WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume rendering images

  1. A Multiresolution Image Cache for Volume Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMar, E; Pascucci, V

    2003-02-27

    The authors discuss the techniques and implementation details of the shared-memory image caching system for volume visualization and iso-surface rendering. One of the goals of the system is to decouple image generation from image display. This is done by maintaining a set of impostors for interactive display while the production of the impostor imagery is performed by a set of parallel, background processes. The system introduces a caching basis that is free of the gap/overlap artifacts of earlier caching techniques. instead of placing impostors at fixed, pre-defined positions in world space, the technique is to adaptively place impostors relative to the camera viewpoint. The positions translate with the camera but stay aligned to the data; i.e., the positions translate, but do not rotate, with the camera. The viewing transformation is factored into a translation transformation and a rotation transformation. The impostor imagery is generated using just the translation transformation and visible impostors are displayed using just the rotation transformation. Displayed image quality is improved by increasing the number of impostors and the frequency that impostors are re-rendering is improved by decreasing the number of impostors.

  2. Volume rendering of segmented image objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Aylward, Stephen R

    2002-08-01

    This paper describes a new method of combining ray-casting with segmentation. Volume rendering is performed at interactive rates on personal computers, and visualizations include both "superficial" ray-casting through a shell at each object's surface and "deep" ray-casting through the confines of each object. A feature of the approach is the option to smoothly and interactively dilate segmentation boundaries along all axes. This ability, when combined with selective "turning off" of extraneous image objects, can help clinicians detect and evaluate segmentation errors that may affect surgical planning. We describe both a method optimized for displaying tubular objects and a more general method applicable to objects of arbitrary geometry. In both cases, select three-dimensional points are projected onto a modified z buffer that records additional information about the projected objects. A subsequent step selectively volume renders only through the object volumes indicated by the z buffer. We describe how our approach differs from other reported methods for combining segmentation with ray-casting, and illustrate how our method can be useful in helping to detect segmentation errors.

  3. Multivariate volume rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a new technique for representing multivalued data sets defined on an integer lattice. It extends the state-of-the-art in volume rendering to include nonhomogeneous volume representations. That is, volume rendering of materials with very fine detail (e.g. translucent granite) within a voxel. Multivariate volume rendering is achieved by introducing controlled amounts of noise within the volume representation. Varying the local amount of noise within the volume is used to represent a separate scalar variable. The technique can also be used in image synthesis to create more realistic clouds and fog.

  4. Medical image rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, J K; Goncalves, R J

    1993-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization has recently become an established discipline in medicine. Although numerous visualization methods are currently available, a unified framework to describe and study them has been lacking. Often, the functionally independent operations in a method are integrated among themselves or with the method itself for computational efficiency. The two main aims of this article are (1) to review the methods in a unified way in a general setting so that it becomes possible to appreciate the interrelationship and interdependence of methods, and (2) to show how a variety of new methods emerge with potentially improved renditions in this unified treatment. To this end, we introduce an operator notation to describe concisely the basic 3-D imaging transforms commonly used in visualization and identify a comprehensive set of basic transforms. We describe several new basic transforms for filtering and interpolating structures and scenes, and for rendering surfaces and volumes. We show the power of the principle of treating 3-D imaging methodologies as comprising an appropriate combination of the basic operators. We show how such a treatment leads to a great variety of new rendering methods and how many such methods can lead to improved portrayal. We develop separate transform sequences to optimally render robust and frail structures (ie, structures represented in scenes with well-defined and ill-defined boundaries, respectively).

  5. Anatomic evaluation of the membranous labyrinth by imaging: 3D-MRI volume-rendered reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguéis, A; Melo Freitas, P; Cordeiro, M

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology has allowed the development of imaging sequences tailored to the assessment of minute anatomic detail of the temporal bone structures. Volume Rendering (VR) is a 3D rendering method used in MRI. It helps in understanding complex anatomic conditions and is particularly useful in the evaluation of tiny structures as the membranous labyrinth. The authors aimed at verifying the contribution of VR in the study of labyrinthine pathology in view of all the possible anatomic correlation. We performed 3D T2-weighted FSE MRI at 1.5 T with a dedicated surface coil, at high resolution (0.5 mm partition). All selected patients were volunteers and unknown for temporal bone pathology. The anatomy of the cochlea and vestibule were clearly defined. We could distinguish components of the cochlea to the level of the scala tympani, the vestibule and the cochlear duct. The saccule, utricle, endolymphatic duct and sac, and semicircular canals were also distinguished. Volume reconstructions yielded excellent spatial information regarding the cochlea, vestibule, semicircular canals and all three ampullae. Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) images are useful as a preliminary study, to show eventual inner acoustic canal pathology and to provide information with the use of contrasting agents. We conclude therefore that VR seems to be essential in evaluating labyrinthine anatomy and pathology. Our results suggest that improved diagnostic information can be obtained by applying this volume visualization reconstruction technique in all inner ear neuroradiological protocols.

  6. The physics of volume rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Radiation transfer is an important topic in several physical disciplines, probably most prominently in astrophysics. Computer scientists use radiation transfer, among other things, for the visualization of complex data sets with direct volume rendering. In this article, I point out the connection between physical radiation transfer and volume rendering, and I describe an implementation of direct volume rendering in the astrophysical radiation transfer code RADMC-3D. I show examples for the use of this module on analytical models and simulation data.

  7. Subjective quality and depth assessment in stereoscopic viewing of volume-rendered medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousson, Johanna; Couturou, Jeanne; Vetsuypens, Arnout; Platisa, Ljiljana; Kumcu, Asli; Kimpe, Tom; Philips, Wilfried

    2014-03-01

    No study to-date explored the relationship between perceived image quality (IQ) and perceived depth (DP) in stereoscopic medical images. However, this is crucial to design objective quality metrics suitable for stereoscopic medical images. This study examined this relationship using volume-rendered stereoscopic medical images for both dual- and single-view distortions. The reference image was modified to simulate common alterations occurring during the image acquisition stage or at the display side: added white Gaussian noise, Gaussian filtering, changes in luminance, brightness and contrast. We followed a double stimulus five-point quality scale methodology to conduct subjective tests with eight non-expert human observers. The results suggested that DP was very robust to luminance, contrast and brightness alterations and insensitive to noise distortions until standard deviation σ=20 and crosstalk rates of 7%. In contrast, IQ seemed sensitive to all distortions. Finally, for both DP and IQ, the Friedman test indicated that the quality scores for dual-view distortions were significantly worse than scores for single-view distortions for multiple blur levels and crosstalk impairments. No differences were found for most levels of brightness, contrast and noise distortions. So, DP and IQ didn't react equivalently to identical impairments, and both depended whether dual- or single-view distortions were applied.

  8. Gradient-enhanced volume rendering: an image processing strategy to facilitate whole small bowel imaging with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyss, Michael [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M.; Patak, Michael A.; Juli, Christoph F.; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Scheidegger, Markus B. [ETH and University of Zuerich, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wentz, Klaus U. [Cantonal Hospital, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); University of Witten Herdecke, Herdecke (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    MRI of the small bowel with positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent is a promising non-invasive imaging method. The aim of our study was to introduce small bowel MRI in a display format that clinicians are accustomed to and that maximizes the amount of information visualized on a single image. Twelve healthy volunteers, median age 32 years (range 18-49 years) participated in the study. A mixture of 20 ml Gd-DOTA (Dotarem), 0.8 g/kg body weight psyllium fibre (Metamucil) and 1.2 l water were sequentially administered over a period of 4 h. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T unit (Philips Gyroscan, Intera). Fat-saturated, 3D, gradient echo imaging was performed while the patient was in apnea (30 s). Bowel motion was reduced with 40 mg intravenously administered scopolamine (Buscopan). A 3D, gradient-enhanced, volume rendering technique was applied to the 3D data sets. Standard projections [left anterior oblique (LAO), right anterior oblique (RAO), supine and prone] resembling conventional enteroclysis were successfully generated within fewer than 10 min processing time. Reconstructions were reproducible and provided an entire overview of the small bowel. In addition thin-slab volume rendering allowed an overlap-free display of individual structures. Positive contrast from orally administered contrast agent, combined with a gradient enhanced volume rendering method, allows the reconstruction of the small bowel in a pattern resembling conventional double-contrast enteroclysis. Segmental display without overlay is possible. (orig.)

  9. Stature estimation from sternum length using computed tomography-volume rendering technique images of western Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kui; Luo, Ying-zhen; Fan, Fei; Zheng, Jie-qian; Yang, Min; Li, Tao; Pang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to generate linear regression models for stature estimation on the basis of sternum length derived from computed tomography-volume rendering technique (CT-VRT) images for Western Chinese. The study sample comprised 288 individuals of Western Chinese, including 124 females and 164 males, with documented ages between 19 and 78 years, and was randomly divided into two subgroups. The linear regression analysis for the calibration sample data yielded the following formulae: male stature (cm) = 137.28 + 1.99*combined length of manubrium and mesosternum and female stature (cm) = 111.59 + 3.51* combined length of manubrium and mesosternum. Pearson's correlation coefficients for the regression models were r = 0.459 and r = 0.541 for the male and female formulae, respectively. The standard errors of the estimate (SEE) were 4.76 cm for the male equation and 6.73 cm for the female equation. The 95% confidence intervals of the predicted values encompassed the correct stature of all specimen in the validation sample. The regression equations derived from the sternum length in the present study can be used for stature estimation and the length of the sternum is a reliable predictor of stature in Chinese when better predictors of stature like the long bones are not available, and the CT-VRT method may be a practical method for stature estimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  10. Mapping high-fidelity volume rendering for medical imaging to CPU, GPU and many-core architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; Holmes, David; Chhugani, Jatin; Larson, Alan; Carmean, Douglas M; Hanson, Dennis; Dubey, Pradeep; Augustine, Kurt; Kim, Daehyun; Kyker, Alan; Lee, Victor W; Nguyen, Anthony D; Seiler, Larry; Robb, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Medical volumetric imaging requires high fidelity, high performance rendering algorithms. We motivate and analyze new volumetric rendering algorithms that are suited to modern parallel processing architectures. First, we describe the three major categories of volume rendering algorithms and confirm through an imaging scientist-guided evaluation that ray-casting is the most acceptable. We describe a thread- and data-parallel implementation of ray-casting that makes it amenable to key architectural trends of three modern commodity parallel architectures: multi-core, GPU, and an upcoming many-core Intel architecture code-named Larrabee. We achieve more than an order of magnitude performance improvement on a number of large 3D medical datasets. We further describe a data compression scheme that significantly reduces data-transfer overhead. This allows our approach to scale well to large numbers of Larrabee cores.

  11. Super resolution volume rendering hardware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Marco; Smit, Jaap; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Jeroen

    1995-01-01

    The resolution obtained in volume rendering is greatly increased over known methods through the introduction of super resolution techniques which make it possible to enlarge the view o f the dataset without the introduction of unnecessary positional, gradient and opacity errors. In this paper our

  12. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the ankle based on magnetic resonance images enables the generation of images comparable to real anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Trimarchi, Fabio; Ielitro, Giuseppe; Cammaroto, Simona; Duca, Antonio; Bramanti, Placido; Favaloro, Angelo; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2009-11-01

    We have applied high-quality medical imaging techniques to study the structure of the human ankle. Direct volume rendering, using specific algorithms, transforms conventional two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance image (MRI) series into 3D volume datasets. This tool allows high-definition visualization of single or multiple structures for diagnostic, research, and teaching purposes. No other image reformatting technique so accurately highlights each anatomic relationship and preserves soft tissue definition. Here, we used this method to study the structure of the human ankle to analyze tendon-bone-muscle relationships. We compared ankle MRI and computerized tomography (CT) images from 17 healthy volunteers, aged 18-30 years (mean 23 years). An additional subject had a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon. The MRI images demonstrated superiority in overall quality of detail compared to the CT images. The MRI series accurately rendered soft tissue and bone in simultaneous image acquisition, whereas CT required several window-reformatting algorithms, with loss of image data quality. We obtained high-quality digital images of the human ankle that were sufficiently accurate for surgical and clinical intervention planning, as well as for teaching human anatomy. Our approach demonstrates that complex anatomical structures such as the ankle, which is rich in articular facets and ligaments, can be easily studied non-invasively using MRI data.

  13. Console-integrated stereoscopic OsiriX 3D volume-rendered images for da Vinci colorectal robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonté, Francesco; Pugin, Francois; Buchs, Nicolas Christian; Spaltenstein, Joël; Hagen, Monika; Ratib, Osman; Morel, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    The increased distance between surgeon and surgical field is a significant problem in laparoscopic surgery. Robotic surgery, although providing advantages for the operator, increases this gap by completely removing force feedback. Enhancement with visual tools can therefore be beneficial. The goal of this preliminary work was to create a custom plugin for OsiriX to display volume-rendered images in the da Vinci surgeon's console. The TilePro multi-input display made the generated stereoscopic pairs appear to have depth. Tumor position, vascular supply, spatial location, and relationship between organs appear directly within the surgeon's field of view. This study presents a case of totally robotic right colectomy for cancer using this new technology. Sight diversion was no longer necessary. Depth perception was subjectively perceived as profitable. Total immersion in the operative field helped compensate for the lack of tactile feedback specific to robotic intervention. This innovative tool is a step forward toward augmented-reality robot-assisted surgery.

  14. Anisotropic 3D texture synthesis with application to volume rendering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lasse Farnung; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel approach to improving volume rendering by using synthesized textures in combination with a custom transfer function. First, we use existing knowledge to synthesize anisotropic solid textures to fit our volumetric data. As input to the synthesis method, we acquire high quality...... images using a 12.1 megapixel camera. Next, we extend the volume rendering pipeline by creating a transfer function which yields not only color and opacity from the input intensity, but also texture coordinates for our synthesized 3D texture. Thus, we add texture to the volume rendered images....... This method is applied to a high quality visualization of a pig carcass, where samples of meat, bone, and fat have been used to produce the anisotropic 3D textures....

  15. Remote volume rendering pipeline for mHealth applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhao, Xin; Park, Ji Hwan; Kaufman, Arie; Cha, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel remote volume rendering pipeline for medical visualization targeted for mHealth (mobile health) applications. The necessity of such a pipeline stems from the large size of the medical imaging data produced by current CT and MRI scanners with respect to the complexity of the volumetric rendering algorithms. For example, the resolution of typical CT Angiography (CTA) data easily reaches 512^3 voxels and can exceed 6 gigabytes in size by spanning over the time domain while capturing a beating heart. This explosion in data size makes data transfers to mobile devices challenging, and even when the transfer problem is resolved the rendering performance of the device still remains a bottleneck. To deal with this issue, we propose a thin-client architecture, where the entirety of the data resides on a remote server where the image is rendered and then streamed to the client mobile device. We utilize the display and interaction capabilities of the mobile device, while performing interactive volume rendering on a server capable of handling large datasets. Specifically, upon user interaction the volume is rendered on the server and encoded into an H.264 video stream. H.264 is ubiquitously hardware accelerated, resulting in faster compression and lower power requirements. The choice of low-latency CPU- and GPU-based encoders is particularly important in enabling the interactive nature of our system. We demonstrate a prototype of our framework using various medical datasets on commodity tablet devices.

  16. Depth of Field Effects for Interactive Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Mathias

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed for computing depth of field effects, which previously were shown to aid observers in depth and size perception of synthetically generated images. The presented technique extends those benefits to volume rendering visualizations of 3D scalar fields from CT/MRI scanners or numerical simulations. It is based on incremental filtering and as such does not depend on any precomputation, thus allowing interactive explorations of volumetric data sets via on-the-fly editing of the shading model parameters or (multi-dimensional) transfer functions. © 2011 The Author(s).

  17. Image Based Rendering and Virtual Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation.......The Presentation concerns with an overview of Image Based Rendering approaches and their use on Virtual Reality, including Virtual Photography and Cinematography, and Mobile Robot Navigation....

  18. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kroes, T; Post, F.H; Botha, C.P

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets...

  19. Lighting design for globally illuminated volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2013-12-01

    With the evolution of graphics hardware, high quality global illumination becomes available for real-time volume rendering. Compared to local illumination, global illumination can produce realistic shading effects which are closer to real world scenes, and has proven useful for enhancing volume data visualization to enable better depth and shape perception. However, setting up optimal lighting could be a nontrivial task for average users. There were lighting design works for volume visualization but they did not consider global light transportation. In this paper, we present a lighting design method for volume visualization employing global illumination. The resulting system takes into account view and transfer-function dependent content of the volume data to automatically generate an optimized three-point lighting environment. Our method fully exploits the back light which is not used by previous volume visualization systems. By also including global shadow and multiple scattering, our lighting system can effectively enhance the depth and shape perception of volumetric features of interest. In addition, we propose an automatic tone mapping operator which recovers visual details from overexposed areas while maintaining sufficient contrast in the dark areas. We show that our method is effective for visualizing volume datasets with complex structures. The structural information is more clearly and correctly presented under the automatically generated light sources.

  20. Immersive volume rendering of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gregory; Kim, Han Suk; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method of visualizing flow in blood vessels. Our approach reads unstructured tetrahedral data, resamples it, and uses slice based 3D texture volume rendering. Due to the sparse structure of blood vessels, we utilize an octree to efficiently store the resampled data by discarding empty regions of the volume. We use animation to convey time series data, wireframe surface to give structure, and utilize the StarCAVE, a 3D virtual reality environment, to add a fully immersive element to the visualization. Our tool has great value in interdisciplinary work, helping scientists collaborate with clinicians, by improving the understanding of blood flow simulations. Full immersion in the flow field allows for a more intuitive understanding of the flow phenomena, and can be a great help to medical experts for treatment planning.

