time thanks to the Monte Carlo approach based on GPU. Because of its nature, the photon propagation problem can be very easily parallelized and ran on low cost hardware, avoiding the need for expensive Super Computers. A comparison between Diffusion and MC photon propagation theory is presented in this work with application to neuroimaging, investigating low scattering regions in a mouse-like phantom. Regions such as the Cerebral Spinal Fluid, are currently not taken into account in the classical computational models because of the impossibility to accurately simulate light propagation using fast Diffusive Equation approaches, leading to inaccuracies during the reconstruction process. The goal of the study presented here, is to reduce and further improve the computation accuracy of the reconstructed solution in a highly realistic scenario in the case of neuroimaging in preclinical mouse models.

  9. SU-E-T-611: Effective Treatment Volume of the Small Size IORT Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krechetov, A.S. [Intraop Medical Corp, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); ASK Physics, Mountain View, CA (United States); Goer, D.A. [Intraop Medical Corp, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose Mobile electron linear accelerators are gaining more attention recently, providing a lower cost and simpler way to perform intraoperative treatment. However, the simplicity of the treatment process does not eliminate the need for proper attention to the technical aspects of the treatment. One of the potential pitfalls is incorrect selection of the appropriate applicator size to adequately cover the tumor bed to the prescription dose. When treating tumor beds in the pelvis, the largest applicator that fits into the pelvis is usually selected as there is concern about microscopic extension of the disease along the sidewalls of the pelvis. But when treating early stage breast tumors, there is a natural tendency to select an applicator as small as possible so as not to jeopardize cosmesis. Methods This investigation questions how much of the typical breast treatment volume gets adequate exposure and what is the correct strategy in selecting the proper applicator size. Actual data from isodose scans were analyzed. Results We found that typical treatment dose prescriptions can cover as much as 80% and as little as 20% of the nominal treatment volume depending on the applicator size and energy of the beam and whether the dose is prescribed to the 80 or 90% isodose level. Treatment volume is defined as a cylinder with diameter equal to applicator and height equal to the corresponding D80 or D90 depth. Conclusion If mobile linear accelerators are used, there can be significant amount of “cold volume” depending on the applicator size and this should be taken into account when selecting the applicator that is needed. Using too small of an applicator could result in significant under-dosing to the tissue at risk. Long-term clinical data demonstrates that selecting an adequate field size results in good ontological control as well as excellent cosmesis. Intraop Medical Corp was providing facilities and equipment for this research.

  10. Workshop on ’Recent Progress in Surface and Volume Scattering’ Held in Madrid, Spain on 14-16 September 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-16

    Interes Publico, Av. Espinoza No. 843, Apdo. Postal 2732, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico RIGOROUS SOLUTION OF PROBLEMS OF SCATTERING BY LARGE SIZE...CONDITIONS USED TO STUDY LIGHT SCATTERING FROM METALLIC ROUGH SURFACES Ricardo A. Depine. Universidad de Buenos Aires The scattering of a plane wave by

  11. The Institute for Mathematics and its Applications. Volume 68, Flow Control,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Avner FriedIT0a1, Volume 17: Applicatio:n_ ol’ Couiibinatorics and Graph ThEor, to the Biological and Social Scit-nc’es Editor: Frcd Rc,herts Volume 18...Foundation and Office of Naval Ec•careh whose financial support made the workshop poss)h!e. Avner l’¥iedman Willard Miller. Jr. i xi PRErACE This...interested in models and methodologies which treat trait- " The research of KI.1B. was supported in pprt bv the Air Force Office .f Scientifie Research

  12. Rigorous and asymptotic models of coherent scattering from random rough layers with applications to roadways and geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe; Le Bastard, Cédric

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the rigorous efficient PILE (Propagation-Inside-Layer Expansion) numerical method [1] and an extension of the Ament model [2] to calculate the field scattered by three homogeneous media separated by two random rough surfaces. Here, the study is applied to ground penetrating radar (GPR) (nadir angle, wide band) for nondestructive survey by taking the roughness of the surfaces into account and by calculating the contribution of each echo coming from the multiple scattering inside the layer. Applications to roadways and geoscience are investigated. The PILE method starts from the Method of Moments (MoM), and the impedance matrix is inverted by blocks from the Taylor series expansion of the inverse of the Schur complement. Its great advantage is that it is rigorous, with a simple formulation and has a straightforward physical interpretation. Actually, this last property relies on the fact that each block of the impedance matrix is linked to a particular and quasi-independent physical process occurring during the multiple scattering between the two rough surfaces. Furthermore, the PILE method allows us to use any acceleration algorithm (MLFMM, BMIA/CAG, Forward-Backward with or without Spectral Acceleration, etc.) developed for a single interface. In addition, an asymptotic approach is extended to rough layered media: the scalar Kirchhoff-tangent plane approximation (SKA), for calculating the coherent scattering from the rough layer. The numerical rigorous PILE method is used as a reference to validate this asymptotic model. The study focuses on 2D problems with so-called 1D surfaces, for computational ease of the reference numerical method. Nevertheless, it must be highlighted that the SKA approach can readily be applied to 3D problems. This approach is applied to rough layers with two slightly rough surfaces characterized by either Gaussian or exponential correlation functions. The height probability density function (PDF) is assumed to be Gaussian

  13. Applications of the Hybrid Theory to the Scattering of Electrons from HE+ and Li++ and Resonances in these Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anand K.

    2008-01-01

    Applications of the hybrid theory to the scattering of electrons from Ile+ and Li++ and resonances in these systems, A. K. Bhatia, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center- The Hybrid theory of electron-hydrogen elastic scattering [I] is applied to the S-wave scattering of electrons from He+ and Li++. In this method, both short-range and long-range correlations are included in the Schrodinger equation at the same time. Phase shifts obtained in this calculation have rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared with those obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [2], the close-coupling approach [3], and Harris-Nesbet method [4]. The agreement among all the calculations is very good. These systems have doubly-excited or Feshbach resonances embedded in the continuum. The resonance parameters for the lowest ' S resonances in He and Li+ are calculated and they are compared with the results obtained using the Feshbach projection operator formalism [5,6]. It is concluded that accurate resonance parameters can be obtained by the present method, which has the advantage of including corrections due to neighboring resonances and the continuum in which these resonances are embedded.

  14. Testing the Feasibility of Using PERM to Apply Scattering-Angle Filtering in the Image-Domain for FWI Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alzahrani, Hani Ataiq

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT Testing the Feasibility of Using PERM to Apply Scattering-Angle Filtering in the Image-Domain for FWI Applications Hani Ataiq Alzahrani Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) is a non-linear optimization problem aimed to estimating subsurface parameters by minimizing the mis t between modeled and recorded seismic data using gradient descent methods, which are the only practical choice because of the size of the problem. Due to the high non-linearity of the problem, gradient methods will converge to a local minimum if the starting model is not close to the true one. The accuracy of the long-wavelength components of the initial model controls the level of non-linearity of the inversion. In order for FWI to converge to the global minimum, we have to obtain the long wavelength components of the model before inverting for the short wavelengths. Ultra-low temporal frequencies are sensitive to the smooth (long wavelength) part of the model, and can be utilized by waveform inversion to resolve that part. Un- fortunately, frequencies in this range are normally missing in eld data due to data- acquisition limitations. The lack of low frequencies can be compensated for by uti- lizing wide-aperture data, as they include arrivals that are especially sensitive to the long wavelength components of the model. The higher the scattering angle of a 5 recorded event, the higher the model wavelength it can resolve. Based on this prop- erty, a scattering-angle ltering algorithm is proposed to start the inversion process with events corresponding to the highest scattering angle available in the data, and then include lower scattering angles progressively. The large scattering angles will resolve the smooth part of the model and reduce the non-linearity of the problem, then the lower ones will enhance the resolution of the model. Recorded data is rst migrated using Pre-stack Exploding Re ector Migration (PERM), then the resulting pre-stack image is transformed into angle gathers to which

  15. Towards clinical application: prompt gamma imaging of passively scattered proton fields with a knife-edge slit camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priegnitz, M.; Barczyk, S.; Nenoff, L.; Golnik, C.; Keitz, I.; Werner, T.; Mein, S.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Janssens, G.; Hotoiu, L.; Fiedler, F.; Prieels, D.; Enghardt, W.; Pausch, G.; Richter, C.

    2016-11-01

    Prompt γ-ray imaging with a knife-edge shaped slit camera provides the possibility of verifying proton beam range in tumor therapy. Dedicated experiments regarding the characterization of the camera system have been performed previously. Now, we aim at implementing the prototype into clinical application of monitoring patient treatments. Focused on this goal of translation into clinical operation, we systematically addressed remaining challenges and questions. We developed a robust energy calibration routine and corresponding quality assurance protocols. Furthermore, with dedicated experiments, we determined the positioning precision of the system to 1.1 mm (2σ). For the first time, we demonstrated the application of the slit camera, which was intentionally developed for pencil beam scanning, to double scattered proton beams. Systematic experiments with increasing complexity were performed. It was possible to visualize proton range shifts of 2-5 mm with the camera system in phantom experiments in passive scattered fields. Moreover, prompt γ-ray profiles for single iso-energy layers were acquired by synchronizing time resolved measurements to the rotation of the range modulator wheel of the treatment system. Thus, a mapping of the acquired profiles to different anatomical regions along the beam path is feasible and additional information on the source of potential range shifts can be obtained. With the work presented here, we show that an application of the slit camera in clinical treatments is possible and of potential benefit.

  16. Towards clinical application: prompt gamma imaging of passively scattered proton fields with a knife-edge slit camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priegnitz, M; Barczyk, S; Nenoff, L; Golnik, C; Keitz, I; Werner, T; Mein, S; Smeets, J; Vander Stappen, F; Janssens, G; Hotoiu, L; Fiedler, F; Prieels, D; Enghardt, W; Pausch, G; Richter, C

    2016-11-21

    Prompt γ-ray imaging with a knife-edge shaped slit camera provides the possibility of verifying proton beam range in tumor therapy. Dedicated experiments regarding the characterization of the camera system have been performed previously. Now, we aim at implementing the prototype into clinical application of monitoring patient treatments. Focused on this goal of translation into clinical operation, we systematically addressed remaining challenges and questions. We developed a robust energy calibration routine and corresponding quality assurance protocols. Furthermore, with dedicated experiments, we determined the positioning precision of the system to 1.1 mm (2σ). For the first time, we demonstrated the application of the slit camera, which was intentionally developed for pencil beam scanning, to double scattered proton beams. Systematic experiments with increasing complexity were performed. It was possible to visualize proton range shifts of 2-5 mm with the camera system in phantom experiments in passive scattered fields. Moreover, prompt γ-ray profiles for single iso-energy layers were acquired by synchronizing time resolved measurements to the rotation of the range modulator wheel of the treatment system. Thus, a mapping of the acquired profiles to different anatomical regions along the beam path is feasible and additional information on the source of potential range shifts can be obtained. With the work presented here, we show that an application of the slit camera in clinical treatments is possible and of potential benefit.

  17. Joint modelling of flood peaks and volumes: A copula application for the Danube River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou George

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flood frequency analysis is usually performed as a univariate analysis of flood peaks using a suitable theoretical probability distribution of the annual maximum flood peaks or peak over threshold values. However, other flood attributes, such as flood volume and duration, are necessary for the design of hydrotechnical projects, too. In this study, the suitability of various copula families for a bivariate analysis of peak discharges and flood volumes has been tested. Streamflow data from selected gauging stations along the whole Danube River have been used. Kendall’s rank correlation coefficient (tau quantifies the dependence between flood peak discharge and flood volume settings. The methodology is applied to two different data samples: 1 annual maximum flood (AMF peaks combined with annual maximum flow volumes of fixed durations at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 60 days, respectively (which can be regarded as a regime analysis of the dependence between the extremes of both variables in a given year, and 2 annual maximum flood (AMF peaks with corresponding flood volumes (which is a typical choice for engineering studies. The bivariate modelling of the extracted peak discharge - flood volume couples is achieved with the use of the Ali-Mikhail-Haq (AMH, Clayton, Frank, Joe, Gumbel, Hüsler-Reiss, Galambos, Tawn, Normal, Plackett and FGM copula families. Scatterplots of the observed and simulated peak discharge - flood volume pairs and goodness-of-fit tests have been used to assess the overall applicability of the copulas as well as observing any changes in suitable models along the Danube River. The results indicate that for the second data sampling method, almost all of the considered Archimedean class copula families perform better than the other copula families selected for this study, and that for the first method, only the upper-tail-flat copulas excel (except for the AMH copula due to its inability to model stronger relationships.

  18. [Review on Application of Optical Scattering Spectroscopy for Elastic Wave Velocity Study on Materials in Earth's Interior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-jun; Li, He-ping; Dai, Li-dong; Hu, Hai-ying; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Chao-shuai

    2015-09-01

    In-situ experimental results on the elastic wave velocity of Earth materials at high pressure and high temperature in combination with data from seismic observation can help to inverse the chemical composition, state and migration of materials in Earth's interior, providing an important approach to explore information of deep earth. Applying the Brillouin scattering into the Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) to obtain the in situ elastic wave velocities of minerals, is the important approach to investigate elastic properties of Earth's Interior. With the development of DAC technology, on the one hand, the high temperature and high pressure experimental environment to simulate different layers of the earth can be achieved; on the other hand, the optical properties of DAC made many kinds of optical analysis and test methods have been widely applied in this research field. In order to gain the elastic wave velocity under high temperature and high pressure, the accurate experimental pressure and heating temperature of the sample in the cavity should be measured and calibrated first, then the scattering signal needs to dealt with, using the Brillouin frequency shift to calculate the velocity in the sample. Combined with the lattice constants obtained from X ray technique, by a solid elastic theory, all the elastic parameters of minerals can be solved. In this paper, firstly, application of methods based on optical spectrum such as Brillouin and Raman scattering in elasticity study on materials in Earth's interior, and the basic principle and research progress of them in the velocity measurement, pressure and temperature calibration are described in detail. Secondly, principle and scope of application of two common methods of spectral pressure calibration (fluorescence and Raman spectral pressure standard) are analyzed, in addition with introduce of the application of two conventional means of temperature calibration (blackbody radiation and Raman temperature scale) in

  19. A general framework and review of scatter correction methods in x-ray cone-beam computerized tomography. Part 1: Scatter compensation approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehrnschopf, Ernst-Peter; Klingenbeck, Klaus [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Imaging and Therapy Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Since scattered radiation in cone-beam volume CT implies severe degradation of CT images by quantification errors, artifacts, and noise increase, scatter suppression is one of the main issues related to image quality in CBCT imaging. The aim of this review is to structurize the variety of scatter suppression methods, to analyze the common structure, and to develop a general framework for scatter correction procedures. In general, scatter suppression combines hardware techniques of scatter rejection and software methods of scatter correction. The authors emphasize that scatter correction procedures consist of the main components scatter estimation (by measurement or mathematical modeling) and scatter compensation (deterministic or statistical methods). The framework comprises most scatter correction approaches and its validity also goes beyond transmission CT. Before the advent of cone-beam CT, a lot of papers on scatter correction approaches in x-ray radiography, mammography, emission tomography, and in Megavolt CT had been published. The opportunity to avail from research in those other fields of medical imaging has not yet been sufficiently exploited. Therefore additional references are included when ever it seems pertinent. Scatter estimation and scatter compensation are typically intertwined in iterative procedures. It makes sense to recognize iterative approaches in the light of the concept of self-consistency. The importance of incorporating scatter compensation approaches into a statistical framework for noise minimization has to be underscored. Signal and noise propagation analysis is presented. A main result is the preservation of differential-signal-to-noise-ratio (dSNR) in CT projection data by ideal scatter correction. The objective of scatter compensation methods is the restoration of quantitative accuracy and a balance between low-contrast restoration and noise reduction. In a synopsis section, the different deterministic and statistical methods are

  20. Application of geometric algebra to electromagnetic scattering the Clifford-Cauchy-Dirac technique

    CERN Document Server

    Seagar, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the Clifford-Cauchy-Dirac (CCD) technique for solving problems involving the scattering of electromagnetic radiation from materials of all kinds. It allows anyone who is interested to master techniques that lead to simpler and more efficient solutions to problems of electromagnetic scattering than are currently in use. The technique is formulated in terms of the Cauchy kernel, single integrals, Clifford algebra and a whole-field approach. This is in contrast to many conventional techniques that are formulated in terms of Green's functions, double integrals, vector calculus and the combined field integral equation (CFIE). Whereas these conventional techniques lead to an implementation using the method of moments (MoM), the CCD technique is implemented as alternating projections onto convex sets in a Banach space. The ultimate outcome is an integral formulation that lends itself to a more direct and efficient solution than conventionally is the case, and applies without exception to all types...

  1. A Multiple Scattering Polarized Radiative Transfer Model: Application to HD 189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Zhang, Xi; Swain, Mark R; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J; Yung, Yuk L

    2015-01-01

    We present a multiple scattering vector radiative transfer model which produces disk integrated, full phase polarized light curves for reflected light from an exoplanetary atmosphere. We validate our model against results from published analytical and computational models and discuss a small number of cases relevant to the existing and possible near-future observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b. HD 189733b is arguably the most well observed exoplanet to date and the only exoplanet to be observed in polarized light, yet it is debated if the planet's atmosphere is cloudy or clear. We model reflected light from clear atmospheres with Rayleigh scattering, and cloudy or hazy atmospheres with Mie and fractal aggregate particles. We show that clear and cloudy atmospheres have large differences in polarized light as compared to simple flux measurements, though existing observations are insufficient to make this distinction. Futhermore, we show that atmospheres that are spatially inhomogeneous, such as being partial...

  2. A simple nonbinary scattering model applicable to atomic collisions is crystals at 1ow energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Sigmund, Peter

    1966-01-01

    Presents the solution of a special scattering problem which may be important in the theory of slowing-down of atomic particles in crystals. A projectile moves along the centre axis of a regular ring of n equal atoms which are free and do not interact with each other. The interaction between...... the projectile and each ring atom is described by a Born-Mayer potential, and the scattering is assumed to be elastic and governed by the classical equations of motion. Because of symmetry, the problem can be reduced to plane motion of a particle in a potential of elliptic symmetry. The elliptic force field...... the asymptotic velocities of the ring atoms as well as the energy loss of the projectile. Furthermore, it can be decided whether the projectile is reflected by the ring. Both the feasibility of assumptions specifying the problem and the validity of different approximations made in the transformation from...

  3. Imaging, scattering, and spectroscopic systems for biomedical optics: Tools for bench top and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, William J.

    Optical advances have had a profound impact on biology and medicine. The capabilities range from sensing biological analytes to whole animal and subcellular imaging and clinical therapies. The work presented in this thesis describes three independent and multifunctional optical systems, which explore clinical therapy at the tissue level, biological structure at the cell/organelle level, and the function of underlying fundamental cellular processes. First, we present a portable clinical instrument for delivering delta-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivered the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performed reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument was used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, and blood oxygen saturation during a clinical ALA-PDT trial on superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 632.8 nm PDT treatment laser was collected between 665 and 775 nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programmable time points, white-light reflectance spectra between 475 and 775 nm were acquired. Fluorescence spectra were corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular-value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provided information on hemoglobin oxygen saturation. We next describe the incorporation of this instrument into clinical trials at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (Buffalo, NY). In this trial we examined the effects of light irradiance on photodynamic efficiency and pain. The rate of singlet-oxygen production depends on the product of irradiance and photosensitizer and oxygen

  4. Resonance light scattering spectroscopy study of interaction between gold colloid and thiamazole and its analytical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoling; Yuan, Hong; Pang, Daiwen; Cai, Ruxiu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we used resonance light scattering (RLS) spectroscopy to study the interaction between thiol-containing pharmaceutical-thiamazole and gold colloid. At pH 5.2, the resonance light scattering spectrum of gold nanoparticles has a maximum peak at 555 nm and the RLS intensity is enhanced by trace amount of thiamazole due to the interaction between thiamazole and gold colloid. The binding of colloidal gold to thiamazole results in ligand-induced aggregation of colloidal gold, which was characterized by RLS spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrum, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Based upon the study, we proposed a highly sensitive, gold colloid-based assay using RLS spectrum to detect pharmaceuticals for the first time. The mechanism of binding interaction between Au colloid and thiamazole was also discussed.

  5. New Frontier in Probing Fluid Transport in Low-Permeability Geomedia: Applications of Elastic and Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Sussman, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Low-permeability geomedia are prevalent in subsurface environments. They have become increasingly important in a wide range of applications such as CO2-sequestration, hydrocarbon recovery, enhanced geothermal systems, legacy waste stewardship, high-level radioactive waste disposal, and global security. The flow and transport characteristics of low-permeability geomedia are dictated by their exceedingly low permeability values ranging from 10-6 to 10-12 darcy with porosities dominated by nanoscale pores. Developing new characterization methods and robust computational models that allow estimation of transport properties of low-permeability geomedia has been identified as a critical basic research and technology development need for controlling subsurface and fluids flow. Due to its sensibility to hydrogen and flexible sample environment, neutron based elastic and inelastic scattering can, through various techniques, interrogate all the nanoscale pores in the sample whether they are fluid accessible or not, and readily characterize interfacial waters. In this presentation, we will present two studies revealing the effects of nanoscale pore confinement on fluid dynamics in geomedia. In one study, we use combined (ultra-small)/small-angle elastic neutron scatterings to probe nanoporous features responses in geological materials to transport processes. In the other study, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering was used to distingwish between intergranular pore water and fluid inclusion moisture in bedded rock salt, and to explore their thermal stablibility. Our work demonstrates that neutron based elastic and inelastic scatterings are techniques of choice for in situ probing hydrocarbon and water behavior in nanoporous materials, providing new insights into water-rock interaction and fluids transport in low-permeability geomaterials.

  6. An Easy Method for Finding the Scattering Coefficients of Quantum Graphs and Some Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Seth

    2015-03-01

    Quantum walks are roughly analogous to classical random walks, and like classical walks they have been used to find new (quantum) algorithms. When studying the behavior of large graphs or combinations of graphs it has often been useful to find the response of a subgraph to signals of different frequencies. In this talk I'll be presenting a simple technique for quickly finding the scattering coefficients of any quantum graph. This is done by imitating the scattering states using normalizable states on a modified version of the graph. These scattering coefficients can be expressed entirely in terms of the characteristic polynomial of the graph's time-step operator. With these coefficients in hand we can replace an entire subgraph with a single vertex whose behavior is frequency dependent. This gives us a powerful set of tools for rapidly understanding the behavior of more complex structures. Time permitting, I will apply these tools to several types of graphs (star, complete, tree) demonstrating how we can gain information about the structure of these graphs by bouncing signals off of them, describing the limitations on what information cannot be accessed, and even show how to construct some computations using quantum walks that can be run in faster than classical time.

  7. Full waveform inversion based on scattering angle enrichment with application to real dataset

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI). However, the drawback of the existing RWI methods is inability to utilize diving waves and the extra sensitivity to the migrated image. We propose a combined FWI and RWI optimization problem through dividing the velocity into the background and perturbed components. We optimize both the background and perturbed components, as independent parameters. The new objective function is quadratic with respect to the perturbed component, which will reduce the nonlinearity of the optimization problem. Solving this optimization provides a true amplitude image and utilizes the diving waves to update the velocity of the shallow parts. To insure a proper wavenumber continuation, we use an efficient scattering angle filter to direct the inversion at the early stages to direct energy corresponding to large (smooth velocity) scattering angles to the background velocity update and the small (high wavenumber) scattering angles to the perturbed velocity update. This efficient implementation of the filter is fast and requires less memory than the conventional approach based on extended images. Thus, the new FWI procedure updates the background velocity mainly along the wavepath for both diving and reflected waves in the initial stages. At the same time, it updates the perturbation with mainly reflections (filtering out the diving waves). To demonstrate the capability of this method, we apply it to a real 2D marine dataset.

  8. A MULTIPLE SCATTERING POLARIZED RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODEL: APPLICATION TO HD 189733b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopparla, Pushkar; Yung, Yuk L. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Natraj, Vijay; Swain, Mark R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA-JPL), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhang, Xi [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Wiktorowicz, Sloane J., E-mail: pkk@gps.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We present a multiple scattering vector radiative transfer model that produces disk integrated, full phase polarized light curves for reflected light from an exoplanetary atmosphere. We validate our model against results from published analytical and computational models and discuss a small number of cases relevant to the existing and possible near-future observations of the exoplanet HD 189733b. HD 189733b is arguably the most well observed exoplanet to date and the only exoplanet to be observed in polarized light, yet it is debated if the planet’s atmosphere is cloudy or clear. We model reflected light from clear atmospheres with Rayleigh scattering, and cloudy or hazy atmospheres with Mie and fractal aggregate particles. We show that clear and cloudy atmospheres have large differences in polarized light as compared to simple flux measurements, though existing observations are insufficient to make this distinction. Futhermore, we show that atmospheres that are spatially inhomogeneous, such as being partially covered by clouds or hazes, exhibit larger contrasts in polarized light when compared to clear atmospheres. This effect can potentially be used to identify patchy clouds in exoplanets. Given a set of full phase polarimetric measurements, this model can constrain the geometric albedo, properties of scattering particles in the atmosphere, and the longitude of the ascending node of the orbit. The model is used to interpret new polarimetric observations of HD 189733b in a companion paper.

  9. Simultaneous Analysis of Secondary Structure and Light Scattering from Circular Dichroism Titrations: Application to Vectofusin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Marquette, Arnaud; Schoup, Michel; Fenard, David; Galy, Anne; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2016-12-01

    Circular Dichroism data are often decomposed into their constituent spectra to quantify the secondary structure of peptides or proteins but the estimation of the secondary structure content fails when light scattering leads to spectral distortion. If peptide-induced liposome self-association occurs, subtracting control curves cannot correct for this. We show that if the cause of the light scattering is independent from the peptide structural changes, the CD spectra can be corrected using principal component analysis (PCA). The light scattering itself is analysed and found to be in good agreement with backscattering experiments. This method therefore allows to simultaneously follow structural changes related to peptide-liposome binding as well as peptide induced liposome self-association. We apply this method to study the structural changes and liposome binding of vectofusin-1, a transduction enhancing peptide used in lentivirus based gene therapy. Vectofusin-1 binds to POPC/POPS liposomes, causing a reversal of the negative liposome charge at high peptide concentrations. When the peptide charges exactly neutralise the lipid charges on both leaflets reversible liposome self-association occurs. These results are in good agreement with biological observations and provide further insight into the conditions required for efficent transduction enhancement.

  10. Simultaneous Analysis of Secondary Structure and Light Scattering from Circular Dichroism Titrations: Application to Vectofusin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Marquette, Arnaud; Schoup, Michel; Fenard, David; Galy, Anne; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Circular Dichroism data are often decomposed into their constituent spectra to quantify the secondary structure of peptides or proteins but the estimation of the secondary structure content fails when light scattering leads to spectral distortion. If peptide-induced liposome self-association occurs, subtracting control curves cannot correct for this. We show that if the cause of the light scattering is independent from the peptide structural changes, the CD spectra can be corrected using principal component analysis (PCA). The light scattering itself is analysed and found to be in good agreement with backscattering experiments. This method therefore allows to simultaneously follow structural changes related to peptide-liposome binding as well as peptide induced liposome self-association. We apply this method to study the structural changes and liposome binding of vectofusin-1, a transduction enhancing peptide used in lentivirus based gene therapy. Vectofusin-1 binds to POPC/POPS liposomes, causing a reversal of the negative liposome charge at high peptide concentrations. When the peptide charges exactly neutralise the lipid charges on both leaflets reversible liposome self-association occurs. These results are in good agreement with biological observations and provide further insight into the conditions required for efficent transduction enhancement. PMID:28004740

  11. 中子散射技术在生物大分子领域的应用%Neutron Scattering's Application in Biopolymers' Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍国琳; 马建标

    2001-01-01

      Neutron scattering has been used more and more widely, as neutron sources and scattering techniques have been developed. For the basic properties of the neutron the usefulness of neutrons scattering is better than other scattering techniques (X-Ray scattering, Raman scattering etc.) at a lot of areas especially in biopolymer studies. Because firstly, H has a very big neutron scattering cross-section as neutron scattering can tell us the site of H and H-bond distinctly and it is very important in the researches of the biopolymer structures. Secondly, neutron can distribute H and D for they have different neutron scattering cross-sections, so we can use isotopic substitution at studies, it is very useful for the researches of compound biopolymers and a lot of biopolymers are compounds. At the same time biopolymers' dynamic behaviors can be obtained by neutron scattering too. In this paper the applications of neutron scattering in biopolymers including structure and dynamics of biomacromolecules are reviewed.%  随着中子源和散射装置的改进,中子散射技术在生物大分子领域的应用也日益广泛,且许多方面是其它(X射线等)散射技术无法比拟的。本文综述了中子散射在生物大分子的结构和动态性能等方面的研究进展和方法,同时也讨论了中子散射技术在应用过程中的一些优缺点。

  12. A one-step green route to synthesize copper nanocrystals and their applications in catalysis and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pinhua; Sui, Yongming; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yingnan; Cui, Guangliang; Wang, Chunzhong; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Bo

    2014-04-01

    A nontoxic, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible strategy, which meets the standard of green chemistry, is introduced for the synthesis of copper nanocrystals (Cu NCs) with olive oil as both reducing agent and capping agent. By changing the reaction parameters, the shape, size and surface structure of the Cu NCs can be well controlled. The obtained Cu nanocubes show excellent catalytic properties for the catalytic reduction of dyes and CO oxidation. Moreover, the prepared Cu nanocubes as substrates exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity for 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy). Therefore, this facile route provides a useful platform for the fabrication of Cu NCs which have the potential to replace noble metals for certain applications.A nontoxic, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible strategy, which meets the standard of green chemistry, is introduced for the synthesis of copper nanocrystals (Cu NCs) with olive oil as both reducing agent and capping agent. By changing the reaction parameters, the shape, size and surface structure of the Cu NCs can be well controlled. The obtained Cu nanocubes show excellent catalytic properties for the catalytic reduction of dyes and CO oxidation. Moreover, the prepared Cu nanocubes as substrates exhibit surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity for 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy). Therefore, this facile route provides a useful platform for the fabrication of Cu NCs which have the potential to replace noble metals for certain applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00412d

  13. Application of dual volume reconstruction technique in embolization of intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hai ZHANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the value of dual volume reconstruction technique in Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysms. Methods Three-dimensional imaging data of 20 patients received GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysms from Jun. 2012 to Apr. 2013 were analyzed for dual volume reconstruction. The value of application of dual volume reconstruction was evaluated by the detection rate of coils bolus, degree of aneurysm occlusion, the length of aneurysm sac and aneurysm neck before and after embolization, and the characteristics and clinical value of the reconstructed images. Results  A total of 20 coil boluses were detected by dual volume reconstruction images, and the detection rate was 100%. Among all of 20 patients, no visualization of contrast medium in the aneurysm was found in 13 patients, while contrast agent was found in the aneurysm sac in 3 patients and in the aneurysm neck in 4 patients. The length of aneurysm neck and sac was somewhat changed before and after embolization with no statistically significant difference (P>0.05. The dual volume reconstruction could reveal coil bolus, vessels, cranium and fusion images, and the aneurysms could be shown by different imaging modes according to the clinical requirement. Conclusion Dual volume reconstruction technique can display the location of coil bolus, degree of occlusion and aneurysm size, and evaluate the embolization effect by multifarious imaging modes, providing a great deal of information for the evaluation of GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysm. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.13

  14. Anisotropic inverse Compton scattering from the trans-relativistic to the ultra-relativistic regime and application to the radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, G

    1999-01-01

    The problem of the anisotropic Inverse Compton scattering between a monochromatic photon beam and relativistic electrons is revisited and formally solved without approximations. Solutions are given for the single scattering with an electron beam and with a population of electrons isotropically distributed, under the assumption that the energy distribution of the relativistic particles follows a simple power law as it is the case in many astrophysical applications. Both the Thomson approximation and the Klein-Nishina regime are considered for the scattering of an unpolarized photon beam. The equations are obtained without the ultra-relativistic approximation and are compared with the ultra-relativistic solutions given in the literature. The main characteristics of the power distribution and spectra of the scattered radiation are discussed for relevant examples. In the Thomson case for an isotropic electron population simple formulae holding down to mildly-relativistic energies are given. As an application the ...

  15. Radioactive Threat Detection with Scattering Physics: A Model-Based Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-01-21

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem in maintaining national security for any country. Emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. The development of a model-based sequential Bayesian processor that captures both the underlying transport physics including scattering offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. It is shown that this processor can be used to develop an effective detection technique.

  16. Raman scattering enhanced by plasmonic clusters and its application to single-molecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, Tomokazu [The Open University of Japan, Wakaba 2-11, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8586 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Nobusada, Katsuyuki [Institute for Molecular Science and SOKENDAI, Nishigonaka 38, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The optical response of the linear Au{sub 8} cluster is investigated by the linear response theory based on the density functional theory. It is revealed that the observed many peaks in the visible region originate from the interaction of the ideal plasmonic excitation along the molecular axis with the background d-electron excitations, i.e., the Landau damping. In spite of the existence of the damping, the Raman scattering is shown to be enhanced remarkably by the incident light resonant to the visible excitations. The novel imaging experiment with the atomic resolution is proposed by utilizing a plasmonic cluster as the probing tip.

  17. Frabrication of Au Nanoparticles in Various Shapes and Their Application in Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-yang XUE; Hui-juan WANG; Yong-feng LIANG; Rong CHEN; Jun LIU

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic metallic Nanoparticles (NPs) have unique optical properties, such as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)spectroscopy. In this paper, star-shaped and sphere gold NPs were prepared by seed-mediated growth and Frence methods respectively. The reaction process and the effect of reagent in seed-mediated growth of gold nanostar particles were systematically described. After fabricating NPs the authors test their Raman enhancement using Crystal Violet (CV) molecules apart. The experimental results indicated that star-shaped Au NPs had stronger Raman enhancement spectrum than that of sphere Au NPs.

  18. Forward scattering from square cylinders in the resonance region with application to aperture blockage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusch, W.; Appel-Hansen, Jørgen; Klein, C

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between the induced field ratio (IFR) of a cylinder and aperture blocking of a constant-phase aperture by cylindrical struts is discussed. An analytical technique is presented whereby the IFR of rectangular cylinders can be calculated using the method-of-moments with internal...... constraint points. An experimental technique using a forward-scattering range is used to measure the IFR's of square and circular cylinders in an anechoic chamber. These experimental results are compared with the theory, and their implications on aperture blocking losses and boresight cross polarization...

  19. Radar scattering of linear dunes and mega-yardangs: Application to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillou, Philippe; Seignovert, Benoît; Radebaugh, Jani; Wall, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    The Ku-band (13.8 GHz - 2.2 cm) RADAR instrument onboard the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has revealed the richness of the surface of Titan, as numerous seas, lakes, rivers, cryo-volcanic flows and vast dune fields have been discovered. Linear dunes are a major geomorphological feature present on Titan, covering up to 17% of its surface, mainly in equatorial regions. However, the resolution of the RADAR instrument is not good enough to allow a detailed study of the morphology of these features. In addition, other linear wind-related landforms, such as mega-yardangs (linear wind-abraded ridges formed in cohesive rocks), are likely to present a comparable radar signature that could be confused with the one of dunes. We conducted a comparative study of the radar radiometry of both linear dunes and mega-yardangs, based on representative terrestrial analogues: the linear dunes located in the Great Sand Sea in western Egypt and in the Namib Desert in Namibia, and the mega-yardangs observed in the Lut Desert in eastern Iran and in the Borkou Desert in northern Chad. We analysed the radar scattering of both terrestrial linear dunes and mega-yardangs, using high-resolution radar images acquired by the X-band (9.6 GHz - 3.1 cm) sensor of the TerraSAR-X satellite. Variations seen in the radar response of dunes are the result of a contrast between the dune and interdune scattering, while for mega-yardangs these variations are the result of a contrast between ridges and erosion valleys. We tested a simple surface scattering model, with parameters derived from the local topography and surface roughness estimates, to accurately reproduce the radar signal variations for both landforms. It appears that we can discriminate between two types of dunes - bare interdunes as in Egypt and sand-covered interdunes as in Namibia, and between two types of mega-yardangs - young yardangs as in Iran and older ones as in Chad. We applied our understanding of the radar scattering to the analysis of

  20. Computing n-dimensional volumes of complexes: Application to constructive entropy bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.; Makaruk, H.E.

    1997-11-01

    The constructive bounds on the needed number-of-bits (entropy) for solving a dichotomy (i.e., classification of a given data-set into two distinct classes) can be represented by the quotient of two multidimensional solid volumes. Exact methods for the calculation of the volume of the solids lead to a tighter lower bound on the needed number-of-bits--than the ones previously known. Establishing such bounds is very important for engineering applications, as they can improve certain constructive neural learning algorithms, while also reducing the area of future VLSI implementations of neural networks. The paper will present an effective method for the exact calculation of the volume of any n-dimensional complex. The method uses a divide-and-conquer approach by: (i) partitioning (i.e., slicing) a complex into simplices; and (ii) computing the volumes of these simplices. The slicing of any complex into a sum of simplices always exists, but it is not unique. This non-uniqueness gives us the freedom to choose that specific partitioning which is convenient for a particular case. It will be shown that this optimal choice is related to the symmetries of the complex, and can significantly reduce the computations involved.

  1. Recent Advances in Development and Applications of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Inelastic Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babikov, Dmitri; Semenov, Alexander

    2016-01-28

    A mixed quantum/classical approach to inelastic scattering (MQCT) is developed in which the relative motion of two collision partners is treated classically, and the rotational and vibrational motion of each molecule is treated quantum mechanically. The cases of molecule + atom and molecule + molecule are considered including diatomics, symmetric-top rotors, and asymmetric-top rotor molecules. Phase information is taken into consideration, permitting calculations of elastic and inelastic, total and differential cross sections for excitation and quenching. The method is numerically efficient and intrinsically parallel. The scaling law of MQCT is favorable, which enables calculations at high collision energies and for complicated molecules. Benchmark studies are carried out for several quite different molecular systems (N2 + Na, H2 + He, CO + He, CH3 + He, H2O + He, HCOOCH3 + He, and H2 + N2) in a broad range of collision energies, which demonstrates that MQCT is a viable approach to inelastic scattering. At higher collision energies it can confidently replace the computationally expensive full-quantum calculations. At low collision energies and for low-mass systems results of MQCT are less accurate but are still reasonable. A proposal is made for blending MQCT calculations at higher energies with full-quantum calculations at low energies.

  2. Unitarized Diffractive Scattering in QCD and Application to Virtual Photon Total Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, R; Lam, C S; Dib, Rim; Khoury, Justin

    1999-01-01

    The problem of restoring Froissart bound to the BFKL-Pomeron is studied in an extended leading-log approximation of QCD. We consider parton-parton scattering amplitude and show that the sum of all Feynman-diagram contributions can be written in an eikonal form. In this form dynamics is determined by the phase shift, and subleading-logs of all orders needed to restore the Froissart bound are automatically provided. The main technical difficulty is to find a way to extract these subleading contributions without having to compute each Feynman diagram beyond the leading order. We solve that problem by using nonabelian cut diagrams introduced elsewhere. They can be considered as colour filters used to isolate the multi-Reggeon contributions that supply these subleading-log terms. Illustration of the formalism is given for amplitudes and phase shifts up to three loops. For diffractive scattering, only phase shifts governed by one and two Reggeon exchanges are needed. They can be computed from the leading-log-Reggeo...

  3. Inverse scattering in a Bayesian framework: application to microwave imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsalli, Leila; Ayasso, Hacheme; Duchêne, Bernard; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we deal with a nonlinear inverse scattering problem where the goal is to detect breast cancer from measurements of the scattered field that results from the interaction between the breast and a known interrogating wave in the microwave frequency range. Modeling of the wave-object (breast) interaction is tackled through a domain integral representation of the electric field in a 2D-TM configuration. The inverse problem is solved in a Bayesian framework where prior information, which consists in the fact that the object is supposed to be composed of compact homogeneous regions made of a restricted number of different materials, is introduced via a Gauss-Markov-Potts model. As an analytic expression for the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators yields an intractable solution, an approximation of the latter is proposed. This is done by means of a variational Bayesian approximation (VBA) technique that is adapted to complex-valued contrast and applied to compute the posterior estimators, and reconstruct maps of both permittivity and conductivity of the sought object. This leads to a joint semi-supervised estimation approach, which allows us to estimate the induced currents, the contrast and all of the parameters introduced in the prior model. The method is tested on two sets of synthetic data generated in different configurations and its performances are compared to that given by a contrast source inversion technique.

  4. Multi-Grid Boron-10 detector for large area applications in neutron scattering science

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Ken; Birch, Jens; Buffet, Jean-Claude; Correa, Jonathan; van Esch, Patrick; Guerard, Bruno; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Hultman, Lars; Höglund, Carina; Jensen, Jens; Khaplanov, Anton; Kirstein, Oliver; Piscitelli, Francesco; Vettier, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The present supply of 3He can no longer meet the detector demands of the upcoming ESS facility and continued detector upgrades at current neutron sources. Therefore viable alternative technologies are required to support the development of cutting-edge instrumentation for neutron scattering science. In this context, 10B-based detectors are being developed by collaboration between the ESS, ILL, and Link\\"{o}ping University. This paper reports on progress of this technology and the prospects applying it in modern neutron scattering experiments. The detector is made-up of multiple rectangular gas counter tubes coated with B4C, enriched in 10B. An anode wire reads out each tube, thereby giving position of conversion in one of the lateral co-ordinates as well as in depth of the detector. Position resolution in the remaining co-ordinate is obtained by segmenting the cathode tube itself. Boron carbide films have been produced at Link\\"{o}ping University and a detector built at ILL. The characterization study is pres...

  5. Femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering for polyatomics with harmonic potentials: Application to rhodamine 6G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Kai; Cong, Shulin; Lee, Soo-Y.

    2009-08-01

    The perturbation theory of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), with Raman pump on minus pump off and heterodyne detection along the probe direction, is reviewed. It has four third-order polarization terms, labeled as SRS or inverse Raman scattering (IRS): SRS(I), SRS(II), IRS(I), and IRS(II). These four polarizations have a wave packet interpretation. The polarizations, with homogenous and inhomogeneous broadening included, can be written as integrals over four-time correlation functions, and analytic formulas are derived for the latter for multidimensional harmonic potential surfaces with Franck-Condon displacements in the modes which facilitates the calculation of the SRS cross sections. The theory is applied to understand recent experimental results on the femtosecond SRS (FSRS) of a fluorescent dye, rhodamine 6G (R6G), where the Raman pump pulse is about 1 ps long, and the probe pulse is about 10 fs. The calculations compared very well with the R6G experimental results for off-resonance and resonance FSRS spectra spanning both Stokes and anti-Stokes bands, and for negative and positive pump-probe delay times on resonance.

  6. Applications of Generalized Cascade Scattering Matrix on the Microwave Circuits and Antenna Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Feng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal lossless symmetrical reciprocal network (ILSRN is constructed and introduced to resolve the complex interconnections of two arbitrary microwave networks. By inserting the ILSRNs, the complex interconnections can be converted into the standard one-by-one case without changing the characteristics of the previous microwave networks. Based on the algorithm of the generalized cascade scattering matrix, a useful derivation on the excitation coefficients of antenna arrays is firstly proposed with consideration of the coupling effects. And then, the proposed techniques are applied on the microwave circuits and antenna arrays. Firstly, an improved magic-T is optimized, fabricated, and measured. Compared with the existing results, the prototype has a wider bandwidth, lower insertion loss, better return loss, isolation, and imbalances. Secondly, two typical linear waveguide slotted arrays are designed. Both the radiation patterns and scattering parameters at the input ports agree well with the desired goals. Finally, the feeding network of a two-element microstrip antenna array is optimized to decrease the mismatch at the input port, and a good impedance matching is successfully achieved.

  7. Sustainable Use of Pesticide Applications in Citrus: A Support Tool for Volume Rate Adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Garcerá

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rational application of pesticides by properly adjusting the amount of product to the actual needs and specific conditions for application is a key factor for sustainable plant protection. However, current plant protection product (PPP labels registered for citrus in EU are usually expressed as concentration (%; rate/hl and/or as the maximum dose of product per unit of ground surface, without taking into account those conditions. In this work, the fundamentals of a support tool, called CitrusVol, developed to recommend mix volume rates in PPP applications in citrus orchards using airblast sprayers, are presented. This tool takes into consideration crop characteristics (geometry, leaf area density, pests, and product and application efficiency, and it is based on scientific data obtained previously regarding the minimum deposit required to achieve maximum efficacy, efficiency of airblast sprayers in citrus orchards, and characterization of the crop. The use of this tool in several commercial orchards allowed a reduction of the volume rate and the PPPs used in comparison with the commonly used by farmers of between 11% and 74%, with an average of 31%, without affecting the efficacy. CitrusVol is freely available on a website and in an app for smartphones.

  8. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering of the solar lightfield, due to energy absorption by vibrational modes of water molecules, may contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites over water. The inelastic fraction of the water-leaving radiance for clear water reaches values of 30% in the red part of the visible spectrum, and still reaches values of several percent in moderately turbid waters. Furthermore, inelastic scattering due to chlorophyll and yellow substance fluorescence adds to this fraction. For these reasons the inclusion of inelastic scattering sources into radiative-transfer models, used in ocean remote sensing applications or atmosphere remote sensing over the ocean, can be important. MOMO is a computer code based on the matrix-operator method designed to calculate the lightfield in the stratified atmosphere-ocean system. It has been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin and provides the full polarization state (in the newest version) and an air-sea interface accounting for radiative effects of the wind roughened water surface. The inclusion of Raman scattering effects is done by a processing module, that starts a primary MOMO program run with a high spectral resolution, to calculate the radiative energy available for inelastic scattering at each model layer boundary. The processing module then calculates the first order Raman source-terms for every observation wavelength at every layer boundary, accounting for the non-isotropicity (including the azimuthal dependence) of the Raman phase-function, the spectral redistribution, and the spectral dependence of the Raman scattering coefficient. These elementary source-terms then serve as input for the second program run, which then calculates the source-terms of all model layers, using the doubling-adding method, and the resulting radiance field. Higher orders of the Raman contribution can be computed with additional program runs. Apart from the Raman

  9. Electrical power free, low dead volume, pressure-driven pumping for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Mario; Chien, Wei-Yin; Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Sun, Yu

    2010-10-13

    This paper presents a simple-to-construct, low dead volume pump capable of generating a wide range of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications. The pump generates pressure or vacuum by changing the volume of air confined inside a syringe and is able to generate pressures between -95 and +300 kPa with a resolution as high as 1 Pa. Different from syringe pumps and electrokinetic pumping, which are capable of controlling flow rates only, our pump can be used to generate constant flow rates or constant pressures, which are required for certain applications such as the aspiration of biological cells for biophysical characterization. Compared to syringe pumps, the new pump has almost zero dead volume and does not exhibit pulsatile flows. Additionally, the system does not require electrical power and is cost effective (∼$100). To demonstrate the capabilities of the pump, we used it to aspirate osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) and to determine Young's modulus of the cells, to generate a concentration gradient, and to produce variable-sized droplets in microchannels using hydrodynamic focusing.

  10. Hadron scattering in an asymmetric box*

    Science.gov (United States)

    China Lattice QCD Collaboration; Li, Xin; Chen, Ying; Meng, Guo-Zhan; Feng, Xu; Gong, Ming; He, Song; Li, Gang; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Ma, Jian-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Fei; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2007-06-01

    We propose to study hadron-hadron scattering using lattice QCD in an asymmetric box which allows one to access more non-degenerate low-momentum modes for a given volume. The conventional Lüscher's formula applicable in a symmetric box is modified accordingly. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, pion-pion elastic scattering phase shifts in the I = 2, J = 0 channel are calculated within quenched approximation using improved gauge and Wilson fermion actions on anisotropic lattices in an asymmetric box. After the chiral and continuum extrapolation, we find that our quenched results for the scattering phase shifts in this channel are consistent with the experimental data when the three-momentum of the pion is below 300MeV. Agreement is also found when compared with previous theoretical results from lattice and other means. Moreover, with the usage of asymmetric volume, we are able to compute the scattering phases in the low-momentum range (pion three momentum less than about 350MeV in the center of mass frame) for over a dozen values of the pion three-momenta, much more than using the conventional symmetric box with comparable volume.

  11. Scattering theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Harald [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2013-08-01

    Written by the author of the widely acclaimed textbook. Theoretical Atomic Physics Includes sections on quantum reflection, tunable Feshbach resonances and Efimov states. Useful for advanced students and researchers. This book presents a concise and modern coverage of scattering theory. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. The level of abstraction is kept as low as at all possible, and deeper questions related to mathematical foundations of scattering theory are passed by. The book should be understandable for anyone with a basic knowledge of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. It is intended for advanced students and researchers, and it is hoped that it will be useful for theorists and experimentalists alike.

  12. Scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of "Scattering Theory" presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is k...

  13. Introducing the Jacobian-volume-histogram of deforming organs: application to parotid shrinkage evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Broggi, Sara; Liberini, Simone; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Dell'oca, Italo; Faggiano, Elena; Di Muzio, Nadia; Calandrino, Riccardo; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2011-06-07

    The Jacobian of the deformation field of elastic registration between images taken during radiotherapy is a measure of inter-fraction local deformation. The histogram of the Jacobian values (Jac) within an organ was introduced (JVH-Jacobian-volume-histogram) and first applied in quantifying parotid shrinkage. MVCTs of 32 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy for head-neck cancers were collected. Parotid deformation was evaluated through elastic registration between MVCTs taken at the first and last fractions. Jac was calculated for each voxel of all parotids, and integral JVHs were calculated for each parotid; the correlation between the JVH and the planning dose-volume histogram (DVH) was investigated. On average, 82% (±17%) of the voxels shrinks (Jac 50% (Jac Jac Jac0.5Jac and the JVH are promising tools for scoring/modelling toxicity and for evaluating organ/contour variations with potential applications in adaptive radiotherapy.

  14. Characterization of volume holographic optical elements recorded in Bayfol HX photopolymer for solar photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Sáez, Julia; Atencia, Jesús; Chemisana, Daniel; Collados, María-Victoria

    2016-03-21

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) present interesting characteristics for photovoltaic applications as they can select spectrum for concentrating the target bandwidth and avoiding non-desired wavelengths, which can cause the decrease of the performance on the cell, for instance by overheating it. Volume HOEs have been recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer to test the suitability of this material for solar concentrating photovoltaic systems. The HOEs were recorded at 532 nm and provided a dynamic range, reaching close to 100% efficiency at 800 nm. The diffracted spectrum had a FWHM of 230 nm when illuminating at Bragg angle. These characteristics prove HOEs recorded on Bayfol HX photopolymer are suitable for concentrating solar light onto photovoltaic cells sensitive to that wavelength range.

  15. Phasing Diffuse Scattering: Application of the SIR2002 Algorithm to the Non-Crystallographic Phase Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrozini, B; Cascarano, G; De Caro, L; Giacovazzo, C; Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Howells, M R; He, H; Wu, J S; Weiestrall, U; Spence, J H

    2004-03-18

    A new phasing algorithm has been used to determine the phases of diffuse elastic X-ray scattering from a non-periodic array of gold balls of 50 nm diameter. Two-dimensional real-space images , showing the charge-density distribution of the balls, have been reconstructed at 50 nm resolution from transmission diffraction patterns recorded at 550 eV energy. The reconstructed image fits well with scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the same sample. The algorithm, which uses only the density modification portion of the SIR2002 program, is compared with the results obtained via the Gerchberg-Saxton-Fienup HiO algorithm. The new algorithm requires no knowledge of the object's boundary, and proceeds from low to high resolution. In this way the relationship between density modification in crystallography and the HiO algorithm used in signal and image processing is elucidated.

  16. Multiple scattering filter: Application to plane defect detection in a nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Camille; Shahjhan, Sharfine; Schumm, Andreas; Aubry, Alexandre; Derode, Arnaud

    2016-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of polycrystalline media remains a challenge. The high noise levels due to interaction between the wave and the microstructure limit the efficiency of classical ultrasonic techniques to detect a defect in a coarse grain structure. The aim of this work is to reduce the influence of multiple scattering in order to increase the information obtained from the defect. The technique introduced here is based on array probes for the acquisition of the medium's response matrix by full matrix capture, after which a filter based on random matrix theory is applied. Here an improvement of this technique is applied on nickel-based alloy mock-ups that present an unfavourable grain structure and well known bulk and plane defects. The results in normal incidence and with an angle array probe of 128 elements and 5 MHz of central frequency are compared to classical phased array probe techniques.

  17. Applications of Total Scattering & Pair Distribution Function Analysis in Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Hui; Birgisson, Steinar; Sommer, Sanna

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) is constructed by metal-oxide nodes and organic ligands. The formation of different structures of metal-oxide nodes (also called secondary building units, SBU) is crucial for MOF final structures, because the connectivity of SBU greatly influence the final MOF...... structure. At the same time, there is an ongoing debate on whether the SBU is present prior, or during MOF crystallization in MOF chemistry. However, little is known about MOFs formation mechanism. Currently techniques to study the in situ MOF formation process mainly focused on after......-crystallization process, for example in situ XRD and SAXS/WAXS study on MOF formation. However, the pre-crystallization process in the early stage of MOF formation is still unexplored. In this project, total scattering and PDF study will be carried out to explore the MOF formation process in early stage. This includes...

  18. Nanosilver resonance scattering spectral method for determination of hydroxyl radical and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were prepared under a microwave high-pressure condition using citric acid sodium as a reducer while the excess citrate was removed under high speed centrifugation. There is a resonance scattering (RS) peak at 470 nm for silver nanoparticles. In a pH 4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer solution, hydroxyl radicals from the Fenton reaction can oxidize silver nanoparticles to Ag+, resulting in the RS intensity decreasing. The decreased RS intensity at 470 nm (△I 470 nm) is linear with respect to the concentration of H2O2 (C) in the range of 0.27-7.56 μmol/L with a detection limit of 0.23 μmol/L. Its regression equation is △I 470 nm = 24.3 C + 13.8 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9959. This method was applied to screening the antioxidants with satisfactory results.

  19. Resonance light scattering spectroscopy of procyanidin-CPB-DNA ternary system and its potential application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Bi, Shuyun; Zhou, Huifeng; Zhao, Tingting

    2015-07-05

    A new method for the determination of calf thymus DNA at nanogram level was proposed based on the enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS) signals of DNA in the presence of procyanidin and cetylpyridinium bromide dihydrate (CPB). Under the experimental conditions, the RLS intensity of DNA at 291.0 nm was greatly enhanced by procyanidin-CPB at pH 7.0. There was a good linear relationship (r=0.9993) between the enhanced RLS intensity (ΔI(RLS)) and DNA concentration of 0.0084-3.36 μg mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 2.27 ng mL(-1) (3S0/S). Three synthetic DNA samples were measured with satisfactory, and the recovery was 102.3-107.2%.

  20. Silver nanoplates: controlled preparation, self-assembly, and applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zao; Xu, Xibin; Wu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Chaohua; Li, Xibo; Luo, Bingchi; Luo, Jiangshan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Yi, Yougen; Tang, Yongjian

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoplates were prepared in a dual reduction system with NaBH4 and sodium citrate both as reducing agents. And then the as-prepared nanoplates could be growing up through multistage growth methodology. The average edge length of Ag nanoplates can be tailored from 40 nm to 260 nm without changing their shape, crystallinity, and the average thickness. Furthermore, the effectiveness of these silver nanoplates as substrates prepared by the silanization self-assembly method toward surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection was evaluated by using 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) and rhodamine 6G (R6G) as probe molecules. It was found that the enhancement ability of the silver nanoplates film is remarkable lower than that of the spherical silver nanoparticle film. The reason is attributed to the electromagnetic mechanism and chemical mechanism. This work will be of great significance in understanding the SERS enhancement mechanism and in the fabrication of nanoparticle films for biosensing.

  1. Nanosilver resonance scattering spectral method for determination of hydroxyl radical and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG AiHui; ZHANG NanNan; JIANG ZhiLiang; LIU RongJin

    2008-01-01

    Silver nanoparUcles were prepared under a microwave high-pressure condition using citric acid so-dium as a reducer while the excess citrate was removed under high speed centrifugation. There is a resonance scattering (RS) peak at 470 nm for silver nanoparticles. In a pH 4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer solution, hydroxyl radicals from the Fenton reaction can oxidize silver nanoparticles to Ag+, resulting in the RS intensity decreasing. The decreased RS intensity at 470 nm (△/470nm) is linear with respect to the con-centration of H2O2 (C) in the range of 0.27-7.56 μmol/L with a detection limit of 0.23 μmol/L. Its regres-sion equation is △/470nm= 24.3 C + 13.8 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9959. This method was applied to screening the antioxidants with satisfactory results.

  2. Tutorial on Fourier space coverage for scattering experiments, with application to SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Ross W.

    2010-04-01

    The Fourier Diffraction Theorem relates the data measured during electromagnetic, optical, or acoustic scattering experiments to the spatial Fourier transform of the object under test. The theorem is well-known, but since it is based on integral equations and complicated mathematical expansions, the typical derivation may be difficult for the non-specialist. In this paper, the theorem is derived and presented using simple geometry, plus undergraduatelevel physics and mathematics. For practitioners of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, the theorem is important to understand because it leads to a simple geometric and graphical understanding of image resolution and sampling requirements, and how they are affected by radar system parameters and experimental geometry. Also, the theorem can be used as a starting point for imaging algorithms and motion compensation methods. Several examples are given in this paper for realistic scenarios.

  3. Resonance Rayleigh Scattering Spectrum of Palladium(Ⅱ)-Clindamycin-Halofluorescein Systems and Their Analytical Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI,Ao-Er; LIU,Zhong-Fang; LIU,Shao-Pu; KONG,Ling

    2008-01-01

    In pH 5.0-5.4 HOAc-NaOAc buffer solution, clindamycin (Clin) could react with Pd(II) to form a 1 : 1 cati-onic chelate, which could further react with halofluorescein dyes such as diiodofluorescein (DIP), erythrosine (Ery) and eosin Y (EY) to form 1:1 ion-association complexes. As a result, not only the absorption and fluorescence spectra were changed, but also the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensities enhanced greatly and new RRS spectra appeared. The three reaction products had characteristic RRS spectra and their maximum RRS wavelengths were located at 285 (DIP system), 287 (Ery system) and 321 (EY system) nm, respectively. The scattering intensities were proportional to the concentration of Clin in certain range which could be applied to determine Clin. The linear ranges and detection limits of Clin were 0.025-2.1μg·mL-1 and 7.8 ng·mL-1 for the DIP system, 0.053-2.4μg·mL-1 and 16.0 ng·mL-1 for the Ery system, 0.038-2.4μg·mL-1 and 11.0 ng·mL-1 for the EY system, respectively. In this work, the optimum reaction conditions and the foreign substances were investigated. A simple, sensitive and fast method was developed for the determination of Clin either in the pharmaceutical form or in the human body fluid. Moreover, the composition, structure, reaction mechanism of the ternary complexes and their effects on the absorption, fluorescence and RRS spectra as well as the reasons of RRS enhancement were discussed.

  4. Facile and rapid synthesis of Pd nanodendrites for electrocatalysis and surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Palanisamy; Dolinska, Joanna; Maiyalagan, Thandavarayan; Opallo, Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Numerous properties from metal nanostructures can be tuned by controlling both their size and shape. In particular, the latter is extremely important because the type of crystalline surface affects the surface electronic density. This paper describes a simple approach to the synthesis of highly-structured, anisotropic palladium nanostructured dendrites. They were obtained using an eco-friendly biomolecule 5-hydroxytryptophan, which acts as both a reducing and stabilizing agent. The growth mechanism is proposed for the evolution of dendrites morphology. It was found that the concentration of 5-hydroxytryptophan played a vital role on the morphology of the nanostructured Pd dendrites. This nanomaterial shows enhanced electrocatalytic performance towards the oxidation of formic acid, and it exhibits surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties towards the prostate specific antigen. These properties may be explored in fuel cells and biosensors, respectively.Numerous properties from metal nanostructures can be tuned by controlling both their size and shape. In particular, the latter is extremely important because the type of crystalline surface affects the surface electronic density. This paper describes a simple approach to the synthesis of highly-structured, anisotropic palladium nanostructured dendrites. They were obtained using an eco-friendly biomolecule 5-hydroxytryptophan, which acts as both a reducing and stabilizing agent. The growth mechanism is proposed for the evolution of dendrites morphology. It was found that the concentration of 5-hydroxytryptophan played a vital role on the morphology of the nanostructured Pd dendrites. This nanomaterial shows enhanced electrocatalytic performance towards the oxidation of formic acid, and it exhibits surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties towards the prostate specific antigen. These properties may be explored in fuel cells and biosensors, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI

  5. Applications of computer simulation, nuclear reactions and elastic scattering to surface analysis of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacheco de Carvalho, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article involves computer simulation and surface analysis by nuclear techniques, which are non-destructive. Both the “energy method of analysis” for nuclear reactions and elastic scattering are used. Energy spectra are computer simulated and compared with experimental data, giving target composition and concentration profile information. The method is successfully applied to thick flat targets of graphite, quartz and sapphire and targets containing thin films of aluminium oxide. Depth profiles of 12C and 16O nuclei are determined using (d,p and (d,α deuteron induced reactions. Rutherford and resonance elastic scattering of (4He+ ions are also used.