  1. Breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography with three-dimensional, segmented, echo-planar imaging and volume rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); J. Gaa; D.R. Wielopolski; M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEnd-expiration, 21-second breath-hold, three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was developed with segmented echo-planar imaging. In 15 healthy subjects and 14 randomly selected patients undergoing liver studies,

  2. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicat, Ronell; Krüger, Jens; Möller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  3. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera

    2014-12-31

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  4. Visualization of inner ear dysplasias in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. High-resolution MR imaging and volume-rendered reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingebiel, R.; Bockmuehl, U. [Charite CM, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Werbs, M. [Charite CM, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). ENT Dept.; Freigang, B. [O. von Guericke Univ., Magdeburg (Germany). ENT Dept.; Vorwerk, W. [St. Salvator Krankenhaus, Halberstadt (Germany). ENT Dept.; Thieme, N.; Lehmann, R. [Charite CM, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: We evaluated a data acquisition and post-processing protocol for inner ear (IE) assessment by MR imaging in patients, suffering from various labyrinth malformations. Material and Methods: MR IE studies of 158 consecutive patients (316 IEs) suffering from sensorineural hearing loss without evidence of an acoustic neurinoma were reviewed for pathologies of the IE and internal acoustic meatus. High-resolution MR data of all abnormal IE studies (n=45) were post-processed to previously standardized 3D volume rendered (VR) reconstructions. Results: In 9 patients (5.7%) the following IE dysplasias were detected: malformation of the cochlea (6 IEs), vestibulum (4 IEs), semicircular canals (12 IEs) and vestibular aqueduct/endolymphatic sac (10 IEs). One patient showed evidence of an aplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. In 4 patients multiple IE dysplasias were encountered. Comprehensive 3D visualization of all labyrinthine dysplasias was achieved by the use of two VR reconstructions. The overall time for bilateral IE assessment amounted to 30-35 min. Conclusion: The imaging protocol allows for rapid and comprehensive visualization of various IE dysplasias, based on a limited number of VR reconstructions.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of a volume-rendered computed tomography movie and other computed tomography-based imaging methods in assessment of renal vascular anatomy for laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shingo; Tanooka, Masao; Ando, Kumiko; Yamano, Toshiko; Ishikura, Reiichi; Nojima, Michio; Hirota, Shozo; Shima, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT)-based imaging methods for assessing renal vascular anatomy, imaging studies, including standard axial CT, three-dimensional volume-rendered CT (3DVR-CT), and a 3DVR-CT movie, were performed on 30 patients who underwent laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (10 right side, 20 left side) for predicting the location of the renal arteries and renal, adrenal, gonadal, and lumbar veins. These findings were compared with videos obtained during the operation. Two of 37 renal arteries observed intraoperatively were missed by standard axial CT and 3DVR-CT, whereas all arteries were identified by the 3DVR-CT movie. Two of 36 renal veins were missed by standard axial CT and 3DVR-CT, whereas 1 was missed by the 3DVR-CT movie. In 20 left renal hilar anatomical structures, 20 adrenal, 20 gonadal, and 22 lumbar veins were observed during the operation. Preoperatively, the standard axial CT, 3DVR-CT, and 3DVR-CT movie detected 11, 19, and 20 adrenal veins; 13, 14, and 19 gonadal veins; and 6, 11, and 15 lumbar veins, respectively. Overall, of 135 renal vascular structures, the standard axial CT, 3DVR-CT, and 3DVR-CT movie accurately detected 99 (73.3%), 113 (83.7%), and 126 (93.3%) vessels, respectively, which indicated that the 3DVR-CT movie demonstrated a significantly higher detection rate than other CT-based imaging methods (P renal vascular anatomy before laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

  6. Accuracy of CT angiography in the assessment of the circle of Willis: comparison of volume-rendered images and digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ari; Yoon, Dae Young; Chang, Suk Ki (Dept. of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: evee0914@chollian.net; Lim, Kyoung Ja (Dept. of Radiology, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National Univ. College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do (Korea, Republic of)); Cho, Byung-Moon (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Shin, Yoon Cheol (Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Kangdong Seong-Sim Hospital, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Kim, Sam Soo (Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National Univ. College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do (Korea, Republic of)); Kim, Keon Ha (Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-10-15

    Background Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is increasingly used for non-invasive imaging of the cerebrovascular diseases. Purpose To evaluate the accuracy of CTA in the assessment of the variation of the segment calibers of the circle of Willis. Material and Methods One hundred and 17 patients with acute SAH (51 men and 66 women, mean age 50.9 years) who underwent CTA using a 16 detector-row CT scanner and DSA were evaluated retrospectively. The CTA and DSA studies were performed within 24 h after the onset of symptoms and within 24 h of each other. A total of 819 arterial segments (A-comA, right and left A1 segment, right and left P-com A, and right and left P1 segment) of the circle of Willis were determined to be aplastic (grade 1), hypoplastic (grade 2), or normal-sized (grade 3) by blinded observers evaluating CTA volume-rendered images. The CTA results were then compared with findings on the corresponding DSA images (reference standard). Results The overall agreement between CTA and DSA was 92.4%. We had 62 (7.6%) cases of disagreement (58 cases of under-estimation and four cases of over-estimation by CTA) between tow modalities. The sensitivity and specificity of CTA in the detection of aplastic and normal-sized segments were more than 90%. In contrast, subgroup analysis of the hypoplastic segments showed a sensitivity of 52.6% and a specificity of 98.2%. Conclusion CTA is highly accurate in the assessment of anatomical variations of the circle of Willis; however, its sensitivity is limited in depicting hypoplastic segments

  7. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography and volume-rendered imaging for evaluation of cellophane banding in a dog with extrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yoon

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old, 1.8 kg, male, castrated Maltese was presented for evaluation of urolithiasis. Urinary calculi were composed of ammonium biurate. Preprandial and postprandial bile acids were 44.2 and 187.3 μmol/ , respectively (reference ranges 0–10 and 0–20 μmol/ , respectively. Single-phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA with volume-rendered imaging (VRI was obtained. VRI revealed a portocaval shunt originating just cranial to a tributary of the gastroduodenal vein and draining into the caudal vena cava at the level of the epiploic foramen. CTA revealed a 3.66 mm-diameter shunt measured at the level of the termination of the shunt and a 3.79 mm-diameter portal vein measured at the level between the origin of the shunt and the porta of the liver. Surgery was performed using cellophane banding without attenuation. Follow-up single-phase CTA with VRI was obtained 10 weeks after surgery. VRI revealed no evidence of portosystemic communication on the level of a cellophane band and caudal to the cellophane band. CTA demonstrated an increased portal vein diameter (3.79–5.27 mm measured at the level between the origin of the shunt and the porta of the liver. Preprandial and postprandial bile acids were 25 and 12.5 μmol/ , respectively (aforementioned respective reference ranges, 3 months post-surgery. No problems were evident at 6 months.

  8. 3D SPECT/CT fusion using image data projection of bone SPECT onto 3D volume-rendered CT images: feasibility and clinical impact in the diagnosis of bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Ode, Kenichi; Matsusaka, Yohji; Katagiri, Mari; Iwabuchi, Yu; Itoh, Kazunari; Ichimura, Akira; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method of image data projection of bone SPECT into 3D volume-rendered CT images for 3D SPECT/CT fusion. The aims of our study were to evaluate its feasibility and clinical usefulness. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB) and SPECT/CT scans were performed in 318 cancer patients using a dedicated SPECT/CT systems. Volume data of bone SPECT and CT were fused to obtain 2D SPECT/CT images. To generate our 3D SPECT/CT images, colored voxel data of bone SPECT were projected onto the corresponding location of the volume-rendered CT data after a semi-automatic bone extraction. Then, the resultant 3D images were blended with conventional volume-rendered CT images, allowing to grasp the three-dimensional relationship between bone metabolism and anatomy. WB and SPECT (WB + SPECT), 2D SPECT/CT fusion, and 3D SPECT/CT fusion were evaluated by two independent reviewers in the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The inter-observer variability and diagnostic accuracy in these three image sets were investigated using a four-point diagnostic scale. Increased bone metabolism was found in 744 metastatic sites and 1002 benign changes. On a per-lesion basis, inter-observer agreements in the diagnosis of bone metastasis were 0.72 for WB + SPECT, 0.90 for 2D SPECT/CT, and 0.89 for 3D SPECT/CT. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for the diagnostic accuracy of bone metastasis showed that WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT had an area under the curve of 0.800, 0.983, and 0.983 for reader 1, 0.865, 0.992, and 0.993 for reader 2, respectively (WB + SPECT vs. 2D or 3D SPECT/CT, p images were 241 ± 75, 225 ± 73, and 182 ± 71 s for reader 1 and 207 ± 72, 190 ± 73, and 179 ± 73 s for reader 2, respectively. As a result, it took shorter time to read 3D SPECT/CT images than 2D SPECT/CT (p images (p reading time compared to 2D SPECT/CT fusion.

  9. User Interface for Volume Rendering in Virtual Reality Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Jonathan; Reuling, Dennis; Grimm, Jan; Pfau, Andreas; Lefloch, Damien; Lambers, Martin; Kolb, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Volume Rendering applications require sophisticated user interaction for the definition and refinement of transfer functions. Traditional 2D desktop user interface elements have been developed to solve this task, but such concepts do not map well to the interaction devices available in Virtual Reality environments. In this paper, we propose an intuitive user interface for Volume Rendering specifically designed for Virtual Reality environments. The proposed interface allows transfer function d...

  10. Interactive Volume Rendering of Diffusion Tensor Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlawitschka, Mario; Weber, Gunther; Anwander, Alfred; Carmichael, Owen; Hamann, Bernd; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2007-03-30

    As 3D volumetric images of the human body become an increasingly crucial source of information for the diagnosis and treatment of a broad variety of medical conditions, advanced techniques that allow clinicians to efficiently and clearly visualize volumetric images become increasingly important. Interaction has proven to be a key concept in analysis of medical images because static images of 3D data are prone to artifacts and misunderstanding of depth. Furthermore, fading out clinically irrelevant aspects of the image while preserving contextual anatomical landmarks helps medical doctors to focus on important parts of the images without becoming disoriented. Our goal was to develop a tool that unifies interactive manipulation and context preserving visualization of medical images with a special focus on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. At each image voxel, DTI provides a 3 x 3 tensor whose entries represent the 3D statistical properties of water diffusion locally. Water motion that is preferential to specific spatial directions suggests structural organization of the underlying biological tissue; in particular, in the human brain, the naturally occuring diffusion of water in the axon portion of neurons is predominantly anisotropic along the longitudinal direction of the elongated, fiber-like axons [MMM+02]. This property has made DTI an emerging source of information about the structural integrity of axons and axonal connectivity between brain regions, both of which are thought to be disrupted in a broad range of medical disorders including multiple sclerosis, cerebrovascular disease, and autism [Mos02, FCI+01, JLH+99, BGKM+04, BJB+03].

  11. HDlive rendering images of the fetal stomach: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubashiri, Eisuke; Abe, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Yukio; Akutagawa, Noriyuki; Kuroki, Katumaru; Sugawara, Masaki; Maeda, Nobuhiko; Minami, Kunihiro; Nomura, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to show reconstruction of the fetal stomach using the HDlive rendering mode in ultrasound. Seventeen healthy singleton fetuses at 18-34 weeks' gestational age were observed using the HDlive rendering mode of ultrasound in utero. In all of the fetuses, we identified specific spatial structures, including macroscopic anatomical features (e.g., the pyrous, cardia, fundus, and great curvature) of the fetal stomach, using the HDlive rendering mode. In particular, HDlive rendering images showed remarkably fine details that appeared as if they were being viewed under an endoscope, with visible rugal folds after 27 weeks' gestational age. Our study suggests that the HDlive rendering mode can be used as an additional method for evaluating the fetal stomach. The HDlive rendering mode shows detailed 3D structural images and anatomically realistic images of the fetal stomach. This technique may be effective in prenatal diagnosis for examining detailed information of fetal organs.

  12. Efficient high-quality volume rendering of SPH data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraedrich, Roland; Auer, Stefan; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    High quality volume rendering of SPH data requires a complex order-dependent resampling of particle quantities along the view rays. In this paper we present an efficient approach to perform this task using a novel view-space discretization of the simulation domain. Our method draws upon recent work on GPU-based particle voxelization for the efficient resampling of particles into uniform grids. We propose a new technique that leverages a perspective grid to adaptively discretize the view-volume, giving rise to a continuous level-of-detail sampling structure and reducing memory requirements compared to a uniform grid. In combination with a level-of-detail representation of the particle set, the perspective grid allows effectively reducing the amount of primitives to be processed at run-time. We demonstrate the quality and performance of our method for the rendering of fluid and gas dynamics SPH simulations consisting of many millions of particles.

  13. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Abdellah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourier volume rendering (FVR is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its O(N2log⁡N time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are O(N3 computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures.

  14. High Performance GPU-Based Fourier Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Marwan; Eldeib, Ayman; Sharawi, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Fourier volume rendering (FVR) is a significant visualization technique that has been used widely in digital radiography. As a result of its (N (2)log⁡N) time complexity, it provides a faster alternative to spatial domain volume rendering algorithms that are (N (3)) computationally complex. Relying on the Fourier projection-slice theorem, this technique operates on the spectral representation of a 3D volume instead of processing its spatial representation to generate attenuation-only projections that look like X-ray radiographs. Due to the rapid evolution of its underlying architecture, the graphics processing unit (GPU) became an attractive competent platform that can deliver giant computational raw power compared to the central processing unit (CPU) on a per-dollar-basis. The introduction of the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) technology enables embarrassingly-parallel algorithms to run efficiently on CUDA-capable GPU architectures. In this work, a high performance GPU-accelerated implementation of the FVR pipeline on CUDA-enabled GPUs is presented. This proposed implementation can achieve a speed-up of 117x compared to a single-threaded hybrid implementation that uses the CPU and GPU together by taking advantage of executing the rendering pipeline entirely on recent GPU architectures.

  15. Optical coherence tomography with online visualization of more than seven rendered volumes per second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Joachim; Hillmann, Dierck; Lankenau, Eva; Winter, Christan; Oelckers, Stefan; Koch, Peter; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2010-03-01

    Nearly real-time visualization of 3-D volumes is crucial for the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) during microsurgery. With an ultrahigh speed spectral domain OCT coupled to a surgical microscope, on-line display of 7.2 rendered volumes at 87 megapixels per second is demonstrated. Calculating the A-scans from the spectra is done on a quad-core personal computer (PC), while dedicated software for the 3-D rendering is executed on a high performance video card. Imaging speed is practically only limited by the readout of the camera. First experiments show the feasibility of real-time 3-D OCT for guided interventions.

  16. Efficient visibility encoding for dynamic illumination in direct volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronander, Joel; Jönsson, Daniel; Löw, Joakim; Ljung, Patric; Ynnerman, Anders; Unger, Jonas

    2012-03-01

    We present an algorithm that enables real-time dynamic shading in direct volume rendering using general lighting, including directional lights, point lights, and environment maps. Real-time performance is achieved by encoding local and global volumetric visibility using spherical harmonic (SH) basis functions stored in an efficient multiresolution grid over the extent of the volume. Our method enables high-frequency shadows in the spatial domain, but is limited to a low-frequency approximation of visibility and illumination in the angular domain. In a first pass, level of detail (LOD) selection in the grid is based on the current transfer function setting. This enables rapid online computation and SH projection of the local spherical distribution of visibility information. Using a piecewise integration of the SH coefficients over the local regions, the global visibility within the volume is then computed. By representing the light sources using their SH projections, the integral over lighting, visibility, and isotropic phase functions can be efficiently computed during rendering. The utility of our method is demonstrated in several examples showing the generality and interactive performance of the approach.

  17. A cache-friendly sampling strategy for texture-based volume rendering on GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The texture-based volume rendering is a memory-intensive algorithm. Its performance relies heavily on the performance of the texture cache. However, most existing texture-based volume rendering methods blindly map computational resources to texture memory and result in incoherent memory access patterns, causing low cache hit rates in certain cases. The distance between samples taken by threads of an atomic scheduling unit (e.g. a warp of 32 threads in CUDA of the GPU is a crucial factor that affects the texture cache performance. Based on this fact, we present a new sampling strategy, called Warp Marching, for the ray-casting algorithm of texture-based volume rendering. The effects of different sample organizations and different thread-pixel mappings in the ray-casting algorithm are thoroughly analyzed. Also, a pipeline manner color blending approach is introduced and the power of warp-level GPU operations is leveraged to improve the efficiency of parallel executions on the GPU. In addition, the rendering performance of the Warp Marching is view-independent, and it outperforms existing empty space skipping techniques in scenarios that need to render large dynamic volumes in a low resolution image. Through a series of micro-benchmarking and real-life data experiments, we rigorously analyze our sampling strategies and demonstrate significant performance enhancements over existing sampling methods.

  18. Dynamic Resolution in GPU-Accelerated Volume Rendering to Autostereoscopic Multiview Lenticular Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ruijters

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The generation of multiview stereoscopic images of large volume rendered data demands an enormous amount of calculations. We propose a method for hardware accelerated volume rendering of medical data sets to multiview lenticular displays, offering interactive manipulation throughout. The method is based on buffering GPU-accelerated direct volume rendered visualizations of the individual views from their respective focal spot positions, and composing the output signal for the multiview lenticular screen in a second pass. This compositing phase is facilitated by the fact that the view assignment per subpixel is static, and therefore can be precomputed. We decoupled the resolution of the individual views from the resolution of the composited signal, and adjust the resolution on-the-fly, depending on the available processing resources, in order to maintain interactive refresh rates. The optimal resolution for the volume rendered views is determined by means of an analysis of the lattice of the output signal for the lenticular screen in the Fourier domain.

  19. Forensic 3D Visualization of CT Data Using Cinematic Volume Rendering: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Lars C; Schweitzer, Wolf; Gascho, Dominic; Ruder, Thomas D; Flach, Patricia M; Thali, Michael J; Ampanozi, Garyfalia

    2017-02-01

    The 3D volume-rendering technique (VRT) is commonly used in forensic radiology. Its main function is to explain medical findings to state attorneys, judges, or police representatives. New visualization algorithms permit the generation of almost photorealistic volume renderings of CT datasets. The objective of this study is to present and compare a variety of radiologic findings to illustrate the differences between and the advantages and limitations of the current VRT and the physically based cinematic rendering technique (CRT). Seventy volunteers were shown VRT and CRT reconstructions of 10 different cases. They were asked to mark the findings on the images and rate them in terms of realism and understandability. A total of 48 of the 70 questionnaires were returned and included in the analysis. On the basis of most of the findings presented, CRT appears to be equal or superior to VRT with respect to the realism and understandability of the visualized findings. Overall, in terms of realism, the difference between the techniques was statistically significant (p 0.05). CRT, which is similar to conventional VRT, is not primarily intended for diagnostic radiologic image analysis, and therefore it should be used primarily as a tool to deliver visual information in the form of radiologic image reports. Using CRT for forensic visualization might have advantages over using VRT if conveying a high degree of visual realism is of importance. Most of the shortcomings of CRT have to do with the software being an early prototype.

  20. Lighting System for Visual Perception Enhancement in Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Kaufman, Arie E

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a lighting system that enhances the visual cues in a rendered image for the perception of 3D volumetric objects. We divide the lighting effects into global and local effects, and deploy three types of directional lights: the key light and accessory lights (fill and detail lights). The key light provides both lighting effects and carries the visual cues for the perception of local and global shapes and depth. The cues for local shapes are conveyed by gradient; those for global shapes are carried by shadows; and those for depth are provided by shadows and translucent objects. Fill lights produce global effects to increase the perceptibility. Detail lights generate local effects to improve the cues for local shapes. Our method quantifies the perception and uses an exhaustive search to set the lights. It configures accessory lights with the consideration of preserving the global impression conveyed by the key light. It ensures the feeling of smooth light movements in animations. With simplification, it achieves interactive frame rates and produces results that are visually indistinguishable from results using the nonsimplified algorithm. The major contributions of this paper are our lighting system, perception measurement and lighting design algorithm with our indistinguishable simplification.

  1. Establishing the 3-D finite element solid model of femurs in partial by volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinwang; Zhong, Wuxue; Zhu, Haibo; Chen, Yun; Xu, Lingjun; Zhu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    It remains rare to report three-dimensional (3-D) finite element solid model of femurs in partial by volume rendering method, though several methods of femoral 3-D finite element modeling are already available. We aim to analyze the advantages of the modeling method by establishing the 3-D finite element solid model of femurs in partial by volume rendering. A 3-D finite element model of the normal human femurs, made up of three anatomic structures: cortical bone, cancellous bone and pulp cavity, was constructed followed by pretreatment of the CT original image. Moreover, the finite-element analysis was carried on different material properties, three types of materials given for cortical bone, six assigned for cancellous bone, and single for pulp cavity. The established 3-D finite element of femurs contains three anatomical structures: cortical bone, cancellous bone, and pulp cavity. The compressive stress primarily concentrated in the medial surfaces of femur, especially in the calcar femorale. Compared with whole modeling by volume rendering method, the 3-D finite element solid model created in partial is more real and fit for finite element analysis. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Color-coded depth information in volume-rendered magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedby, Orjan; Edsborg, Karin; Henriksson, John

    2004-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) and Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) data are usually presented using Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) or Volume Rendering Technique (VRT), but these often fail to demonstrate a stenosis if the projection angle is not suitably chosen. In order to make vascular stenoses visible in projection images independent of the choice of viewing angle, a method is proposed to supplement these images with colors representing the local caliber of the vessel. After preprocessing the volume image with a median filter, segmentation is performed by thresholding, and a Euclidean distance transform is applied. The distance to the background from each voxel in the vessel is mapped to a color. These colors can either be rendered directly using MIP or be presented together with opacity information based on the original image using VRT. The method was tested in a synthetic dataset containing a cylindrical vessel with stenoses in varying angles. The results suggest that the visibility of stenoses is enhanced by the color information. In clinical feasibility experiments, the technique was applied to clinical MRA data. The results are encouraging and indicate that the technique can be used with clinical images.