    Este artículo trata de simulación por ordenador y del análisis de superficies mediante técnicas nucleares, que son no destructivas. Se usa el “método de análisis en energia” para reacciones nucleares, así como el de difusión elástica. Se simulan en ordenador espectros en energía que se comparan com datos experimentales, de lo que resulta la obención de información sobre la composición y los perfiles de concentración de la muestra. Este método se aplica con éxito em muestras espesas y planas de grafito, cuarzo y zafiro y muestras conteniendo películas finas de óxido de aluminio. Se calculan perfiles en profundidad de núcleos de 12C y de 16O a través de reacciones (d,p y (d,α inducidas por deuterones. Se utiliza también la difusión elástica de iones (4He+, tanto a Rutherford como resonante.

  6. Review of the fundamental theories behind small angle X-ray scattering, molecular dynamics simulations, and relevant integrated application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Boldon

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the fundamental concepts and equations necessary for performing small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS experiments, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and MD-SAXS analyses were reviewed. Furthermore, several key biological and non-biological applications for SAXS, MD, and MD-SAXS are presented in this review; however, this article does not cover all possible applications. SAXS is an experimental technique used for the analysis of a wide variety of biological and non-biological structures. SAXS utilizes spherical averaging to produce one- or two-dimensional intensity profiles, from which structural data may be extracted. MD simulation is a computer simulation technique that is used to model complex biological and non-biological systems at the atomic level. MD simulations apply classical Newtonian mechanics’ equations of motion to perform force calculations and to predict the theoretical physical properties of the system. This review presents several applications that highlight the ability of both SAXS and MD to study protein folding and function in addition to non-biological applications, such as the study of mechanical, electrical, and structural properties of non-biological nanoparticles. Lastly, the potential benefits of combining SAXS and MD simulations for the study of both biological and non-biological systems are demonstrated through the presentation of several examples that combine the two techniques.

  7. Realistic Numerical and Analytical Modeling of Light Scattering in Brain Tissue for Optogenetic Applications(1,2,3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yona, Guy; Meitav, Nizan; Kahn, Itamar; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, optogenetics has become a central tool in neuroscience research. Estimating the transmission of visible light through brain tissue is of crucial importance for controlling the activation levels of neurons in different depths, designing optical systems, and avoiding lesions from excessive power density. The Kubelka-Munk model and Monte Carlo simulations have previously been used to model light propagation through rodents' brain tissue, however, these prior attempts suffer from fundamental shortcomings. Here, we introduce and study two modified approaches for modeling the distributions of light emanating from a multimode fiber and scattering through tissue, using both realistic numerical Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical approach based on the beam-spread function approach. We demonstrate a good agreement of the new methods' predictions both with recently published data, and with new measurements in mouse brain cortical slices, where our results yield a new cortical scattering length estimate of ∼47 µm at λ = 473 nm, significantly shorter than ordinarily assumed in optogenetic applications.

  8. Preparation and optical scattering characterization of gold nanorods and their application to a dot-immunogold assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, Anna V.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Dykman, Lev A.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Trachuk, Lyubov A.; Melnikov, Andrei G.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2005-10-01

    We describe optical monitoring of the synthesis of gold nanorods (NRs) based on seed-mediated growth in the presence of the soft surfactant template cetyltrimethyilammonium bromide. To separate NRs from spheres and surfactants we fractionated samples in the density gradient of glycerol. The optical properties of NRs were characterized by extinction and differential light-scattering spectra (at 90°, 450-800 nm) and by the depolarization light-scattering ratio, I_vh/I_vv, measured at 90° with a helium-neon laser. Theoretical spectra and the I_vh/I_vv ratios were calculated by the T-matrix method as applied to randomly oriented NRs, which were modeled by right-circular cylinders with semispherical ends. The simulated data were fitted to experimental observations by use of particle length and width as adjustable parameters, which were close to the data yielded by transmission electron microscopy. The sensitivity of the long-wavelength resonance of NRs to the dielectric surroundings was examined both experimentally and theoretically by comparison of the extinction spectra of NRs in water and in a 25% glycerol solution. Finally, we discuss the application of NR-protein A conjugates to a dot-immunogold assay with the example of biospecific staining of human IgG molecules adsorbed onto small membrane spots.

  9. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  10. Proceedings of the Antenna Applications Symposium Held at Urbana, Illinois on 19-21 September 1984. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Antenna Performance in the Presence of 643 Large Scatterers Using RF Field Probe Techniques," J. Wojtowlcz, R. Konapelsky, J. Havrilla , T(. Vogelsang...Konapeisky, J. Havrilla , R. Vogelsang and X. Ramsey September 19-21, 1984 Prepared For . -- 1984 Antenna- Applications Symposi., University of

  11. Application of rock mechanics to cut-and-fill mining. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-15

    The conference on application of rock mechanics to cut-and-fill mining was held June 1-3, 1980, at the University of Luleaa, Sweden. The papers in this volume deal almost entirely with the Naesliden project in Sweden. Stress measurements were made on the rock mass before and during mining and complex computer codes using the finite element method developed to calculate the strains and their changes as mining developed. Major problems involved the effects of joints and the mechanical properties of the hydraulic backfill and in corporating these items in the calculations. Most papers were entered individually into EDB. (LTN)

  12. Theoretical chemistry theory of scattering papers in honor of Henry Eyring

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Douglas W

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical Chemistry: Theory of Scattering: Papers in Honor of Henry Eyring, Volume 6, Part A covers the aspects of reactive and nonreactive scattering. The book discusses the applications of classical trajectory to reactive scattering and the accurate quantum calculations of reactive systems. The text also describes the fluctuations in chemically reacting systems, as well as the coupling of electronically adiabatic states in atomic and molecular collisions. Chemists, physicists, people involved in the study of the theory of scattering, and students taking related courses will find the book u

  13. Single electron emission in two-phase xenon with application to the detection of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, E; Chepel, V; Araujo, H M; Akimov, D Yu; Barnes, E J; Belov, V A; Burenkov, A A; Currie, A; DeViveiros, L; Ghag, C; Hollingsworth, A; Horn, M; Kalmus, G E; Kobyakin, A S; Kovalenko, A G; Lebedenko, V N; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Luscher, R; Majewski, P; Murphy, A StJ; Neves, F; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R; Quenby, J J; Reichhart, L; Scovell, P R; Silva, C; Solovov, V N; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Stekhanov, V N; Sumner, T J; Thorne, C; Walker, R J

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental study of single electron emission in ZEPLIN-III, a two-phase xenon experiment built to search for dark matter WIMPs, and discuss applications enabled by the excellent signal-to-noise ratio achieved in detecting this signature. Firstly, we demonstrate a practical method for precise measurement of the free electron lifetime in liquid xenon during normal operation of these detectors. Then, using a realistic detector response model and backgrounds, we assess the feasibility of deploying such an instrument for measuring coherent neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering using the ionisation channel in the few-electron regime. We conclude that it should be possible to measure this elusive neutrino signature above an ionisation threshold of $\\sim$3 electrons both at a stopped pion source and at a nuclear reactor. Detectable signal rates are larger in the reactor case, but the triggered measurement and harder recoil energy spectrum afforded by the accelerator source enable lower overall backgroun...

  14. Application of the Tor Vergata Scattering Model to L Band Backscatter During the Corn Growth Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; ONeill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Gish, T.

    2010-01-01

    At the USDA's Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) experimental site in Beltsville, Maryland, USA) a field campaign took place throughout the 2002 corn growth cycle from May 10th (emergence of corn crops) to October 2nd (harvest). One of the microwave instruments deployed was the multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) quad-polarized (HH, HV, VV, VH) NASA GSFC/George Washington University (GWU) truck mounted radar. During the field campaign, this radar system provided once a week fully polarized C- and L-band (4.75 and 1.6 GHz) backscatter measurements from incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees. In support of microwave observations, an extensive ground characterization took place, which included measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, vegetation biomass and morphology. The field conditions during the campaign are characterized by several dry downs with a period of drought in the month of August. Peak biomass the corn canopies was reached on July 24th with a total biomass of approximately 6.5 kg/sq m. This dynamic range in both soil moisture and vegetation conditions within the data set is ideal for the validation of discrete medium vegetation scattering models. In this study, we compare the L band backscatter measurements with simulations by the Tor Vergata model (ferrazzoli and Guerriero 1996). The measured soil moisture, vegetation biomass and most reliably measured vegetation morphological parameters (e.g. number of leaves, number of stems and stem height) were used as input for the Tor Vergata model. The more uncertain model parameters (e.g. surface roughness, leaf thickness) and the stem diameter were optimized using a parameter estimation routine based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. As cost function for this optimization, the HH and VV polarized backscatter measured and stimulated by the TOR Vergata model for incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees were used (6 measurements in total). The calibrated

  15. Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Jared T; Nelson, Todd G; Zimmerman, Trent K; Fernelius, Janette D; Magleby, Spencer P; Howell, Larry L

    2016-09-01

    Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the 'flasher' and the 'inverted-cone fold', for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver's side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes.

  16. Packing and deploying Soft Origami to and from cylindrical volumes with application to automotive airbags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Jared T.; Nelson, Todd G.; Zimmerman, Trent K.; Fernelius, Janette D.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-09-01

    Packing soft-sheet materials of approximately zero bending stiffness using Soft Origami (origami patterns applied to soft-sheet materials) into cylindrical volumes and their deployment via mechanisms or internal pressure (inflation) is of interest in fields including automobile airbags, deployable heart stents, inflatable space habitats, and dirigible and parachute packing. This paper explores twofold patterns, the `flasher' and the `inverted-cone fold', for packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes. Two initial packing methods and mechanisms are examined for each of the flasher and inverted-cone fold patterns. An application to driver's side automobile airbags is performed, and deployment tests are completed to compare the influence of packing method and origami pattern on deployment performance. Following deployment tests, two additional packing methods for the inverted-cone fold pattern are explored and applied to automobile airbags. It is shown that modifying the packing method (using different methods to impose the same base pattern on the soft-sheet material) can lead to different deployment performance. In total, two origami patterns and six packing methods are examined, and the benefits of using Soft Origami patterns and packing methods are discussed. Soft Origami is presented as a viable method for efficiently packing soft-sheet materials into cylindrical volumes.

  17. Facile synthesis of Cu2S nanoarchitectures in application of surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shih-Yu; Chang, Hao-Hsuan; Hsu, Yu-Kuei; Lin, Yan-Gu

    2014-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is one of the main mechanisms of Surface Raman Enhance Scattering (SERS) and it will depend on the morphology and free carrier density of substrates, in many of discussions have been proved. Recently, the semiconductor copper(I) sulphide (Cu2S), the natural p-type semiconductor, exhibits remarkable SPR in the nearinfrared region[1] and can be regards as best candidate for active SERS substrates. In this report, the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process will be used to synthesis Cu2S nanostructures[2] from ZnO nanorods as template deposited by electrochemical reaction. To further manipulate the different carrier densities of Cu2S nanostructuress, the adjustment of Cu vacancy in Cu2S can be accomplished by thermal processes under noble gas. Taking 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) as probe molecule to measure the SERS performance by Cu2S nanostructures made in this fabrication and also examines the effect on SERS by adjusting Cu vacancy under an excited wavelength of 632.8 nm and light power of 15 mW. In fact, the modulation of Cu vacancy will positively correlate to the SPR frequencies and so could get the best enhancement factor under the limited condition of excited source. Therefore, our results could provide a new opportunity to use SERS to explore the molecule-semiconductor interaction, a fundamental but essential question for designing novel devices.

  18. Probing the interaction of nanoparticles with mucin for drug delivery applications using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter Charles; Cattoz, Beatrice; Ibrahim, Mervat Shafik; Anuonye, Josephine Chibuzor

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery via the eye, nose, gastrointestinal tract and lung is of great interest as they represent patient-compliant and facile methods to administer drugs. However, for a drug to reach the systemic circulation it must penetrate the "mucus barrier". An understanding of the characteristics of the mucus barrier is therefore important in the design of mucus penetrating drug delivery vehicles e.g. nanoparticles. Here, a range of nanoparticles - silica, aluminium coated silica, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PEGylated PLGA - each with known but different physicochemical characteristics were examined in the presence of mucin to identify those characteristics that engender nanoparticle/mucin interactions and thus, to define "design rules" for mucus penetrating (nano)particles (MPP), at least in terms of the surface characteristics of charge and hydrophilicity. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and rheology have been used to assess the interaction between such nanoparticles and mucin. It was found that negatively charged and hydrophilic nanoparticles do not exhibit an interaction with mucin whereas positively charged and hydrophobic nanoparticles show a strong interaction. Surface grafted poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains significantly reduced this interaction. This study clearly demonstrates that the established colloid science techniques of DLS and rheology are very powerful screening tools to probe nanoparticle/mucin interactions.

  19. Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Studies of Hybrid Perovskites for Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael; Whitfield, Pamela; Jalarvo, Niina; Ehlers, Georg; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Herron, Norman; Johnson, Lynda; Guise, William; Milas, Ivan; Cheng, Yongqiang; Daemen, Luke; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal; Page, Katharine; Wang, Xiaoping; Ye, Feng

    Hybrid perovskites (ABX3) have attracted a great deal of attention recently as light absorbers for photovoltaics. In these materials the A site is occupied by organic cations, for example methyl ammonium (MA) or formamidinium (FA) cations, the B site is occupied by metals, for example Pb or Sn, and the X anions are halogens (I, Br, or Cl). Typical of perovskites, these materials exhibit a series of structural phase transitions involving rotations or tilts of the BX6 octahedra, but with the added complexity that the inorganic framework is coupled to order-disorder transitions of the organic cations. We have used neutron scattering techniques to characterize the structures and dynamics of several of these compounds as a function of temperature. In addition, high resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements have been performed to investigate the structural phase transitions. These studies yield a detailed picture of the structures, dynamics, and structural phase transitions of these compounds, and provide a firm basis for understanding their excellent photovoltaic properties.

  20. Mechanism of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Its Application to Highly Sensitive Protein Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozaki Y; Itoh T; Yoshida K; Kitahama y; Han X X; Zhao B

    2009-01-01

    @@ Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering(SERRS)has recently attracted great interest in analytical science due to enormous enhancement factors that have decreased the detection limits of a wide variety of molecules tO the single molecule level.The SERRS-electromagnetic(EM)model describes single-molecule SERRS sensitivity at interparticle junctions and at sharp edges in Ag and Au nanoaggregatcs based on the fourth power of a local EM-field enhancement factor M The realization of SERRS enhancement factors |M|4 of up to 1014has made single-molecule sensitivity realistic.In other words,twofold EM enhancement processes are important for verifying SERRS enhancement factors that enable single molecules to be detected:in these processes the first enhancement iS due to coupling between incident photons and plasmons and the second enhancement is due tO coupling between SERRS photons and plasmons.The relationship between plasmon resonance,the SERRS intensity,and Ag-nanoparticle microstructures was comprehensively studied to verify EM enhancement in SERRS.However,the first and second enhancements were not treated independently in these investigations and thus they were not able tO provide conclusive evidence for twofold EM enhancements.

  1. One-step Synthesis of Shape-controllable Gold Nanoparticles and Their Application in Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanlan Sun; Dongxu Zhao; Meng Ding; Haifeng Zhao; Zhenzhong Zhang; Binghui Li; Dezhen Shen

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) of various shapes were synthesized by a one-step method at ambient temperature in the presence of NaCl.2-mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) was used as both reducing agent and stabilizing agent.The shapes of gold NPs were controllable by simply tuning S/Au ratio (S is from MSA molecule,and S/Au ratio is controlled by tuning the volume of added MSA solution),and triangle,polygonal and spherical nanoparticles were obtained.This result suggested a new way to consider the effects of MSA on the growth of nanoparticles,which showed that MSA is a strong capping agent and facilitates more uniform growth of nanoparticles in every dimension.And other important factors on nanoparticles growth including NaCl and temperature were discussed.Furthermore,a typical probe molecule,4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was used to test the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these gold NPs and the results indicated good Raman activity on these substrates.And the enhancement factor (EF) at 1078 cm-1 (a1) was estimated to be as large as 6.3 × 104 and 5.5 × 104 for triangular plates and truncated particles,respectively.

  2. Graphene–Gold Nanoparticles Hybrid—Synthesis, Functionalization, and Application in a Electrochemical and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Khalil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Graphene is a single-atom-thick two-dimensional carbon nanosheet with outstanding chemical, electrical, material, optical, and physical properties due to its large surface area, high electron mobility, thermal conductivity, and stability. These extraordinary features of graphene make it a key component for different applications in the biosensing and imaging arena. However, the use of graphene alone is correlated with certain limitations, such as irreversible self-agglomerations, less colloidal stability, poor reliability/repeatability, and non-specificity. The addition of gold nanostructures (AuNS with graphene produces the graphene–AuNS hybrid nanocomposite which minimizes the limitations as well as providing additional synergistic properties, that is, higher effective surface area, catalytic activity, electrical conductivity, water solubility, and biocompatibility. This review focuses on the fundamental features of graphene, the multidimensional synthesis, and multipurpose applications of graphene–Au nanocomposites. The paper highlights the graphene–gold nanoparticle (AuNP as the platform substrate for the fabrication of electrochemical and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-based biosensors in diverse applications as well as SERS-directed bio-imaging, which is considered as an emerging sector for monitoring stem cell differentiation, and detection and treatment of cancer.

  3. Graphene–Gold Nanoparticles Hybrid—Synthesis, Functionalization, and Application in a Electrochemical and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ibrahim; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd; Yehye, Wageeh A.; Basirun, Wan Jefrey; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is a single-atom-thick two-dimensional carbon nanosheet with outstanding chemical, electrical, material, optical, and physical properties due to its large surface area, high electron mobility, thermal conductivity, and stability. These extraordinary features of graphene make it a key component for different applications in the biosensing and imaging arena. However, the use of graphene alone is correlated with certain limitations, such as irreversible self-agglomerations, less colloidal stability, poor reliability/repeatability, and non-specificity. The addition of gold nanostructures (AuNS) with graphene produces the graphene–AuNS hybrid nanocomposite which minimizes the limitations as well as providing additional synergistic properties, that is, higher effective surface area, catalytic activity, electrical conductivity, water solubility, and biocompatibility. This review focuses on the fundamental features of graphene, the multidimensional synthesis, and multipurpose applications of graphene–Au nanocomposites. The paper highlights the graphene–gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as the platform substrate for the fabrication of electrochemical and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based biosensors in diverse applications as well as SERS-directed bio-imaging, which is considered as an emerging sector for monitoring stem cell differentiation, and detection and treatment of cancer. PMID:28773528

  4. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanic research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  5. 7th International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The proceedings volumes 1 and 2 comprise the papers that were accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Symposium on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics held at The Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, during the period of July 11 to 14, 1994. The prime objective of this Seventh Symposium is to provide a forum for the presentation of the most advanced research on laser techniques for flow measurements, and reveal significant results to fluid mechanics. The applications of laser techniques to scientific and engineering fluid flow research is emphasized, but contributions to the theory and practice of laser methods are also considered where they facilitate new improved fluid mechanics research. Attention is focused on laser-Doppler anemometry, particle sizing and other methods for the measurement of velocity and scalars such as particle image velocimetry and laser induced fluorescence.

  6. Methods of Celestial Mechanics Volume II: Application to Planetary System, Geodynamics and Satellite Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    G. Beutler's Methods of Celestial Mechanics is a coherent textbook for students as well as an excellent reference for practitioners. Volume II is devoted to the applications and to the presentation of the program system CelestialMechanics. Three major areas of applications are covered: (1) Orbital and rotational motion of extended celestial bodies. The properties of the Earth-Moon system are developed from the simplest case (rigid bodies) to more general cases, including the rotation of an elastic Earth, the rotation of an Earth partly covered by oceans and surrounded by an atmosphere, and the rotation of an Earth composed of a liquid core and a rigid shell (Poincaré model). (2) Artificial Earth Satellites. The oblateness perturbation acting on a satellite and the exploitation of its properties in practice is discussed using simulation methods (CelestialMechanics) and (simplified) first order perturbation methods. The perturbations due to the higher-order terms of the Earth's gravitational potential and reso...

  7. Optical scatter: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, John C.

    1991-12-01

    Optical scatter is a bothersome source of optical noise, limits resolution and reduces system throughput. However, it is also an extremely sensitive metrology tool. It is employed in a wide variety of applications in the optics industry (where direct scatter measurement is of concern) and is becoming a popular indirect measurement in other industries where its measurement in some form is an indicator of another component property - like roughness, contamination or position. This paper presents a brief review of the current state of this technology as it emerges from university and government laboratories into more general industry use. The bidirectional scatter distribution function (or BSDF) has become the common format for expressing scatter data and is now used almost universally. Measurements made at dozens of laboratories around the country cover the spectrum from the uv to the mid- IR. Data analysis of optical component scatter has progressed to the point where a variety of analysis tools are becoming available for discriminating between the various sources of scatter. Work has progressed on the analysis of rough surface scatter and the application of these techniques to some challenging problems outside the optical industry. Scatter metrology is acquiring standards and formal test procedures. The available scatter data base is rapidly expanding as the number and sophistication of measurement facilities increases. Scatter from contaminants is continuing to be a major area of work as scatterometers appear in vacuum chambers at various laboratories across the country. Another area of research driven by space applications is understanding the non-topographic sources of mid-IR scatter that are associated with Beryllium and other materials. The current flurry of work in this growing area of metrology can be expected to continue for several more years and to further expand to applications in other industries.

  8. Elastic scattering phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackintosh, R.S. [The Open University, School of Physical Sciences, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    We argue that, in many situations, fits to elastic scattering data that were historically, and frequently still are, considered ''good'', are not justifiably so describable. Information about the dynamics of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering is lost when elastic scattering phenomenology is insufficiently ambitious. It is argued that in many situations, an alternative approach is appropriate for the phenomenology of nuclear elastic scattering of nucleons and other light nuclei. The approach affords an appropriate means of evaluating folding models, one that fully exploits available empirical data. It is particularly applicable for nucleons and other light ions. (orig.)

  9. Application of Persistent Scatterers deformation inventories to assess regional landslide susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, S. C.; Nico, G.; Zêzere, J. L.; Catalão, J.; Garcia, R. A. C.; Benevides, P.; Piedade, A.

    2010-05-01

    The consistency of landslide inventories is an important issue when analyzing a hazard scenario. Landslide Inventory maps depends on the scope, the available resources, and the scale of investigation, and are conditioned by factors such as the chosen data acquisition technique (e.g. field survey or aerial photo-interpretation), the experience of the geomorphologist, and the complexity of the study area (Guzzetti et al. 2000). In addition, the time available to complete the landslide inventory may be a constrain regarding its reliability. It is now generally accepted that landslide inventories must be permanently up to date. However, it is not easy to guarantee the complete update as well as the robustness of landslide inventories for large areas, because of the time consuming process of landslide data acquisition. In this context, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) methods can provide data to turn more reliable the existent landslide inventories and consequently improve landslide susceptibility assessment at the regional/basin scales. The aim of this work is: i) to evaluate the possibility to use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data to generate landslide inventories; ii) to assess landslide susceptibility at a regional/basin scale with Persistent Scatterers-based landslide inventories; and iii) to validate the reliability of this landslide susceptibility map with an independent filed survey-based landslide inventory. A dataset of 58 ERS-1/2 SAR images, from 1992 to 1998, and a second dataset of 25 ENVISAT/ASAR images, from 2003 to 2009, were processed. The Persistent Scatters (PS) technique was used to estimate the Line Of Sight (LOS) surface deformation. All PSs located on a slope and with a positive LOS velocity (subsidence) are believed to be indicative of landslide activity. The main assumption after images processing and verification (validation) is that the resultant PS data-base corresponds to landslide activity, so, each PS is assumed

  10. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  11. Rayleigh like scattering from silica–titania core-shell particles and their application in protection against harmful ultraviolet rays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudipta G Dastidar; P Bharath; Arindam Roy

    2011-04-01

    In this article we report experimental and theoretical results of angle-dependent laser light scattering of nano titanium dioxide nucleated on silica particles. It was observed that the experimental scattering profile from nano-titania coated silica (TCS) particle resembles that of a Rayleigh scattering. It can be inferred from the light scattering profile that nucleating fine particles onto a surface of a bigger particle (core), the resulting scattering profile is dominated by the smaller particles. Thin film transmittance measurement of TCS particles also supports this claim. The theoretical scattering predictions do not match with the experimental findings and the reasons for the discrepancies are addressed. This Rayleigh-like scattering property of TCS particles can be used in cosmetic formulations as a replacement for nanoparticles to provide protection from harmful ultraviolet rays. This study helps to provide insights into these systems for their potential usage in cosmetics.

  12. Application of asymptotic waveform approximation technique to hybrid FE/BI method for 3D scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Zhen; SHENG XinQing

    2007-01-01

    The asymptotic waveform evaluation (AWE) technique is a rational function approximation method in computational mathematics, which is used in many applications in computational electromagnetics. In this paper, the performance of the AWE technique in conjunction with hybrid finite element/boundary integral (FE/BI) method is firstly investigated. The formulation of the AWE applied in hybrid FE/BI method is given in detail. The characteristic implementation of the application of the AWE to the hybrid FE/BI method is discussed. Numerical results demonstrate that the AWE technique can greatly speed up the hybrid FE/BI method to acquire wide-band and wide-angle backscatter radar-cross-section (RCS) by complex targets.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays. Applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driskell, Jeremy Daniel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  14. iFit: a new data analysis framework. Applications for data reduction and optimization of neutron scattering instrument simulations with McStas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farhi, E.; Y., Debab,; Willendrup, Peter Kjær

    2014-01-01

    and noisy problems. These optimizers can then be used to fit models onto data objects, and optimize McStas instrument simulations. As an application, we propose a methodology to analyse neutron scattering measurements in a pure Monte Carlo optimization procedure using McStas and iFit. As opposed...

  15. Application of Hydrogel in Reconstruction Surgery: Hydrogel/Fat Graft Complex Filler for Volume Reconstruction in Critical Sized Muscle Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Lui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autogenic fat graft usually suffers from degeneration and volume shrinkage in volume reconstruction applications. How to maintain graft viability and graft volume is an essential consideration in reconstruction therapies. In this presented investigation, a new fat graft transplantation method was developed aiming to improve long term graft viability and volume reconstruction effect by incorporation of hydrogel. The harvested fat graft is dissociated into small fragments and incorporated into a collagen based hydrogel to form a hydrogel/fat graft complex for volume reconstruction purpose. In vitro results indicate that the collagen based hydrogel can significantly improve the survivability of cells inside isolated graft. In a 6-month investigation on artificial created defect model, this hydrogel/fat graft complex filler has demonstrated the ability of promoting fat pad formation inside the targeted defect area. The newly generated fat pad can cover the whole defect and restore its original dimension in 6-month time point. Compared to simple fat transplantation, this hydrogel/fat graft complex system provides much improvement on long term volume restoration effect against degeneration and volume shrinkage. One notable effect is that there is continuous proliferation of adipose tissue throughout the 6-month period. In summary, the hydrogel/fat graft system presented in this investigation demonstrated a better and more significant effect on volume reconstruction in large sized volume defect than simple fat transplantation.

  16. Ag Nanorods-Oxide Hybrid Array Substrates: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingwei Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, benefitting from the sufficient sensitivity, high specificity, nondestructive, and rapid detection capability of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS technique, numerous nanostructures have been elaborately designed and successfully synthesized as high-performance SERS substrates, which have been extensively exploited for the identification of chemical and biological analytes. Among these, Ag nanorods coated with thin metal oxide layers (AgNRs-oxide hybrid array substrates featuring many outstanding advantages have been proposed as fascinating SERS substrates, and are of particular research interest. The present review provides a systematic overview towards the representative achievements of AgNRs-oxide hybrid array substrates for SERS applications from diverse perspectives, so as to promote the realization of real-world SERS sensors. First, various fabrication approaches of AgNRs-oxide nanostructures are introduced, which are followed by a discussion on the novel merits of AgNRs-oxide arrays, such as superior SERS sensitivity and reproducibility, high thermal stability, long-term activity in air, corrosion resistivity, and intense chemisorption of target molecules. Next, we present recent advances of AgNRs-oxide substrates in terms of practical applications. Intriguingly, the recyclability, qualitative and quantitative analyses, as well as vapor-phase molecule sensing have been achieved on these nanocomposites. We further discuss the major challenges and prospects of AgNRs-oxide substrates for future SERS developments, aiming to expand the versatility of SERS technique.

  17. Study on the interaction between albendazole and eosin Y by fluorescence, resonance Rayleigh scattering and frequency doubling scattering spectra and their analytical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengling; Huang, Wei; Yang, Jidong; Li, Qin

    In pH 3.25-3.35 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, albendazole (ABZ) could react with eosin Y (EY) to form a 1:1 ion-association complex, which not only results in the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and frequency doubling scattering (FDS). Furthermore, a new RRS spectrum will appear, and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 356 nm. The detection limit for ABZ were 21.51 ng mL-1 for the fluorophotometry, 6.93 ng mL-1 for the RRS method and 12.89 ng mL-1 for the FDS method. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. The experimental conditions were optimized and effects of coexisting substances were evaluated. Meanwhile, the influences of coexisting substances were tested. The methods have been successfully applied to the determination of ABZ in capsules and human urine samples. The composition and structure of the ion-association complex and the reaction mechanism were discussed.

  18. Multiplexed Volume Bragg Gratings in Narrowand Broad-band Spectral Systems: Analysis and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Gregory B.

    Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) are important holographic optical elements in many spectral systems. Using multiple volume gratings, whether multiplexed or arranged sequentially, provides advantages to many types of systems in overall efficiency, dispersion performance, flexibility of design, etc. However, the use of multiple gratings---particularly when the gratings are multiplexed in a single holographic optical element (HOE)---is subject to inter-grating coupling effects that ultimately limit system performance. Analyzing these coupling effects requires a more complex mathematical model than the straightforward analysis of a single volume grating. We present a matrix-based algorithm for determining diffraction efficiencies of significant coupled waves in these multiplexed grating holographic optical elements (HOEs). Several carefully constructed experiments with spectrally multiplexed gratings in dichromated gelatin verify our conclusions. Applications of this theory to broad- and narrow-band systems are explored in detailed simulations. Broadband systems include spectrum splitters for diverse-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cells. Volume Bragg gratings can serve as effective spectrum splitters, but the inherent dispersion of a VBG can be detrimental given a broad-spectrum input. The performance of a holographic spectrum splitter element can be improved by utilizing multiple volume gratings, each operating in a slightly different spectral band. However, care must be taken to avoid inter-grating coupling effects that limit ultimate performance. We explore broadband multi-grating holographic optical elements (HOEs) in sandwiched arrangements where individual single-grating HOEs are placed in series, and in multiplexed arrangements where multiple gratings are recorded in a single HOE. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is used to tailor these systems to the solar spectrum taking into account both efficiency and dispersion. Both multiplexed and sandwiched two-grating systems

  19. Formation of superpower volume discharges and their application for modification of surface of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    The results of experimental investigations of a volume avalanche discharge initiated by an e-beam (VADIEB) and surface layer of Cu and AlBe foils modifications at the plasma action of VADIEB are given. The volume discharge in the air of atmosphere pressure formed in the gap with the cathode having small curvature radius and with high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration and positive and negative polarity. A supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with formation conditions in gases under atmospheric pressure have been investigated. It is proved that the surface layer is cleared of carbon at foil treatment, and atoms of oxygen penetrate into a foil. It is show that the cleaning depth depends on polarity of voltage pulses. At positive polarity of a copper foil electrode the cleaning is observed at the depth over 50 nm, and atoms of oxygen penetrate at the depth up to 25 nm. Plasma of the superpower volume discharge of nanosecond duration with a specific excitation power of hundreds of MW/cm3, and SAEB, and the discharge plasma radiation of various spectral ranges (including UV, VUV and X-ray) has the influence on the anode. The supershort avalanche electronic beam is generated only at negative polarity of a voltage pulse on an electrode with a small radius of curvature. SAEB influence on modifications of the copper foil surface is registered. VADIEB is easily realized in various gases and at various pressures, and, at gas pressure decrease the density of the beam current in helium can achieve 2 kA/cm2. It allows predicting an opportunity of VADIEB application for metal surface modifications in various technological processes, and for surface dielectric modifications at the certain design of the anode.

  20. Environmental fate model for ultra-low-volume insecticide applications used for adult mosquito management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J; Peterson, Robert K D; Irvine, Kathryn M; Marshall, Lucy M; Weaver, David K; Preftakes, Collin J

    2012-11-01

    One of the more effective ways of managing high densities of adult mosquitoes that vector human and animal pathogens is ultra-low-volume (ULV) aerosol applications of insecticides. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses models that are not validated for ULV insecticide applications and exposure assumptions to perform their human and ecological risk assessments. Currently, there is no validated model that can accurately predict deposition of insecticides applied using ULV technology for adult mosquito management. In addition, little is known about the deposition and drift of small droplets like those used under conditions encountered during ULV applications. The objective of this study was to perform field studies to measure environmental concentrations of insecticides and to develop a validated model to predict the deposition of ULV insecticides. The final regression model was selected by minimizing the Bayesian Information Criterion and its prediction performance was evaluated using k-fold cross validation. Density of the formulation and the density and CMD interaction coefficients were the largest in the model. The results showed that as density of the formulation decreases, deposition increases. The interaction of density and CMD showed that higher density formulations and larger droplets resulted in greater deposition. These results are supported by the aerosol physics literature. A k-fold cross validation demonstrated that the mean square error of the selected regression model is not biased, and the mean square error and mean square prediction error indicated good predictive ability.

  1. Environmental fate model for ultra-low-volume insecticide applications used for adult mosquito management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleier, Jerome J.; Peterson, Robert K.D.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Marshall, Lucy M.; Weaver, David K.; Preftakes, Collin J.

    2012-01-01

    One of the more effective ways of managing high densities of adult mosquitoes that vector human and animal pathogens is ultra-low-volume (ULV) aerosol applications of insecticides. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses models that are not validated for ULV insecticide applications and exposure assumptions to perform their human and ecological risk assessments. Currently, there is no validated model that can accurately predict deposition of insecticides applied using ULV technology for adult mosquito management. In addition, little is known about the deposition and drift of small droplets like those used under conditions encountered during ULV applications. The objective of this study was to perform field studies to measure environmental concentrations of insecticides and to develop a validated model to predict the deposition of ULV insecticides. The final regression model was selected by minimizing the Bayesian Information Criterion and its prediction performance was evaluated using k-fold cross validation. Density of the formulation and the density and CMD interaction coefficients were the largest in the model. The results showed that as density of the formulation decreases, deposition increases. The interaction of density and CMD showed that higher density formulations and larger droplets resulted in greater deposition. These results are supported by the aerosol physics literature. A k-fold cross validation demonstrated that the mean square error of the selected regression model is not biased, and the mean square error and mean square prediction error indicated good predictive ability.

  2. Introducing the Jacobian-volume-histogram of deforming organs: application to parotid shrinkage evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Maggiulli, Eleonora; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Calandrino, Riccardo [Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy); Liberini, Simone; Faggiano, Elena; Rizzo, Giovanna [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, Segrate (Italy); Dell' Oca, Italo; Di Muzio, Nadia, E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it [Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milano (Italy)

    2011-06-07

    The Jacobian of the deformation field of elastic registration between images taken during radiotherapy is a measure of inter-fraction local deformation. The histogram of the Jacobian values (Jac) within an organ was introduced (JVH-Jacobian-volume-histogram) and first applied in quantifying parotid shrinkage. MVCTs of 32 patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy for head-neck cancers were collected. Parotid deformation was evaluated through elastic registration between MVCTs taken at the first and last fractions. Jac was calculated for each voxel of all parotids, and integral JVHs were calculated for each parotid; the correlation between the JVH and the planning dose-volume histogram (DVH) was investigated. On average, 82% ({+-}17%) of the voxels shrinks (Jac < 1) and 14% ({+-}17%) shows a local compression >50% (Jac < 0.5). The best correlation between the DVH and the JVH was found between V10 and V15, and Jac < 0.4-0.6 (p < 0.01). The best constraint predicting a higher number of largely compressing voxels (Jac0.5<7.5%, median value) was V15 {>=} 75% (OR: 7.6, p = 0.002). Jac and the JVH are promising tools for scoring/modelling toxicity and for evaluating organ/contour variations with potential applications in adaptive radiotherapy.

  3. Seismic hazard analysis application of methodology, results, and sensitivity studies. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernreuter, D. L

    1981-08-08

    As part of the Site Specific Spectra Project, this report seeks to identify the sources of and minimize uncertainty in estimates of seismic hazards in the Eastern United States. Findings are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a synthesis among various methods that can be used in evaluating seismic hazard at the various plants in the Eastern United States. In this volume, one of a five-volume series, we discuss the application of the probabilistic approach using expert opinion. The seismic hazard is developed at nine sites in the Central and Northeastern United States, and both individual experts' and synthesis results are obtained. We also discuss and evaluate the ground motion models used to develop the seismic hazard at the various sites, analyzing extensive sensitivity studies to determine the important parameters and the significance of uncertainty in them. Comparisons are made between probabilistic and real spectral for a number of Eastern earthquakes. The uncertainty in the real spectra is examined as a function of the key earthquake source parameters. In our opinion, the single most important conclusion of this study is that the use of expert opinion to supplement the sparse data available on Eastern United States earthquakes is a viable approach for determining estimted seismic hazard in this region of the country. 29 refs., 15 tabs.

  4. Applicability of nursing outcomes in patients with heart failure and fluid volume excessive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, Joelza Celesilvia Chisté; Orlandin, Letícia; Aliti, Graziella Badin; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the clinical applicability of the Nursing Outcomes Classification in patients with decompensated heart failure and the nursing diagnosis of fluid volume excess. This is a longitudinal study conducted in two stages at a university hospital, in 2013. During the first stage the consensus of experts was used to select the nursing outcomes and the indicators related to diagnosing fluid volume excess. The longitudinal study was conducted in the second stage to clinically evaluate the patients using the instrument containing the results and indicators produced in the consensus. A total of 17 patients were assessed. The nursing outcomes were measured during the clinical evaluation by analysing their indicators. The scores increased in six of the results, in comparison with the average results of the first and last assessment. The Nursing Outcomes Classification during medical practice revealed a clinical improvement among the patient who were admitted following decompensated heart failure. The Nursing Outcomes Classification managed to detect changes in the clinical status of patients.

  5. Shape-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering in gold-Raman probe-silica sandwiched nanoparticles for biocompatible applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K; Zhang, Jianming; Lankford, Jessica; Aguilar, Zoraida P; Ma, Dongling; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-03-23

    To meet the requirement of Raman probes (labels) for biocompatible applications, a synthetic approach has been developed to sandwich the Raman-probe (malachite green isothiocyanate, MGITC) molecules between the gold core and the silica shell in gold-SiO₂ composite nanoparticles. The gold-MGITC-SiO₂ sandwiched structure not only prevents the Raman probe from leaking out but also improves the solubility of the nanoparticles in organic solvents and in aqueous solutions even with high ionic strength. To amplify the Raman signal, three types of core, gold nanospheres, nanorods and nanostars, have been chosen as the substrates of the Raman probe. The effect of the core shape on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been investigated. The colloidal nanostars showed the highest SERS enhancement factor while the nanospheres possessed the lowest SERS activity under excitation with 532 and 785 nm lasers. Three-dimensional finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation showed significant differences in the local electromagnetic field distributions surrounding the nanospheres, nanorods, and nanostars, which were induced by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The electromagnetic field was enhanced remarkably around the two ends of the nanorods and around the sharp tips of the nanostars. This local electromagnetic enhancement made the dominant contribution to the SERS enhancement. Both the experiments and the simulation revealed the order nanostars > nanorods > nanospheres in terms of the enhancement factor. Finally, the biological application of the nanostar-MGITC-SiO₂ nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the monitoring of DNA hybridization. In short, the gold–MGITC-SiO₂ sandwiched nanoparticles can be used as a Raman probe that features high sensitivity, good water solubility and stability, low-background fluorescence, and the absence of photobleaching for future biological applications.

  6. Applications of a finite-volume algorithm for incompressible MHD problems

    CERN Document Server

    Vantieghem, S; Jackson, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the theory, algorithms and implementation of a parallel finite-volume algorithm for the solution of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations using unstructured grids that are applicable for a wide variety of geometries. Our method implements a mixed Adams-Bashforth/Crank-Nicolson scheme for the nonlinear terms in the MHD equations and we prove that it is stable independent of the time step. To ensure that the solenoidal condition is met for the magnetic field, we use a method whereby a pseudo-pressure is introduced into the induction equation; since we are concerned with incompressible flows, the resulting Poisson equation for the pseudo-pressure is solved alongside the equivalent Poisson problem for the velocity field. We validate our code in a variety of geometries including periodic boxes, spheres, spherical shells, spheroids and ellipsoids; for the finite geometries we implement the so-called ferromagnetic or pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions appropriate for a surrounding medium w...

  7. X-Ray Scattering Applications Using Pulsed X-Ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, B.C.

    1999-05-23

    Pulsed x-ray sources have been used in transient structural phenomena investigations for over fifty years; however, until the advent of synchrotrons sources and the development of table-top picosecond lasers, general access to ligh temporal resolution x-ray diffraction was relatively limited. Advances in diffraction techniques, sample excitation schemes, and detector systems, in addition to IncEased access to pulsed sources, have ld tO what is now a diverse and growing array of pulsed-source measurement applications. A survey of time-resolved investigations using pulsed x-ray sources is presented and research opportunities using both present and planned pulsed x-ray sources are discussed.

  8. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sheffield, John

    1975-01-01

    Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation covers the theory and experimental application of plasma scattering. The book discusses the basic properties of a plasma and of the interaction of radiation with a plasma; the relationship between the scattered power spectrum and the fluctuations in plasma density; and the incoherent scattering of low-temperature plasma. The text also describes the constraints and problems that arise in the application of scattering as a diagnostic technique; the characteristic performance of various dispersion elements, image dissectors, and detectors; and the ge

  9. Light Scattering Reviews, Vol 6 Light Scattering and Remote Sensing of Atmosphere and Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander A

    2012-01-01

    This is the next volume in series of Light Scattering Reviews. Volumes 1-5 have already been printed by Springer. The volume is composed of several papers ( usually, 10) of leading researchers in the respective field. The main focus of this book is light scattering, radiative transfer and optics of snow.

  10. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  11. Diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostorz, G. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Angewandte Physik, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    While Bragg scattering is characteristic for the average structure of crystals, static local deviations from the average lattice lead to diffuse elastic scattering around and between Bragg peaks. This scattering thus contains information on the occupation of lattice sites by different atomic species and on static local displacements, even in a macroscopically homogeneous crystalline sample. The various diffuse scattering effects, including those around the incident beam (small-angle scattering), are introduced and illustrated by typical results obtained for some Ni alloys. (author) 7 figs., 41 refs.

  12. ICO Topical Meeting on Atmospheric, Volume and Surface Scattering and Propagation Held in Florence, Italy on 27-30 August 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Research Office * Banca Toscana Under the Auspices of - Italian Commission of Optics-ClO - European Optical Society - EOS - European Physical Society...invoke the central -limit theorem and claim that the sum of the scattered fields is a circular-Gaussian random variable. This implies that the received...factors from all of the eddies along the path. Therefore, if we assume that many such eddies exist, we can invoke the central -limit theorem to claim

  13. Application of the Method of Auxiliary Sources for the Analysis of Plane-Wave Scattering by Impedance Spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karamehmedovic, Mirza; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2002-01-01

    The Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) is applied to 3D scattering problems involving spherical impedance scatterers. The MAS results are compared with the reference spherical wave expansion (SWE) solution. It is demonstrated that good agreement is achieved between the MAS and SWE results....

  14. A high spatial resolution double-pulse Thomson scattering diagnostic; description, assessment of accuracy and examples of applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Barth, C. J.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    A high spatial resolution (3 mm full width half maximum, i.e. 2% of the minor radius) double-pulse multiposition Thomson scattering system was in operation at the Rijnhuizen tokamak project RTP from March 1996 until September 1998. It upgrades the previously installed single-pulse Thomson scattering

  15. [New type distributed optical fiber temperature sensor (DTS) based on Raman scattering and its' application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Hong-Lin; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Yu, Xiang-Dong; Sun, Zhong-Zhou; Jin, Shang-Zhong; Zhang, Zai-Xuan

    2013-04-01

    Basic principles, development trends and applications status of distributed optical fiber Raman temperature sensor (DTS) are introduced. Performance parameters of DTS system include the sensing optical fiber length, temperature measurement uncertainty, spatial resolution and measurement time. These parameters have a certain correlation and it is difficult to improve them at the same time by single technology. So a variety of key techniques such as Raman amplification, pulse coding technique, Raman related dual-wavelength self-correction technique and embedding optical switching technique are researched to improve the performance of the DTS system. A 1 467 nm continuous laser is used as pump laser and the light source of DTS system (1 550 nm pulse laser) is amplified. When the length of sensing optical fiber is 50 km the Raman gain is about 17 dB. Raman gain can partially compensate the transmission loss of optical fiber, so that the sensing length can reach 50 km. In DTS system using pulse coding technique, pulse laser is coded by 211 bits loop encoder and correlation calculation is used to demodulate temperature. The encoded laser signal is related, whereas the noise is not relevant. So that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of DTS system can be improved significantly. The experiments are carried out in DTS system with single mode optical fiber and multimode optical fiber respectively. Temperature measurement uncertainty can all reach 1 degrees C. In DTS system using Raman related dual-wavelength self-correction technique, the wavelength difference of the two light sources must be one Raman frequency shift in optical fiber. For example, wavelength of the main laser is 1 550 nm and wavelength of the second laser must be 1 450 nm. Spatial resolution of DTS system is improved to 2 m by using dual-wavelength self-correction technique. Optical switch is embedded in DTS system, so that the temperature measurement channel multiply extended and the total length of the sensing

  16. Spontaneous Raman Scattering Diagnostics: Applications in Practical Combustion Systems. Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Viet-Nguyen, Quang; Lackner, Maximilian (Editor); Winter, Franz (Editor); Agarwal, Avinash (Editor)

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the recent advancements and practical aspects of laser SRS diagnostics have been reviewed wi til regards to applications in practical combustion systems. Clearly, SRS represents a theoretically and experimentally mature diagnostic technology that has become an essential tool for multiscalar measurements in turbulent combustion at elevated pressures. Today, time-, space-, spectrally, and even polarization-resolved S RS diagnostics is at hand, with aid from recent innovations in theoretical and technological developments on electro-optical or electromechanical devices. Whilst a linear increase in SRS signals can be expected in high-pressure systems (this is perhaps one of the most important advantages for using SRS in high-pressure systems), there are practical (often severe) restrictions associated with pressurized vessels, due mainly to the limited degree of optical access. This narrows ti,e available choice of diagnostics that can be employed at any given time. Point-wise SRS diagnostics provides the highest accuracy on the chemical species and temperature measurements, and will continue to remain a vital approach for the study in such harsh environments. The practical design considerations and hands-on set-up guide for SRS diagnostics provided in this chapter are rarely presented elsewhere. Although the second-harmonic Nd:YAG pulsed laser (532 nm), combined with pulse-stretching optics or the recently introduced White Cell-based laser, seems to be the most favored excitation source of choice by the research community, UV excitation will undoubtedly continue to be used on many occasions, and especially in sooting flames. Detection methods may be divided into ICCD-based nanosecond-gate detection or a rotary-chopper electromechanical shutter-based CCD array detection, and the levels of background flame emission in individual cases would determine this critical design choice. Here, a process of Raman signal calibration based on ti,e crosstalk matrix

  17. Application of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the identification of anthraquinone dyes used in works of art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kui [ORNL; Leona, Marco [ORNL; Yan, Fei [ORNL; Wabuyele, Musundi B [ORNL; Vo Dinh, Tuan [ORNL

    2006-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was investigated for applications in the analysis of anthraquinone dyes used in works of art. Two SERS procedures were developed and evaluated with three frequently used anthraquinone dyes, alizarin, carminic acid and lac dye. The first procedure involves coating a layer of silver nanoparticles directly on pieces of filter paper stained with the dyes of interest by thermal evaporation to induce SERS effect. In the second procedure, a SERS-active Ag-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate was prepared by spin-coating an alumina-nanoparticle layer onto a glass slide to provide the nanostructure of the substrate, followed by thermally evaporating a layer of silver nanoparticles on top of the alumina layer. Aliquots of dye solutions were delivered onto this substrate to be analyzed. Intense SERS spectra characteristic of alizarin, carminic acid and lac dye were obtained using both SERS procedures. The effects of two parameters, the concentration of the alumina suspension and the thickness of the silver nanoparticle layer on the performance of the Ag-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate were examined with alizarin as the model compound. Comparative studies were conducted between the Ag-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate and the SERS substrate prepared using Tollens reaction. The Ag-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate was shown to offer larger enhancement and improved reproducibility than the Tollens substrates. Finally, the potential applicability of the Ag-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate for the analysis of real artifact objects was illustrated by the identification of alizarin extracted from a small piece of textile dyed using traditional methods and materials. The limit of detection for alizarin was estimated to be 7 x 10{sup -15} g from tests performed on solutions of known concentration.

  18. Neutron applications in earth, energy and environmental sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Liyuan; Schober, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    This text is a comprehensive overview of neutron scattering techniques that enhance the study of materials at the micro and nanoscale. The well structured volume provides introductions to various neutron applications from leading experts in the field.

  19. Recent advances in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy: Fundamental developments and applications in reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sukesh [Spectral Energies, LLC, 5100 Springfield Street, Ste. 301, Dayton, OH 45431 (United States); Gord, James R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Patnaik, Anil K. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Department of Physics, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy is widely used for measuring temperature and species concentration in reacting flows. This paper reviews the advances made over the last twelve years in the development and application of CARS spectroscopy in gas-phase reacting flows. The advent of high-power nanosecond (ns) lasers and off-the-shelf compact picosecond (ps) and femtosecond (fs) lasers is enabling the rapid expansion of the application of single-shot or high-bandwidth CARS spectroscopy in a way that would have been quite unimaginable two decades ago. Furthermore, compact ps lasers are paving the way for the development of a fiber-based CARS system for use in harsh environments. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of recent progresses in ns-, ps-, and fs-CARS spectroscopy for gas-phase thermometry and species-concentration measurements since the second edition of A.C. Eckbreth's book entitled Laser Diagnostics for Combustion Temperature and Species, which was published in 1996. During the last two decades, four encompassing issues have driven the fundamental development and application of CARS spectroscopy in reacting flows: 1) measurement of temperature and concentration of multiple species with one CARS system, 2) extension of the application of traditional ns-CARS to challenging reacting flow environments, 3) performance of nonresonant background-free and collision-free measurements in high-pressure reacting flows, and 4) measurement of temperature and species concentration at high bandwidth, typically 1 kHz or greater, to address the instability and transient phenomena associated with turbulent reacting flows in the combustors and augmentors of modern propulsion systems. This review is focused on identifying and discussing the recent results of gas-phase CARS spectroscopy related to the four issues mentioned above. The feasibility of performing high-bandwidth CARS spectroscopy with one laser beam as well as the

  20. Correlating the morphological and light scattering properties of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Marina

    , nuclear size, and mitochondrial volume density and size with over 90% classification accuracy. This study suggested the location of the scattering planes that are most relevant to researchers depending on the desired information about the cell and may provide a quantitative approach to cell discrimination with practical applications in flow cytometry for the diagnosis of diseases.

  1. Application of wide-angle scattering techniques using microfocus X-ray beam to investigate structural variation in polymer laminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, R

    1999-09-01

    Experiments have been conducted at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble (France). The Synchrotron Radiation used provides a monochromatic X-ray beam with brilliance and flux density far greater than is attainable with a rotating anode laboratory source. In addition the glass capillary optics used, increases the flux density at the capillary exit as well as providing a sub-micron beam which coupled with the XYZ stage allows data to be collected at high spatial resolution. A Photonics Science CCD detector coupled to a frame grabber has permitted data to be collected at high temporal resolution (40ms) as well as displaying the data in real-time mode. Software used during analysis was used to reduce the amount of spurious signals due to background scatter as well as enable results to be calculated with a high degree of confidence. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of industrial processing parameters in production of PET laminates and PEN films. Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) patterns have been collected, using a beam size of 2.3 {mu}m at intervals of 1 {mu}m through the sample. Crystallite sizeand orientation analyses on patterns collected have been used as an indication of changes in the structural morphology through the thickness of the films. Data analyses of PET films show that biaxial stretching of films is very complex and depending on the parameters at each stage of the process, the final film has very different characteristics. It has been shown that the effects of draw ratio and draw temperature in the forward direction results in a range of crystallite sizes that lead to either crystal fracture or reorientation of the crystallites as the dominant process in the transverse draw. The effects of annealing can also lead to crystal welding or melting and re-crystallisation depending on the amount of time spent in the lamination process. Data analyses of PEN films show that the choice of parameters in biaxial

  2. Applications of on-product diffraction-based focus metrology in logic high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Ben F.; Mokaberi, Babak; Bolton, David; Li, Chen; Palande, Ashwin; Park, Kevin; Noot, Marc; Kea, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The integration of on-product diffraction-based focus (DBF) capability into the majority of immersion lithography layers in leading edge logic manufacturing has enabled new applications targeted towards improving cycle time and yield. A CD-based detection method is the process of record (POR) for excursion detection. The drawback of this method is increased cycle time and limited sampling due to CD-SEM metrology capacity constraints. The DBFbased method allows the addition of focus metrology samples to the existing overlay measurements on the integrated metrology (IM) system. The result enables the addition of measured focus to the SPC system, allowing a faster excursion detection method. For focus targeting, the current method involves using a dedicated focus-exposure matrix (FEM) on all scanners, resulting in lengthy analysis times and uncertainty in the best focus. The DBF method allows the measurement to occur on the IM system, on a regular production wafer, and at the same time as the exposure. This results in a cycle time gain as well as a less subjective determination of best focus. A third application aims to use the novel onproduct focus metrology data in order to apply per-exposure focus corrections to the scanner. These corrections are particularly effective at the edge of the wafer, where systematic layer-dependent effects can be removed using DBFbased scanner feedback. This paper will discuss the development of a methodology to accomplish each of these applications in a high-volume production environment. The new focus metrology method, sampling schemes, feedback mechanisms and analysis methods lead to improved focus control, as well as earlier detection of failures.

  3. Development of novel series and parallel sensing system based on nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate for biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Wei

    With the advance of nanofabrication, the capability of nanoscale metallic structure fabrication opens a whole new study in nanoplasmonics, which is defined as the investigation of photon-electron interaction in the vicinity of nanoscale metallic structures. The strong oscillation of free electrons at the interface between metal and surrounding dielectric material caused by propagating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enables a variety of new applications in different areas, especially biological sensing techniques. One of the promising biological sensing applications by surface resonance polariton is surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), which significantly reinforces the feeble signal of traditional Raman scattering by at least 104 times. It enables highly sensitive and precise molecule identification with the assistance of a SERS substrate. Until now, the design of new SERS substrate fabrication process is still thriving since no dominant design has emerged yet. The ideal process should be able to achieve both a high sensitivity and low cost device in a simple and reliable way. In this thesis two promising approaches for fabricating nanostructured SERS substrate are proposed: thermal dewetting technique and nanoimprint replica technique. These two techniques are demonstrated to show the capability of fabricating high performance SERS substrate in a reliable and cost efficient fashion. In addition, these two techniques have their own unique characteristics and can be integrated with other sensing techniques to build a serial or parallel sensing system. The breakthrough of a combination system with different sensing techniques overcomes the inherent limitations of SERS detection and leverages it to a whole new level of systematic sensing. The development of a sensing platform based on thermal dewetting technique is covered as the first half of this thesis. The process optimization, selection of substrate material

  4. Closed system generation of dendritic cells from a single blood volume for clinical application in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M; van Zanten, J; Hospers, G A P; Setroikromo, A; de Jong, M A; de Leij, L F M H; Mulder, N H

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) used for clinical trials should be processed on a large scale conforming to current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of immature DC in a closed-system. Aphereses were performed with the Cobe Spectra continuous flow cell separator and material was derived from one volume of blood processed. Optimisation of a 3-phase collection autoPBSC technique significantly improved the quality of the initial mononuclear cell (MNC) product. Monocytes were then enriched from MNC by immunomagnetic depletion of CD19+ B cells and CD2+ T cells and partial depletion of NK cells using the Isolex 300I Magnetic cell selector. The quality of the initial mononuclear cell product was found to determine the outcome of monocyte enrichment. Enriched monocytes were cultured in Opticyte gas-permeable containers using CellGro serum-free medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4 to generate immature DC. A seeding concentration of 1 x 10(6) was found optimal in terms of DC phenotype expression, monocyte percentage in culture, and cell viability. The differentiation pattern favours day 7 for harvest of immature DC. DC recovery, viability, as well as phenotype expression after cryopreservation of immature DC was considered in this study. DC were induced to maturation and evaluated in FACS analysis for phenotype expression and proliferation assays. Mature DC were able to generate an allogeneic T-cell response as well as an anti-CMV response as detected by proliferation assays. These data indicate that the described large-scale GMP-compatible system results in the generation of stable DC derived from one volume of blood processed, which are qualitatively and quantitatively sufficient for clinical application in immunotherapeutic protocols.

  5. Relationship between LIBS Ablation and Pit Volume for Geologic Samples: Applications for in situ Absolute Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devismes, D.; Cohen, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    In planetary sciences, in situ absolute geochronology is a scientific and engineering challenge. Currently, the age of the Martian surface can only be determined by crater density counting. However this method has significant uncertainties and needs to be calibrated with absolute ages. We are developing an instrument to acquire in situ absolute geochronology based on the K-Ar method. The protocol is based on the laser ablation of a rock by hundreds of laser pulses. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) gives the potassium content of the ablated material and a mass spectrometer (quadrupole or ion trap) measures the quantity of 40Ar released. In order to accurately measure the quantity of released 40Ar in cases where Ar is an atmospheric constituent (e.g., Mars), the sample is first put into a chamber under high vacuum. The 40Arquantity, the concentration of K and the estimation of the ablated mass are the parameters needed to give the age of the rocks. The main uncertainties with this method are directly linked to the measures of the mass (typically some µg) and of the concentration of K by LIBS (up to 10%). Because the ablated mass is small compared to the mass of the sample, and because material is redeposited onto the sample after ablation, it is not possible to directly measure the ablated mass. Our current protocol measures the ablated volume and estimates the sample density to calculate ablated mass. The precision and accuracy of this method may be improved by using knowledge of the sample's geologic properties to predict its response to laser ablation, i.e., understanding whether natural samples have a predictable relationship between laser energy deposited and resultant ablation volume. In contrast to most previous studies of laser ablation, theoretical equations are not highly applicable. The reasons are numerous, but the most important are: a) geologic rocks are complex, polymineralic materials; b) the conditions of ablation are unusual (for example

  6. MATLAB simulation of Mie scattering by hollow sphere TiO2 for dye solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaine, Siti Nur Azella; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2016-11-01

    The capability to capture photons by photoelectrode film of a Dye Solar Cell (DSC) can be improved through improvement of the light harvesting efficiency (LHE). Incorporation of light scattering center in the photoelectrode film has shown promising results in improving the LHE. The scattering center act by extending the optical path length and improving the long-wavelength response of the DSC. One of the potential scattering center is hollow sphere structure. The structure could extend the travel distance of light radiance thus increase the possibility of photon being captured by the dye sensitizer causing more electrons to be excited. The aim of this study is to simulate the effect of the hollow diameter and shell thickness on the scattering efficiency of the TiO2 hollow sphere structure. MATLAB programming was used to simulate the effect based on the Mie Scattering theory. The optimum hollow diameter and shell thickness to obtain high scattering efficiency is approximately 310 nm and 25 nm, respectively if the inner media is iodide electrolyte while 240 nm and 65 nm, respectively if the inner media is air. A hollow sphere structure could improve the scattering of light due to the presence of inner sphere light confinement by the presence of inner sphere's voids.

  7. Model for water pollution remote sensing based on double scattering and its application in the Zhujiang River outfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Ruru; LIU Qinhuo; KE Ruiping; CHENG Lei; LIU Xiaoping

    2004-01-01

    It is a valid route for quantitatively remote sensing on water pollution to build a model according to the physical mechanisms of scattering and absorbing of suspended substance, pollutant, and molecules of water. Remote sensing model for water pollution based on single scattering is simple and easy to be used, but the precision is affected by turbidity of water. The characteristics of the energy composition of multiple scattering, are analyzed and it is proposed that, based on the model of single scattering, ifthe flux of the second scattering is considered additionally, the precision of the modelwill be remarkably improved and the calculation is still very simple. The factor of the second scattering is deduced to build a double scattering model, and the practical arithmetic for the calculation of the model is put forward. The result of applying this model in the water area around the Zhujiang(Pearl) River outfall shows that the precision is obviously improved. The result also shows that the seriously polluted water area is distributed in the northeast of Lingding Sea, the Victoria Bay of Hong Kong, and the Shengzhen Bay.