  3. Autostereoscopic image creation by hyperview matrix controlled single pixel rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2017-06-01

    technology just with a simple equation. This formula can be utilized to create a specific hyperview matrix for a certain 3D display - independent of the technology used. A hyperview matrix may contain the references to loads of images and act as an instruction for a subsequent rendering process of particular pixels. Naturally, a single pixel will deliver an image with no resolution and does not provide any idea of the rendered scene. However, by implementing the method of pixel recycling, a 3D image can be perceived, even if all source images are different. It will be proven that several millions of perspectives can be rendered with the support of GPU rendering and benefit from the hyperview matrix. In result, a conventional autostereoscopic display, which is designed to represent only a few perspectives can be used to show a hyperview image by using a suitable hyperview matrix. It will be shown that a millions-of-views-hyperview-image can be presented on a conventional autostereoscopic display. For such an hyperview image it is required that all pixels of the displays are allocated by different source images. Controlled by the hyperview matrix, an adapted renderer can render a full hyperview image in real-time.

  4. Clustered deep shadow maps for integrated polyhedral and volume rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Bornik, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a hardware-accelerated approach for shadow computation in scenes containing both complex volumetric objects and polyhedral models. Our system is the first hardware accelerated complete implementation of deep shadow maps, which unifies the computation of volumetric and geometric shadows. Up to now such unified computation was limited to software-only rendering . Previous hardware accelerated techniques can handle only geometric or only volumetric scenes - both resulting in the loss of important properties of the original concept. Our approach supports interactive rendering of polyhedrally bounded volumetric objects on the GPU based on ray casting. The ray casting can be conveniently used for both the shadow map computation and the rendering. We show how anti-aliased high-quality shadows are feasible in scenes composed of multiple overlapping translucent objects, and how sparse scenes can be handled efficiently using clustered deep shadow maps. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Simulation and training of lumbar punctures using haptic volume rendering and a 6DOF haptic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färber, Matthias; Heller, Julika; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The lumbar puncture is performed by inserting a needle into the spinal chord of the patient to inject medicaments or to extract liquor. The training of this procedure is usually done on the patient guided by experienced supervisors. A virtual reality lumbar puncture simulator has been developed in order to minimize the training costs and the patient's risk. We use a haptic device with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) to feedback forces that resist needle insertion and rotation. An improved haptic volume rendering approach is used to calculate the forces. This approach makes use of label data of relevant structures like skin, bone, muscles or fat and original CT data that contributes information about image structures that can not be segmented. A real-time 3D visualization with optional stereo view shows the punctured region. 2D visualizations of orthogonal slices enable a detailed impression of the anatomical context. The input data consisting of CT and label data and surface models of relevant structures is defined in an XML file together with haptic rendering and visualization parameters. In a first evaluation the visible human male data has been used to generate a virtual training body. Several users with different medical experience tested the lumbar puncture trainer. The simulator gives a good haptic and visual impression of the needle insertion and the haptic volume rendering technique enables the feeling of unsegmented structures. Especially, the restriction of transversal needle movement together with rotation constraints enabled by the 6DOF device facilitate a realistic puncture simulation.

  6. Volume rendering versus maximum intensity projection in CT angiography: what works best, when, and why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Elliot K; Ney, Derek R; Heath, David G; Corl, Frank M; Horton, Karen M; Johnson, Pamela T

    2006-01-01

    The introduction and widespread availability of 16-section multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) technology and, more recently, 64-section scanners, has greatly advanced the role of CT angiography in clinical practice. CT angiography has become a key component of state-of-the-art imaging, with applications ranging from oncology (eg, staging of pancreatic or renal cancer) to classic vascular imaging (eg, evaluation of aortic aneurysms and renal artery stenoses) as well as newer techniques such as coronary artery imaging and peripheral runoff studies. With an average of 400-1000 images in each volume data set, three-dimensional postprocessing is crucial to volume visualization. Radiologists now have workstations that provide capabilities for evaluation of these data sets by using a range of software programs and processing tools. Although different systems have unique capabilities and functionality, all provide the options of volume rendering and maximum intensity projection for image display and analysis. These two postprocessing techniques have different advantages and disadvantages when used in clinical practice, and it is important that radiologists understand when and how each technique should be used. Copyright RSNA, 2006.

  7. Functionality and Performance Visualization of the Distributed High Quality Volume Renderer (HVR)

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Sara

    2012-07-01

    Volume rendering systems are designed to provide means to enable scientists and a variety of experts to interactively explore volume data through 3D views of the volume. However, volume rendering techniques are computationally intensive tasks. Moreover, parallel distributed volume rendering systems and multi-threading architectures were suggested as natural solutions to provide an acceptable volume rendering performance for very large volume data sizes, such as Electron Microscopy data (EM). This in turn adds another level of complexity when developing and manipulating volume rendering systems. Given that distributed parallel volume rendering systems are among the most complex systems to develop, trace and debug, it is obvious that traditional debugging tools do not provide enough support. As a consequence, there is a great demand to provide tools that are able to facilitate the manipulation of such systems. This can be achieved by utilizing the power of compute graphics in designing visual representations that reflect how the system works and that visualize the current performance state of the system.The work presented is categorized within the field of software Visualization, where Visualization is used to serve visualizing and understanding various software. In this thesis, a number of visual representations that reflect a number of functionality and performance aspects of the distributed HVR, a high quality volume renderer system that uses various techniques to visualize large volume sizes interactively. This work is provided to visualize different stages of the parallel volume rendering pipeline of HVR. This is along with means of performance analysis through a number of flexible and dynamic visualizations that reflect the current state of the system and enables manipulation of them at runtime. Those visualization are aimed to facilitate debugging, understanding and analyzing the distributed HVR.

  8. In Vivo CT Direct Volume Rendering: A Three-Dimensional Anatomical Description of the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Trimarchi, Fabio; Cacciola, Alberto; Cinquegrani, Maria; Duca, Antonio; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Alati, Emanuela; Gaeta, Michele; Milardi, Demetrio

    2016-01-01

    Since cardiac anatomy continues to play an important role in the practice of medicine and in the development of medical devices, the study of the heart in three dimensions is particularly useful to understand its real structure, function and proper location in the body. This study demonstrates a fine use of direct volume rendering, processing the data set images obtained by Computed Tomography (CT) of the heart of 5 subjects with age range between 18 and 42 years (2 male, 3 female), with no history of any overt cardiac disease. The cardiac structure in CT images was first extracted from the thorax by marking manually the regions of interest on the computer, and then it was stacked to create new volumetric data. The use of a specific algorithm allowed us to observe with a good perception of depth the heart and the skeleton of the thorax at the same time. Besides, in all examined subjects, it was possible to depict its structure and its position within the body and to study the integrity of papillary muscles, the fibrous tissue of cardiac valve and chordae tendineae and the course of coronary arteries. Our results demonstrated that one of the greatest advantages of algorithmic modifications of direct volume rendering parameters is that this method provides much necessary information in a single radiologic study. It implies a better accuracy in the study of the heart, being complementary to other diagnostic methods and facilitating the therapeutic plans.

  9. Feed-forward volume rendering algorithm for moderately parallel MIMD machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagel, Roni

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for direct volume rendering on parallel and vector processors are investigated. Volumes are transformed efficiently on parallel processors by dividing the data into slices and beams of voxels. Equal sized sets of slices along one axis are distributed to processors. Parallelism is achieved at two levels. Because each slice can be transformed independently of others, processors transform their assigned slices with no communication, thus providing maximum possible parallelism at the first level. Within each slice, consecutive beams are incrementally transformed using coherency in the transformation computation. Also, coherency across slices can be exploited to further enhance performance. This coherency yields the second level of parallelism through the use of the vector processing or pipelining. Other ongoing efforts include investigations into image reconstruction techniques, load balancing strategies, and improving performance.

  10. Adaptive B-spline volume representation of measured BRDF data for photorealistic rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hyungjun; Lee, Joo-Haeng

    2015-01-01

    Measured bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) data have been used to represent complex interaction between lights and surface materials for photorealistic rendering. However, their massive size makes it hard to adopt them in practical rendering applications. In this paper, we propose an adaptive method for B-spline volume representation of measured BRDF data. It basically performs approximate B-spline volume lofting, which decomposes the problem into three sub-problems of mu...

  11. Three-dimensional volume rendering of multidetector-row CT data: applicable for emergency radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Marcel O.; Kubin, Klaus; Mang, Thomas; Hoermann, Marcus; Metz, Viktor M. E-mail: viktor.metz@univie.ac.at

    2003-10-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MD-CT) not only creates new opportunities but also challenges for medical imaging. Isotropic imaging allows in-depth views into anatomy and disease but the concomitant dramatic increase of image data requires new approaches to visualize, analyze and store CT data. The common diagnostic reviewing process slice by slice becomes more and more time consuming as the number of slice increases, while on the other hand CT volume data sets could be used for three-dimensional visualization. These techniques allow for comprehensive interpretation of extent of fracture, amount of dislocation and fragmentation in a three-dimensional highly detailed setting. Further more, using minimal invasive techniques like CT angiography, new opportunities for fast emergency room patient's work up arise. But the most common application is still trauma of the muskuloskeletal system as well as face and head. The following is a brief review of recent literature on volume rendering technique and some exemplary applications for the emergency room.

  12. Evaluation of the middle and inner ear structures: comparison of hybrid rendering, virtual endoscopy and axial 2D source images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seemann, M.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Seemann, O. [Department of Psychiatry, Klinikum Innenstadt, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Bonel, H.; Allen, C.M.; Reiser, M.F. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Suckfuell, M.; Naumann, A. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Englmeier, K.H. [Department of Medical Informatics and Health System Research, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Recent developments in 3D reconstructions can enhance the quality and diagnostic value of axial 2D image data sets with direct benefits for clinical practice. To show the possible advantages of a hybrid rendering method [color-coded 3D shaded-surface display (SSD)- and volume rendering method] with the possibility of virtual endoscopy we have specifically highlighted the use in relation to the middle and inner ear structures. We examined 12 patients with both normal findings and postoperative changes, using image data sets from high-resolution spiral computed tomography (HRSCT). The middle and inner ear was segmented using an interactive threshold interval density volume-growing method and visualized with a color-coded SSD rendering method. The temporal bone was visualized using a transparent volume rendering method. The 3D- and virtual reconstructions were compared with the axial 2D source images. The evaluated middle and inner ear structures could be seen in their complete form and correct topographical relationship, and the 3D- and virtual reconstructions indicated an improved representation and spatial orientation of these structures. A hybrid and virtual endoscopic method could add information and improve the value of imaging in the diagnosis and management of patients with middle or inner ear diseases making the understanding and interpretation of axial 2D CT image data sets easier. The introduction of an improved rendering algorithm aids radiological diagnostics, medical education, surgical planning, surgical training, and postoperative assessment. (orig.)

  13. Flow Visualization Techniques for CDF using Volume Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawfis, R.A.; Shen, H-W.; Max, N.

    2000-07-10

    As simulations have migrated towards three-dimensions, new tools for examining the resulting complex datasets have been required. Much progress has been achieved in the area of scientific visualization towards this goal. However, most of the research has focused on the representation and understanding of a single scalar field. Some nice results have been achieved for vector or flow fields. This paper reviews several of these techniques, organizes them by their approach and complexity and presents some observations on their benefits and limitations. Several example images are used to highlight the character of these techniques.

  14. Shwirl: Meaningful coloring of spectral cube data with volume rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohl, Dany

    2017-04-01

    Shwirl visualizes spectral data cubes with meaningful coloring methods. The program has been developed to investigate transfer functions, which combines volumetric elements (or voxels) to set the color, and graphics shaders, functions used to compute several properties of the final image such as color, depth, and/or transparency, as enablers for scientific visualization of astronomical data. The program uses Astropy (ascl:1304.002) to handle FITS files and World Coordinate System, Qt (and PyQt) for the user interface, and VisPy, an object-oriented Python visualization library binding onto OpenGL.

  15. SparseLeap: Efficient Empty Space Skipping for Large-Scale Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Hadwiger, Markus

    2017-08-28

    Recent advances in data acquisition produce volume data of very high resolution and large size, such as terabyte-sized microscopy volumes. These data often contain many fine and intricate structures, which pose huge challenges for volume rendering, and make it particularly important to efficiently skip empty space. This paper addresses two major challenges: (1) The complexity of large volumes containing fine structures often leads to highly fragmented space subdivisions that make empty regions hard to skip efficiently. (2) The classification of space into empty and non-empty regions changes frequently, because the user or the evaluation of an interactive query activate a different set of objects, which makes it unfeasible to pre-compute a well-adapted space subdivision. We describe the novel SparseLeap method for efficient empty space skipping in very large volumes, even around fine structures. The main performance characteristic of SparseLeap is that it moves the major cost of empty space skipping out of the ray-casting stage. We achieve this via a hybrid strategy that balances the computational load between determining empty ray segments in a rasterization (object-order) stage, and sampling non-empty volume data in the ray-casting (image-order) stage. Before ray-casting, we exploit the fast hardware rasterization of GPUs to create a ray segment list for each pixel, which identifies non-empty regions along the ray. The ray-casting stage then leaps over empty space without hierarchy traversal. Ray segment lists are created by rasterizing a set of fine-grained, view-independent bounding boxes. Frame coherence is exploited by re-using the same bounding boxes unless the set of active objects changes. We show that SparseLeap scales better to large, sparse data than standard octree empty space skipping.

  16. SparseLeap: Efficient Empty Space Skipping for Large-Scale Volume Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwiger, Markus; Al-Awami, Ali K; Beyer, Johanna; Agus, Marco; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in data acquisition produce volume data of very high resolution and large size, such as terabyte-sized microscopy volumes. These data often contain many fine and intricate structures, which pose huge challenges for volume rendering, and make it particularly important to efficiently skip empty space. This paper addresses two major challenges: (1) The complexity of large volumes containing fine structures often leads to highly fragmented space subdivisions that make empty regions hard to skip efficiently. (2) The classification of space into empty and non-empty regions changes frequently, because the user or the evaluation of an interactive query activate a different set of objects, which makes it unfeasible to pre-compute a well-adapted space subdivision. We describe the novel SparseLeap method for efficient empty space skipping in very large volumes, even around fine structures. The main performance characteristic of SparseLeap is that it moves the major cost of empty space skipping out of the ray-casting stage. We achieve this via a hybrid strategy that balances the computational load between determining empty ray segments in a rasterization (object-order) stage, and sampling non-empty volume data in the ray-casting (image-order) stage. Before ray-casting, we exploit the fast hardware rasterization of GPUs to create a ray segment list for each pixel, which identifies non-empty regions along the ray. The ray-casting stage then leaps over empty space without hierarchy traversal. Ray segment lists are created by rasterizing a set of fine-grained, view-independent bounding boxes. Frame coherence is exploited by re-using the same bounding boxes unless the set of active objects changes. We show that SparseLeap scales better to large, sparse data than standard octree empty space skipping.

  17. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  18. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.T.C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  19. Role of volume rendered 3-D computed tomography in conservative management of trauma-related thoracic injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OʼLeary, Donal Peter

    2012-09-01

    Pneumatic nail guns are a tool used commonly in the construction industry and are widely available. Accidental injuries from nail guns are common, and several cases of suicide using a nail gun have been reported. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging, together with echocardiography, has been shown to be the gold standard for investigation of these cases. We present a case of a 55-year-old man who presented to the accident and emergency unit of a community hospital following an accidental pneumatic nail gun injury to his thorax. Volume-rendered CT of the thorax allowed an accurate assessment of the thoracic injuries sustained by this patient. As there was no evidence of any acute life-threatening injury, a sternotomy was avoided and the patient was observed closely until discharge. In conclusion, volume-rendered 3-dimensional CT can greatly help in the decision to avoid an unnecessary sternotomy in patients with a thoracic nail gun injury.

  20. Comparison of grayscale and color-scale renderings of digital medical images for diagnostic interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Akio; Kamakura, Aoi; Kaneko, Youhei; Kitaoka, Tomoya; Hayashi, Norio; Taniguchi, Anna

    2017-09-01

    Medical images are increasingly being rendered as digital images that are displayed on a monitor to provide diagnoses. However, these images are often rendered in grayscale. In this context, we compare the detectability of low-contrast signals between digital grayscale images and color-scale images. Low-contrast phantom images were rendered with the use of five color tables (gray, blue, red, yellow, and green). The 32 acquired images sorted in random order were evaluated by nine observers, and their observations were subjected to receiver operating characteristic analysis. In addition, the evaluators' preferred color and their eye fatigue upon image observation were compared. The low-contrast resolutions of yellow and green color scales were superior to that of grayscale. The use of yellow resulted in the least eye fatigue, and importantly our results indicate that the interpretation of digital medical images can be improved when these images are rendered in a "yellow scale" rather than grayscale.

  1. A comparison of gradient estimation methods for volume rendering on unstructured meshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Carlos D; Hero, Robert; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a study of gradient estimation methods for rendering unstructured-mesh volume data. Gradient estimation is necessary for rendering shaded isosurfaces and specular highlights, which provide important cues for shape and depth. Gradient estimation has been widely studied and deployed for regular-grid volume data to achieve local illumination effects, but has been, otherwise, for unstructured-mesh data. As a result, most of the unstructured-mesh volume visualizations made so far were unlit. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of gradient estimation methods for unstructured meshes with respect to their cost and performance. Through a number of benchmarks, we discuss the effects of mesh quality and scalar function complexity in the accuracy of the reconstruction, and their impact in lighting-enabled volume rendering. Based on our study, we also propose two heuristic improvements to the gradient reconstruction process. The first heuristic improves the rendering quality with a hybrid algorithm that combines the results of the multiple reconstruction methods, based on the properties of a given mesh. The second heuristic improves the efficiency of its GPU implementation, by restricting the computation of the gradient on a fixed-size local neighborhood. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Clinical Application of an Open-Source 3D Volume Rendering Software to Neurosurgical Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes de Oliveira Santos, Bruno; Silva da Costa, Marcos Devanir; Centeno, Ricardo Silva; Cavalheiro, Sergio; Antônio de Paiva Neto, Manoel; Lawton, Michael T; Chaddad-Neto, Feres

    2018-02-01

    Preoperative recognition of the anatomic individualities of each patient can help to achieve more precise and less invasive approaches. It also may help to anticipate potential complications and intraoperative difficulties. Here we describe the use, accuracy, and precision of a free tool for planning microsurgical approaches using 3-dimensional (3D) reconstructions from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We used the 3D volume rendering tool of a free open-source software program for 3D reconstruction of images of surgical sites obtained by MRI volumetric acquisition. We recorded anatomic reference points, such as the sulcus and gyrus, and vascularization patterns for intraoperative localization of lesions. Lesion locations were confirmed during surgery by intraoperative ultrasound and/or electrocorticography and later by postoperative MRI. Between August 2015 and September 2016, a total of 23 surgeries were performed using this technique for 9 low-grade gliomas, 7 high-grade gliomas, 4 cortical dysplasias, and 3 arteriovenous malformations. The technique helped delineate lesions with an overall accuracy of 2.6 ± 1.0 mm. 3D reconstructions were successfully performed in all patients, and images showed sulcus, gyrus, and venous patterns corresponding to the intraoperative images. All lesion areas were confirmed both intraoperatively and at the postoperative evaluation. With the technique described herein, it was possible to successfully perform 3D reconstruction of the cortical surface. This reconstruction tool may serve as an adjunct to neuronavigation systems or may be used alone when such a system is unavailable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Digital forensic osteology: morphological sexing of skeletal remains using volume-rendered cranial CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsthaler, Frank; Kettner, Mattias; Gehl, Axel; Verhoff, M A

    2010-02-25

    Because of the increasing lack of recent bone collections, ethical issues concerning maceration procedures, and progress in radiological imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) scans offer an alternative to traditional anthropological bone collection. The present study examined volume-rendered cranial CT (CCT) scans from 50 crania to morphologically evaluate sex characteristics. CCT scans were performed and scored by two teams (Teams A and B) of two examiners each (2x50=100 examinations) to evaluate the occurrence and/or absence of morphological traits. Altogether, 60 of 100 crania (31 Team A+29 Team B) crania were determined to be male, and 40 (19 Team A+21 Team B) were determined to be female when using the scoring system adapted from Knussmann. These results imply a sex determination accuracy rate of 96%. Only in one case was recalculation of weighting factors necessary to determine one additional correct classification. As a single parameter, arcus superciliaris evaluation permitted the most accurate sex determination (female, 84.2%; male, 85.5%). No significant difference in accuracy rates was observed between the two sexes (pforensic casework and the systematic reevaluation and improvement of classical anthropological methods and their adaptation to changing populations. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Full body virtual autopsies using a state-of-the-art volume rendering pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Patric; Winskog, Calle; Persson, Anders; Lundström, Claes; Ynnerman, Anders

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for virtual autopsies based on interactive 3D visualizations of large scale, high resolution data from CT-scans of human cadavers. The procedure is described using examples from forensic medicine and the added value and future potential of virtual autopsies is shown from a medical and forensic perspective. Based on the technical demands of the procedure state-of-the-art volume rendering techniques are applied and refined to enable real-time, full body virtual autopsies involving gigabyte sized data on standard GPUs. The techniques applied include transfer function based data reduction using level-of-detail selection and multi-resolution rendering techniques. The paper also describes a data management component for large, out-of-core data sets and an extension to the GPU-based raycaster for efficient dual TF rendering. Detailed benchmarks of the pipeline are presented using data sets from forensic cases.

  5. FluoRender: An application of 2D image space methods for 3D and 4D confocal microscopy data visualization in neurobiology research

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Yong

    2012-02-01

    2D image space methods are processing methods applied after the volumetric data are projected and rendered into the 2D image space, such as 2D filtering, tone mapping and compositing. In the application domain of volume visualization, most 2D image space methods can be carried out more efficiently than their 3D counterparts. Most importantly, 2D image space methods can be used to enhance volume visualization quality when applied together with volume rendering methods. In this paper, we present and discuss the applications of a series of 2D image space methods as enhancements to confocal microscopy visualizations, including 2D tone mapping, 2D compositing, and 2D color mapping. These methods are easily integrated with our existing confocal visualization tool, FluoRender, and the outcome is a full-featured visualization system that meets neurobiologists\\' demands for qualitative analysis of confocal microscopy data. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Image rendering and processing of magnetic resonance angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ooijen, P.M.A.; Kuijpers, Th.J.A.; Boeve, W.J.; De Groot, J.C.; Oudkerk, M.

    2000-01-01

    New imaging sequences with increasing spatial and temporal resolution are introduced frequently in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to perform noninvasive angiography both with and without contrast media for the enhancement of the vessels. These new sequences produce a growing amount of data to be

  7. The LLNL High Accuracy Volume Renderer for Unstructured Data: Capabilities, Current Limits, and Potential for ASCI/VIEWS Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P L; Max, N L

    2001-06-04

    This report describes a volume rendering system for unstructured data, especially finite element data, that creates images with very high accuracy. The system will currently handle meshes whose cells are either linear or quadratic tetrahedra, or meshes with mixed cell types: tetrahedra, bricks, prisms, and pyramids. The cells may have nonplanar facets. Whenever possible, exact mathematical solutions for the radiance integrals and for interpolation are used. Accurate semitransparent shaded isosurfaces may be embedded in the volume rendering. For very small cells, subpixel accumulation by splatting is used to avoid sampling error. A new exact and efficient visibility ordering algorithm is described. The most accurate images are generated in software, however, more efficient algorithms utilizing graphics hardware may also be selected. The report describes the parallelization of the system for a distributed-shared memory multiprocessor machine, and concludes by discussing the system's limits, desirable future work, and ways to extend the system so as to be compatible with projected ASCI/VIEWS architectures.

  8. On image rendering methods for improved image consistency in PACS environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Zhimin; Zhang, Jane; Lu, Huihai; Wandtke, John; Foos, David

    2010-03-01

    The average workload per full-time equivalent (FTE) radiologist increased by 70% from1991-1992 to 2006- 2007. The increase is mainly due to the increase (34%) in the number of procedures, particularly in 3D imaging procedures. New technologies such as picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and embodied viewing capability were accredited for an improved workflow environment leading to the increased productivity. However, the need for further workflow improvement is still in demand as the number of procedures continues growing. Advanced and streamlined viewing capability in PACS environment could potentially reduce the reading time, thus further increasing the productivity. With the increasing number of 3D image procedures, radiographic procedures (excluding mammography) have remained their critical roles in screening and diagnosis of various diseases. Although radiographic procedures decreased in shares from 70% to 49.5%, the total number has remained the same from 1991-1992 to 2006- 2007. Inconsistency in image quality for radiographic images has been identified as an area of concern. It affects the ability of clinicians to interpret images effectively and efficiently in areas where diagnosis, for example, in screening mammography and portable chest radiography, requires a comparison of current images with priors. These priors can potentially have different image quality. Variations in image acquisition techniques (x-ray exposure), patient and apparatus positioning, and image processing are the factors attributed to the inconsistency in image quality. The inconsistency in image quality, for example, in contrast may require manual image manipulation (i.e., windowing and leveling) of images to accomplish an optimal comparison to detect the subtle changes. We developed a tone-scale image rendering technique which improves the image consistency of chest images across time and modality. The rendering controls both the global and local contrast for a

  9. Three-Dimensional Volume Rendering of Entrapped Malecot Nephrostomy Catheter by Granulation Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Sugihara

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An 87-year-old man undergoing radical cystectomy and bilateral nephrostomy visited our hospital 19 days postoperatively because of a lack of urine flow from the left 14-Fr Malecot nephrostomy catheter. The catheter was apparently firmly anchored to the kidney, and an attempt to reposition the catheter failed. Three-dimensional computed tomography volume rendering indicated a deformity of the left catheter compared with the right, implying that something was lodged in the Malecot flanges. Surgical removal of the catheter 2 days later revealed granulation tissue overbridging the Malecot wings. We cut the tissue, and the catheter was successfully exchanged.

  10. Pulmonary nodules: sensitivity of maximum intensity projection versus that of volume rendering of 3D multidetector CT data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peloschek, Philipp; Sailer, Johannes; Weber, Michael; Herold, Christian J.; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively compare maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR) of multidetector computed tomographic (CT) data for the detection of small intrapulmonary nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This institutional review board-approved prospective study included 20 oncology

  11. Fast interactive real-time volume rendering of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography: an implementation for low-end computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Shiota, T.; Corsi, C.; Lamberti, C.; Thomas, J. D.

    2002-01-01

    Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) is an innovative cardiac imaging modality. However, partly due to lack of user-friendly software, RT3DE has not been widely accepted as a clinical tool. The object of this study was to develop and implement a fast and interactive volume renderer of RT3DE datasets designed for a clinical environment where speed and simplicity are not secondary to accuracy. Thirty-six patients (20 regurgitation, 8 normal, 8 cardiomyopathy) were imaged using RT3DE. Using our newly developed software, all 3D data sets were rendered in real-time throughout the cardiac cycle and assessment of cardiac function and pathology was performed for each case. The real-time interactive volume visualization system is user friendly and instantly provides consistent and reliable 3D images without expensive workstations or dedicated hardware. We believe that this novel tool can be used clinically for dynamic visualization of cardiac anatomy.

  12. Affine-representation- based Calibrationfree Augmented Reality Using Image-based Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Can; Ma, Lizhuang

    2005-01-01

    Affine-representation-based calibrationfree augmented reality avoids the complicated measurements and calibration of the camera and renders virtual objects without any metric information, thus provides better usability over traditional augmented reality systems. However, the lack of metric information makes lighting computation impossible. In this paper, a novel image-based approach is proposed to simulate the lighting effect on the virtual object. The approach requires a preprocess phase in which the source images are made, and in rendering phase, the source images are selected according to the camera viewing direction. This approach provides virtual objects rendered under affine-based calibration-free augmented reality systems with a 3-D look and feel, and thus will improve the quality of the video output and the user experience under such systems.

  13. State of the Art in Transfer Functions for Direct Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Ljung, Patric

    2016-07-04

    A central topic in scientific visualization is the transfer function (TF) for volume rendering. The TF serves a fundamental role in translating scalar and multivariate data into color and opacity to express and reveal the relevant features present in the data studied. Beyond this core functionality, TFs also serve as a tool for encoding and utilizing domain knowledge and as an expression for visual design of material appearances. TFs also enable interactive volumetric exploration of complex data. The purpose of this state-of-the-art report (STAR) is to provide an overview of research into the various aspects of TFs, which lead to interpretation of the underlying data through the use of meaningful visual representations. The STAR classifies TF research into the following aspects: dimensionality, derived attributes, aggregated attributes, rendering aspects, automation, and user interfaces. The STAR concludes with some interesting research challenges that form the basis of an agenda for the development of next generation TF tools and methodologies. © 2016 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2016 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large-, Multi-, and Many-Core Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howison, M; Bethel, E W; Childs, H

    2012-01-01

    With the computing industry trending toward multi- and many-core processors, we study how a standard visualization algorithm, raycasting volume rendering, can benefit from a hybrid parallelism approach. Hybrid parallelism provides the best of both worlds: using distributed-memory parallelism across a large numbers of nodes increases available FLOPs and memory, while exploiting shared-memory parallelism among the cores within each node ensures that each node performs its portion of the larger calculation as efficiently as possible. We demonstrate results from weak and strong scaling studies, at levels of concurrency ranging up to 216,000, and with data sets as large as 12.2 trillion cells. The greatest benefit from hybrid parallelism lies in the communication portion of the algorithm, the dominant cost at higher levels of concurrency. We show that reducing the number of participants with a hybrid approach significantly improves performance.

  15. Hybrid Parallelism for Volume Rendering on Large-, Multi-, and Many-Core Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howison, Mark [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Childs, Hank [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    With the computing industry trending towards multi- and many-core processors, we study how a standard visualization algorithm, ray-casting volume rendering, can benefit from a hybrid parallelism approach. Hybrid parallelism provides the best of both worlds: using distributed-memory parallelism across a large numbers of nodes increases available FLOPs and memory, while exploiting shared-memory parallelism among the cores within each node ensures that each node performs its portion of the larger calculation as efficiently as possible. We demonstrate results from weak and strong scaling studies, at levels of concurrency ranging up to 216,000, and with datasets as large as 12.2 trillion cells. The greatest benefit from hybrid parallelism lies in the communication portion of the algorithm, the dominant cost at higher levels of concurrency. We show that reducing the number of participants with a hybrid approach significantly improves performance.

  16. Topological Galleries: A High Level User Interface for Topology Controlled Volume Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacCarthy, Brian; Carr, Hamish; Weber, Gunther H.

    2011-06-30

    Existing topological interfaces to volume rendering are limited by their reliance on sophisticated knowledge of topology by the user. We extend previous work by describing topological galleries, an interface for novice users that is based on the design galleries approach. We report three contributions: an interface based on hierarchical thumbnail galleries to display the containment relationships between topologically identifiable features, the use of the pruning hierarchy instead of branch decomposition for contour tree simplification, and drag-and-drop transfer function assignment for individual components. Initial results suggest that this approach suffers from limitations due to rapid drop-off of feature size in the pruning hierarchy. We explore these limitations by providing statistics of feature size as function of depth in the pruning hierarchy of the contour tree.

  17. Multi-detector row and volume-rendered CT of the normal and accessory flow pathways of the thoracic systemic and pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Leo P; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) and volume rendering can be used as an interpretive aid to present the systemic and pulmonary venous anatomy of the thorax. Both of these venous systems are routinely imaged in clinical practice and are important in interpretation of diagnostic images in health and disease. Multi-detector row CT and three-dimensional volume rendering provide high-quality near-isotropic data (ie, the longitudinal resolution approximates the in-plane resolution). The data sets allow tailored postprocessing to produce images optimized for these vessels, which are often not fully appreciated at planar axial imaging alone. Venous structures of the thorax that can be demonstrated with multi-detector row CT and volume rendering include the jugular veins; the subclavian and brachiocephalic veins; the internal and lateral thoracic veins; the superior and inferior venae cavae; the coronary sinus, the cardiac and pericardiophrenic veins, and vein grafts; the azygos, hemiazygos, and accessory hemiazygos veins; the intercostal veins; the pulmonary veins; and other thoracic veins. Copyright RSNA, 2002

  18. Real-time Lens based Rendering Algorithm for Super-multiview Integral Photography without Image Resampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guowen; Ma, Cong; Fan, Zhencheng; Cui, Xiwen; Liao, Hongen

    2017-09-27

    We propose a computer generated integral photography (CGIP) method that employs a lens based rendering (LBR) algo-rithm for super-multiview displays to achieve higher frame rates and better image quality without pixel resampling or view interpolation. The algorithm can utilize both fixed and programmable graphics pipelines to accelerate CGIP rendering and exploit inter-perspective antialiasing. Two hardware prototypes were fabricated with two high-resolution liquid crystal dis-plays and micro-lens arrays (MLA). Qualitative and quantitative experiments were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm. To the best of our knowledge, the proposed LBR method outperforms state-of-the-art CGIP algo-rithms relative to rendering speed and image quality with our super-multiview hardware configurations. A demonstration experiment was also conducted to reveal the interactivity of a super-multiview display utilizing the proposed algorithm.

  19. High-performance GPU-based rendering for real-time, rigid 2D/3D-image registration and motion prediction in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerk, Jakob; Gendrin, Christelle; Weber, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Furtado, Hugo; Fabri, Daniella; Bloch, Christoph; Bergmann, Helmar; Gröller, Eduard; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    A common problem in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of lung cancer as well as other malignant diseases is the compensation of periodic and aperiodic motion during dose delivery. Modern systems for image-guided radiation oncology allow for the acquisition of cone-beam computed tomography data in the treatment room as well as the acquisition of planar radiographs during the treatment. A mid-term research goal is the compensation of tumor target volume motion by 2D/3D Registration. In 2D/3D registration, spatial information on organ location is derived by an iterative comparison of perspective volume renderings, so-called digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) from computed tomography volume data, and planar reference x-rays. Currently, this rendering process is very time consuming, and real-time registration, which should at least provide data on organ position in less than a second, has not come into existence. We present two GPU-based rendering algorithms which generate a DRR of 512×512 pixels size from a CT dataset of 53 MB size at a pace of almost 100 Hz. This rendering rate is feasible by applying a number of algorithmic simplifications which range from alternative volume-driven rendering approaches - namely so-called wobbled splatting - to sub-sampling of the DRR-image by means of specialized raycasting techniques. Furthermore, general purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming paradigms were consequently utilized. Rendering quality and performance as well as the influence on the quality and performance of the overall registration process were measured and analyzed in detail. The results show that both methods are competitive and pave the way for fast motion compensation by rigid and possibly even non-rigid 2D/3D registration and, beyond that, adaptive filtering of motion models in IGRT. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Three-dimensional volume rendering of tibiofibular joint space and quantitative analysis of change in volume due to tibiofibular syndesmosis diastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taser, F.; Shafiq, Q.; Ebraheim, N.A. [Medical University of Ohio, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The diagnosis of ankle syndesmosis injuries is made by various imaging techniques. The present study was undertaken to examine whether the three-dimensional reconstruction of axial CT images and calculation of the volume of tibiofibular joint space enhances the sensitivity of diastases diagnoses or not. Six adult cadaveric ankle specimens were used for spiral CT-scan assessment of tibiofibular syndesmosis. After the specimens were dissected, external fixation was performed and diastases of 1, 2, and 3 mm was simulated by a precalibrated device. Helical CT scans were obtained with 1.0-mm slice thickness. The data was transferred to the computer software AcquariusNET. Then the contours of the tibiofibular syndesmosis joint space were outlined on each axial CT slice and the collection of these slices were stacked using the computer software AutoCAD 2005, according to the spatial arrangement and geometrical coordinates between each slice, to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction of the joint space. The area of each slice and the volume of the entire tibiofibular joint space were calculated. The tibiofibular joint space at the 10th-mm slice level was also measured on axial CT scan images at normal, 1, 2 and 3-mm joint space diastases. The three-dimensional volume-rendering of the tibiofibular syndesmosis joint space from the spiral CT data demonstrated the shape of the joint space and has been found to be a sensitive method for calculating joint space volume. We found that, from normal to 1 mm, a 1-mm diastasis increases approximately 43% of the joint space volume, while from 1 to 3 mm, there is about a 20% increase for each 1-mm increase. Volume calculation using this method can be performed in cases of syndesmotic instability after ankle injuries and for preoperative and postoperative evaluation of the integrity of the tibiofibular syndesmosis. (orig.)

  1. Using Opaque Image Blur for Real-Time Depth-of-Field Rendering and Image-Based Motion Blur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2013-01-01

    avoided by a decomposition into sub-images and the independent blurring of each sub-image. This decomposition, however, can result in rendering artifacts at silhouettes of objects. We propose a new blur filter that increases the opacity of all pixels to avoid these artifacts at the cost of physically less...

  2. Spectral domain OCT to diagnose clinically inapparent hypotony maculopathy using 3D image rendering software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Muhammad; Boukavala, Stavoroula; Goldsmith, Craig; Mukherji, Subhanjan

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) image rendering capability of a commercially available 3D-optical coherence tomogram (OCT) system was used to diagnose a subclinical but symptomatic case of hypotony maculopathy in an eye with significant cataract and an only-eyed patient. Bleb revision improved intraocular pressure and symptoms, confirmed by repeat OCT imaging. Hypotony maculopathy may be subclinical and difficult to diagnose particularly in eyes with non-clear ocular media. Use of spectral domain OCT can be complementary to improve patient outcomes. PMID:23264160

  3. Using Opaque Image Blur for Real-Time Depth-of-Field Rendering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, Martin

    2011-01-01

    While depth of field is an important cinematographic means, its use in real-time computer graphics is still limited by the computational costs that are necessary to achieve a sufficient image quality. Specifically, color bleeding artifacts between objects at different depths are most effectively...... avoided by a decomposition into subimages and the independent blurring of each sub-image. This decomposition, however, can result in rendering artifacts at silhouettes of objects. While various algorithms have been suggested to eliminate these artifacts, we propose a new blur filter that increases...