  8. A formalism for scattering of complex composite structures. I. Applications to branched structures of asymmetric sub-units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaneborg, Carsten; Pedersen, Jan Skov

    2012-03-14

    We present a formalism for the scattering of an arbitrary linear or acyclic branched structure build by joining mutually non-interacting arbitrary functional sub-units. The formalism consists of three equations expressing the structural scattering in terms of three equations expressing the sub-unit scattering. The structural scattering expressions allow composite structures to be used as sub-units within the formalism itself. This allows the scattering expressions for complex hierarchical structures to be derived with great ease. The formalism is generic in the sense that the scattering due to structural connectivity is completely decoupled from internal structure of the sub-units. This allows sub-units to be replaced by more complex structures. We illustrate the physical interpretation of the formalism diagrammatically. By applying a self-consistency requirement, we derive the pair distributions of an ideal flexible polymer sub-unit. We illustrate the formalism by deriving generic scattering expressions for branched structures such as stars, pom-poms, bottle-brushes, and dendrimers build out of asymmetric two-functional sub-units.

  9. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  10. Applied electromagnetic scattering theory

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Andrey A

    2017-01-01

    Besides classical applications (radar and stealth, antennas, microwave engineering), scattering and diffraction are enabling phenomena for some emerging research fields (artificial electromagnetic materials or metamaterials, terahertz technologies, electromagnetic aspects of nano-science). This book is a tutorial for advanced students who need to study diffraction theory. The textbook gives fundamental knowledge about scattering and diffraction of electromagnetic waves and provides some working examples of solutions for practical high-frequency scattering and diffraction problems. The book focuses on the most important diffraction effects and mechanisms influencing the scattering process and describes efficient and physically justified simulation methods - physical optics (PO) and the physical theory of diffraction (PTD) - applicable in typical remote sensing scenarios. The material is presented in a comprehensible and logical form, which relates the presented results to the basic principles of electromag...

  11. Hadron scattering and resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Jozef J. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study pi pi elastic scattering, including the rho resonance, as well as coupled-channel pi K, eta K scattering. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  12. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06{mu}m as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-04-01

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs.

  13. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06{mu}m as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-04-01

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs.

  14. A new metric enabling an exact hypergraph model for the communication volume in distributed-memory parallel applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortmeier, O.; Bücker, H.M.; Fagginger Auer, B.O.; Bisseling, R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A hypergraph model for mapping applications with an all-neighbor communication pattern to distributed-memory computers is proposed, which originated in finite element triangulations. Rather than approximating the communication volume for linear algebra operations, this new model represents the commu

  15. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Part B permit application [for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)]. Volume 1, Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This volume includes the following chapters: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant RCRA A permit application; facility description; waste analysis plan; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; RCRA contingency plan; personnel training; corrective action for solid waste management units; and other Federal laws.

  16. Small angle X-ray scattering study of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) based cryogels near the volume-phase transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalal, Mohand [Laboratoire d' Electronique Quantique, Faculte de Physique, USTHB Alger, 16111 Alger (Algeria); Ehrburger-Dolle, Francoise; Morfin, Isabelle [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique, UMR 5588 CNRS/UJF, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Armas, Maria-Rosa Aguilar de; Lopez, Maria-Luisa [Instituto de Ciencia y TecnologIa de PolImeros, CSIC and CIBER-BBN, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Bley, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.ehrburger-dolle@ujf-grenoble.f [Science et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, UMR 5266 CNRS/INPG/UJF, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2010-10-01

    The structural modifications induced by changes in temperature are investigated by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) over a broad range of q-values (3.5x10{sup -2} - 12 nm{sup -1}) in cryogels based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) and/or 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate-L-Lactide-Dextran (HEMA-LLA-D) macromer. Various copolymeric cryogels of these two monomers are prepared by cryopolymerization yielding macroporous gels (cryogels). For the plain pNIPA cryogel, the SAXS curves obtained at each temperature are well fitted by a sum of four equations describing respectively the scattering resulting from the gel surface (power law), from the solid-like (Guinier equation) and liquid-like (Ornstein-Zernike equation) heterogeneities and from the chain-chain correlation yielding a broad peak (pseudo-Voigt equation) in the high-q domain. The temperature dependence of the parameters obtained from the fit is analyzed and discussed. It is shown that the existence of an isoscattering (or isosbestic) point observed in pNIPA gels and in some copolymers is related to features observed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and swelling ratio measurements.

  17. Unconventional application of the two-flux approximation for the calculation of the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar function and the angular spectrum of the backward-scattered radiation for a semi-infinite isotropically scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remizovich, V. S.

    2010-06-01

    It is commonly accepted that the Schwarzschild-Schuster two-flux approximation (1905, 1914) can be employed only for the calculation of the energy characteristics of the radiation field (energy density and energy flux density) and cannot be used to characterize the angular distribution of radiation field. However, such an inference is not valid. In several cases, one can calculate the radiation intensity inside matter and the reflected radiation with the aid of this simplest approximation in the transport theory. In this work, we use the results of the simplest one-parameter variant of the two-flux approximation to calculate the angular distribution (reflection function) of the radiation reflected by a semi-infinite isotropically scattering dissipative medium when a relatively broad beam is incident on the medium at an arbitrary angle relative to the surface. We do not employ the invariance principle and demonstrate that the reflection function exhibits the multiplicative property. It can be represented as a product of three functions: the reflection function corresponding to the single scattering and two identical h functions, which have the same physical meaning as the Ambartsumyan-Chandrasekhar function ( H) has. This circumstance allows a relatively easy derivation of simple analytical expressions for the H function, total reflectance, and reflection function. We can easily determine the relative contribution of the true single scattering in the photon backscattering at an arbitrary probability of photon survival Λ. We compare all of the parameters of the backscattered radiation with the data resulting from the calculations using the exact theory of Ambartsumyan, Chandrasekhar, et al., which was developed decades after the two-flux approximation. Thus, we avoid the application of fine mathematical methods (the Wiener-Hopf method, the Case method of singular functions, etc.) and obtain simple analytical expressions for the parameters of the scattered radiation

  18. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Robert Y., E-mail: rx-tang@laurentian.ca [Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); McDonald, Nancy, E-mail: mcdnancye@gmail.com; Laamanen, Curtis, E-mail: cx-laamanen@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); LeClair, Robert J., E-mail: rleclair@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ{sub s} of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν{sub fat} for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν{sup ¯}{sub fat} were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10{sup −5} sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ{sub s} was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ{sub s} of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ{sub s} of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν{sup ¯}{sub fat}=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ{sub s} for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ{sub s} of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the

  19. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: animal tissue evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Robert Y; McDonald, Nancy; Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν¯fat) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν¯fat in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μs of the remaining fatless tissue. The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, νfat for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν¯fat were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10(-5) sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μs was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μs of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μs of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. For chicken and beef composites, ν¯fat=0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μs for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μs of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby validating the methods. The methodology to

  20. Calculation of patient effective dose and scattered dose for dental mobile fluoroscopic equipment: application of the Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boram; Lee, Jungseok; Kang, Sangwon; Cho, Hyelim; Shin, Gwisoon; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Jonghak

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the patient effective dose and scattered dose from recently developed dental mobile equipment in Korea. The MCNPX 2.6 (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) was used in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate both the effective and scattered doses. The MCNPX code was constructed identically as in the general use of equipment and the effective dose and scattered dose were calculated using the KTMAN-2 digital phantom. The effective dose was calculated as 906 μSv. The equivalent doses per organ were calculated via the MCNPX code, and were 32 174 and 19 μSv in the salivary gland and oesophagus, respectively. The scattered dose of 22.5-32.6 μSv of the tube side at 25 cm from the centre in anterior and posterior planes was measured as 1.4-3 times higher than the detector side of 10.5-16.0 μSv.

  1. Multichannel forward scattering meter for oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluney, W R

    1974-03-01

    An instrument was designed and built that measures the light scattered at several angles in the forward direction simultaneously. The instrument relies on an optical multiplexing technique for frequency encoding of the different channels suitable for detection by a single photodetector. A Mie theory computer program was used to calculate the theoretical volume scattering function for a suspension of polystyrene latex spheres. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental volume scattering functions is taken as a verification of the calibration technique used.

  2. A Process for Modelling Diffuse Scattering from Disordered Molecular Crystals, Illustrated by Application to Monoclinic 9-Chloro-10-methylanthracene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Goossens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse scattering from a crystal contains valuable information about the two-body correlations (related to the nanoscale order in the material. Despite years of development, the detailed analysis of single crystal diffuse scattering (SCDS has yet to become part of the everyday toolbox of the structural scientist. Recent decades have seen the pair distribution function approach to diffuse scattering (in fact, total scattering from powders become a relatively routine tool. However, analysing the detailed, complex, and often highly anisotropic three-dimensional distribution of SCDS remains valuable yet rare because there is no routine method for undertaking the analysis. At present, analysis requires significant investment of time to develop specialist expertise, which means that the analysis of diffuse scattering, which has much to offer, is not incorporated thorough studies of many compounds even though it has the potential to be a very useful adjunct to existing techniques. This article endeavours to outline in some detail how the diffuse scattering from a molecular crystal can be modelled relatively quickly and largely using existing software tools. It is hoped this will provide a template for other studies. To enable this, the entire simulation is included as deposited material.

  3. Comparison of combined-field and electric-field volume integral equations for modelling double-negative metematerial antennas and scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Two volume integral equation formulations for modelling magneto-dielectric objects are compared in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The first is the combined-field integral equation (CFVIE), in which the unknown quantities are both the electric and magnetic fields, while the second...... is the electric-field integral equation (EFVIE) with a single unknown quantity - the electric field. A resonant double-negative metamaterial spherical shell is analysed as an example....

  4. Comparison of combined-field and electric-field volume integral equations for modelling double-negative metematerial antennas and scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Oleksiy S.; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Two volume integral equation formulations for modelling magneto-dielectric objects are compared in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. The first is the combined-field integral equation (CFVIE), in which the unknown quantities are both the electric and magnetic fields, while the second...... is the electric-field integral equation (EFVIE) with a single unknown quantity - the electric field. A resonant double-negative metamaterial spherical shell is analysed as an example....

  5. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  6. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  7. MOT solution of the PMCHWT equation for analyzing transient scattering from conductive dielectrics

    KAUST Repository

    Uysal, Ismail Enes

    2015-01-01

    Transient electromagnetic interactions on conductive dielectric scatterers are analyzed by solving the Poggio-Miller-Chan-Harrington-Wu-Tsai (PMCHWT) surface integral equation with a marching on-in-time (MOT) scheme. The proposed scheme, unlike the previously developed ones, permits the analysis on scatterers with multiple volumes of different conductivity. This is achieved by maintaining an extra temporal convolution that only depends on permittivity and conductivity of these volumes. Its discretization and computation come at almost no additional cost and do not change the computational complexity of the resulting MOT solver. Accuracy and applicability of the MOT-PMCHWT solver are demonstrated by numerical examples.

  8. Energy-state formulation of lumped volume dynamic equations with application to a simplified free piston Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, C. J.; Lorenzo, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    Lumped volume dynamic equations are derived using an energy-state formulation. This technique requires that kinetic and potential energy state functions be written for the physical system being investigated. To account for losses in the system, a Rayleigh dissipation function is also formed. Using these functions, a Lagrangian is formed and using Lagrange's equation, the equations of motion for the system are derived. The results of the application of this technique to a lumped volume are used to derive a model for the free-piston Stirling engine. The model was simplified and programmed on an analog computer. Results are given comparing the model response with experimental data.

  9. Automatic definition of targeted biological volumes for the radiotherapy applications; Definition automatique des volumes biologiques cibles pour les applications de radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, M.; Visvikis, D. [LaTIM, U650 Inserm, 29 - Brest (France); Cheze-Le-Rest, C. [Service de medecine nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France); Pradier, O. [Service de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2009-10-15

    The proposed method: Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) showed its reliability and its precision on very complete collection of realistic simulated and real data. Its use in the context of radiotherapy allows to consider easily the studies implementation and scenari of dose painting or dose escalation, including in complex cases of heterogenous fixations. It is conceivable to apply F.L.A.B. on PET images with F.M.I.S.O. ({sup 18}F fluoro misonidazole) or F.L.T. (fluoro-L-thymidine) to complete the definition of the biological target volume. (N.C.)

  10. Small angle neutron scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousin Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ∼ 1 nm up to ∼ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ∼ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area… through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer, form factor analysis (I(q→0, Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system, structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates, and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast. It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of

  11. Benchmark calculations for elastic fermion-dimer scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bour, Shahin; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2012-01-01

    We present continuum and lattice calculations for elastic scattering between a fermion and a bound dimer in the shallow binding limit. For the continuum calculation we use the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian (STM) integral equation to determine the scattering length and effective range parameter to high precision. For the lattice calculation we use the finite-volume method of L\\"uscher. We take into account topological finite-volume corrections to the dimer binding energy which depend on the momentum of the dimer. After subtracting these effects, we find from the lattice calculation kappa a_fd = 1.174(9) and kappa r_fd = -0.029(13). These results agree well with the continuum values kappa a_fd = 1.17907(1) and kappa r_fd = -0.0383(3) obtained from the STM equation. We discuss applications to cold atomic Fermi gases, deuteron-neutron scattering in the spin-quartet channel, and lattice calculations of scattering for nuclei and hadronic molecules at finite volume.

  12. Applications of Hubble Volume in Atomic Physics, Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Quantum Physics and Cosmic Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. V. S. Seshavatharam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt is made to emphasize the major shortcomings of standard cosmology. It can be suggested that, the current cosmological changes can be understood by studying the atom and the atomic nucleus through ground based experiments. If light is coming from the atoms of the gigantic galaxy, then redshift can be interpreted as an index of the galactic atomic ‘light emission mechanism’. In no way it seems to be connected with ‘galaxy receding’. With ‘cosmological increasing (emitted photon energy’, observed cosmic redshift can be considered as a measure of the age difference between our galaxy and any observed galaxy. If it is possible to show that, (from the observer older galaxy’s distance increases with its ‘age’, then ‘galaxy receding’ and ‘accelerating universe’ concepts can be put for a revision at fundamental level. At any given cosmic time, the product of ‘critical density’ and ‘Hubble volume’ gives a characteristic cosmic mass and it can be called as the ‘Hubble mass’. Interesting thing is that, Schwarzschild radius of the ‘Hubble mass’ again matches with the ‘Hubble length’. Most of the cosmologists believe that this is merely a coincidence. At any given cosmic time,’Hubble length’ can be considered as the gravitational or electromagnetic interaction range. If one is willing to think in this direction, by increasing the number of applications of Hubble mass and Hubble volume in other areas of fundamental physics like quantum physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and particle physics - slowly and gradually - in a progressive way, concepts of ‘Black hole Cosmology’ can be strengthened and can also be confirmed.

  13. Applications of a finite-volume algorithm for incompressible MHD problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantieghem, S.; Sheyko, A.; Jackson, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present the theory, algorithms and implementation of a parallel finite-volume algorithm for the solution of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations using unstructured grids that are applicable for a wide variety of geometries. Our method implements a mixed Adams-Bashforth/Crank-Nicolson scheme for the nonlinear terms in the MHD equations and we prove that it is stable independent of the time step. To ensure that the solenoidal condition is met for the magnetic field, we use a method whereby a pseudo-pressure is introduced into the induction equation; since we are concerned with incompressible flows, the resulting Poisson equation for the pseudo-pressure is solved alongside the equivalent Poisson problem for the velocity field. We validate our code in a variety of geometries including periodic boxes, spheres, spherical shells, spheroids and ellipsoids; for the finite geometries we implement the so-called ferromagnetic or pseudo-vacuum boundary conditions appropriate for a surrounding medium with infinite magnetic permeability. This implies that the magnetic field must be purely perpendicular to the boundary. We present a number of comparisons against previous results and against analytical solutions, which verify the code's accuracy. This documents the code's reliability as a prelude to its use in more difficult problems. We finally present a new simple drifting solution for thermal convection in a spherical shell that successfully sustains a magnetic field of simple geometry. By dint of its rapid stabilization from the given initial conditions, we deem it suitable as a benchmark against which other self-consistent dynamo codes can be tested.

  14. Development and Validation of Temperature Dependent Thermal Neutron Scattering Laws for Applications and Safety Implications in Generation IV Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari

    2008-06-20

    The overall obljectives of this project are to critically review the currently used thermal neutron scattering laws for various moderators as a function of temperature, select as well documented and representative set of experimental data sensitive to the neutron spectra to generate a data base of benchmarks, update models and models parameters by introducing new developments in thermalization theory and condensed matter physics into various computational approaches in establishing the scattering laws, benchmark the results against the experimentatl set. In the case of graphite, a validation experiment is performed by observing nutron slowing down as a function of temperatures equal to or greater than room temperature.

  15. Inelastic Scattering of Identical Molecules within Framework of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory: Application to Rotational Excitations in H2 + H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-06-09

    Theoretical foundation is laid out for description of permutation symmetry in the inelastic scattering processes that involve collisions of two identical molecules, within the framework of the mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT). In this approach, the rotational (and vibrational) states of two molecules are treated quantum-mechanically, whereas their translational motion (responsible for scattering) is treated classically. This theory is applied to H2 + H2 system, and the state-to-state transition cross sections are compared versus those obtained from the full-quantum calculations and experimental results from the literature. Good agreement is found in all cases. It is also found that results of MQCT, where the Coriolis coupling is included classically, are somewhat closer to exact full-quantum results than results of the other approximate quantum methods, where those coupling terms are neglected. These new developments allow applications of MQCT to a broad variety of molecular systems and processes.

  16. Crystallography without crystals. I. The common-line method for assembling a three-dimensional diffraction volume from single-particle scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneerson, V L; Ourmazd, A; Saldin, D K

    2008-03-01

    It is demonstrated that a common-line method can assemble a three-dimensional oversampled diffracted intensity distribution suitable for high-resolution structure solution from a set of measured two-dimensional diffraction patterns, as proposed in experiments with an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) [Neutze et al. (2000). Nature (London), 406, 752-757]. Even for a flat Ewald sphere, it is shown how the ambiguities due to Friedel's law may be overcome. The method breaks down for photon counts below about 10 per detector pixel, almost three orders of magnitude higher than expected for scattering by a 500 kDa protein with an XFEL beam focused to a 0.1 microm diameter spot. Even if 10(3) orientationally similar diffraction patterns could be identified and added to reach the requisite photon count per pixel, the need for about 10(6) orientational classes for high-resolution structure determination suggests that about 10(9) diffraction patterns must be recorded. Assuming pulse and readout rates of approximately 100 Hz, such measurements would require approximately 10(7) s, i.e. several months of continuous beam time.

  17. A simple method for the production of large volume 3D macroporous hydrogels for advanced biotechnological, medical and environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Irina N.; Ingavle, Ganesh C.; Cundy, Andrew B.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

    2016-02-01

    The development of bulk, three-dimensional (3D), macroporous polymers with high permeability, large surface area and large volume is highly desirable for a range of applications in the biomedical, biotechnological and environmental areas. The experimental techniques currently used are limited to the production of small size and volume cryogel material. In this work we propose a novel, versatile, simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of large volume porous polymer hydrogels by cryogelation. By controlling the freezing process of the reagent/polymer solution, large-scale 3D macroporous gels with wide interconnected pores (up to 200 μm in diameter) and large accessible surface area have been synthesized. For the first time, macroporous gels (of up to 400 ml bulk volume) with controlled porous structure were manufactured, with potential for scale up to much larger gel dimensions. This method can be used for production of novel 3D multi-component macroporous composite materials with a uniform distribution of embedded particles. The proposed method provides better control of freezing conditions and thus overcomes existing drawbacks limiting production of large gel-based devices and matrices. The proposed method could serve as a new design concept for functional 3D macroporous gels and composites preparation for biomedical, biotechnological and environmental applications.

  18. Price-volume multifractal analysis and its application in Chinese stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ying; Zhuang, Xin-tian; Liu, Zhi-ying

    2012-06-01

    An empirical research on Chinese stock markets is conducted using statistical tools. First, the multifractality of stock price return series, ri(ri=ln(Pt+1)-ln(Pt)) and trading volume variation series, vi(vi=ln(Vt+1)-ln(Vt)) is confirmed using multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. Furthermore, a multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis between stock price return and trading volume variation in Chinese stock markets is also conducted. It is shown that the cross relationship between them is also found to be multifractal. Second, the cross-correlation between stock price Pi and trading volume Vi is empirically studied using cross-correlation function and detrended cross-correlation analysis. It is found that both Shanghai stock market and Shenzhen stock market show pronounced long-range cross-correlations between stock price and trading volume. Third, a composite index R based on price and trading volume is introduced. Compared with stock price return series ri and trading volume variation series vi, R variation series not only remain the characteristics of original series but also demonstrate the relative correlation between stock price and trading volume. Finally, we analyze the multifractal characteristics of R variation series before and after three financial events in China (namely, Price Limits, Reform of Non-tradable Shares and financial crisis in 2008) in the whole period of sample to study the changes of stock market fluctuation and financial risk. It is found that the empirical results verified the validity of R.

  19. Sampling based motion planning with reachable volumes: Application to manipulators and closed chain systems

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2014-09-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a geometric representation of the regions the joints of a robot can reach. They can be used to generate constraint satisfying samples for problems including complicated linkage robots (e.g. closed chains and graspers). They can also be used to assist robot operators and to help in robot design.We show that reachable volumes have an O(1) complexity in unconstrained problems as well as in many constrained problems. We also show that reachable volumes can be computed in linear time and that reachable volume samples can be generated in linear time in problems without constraints. We experimentally validate reachable volume sampling, both with and without constraints on end effectors and/or internal joints. We show that reachable volume samples are less likely to be invalid due to self-collisions, making reachable volume sampling significantly more efficient for higher dimensional problems. We also show that these samples are easier to connect than others, resulting in better connected roadmaps. We demonstrate that our method can be applied to 262-dof, multi-loop, and tree-like linkages including combinations of planar, prismatic and spherical joints. In contrast, existing methods either cannot be used for these problems or do not produce good quality solutions.

  20. Sonographic Determination of Residual Bladder Volume after Application of Different Cystotomy Closure Techniques in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IU Khan1*, MA Khan2, SG Bokhari2, A Safdar2, M Shoaib1, H Akbar2, S Aslam2, MA Khan2 and A Noor2

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Residual urine volume is measured to diagnose various neurogenic and obstructive disorders of the urinary bladder. However, it is hypothesized that cystotomy closure using inverting patterns decreases intraluminal diameter of urinary bladder which consequently reduce residual bladder volume. This study aimed to investigate the ideal suturing style for cystotomy incision closure which would exert the least effect on residual bladder volume. The effect of various suturing styles on residual bladder volume was studied sonographically. Residual Bladder Volume (RBV was calculated by the formula, i.e. RBV=L×W× (DL+DT/2×0.625, where L=longitudinal diameter, W=transverse diameter, DL= depth at longitudinal diameter, DT=depth at transverse diameter. 24 healthy mongrel dogs were selected and randomly divided into four equal groups A, B, C and D (n=6. In groups A, B and C, the cystotomy incision was subsequently closed by two-layered appositional suturing pattern, two-layered inverting pattern and three layers (using a combination of appositional and inverting styles, respectively. Group-D remained as sham-operated Control. The results clearly showed that the three-layered closure technique using a combination of appositional and inverting patterns (Group-C, significantly reduced the bladder volume (P<0.01. Two-layered inverting patterns (Group B, also reduced the bladder volume but not up to a significant level, whereas, the appositional suturing technique (group-A exerted the least effect on residual bladder volume. Conclusively, it was inferred that a two-layered appositional suturing pattern should be preferred for closure of cystotomy incision to avoid significant changes in residual bladder volume.

  1. Light Scattering in Solid IX

    CERN Document Server

    Cardona, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    This is the ninth volume of a well-established series in which expert practitioners discuss topical aspects of light scattering in solids. It reviews recent developments concerning mainly semiconductor nanostructures and inelastic x-ray scattering, including both coherent time-domain and spontaneous scattering studies. In the past few years, light scattering has become one of the most important research and characterization methods for studying carbon nanotubes and semiconducting quantum dots, and a crucial tool for exploring the coupled exciton--photon system in semiconductor cavities. Among the novel techniques discussed in this volume are pump--probe ultrafast measurements and those which use synchrotron radiation as light source. The book addresses improvements in the intensity, beam quality and time synchronization of modern synchrotron sources, which made it possible to measure the phonon dispersion in very small samples and to determine electronic energy bands as well as enabling real-time observations...

  2. Footbridge between finite volumes and finite elements with applications to CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Frédéric; Ghidaglia, Jean-Michel

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new algorithm for the discretization of second-order elliptic operators in the context of finite volume schemes on unstructured meshes. We are strongly motivated by partial differential equations (PDEs) arising in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), like the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Our technique consists of matching up a finite volume discretization based on a given mesh with a finite element representation on the same mesh. An inverse operator is also built, which has the desirable property that in the absence of diffusion, one recovers exactly the finite volume solution. Numerical results are also provided. Copyright

  3. Classical scattering theory of waves from the view point of an eigenvalue problem and application to target identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Werby, M.F. [Naval Research Lab. Detachment, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The Helmholtz-Poincare Wave Equation (H-PWE) arises in many areas of classical wave scattering theory. In particular it can be found for the cases of acoustical scattering from submerged bounded objects and electromagnetic scattering from objects. The extended boundary integral equations (EBIE) method is derived from considering both the exterior and interior solutions of the H-PWE`s. This coupled set of expressions has the advantage of not only offering a prescription for obtaining a solution for the exterior scattering problem, but it also obviates the problem of irregular values corresponding to fictitious interior eigenvalues. Once the coupled equations are derived, they can by obtained in matrix form be expanding all relevant terms in partial wave expansions, including a biorthogonal expansion of the Green function. However some freedom of choice in the choice of the surface expansion is available since the unknown surface quantities may be expanded in a variety of ways to long as closure is obtained. Out of many possible choices, we develop an optimal method to obtain such expansions which is based on the optimum eigenfunctions related to the surface of the object. In effect, we convert part of the problem (that associated with the Fredholms integral equation of the first kind) an eigenvalue problem of a related Hermition operator. The methodology will be explained in detail and examples will be presented.

  4. A PDE-Constrained Optimization Approach to Uncertainty Quantification in Inverse Problems, with Applications to Inverse Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    illuminations. Inverse medium problems are encountered in acoustic, elastic, and electromagnetic wave propagation. We use a Lippmann- Schwinger formulation...Na. (5) This is a Born-approximation Lippmann- Schwinger scattering equation, where G(-, •;u) is the Green’s function (in the reference medium

  5. Infrared radiative transfer modelling in a 3D scattering cloudy atmosphere: Application to limb sounding measurements of cirrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewen, G.B.L. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gewen@atm.ox.ac.uk; Grainger, R.G. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Lambert, A. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Baran, A.J. [Met Office, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    The Monte Carlo cloud scattering forward model (McClouds{sub F}M) has been developed to simulate limb radiative transfer in the presence of cirrus clouds, for the purposes of simulating cloud contaminated measurements made by an infrared limb sounding instrument, e.g. the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). A reverse method three-dimensional Monte Carlo transfer model is combined with a line-by-line model for radiative transfer through the non-cloudy atmosphere to explicitly account for the effects of multiple scattering by the clouds. The ice cloud microphysics are characterised by a size distribution of randomly oriented ice crystals, with the single scattering properties of the distribution determined by accurate calculations accounting for non-spherical habit. A comparison of McClouds{sub F}M simulations and real MIPAS spectra of cirrus shows good agreement. Of particular interest are several noticeable spectral features (i.e. H{sub 2}O absorption lines) in the data that are replicated in the simulations: these can only be explained by upwelling tropospheric radiation scattered into the line-of-sight by the cloud ice particles.

  6. Application of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS for Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Breast Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Small angle, between 3° and 10°, X ray scattering is predominantly coherent giving rise to diffraction effects that can be observed as constructive and destructive interferences. These interferences carry information about the molecular structure of the tissue and hence can be used to identify changes that occur due to cancer. Method: In this study an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method was used. The optimum scattering angle, determined from a series of measurements on adipose breast tissue at several angles from 4 to 7.3 degrees, was found to be 6.5°. Once optimized the system was used to measure the diffraction profiles (corrected scattered intensity versus momentum transfer of a total of 99 breast tissue samples. The samples were both normal and tumour samples. Results: Adipose tissue showed a sharp, high intensity peak at low momentum transfer values of approximately 1.1nm-1. Adipose tissue, mixed tissue (adipose & fibroglandular and tumor have peaks at different values of momentum transfer that can be used to identify the tissue. Benign and malignant breast tissues can also be differentiated by both peak positions and peak heights. It was also observed that the results were reproducible even after the tissue had been preserved at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Conclusion: We were able to differentiate between normal, benign and malignant breast tissues by using energy dispersive small angle x-ray scattering.

  7. Critical scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ., Dep. of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Perry, S.C. [Keele Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO{sub 3} is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs.

  8. Scattering of light by a periodic structure in the presence of randomness VII: Application of statistical detection test

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V C Vani; S Chatterjee

    2008-05-01

    Detection of periodic structures, hidden in random surfaces has been addressed by us for some time and the `extended matched filter' method, developed by us, has been shown to be effective in detecting the hidden periodic part from the light scattering data in circumstances where conventional data analysis methods cannot reveal the successive peaks due to scattering by the periodic part of the surface. It has been shown that if 0 is the coherence length of light on scattering from the rough part and is the wavelength of the periodic part of the surface, the extended matched filter method can detect hidden periodic structures for (0/) ≥ 0:11, while conventional methods are limited to much higher values ((0/) ≥ 0:33). In the method developed till now, the detection of periodic structures involves the detection of the central peak, first peak and second peak in the scattered intensity of light, located at scattering wave vectors = 0, , 2, respectively, where = 2/, their distinct identities being obfuscated by the fact that the peaks have width = 2/0 ≫ . The relative magnitudes of these peaks and the consequent problems associated in identifying them is discussed. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical goodness test is used to justify the identification of the peaks. This test is used to `reject' or `not reject' the null hypothesis which states that the successive peaks do exist. This test is repeated for various values of 0/, which leads to the conclusion that there is really a periodic structure hidden behind the random surface.

  9. Mechanics of the occlusive arm cuff and its application as a volume sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecki, G; Bansal, V; Karam, E; Hood, R; Apple, H

    1993-07-01

    Although a common medical instrument, the mechanical function of an occlusive arm cuff has not been fully described in an engineering sense. The occlusive arm cuff is examined here using a mathematical mechanics model and experimental measurements. Cuff stretch was modeled by a nonlinear pressure-volume function. Air compression was represented by Boyle's law. An apparatus was developed to measure pressure due to the air volume pumped into the cuff for fixed arm volume. Data were obtained for two different cuff designs, and reveal a nonlinear cuff pressure-volume relationship that could be represented accurately by the mathematical model. Calibration constants are provided for the two types of occlusive cuff. Thus, the cuff pressure was found to consist of a balance between that produced by stretch of the elastic cuff bladder and that of the compression of the air contained within the bladder. The use of the gas law alone was found to be inadequate to represent the cuff mechanics. When applying the cuff to measure change in arm volume, such as during plethysmography or oscillometry, it cannot be assumed that the cuff sensitivity is constant. More precisely, it was found that the occlusive cuff is a transducer with a volume sensitivity that increases with cuff pressure and volume until it becomes nearly constant at high levels of cuff pressure (150 mmHg). A hypothetical case of a linear elastic artery with constant pulse pressure was used as input to the cuff model to illustrate the change in cuff pressure oscillations that occurs while cuff pressure is released.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Tuning the interaction between propagating and localized surface plasmons for surface enhanced Raman scattering in water for biomedical and environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shioi, Masahiko, E-mail: shioi.masahiko@jp.panasonic.com [Device Solutions Center, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4, Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Jans, Hilde [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center VZW., Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lodewijks, Kristof [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center VZW., Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van Dorpe, Pol; Lagae, Liesbet [Interuniversity Microelectronics Center VZW., Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kawamura, Tatsuro [Device Solutions Center, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4, Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan)

    2014-06-16

    With a view to biomedical and environmental applications, we investigate the plasmonic properties of a rectangular gold nanodisk array in water to boost surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effects. To control the resonance wavelengths of the surface plasmon polariton and the localized surface plasmon, their dependence on the array period and diameter in water is studied in detail using a finite difference time domain method. A good agreement is obtained between calculated resonant wavelengths and those of gold nanodisk arrays fabricated using electron beam lithography. For the optimized structure, a SERS enhancement factor of 7.8 × 10{sup 7} is achieved in water experimentally.

  11. Application of Minimum Effective Cuff Inflating Volume for Laryngeal Mask Airway and its Impact on Postoperative Pharyngeal Complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Bing Li; Jie Yan; Hong-Gang Zhou; Jing Hao; Ai-Jia Liu; Zheng-Liang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Background:High intracuffpressure can cause severe pharyngeal complications including sore throat or hoarseness after laryngeal mask airway (LMA) removal postoperatively.Though the application of minimum effective cuffinflating volume is suggested to maintain airway sealing and adequacy of ventilation for patients receiving general anesthesia with LMA at lower level of the intracuffpressure,it is currently not a standard care in most of the anesthetic departments.In this study,the minimum effective cuff inflating volume was determined for classic LMA Well LeadTM (Well Lead Medical Co.,Ltd.,China) and its impact on postoperative pharyngeal complications was also explored.Methods:Patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status (Ⅰ-Ⅲ) undergoing the short-duration urological surgery were recruited in this trial.First,the minimum effective cuff inflating volume was determined for size 4 or 5 LMA Well LeadTM in the study 1.Immediately following placement and confirmation of ideal LMA position,the cuff was inflated with 5,7,10 ml of air and up to 30 ml at 5 ml increment.The intracuff pressure,oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP),and inspiratory peak airway pressure under positive pressure ventilation at the corresponding cuff volume as indicated above were recorded.Second,the enrolled patients were randomly allocated into minimum effective cuff inflating volume group (MC) and routine care (RC) group in the study 2.The minimum effective cuff inflating volume was applied and maintained in MC group,whereas the cuff volume was inflated with half of the maximum cuff inflating volume recommended by manufacturer in RC group throughout the surgical procedure and stay in postanesthesia care unit prior to LMA removal.The incidence of pharyngeal complications at 0,2,24,and 48 h after removal of LMA and other intra-operative adverse events were also documented.Results:The intracuffpressure varied with the cuff inflating volume in a positive linear correlation

  12. New methods to interpolate large volume of data from points or particles (Mesh-Free) methods application for its scientific visualization; Nuevos metodos de interpolacion de grandes volumenes de datos provenientes de la aplicacion de los metodos de particulas o puntos (libre de malla) para su visualizacion cientifica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes Lopez, Y.; Yervilla Herrera, H.; Viamontes Esquivel, A.; Recarey Morfa, C. A.

    2009-07-01

    In the following paper we developed a new method to interpolate large volumes of scattered data, focused mainly on the results of the Mesh free Methods, Points Methods and the Particles Methods application. Through this one, we use local radial basis function as interpolating functions. We also use over-tree as the data structure that allows to accelerate the localization of the data that influences to interpolate the values at a new point, speeding up the application of scientific visualization techniques to generate images from large data volumes from the application of Mesh-free Methods, Points and Particle Methods, in the resolution of diverse models of physics-mathematics. As an example, the results obtained after applying this method using the local interpolation functions of Shepard are shown. (Author) 22 refs.

  13. A study of pseudoresonances in the application of the Schwinger variational principle to electron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, Charles A.; Odom, Gregory; Tucker, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The Schwinger variational principle is applied to s-wave electron-hydrogen atom scattering. Computationally, consistent with a recent paper by Apagyi et al. (1988), there are pseudoresonances at the static exchange level of approximation, but not at the static level. The T-matrix as well as the K-matrix version of the Schwinger principle is used with a real Slater basis, and the same results are obtained in both. The origin of the pseudoresonances from singularities in the separable potential that is effectively employed in the Lippman-Schwinger equation from which the Schwinger variational principle can be derived. The determination of the pseudoresonance parameters from the separable potential is computationally inexpensive and may be used to predict the pseudoresonance parameters for the scattering calculations so as to avoid them.

  14. An efficient approach to computing third- order scattering of sound by sound with application to parametric arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Spencer J; Steer, Michael B

    2014-10-01

    A mathematical description of third-order scattered sound fields is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) model that describes the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear secondorder effects when analyzing the interaction between the firstand second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Measurements are presented for the IM3 frequency components and parametric array sound fields and comparisons of the model are made with traditional simulation results from direct numerical integration.

  15. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P.; Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark; Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2013-12-01

    An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO2 as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH4 and H2O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  16. Sandwich-like design of TiO{sub 2} electrodes containing multiple light scattering layers for dye-sensitized solar cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshayesh, A.M., E-mail: abakhsh4@uwo.ca

    2015-11-02

    This study comes up with a new architecture of multi-layered photoanode electrodes containing three thick layers (i.e., 4 μm) of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} particles and three thin layers (i.e., 1 μm) of uniform TiO{sub 2} aggregates, which are alternately deposited. The aggregates layers are deposited by a straightforward gel process, developed for the preparation of uniform and sponge-like light scattering layer for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) applications. The aggregates layers are composed of uniform spherical particles with average diameter of 2 μm, containing small nanoparticles with the average grain size of 20 nm. The nanocrystalline layers contain 20-nm-diameter TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals that the nanocrystalline layers have a pure anatase phase, whereas the aggregates layers show a mixture of anatase and rutile phases. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) demonstrates that the multi-layered electrode enjoys better light scattering ability than that of mono-layered electrode due to the incorporation of a thin light scattering layer into the nanocrystalline film. The multi-layered DSC shows the highest power conversion efficiency of 7.85% as a result of higher light harvesting and less recombination which is demonstrated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From IPCE measurement, the external quantum efficiency of the multi-layered cell at 530 nm is equal to 89%, which is higher than that of mono-layered cell (i.e., 78%). - Highlights: • A new architecture of multi-layered TiO{sub 2} electrodes is presented. • The electrode contains six alternate layers of TiO{sub 2} nanoarticles and aggregates. • The aggregates are uniformly distributed into the light scattering layers. • The new design showed improved efficiency compared to conventional cells.

  17. Application of the confluent Heun functions to study the physics of black holes: resonant frequencies and scattering of scalar waves

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, H S

    2016-01-01

    We study the scattering and the resonant frequencies (quasispectrum) of charged massive scalar waves by Kerr-Newman-Kasuya spacetime (dyon black hole). The equations of motion are written into a Heun form, and its analytical solutions are obtained. We obtain the resonant frequencies expression and the general exact regular partial wave solution. The special cases of the Kerr and Schwarzschild black holes are analyzed and the solutions are shown.

  18. Resistivity of thin gold films on mica induced by electron-surface scattering: Application of quantitative scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles, Marcelo E. [Departamento de Ciencias de la Construccion, FCCyOT, Universidad Tecnologica Metropolitana, Dieciocho 390, Santiago 8330526 (Chile); Gonzalez-Fuentes, Claudio A.; Henriquez, Ricardo [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile); Kremer, German [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Las Palmeras 3425, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Moraga, Luis; Oyarzun, Simon; Suarez, Marco Antonio; Flores, Marcos [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile); Munoz, Raul C., E-mail: ramunoz@ing.uchile.cl [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Casilla 487-3, Santiago 8370449 (Chile)

    2012-02-01

    We report a comparison between the resistivity measured on thin gold films deposited on mica, with predictions based upon classical theories of size effects (Drude's, Sondheimer's and Calecki's), as well as predictions based upon quantum theories of electron-surface scattering (the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, the theory of Tesanovic, Jaric and Maekawa, and that of Trivedi and Aschroft). From topographic images of the surface recorded with a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, we determined the rms roughness amplitude, {delta} and the lateral correlation length, {xi} corresponding to a Gaussian representation of the average height-height autocorrelation function, describing the roughness of each sample in the scale of length set by the Fermi wave length. Using ({delta}, {xi}) as input data, we present a rigorous comparison between resistivity data and predictions based upon the theory of Calecki as well as quantum theoretical predictions without adjustable parameters. The resistivity was measured on gold films of different thickness evaporated onto mica substrates, between 4 K and 300 K. The resistivity data covers the range 0.1 < x(T) < 6.8, for 4 K < T < 300 K, where x(T) is the ratio between film thickness and electron mean free path in the bulk at temperature T. We experimentally identify electron-surface and electron-phonon scattering as the microscopic electron scattering mechanisms giving rise to the macroscopic resistivity. The different theories are all capable of estimating the thin film resistivity to an accuracy better than 10%; however the mean free path and the resistivity characterizing the bulk turn out to depend on film thickness. Surprisingly, only the Sondheimer theory and its quantum version, the modified theory of Sheng, Xing and Wang, predict and increase in resistivity induced by size effects that seems consistent with published galvanomagnetic phenomena also arising from electron-surface scattering measured at low

  19. Generalized Wideband Harmonic Imaging of Nonlinearly Loaded Scatterers: Theory, Analysis, and Application for Forward-Looking Radar Target Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    nonlinearly loaded, perfectly conducting scatterer) is assumed to be excited by infinitesimal electric dipoles at ’r transmitting time-harmonic fields at...that for the half-space problem, for the calculation of the dyadic and scalar Green’s functions within the integral equation solver, exact...and located at the center of the array—is a vertical infinitesimal electric dipole operating over the frequency band [300 MHz, 1.5 GHz] in 401P

  20. SMALL-ANGLE NEUTRON SCATTERING CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STRUCTURE OF NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR ENERGY-RELATED APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lilin [ORNL; Mavila Chathoth, Suresh [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Presser, Volker [Drexel University; Mcdonough, John [Drexel University; Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel University

    2011-01-01

    We used small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron contrast variation to study the structure of four nanoporouscarbons prepared by thermo-chemical etching of titanium carbide TiC in chlorine at 300, 400, 600, and 800 C with pore diameters ranging between -4 and -11 {angstrom}. SANS patterns were obtained from dry samples and samples saturated with deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O) in order to delineate origin of the power law scattering in the low Q domain as well as to evaluate pore accessibility for D{sub 2}O molecules. SANS cross section of all samples was fitted to Debye-Anderson-Brumberger (DAB), DAB-Kirste-Porod models as well as to the Guinier and modified Guinier formulae for cylindrical objects, which allowed for evaluating the radii of gyration as well as the radii and lengths of the pores under cylindrical shape approximation. SANS data from D{sub 2}O-saturated samples indicate that strong upturn in the low Q limit usually observed in the scattering patterns from microporous carbon powders is due to the scattering from outer surface of the powder particles. Micropores are only partially filled with D{sub 2}O molecules due to geometrical constraints and or partial hydrophobicity of the carbon matrix. Structural parameters of the dry carbons obtained using SANS are compared with the results of the gas sorption measurements and the values agree for carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) obtained at high chlorination temperatures (>600 C). For lower chlorination temperatures, pore radii obtained from gas sorption overestimate the actual pore size as calculated from SANS for two reasons: inaccessible small pores are present and the model-dependent fitting based on density functional theory models assumes non-spherical pores, whereas SANS clearly indicates that the pore shape in microporous CDC obtained at low chlorination temperatures is nearly spherical.

  1. Study on the interaction between fluoroquinolones and erythrosine by absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra and their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Jiangtao; Liu, Shaopu; Shen, Wei

    2008-03-01

    In pH 4.4-4.5 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, fluoroquinolone antibiotics (FLQs) including ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), levofloxacin (LEV) and lomefloxacin (LOM) could react with erythrosine (Ery) to form 1:1 ion-association complexes, which not only resulted in the changes of the absorption spectra and the quenching of fluorescence, but also resulted in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). These offered some indications of the determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by spectrophotometric, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering methods. The detection limits for fluoroquinolone antibiotics were in the range of 0.097-0.265 μg/mL for absorption methods, 0.022-0.100 μg/mL for fluorophotometry and 0.014-0.027 μg/mL for RRS method, respectively. Among them, the RRS method had the highest sensitivity. In this work, the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reactions and the properties of the analytical chemistry were investigated. The methods have been successfully applied to determination of some fluoroquinolone antibiotics in human urine samples and tablets. Taking CIP-Ery system as an example, the charge distribution, the enthalpy of formation and the mean polarizability were calculated by density function theory (DFT) method. In addition, the reasons for the enhancement of scattering spectra were discussed.

  2. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P. [School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark [Department of Chemistry, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Staffs ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Lennon, David, E-mail: David.Lennon@glasgow.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, Joseph Black Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-12

    Highlights: • Inelastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate a Ni/alumina catalyst. • The extent of hydrogen retention by the catalyst has been determined. • Filamentous carbon is identified as a by-product. - Abstract: An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO{sub 2} as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  3. Application of circularly polarized light for non-invasive diagnosis of cancerous tissues and turbid tissue-like scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnen, Britt; Macdonald, Callum; Doronin, Alexander; Jacques, Steven; Eccles, Michael; Meglinski, Igor

    2015-04-01

    Polarization-based optical techniques have become increasingly popular in the field of biomedical diagnosis. In the current report we exploit the directional awareness of circularly and/or elliptically polarized light backscattered from turbid tissue-like scattering media. We apply circularly and elliptically polarized laser light which illuminates the samples of interest, and a standard optical polarimeter is used to observe the polarization state of light backscattered a few millimeters away from the point of incidence. We demonstrate that the Stokes vector of backscattered light depicted on a Poincaré sphere can be used to assess a turbid tissue-like scattering medium. By tracking the Stokes vector of the detected light on the Poincaré sphere, we investigate the utility of this approach for characterization of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue samples in vitro. The obtained results are discussed in the framework of a phenomenological model and the results of a polarization tracking Monte Carlo model, developed in house. Schematic illustration of the experimental approach utilizing circularly and elliptically polarized light for probing turbid tissue-like scattering media. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Licensing an assured isolation facility for low-level radioactive waste. Volume 2: Recommendations on the content and review of an application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, D.J.; Bauser, M.A. [Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, Washington, DC (United States); Baird, R.D. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a detailed set of proposed criteria and guidance for the preparation of a license application for an assured isolation facility (AIF). The report is intended to provide a detailed planning basis upon which a prospective applicant may begin pre-licensing discussions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and initiate development of a license application. The report may also be useful to the NRC or to state regulatory agencies that may be asked to review such an application. Volume 1 of this report provides background information, and describes the licensing approach and methodology. Volume 2 identifies specific information that is recommended for inclusion in a license application.

  5. Volume measurement by using super-resolution MRI: application to prostate volumetry

    CERN Document Server

    Oubel, Estanislao; Iannessi, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Accuracy and precision of measurements are important for patient follow up in oncology but, unfortunately, partial volume effects introduce an undesired variability between observers. Super resolution techniques (SR) combine multiple acquisitions of an object into a single image richer in details. Herein, the use of SR for reducing variability is investigated in the specific context of prostate measurements. Prostate is typically imaged by T2-weighted MRI in three perpendicular low resolution images, each of them presenting partial volume effects in the direction of the slice selection gradient. SR techniques allow to combine these images into an image presenting the same level of details in all directions. This is expected to increase the accuracy and reproducibility of volume measurements, which in turn improves other derived measurements like PSA density.

  6. Light scattering by small particles

    CERN Document Server

    Hulst, H C van de

    1981-01-01

    ""A must for researchers using the techniques of light scattering."" ? S. C. Snowdon, Journal of the Franklin InstituteThe measurement of light scattering of independent, homogeneous particles has many useful applications in physical chemistry, meteorology and astronomy. There is, however, a sizeable gap between the abstract formulae related to electromagnetic-wave-scattering phenomena, and the computation of reliable figures and curves. Dr. van de Hulst's book enables researchers to bridge that gap. The product of twelve years of work, it is an exhaustive study of light-scattering properties

  7. Differential dynamic microscopy of weakly scattering and polydisperse protein-rich clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S; Vorontsova, Maria A; Poling-Skutvik, Ryan; Vekilov, Peter G; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticle dynamics impact a wide range of biological transport processes and applications in nanomedicine and natural resource engineering. Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) was recently developed to quantify the dynamics of submicron particles in solutions from fluctuations of intensity in optical micrographs. Differential dynamic microscopy is well established for monodisperse particle populations, but has not been applied to solutions containing weakly scattering polydisperse biological nanoparticles. Here we use bright-field DDM (BDDM) to measure the dynamics of protein-rich liquid clusters, whose size ranges from tens to hundreds of nanometers and whose total volume fraction is less than 10(-5). With solutions of two proteins, hemoglobin A and lysozyme, we evaluate the cluster diffusion coefficients from the dependence of the diffusive relaxation time on the scattering wave vector. We establish that for weakly scattering populations, an optimal thickness of the sample chamber exists at which the BDDM signal is maximized at the smallest sample volume. The average cluster diffusion coefficient measured using BDDM is consistently lower than that obtained from dynamic light scattering at a scattering angle of 90°. This apparent discrepancy is due to Mie scattering from the polydisperse cluster population, in which larger clusters preferentially scatter more light in the forward direction.

  8. Derivation of Plastic Work Rate Done per Unit Volume for Mean Yield Criterion and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dewen ZHAO; Yingjie XIE; Xiaowen WANG; Xianghua LIU

    2005-01-01

    In Haigh Westergaard stress space linear combination of twin shear stress and Tresca yield functions is called the mean yield (MY) criterion. The mathematical relationship of the criterion and its plastic work rate done per unit volume were derived. A generalized worked example of slab forging was analyzed by the criterion and its corresponding plastic work rate done per unit volume. Then, the precision of the solution was compared with those by Mises and Twin shear stress yield criterions, respectively. It turned out that the calculated results by MY criterion were in good agreement with those by Mises criterion.

  9. Wave propagation and scattering in random media

    CERN Document Server

    Ishimaru, Akira

    1978-01-01

    Wave Propagation and Scattering in Random Media, Volume 2, presents the fundamental formulations of wave propagation and scattering in random media in a unified and systematic manner. The topics covered in this book may be grouped into three categories: waves in random scatterers, waves in random continua, and rough surface scattering. Random scatterers are random distributions of many particles. Examples are rain, fog, smog, hail, ocean particles, red blood cells, polymers, and other particles in a state of Brownian motion. Random continua are the media whose characteristics vary randomly an

  10. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 4: License Application Plan and Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  11. Automated cerebellar segmentation: Validation and application to detect smaller volumes in children prenatally exposed to alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie A. Cardenas

    2014-01-01

    Discussion: These results demonstrate excellent reliability and validity of automated cerebellar volume and mid-sagittal area measurements, compared to manual measurements. These data also illustrate that this new technology for automatically delineating the cerebellum leads to conclusions regarding the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the cerebellum consistent with prior studies that used labor intensive manual delineation, even with a very small sample.

  12. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements.

  13. Estimating seabed scattering mechanisms via Bayesian model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Gavin; Dosso, Stan E; Holland, Charles W; Dettmer, Jan

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative inversion procedure is developed and applied to determine the dominant scattering mechanism (surface roughness and/or volume scattering) from seabed scattering-strength data. The classification system is based on trans-dimensional Bayesian inversion with the deviance information criterion used to select the dominant scattering mechanism. Scattering is modeled using first-order perturbation theory as due to one of three mechanisms: Interface scattering from a rough seafloor, volume scattering from a heterogeneous sediment layer, or mixed scattering combining both interface and volume scattering. The classification system is applied to six simulated test cases where it correctly identifies the true dominant scattering mechanism as having greater support from the data in five cases; the remaining case is indecisive. The approach is also applied to measured backscatter-strength data where volume scattering is determined as the dominant scattering mechanism. Comparison of inversion results with core data indicates the method yields both a reasonable volume heterogeneity size distribution and a good estimate of the sub-bottom depths at which scatterers occur.

  14. Evaluation of low tidal volume with positive end-expiratory pressure application effects on arterial blood gases during laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Elif Dogan; Kokulu, Serdar; Bal, Ahmet; Ela, Yüksel; Sivaci, Remziye Gül; Yoldas, Murat; Çelik, Fatih; Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut

    2014-07-01

    Pneumoperitoneum (PNP) and patient positions required for laparoscopy can induce pathophysiological changes that complicate anesthetic management during laparoscopic procedures. This study investigated whether low tidal volume and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) application can improve ventilatory and oxygenation parameters during laparoscopic surgery. A total of 60 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery were randomized to either the conventional group (n = 30, tidal volume = 10 mL/kg, rate = 12/minute, PEEP = 0 cm H(2)O) or the low tidal group with PEEP group (n = 30, tidal volume = 6 mL/kg, rate = 18/minute, PEEP = 5 cm H(2)O) at maintenance of anesthesia. Hemodynamic parameters, peak plateau pressure (Pplat) and arterial blood gases results were recorded before and after PNP. There was a significant increase in the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) values after PNP in the conventional group in the reverse Trendelenburg (41.28 mmHg) and Trendelenburg positions (44.80 mmHg;p = 0.001), but there was no difference in the low tidal group at any of the positions (36.46 and 38.56, respectively). We saw that PaO(2) values recorded before PNP were significantly higher than the values recorded 1 hour after PNP in the two groups at all positions. No significant difference was seen in peak inspiratory pressure (Ppeak) at the reverse Trendelenburg position before and after PNP between the groups, but there was a significant increase at the Trendelenburg position in both groups (conventional; 21.67 cm H(2)O, p = 0.041, low tidal; 23.67 cm H(2)O, p = 0.004). However, Pplat values did not change before and after PNP in the two groups at all positions. The application of low tidal volume + PEEP + high respiratory rate during laparoscopic surgeries may be considered to improve good results of arterial blood gases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  16. Application of Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering to the analysis of synthetic dyes found in ballpoint pen inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiman, Irina; Leona, Marco; Lombardi, John R

    2009-07-01

    The applicability of Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) to the analysis of synthetic dyes commonly found in ballpoint inks was investigated in a comparative study. Spectra of 10 dyes were obtained using a dispersive system (633 nm, 785 nm lasers) and a Fourier transform system (1064 nm laser) under different analytical conditions (e.g., powdered pigments, solutions, thin layer chromatography [TLC] spots). While high fluorescence background and poor spectral quality often characterized the normal Raman spectra of the dyes studied, SERS was found to be generally helpful. Additionally, dye standards and a single ballpoint ink were developed on a TLC plate following a typical ink analysis procedure. SERS spectra were successfully collected directly from the TLC plate, thus demonstrating a possible forensic application for the technique.

  17. A scattering model for nano-textured interfaces and its application in opto-electrical simulations of thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jäger, K.; Fischer, M.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a scattering model based on the scalar scattering theory that allows estimating far field scattering properties in both transmission and reflection for nano-textured interfaces. We first discuss the theoretical formulation of the scattering model and validate it for nano-textures with dif

  18. Multiple scattering polarization – Application of Chandrasekhar’s formalisms to the atmosphere of brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sujan Sengupta; Mark S Marley

    2011-07-01

    Chandrasekhar’s formalisms for the transfer of polarized radiation are used to explain the observed dust scattering polarization of brown dwarfs in the optical band. Model polarization profiles for hot and young directly imaged extrasolar planets are presented with specific prediction of the degree of polarization in the infrared. The model invokes Chandrasekhar’s formalism for the rotation-induced oblateness of the objects that gives rise to the necessary asymmetry for yielding net non-zero disk integrated linear polarization. The observed optical polarization constrains the surface gravity and could be a tool to estimate the mass of extrasolar planets.

  19. Weak hyperon-nucleon interaction in a quark model and application to the pn {yields} {lambda}p scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Takashi; Sasaki, Kenji; Oka, Makoto [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Takeuchi, Sachiko [Japan College of Social Work, Kiyose, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    The weak {lambda}N {r_reversible} NN (and {sigma}N {r_reversible} NN) transition is studied, in which the quark substructure of the baryons are taken into account. The short-range part of the transition potential is induced by the direct quark (DQ) mechanism, while the long-range part is described by the meson ({pi} and K) exchanges. The transition potential is calculated and is applied to the decay of hypernuclei and the weak {lambda} production in the proton-neutron scattering. We show that the short-range DQ transition plays a significant role in these processes. (author)

  20. Study of Hadron Scattering Using an Asymmetric Box

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Li, X; Meng, G Z; Feng, X; Gong, M; He, S; Chen, Y; Li, G; Liu, Y B; Meng, X F; Ma, J P; Zhang, J B

    2007-01-01

    We propose to study hadron-hadron scattering using lattice QCD in an asymmetric box which allows one to access more non-degenerate low-momentum modes for a given volume. The conventional L\\"{u}scher's formula applicable in a symmetric box is modified accordingly. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, pion-pion elastic scattering phase shifts in the I=2, J=0 channel are calculated within quenched approximation using improved gauge and Wilson fermion actions on anisotropic lattices in an asymmetric box. After the chiral and continuum extrapolation, we find that our quenched results for the scattering phase shifts in this channel are consistent with the experimental data when the three-momentum of the pion is below 300MeV. Agreement is also found when compared with previous theoretical results from lattice and other means. Moreover, with the usage of asymmetric volume, we are able to compute the scattering phases in the low-momentum range (pion three momentum less than about 350MeV in the center of mas...

  1. Application of the control volume mixed finite element method to a triangular discretization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional control volume mixed finite element method is applied to the elliptic equation. Discretization of the computational domain is based in triangular elements. Shape functions and test functions are formulated on the basis of an equilateral reference triangle with unit edges. A pressure support based on the linear interpolation of elemental edge pressures is used in this formulation. Comparisons are made between results from the standard mixed finite element method and this control volume mixed finite element method. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. ?? 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Deduction of plastic work rate per unit volume for unified yield criterion and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO De-wen; LI Jing; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2009-01-01

    A unified linear expression of plastic work rate per unit volume is deduced from the unified linear yield criterion and the associated flow rule. The expression is suitable for various linear yield loci in the error triangle between Tresca's and twin shear stress yield loci on the π-plane. It exhibits generalization in which the different value of criterion parameter b corresponds to a specific linear formula of plastic work rate per unit volume. Finally, with the unified linear expression of plastic work rate and upper-bound parallel velocity field the strip forging without bulge is successfully analyzed and an analytical result is also obtained. The comparison with traditional solutions shows that when b=1/(1+(√3)) the result is the same as the upper bound result by Mises' yield criterion, and it also is identical to that by slab method with m=1, σ0=0.

  3. Statistics of α-μ Random Variables and Their Applications inWireless Multihop Relaying and Multiple Scattering Channels

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Kezhi

    2015-06-01

    Exact results for the probability density function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the sum of ratios of products (SRP) and the sum of products (SP) of independent α-μ random variables (RVs) are derived. They are in the form of 1-D integral based on the existing works on the products and ratios of α-μ RVs. In the derivation, generalized Gamma (GG) ratio approximation (GGRA) is proposed to approximate SRP. Gamma ratio approximation (GRA) is proposed to approximate SRP and the ratio of sums of products (RSP). GG approximation (GGA) and Gamma approximation (GA) are used to approximate SP. The proposed results of the SRP can be used to calculate the outage probability (OP) for wireless multihop relaying systems or multiple scattering channels with interference. The proposed results of the SP can be used to calculate the OP for these systems without interference. In addition, the proposed approximate result of the RSP can be used to calculate the OP of the signal-To-interference ratio (SIR) in a multiple scattering system with interference. © 1967-2012 IEEE.

  4. Experiences with the application of the ADIC automatic differentiation tool for to the CSCMDO 3-D volume grid generation code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischof, C.H.; Mauer, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Division; Jones, W.T. [Computer Sciences Corp., Hampton, VA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is a methodology for developing reliable sensitivity-enhanced versions of arbitrary computer programs with little human effort. It can vastly accelerate the use of advanced simulation codes in multidisciplinary design optimization, since the time for generating and verifying derivative codes is greatly reduced. In this paper, we report on the application of the recently developed ADIC automatic differentiation tool for ANSI C programs to the CSCMDO multiblock three-dimensional volume grid generator. The ADIC-generated code can easily be interfaced with Fortran derivative codes generated with the ADIFOR AD tool FORTRAN 77 programs, thus providing efficient sensitivity-enhancement techniques for multilanguage, multidiscipline problems.

  5. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

  6. Analytical challenges of determining composition and structure in small volumes with applications to semiconductor technology, nanostructures and solid state science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Kuhn, Markus; Johnson, David C.

    2017-03-01

    Determining the structure and composition of small volumes is vital to the ability to understand and control nanoscale properties and critical for advancing both fundamental science and applications, such as semiconductor device manufacturing. While metrology of nanoscale materials (nanoparticles, nanocomposites) and nanoscale semiconductor structures is challenging, both basic research and cutting edge technology benefit from new and enhanced analytical techniques. This focus issue contains articles describing approaches to overcome the challenges in obtaining statistically significant atomic-scale quantification of structure and composition in a variety of materials and devices using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

  7. Volume and Mass Estimation of Three-Phase High Power Transformers for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft historically have had sub-1kW(sub e), electrical requirements for GN&C, science, and communications: Galileo at 600W(sub e), and Cassini at 900W(sub e), for example. Because most missions have had the same order of magnitude power requirements, the Power Distribution Systems (PDS) use existing, space-qualified technology and are DC. As science payload and mission duration requirements increase, however, the required electrical power increases. Subsequently, this requires a change from a passive energy conversion (solar arrays and batteries) to dynamic (alternator, solar dynamic, etc.), because dynamic conversion has higher thermal and conversion efficiencies, has higher power densities, and scales more readily to higher power levels. Furthermore, increased power requirements and physical distribution lengths are best served with high-voltage, multi-phase AC to maintain distribution efficiency and minimize voltage drops. The generated AC-voltage must be stepped-up (or down) to interface with various subsystems or electrical hardware. Part of the trade-space design for AC distribution systems is volume and mass estimation of high-power transformers. The volume and mass are functions of the power rating, operating frequency, the ambient and allowable temperature rise, the types and amount of heat transfer available, the core material and shape, the required flux density in a core, the maximum current density, etc. McLyman has tabulated the performance of a number of transformers cores and derived a "cookbook" methodology to determine the volume of transformers, whereas Schawrze had derived an empirical method to estimate the mass of single-phase transformers. Based on the work of McLyman and Schwarze, it is the intent herein to derive an empirical solution to the volume and mass estimation of three-phase, laminated EI-core power transformers, having radiated and conducted heat transfer mechanisms available. Estimation of the mounting hardware, connectors

  8. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 2: Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumfield, J.O.; Schiffman, Y.M.