  4. Visibility sweeps for joint-hierarchical importance sampling of direct lighting for stochastic volume rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, T.; Eisemann, M.; Eisemann, E.

    2015-01-01

    Physically-based light transport in heterogeneous volumetric data is computationally expensive because the rendering integral (particularly visibility) has to be stochastically solved. We present a visibility estimation method in concert with an importance-sampling technique for efficient and

  5. A study on variation types in celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery using 3D volume rendering of MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Keun; Jang, Seong Joo [Dept. of Radiological physics Graduate School of Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Young Ill [Dept. of Radiological Technology of Kwangyang Health College, Kwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the variation which based on Celiac axis and SMA using by CT volume rendering images. 613 patients underwent abdominal CTA, there were 552 patients (99.05%, TypeⅠ, Ⅱ ) with normal anatomical form and 61 (9.95%, Type Ⅲ-Ⅻ) with variation. TypeⅠ was 339(55.31%), Type Ⅱ was 213 (34.74%), Type Ⅲ was 18 (2.93%), Type Ⅳ was 12 patients (1.95%), Type Ⅴ was 11 patient (1.79%), Type Ⅵ was 9 patients (1.46%), Type Ⅶ was 6 patients (0.97%), Type Ⅷ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅸ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅹ was 1 patient (0.16%), Type Ⅺ was 1 patient (0.16%), and Type Ⅻ was 1 patient (0.16%) into totally new types of variation. In conclusion, we could found 9 new types of variation by classifying based on celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. These results were considered to be an important opportunity for a new vessel map.

  6. 3D-TV System with Depth-Image-Based Rendering Architectures, Techniques and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yin; Yu, Lu; Tanimoto, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Riding on the success of 3D cinema blockbusters and advances in stereoscopic display technology, 3D video applications have gathered momentum in recent years. 3D-TV System with Depth-Image-Based Rendering: Architectures, Techniques and Challenges surveys depth-image-based 3D-TV systems, which are expected to be put into applications in the near future. Depth-image-based rendering (DIBR) significantly enhances the 3D visual experience compared to stereoscopic systems currently in use. DIBR techniques make it possible to generate additional viewpoints using 3D warping techniques to adjust the perceived depth of stereoscopic videos and provide for auto-stereoscopic displays that do not require glasses for viewing the 3D image.   The material includes a technical review and literature survey of components and complete systems, solutions for technical issues, and implementation of prototypes. The book is organized into four sections: System Overview, Content Generation, Data Compression and Transmission, and 3D V...

  7. Full-parallax virtual view image synthesis using image-based rendering for light-field content generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngsoo; Shin, Hong-chang; Lee, Gwangsoon; Cheong, Won-sik; Hur, Namho

    2017-05-01

    Light-field content is required to provide full-parallax 3D view with dense angular resolution. However, it is very hard to directly capture such dense full-parallax view images using a camera system because it requires specialised micro-lens arrays or a heavy camera-array system. Therefore, we present an algorithm to synthesise full-parallax virtual view images using image-based rendering appropriate for light-field content generation. The proposed algorithm consists of four-directional image warping, view image blending using the nearest view image priority selection and the sum of the weighted inverse Euclidean distance, and hole filling. Experimental results show that dense full-parallax virtual view images can be generated from sparse full-parallax view images with fewer image artefacts. Finally, it is confirmed that the proposed full-parallax view synthesis algorithm can be used for light-field content generation without a dense camera array system.

  8. Imaging transforms for visualizing surfaces and volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, J K; Gonçalves, R J

    1993-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization in biomedical and other imaging areas is a rapidly emerging discipline. The major developments in this field are described in a unified and concise way. To this end, we introduce an operator notation to describe the basic imaging transforms commonly used in 3D visualization and to identify a comprehensive set of basic transforms. We also introduce several new basic transforms for filtering and interpolating scenes and structures and for rendering surfaces and volumes. We demonstrate not only how the existing visualization methodologies can be described concisely, but we also show how a great variety of new methodologies can be generated using both the existing imaging transforms and the new transforms introduced in this paper. A comprehensive evaluation method to compare objectively rendering methods used in visualization based on task-specific mathematical phantoms is described. We examine in detail separate transform sequences that are best suited for rendering robust and frail structures (ie, structures with well- and poorly defined boundaries).

  9. Panoramic-image-based rendering solutions for visualizing remote locations via the web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeysekare, Upul R.; Egts, David; Bethmann, John

    2000-05-01

    With advances in panoramic image-based rendering techniques and the rapid expansion of web advertising, new techniques are emerging for visualizing remote locations on the WWW. Success of these techniques depends on how easy and inexpensive it is to develop a new type of web content that provides pseudo 3D visualization at home, 24-hours a day. Furthermore, the acceptance of this new visualization medium depends on the effectiveness of the familiarization tools by a segment of the population that was never exposed to this type of visualization. This paper addresses various hardware and software solutions available to collect, produce, and view panoramic content. While cost and effectiveness of building the content is being addressed using a few commercial hardware solutions, effectiveness of familiarization tools is evaluated using a few sample data sets.

  10. Accurate representation of interference colours (Michel-Lévy chart): from rendering to image colour correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge Johnsen, S A; Bollmann, J; Lee, H W; Zhou, Y

    2017-09-21

    Here a work flow towards an accurate representation of interference colours (Michel-Lévy chart) digitally captured on a polarised light microscope using dry and oil immersion objectives is presented. The work flow includes accurate rendering of interference colours considering the colour temperature of the light source of the microscope and chromatic adaptation to white points of RGB colour spaces as well as the colour correction of the camera using readily available colour targets. The quality of different colour correction profiles was tested independently on an IT8.7/1 target. The best performing profile was using the XYZ cLUT algorithm and it revealed a ΔE00 of 1.9 (6.4 no profile) at 5× and 1.1 (8.4 no profile) at 100× magnification, respectively. The overall performance of the workflow was tested by comparing rendered interference colours with colour-corrected images of a quartz wedge captured over a retardation range from 80-2500 nm at 5× magnification. Uncorrected images of the quartz wedge in sRGB colour space revealed a mean ΔE00 of 12.3, which could be reduced to a mean of 4.9 by applying a camera correction profile based on an IT8.7/1 target and the Matrix only algorithm (ΔE00 colour differences imperceptible by the human eye). ΔE00 varied significantly over the retardation range of 80-2500 nm of the quartz wedge, but the reasons for this variation is not well understood and the quality of colour correction might be further improved in future by using custom made colour targets specifically designed for the analysis of high-order interference colours. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Spatio-temporal visualization of air-sea CO2 flux and carbon budget using volume rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhenhong; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Renyi

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a novel visualization method to show the spatio-temporal dynamics of carbon sinks and sources, and carbon fluxes in the ocean carbon cycle. The air-sea carbon budget and its process of accumulation are demonstrated in the spatial dimension, while the distribution pattern and variation of CO2 flux are expressed by color changes. In this way, we unite spatial and temporal characteristics of satellite data through visualization. A GPU-based direct volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing is adopted to dynamically visualize the released or absorbed CO2 gas with shadow effects. A data model is designed to generate four-dimensional (4D) data from satellite-derived air-sea CO2 flux products, and an out-of-core scheduling strategy is also proposed for on-the-fly rendering of time series of satellite data. The presented 4D visualization method is implemented on graphics cards with vertex, geometry and fragment shaders. It provides a visually realistic simulation and user interaction for real-time rendering. This approach has been integrated into the Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) for the research and assessment of air-sea CO2 flux in the China Seas.

  12. Development of a computer simulation system of intraoral radiography using perspective volume rendering of CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Kazutoshi, Tanaka, Takemasa [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dental Hospital; Yoshiura, Kazunori; Tokumori, Kenji; Kanda, Shigenobu [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Dental Science

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a computer simulation system for intraoral radiography as an educational aid for radiographic training for dental students. A dried skull was scanned with a multidetector CT, and the series of slice data was transferred to a workstation. A software AVS Express Developer was used to construct the x-ray projected images from the CT slice data. Geometrical reproducibilities were confirmed using numerical phantoms. We simulated images using the perspective projection method with an average value algorithm on this software. Simulated images were compared with conventional film images projected from the same geometrical positions, including eccentric projection. Furthermore, to confirm the changes of the image depending on the projection angles of the x-ray beam, we constructed simulation images in which the root apexes were enhanced with the maximum value algorithm. Using this method, high resolution simulated images with perspective projection, as opposed to parallel, were constructed. Comparing with conventional film images, all major anatomic components could be visualized easily. Any intraoral radiographs at an arbitrary angular projection could be simulated, which was impossible in the conventional training schema for radiographic technique. Therefore, not only standard projected images but also eccentric projections could be displayed. A computer simulation system of intraoral radiography with this method may be useful for training in intraoral radiographic technique for dental students. (author)

  13. Efficient 3D rendering for web-based medical imaging software: a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Medical Imaging Software (MIS) found in research and in clinical practice, such as in Picture and Archiving Communication Systems (PACS) and Radiology Information Systems (RIS), has not been able to take full advantage of the Internet as a deployment platform. MIS is usually tightly coupled to algorithms that have substantial hardware and software requirements. Consequently, MIS is deployed on thick clients which usually leads project managers to allocate more resources during the deployment phase of the application than the resources that would be allocated if the application were deployed through a web interface.To minimize the costs associated with this scenario, many software providers use or develop plug-ins to provide the delivery platform (internet browser) with the features to load, interact and analyze medical images. Nevertheless there has not been a successful standard means to achieve this goal so far. This paper presents a study of WebGL as an alternative to plug-in development for efficient rendering of 3D medical models and DICOM images. WebGL is a technology that enables the internet browser to have access to the local graphics hardware in a native fashion. Because it is based in OpenGL, a widely accepted graphic industry standard, WebGL is being implemented in most of the major commercial browsers. After a discussion on the details of the technology, a series of experiments are presented to determine the operational boundaries in which WebGL is adequate for MIS. A comparison with current alternatives is also addressed. Finally conclusions and future work are discussed.

  14. Photometric and Colorimeric Comparison of HDR and Spctrally Resolved Rendering Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Soreze, Thierry Silvio Claude; Thorseth, Anders

    2017-01-01

    . The spectral irradiances of the light source were measured for two lighting scenarios: low and high correlated colour temperature (CCT) white lighting conditions for the modelling of the light source. Based on these measurements, we have conducted spectrally resolved renderings with a spectral renderer, Ocean...

  15. High-resolution spiral computed tomography with multiplanar reformatting, 3D surface- and volume rendering: a non-destructive method to visualize ancient Egyptian mummification techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Roel J; Poulus, Martin; Taconis, Wijbren; Stoker, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Ancient Egyptians used mummification techniques to prevent their deceased from decay. This study evaluates the potential of computed tomography (CT) in determining these techniques in a non-destructive way. Twenty-five mummies were studied by using high-resolution spiral CT, 1mm slice thickness for the head and 3mm slice thickness for the rest of the body. Images were reconstructed with 3D, multiplanar reformatting and volume rendering. In all cases the used mummification techniques could be reconstructed. The way the brain was removed, the presence of chemicals, like resin and natron, could be detected and the way the intestines were handled could be made visible. The use of CT is indispensable as a non-destructive method in the reconstruction of mummification techniques.

  16. Single minimum incision endoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal tumors with preoperative virtual navigation using 3D-CT volume-rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shioyama Yasukazu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single minimum incision endoscopic surgery (MIES involves the use of a flexible high-definition laparoscope to facilitate open surgery. We reviewed our method of radical nephrectomy for renal tumors, which is single MIES combined with preoperative virtual surgery employing three-dimensional CT images reconstructed by the volume rendering method (3D-CT images in order to safely and appropriately approach the renal hilar vessels. We also assessed the usefulness of 3D-CT images. Methods Radical nephrectomy was done by single MIES via the translumbar approach in 80 consecutive patients. We performed the initial 20 MIES nephrectomies without preoperative 3D-CT images and the subsequent 60 MIES nephrectomies with preoperative 3D-CT images for evaluation of the renal hilar vessels and the relation of each tumor to the surrounding structures. On the basis of the 3D information, preoperative virtual surgery was performed with a computer. Results Single MIES nephrectomy was successful in all patients. In the 60 patients who underwent 3D-CT, the number of renal arteries and veins corresponded exactly with the preoperative 3D-CT data (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These 60 nephrectomies were completed with a shorter operating time and smaller blood loss than the initial 20 nephrectomies. Conclusions Single MIES radical nephrectomy combined with 3D-CT and virtual surgery achieved a shorter operating time and less blood loss, possibly due to safer and easier handling of the renal hilar vessels.

  17. Pathfinder. Volume 8, Number 3, May/June 2010. Technology - Rendering an Ever-Clearer Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    the Navy fact sheet. These Gerald R. Ford Class aircraft carriers, scheduled to be delivered in 2015, will serve as a premier asset for crisis re...navigation and includes platform display application software and electronic chart data. The first class of the CVN 21 program, USS Gerald R. Ford...district of Baghdad, Iraq. Photo by Scott L. This image shows two girls perched on a rock in the Farah province in Afghanistan. Photo by Wayne D

  18. Perception-based 3D tactile rendering from a single image for human skin examinations by dynamic touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Lee, S

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosis of skin conditions is dependent on the assessment of skin surface properties that are represented by more tactile properties such as stiffness, roughness, and friction than visual information. Due to this reason, adding tactile feedback to existing vision based diagnosis systems can help dermatologists diagnose skin diseases or disorders more accurately. The goal of our research was therefore to develop a tactile rendering system for skin examinations by dynamic touch. Our development consists of two stages: converting a single image to a 3D haptic surface and rendering the generated haptic surface in real-time. Converting to 3D surfaces from 2D single images was implemented with concerning human perception data collected by a psychophysical experiment that measured human visual and haptic sensibility to 3D skin surface changes. For the second stage, we utilized real skin biomechanical properties found by prior studies. Our tactile rendering system is a standalone system that can be used with any single cameras and haptic feedback devices. We evaluated the performance of our system by conducting an identification experiment with three different skin images with five subjects. The participants had to identify one of the three skin surfaces by using a haptic device (Falcon) only. No visual cue was provided for the experiment. The results indicate that our system provides sufficient performance to render discernable tactile rendering with different skin surfaces. Our system uses only a single skin image and automatically generates a 3D haptic surface based on human haptic perception. Realistic skin interactions can be provided in real-time for the purpose of skin diagnosis, simulations, or training. Our system can also be used for other applications like virtual reality and cosmetic applications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Segmentation, surface rendering, and surface simplification of 3-D skull images for the repair of a large skull defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weibing; Shi, Pengfei; Li, Shuguang

    2009-10-01

    Given the potential demonstrated by research into bone-tissue engineering, the use of medical image data for the rapid prototyping (RP) of scaffolds is a subject worthy of research. Computer-aided design and manufacture and medical imaging have created new possibilities for RP. Accurate and efficient design and fabrication of anatomic models is critical to these applications. We explore the application of RP computational methods to the repair of a pediatric skull defect. The focus of this study is the segmentation of the defect region seen in computerized tomography (CT) slice images of this patient's skull and the three-dimensional (3-D) surface rendering of the patient's CT-scan data. We see if our segmentation and surface rendering software can improve the generation of an implant model to fill a skull defect.

  20. Volumetric rendering and metrology of spherical gradient refractive index lens imaged by angular scan optical coherence tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianing; Thompson, Kevin P; Ma, Bin; Ponting, Michael; Rolland, Jannick P

    2016-08-22

    In this paper, we develop the methodology, including the refraction correction, geometrical thickness correction, coordinate transformation, and layer segmentation algorithms, for 3D rendering and metrology of a layered spherical gradient refractive index (S-GRIN) lens based on the imaging data collected by an angular scan optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The 3D mapping and rendering enables direct 3D visualization and internal defect inspection of the lens. The metrology provides assessment of the surface geometry, the lens thickness, the radii of curvature of the internal layer interfaces, and the misalignment of the internal S-GRIN distribution with respect to the lens surface. The OCT metrology results identify the manufacturing defects, and enable targeted process development for optimizing the manufacturing parameters. The newly fabricated S-GRIN lenses show up to a 7x spherical aberration reduction that allows a significantly increased utilizable effective aperture.

  1. Multidimensional Processing and Visual Rendering of Complex 3D Biomedical Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.

    2016-01-01

    The proposed technology uses advanced image analysis techniques to maximize the resolution and utility of medical imaging methods being used during spaceflight. We utilize COTS technology for medical imaging, but our applications require higher resolution assessment of the medical images than is routinely applied with nominal system software. By leveraging advanced data reduction and multidimensional imaging techniques utilized in analysis of Planetary Sciences and Cell Biology imaging, it is possible to significantly increase the information extracted from the onboard biomedical imaging systems. Year 1 focused on application of these techniques to the ocular images collected on ground test subjects and ISS crewmembers. Focus was on the choroidal vasculature and the structure of the optic disc. Methods allowed for increased resolution and quantitation of structural changes enabling detailed assessment of progression over time. These techniques enhance the monitoring and evaluation of crew vision issues during space flight.

  2. A Model for the Omnidirectional Acquisition and Rendering of Stereoscopic Images for Human Viewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurrieri, Luis E.; Dubois, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Interactive visual media enable the visualization and navigation of remote-world locations in all gaze directions. A large segment of such media is created using pictures from the remote sites thanks to the advance in panoramic cameras. A desirable enhancement is to facilitate the stereoscopic visualization of remote scenes in all gaze directions. In this context, a model for the signal to be acquired by an omnistereoscopic sensor is needed in order to design better acquisition strategies. This omnistereoscopic viewing model must take into account the geometric constraints imposed by our binocular vision system since we want to produce stereoscopic imagery capable to induce stereopsis consistently in any gaze direction; in this paper, we present such model. In addition, we discuss different approaches to sample or to approximate this function and we propose a general acquisition model for sampling the omnistereoscopic light signal. From this model, we propose that by acquiring and mosaicking sparse sets of partially overlapped stereoscopic snapshots, a satisfactory illusion of depth can be evoked. Finally, we show an example of the rendering pipeline to create the omnistereoscopic imagery.

  3. Spatially Varying Image Based Lighting by Light Probe Sequences, Capture, Processing and Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, Jonas; Gustavson, Stefan; Ynnerman, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel technique for capturing spatially or temporally resolved light probe sequences, and using them for image based lighting. For this purpose we have designed and built a real-time light probe, a catadioptric imaging system that can capture the full dynamic range of the lighting incident at each point in space at video frame rates, while being moved through a scene. The real-time light probe uses a digital imaging system which we have programmed to capture high quality, photome...

  4. Effect of slab thickness on the CT detection of pulmonary nodules: use of sliding thin-slab maximum intensity projection and volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawel, Nadine; Seifert, Burkhardt; Luetolf, Marcus; Boehm, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the detection rates of pulmonary nodules on CT as a function of slab thickness using sliding thin-slab maximum intensity projection (MIP) and volume rendering (VR). Eighty-eight oncology patients (33 women, 55 men; mean age, 59 years; age range, 18-81 years) who routinely underwent chest CT examinations were prospectively included. Two radiologists independently evaluated each CT examination for the presence of pulmonary nodules using MIP and VR, with each image reconstructed using three different slab thicknesses (5, 8, 11 mm). The standard of reference was the maximum number of detected nodules, which were classified by localization and size, judged to be true-positives by a consensus panel. Interreader agreement was assessed by kappa value on a nodule-by-nodule basis. Sensitivities for both reconstruction techniques and for the three slab thicknesses were calculated using the proportion procedure for survey data with the patient as the primary sample unit and were compared using the Wilcoxon's signed rank test with Bonferroni correction for both readers separately. One thousand fifty-eight true-positive nodules were detected. Interreader agreement was fair to moderate. Sensitivity for pulmonary nodules was superior for 8-mm MIP (reader 1, 84%; reader 2, 81%) and was significantly better than the sensitivities of all other tested techniques for both readers (p 8 mm). A higher sensitivity was achieved using MIP than VR. MIP with a slab thickness of 8 mm is superior in the detection of pulmonary nodules to all other tested techniques.

  5. Hybrid 3D reconstruction and image-based rendering techniques for reality modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Vitor; Wolfart, Erik; Bovisio, Emanuele; Biotti, Ester; Goncalves, Joao G. M.

    2000-12-01

    This paper presents a component approach that combines in a seamless way the strong features of laser range acquisition with the visual quality of purely photographic approaches. The relevant components of the system are: (i) Panoramic images for distant background scenery where parallax is insignificant; (ii) Photogrammetry for background buildings and (iii) High detailed laser based models for the primary environment, structure of exteriors of buildings and interiors of rooms. These techniques have a wide range of applications in visualization, virtual reality, cost effective as-built analysis of architectural and industrial environments, building facilities management, real-estate, E-commerce, remote inspection of hazardous environments, TV production and many others.

  6. MDCT Angiography With 3D Rendering: A Novel Cinematic Rendering Algorithm for Enhanced Anatomic Detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pamela T; Schneider, Robert; Lugo-Fagundo, Carolina; Johnson, Michael B; Fishman, Elliot K

    2017-08-01

    The two most widely used postprocessing 3D tools in clinical practice are volume rendering (VR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). With the use of current-generation MDCT, these techniques enable accurate characterization of arterial anatomy and pathology in all anatomic regions. Recently, the VR algorithm has been enhanced by the incorporation of a new lighting model. This new technique-called cinematic rendering-generates photorealistic images with the potential to more accurately depict anatomic detail. As an enhancement of the technology championed in VR, cinematic rendering promises to provide additional anatomic detail for MDCT interpretation and display. Future investigations must be conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cinematic rendering and determine whether interpretative pitfalls result from its unique lighting model in practice.

  7. Differentiating aneurysm from infundibular dilatation by volume rendering MRA. Techniques for improving depiction of the posterior communicating and anterior choroidal arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takaaki; Ito, Takeo; Hasunuma, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Kohama, Ikuhide; Yonemori, Terutake; Izumo, Masaki [Hakodate Shintoshi Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    With the spread of brain dock procedures, non-invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is being utilized to broadly screen for brain blood vessel diseases. However, diagnosis of cerebral aneurysm can be difficult by routine MRA. In particular, differentiating aneurysms and infundibular dilatations (IDS) of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) and anterior choroidal artery (AChA) at their bifurcations with the internal carotid artery (ICA) is extremely difficult and additional studies are frequently necessary. In this situation, three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA) and cerebral angiography have been utilized, but both techniques are invasive. Furthermore, images from cerebral angiography are only two-dimensional, and 3D-CTA requires differentiation between aneurysm and ID by observing configurational changes at the apex of the protrusion and by following gradual changes to the threshold. We therefore undertook the following steps to improve both depiction of the PCoA and AChA and differential diagnosis between aneurysm and ID: reduced slice thickness and increased number of excitations; utilized volume rendering methods to construct images; lowered thresholds for the beginning of the PCoA and AChA arteries, which represent the regions of interest. In all 11 cases that we operated on, cerebral aneurysms were diagnosed correctly and the minimum neck diameter of the cerebral aneurysm was 1.2 mm. In addition, the number of AChAs and PCoAs present in target MRA and in operational views were evaluated. In one case with an AChA aneurysm, a PCoA was not detected by target MRA, because the ICA deviated posterolaterally and pushed the PCoA to the posterior clinoid process, and blood flow was poor in operational views. In another 2 cases with AChA aneurysms, only one AChA was described in target MRA, whereas two aneurysms were present. However, one of these had a diameter less than 1 mm. In conclusion, this method offers an extremely useful aid

  8. Virtual reality system for treatment of the fear of public speaking using image-based rendering and moving pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae M; Ku, Jeong H; Jang, Dong P; Kim, Dong H; Choi, Young H; Kim, In Y; Kim, Sun I

    2002-06-01

    The fear of speaking is often cited as the world's most common social phobia. The rapid growth of computer technology enabled us to use virtual reality (VR) for the treatment of the fear of public speaking. There have been two techniques used to construct a virtual environment for the treatment of the fear of public speaking: model-based and movie-based. Virtual audiences and virtual environments made by model-based technique are unrealistic and unnatural. The movie-based technique has a disadvantage in that each virtual audience cannot be controlled respectively, because all virtual audiences are included in one moving picture file. To address this disadvantage, this paper presents a virtual environment made by using image-based rendering (IBR) and chroma keying simultaneously. IBR enables us to make the virtual environment realistic because the images are stitched panoramically with the photos taken from a digital camera. And the use of chroma keying allows a virtual audience to be controlled individually. In addition, a real-time capture technique was applied in constructing the virtual environment to give the subjects more interaction, in that they can talk with a therapist or another subject.

  9. Spatiotemporal Visualization of Time-Series Satellite-Derived CO2 Flux Data Using Volume Rendering and Gpu-Based Interpolation on a Cloud-Driven Digital Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S.; Yan, Y.; Du, Z.; Zhang, F.; Liu, R.

    2017-10-01

    The ocean carbon cycle has a significant influence on global climate, and is commonly evaluated using time-series satellite-derived CO2 flux data. Location-aware and globe-based visualization is an important technique for analyzing and presenting the evolution of climate change. To achieve realistic simulation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of ocean carbon, a cloud-driven digital earth platform is developed to support the interactive analysis and display of multi-geospatial data, and an original visualization method based on our digital earth is proposed to demonstrate the spatiotemporal variations of carbon sinks and sources using time-series satellite data. Specifically, a volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing and particle system is implemented to dynamically display the released or absorbed CO2 gas. To enable location-aware visualization within the virtual globe, we present a 3D particlemapping algorithm to render particle-slicing textures onto geospace. In addition, a GPU-based interpolation framework using CUDA during real-time rendering is designed to obtain smooth effects in both spatial and temporal dimensions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed method, a series of satellite data is applied to simulate the air-sea carbon cycle in the China Sea. The results show that the suggested strategies provide realistic simulation effects and acceptable interactive performance on the digital earth.

  10. SPATIOTEMPORAL VISUALIZATION OF TIME-SERIES SATELLITE-DERIVED CO2 FLUX DATA USING VOLUME RENDERING AND GPU-BASED INTERPOLATION ON A CLOUD-DRIVEN DIGITAL EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The ocean carbon cycle has a significant influence on global climate, and is commonly evaluated using time-series satellite-derived CO2 flux data. Location-aware and globe-based visualization is an important technique for analyzing and presenting the evolution of climate change. To achieve realistic simulation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of ocean carbon, a cloud-driven digital earth platform is developed to support the interactive analysis and display of multi-geospatial data, and an original visualization method based on our digital earth is proposed to demonstrate the spatiotemporal variations of carbon sinks and sources using time-series satellite data. Specifically, a volume rendering technique using half-angle slicing and particle system is implemented to dynamically display the released or absorbed CO2 gas. To enable location-aware visualization within the virtual globe, we present a 3D particlemapping algorithm to render particle-slicing textures onto geospace. In addition, a GPU-based interpolation framework using CUDA during real-time rendering is designed to obtain smooth effects in both spatial and temporal dimensions. To demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed method, a series of satellite data is applied to simulate the air-sea carbon cycle in the China Sea. The results show that the suggested strategies provide realistic simulation effects and acceptable interactive performance on the digital earth.

  11. A retrospective comparative study of cone-beam computed tomography versus rendered panoramic images in identifying the presence, types, and characteristics of dens invaginatus in a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, Ismail Davut; Ertas, Huseyin; Arslan, Hakan; Tarim Ertas, Elif

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the presence, characteristics, and type of dens invaginatus (DI) by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and panoramic images rendered from CBCT images. In addition, the findings of the imaging techniques were compared. We evaluated 300 CBCT images to determine the type of DI, the presence of an impacted tooth near the DI, and the presence of apical pathosis. The McNemar test was used to compare the prevalence of DI according to CBCT and panoramic images rendered from CBCT images. The presence of DI was lower on panoramic images rendered from CBCT images (3% of the patients) compared with on CBCT images (10.7% of the patients) (P mesiodens (9%), maxillary canines (2.3%), and mandibular canines (2.3%). Type I DI was the most commonly observed type of invaginatus (65.9%), followed by type II (29.5%) and type III (4.6%). All patients with type III DI and 25% of the patients with type II DI had apical pathosis at the time of referral, but periapical lesions were not observed in teeth with type I DI. In total, 13.6% of DI cases had impacted teeth. CBCT can be recommended as an effective diagnostic device for identifying DI because it provides an accurate representation of the external and internal dental anatomy. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Is it possible to use highly realistic virtual reality in the elderly? A feasibility study with image-based rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Michel Benoit,1,2 Rachid Guerchouche,3 Pierre-David Petit,1 Emmanuelle Chapoulie,3 Valeria Manera,1 Gaurav Chaurasia,3 George Drettakis,3 Philippe Robert1,4 1EA CoBTeK/IA, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, 2Clinique de Psychiatrie, Pole des Neurosciences Cliniques, CHU de Nice, 3Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique, Sophia-Antipolis, 4Centre Mémoire de Ressources et de Recherche, CHU de Nice, Nice, France Background: Virtual reality (VR opens up a vast number of possibilities in many domains of therapy. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the acceptability for elderly subjects of a VR experience using the image-based rendering virtual environment (IBVE approach and secondly to test the hypothesis that visual cues using VR may enhance the generation of autobiographical memories.Methods: Eighteen healthy volunteers (mean age 68.2 years presenting memory complaints with a Mini-Mental State Examination score higher than 27 and no history of neuropsychiatric disease were included. Participants were asked to perform an autobiographical fluency task in four conditions. The first condition was a baseline grey screen, the second was a photograph of a well-known location in the participant’s home city (FamPhoto, and the last two conditions displayed VR, ie, a familiar image-based virtual environment (FamIBVE consisting of an image-based representation of a known landmark square in the center of the city of experimentation (Nice and an unknown image-based virtual environment (UnknoIBVE, which was captured in a public housing neighborhood containing unrecognizable building fronts. After each of the four experimental conditions, participants filled in self-report questionnaires to assess the task acceptability (levels of emotion, motivation, security, fatigue, and familiarity. CyberSickness and Presence questionnaires were also assessed after the two VR conditions. Autobiographical memory was assessed

  13. Is it possible to use highly realistic virtual reality in the elderly? A feasibility study with image-based rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michel; Guerchouche, Rachid; Petit, Pierre-David; Chapoulie, Emmanuelle; Manera, Valeria; Chaurasia, Gaurav; Drettakis, George; Robert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) opens up a vast number of possibilities in many domains of therapy. The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the acceptability for elderly subjects of a VR experience using the image-based rendering virtual environment (IBVE) approach and secondly to test the hypothesis that visual cues using VR may enhance the generation of autobiographical memories. Methods Eighteen healthy volunteers (mean age 68.2 years) presenting memory complaints with a Mini-Mental State Examination score higher than 27 and no history of neuropsychiatric disease were included. Participants were asked to perform an autobiographical fluency task in four conditions. The first condition was a baseline grey screen, the second was a photograph of a well-known location in the participant’s home city (FamPhoto), and the last two conditions displayed VR, ie, a familiar image-based virtual environment (FamIBVE) consisting of an image-based representation of a known landmark square in the center of the city of experimentation (Nice) and an unknown image-based virtual environment (UnknoIBVE), which was captured in a public housing neighborhood containing unrecognizable building fronts. After each of the four experimental conditions, participants filled in self-report questionnaires to assess the task acceptability (levels of emotion, motivation, security, fatigue, and familiarity). CyberSickness and Presence questionnaires were also assessed after the two VR conditions. Autobiographical memory was assessed using a verbal fluency task and quality of the recollection was assessed using the “remember/know” procedure. Results All subjects completed the experiment. Sense of security and fatigue were not significantly different between the conditions with and without VR. The FamPhoto condition yielded a higher emotion score than the other conditions (P<0.05). The CyberSickness questionnaire showed that participants did not experience sickness during the

  14. Hardware Accelerated Point Rendering of Isosurfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Christensen, Niels Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    and that the advantage of rendering points as opposed to triangles increases with the size and complexity of the volumes. To gauge the visual quality of future hardware accelerated point rendering schemes, we have implemented a software based point rendering method and compare the quality to both MC and our OpenGL based...

  15. Volume-rendered 3D CT of the mesenteric vasculature: normal anatomy, anatomic variants, and pathologic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) offers important advantages over more conventional imaging methods in the evaluation of the mesenteric vasculature. It allows faster scanning, which practically eliminates motion and breathing artifacts, as well as thinner collimation. These advances, coupled with rapid intravenous administration of contrast material, allow excellent opacification of the mesenteric arteries and veins. This improves the quality of the three-dimensional (3D) data sets, which in turn leads to improved 3D vascular maps and more accurate assessment of various conditions such as arterial or venous encasement in patients with pancreatic cancer, mesenteric ischemia, or inflammatory bowel disease. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT also allows better visualization of arterial and venous branching, thereby improving detection of more distal vascular involvement. In addition, 3D multi-detector row CT may help detect hemodynamic changes in patients with active inflammation and hyperemia of a bowel segment because it can be used to measure bowel wall enhancement over time. Carcinoid tumors that have infiltrated the mesentery have a characteristic CT appearance, and other conditions such as lymphoma or sclerosing mesenteritis can also manifest as an infiltrating mass that envelops mesenteric vessels. Three-dimensional multi-detector row CT represents a significant advance in CT technology and can help ensure prompt, accurate evaluation of the mesenteric vasculature. Copyright RSNA, 2002

  16. Wavelength-coded volume holographic imaging endoscope for multidepth imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Isela D; Han, Wanglei; Rice, Photini; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2017-10-01

    A wavelength-coded volume holographic imaging (WC-VHI) endoscope system capable of simultaneous multifocal imaging is presented. The system images light from two depths separated by 100  μm in a tissue sample by using axial chromatic dispersion of a gradient index probe in combination with two light-emitting diode sources and a multiplexed volume hologram to separate the images. This system is different from previous VHI systems in that it uses planar multiplexed gratings and does not require curved holographic gratings. This results in improved lateral imaging resolution from 228.1 to 322.5  lp/mm. This letter describes the design and fabrication of the WC-VHI endoscope and experimental images of hard and soft resolution targets and biological tissue samples to illustrate the performance properties. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  17. A Sort-Last Rendering System over an Optical Backplane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Kirihata

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sort-Last is a computer graphics technique for rendering extremely large data sets on clusters of computers. Sort-Last works by dividing the data set into even-sized chunks for parallel rendering and then composing the images to form the final result. Since sort-last rendering requires the movement of large amounts of image data among cluster nodes, the network interconnecting the nodes becomes a major bottleneck. In this paper, we describe a sort-last rendering system implemented on a cluster of computers whose nodes are connected by an all-optical switch. The rendering system introduces the notion of the Photonic Computing Engine, a computing system built dynamically by using the optical switch to create dedicated network connections among cluster nodes. The sort-last volume rendering algorithm was implemented on the Photonic Computing Engine, and its performance is evaluated. Prelimi- nary experiments show that performance is affected by the image composition time and average payload size. In an attempt to stabilize the performance of the system, we have designed a flow control mechanism that uses feedback messages to dynamically adjust the data flow rate within the computing engine.

  18. Large-Scale Multi-Resolution Representations for Accurate Interactive Image and Volume Operations

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell B.

    2015-11-25

    The resolutions of acquired image and volume data are ever increasing. However, the resolutions of commodity display devices remain limited. This leads to an increasing gap between data and display resolutions. To bridge this gap, the standard approach is to employ output-sensitive operations on multi-resolution data representations. Output-sensitive operations facilitate interactive applications since their required computations are proportional only to the size of the data that is visible, i.e., the output, and not the full size of the input. Multi-resolution representations, such as image mipmaps, and volume octrees, are crucial in providing these operations direct access to any subset of the data at any resolution corresponding to the output. Despite its widespread use, this standard approach has some shortcomings in three important application areas, namely non-linear image operations, multi-resolution volume rendering, and large-scale image exploration. This dissertation presents new multi-resolution representations for large-scale images and volumes that address these shortcomings. Standard multi-resolution representations require low-pass pre-filtering for anti- aliasing. However, linear pre-filters do not commute with non-linear operations. This becomes problematic when applying non-linear operations directly to any coarse resolution levels in standard representations. Particularly, this leads to inaccurate output when applying non-linear image operations, e.g., color mapping and detail-aware filters, to multi-resolution images. Similarly, in multi-resolution volume rendering, this leads to inconsistency artifacts which manifest as erroneous differences in rendering outputs across resolution levels. To address these issues, we introduce the sparse pdf maps and sparse pdf volumes representations for large-scale images and volumes, respectively. These representations sparsely encode continuous probability density functions (pdfs) of multi-resolution pixel

  19. CT two-dimensional reformation versus three-dimensional volume rendering with regard to surgical findings in the preoperative assessment of the ossicular chain in chronic suppurative otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yong, E-mail: guoyong27@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Navy General Hospital, 6# Fucheng Road, Beijing 100048 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyangdoc@sina.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Navy General Hospital, 6# Fucheng Road, Beijing 100048 (China); Lu, Qiao-hui, E-mail: Luqiaohui465@126.com [Department of Radiology, Navy General Hospital, 6# Fucheng Road, Beijing 100048 (China); Zheng, Kui-hong, E-mail: zhengkuihong1971@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Navy General Hospital, 6# Fucheng Road, Beijing 100048 (China); Shi, Li-jing, E-mail: Shilijing2003@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Navy General Hospital, 6# Fucheng Road, Beijing 100048 (China); Wang, Qing-jun, E-mail: wangqingjun77@163.com [Department of Radiology, Navy General Hospital, 6# Fucheng Road, Beijing 100048 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the role of three-dimensional volume rendering (3DVR) in the preoperative assessment of the ossicular chain in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Materials and methods: Sixty-six patients with CSOM were included in this prospective study. Temporal bone was scanned with a 128-channel multidetector row CT and the axial data was transferred to the workstation for multiplanar reformation (MPR) and 3DVR reconstructions. Evaluation of the ossicular chain according to a three-point scoring system on two-dimensional reformation (2D) and 3DVR was performed independently by two radiologists. The evaluation results were compared with surgical findings. Results: 2D showed over 89% accuracy in the assessment of segmental absence of the ossicular chain in CSOM, no matter how small the segmental size was. 3DVR was as accurate as 2D for the assessment of segmental absence. However, 3DVR was found to be more accurate than 2D in the evaluation of partial erosion of segments. Conclusion: Both 3DVR and 2D are accurate and reliable for the assessment of the ossicular chain in CSOM. The inclusion of 3DVR images in the imaging protocol improves the accuracy of 2D in detecting ossicular erosion from CSOM.