    1982-01-01

    Subject areas related to the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information systems for application in energy resource management are covered. The current trends and advances in the application of these systems to a number of energy concerns are addressed. For individual titles, see N83-26177 through N83-26200.

  9. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 2: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, J. O. (Editor); Schiffman, Y. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Subject areas related to the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information systems for application in energy resource management are covered. The current trends and advances in the application of these systems to a number of energy concerns are addressed.

  10. Real-time bladder volume monitoring by the application of a new implantable bladder volume sensor for a small animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sup Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although real-time monitoring of bladder volume together with intravesical pressure can provide more information for understanding the functional changes of the urinary bladder, it still entails difficulties in the accurate prediction of real-time bladder volume in urodynamic studies with small animal models. We studied a new implantable bladder volume monitoring device with eight rats. During cystometry, microelectrodes prepared by the microelectromechanical systems process were placed symmetrically on both lateral walls of the bladder, and the expanded bladder volume was calculated. Immunohistological study was done after 1 week and after 4 weeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of the microelectrode. From the point that infused saline volume into the bladder was higher than 0.6 mL, estimated bladder volume was statistically correlated with the volume of saline injected (p<0.01. Additionally, the microelectromechanical system microelectrodes used in this study showed reliable biocompatibility. Therefore, the device can be used to evaluate changes in bladder volume in studies with small animals, and it may help to provide more information about functional changes in the bladder in laboratory studies. Furthermore, owing to its biocompatibility, the device could be chronically implanted in conscious ambulating animals, thus allowing a novel longitudinal study to be performed for a specific purpose.

  11. Fast radiative transfer models for retrieval of cloud properties in the back-scattering region: application to DSCOVR-EPIC sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Garcia, Victor; Sasi, Sruthy; Efremenko, Dmitry; Doicu, Adrian; Loyola, Diego

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the requirements for the retrieval of cloud properties in the back-scattering region are described, and their application to the measurements taken by the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is shown. Various radiative transfer models and their linearizations are implemented, and their advantages and issues are analyzed. As radiative transfer calculations in the back-scattering region are computationally time-consuming, several acceleration techniques are also studied. The radiative transfer models analyzed include the exact Discrete Ordinate method with Matrix Exponential (DOME), the Matrix Operator method with Matrix Exponential (MOME), and the approximate asymptotic and equivalent Lambertian cloud models. To reduce the computational cost of the line-by-line (LBL) calculations, the k-distribution method, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a combination of the k-distribution method plus PCA are used. The linearized radiative transfer models for retrieval of cloud properties include the Linearized Discrete Ordinate method with Matrix Exponential (LDOME), the Linearized Matrix Operator method with Matrix Exponential (LMOME) and the Forward-Adjoint Discrete Ordinate method with Matrix Exponential (FADOME). These models were applied to the EPIC oxygen-A band absorption channel at 764 nm. It is shown that the approximate asymptotic and equivalent Lambertian cloud models give inaccurate results, so an offline processor for the retrieval of cloud properties in the back-scattering region requires the use of exact models such as DOME and MOME, which behave similarly. The combination of the k-distribution method plus PCA presents similar accuracy to the LBL calculations, but it is up to 360 times faster, and the relative errors for the computed radiances are less than 1.5% compared to the results when the exact phase function is used. Finally, the linearized models studied show similar behavior

  12. Integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) study. Volume 1: Feasibility studies. [application of flywheels for power storage and generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notti, J. E.; Cormack, A., III; Schmill, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    An Integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) concept consisting of an array of spinning flywheels, with or without gimbals, capable of performing the dual function of power storage and generation, as well as attitude control has been investigated. This system provides attitude control through momentum storage, and replaces the storage batteries onboard the spacecraft. The results of the investigation are presented in two volumes. The trade-off studies performed to establish the feasibility, cost effectiveness, required level of development, and boundaries of application of IPACS to a wide variety of spacecraft are discussed. The conceptual designs for a free-flying research application module (RAM), and for a tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) are presented. Results from dynamic analyses and simulations of the IPACS conceptual designs are included.

  13. A Study on the Evaluation of Field Application of High-Fluidity Concrete Containing High Volume Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent concrete industry, high-fluidity concrete is being widely used for the pouring of dense reinforced concrete. Normally, in the case of high-fluidity concrete, it includes high binder contents, so it is necessary to replace part of the cement through admixtures such as fly ash to procure economic feasibility and durability. This study shows the mechanical properties and field applicability of high-fluidity concrete using mass of fly ash as alternative materials of cement. The high-fluidity concrete mixed with 50% fly ash was measured to manufacture concrete that applies low water/binder ratio to measure the mechanical characteristics as compressive strength and elastic modulus. Also, in order to evaluate the field applicability, high-fluidity concrete containing high volume fly ash was evaluated for fluidity, compressive strength, heat of hydration, and drying shrinkage of concrete.

  14. Resonance Rayleigh Scattering Spectra of Thorium(Ⅳ)-bisazo Dye of Chromotropic Acid-protein Systems and Their Analytical Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN,Li; LIU,Shao-Pu; YANG,Da-Cheng; LUO,Hong-Qun

    2003-01-01

    In acidic medium, thorium (Ⅳ) can react with a bisazo dye ofchromotropic acids such as arsenazo Ⅲ (AA Ⅲ), arsenazo M (AAM), chlorophosphonazo Ⅲ (CPA Ⅲ) and chlorosulphonphenol S (CSP S) to form an anionic chelate which further interacts with some proteins to produce a complex. This results in a significant enhancement of intensity of the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and the appearance of a new RRS spectrum. There are a few obvious RRS peaks in the range of 400-470 nm and the most intensive peak of them is lorated at 470 nm. The intensity of RRS is directly proportional to the concentration of protein in the range of tively. This new RRS method has high sensitivity and fairly good selectivity and can be applied to the direct determinstion of proteins in human serum with satisfactory results.

  15. Gold Nanoparticles With Special Shapes: Controlled Synthesis, Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering, and The Application in Biodetection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghong Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Specially shaped gold nanoparticles have intrigued considerable attention becausethey usually possess high-sensitivity surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and thusresult in large advantages in trace biodetermination. In this article, starch-capped goldnanoparticles with hexagon and boot shapes were prepared through using a nontoxic andbiologically benign aqueous-phase synthetic route. Shape effects of gold nanoparticles onSERS properties were mainly investigated, and found that different-shaped goldnanoparticles possess different SERS properties. Especially, the boot-shaped nanoparticlescould induce more 100-fold SERS enhancements in sensitivity as compared with those fromgold nanospheres. The extremely strong SERS properties of gold nanoboots have beensuccessfully applied to the detection of avidin. The unique nanoboots with high-sensitivitySERS properties are also expected to find use in many other fields such as biolabel,bioassay, biodiagnosis, and even clinical diagnosis and therapy.

  16. The application of hollow box TiO2 as scattering centers in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiong; Li, Xin; Zhu, Menghua

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the hollow box TiO2 (BTiO2) with highly exposed (001) surface was synthesized through solid state precursor and various mixing ratio of BTiO2 film based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated. The photoelectric conversion efficiency of solar cell with the content of 20 wt% BTiO2 could reach 6.1%, which greatly improves the photovoltaic performance by 101% compared with pure P25 film based photoanode (3.04%). This result may attribute to the enhanced light scattering capability and the prolonged electron lifetime with the increasing mixing ratio. Furthermore, the optical composite film structure can result in the faster electron transportation, great charge collection efficiency. This work shows a new photoelectrode design for enhanced energy conversion of DSSCs.

  17. Volume of visual field assessed with kinetic perimetry and its application to static perimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoforidis JB

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available John B ChristoforidisCollege of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to quantify the volume of the kinetic visual field with a single unit that accounts for visual field area and differential luminance sensitivity.Methods: Kinetic visual field perimetry was performed with a Goldmann perimeter using I4e, I3e, I2e, and I1e targets. The visual fields of 25 normal volunteers (17 women, eight men of mean age 33.9 ± 10.1 (range 17–64 years were obtained and digitized. Isopter areas were measured with a method devised to correct cartographic distortion due to polar projection inherent in perimetry and are expressed in steradians. The third dimension of each isopter represents sensitivity to target luminance and was calculated as log (target luminance-1. If luminance is expressed in cd/m2, the values for the third dimension are 0.5 for I4e, 1.0 for I3e, 1.5 for I2e, and 2.0 for I1e. The resulting unit is a steradian (log 103 (cd/m2-1 which is referred to as a Goldmann. In addition, the visual fields of four patients with representative visual defect patterns were examined and compared with normal subjects.Results: Mean isopter areas for normal subjects were 3.092 ± 0.242 steradians for I4e, 2.349 ± 0.280 steradians for I3e, 1.242 ± 0.263 steradians for I2e, and 0.251 ± 0.114 steradians for the I1e target. Isopter volumes were 1.546 ± 0.121 Goldmanns for the I4e target, 1.174 ± 0.140 Goldmanns for I3e, 0.621 ± 0.131 Goldmanns for I2e, and 0.126 ± 0.057 Goldmanns for I1e. The total mean visual field volume in our study for the I target was 3.467 ± 0.371 Goldmanns.Conclusion: The volume of the island of vision may be used to quantify a visual field with a single value which contains information about both visual field extension and differential luminance sensitivity. This technique may be used to assess the progression or stability of visual field defects over time. A similar method may

  18. ON THE FINITE VOLUME ELEMENT VERSION OF RITZ-VOLTERRA PROJECTION AND APPLICATIONS TO RELATED EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie Zhang; Yan-ping Lin; Robert J.Tait

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present a general error analysis framework for the finite volume element (FVE) approximation to the Ritz-Volterra projection, the Sobolev equations and parabolic integro-differential equations. The main idea in our paper is to consider the FVE methods as perturbations of standard finite element methods which enables us to derive the optimal L2 and H1 norm error estimates, and the L∞ and W1∞ norm error estimates by means of the time dependent Green functions. Our disc ussions also include elliptic and parabolic problems as the special cases.

  19. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehndiratta, Amit [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Keble College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Indian Institute of Technology Delhi and All India Institute of Medical Science, Centre for Biomedical Engineering, New Delhi (India); Rabinov, James D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grasruck, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Liao, Eric C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Center for Regenerative Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Crandell, David [Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm{sup 3}. Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  20. DNA-assisted decoration of single-walled carbon nanotubes with gold nanoparticles for applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Elena-Laura; Doroftei, Florica; Peptanariu, Dragos; Pinteala, Mariana; Rotaru, Alexandru

    2017-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are 1D nanostructures with distinct physical and chemical properties that have shown great promise for applications in many fields, including biomedicine. Since for biomedical application the water solubility is crucial and SWNTs have low solubility, various methods (including polymer and biopolymer wrapping, chemical modifications) have been developed to solubilize and disperse them in water. Due to their unique optical properties such as photoluminescence in the NIR and strong resonant Raman signatures, they can be used as nanoprobes in biomedical imaging and phototherapies. Furthermore, decoration of SWNTs with noble metal nanoparticles will induce an excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect of the nanoparticles-SWNTs composites, with applications in cell imaging. Herein, we present a new and facile strategy for the DNA-assisted decoration of SWNTs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and their application in SERS imaging. By ultrasonication at room temperature of SWNTs with AuNPs functionalized with synthetic DNA, SWNT-AuNPs nanocomposites with enhanced Raman signal were obtained. Among the important advantages of the proposed method are the presence of the free DNA overhangs around the SWNT-AuNPs suitable for post-synthetic modification of nanocomposite through hybridization of complementary DNA strands containing molecules of interest attached by well-developed bio-conjugation chemistry.

  1. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 4B: Descriptions of data sets from meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Carolyn; Stonesifer, G. Richard

    1989-01-01

    The main purpose of the data catalog series is to provide descriptive references to data generated by space science flight missions. The data sets described include all of the actual holdings of the Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), all data sets for which direct contact information is available, and some data collections held and serviced by foreign investigators, NASA and other U.S. government agencies. This volume contains narrative descriptions of data sets from meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations. The following spacecraft series are included: Mariner, Pioneer, Pioneer Venus, Venera, Viking, Voyager, and Helios. Separate indexes to the planetary and interplanetary missions are also provided.

  2. Data catalog series for space science and applications flight missions. Volume 4A: Descriptions of meteorological and terrestrial applications spacecraft and investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. Y. (Editor); Sheu, Y. T. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) provides data from and information about space science and applications flight investigations in support of additional studies beyond those performed as the principal part of any flight mission. The Earth-orbiting spacecraft for investigations of the earth and its atmosphere is discussed. Geodetic tracking data are included in this category. The principal subject areas presented are meteorology and earth resources survey, and the spacecraft selection is made according to those subjects. All experiments on board the spacecraft are described. No attempt is made to reference investigations that are related to the above disciplines, but that are described in other volumes of this series.

  3. Photovoltaic system criteria documents. Volume 3: Environmental issues and evaluation criteria for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, John C.; Billitti, Joseph W.; Tallon, John M.

    1979-01-01

    The environmental issues and evaluation criteria relating to the suitability of sites proposed for photovoltaic (PV) system deployment are identified. The important issues are defined, briefly discussed and then developed into evaluation criteria. System designers are provided with information on the environmental sensitivity of PV systems in realistic applications, background material which indicates the applicability of the siting issues identified, and evaluation criteria are defined to facilitate the selection of sites that maximize PV system operation.

  4. Diffusion on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume: Application to cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Choi, Yung-Sze; Resasco, Diana; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2007-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for solving a diffusion equation on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume, a problem often arising in cell biology. It applies to pixilated surfaces obtained from experimental images and performs at low computational cost. In the method, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is approximated locally by the Laplacian on the tangential plane and then a finite volume discretization scheme based on a Voronoi decomposition is applied. Convergence studies show that mass conservation built in the discretization scheme and cancellation of sampling error ensure convergence of the solution in space with an order between 1 and 2. The method is applied to a cell-biological problem where a signaling molecule, G-protein Rac, cycles between the cytoplasm and cell membrane thus coupling its diffusion in the membrane to that in the cell interior. Simulations on realistic cell geometry are performed to validate, and determine the accuracy of, a recently proposed simplified quantitative analysis of fluorescence loss in photobleaching. The method is implemented within the Virtual Cell computational framework freely accessible at http://www.vcell.org.

  5. Optimization of multi-grating volume holographic spectrum splitters for photovoltaic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, G B; Leger, J R

    2016-07-10

    Recent research has shown that using multiple diverse-bandgap photovoltaic (PV) cells in conjunction with a spectrum splitting optical system can significantly improve PV power generation efficiency. Although volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) can serve as effective spectrum splitters, the inherent dispersion of a VBG can be detrimental given a broad-spectrum input. The performance of a single holographic spectrum splitter element can be improved by utilizing multiple single volume gratings, each operating in a slightly different spectral band. However, care must be taken to avoid inter-grating coupling effects that limit the ultimate performance. This work explores broadband two-grating holographic optical elements (HOEs) in multiplexed (single element) and sandwiched-grating arrangements. Particle swarm optimization is used to tailor these systems to the solar spectrum, taking into account both efficiency and dispersion. Both multiplexed and sandwiched two-grating systems exhibit performance improvements over single-grating solutions, especially when reduced dispersion is required. Under a ±2° constraint on output angular spread from wavelength dispersion, sandwiched-, multiplexed-, and single-grating systems exhibit power conversion efficiencies of 82.1%, 80.9%, and 77.5%, respectively, compared to an ideal bandpass spectrum splitter. Dispersion performance can be further improved by employing more than two VBGs in the spectrum splitter, but efficiency is compromised by additional cross-coupling effects. Multiplexed-grating systems are especially susceptible to these effects, but have the advantage of utilizing only a single HOE.

  6. Comparison between experimental and computational methods for scattering anisotropy coefficient determination in dental-resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Carrasco, Irene M.; Ghinea, Razvan; Pérez, María M.; Rubiño, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of light propagation in biological materials is essential for biomedical engineering and its applications. Among the key optical properties of biological media is the angular distribution of the scattered light, characterized by the average cosine of the scattering angle, called the scattering anisotropy coefficient (g). The value of g can be determined by experimentally irradiating the material with a laser beam and making angular-scattering measurements in a goniometer. In this work, an experimental technique was used to determine g by means of goniometric measurements of the laser light scattered off two different dental-resin composites (classified as nano and hybrid). To assess the accuracy of the experimental method, a Mie theory-based computational model was used. Independent measurements were used to determine some of the required input parameters for computation of the theoretical model. The g values estimated with the computational method (nano-filled: 0.9399; hybrid: 0.8975) and the values calculated with the experimental method presented (nano-filled: 0.98297 +/- 0.00021; hybrid: 0.95429 +/- 0.00014) agreed well for both dental resins, with slightly higher experimental values. The higher experimental values may indicate that the scattering particle causes more narrow-angle scattering than does a perfect sphere of equal volume, assuming that with more spherical scattering particles the scattering anisotropy coefficient increases. Since g represents the angular distribution of the scattered light, values provided by both the experimental and the computational methods show a strongly forward-directed scattering in the dental resins studied, more pronounced in the nano-filled composite than in the hybrid composite.

  7. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 2, Topic reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over the period of 5-20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This study was conducted by an 11-member panel of experts from industry and academia, including one each from Japan and Europe. This volume first presents an in-depth overview of the role of catalysis in future energy technology in chapter 1; then current catalytic research is critically reviewed and research recommended in 8 topic chapters: catalyst preparation (design and synthesis), catalyst characterization (structure/function), catalyst performance testing, reaction kinetics/reactor design, catalysis for industrial chemicals, catalysis for electrical applications (clean fuels, pollution remediation), catalysis for control of exhaust emissions, and catalysts for liquid transportation fuels from petroleum, coal, residual oil, and biomass.

  8. Study of the interaction of salmon sperm DNA with myricitrin-CPB based on the enhanced resonance light scattering signal and its potential application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuyun; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Yu; Pang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    A new assay of salmon sperm DNA at nanogram level was established based on enhanced resonance light scattering (RLS) signals of DNA with myricitrin and cetylpyridinium bromide dihydrate (CPB). The RLS spectral characteristics of DNA with myricitrin-CPB and the optimum conditions for determination of DNA samples have been studied. At pH 7.4, myricitrin-CPB could enhance the intensity of RLS signal of DNA at 468 nm. The enhanced RLS intensity was directly proportional to DNA concentration in the range of 0.076-4.2 μg mL(-1) with a good linear relationship (r=0.9944). The detection limit was 4.1 ng mL(-1). The synthetic samples were analyzed with satisfactory results that the recovery was 100.9-102.6% and RSD was 1.4-2.1%, which proved that the new method was reliable and applicable.

  9. Industrial applications study. Volume V. Bibliography of relevant literature. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence W.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1976-12-01

    This five-volume report represents an initial Phase O evaluation of waste heat recovery and utilization potential in the manufacturing portion of the industrial sector. The scope of this initial phase was limited to the two-digit SIC level and addressed the feasibility of obtaining in-depth energy information in the industrial sector. Within this phase, a successful methodology and approaches for data gathering and assessment are established. Using these approaches, energy use and waste heat profiles were developed at the 2-digit level; with this data, waste heat utilization technologies were evaluated. The first section of the bibliography lists extensive citations for all industries. The next section is composed of an extensive literature search with abstracts for industrial energy conservation. EPA publications on specific industries and general references conclude the publication. (MCW)

  10. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topala, I., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Iasi Plasma Advanced Research Center (IPARC), Bd. Carol I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Nagatsu, M., E-mail: ionut.topala@uaic.ro, E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan)

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  11. Feedback linearization based control of a variable air volume air conditioning system for cooling applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thosar, Archana; Patra, Amit; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2008-07-01

    Design of a nonlinear control system for a Variable Air Volume Air Conditioning (VAVAC) plant through feedback linearization is presented in this article. VAVAC systems attempt to reduce building energy consumption while maintaining the primary role of air conditioning. The temperature of the space is maintained at a constant level by establishing a balance between the cooling load generated in the space and the air supply delivered to meet the load. The dynamic model of a VAVAC plant is derived and formulated as a MIMO bilinear system. Feedback linearization is applied for decoupling and linearization of the nonlinear model. Simulation results for a laboratory scale plant are presented to demonstrate the potential of keeping comfort and maintaining energy optimal performance by this methodology. Results obtained with a conventional PI controller and a feedback linearizing controller are compared and the superiority of the proposed approach is clearly established.

  12. Multiagent Systems and Applications Volume 2 Development Using the GORITE BDI Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, Dennis; Ronnquist, Ralph; Jain, Lakhmi C

    2013-01-01

    Since its conception almost 30 years ago, the BDI (Belief Desire Intention) model of agency has become established, along with Soar, as the approach of choice for practitioners in the development of knowledge intensive agent applications. However, in developing BDI agent applications for over 15 years, the authors of this book have observed a disconnect between what the BDI model provides and what is actually required of an agent model in order to build practical systems. The GORITE BDI framework was  developed to address this gap and this book is written for students, researchers and practitioners who wish to gain a practical understanding of how GORITE is used to develop BDI agent applications. In this regard, a feature of the book is the use of complete, annotated examples. As GORITE is a Java framework,  a familiarity with Java (or a similar language) is assumed, but no prior knowledge of the BDI model is required.

  13. Non-ideal axicon-generated Bessel beam application for intra-volume glass modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudutis, Juozas; GeČys, Paulius; RaČiukaitis, Gediminas

    2016-12-12

    The extended focal depth of Bessel beams is a very attracting property for glass cutting applications. However, Bessel beam generation with a non-ideal conical lens induces beam pattern distortions. We present our novel results on bulk modifications of soda-lime glass using a non-ideal axicon-generated Bessel beam. Modelling of the Bessel beam pattern and experimental measurements indicated ellipticity of the central core diameter. That resulted in the formation of cracks in a transverse direction inside the bulk of glass. Furthermore, we demonstrate the possibility to control the transverse crack propagation direction, which is crucial in the case of glass cutting applications.

  14. Application of rock mechanics to cut-and-fill mining. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-15

    The conference on application of rock mechanics to cut-and-fill mining was held June 1-3, 1980, at the University of Luleaa, Luleaa, Sweden. Basic rock mechanics investigations of interest involving improving the support characteristics of backfilling by adding cement, compacting, and water removal have been entered individually into EDB. The papers also cover measurements of the support capability of such fills and the application of deformation measurements and calculations using finite element computer codes to the mining of particular ore bodies, including changes in the calculations as the mining progressed. (LTN)

  15. Resonance Rayleigh scattering spectral characteristics of interaction of nucleic acids with some cationic surfactantsand their analytical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Shaopu(刘绍璞); HU; Xiaoli(胡小莉); LUO; Hongqun(罗红群); FAN; Li(范莉)

    2002-01-01

    In near neutral medium, the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensities of an alone cationic surfactant and nucleic acid are very weak. However, when they combine with each other to form a complex, the RRS intensity of the solution is enhanced greatly. In this paper the reactions of five cationic surfactants with nucleic acids have been studied. The results show that the reaction conditions and RRS spectral characteristics of these reactions are similar, but their sensitivities are obviously different. Among them, the sensitivity of cetyldimethyl benzylammonium chloride (CDBAC) with an aryl and large molecular weight is the highest, while that of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) without aryl and with small molecular weight is the lowest. The detection limits for ctDNA and yRNA of the former are 6.6 and 29.4 ng@mL?1, while that of the latter are 13.3 and 53.6 ng@mL?1. The method has better selectivity and can be applied to the determination of trace amounts of nucleic acids. Furthermore, it is discovered in the investigation that not only the RRS intensity is related to the structure and molecular weight of the cationic surfactants, but also the change of the RRS intensity is closely related to the conformational change of nucleic acid. Therefore, the RRS method can be expanded to become a useful way to study the nucleic acid conformation.

  16. Identification of acoustic waves in ZnO materials by Brillouin light scattering for SAW device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerdali, M.; Bechiri, F.; Hamzaoui, S.; Teherani, F. H.; Rogers, D. J.; Sandana, V. E.; Bove, P.; Djemia, P.; Roussigné, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) was conducted on melt-grown ZnO bulk crystals and ZnO thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The bulk ZnO crystals presented both longitudinal and transverse bulk acoustic waves. Theoretical calculations agreed well with there being one piezoelectric longitudinal branch and two transverse branches. BLS measurements conducted on ZnO thin films also revealed Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (R-SAW) guided by only the surface of the layer and Sezawa modes, guided by the film thickness. Measurements were conducted for three incidence angles in order to investigate different SAW wave numbers. Higher frequency features were identified as being related to a new class of guided longitudinal (LG) SAW modes which are not usually detected for ZnO thin films. The LG-SAW modes were observed for two incidence angles (θ=45° and 55°) corresponding to frequencies of 17.88 and 20.75 GHz, respectively. BLS measurements enable us to estimate the LG-SAW velocity as 6500 m/s. This value is three times higher than that of the currently used R-SAW. Theoretical simulations were coherent with the presence of LG modes in the ZnO layers. Such LG-SAW modes are promising for the development of novel, higher-speed SAW devices operating in the GHz-band and which could be readily incorporated in Si-based integrated circuitry.

  17. The resonance Rayleigh scattering of the interaction of copper(Ⅱ)-bleomycinA2 with DNA and its analytical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The forming of bleomycinA2-Cu(Ⅱ) cationic chelate and the interaction of the chelate with DNA have been investigated by using resonance Rayleigh scattering(RRS),molecular absorption and fluorescence spectra.The result shows that in aqueous solution,bleomycinA2(BLMA2) can react with Cu(Ⅱ) to form 1:1 cationic chelate which contributes to the changes of the absorption spectra and the quenched fluorescence of BLMA2.When the cationic chelate further bound with DNA to form ternary ion-association complexes,the remarkable enhancement of the RRS intensity was observed.In this work,the optimum conditions for the coordination reaction of BLMA2 with Cu(Ⅱ) and some influencing factors have been investigated.The reaction mechanism of BLMA2-Cu(Ⅱ) binding with DNA was suggested and a binding model was proposed.In addition,the fluorescence quenching type of BLMA2 was investigated.A highly sensitive,simple and rapid new method for the determination of DNA by using BLMA2-Cu(Ⅱ) as RRS probe has been developed.The detection limits(3σ) are 7.2 ng/mL for ctDNA,7.1 ng/mL for sDNA and 18 ng/mL for hsDNA.The method can be applied to the determination of trace amounts of DNA.

  18. Silver nanocrystals of various morphologies deposited on silicon wafer and their applications in ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Limiao, E-mail: chenlimiao@csu.edu.cn; Jing, Qifeng; Chen, Jun; Wang, Bodong; Huang, Jianhan; Liu, Younian

    2013-11-15

    Silver nanostructures with dendritic, flower-like and irregular morphologies were controllably deposited on a silicon substrate in an aqueous hydrogen fluoride solution at room temperature. The morphology of the Ag nanostructures changed from dendritic to urchin-like, flowerlike and pinecone-like with increasing the concentration of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (MW = 55,000) from 2 to 10 mM. The Ag nanostructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray diffraction. Through a series of time-dependent morphological evolution studies, the growth processes of Ag nanostructures have been systematically investigated and the corresponding growth mechanisms have been discussed. In addition, the morphology-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering of as-synthesized Ag nanostructures were investigated. The results indicated that flower-like Ag nanostructure had the highest activity than the other Ag nanostructures for Rhodamine 6G probe molecules. Highlights: • A simple method was developed to prepare dendritic and flower-like Ag nanostructures. • The flower-like Ag nanoparticles exhibit highest SERS activity. • The SERS substrate based on flower-like Ag particles can be used to detect melamine.

  19. Noble metal coated single-walled carbon nanotubes for applications in surface enhanced Raman scattering imaging and photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojing; Wang, Chao; Cheng, Liang; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Liu, Zhuang

    2012-05-02

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with various unique optical properties are interesting nanoprobes widely explored in biomedical imaging and phototherapies. Herein, DNA-functionalized SWNTs are modified with noble metal (Ag or Au) nanoparticles via an in situ solution phase synthesis method comprised of seed attachment, seeded growth, and surface modification with polyethylene glycol (PEG), yielding SWNT-Ag-PEG and SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposites stable in physiological environments. With gold or silver nanoparticles decorated on the surface, the SWNT-metal nanocomposites gain an excellent concentration and excitation-source dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Using a near-infrared (NIR) laser as the excitation source, targeted Raman imaging of cancer cells labeled with folic acid (FA) conjugated SWNT-Au nanocomposite (SWNT-Au-PEG-FA) is realized, with images acquired in significantly shortened periods of time as compared to that of using nonenhanced SWNT Raman probes. Owing to the strong surface plasmon resonance absorption contributed by the gold shell, the SWNTs-Au-PEG-FA nanocomposite also offers remarkably improved photothermal cancer cell killing efficacy. This work presents a facile approach to synthesize water-soluble noble metal coated SWNTs with a strong SERS effect suitable for labeling and fast Raman spectroscopic imaging of biological samples, which has been rarely realized before. The SWNT-Au-PEG nanocomposite developed here may thus be an interesting optical theranostic probe for cancer imaging and therapy.

  20. Resonance light scattering spectroscopy study of interaction between norfloxacin and calf thymus DNA and its analytical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Zhang, Taiyu; Han, Yali; Zhu, Li

    2006-11-01

    The interaction between norfloxacin and calf thymus double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) has been studied by a resonance light scattering (RLS) technique with a common spectrofluorometer. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors and optimum conditions of the reaction have been investigated. In Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer (pH 5.87), norfloxacin has a maximum peak 405.5 nm and the RLS intensity is remarkably enhanced by trace amount of calf thymus dsDNA due to the interaction between norfloxacin and dsDNA. The binding of norfloxacin to DNA forms large particles, which were characterized by RLS spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum, and fluorescence spectrum. Based on the enhanced RLS intensity, a novel method for sensitive determination of calf thymus dsDNA concentration ranging from 0.02 to 2.3 μg ml -1 was developed. The determination limit (3 σ) was 1.2 ng ml -1. The method is simple, rapid, practical and relatively free from interference generated by coexisting substance, as well as much more sensitive than most of the reported methods. Three synthetic samples of ctDNA were determined with satisfactory results.

  1. Pair potentials for warm dense matter and their application to x-ray Thomson scattering in aluminum and beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, L.; Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.; Klug, D. D.; Lewis, L. J.