  20. Multidetector-row computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of intestinal complications caused by clinically unsuspected ingested dietary foreign bodies: a case series emphasizing the use of volume rendering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Augusto Cesar Vieira; Torres, Ulysses dos Santos; Oliveira, Eduardo Portela de; Gual, Fabiana; Bauab Junior, Tufik, E-mail: usantor@yahoo.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Hospital de Base. Serv. de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Westin, Carlos Eduardo Garcia [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Hospital de Base. Cirurgia Geral; Cardoso, Luciana Vargas [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Hospital de Base. Setor de Tomografia Computadorizada

    2013-11-15

    Objective: the present study was aimed at describing a case series where a preoperative diagnosis of intestinal complications secondary to accidentally ingested dietary foreign bodies was made by multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), with emphasis on complementary findings yielded by volume rendering techniques (VRT) and curved multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Materials and Methods: The authors retrospectively assessed five patients with surgically confirmed intestinal complications (perforation and/or obstruction) secondary to unsuspected ingested dietary foreign bodies, consecutively assisted in their institution between 2010 and 2012. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiological data were analyzed. VRT and curved MPR were subsequently performed. Results: preoperative diagnosis of intestinal complications was originally performed in all cases. In one case the presence of a foreign body was not initially identified as the causal factor, and the use of complementary techniques facilitated its retrospective identification. In all cases these tools allowed a better depiction of the entire foreign bodies on a single image section, contributing to the assessment of their morphology. Conclusion: although the use of complementary techniques has not had a direct impact on diagnostic performance in most cases of this series, they may provide a better depiction of foreign bodies' morphology on a single image section. (author)

  1. Evaluation of a 3-dimensional voxel-based neuronavigation system with perspective image rendering for keyhole approaches to the skull base: an anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigl, Guenther C; Krischek, Boris; Ritz, Rainer; Thaher, Firas; Marquardt, Jakob S; Hirt, Bernhard; Korn, Andreas; Schumann, Martin; Tatagiba, Marcos; Ebner, Florian H

    2014-01-01

    Keeping track of the endoscope tip in 3 planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal) while performing skull base surgeries can be difficult because the surgeon is focused most on the live video images of the endoscope. For that reason, it was the aim of this anatomical cadaver study to evaluate the usefulness of a voxel-based neuronavigation system with 3-dimensional (3D) perspective image rendering for endoscopic procedures through keyhole approaches to the skull base. On 5 whole-body fixed cadavers, frontolateral and retrosigmoid approaches were performed bilaterally using a neuronavigation system with 3D perspective image rendering (Cbyon, Med-Surgical Services Inc., Sunnyvale, California). Target points defined on the selected target structures were approached with the navigated ∅ 4-mm 0° endoscope (Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany). Using an Endocameleon 4-mm rigid endoscope capable of changing its angle of view while remaining stationary, the surgical field was checked for injuries before and after insertion of the navigated 0° endoscope. The median neuronavigation registration error was 0.95 mm (range 0.6 to 1.2 mm). Evaluation showed that 100% of the defined targets were reached and visualized. Neither a target structure nor neurovascular structures or surrounding brain tissue were injured by the navigated 0° endoscope. A neuronavigation system with 3D voxel-based perspective image rendering could potentially improve safety during complex skull base surgeries, and possibly also help to improve surgical results. Such a system, however, cannot replace a neurosurgeon's experience nor surgical skill or anatomical knowledge. It is an excellent teaching tool for young neurosurgeons, but it also has some limitations. Therefore, clinical studies will be necessary to further evaluate the benefits of this type of neuronavigation system in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RenderMan design principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Tony; Porter, Tom

    1989-01-01

    The two worlds of interactive graphics and realistic graphics have remained separate. Fast graphics hardware runs simple algorithms and generates simple looking images. Photorealistic image synthesis software runs slowly on large expensive computers. The time has come for these two branches of computer graphics to merge. The speed and expense of graphics hardware is no longer the barrier to the wide acceptance of photorealism. There is every reason to believe that high quality image synthesis will become a standard capability of every graphics machine, from superworkstation to personal computer. The significant barrier has been the lack of a common language, an agreed-upon set of terms and conditions, for 3-D modeling systems to talk to 3-D rendering systems for computing an accurate rendition of that scene. Pixar has introduced RenderMan to serve as that common language. RenderMan, specifically the extensibility it offers in shading calculations, is discussed.

  3. Novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D volume rendering toward improving the resolution of the fossil record of charcoal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Belcher

    Full Text Available Variations in the abundance of fossil charcoals between rocks and sediments are assumed to reflect changes in fire activity in Earth's past. These variations in fire activity are often considered to be in response to environmental, ecological or climatic changes. The role that fire plays in feedbacks to such changes is becoming increasingly important to understand and highlights the need to create robust estimates of variations in fossil charcoal abundance. The majority of charcoal based fire reconstructions quantify the abundance of charcoal particles and do not consider the changes in the morphology of the individual particles that may have occurred due to fragmentation as part of their transport history. We have developed a novel application of confocal laser scanning microscopy coupled to image processing that enables the 3-dimensional reconstruction of individual charcoal particles. This method is able to measure the volume of both microfossil and mesofossil charcoal particles and allows the abundance of charcoal in a sample to be expressed as total volume of charcoal. The method further measures particle surface area and shape allowing both relationships between different size and shape metrics to be analysed and full consideration of variations in particle size and size sorting between different samples to be studied. We believe application of this new imaging approach could allow significant improvement in our ability to estimate variations in past fire activity using fossil charcoals.

  4. Extending the imaging volume for biometric iris recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanswamy, Ramkumar; Johnson, Gregory E; Silveira, Paulo E X; Wach, Hans B

    2005-02-10

    The use of the human iris as a biometric has recently attracted significant interest in the area of security applications. The need to capture an iris without active user cooperation places demands on the optical system. Unlike a traditional optical design, in which a large imaging volume is traded off for diminished imaging resolution and capacity for collecting light, Wavefront Coded imaging is a computational imaging technology capable of expanding the imaging volume while maintaining an accurate and robust iris identification capability. We apply Wavefront Coded imaging to extend the imaging volume of the iris recognition application.

  5. Feature tracking for automated volume of interest stabilization on 4D-OCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laves, Max-Heinrich; Schoob, Andreas; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Pfeiffer, Tom; Huber, Robert; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    A common representation of volumetric medical image data is the triplanar view (TV), in which the surgeon manually selects slices showing the anatomical structure of interest. In addition to common medical imaging such as MRI or computed tomography, recent advances in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) have enabled live processing and volumetric rendering of four-dimensional images of the human body. Due to the region of interest undergoing motion, it is challenging for the surgeon to simultaneously keep track of an object by continuously adjusting the TV to desired slices. To select these slices in subsequent frames automatically, it is necessary to track movements of the volume of interest (VOI). This has not been addressed with respect to 4DOCT images yet. Therefore, this paper evaluates motion tracking by applying state-of-the-art tracking schemes on maximum intensity projections (MIP) of 4D-OCT images. Estimated VOI location is used to conveniently show corresponding slices and to improve the MIPs by calculating thin-slab MIPs. Tracking performances are evaluated on an in-vivo sequence of human skin, captured at 26 volumes per second. Among investigated tracking schemes, our recently presented tracking scheme for soft tissue motion provides highest accuracy with an error of under 2.2 voxels for the first 80 volumes. Object tracking on 4D-OCT images enables its use for sub-epithelial tracking of microvessels for image-guidance.

  6. A review of the taxonomy and osteology of the Rhombophryne serratopalpebrosa species group (Anura: Microhylidae) from Madagascar, with comments on the value of volume rendering of micro-CT data to taxonomists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherz, Mark D; Hawlitschek, Oliver; Andreone, Franco; Rakotoarison, Andolalao; Vences, Miguel; Glaw, Frank

    2017-06-06

    Over the last three years, three new species of saw-browed diamond frogs (Rhombophryne serratopalpebrosa species group)-a clade of cophyline microhylid frogs native to northern and eastern Madagascar-have been described. We here review the taxonomy of these frogs based on a new multi-gene phylogeny of the group, which confirms its monophyly but is insufficiently resolved to clarify most intra-group relationships. We confirm Rhombophryne guentherpetersi (Guibé, 1974) to be a member of this group, and we re-describe it based on its type series and newly collected material; the species is characterised by small superciliary spines (overlooked in its original description), as well as large tibial glands and an unusually laterally compressed pectoral girdle. We go on to describe two new species of this group from northern Madagascar: both R. diadema sp. nov. from the Sorata Massif and R. regalis sp. nov. from several sites in the northeast of the island possess three superciliary spines, but they are characterised by several subtle morphological and osteological differences. The new species are separated from all known congeners by an uncorrected pairwise distance of at least 5.1% in a ca. 550 bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. In order to highlight the significance of the skeleton in the taxonomy of this group, we provide a detailed description of its generalized osteology based on volume-rendered micro-CT scans of all described members, revisiting already-described skeletons of some species, and describing the skeletons of R. guentherpetersi, R. coronata, and the new taxa for the first time. Use of volume rendering, instead of surface rendering of micro-CT data, resulted in some discrepancies due to the properties of each method. We discuss these inconsistencies and their bearing on the relative value of surface and volume rendering in the taxonomist's toolkit. We argue that, while surface models are more practical for the reader, volumes are generally a more

  7. Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

  8. Video-based rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A

    2005-01-01

    Driven by consumer-market applications that enjoy steadily increasing economic importance, graphics hardware and rendering algorithms are a central focus of computer graphics research. Video-based rendering is an approach that aims to overcome the current bottleneck in the time-consuming modeling process and has applications in areas such as computer games, special effects, and interactive TV. This book offers an in-depth introduction to video-based rendering, a rapidly developing new interdisciplinary topic employing techniques from computer graphics, computer vision, and telecommunication en

  9. Rendering of Gemstones

    OpenAIRE

    Krtek, Lukáš

    2012-01-01

    The distinctive appearance of gemstones is caused by the way light reflects and refracts multiple times inside of them. The goal of this thesis is to design and implement an application for photorealistic rendering of gems. The most important effects we aim for are realistic dispersion of light and refractive caustics. For rendering we use well-known algorithm of path tracing with an experimental modification for faster computation of caustic effects. In this thesis we also design and impleme...

  10. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p histopathology were 0.949 (p histopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging can accurately estimate index tumor volume as determined by histology. Magnetic resonance imaging has better accuracy in predicting histopathology tumor volume in tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) than prostate specific antigen and age. Index tumor volume as

  11. GPU Pro advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This book covers essential tools and techniques for programming the graphics processing unit. Brought to you by Wolfgang Engel and the same team of editors who made the ShaderX series a success, this volume covers advanced rendering techniques, engine design, GPGPU techniques, related mathematical techniques, and game postmortems. A special emphasis is placed on handheld programming to account for the increased importance of graphics on mobile devices, especially the iPhone and iPod touch.Example programs and source code can be downloaded from the book's CRC Press web page. 

  12. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide...... and wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  13. Predicting Outcome after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury by Early Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lesion Location and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, Emily; Hernandez, Ana; Stavinoha, Peter L.; Huang, Rong; Kernie, Steven G.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Brain lesions after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are heterogeneous, rendering outcome prognostication difficult. The aim of this study is to investigate whether early magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lesion location and lesion volume within discrete brain anatomical zones can accurately predict long-term neurological outcome in children post-TBI. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI hyperintense lesions in 63 children obtained 6.2±5.6 days postinjury were correlated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended-Pediatrics (GOS-E Peds) score at 13.5±8.6 months. FLAIR lesion volume was expressed as hyperintensity lesion volume index (HLVI)=(hyperintensity lesion volume / whole brain volume)×100 measured within three brain zones: zone A (cortical structures); zone B (basal ganglia, corpus callosum, internal capsule, and thalamus); and zone C (brainstem). HLVI-total and HLVI-zone C predicted good and poor outcome groups (pCompared to patients with lesions in zone A alone or in zones A and B, patients with lesions in all three zones had a significantly higher odds ratio (4.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.19–16.0) for developing an unfavorable outcome. PMID:25808802

  14. Three-dimensional CT image segmentation by volume growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongping; Conners, Richard W.; Araman, Philip A.

    1991-11-01

    The research reported in this paper is aimed at locating, identifying, and quantifying internal (anatomical or physiological) structures, by 3-D image segmentation. Computerized tomography (CT) images of an object are first processed on a slice-by-slice basis, generating a stack of image slices that have been smoothed and pre-segmented. The image smoothing operation is executed by a spatially adaptive filter, and the 2-D pre-segmentation is achieved by a thresholding process whereby each individual pixel in the input image space is consistently assigned a label, according to its CT number, i.e., the gray-level value. Given a sequence of pre-segmented images as 3-D input scene (a stack of image slices), the spatial connectivity that exists among neighboring image pixels is utilized in a volume growing process which generates a number of well-defined volumetric regions or image solides, each representing an individual anatomical or physiological structure in the input scene. The 3-D segmentation is implemented using a volume growing process so that the aspect of pixel spatial connectivity is incorporated into the image segmentation procedure. To initialize the volume growing process for each volumetric region in the input 3-D scene, a seed location for a region is defined and loaded into a queue data structure called seed queue. The volume growing process consists of a set of procedures that perform different operations on the volumetric data of a CT image sequence. Examples of experiment of the described system with CT image data of several hardwood logs are given to demonstrate usefulness and flexibility of this approach. This allows solutions to industrial web inspection, as well as to several problems in medical image analysis where low-level image segmentation plays an important role toward successful image interpretation tasks.

  15. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  16. Skeletonization methods for image and volume inpainting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobiecki, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Image and shape restoration techniques are increasingly important in computer graphics. Many types of restoration techniques have been proposed in the 2D image-processing and according to our knowledge only one to volumetric data. Well-known examples of such techniques include digital inpainting,

  17. Assessment of Kidney Volume Measurement Techniques for Ultrasound Images

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Mahani Hafizah Wan Mahmud; Eko Supriyanto

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to assess and compare the accuracy of different methods for estimating the kidney volume of ultrasound images consist of volume measurement from length-based, area-based and surface-based. For length-based method, the ellipsoid formula was used and for surface-based method, the volume can be automatically obtained from 3D ultrasound system after some manual contouring. For area-based method, sets of ultrasound images with different number of slices were used. After manual c...

  18. Estimation of intrinsic volumes from digital grey-scale images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Anne Marie

    Local algorithms are common tools for estimating intrinsic volumes from black-and-white digital images. However, these algorithms are typically biased in the design based setting, even when the resolution tends to infinity. Moreover, images recorded in practice are most often blurred grey...

  19. Rendering and Compositing Infrastructure Improvements to VisIt for Insitu Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ruebel, Oliver [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Compared to posthoc rendering, insitu rendering often generates larger numbers of images, as a result rendering performance and scalability are critical in the insitu setting. In this work we present improvements to VisIt's rendering and compositing infrastructure that deliver increased performance and scalability in both posthoc and insitu settings. We added the capability for alpha blend compositing and use it with ordered compositing when datasets have disjoint block domain decomposition to optimize the rendering of transparent geometry. We also made improvements that increase overall efficiency by reducing communication and data movement and have addressed a number of performance issues. We structured our code to take advantage of SIMD parallelization and use threads to overlap communication and compositing. We tested our improvements on a 20 core workstation using 8 cores to render geometry generated from a $256^3$ cosmology dataset and on a Cray XC31 using 512 cores to render geometry generated from a $2000^2 \\times 800$ plasma dataset. Our results show that ordered compositing provides a speed up of up to $4 \\times$ over the current sort first strategy. The other improvements resulted in modest speed up with one notable exception where we achieve up to $40 \\times$ speed up of rendering and compositing of opaque geometry when both opaque and transparent geometry are rendered together. We also investigated the use of depth peeling, but found that the implementation provided by VTK is substantially slower,both with and without GPU acceleration, than a local camera order sort.

  20. High Fidelity Haptic Rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Otaduy, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The human haptic system, among all senses, provides unique and bidirectional communication between humans and their physical environment. Yet, to date, most human-computer interactive systems have focused primarily on the graphical rendering of visual information and, to a lesser extent, on the display of auditory information. Extending the frontier of visual computing, haptic interfaces, or force feedback devices, have the potential to increase the quality of human-computer interaction by accommodating the sense of touch. They provide an attractive augmentation to visual display and enhance t

  1. Volume estimation of tonsil phantoms using an oral camera with 3D imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anshuman J.; Valdez, Tulio A.; Vargas, Jose Arbouin; Saksupapchon, Punyapat; Rachapudi, Pushyami; Ge, Zhifei; Estrada, Julio C.; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) visualization of oral cavity and oropharyngeal anatomy may play an important role in the evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging are capable of providing 3D anatomical descriptions, this type of technology is not readily available in a clinic setting. Current imaging of the oropharynx is performed using a light source and tongue depressors. For better assessment of the inferior pole of the tonsils and tongue base flexible laryngoscopes are required which only provide a two dimensional (2D) rendering. As a result, clinical diagnosis is generally subjective in tonsillar hypertrophy where current physical examination has limitations. In this report, we designed a hand held portable oral camera with 3D imaging capability to reconstruct the anatomy of the oropharynx in tonsillar hypertrophy where the tonsils get enlarged and can lead to increased airway resistance. We were able to precisely reconstruct the 3D shape of the tonsils and from that estimate airway obstruction percentage and volume of the tonsils in 3D printed realistic models. Our results correlate well with Brodsky’s classification of tonsillar hypertrophy as well as intraoperative volume estimations. PMID:27446667

  2. Brain Volume Estimation Enhancement by Morphological Image Processing Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinali R.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Volume estimation of brain is important for many neurological applications. It is necessary in measuring brain growth and changes in brain in normal/ abnormal patients. Thus, accurate brain volume measurement is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the method of choice for volume quantification due to excellent levels of image resolution and between-tissue contrast. Stereology method is a good method for estimating volume but it requires to segment enough MRI slices and have a good resolution. In this study, it is desired to enhance stereology method for volume estimation of brain using less MRI slices with less resolution. Methods: In this study, a program for calculating volume using stereology method has been introduced. After morphologic method, dilation was applied and the stereology method enhanced. For the evaluation of this method, we used T1-wighted MR images from digital phantom in BrainWeb which had ground truth. Results: The volume of 20 normal brain extracted from BrainWeb, was calculated. The volumes of white matter, gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid with given dimension were estimated correctly. Volume calculation from Stereology method in different cases was made. In three cases, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE was measured. Case I with T=5, d=5, Case II with T=10, D=10 and Case III with T=20, d=20 (T=slice thickness, d=resolution as stereology parameters. By comparing these results of two methods, it is obvious that RMSE values for our proposed method are smaller than Stereology method. Conclusion: Using morphological operation, dilation allows to enhance the estimation volume method, Stereology. In the case with less MRI slices and less test points, this method works much better compared to Stereology method.

  3. Cine magnetic resonance imaging of left ventricular volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi (Chiba Children' s Hospital (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 27 patients with various heart diseases has been undertaken. The children ranged from 11 months to 16 years old (average age: 6.8 years), so as to assess the MRI capability to evaluate the left ventricular volumes, which were previously calculated by angiography. ECG-gated MRI was performed by spin echo and gradient refocused imaging techniques at 0.5 tesla. Ventricular volumes were determined using a single slice comparable with the right anterior oblique projection of the ventriculogram. Comparison of the left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume yielded a high correlation between MRI (y) and ventriculography (x) (y=0.83x + 4.1, r=0.98 and y=0.88x - 1.74, r=0.98, respectively). It is concluded that the cine MRI provides an accurate non-invasive means for quantification of left ventricular volumes. (author).