    2016-11-01

    Ultrafast laser experiments yield increasingly reliable data on warm dense matter, but their interpretation requires theoretical models. We employ an efficient density functional neutral-pseudoatom hypernetted-chain (NPA-HNC) model with accuracy comparable to ab initio simulations and which provides first-principles pseudopotentials and pair potentials for warm-dense matter. It avoids the use of (i) ad hoc core-repulsion models and (ii) "Yukawa screening" and (iii) need not assume ion-electron thermal equilibrium. Computations of the x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS) spectra of aluminum and beryllium are compared with recent experiments and with density-functional-theory molecular-dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations. The NPA-HNC structure factors, compressibilities, phonons, and conductivities agree closely with DFT-MD results, while Yukawa screening gives misleading results. The analysis of the XRTS data for two of the experiments, using two-temperature quasi-equilibrium models, is supported by calculations of their temperature relaxation times.

  2. Time resolved tracking of a sound scatterer in a turbulent flow non-stationary signal analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mordant, N; Pinton, J F

    2001-01-01

    It is known that ultrasound techniques yield non-intrusive measurements of hydrodynamic flows. For example, the study of the echoes produced by a large number of particle insonified by pulsed wavetrains has led to a now standard velocimetry technique. In this paper, we propose to extend the method to the continuous tracking of one single particle embedded in a complex flow. This gives a Lagrangian measurement of the fluid motion, which is of importance in mixing and turbulence studies. The method relies on the ability to resolve in time the Doppler shift of the sound scattered by the continuously insonfied particle. For this signal processing problem two classes of approaches are used: time-frequency analysis and parametric high resolution methods. In the first class we consider the spectrogram and reassigned spectrogram, and we apply it to detect the motion of a small bead settling in a fluid at rest. In more non-stationary turbulent flows where methods in the second class are more robust, we have adapted an...

  3. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  4. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern

  5. Scattering theory. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Harald [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department

    2016-07-01

    This corrected and updated second edition of ''Scattering Theory'' presents a concise and modern coverage of the subject. In the present treatment, special attention is given to the role played by the long-range behaviour of the projectile-target interaction, and a theory is developed, which is well suited to describe near-threshold bound and continuum states in realistic binary systems such as diatomic molecules or molecular ions. It is motivated by the fact that experimental advances have shifted and broadened the scope of applications where concepts from scattering theory are used, e.g. to the field of ultracold atoms and molecules, which has been experiencing enormous growth in recent years, largely triggered by the successful realization of Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute atomic gases in 1995. The book contains sections on special topics such as near-threshold quantization, quantum reflection, Feshbach resonances and the quantum description of scattering in two dimensions. The level of abstraction is kept as low as at all possible and deeper questions related to the mathematical foundations of scattering theory are passed by. It should be understandable for anyone with a basic knowledge of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The book is intended for advanced students and researchers, and it is hoped that it will be useful for theorists and experimentalists alike.

  6. Canola Oil Fuel Cell Demonstration: Volume 3 - Technical, Commercialization, and Application Issues Associated with Harvested Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-17

    Fuels for Fuel Cells.” International Journal of Hydrogen Energy , vol 26, pp. 291-301. Arthur D. Little, Inc. 2001. Conceptual Design of POX / SOFC 5...Compact Plasmatron-Boosted Hydrogen Generation Technology for Vehicular Applications.” International Journal of Hydrogen Energy , No. 24. pp. 341

  7. Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a research and development facility for the demonstration of the permanent isolation of transuranic radioactive wastes in a geologic formation. The facility was constructed in southeastern New Mexico in a manner intended to meet criteria established by the scientific and regulatory community for the safe, long-term disposal of transuranic wastes. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing an application to demonstrate compliance with the requirements outlined in Title 40, Part 191 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) for the permanent disposal of transuranic wastes. As mandated by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act of 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must evaluate this compliance application and provide a determination regarding compliance with the requirements within one year of receiving a complete application. Because the WIPP is a very complex program, the DOE has planned to submit the application as a draft in two parts. This strategy will allow for the DOE and the EPA to begin technical discussions on critical WIPP issues before the one-year compliance determination period begins. This report is the first of these two draft submittals.

  8. Study of airborne science experiment management concepts for application to space shuttle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, D. R.; Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    The management concepts and operating procedures are documented as they apply to the planning of shuttle spacelab operations. Areas discussed include: airborne missions; formulation of missions; management procedures; experimenter involvement; experiment development and performance; data handling; safety procedures; and applications to shuttle spacelab planning. Characteristics of the airborne science experience are listed, and references and figures are included.

  9. Employing a Cerenkov detector for the thickness measurement of X-rays in a scattering background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-Wei; KANG Ke-Jun; WANG Yi; LI Jin; LI Yuan-Jing; ZHANG Qing-Jun

    2010-01-01

    The variation in environmental scattering background is a major source of systematic errors in X-ray inspection and measurement systems.As the energy of these photons consisting of environmental scattering background is much lower generally,the Cerenkov detectors having the detection threshold are likely insensitive to them and able to exclude their influence.A thickness measurement experiment is designed to verify the idea by employing a Cerenkov detector and an ionizing chamber for comparison.Furthermore,it is also found that the application of the Cerenkov detectors is helpful to exclude another systematic error from the variation of low energy components in the spectrum incident on the detector volume.

  10. Superradiant Forward Scattering in Multiple Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Chabe, Julien; Bienaime, Tom; Bachelard, Romain; Piovella, Nicola; Kaiser, Robin

    2012-01-01

    We report on an interference effect in multiple scattering by resonant scatterers resulting in enhanced forward scattering, violating Ohm's law for photons. The underlying mechanism of this wave effect is superradiance, which we have investigated using cold atoms as a toy model. We present numerical and experimental evidences for this superradiant forward scattering, which is robust against disorder and configuration averaging.

  11. Scattering intensity limit value at very small angles

    CERN Document Server

    Ciccariello, Salvino

    2016-01-01

    The existence of the limit of a sample scattering intensity, as the scattering vector approaches zero, requires and is ensured by the property that the mean value of the scattering density fluctuation over volume $V$ asymptotically behaves, at large $V$s, as $\

  12. Radar interferometry persistent scatterer technique

    CERN Document Server

    Kampes, Bert M

    2006-01-01

    Only book on Permanent Scatterer technique of radar interferometryExplains the Permanent Scatterer technique in detail, possible pitfalls, and details a newly developed stochastic model and estimator algorithm to cope with possible problems for the application of the PS techniqueThe use of Permanent Scatterer allows very precise measurements of the displacement of hundreds of points per square kilometerDescribes the only technique currently able to perform displacement measurements in the past, utilizing the ERS satellite data archive using data acquired from 1992-prese

  13. Neutron scattering and hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Ramirez-Cuesta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen has been identified as a fuel of choice for providing clean energy for transport and other applications across the world and the development of materials to store hydrogen efficiently and safely is crucial to this endeavour. Hydrogen has the largest scattering interaction with neutrons of all the elements in the periodic table making neutron scattering ideal for studying hydrogen storage materials. Simultaneous characterisation of the structure and dynamics of these materials during hydrogen uptake is straightforward using neutron scattering techniques. These studies will help us to understand the fundamental properties of hydrogen storage in realistic conditions and hence design new hydrogen storage materials.

  14. Resonance Rayleigh scattering study of the interaction of bleomycinA5 with nucleic acids and its analytical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; JiangTao; LIU; ZhongFang; LIU; ShaoPu

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of bleomycinA5 with nucleic acids has been investigated by using resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS), molecular absorption and fluorescence spectra. The result shows that in near pH 2.2 buffer medium and absence of any metal ions, nucleic acids are capable of binding with bleomycinA5 (BLMA5) to form complexes which can remarkably enhance the RRS intensity and result in bathochromic and hyperchromic molecular absorption of nucleic acids and fluorescence quenching of bleomycinA5. The RRS spectral characteristics for the binding products of bleomycinA5 with various DNA and RNA are similar, and the maximum RRS peaks are at 301 nm for ctDNA and sDNA, 370 nm for hsDNA, 310 nm for RNAtypeVI and RNAtypeIII, respectively. The increments of RRS intensity are greatly different in which DNA enhances greatly and RNA enhances lightly. In this work, the optimum conditions of the interaction and some influencing factors have been investigated. The reaction mechanism and a binding model for the interaction of BLMA5 with the nucleic acids are discussed. In addition, a highly sensitive, simple and rapid new method for the determination of DNA has been developed. The detection limits (3σ) are 5.7 ng/mL for ctDNA, 7.4 ng/mL for sDNA and 9.2 ng/mL for hsDNA, respectively. The method can be applied to determination of trace amounts of DNA.

  15. Effectiveness of indoor ultra-low volume application of Aqua Reslin® Super during an emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez González, José Genaro; Thirion, Jaime; García Orozco, Abel; Rodríguez, Américo D

    2011-06-01

    Indoor ultra-low volume (ULV) applications of Aqua Reslin Super (Permethrin + s-bioallethrin) were carried out using portable Solo Port 423 sprayers in an urban area of Reforma, Chiapas, Mexico. Sprayers were calibrated to discharge a flow rate of 110 ml/min with a dose range of approximately 0.55 to 0.792 mg Al/m3 space. Entomological evaluation, based on 3 cages per house, each containing 15 sugar-fed, 2-4-day-old Aedes aegypti females and placed in hidden locations in 4 randomly selected houses for 15 min, showed 98.8% to 100% mortality. After the spraying, ovitrap data showed no mosquito adults present 4 days after the applications, and only 1 ovitrap out of 60 positive 8 days after the intervention. This evaluation suggests that indoor ULV application can be useful during emergencies after disasters, during dengue outbreaks, or to prevent mosquito population outbreaks before rainy seasons and, therefore, the onset of dengue transmission in Mexican dengue transmission risk areas.

  16. Nanocatalytic resonance scattering spectral analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The resonance scattering spectral technique has been established using the synchronous scanning technique on spectrofluorometry.Because of its advantages of simplicity,rapidity and sensitivity,it has been widely applied to analyses of proteins,nucleic acids and inorganic ions.This paper summarizes the application of immunonanogold and aptamer modified nanogold(AptAu) catalytic resonance scattering spectral technique in combination with the work of our group,citing 53 references.

  17. Application handbook for a Standardized Control Module (SCM) for DC-DC converters, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, F. C.; Mahmoud, M. F.; Yu, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The standardized control module (SCM) was developed for application in the buck, boost and buck/boost DC-DC converters. The SCM used multiple feedback loops to provide improved input line and output load regulation, stable feedback control system, good dynamic transient response and adaptive compensation of the control loop for changes in open loop gain and output filter time constraints. The necessary modeling and analysis tools to aid the design engineer in the application of the SCM to DC-DC Converters were developed. The SCM functional block diagram and the different analysis techniques were examined. The average time domain analysis technique was chosen as the basic analytical tool. The power stage transfer functions were developed for the buck, boost and buck/boost converters. The analog signal and digital signal processor transfer functions were developed for the three DC-DC Converter types using the constant on time, constant off time and constant frequency control laws.

  18. 64 kW concentrator Photovoltaics Application Test Center. Volume. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, D.M.; Jones, D.W.

    1980-06-01

    Kaman Sciences Corporation has designed a 64 kW Concentrating Photovoltaic Applications Test Center (APTEC). The APTEC employs a combined concentrating photovoltaic array in a total energy system application for load sharing the electric and thermal demands of a large computer center with the interfaced electric and natural gas utility. The photovoltaic array is composed of two-axis tracking heliostats of Fresnel lens concentrating, silicon solar cell modules. The modules are cooled with a fluid which transfers heat to a ground coupled heat sink/storage unit for subsequent use in meeting the computer center's thermal load demand. The combined photovoltaic power system shares basic components - a power conditioning unit, batteries and thermal conditioning equipment - with the electric and natural gas utility service, improving the computer center's operating availability time and displacing a portion of the fossil fuel required to power the computer center with solar energy. The detailed system design is reported.

  19. Application of rock mechanics to cut-and-fill mining. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-15

    The conference on application of rock mechanics to cut-and-fill mining was held June 1-3, 1980, at the University of Luleaa, Sweden. The conference began with reviews of the application of rock mechanics to mining and back filling in Australia, Canada and the USA. More particular papers involved mines in Sweden, Italy, Australia (pre reinforcement of walls with steel cables cemented in) and at the Con Mine in Canada. Two papers involved backfill material and specifications. Eight papers involved the use of the mathematical models for calculating the stresses developed in the rock mass by computer calculations and therefore, the probable stability. Such calculations are particularly necessary in deep mines. Papers of general interest were entered individually into EDB. (LTN)

  20. Environmental Fate Model for Ultra-Low-Volume Insecticide Applications Used for Adult Mosquito Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    drift hazard (Hewitt, 2008; Teske et al., 2000). Little is currently known about the deposition and drift of small droplets such as those used during...ULV applications for adult mosquito management ( Teske et al., 2000). Droplets smaller than 50 μm have very low settling velocities, and have similar...risk and regulatory assessments have used models like ISCST3, AgDrift® (Stewart Agricultural Research Services, Macon, MO, USA) ( Teske et al., 2002), and

  1. A New DFT Architecture to Reduce Test Data Volume and Test Application Time

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Zhang; Jishun, Kuang; Junjin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new DFT Architecture that contains three test scan modes. The test data could be interval broadcast to scan chains whenever the data in corresponding locations are compatible. Compared with the conventional broadcast scan architecture, the proposed architecture achieves better compression ratio in all cases, and the test application time is also induced. The hardware overhead is very low. Both theoretical and experimental results prove efficacy and versatility of the pro...

  2. Evaluation of semiconductor devices for Electric and Hybrid Vehicle (EHV) ac-drive applications, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, F. C.; Chen, D. Y.; Jovanovic, M.; Hopkins, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The results of evaluation of power semiconductor devices for electric hybrid vehicle ac drive applications are summarized. Three types of power devices are evaluated in the effort: high power bipolar or Darlington transistors, power MOSFETs, and asymmetric silicon control rectifiers (ASCR). The Bipolar transistors, including discrete device and Darlington devices, range from 100 A to 400 A and from 400 V to 900 V. These devices are currently used as key switching elements inverters for ac motor drive applications. Power MOSFETs, on the other hand, are much smaller in current rating. For the 400 V device, the current rating is limited to 25 A. For the main drive of an electric vehicle, device paralleling is normally needed to achieve practical power level. For other electric vehicle (EV) related applications such as battery charger circuit, however, MOSFET is advantageous to other devices because of drive circuit simplicity and high frequency capability. Asymmetrical SCR is basically a SCR device and needs commutation circuit for turn off. However, the device poses several advantages, i.e., low conduction drop and low cost.

  3. Application of probabilistic and decision analysis methods to structural mechanics and materials sciences problems. Volume 2. Resource document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, B.J.; Tagart, S.W. Jr. (eds.)

    1984-08-01

    This volume presents background resource material on the field of structural reliability assessment and its relationship to the discipline of probabilistic risk analysis and decision analysis. First, general background material is presented on the field of structural reliability assessment. Next, some sample applications of probabilistic and decision analysis methods are presented. A hypothetical example illustrates how a probabilistic approach could be used in structural design, and a brief description is given of how the results of structural reliability analyses can be used as input to a PRA. A case study is described on the use of decision analysis to select strategies for dealing with intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The use of decision analysis to evaluate the merits of different possible research tasks is also discussed. A discussion of decision analysis is then presented. Finally, the document presents a discussion of open issues in the area of structural reliability.

  4. Application of probabilistic and decision analysis methods to structural mechanics and materials sciences problems. Volume 1. Planning document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, B.J.; Tagart, S.W. Jr. (eds.)

    1984-08-01

    Volume I presents an overview of the EPRI structural reliability research program. First, perspectives on the probabilistic treatment of uncertainty are presented. A brief explanation is given of why decision analysis methods are part of EPRI's structural reliability project, and how the use of such methods to handle uncertainty can improve decision-making in this area. A more detailed discussion of one approach for dealing with uncertainty about event probabilities is also presented. Next, review of probabilistic risk analysis is presented. This review includes a brief history of its development and application, an overview of the methodology involved, the role of structural reliability assessment in providing input to PRAs, and the treatment of uncertainties in that input. A brief discussion of the relationship between PRA and safety goals is also included.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of the Applicability of Capacitive and Optical Measurement Methods for the Determination of Liquid Hydrogen Volume Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert HOLLER

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a capacitive and a vision-based method for measuring the velocity of cryogenic hydrogen flows. The capacitive sensing principle exploits the spatial frequency signature of perturbations moving through a multi-electrode structure. This setup increases the sensitivity to dielectric permittivity variations compared to a simple two-electrode structure while preserving the ability to detect small perturbations. The vision-based method relies on a high-speed camera system that monitors the liquid hydrogen flow through an optical window yielding the flow velocity by cross-correlating subsequent images of the flow. Although a comprehensive analysis of the obtainable measurement uncertainty was not performed yet, current measurement results show the applicability of both principles for the non-invasive measurement of the volume flow of cryogenic fuels inside conveyor pipes.

  6. A volume scanner for diffuse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafa, Elham; Roberts, Nicolas; Sharafutdinova, Galiya; Holdsworth, John

    2016-11-01

    Non-invasive optical screening mammography has a significant barrier in the extreme scatter of human tissue at optical wavelengths. A volume scanner suited for high numerical aperture capture of scattered light from diffuse media has been designed, modelled using Trace Pro software and experimentally constructed. Modelling results indicate the presence of an embedded volume with different scatter properties from the bulk yields a measurable difference in the overall scatter pattern and intensity recorded. Work towards a full tomographic reconstruction from scattered light recorded on the two dimensional array detector is currently underway.

  7. Application of the digital volume correlation technique for the measurement of displacement and strain fields in bone: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Bryant C; Perilli, Egon; Reynolds, Karen J

    2014-03-21

    Digital volume correlation (DVC) provides experimental measurements of displacements and strains throughout the interior of porous materials such as trabecular bone. It can provide full-field continuum- and tissue-level measurements, desirable for validation of finite element models, by comparing image volumes from subsequent µCT scans of a sample in unloaded and loaded states. Since the first application of DVC for measurement of strain in bone tissue, subsequent reports of its application to trabecular bone cores up to whole bones have appeared within the literature. An "optimal" set of procedures capable of precise and accurate measurements of strain, however, still remains unclear, and a systematic review focussing explicitly on the increasing number of DVC algorithms applied to bone or structurally similar materials is currently unavailable. This review investigates the effects of individual parameters reported within individual studies, allowing to make recommendations for suggesting algorithms capable of achieving high accuracy and precision in displacement and strain measurements. These recommendations suggest use of subsets that are sufficiently large to encompass unique datasets (e.g. subsets of 500 µm edge length when applied to human trabecular bone cores, such as cores 10mm in height and 5mm in diameter, scanned at 15 µm voxel size), a shape function that uses full affine transformations (translation, rotation, normal strain and shear strain), the robust normalized cross-correlation coefficient objective function, and high-order interpolation schemes. As these employ computationally burdensome algorithms, researchers need to determine whether they have the necessary computational resources or time to adopt such strategies. As each algorithm is suitable for parallel programming however, the adoption of high precision techniques may become more prevalent in the future.

  8. Estimating the Location of Scatterers by Seismic Interferometry of Scattered Surface Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmankaya, U.; Kaslilar, A.; Thorbecke, J.W.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, non-physical (ghost) scattered surface waves are used to obtain the location of a near surface scatterer. The ghost is obtained from application of seismic interferometry to only one source at the surface. Different locations for virtual sources are chosen and ghost scattered surface

  9. Estimating the Location of Scatterers by Seismic Interferometry of Scattered Surface Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmankaya, U.; Kaslilar, A.; Thorbecke, J.W.; Wapenaar, C.P.A.; Draganov, D.S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, non-physical (ghost) scattered surface waves are used to obtain the location of a near surface scatterer. The ghost is obtained from application of seismic interferometry to only one source at the surface. Different locations for virtual sources are chosen and ghost scattered surface

  10. Deposition from Ultra-Low Volume Application of Public Health Insecticides in a Hot Desert Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michael L; Hoel, David F; Farooq, Muhammad; Walker, Todd W

    2015-06-01

    Three insecticides commonly used for mosquito and sand fly control were applied 30 min to 3 h after sunset during June and July 2010, at Camp Buehring, Kuwait, to determine the relative quantity of pesticides to height and distance traveled in a hot desert environment. A BVA dilution oil was used for the control. Oil-based adulticides were sprayed using a truck-mounted Curtis DynaFog Maxi-Pro 4 ultra-low volume (ULV) sprayer. Malathion (Fyfanon ULV, 96% active ingredient [AI]), resmethrin (Scourge 4+12, 4% AI), pyrethrins (ULD BP-300, 3% AI), and BVA Spray 13 (100% refined petroleum distillate) were mixed with Uvitex optical brightener fluorescent dye and applied at 2 speeds on evenings when wind speed was less than 16.1 km/h (10 mph). Collection targets using biodegradable cotton ribbons (1 m×2.5 cm) were later read with a fluorometer to quantify the amount of insecticide deposited on targets set at heights of 15.2, 76.2, and 152.4 cm (6, 30, and 60 in.) and distances of 1.5, 6.1, 15.2, 30.5, 61.0, and 91.4 m (5, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 300 ft). Mean insecticide deposition across all distances was 31% on 76.2-cm targets and 49% on 152.4-cm targets, while 15.2-cm targets typically collected insecticide deposition was 80% at or above 76.2 cm for all insecticides. This finding may explain in part why control of low-flying phlebotomine sand flies with ULV insecticides has been met with less than optimal success by US military forces deployed in the Middle East.

  11. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  12. Aminopolymer Mobility and Support Interactions in Silica-PEI Composites for CO2 Capture Applications: A Quasielastic Neutron Scattering Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewinski, Adam; Sakwa-Novak, Miles A; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y; Potter, Matthew E; Ellebracht, Nathan; Rother, Gernot; Sumpter, Bobby G; Jones, Christopher W

    2017-07-13

    Composite gas sorbents, formed from an active polymer phase and a porous support, are promising materials for the separation of acid gases from a variety of gas streams. Significant changes in sorption performance (capacity, rate, stability etc.) can be achieved by tuning the properties of the polymer and the nature of interactions between polymer and support. Here we utilize quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the dynamic behavior of the most commonly reported polymer in such materials, poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), both in bulk form and when supported in a mesoporous silica framework. The polymer chain dynamics (rotational and translational diffusion) are characterized using two neutron backscattering spectrometers that have overlapping time scales, ranging from picoseconds to a few nanoseconds. Two modes of motion are detected for the PEI molecule in QENS. At low energy transfers, a "slow process" on the time scale of ∼200 ps is found and attributed to jump-mediated, center-of-mass diffusion. A second, "fast process" at ∼20 ps scale is also found and is attributed to a locally confined, jump-diffusion. Characteristic data (time scale and spectral weight) of these processes are compared to those characterized by MD, and reasonable agreement is found. For the nanopore-confined PEI, we observe a significant reduction in the time scale of polymer motion as compared to the bulk. The impacts of silica surface functionalization and of polymer fill fraction in the silica pores (controlling the portion of polymer molecules in contact with the pore walls), are both studied in detail. Hydrophobic functionalization of the silica leads to an increase of the PEI mobility above that in native silanol-terminated silica, but the dynamics are still slower than those in bulk PEI. Sorbents with faster PEI dynamics are also found to be more efficient for CO2 capture, possibly because sorption sites are more

  13. Application of AERONET Single Scattering Albedo and Absorption Angstrom Exponent to Classify Dominant Aerosol Types during DRAGON Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Schafer, J.; Crawford, J. H.; Kim, J.; Sano, I.; Liew, S.; Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Lim, H.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, M.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols can have major implications on human health by inducing respiratory diseases due to inhalation of fine particles from biomass burning smoke or industrial pollution and on radiative forcing whereby the presence of absorbing aerosol particles (e.g., black carbon) increases atmospheric heating. Aerosol classification techniques have utilized aerosol loading and aerosol properties derived from multi-spectral and multi-angle observations by ground-based (e.g., AERONET) and satellite instrumentation (e.g., MISR). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data have been utilized to determine aerosol types by implementing various combinations of measured aerosol optical depth or retrieved size and absorption aerosol properties (e.g., Gobbi et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010). Giles et al. [2012] showed single scattering albedo (SSA) relationship with extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) can provide an estimate of the general classification of dominant aerosol types (i.e., desert dust, urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, and mixtures) based on data from ~20 AERONET sites located in known aerosol source regions. In addition, the absorption Angstrom exponent relationship with EAE can provide an indication of the dominant absorbing aerosol type such as dust, black carbon, brown carbon, or mixtures of them. These classification techniques are applied to the AERONET Level 2.0 quality assured data sets collected during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observational Network (DRAGON) campaigns in Maryland (USA), Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Penang (Malaysia), and California (USA). An analysis of aerosol type classification for DRAGON sites is performed as well as an assessment of the spatial variability of the aerosol types for selected DRAGON campaigns. Giles, D. M., B. N. Holben, T. F. Eck, A. Sinyuk, A. Smirnov, I. Slutsker, R. R. Dickerson, A. M. Thompson, and J. S. Schafer (2012), An analysis of AERONET aerosol absorption properties and classifications

  14. An application of the refined born approximation to the solution of coupled equations involved in electron-ion and electron-atom scattering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszewska, G.

    1981-06-01

    A new approach to the solution of coupled equations involved in electron-ion and electron-atom scattering problems is proposed. This method is a combination of iteration and variation procedures. The main advantage of this method is that exchange terms can be calculated in a direct and straightforward manner. The method is based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and does not require trial functions satisfying appropriate boundary conditions. Using the Volterra formulation one can find the solution on an interval determined by the range of the exchange potential and the long-range potential terms can be taken into account by a projection procedure giving the asymptotic value of the reactance matrix. The method is tested on the case of electron-hydrogen atom scattering in the 1s-2s and 1s-2s-2p approximation. We have adapted the method proposed originally by Rayski to obtain solutions of coupled equations involved in electron-ion and electron-atom scattering. As mentioned in section 1 the construction of the method secures an automatic fulfilment of the boundary conditions. It allows an easy calculation of the exchange potential as well as an estimation of the introduced approximation. It gives also a possibility of detecting any spurious convergence. Moreover, it is important that this formalism can be applied in the case of normalized as well as unnormalized initial integral equations. This fact is of special importance in the case of long-range interactions. When the method is used for unnormalized (Volterra) equations it allows application of a very convenient projection procedure for treating the long-range terms in the direct potential. Electron-hydrogen atom collisions are investigated as a numerical illustration of the method. In the 1s-2s approximation the normalized equations were solved, while in the 1s-2s-2p approximation the solution was obtained with the help of Volterra equations and the long-range terms of the direct potential were taken into account

  15. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  16. A Study of the Operator Expansion Method and its Application to Scattering from Randomly Rough Dirichlet Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    integrated optics [ Marcuse , 19821, as well as in ocean acoustics [DeSanto, 1979]. I Many applications emphasize the solution of the inverse problem: the...Berlin, 1980. Carsey, F. D. ed., Microwave Sensing of Sea Ice, Geophysical Monograph 68 , Amer- ican Geophysical Union, 1992. Chen, J. S., and A... Marcuse , D., Light Transmission Optics, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1982. 3 McDaniel, S.T., "Sea surface reverberation: A review," J. Acoust. Soc

  17. Combination of acoustic levitation with small angle scattering techniques and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism. Application to the study of protein solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristiglio, Viviana; Grillo, Isabelle; Fomina, Margarita; Wien, Frank; Shalaev, Evgenyi; Novikov, Alexey; Brassamin, Séverine; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pérez, Javier; Hennet, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic levitation technique is a useful sample handling method for small solid and liquids samples, suspended in air by means of an ultrasonic field. This method was previously used at synchrotron sources for studying pharmaceutical liquids and protein solutions using x-ray diffraction and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). In this work we combined for the first time this containerless method with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) to study the structural behavior of proteins in solutions during the water evaporation. SANS results are also compared with SAXS experiments. The aggregation behavior of 45μl droplets of lysozyme protein diluted in water was followed during the continuous increase of the sample concentration by evaporating the solvent. The evaporation kinetics was followed at different drying stage by SANS and SAXS with a good data quality. In a prospective work using SRCD, we also studied the evolution of the secondary structure of the myoglobin protein in water solution in the same evaporation conditions. Acoustic levitation was applied for the first time with SANS and the high performances of the used neutron instruments made it possible to monitor fast container-less reactions in situ. A preliminary work using SRCD shows the potentiality of its combination with acoustic levitation for studying the evolution of the protein structure with time. This multi-techniques approach could give novel insights into crystallization and self-assembly phenomena of biological compound with promising potential applications in pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics industry. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Inelastic scattering and neutron polarimetry. Application to a few low-dimensioned magnetic systems; Diffusion inelastique et polarimetrie neutronique. Application a certains systemes magnetiques de basse dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boullier, C

    2005-10-15

    This work introduces the spherical polarization analysis used in the case of the inelastic scattering of polarized neutrons. With this kind of analysis, we are able to access some non-trivial dynamical correlation functions. Those correlation functions are related to nuclear and magnetic degrees of freedom. To study these correlations in the case of inelastic scattering, we used an optimized version of the experimental set-up called CRYOPAD (Cryogenic Polarisation Analysis Device) for which we will introduce a new calibration process. To illustrate the importance of such analysis, we will use it on two low-dimensional systems: the first one is BaCo{sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} with a planar spin system and the second one is Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41} showing both chain and ladder spin systems. The spherical polarization analysis of both elastic and inelastic signal on the compound BaCo{sub 2}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} has allowed us to determine its low temperature magnetic structure and the nature of its magnetic excitations. With the compound Sr{sub 14}Cu{sub 24}O{sub 41} we demonstrated the evidence of a big anisotropy between the out-of-plane and the in-plane magnetic dynamical correlation functions for both the chain and ladder subsystems. Finally, studying the inelastic signal of the chains under a magnetic field, we tried to better understand the 'dynamical chirality' associated with clockwise and anti-clockwise precessions of a magnetic triplet. (author)

  19. Scattering with partial information

    CERN Document Server

    Carney, Daniel; Semenoff, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We study relativistic scattering when one only has access to a subset of the particles, using the language of quantum measurement theory. We give an exact, non-perturbative formula for the von Neumann entanglement entropy of an apparatus particle scattered off an arbitrary set of system particles, in either the elastic or inelastic regime, and show how to evaluate it perturbatively. We give general formulas for the late-time expectation values of apparatus observables. Some simple example applications are included: in particular, a protocol to verify preparation of coherent superpositions of spatially localized system states using position-space information in the outgoing apparatus state, at lowest order in perturbation theory in a weak apparatus-system coupling.

  20. Small angle X-ray and neutron scattering from solutions of biological macromolecules

    CERN Document Server

    Svergun, Dmitri I; May, Roland P; Timmins, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    In this book, following the presentation of the basics of scattering from isotropic macromolecular solutions, modern instrumentation, experimental practice and advanced analysis techniques are explained. Advantages of X-rays (rapid data collection, small sample volumes) and of neutrons (contrast variation by hydrogen/deuterium exchange) are specifically highlighted. Examples of applications of the technique to different macromolecular systems are considered with specific emphasis on the synergistic use of SAXS/SANS with other structural, biophysical and computational techniques.