  4. Determining the organ of origin of large pelvic masses in females using multidetector CT angiography and three-dimensional volume rendering CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, YangKang; Chen, JunWei; Chen, XueYin; Lin, JianBang; Cai, AiQun; Zhou, XiuGuo [Cancer Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Department of Radiology, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Zheng, Yu [Cancer Hospital, Shantou University Medical College, Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Shantou (China)

    2015-04-01

    To study the value of tumour feeding arteries and the ovarian vein in determining the organ of origin of large pelvic tumours in females using multidetector CT. One hundred and thirty patients with 131 pathologically proven tumours (>6.5 cm) were retrospectively reviewed. Conventional CT images and CT angiography were evaluated, with focus on assessing the value of tumour feeding arteries and the ovarian vein in differentiating ovarian from non-ovarian tumours. For 97 ovarian tumours, the feeding arteries included the ovarian artery (n = 51) and the ovarian branch of uterine artery (n = 64). For 34 non-ovarian tumours, the feeding arteries included the ovarian artery (n = 2), the uterine artery (n = 21), the mesenteric artery (n = 5), and the internal iliac artery (n = 1). The ovarian vein was identified in 86 ovarian tumours and 12 non-ovarian tumours. When the feeding arteries and the ovarian vein were combined to confirm ovarian origin, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 97.8 %, 84.2 %, 93.8 %, 94.1 %, and 93.9 %, respectively. The accuracy was significantly higher than that of independently using the ovarian vein or the ovarian feeding arteries. Combined application of tumour feeding arteries and the ovarian vein is valuable to differentiate large ovarian from non-ovarian tumours. (orig.)

  5. Assessment of sex from endocranial cavity using volume-rendered CT scans in a sample from Medellín, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza, Juliana; Díaz, Carlos Alberto; Bedoya, John Fernando; Monsalve, Timisay; Botella, Miguel C

    2014-01-01

    Sex estimation is a primary component of the identification of skeletonized individuals in forensic anthropology. The goal of this research was to develop a new method for estimating sex based on measurements of the endocranial cavity by means of volumetric 3D reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) without contrast. The sample consisted of 249 healthy individuals of both sexes whose tomographies were taken by the imaging unit at the San Vicente de Paul University Hospital in Medellin, Colombia. Sixteen measurements (twelve were designed for this study) of each individual's endocranial base were taken and then used to create formulae via logistic regression, thereby yielding a 89.7% overall sex classification accuracy for the general equation. The measurements showing the greatest degree of sexual dimorphism were the maximum width of the basal occipital portion, the maximum width of the foramen magnum, and the maximum distance between foramina ovalia. This study represents the first physical anthropology study of this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Production rendering: design and implementation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephenson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    ... of techniques into a coherent and manageable body of code. While many books have been written about rendering, they are typically limited to either the basics of ray tracing or they specialize on a certain aspect of rendering research. When I began developing a renderer of my own, I rapidly found that these texts told me very little about real ren...

  7. A novel imaging system of optical detection on cancers and tissues in gastrointestinal endoscope using high-color-rendering white and color tunable LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Jun; Taguchi, Tsunemasa; Uchida, Yuji; Kurai, Satoshi; Yanai, Hideo; Kiyotoki, Shu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Shingo; Sakaida, Isao

    2010-02-01

    The use of white or color tunable LEDs (light-emitting diodes), which can replace a large light source apparatus and light-guiding fiber bundle, enable the miniaturization of the whole endoscope system and remove constraints on the design of its shape. We have developed a novel white LED for a new experimental prototype LED-illuminated gastrointestinal endoscope having the color rendering in the clinically important red range at around 600 nm.­

  8. Emergency department imaging: are weather and calendar factors associated with imaging volume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K; Chernyak, V; Scheinfeld, M H

    2016-12-01

    To identify weather and calendar factors that would enable prediction of daily emergency department (ED) imaging volume to aid appropriate scheduling of imaging resources for efficient ED function. Daily ED triage and imaging volumes for radiography, computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound were obtained from hospital databases for the period between January 2011 and December 2013 at a large tertiary urban hospital with a Level II trauma centre. These data were tabulated alongside daily weather conditions (temperature, wind and precipitation), day of week, season, and holidays. Multivariate analysis was performed. Pearson correlations were used to measure the association between number of imaging studies performed and ED triage volume. For every additional 50 triaged patients, the odds of having high (imaging volume ≥90th percentile) radiography, CT, and ultrasound volume increased by 4.3 times (pWeather factors and other calendar variables were not independent predictors of high imaging volume. Using Pearson correlations, ED triage volume correlated with number of radiographs, CT, and ultrasound examinations with r=0.73, 0.37, and 0.41, respectively (pweather factors were found to be minor or non-significant independent predictors of ED imaging utilisation, these may be important in influencing the actual number of ED triages. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Light Field Rendering for Head Mounted Displays using Pixel Reprojection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Juhler; Klein, Jákup; Kraus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Light field displays have advantages over traditional stereoscopic head mounted displays, for example, because they can overcome the vergence-accommodation conflict. However, rendering light fields can be a heavy task for computers due to the number of images that have to be rendered. Since much...... of the information of the different images is redundant, we use pixel reprojection from the corner cameras to compute the remaining images in the light field. We compare the reprojected images with directly rendered images in a user test. In most cases, the users were unable to distinguish the images. In extreme...... cases, the reprojection approach is not capable of creating the light field. We conclude that pixel reprojection is a feasible method for rendering light fields as far as quality of perspective and diffuse shading is concerned, but render time needs to be reduced to make the method practical....

  10. Standardized rendering from IR surveillance motion imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokoski, F. J.

    2014-06-01

    Government agencies, including defense and law enforcement, increasingly make use of video from surveillance systems and camera phones owned by non-government entities.Making advanced and standardized motion imaging technology available to private and commercial users at cost-effective prices would benefit all parties. In particular, incorporating thermal infrared into commercial surveillance systems offers substantial benefits beyond night vision capability. Face rendering is a process to facilitate exploitation of thermal infrared surveillance imagery from the general area of a crime scene, to assist investigations with and without cooperating eyewitnesses. Face rendering automatically generates greyscale representations similar to police artist sketches for faces in surveillance imagery collected from proximate locations and times to a crime under investigation. Near-realtime generation of face renderings can provide law enforcement with an investigation tool to assess witness memory and credibility, and integrate reports from multiple eyewitnesses, Renderings can be quickly disseminated through social media to warn of a person who may pose an immediate threat, and to solicit the public's help in identifying possible suspects and witnesses. Renderings are pose-standardized so as to not divulge the presence and location of eyewitnesses and surveillance cameras. Incorporation of thermal infrared imaging into commercial surveillance systems will significantly improve system performance, and reduce manual review times, at an incremental cost that will continue to decrease. Benefits to criminal justice would include improved reliability of eyewitness testimony and improved accuracy of distinguishing among minority groups in eyewitness and surveillance identifications.

  11. Eyeball muscles' diameters versus volume estimated by numerical image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majos, A; Grzelak, P; Młynarczyk, W; Stefańczyk, L

    2007-01-01

    To determine the clinical usefulness of the numerical segmentation image technique (NSI) in estimating the volume of extraocular muscles and to compare this value to widely used measurements of single diameters of the muscles. Forty-five patients underwent magnetic resonance examinations in 1.5-T scanner. SE T1 sequences in transversal and coronal planes were provided and data were sent to a personal computer, where the degree of exophthalmos, horizontal diameter of medial rectus muscles, and vertical diameter of inferior rectus muscles were determined on the basis of two-dimensional images. The quantity estimation of all eye muscles volumes using NSI application in three-dimensional space was carried out with use of level set segmentation algorithm. A strong correlation between the total eye muscle volume and degree of exophthalmos was determined. The usefulness of measuring single diameters for estimating the muscles' enlargement was confirmed. The difference between a single muscle's volume and its width also was confirmed. Estimates of muscle volume correlate with the degree of exophthalmos more accurately than measurements of single diameters. The NSI technique is a clinically useful application, providing objective data calculated individually for each orbit. It allows an objective estimation of the pathologic processes leading to exophthalmos and may be especially helpful in monitoring discrete changes in the muscles volume during treatment.

  12. Evaluation of right ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Stubgaard, M; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Right ventricular volumes were determined in 12 patients with different levels of right and left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an ECG gated multisection technique in planes perpendicular to the diastolic position of the interventricular septum. Right ventricular...

  13. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  14. Reliability and Accuracy of Brain Volume Measurement on MR Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamagchii, Kechiro; Lassen, Anders; Ring, Poul

    1998-01-01

    Yamaguchi, K., Lassen, A. And Ring, P. Reliability and Accuracy of Brain Volume Measurement on MR Imaging. Abstract at ESMRMB98 European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology, Geneva, Sept 17-20, 1998 Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre University Hospital...

  15. Sea modeling and rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2010-10-01

    More and more defence and civil applications require simulation of marine synthetic environment. Currently, the "Future Anti-Surface-Guided-Weapon" (FASGW) or "anti-navire léger" (ANL) missile needs this kind of modelling. This paper presents a set of technical enhancement of the SE-Workbench that aim at better representing the sea profile and the interaction with targets. The operational scenario variability is a key criterion: the generic geographical area (e.g. Persian Gulf, coast of Somalia,...), the type of situation (e.g. peace keeping, peace enforcement, anti-piracy, drug interdiction,...)., the objectives (political, strategic, or military objectives), the description of the mission(s) (e.g. antipiracy) and operation(s) (e.g. surveillance and reconnaissance, escort, convoying) to achieve the objectives, the type of environment (Weather, Time of day, Geography [coastlines, islands, hills/mountains]). The paper insists on several points such as the dual rendering using either ray tracing [and the GP GPU optimization] or rasterization [and GPU shaders optimization], the modelling of sea-surface based on hypertextures and shaders, the wakes modelling, the buoyancy models for targets, the interaction of coast and littoral, the dielectric infrared modelling of water material.

  16. An extension of digital volume correlation for multimodality image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, E.; Jailin, C.; Mendoza, A.; Tengattini, A.; Andò, E.; Hall, Stephen A.; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Hild, F.; Roux, S.

    2017-09-01

    The question of registering two images (or image volumes) acquired with different modalities, and thus exhibiting different contrast, at different positions is addressed based on an extension of global digital image (or volume) correlation. A specific comparison metric is introduced allowing the signature of the different phases to be related. A first solution consists of a Gaussian mixture to describe the joint distribution of gray levels, which not only provides a matching of both images, but also offers a natural segmentation indicator. A second ‘self-adapting’ solution does not include any postulated a priori model for the joint histogram and leads to a registration of the images based on their initial histograms. The algorithm is implemented with a pyramidal multiscale framework for the sake of robustness. The proposed multiscale technique is tested on two 3D images obtained from x-ray and neutron tomography respectively. The proposed approach brings the two images to coincidence with a sub-pixel accuracy and allows for a ‘natural’ segmentation of the different phases.

  17. Digital color acquisition, perception, coding and rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine; Macaire, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    In this book the authors identify the basic concepts and recent advances in the acquisition, perception, coding and rendering of color. The fundamental aspects related to the science of colorimetry in relation to physiology (the human visual system) are addressed, as are constancy and color appearance. It also addresses the more technical aspects related to sensors and the color management screen. Particular attention is paid to the notion of color rendering in computer graphics. Beyond color, the authors also look at coding, compression, protection and quality of color images and videos.

  18. GPU Pro 5 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    In GPU Pro5: Advanced Rendering Techniques, section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Marius Bjorge have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book covers rendering, lighting, effects in image space, mobile devices, 3D engine design, and compute. It explores rasterization of liquids, ray tracing of art assets that would otherwise be used in a rasterized engine, physically based area lights, volumetric light

  19. ProteinShader: illustrative rendering of macromolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Joseph R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cartoon-style illustrative renderings of proteins can help clarify structural features that are obscured by space filling or balls and sticks style models, and recent advances in programmable graphics cards offer many new opportunities for improving illustrative renderings. Results The ProteinShader program, a new tool for macromolecular visualization, uses information from Protein Data Bank files to produce illustrative renderings of proteins that approximate what an artist might create by hand using pen and ink. A combination of Hermite and spherical linear interpolation is used to draw smooth, gradually rotating three-dimensional tubes and ribbons with a repeating pattern of texture coordinates, which allows the application of texture mapping, real-time halftoning, and smooth edge lines. This free platform-independent open-source program is written primarily in Java, but also makes extensive use of the OpenGL Shading Language to modify the graphics pipeline. Conclusion By programming to the graphics processor unit, ProteinShader is able to produce high quality images and illustrative rendering effects in real-time. The main feature that distinguishes ProteinShader from other free molecular visualization tools is its use of texture mapping techniques that allow two-dimensional images to be mapped onto the curved three-dimensional surfaces of ribbons and tubes with minimum distortion of the images.

  20. FluoRender: joint freehand segmentation and visualization for many-channel fluorescence data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yong; Otsuna, Hideo; Holman, Holly A; Bagley, Brig; Ito, Masayoshi; Lewis, A Kelsey; Colasanto, Mary; Kardon, Gabrielle; Ito, Kei; Hansen, Charles

    2017-05-26

    Image segmentation and registration techniques have enabled biologists to place large amounts of volume data from fluorescence microscopy, morphed three-dimensionally, onto a common spatial frame. Existing tools built on volume visualization pipelines for single channel or red-green-blue (RGB) channels have become inadequate for the new challenges of fluorescence microscopy. For a three-dimensional atlas of the insect nervous system, hundreds of volume channels are rendered simultaneously, whereas fluorescence intensity values from each channel need to be preserved for versatile adjustment and analysis. Although several existing tools have incorporated support of multichannel data using various strategies, the lack of a flexible design has made true many-channel visualization and analysis unavailable. The most common practice for many-channel volume data presentation is still converting and rendering pseudosurfaces, which are inaccurate for both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Here, we present an alternative design strategy that accommodates the visualization and analysis of about 100 volume channels, each of which can be interactively adjusted, selected, and segmented using freehand tools. Our multichannel visualization includes a multilevel streaming pipeline plus a triple-buffer compositing technique. Our method also preserves original fluorescence intensity values on graphics hardware, a crucial feature that allows graphics-processing-unit (GPU)-based processing for interactive data analysis, such as freehand segmentation. We have implemented the design strategies as a thorough restructuring of our original tool, FluoRender. The redesign of FluoRender not only maintains the existing multichannel capabilities for a greatly extended number of volume channels, but also enables new analysis functions for many-channel data from emerging biomedical-imaging techniques.

  1. Pile volume measurement by range imaging camera in indoor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Altuntas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Range imaging (RIM camera is recent technology in 3D location measurement. The new study areas have been emerged in measurement and data processing together with RIM camera. It has low-cost and fast measurement technique compared to the current measurement techniques. However its measurement accuracy varies according to effects resulting from the device and the environment. The direct sunlight is affect measurement accuracy of the camera. Thus, RIM camera should be used for indoor measurement. In this study gravel pile volume was measured by SwissRanger SR4000 camera. The measured volume is acquired as different 8.13% from the known.

  2. Magnetic resonance image tissue classification using a partial volume model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, D W; Sandor-Leahy, S R; Schaper, K A; Rottenberg, D A; Leahy, R M

    2001-05-01

    We describe a sequence of low-level operations to isolate and classify brain tissue within T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI). Our method first removes nonbrain tissue using a combination of anisotropic diffusion filtering, edge detection, and mathematical morphology. We compensate for image nonuniformities due to magnetic field inhomogeneities by fitting a tricubic B-spline gain field to local estimates of the image nonuniformity spaced throughout the MRI volume. The local estimates are computed by fitting a partial volume tissue measurement model to histograms of neighborhoods about each estimate point. The measurement model uses mean tissue intensity and noise variance values computed from the global image and a multiplicative bias parameter that is estimated for each region during the histogram fit. Voxels in the intensity-normalized image are then classified into six tissue types using a maximum a posteriori classifier. This classifier combines the partial volume tissue measurement model with a Gibbs prior that models the spatial properties of the brain. We validate each stage of our algorithm on real and phantom data. Using data from the 20 normal MRI brain data sets of the Internet Brain Segmentation Repository, our method achieved average kappa indices of kappa = 0.746 +/- 0.114 for gray matter (GM) and kappa = 0.798 +/- 0.089 for white matter (WM) compared to expert labeled data. Our method achieved average kappa indices kappa = 0.893 +/- 0.041 for GM and kappa = 0.928 +/- 0.039 for WM compared to the ground truth labeling on 12 volumes from the Montreal Neurological Institute's BrainWeb phantom. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Evaluation of four volume-based image registration algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Chu, James C H; Hsi, Wenchien; Khan, Atif J; Mehta, Parthiv S; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated 4 volume-based automatic image registration algorithms from 2 commercially available treatment planning systems (Philips Syntegra and BrainScan). The algorithms based on cross correlation (CC), local correlation (LC), normalized mutual information (NMI), and BrainScan mutual information (BSMI) were evaluated with: (1) the synthetic computed tomography (CT) images, (2) the CT and magnetic resonance (MR) phantom images, and (3) the CT and MR head image pairs from 12 patients with brain tumors. For the synthetic images, the registration results were compared with known transformation parameters, and all algorithms achieved accuracy of submillimeter in translation and subdegree in rotation. For the phantom images, the registration results were compared with those provided by frame and marker-based manual registration. For the patient images, the results were compared with anatomical landmark-based manual registration to qualitatively determine how the results were close to a clinically acceptable registration. NMI and LC outperformed CC and BSMI, with the sense of being closer to a clinically acceptable result. As for the robustness, NMI and BSMI outperformed CC and LC. A guideline of image registration in our institution was given, and final visual assessment is necessary to guarantee reasonable results.

  4. Sketchy Rendering for Information Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, Jo; Isenberg, Petra; Isenberg, Tobias; Dykes, Jason; Boukhelifa, Nadia; Slingsby, Aidan

    2012-01-01

    We present and evaluate a framework for constructing sketchy style information visualizations that mimic data graphics drawn by hand. We provide an alternative renderer for the Processing graphics environment that redefines core drawing primitives including line, polygon and ellipse rendering. These

  5. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  6. Volumetric Spectroscopic Imaging of Glioblastoma Multiforme Radiation Treatment Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, N. Andres [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Maudsley, Andrew A. [Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Gupta, Rakesh K. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Ishkanian, Fazilat; Huang, Kris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Walker, Gail R. [Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core Resource, Sylvester Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Padgett, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Roy, Bhaswati [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Fortis Memorial Research Institute, Gurgaon, Haryana (India); Panoff, Joseph; Markoe, Arnold [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Stoyanova, Radka, E-mail: RStoyanova@med.miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are used almost exclusively in radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), despite their well-recognized limitations. MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can identify biochemical patterns associated with normal brain and tumor, predominantly by observation of choline (Cho) and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) distributions. In this study, volumetric 3-dimensional MRSI was used to map these compounds over a wide region of the brain and to evaluate metabolite-defined treatment targets (metabolic tumor volumes [MTV]). Methods and Materials: Volumetric MRSI with effective voxel size of ∼1.0 mL and standard clinical MR images were obtained from 19 GBM patients. Gross tumor volumes and edema were manually outlined, and clinical target volumes (CTVs) receiving 46 and 60 Gy were defined (CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}, respectively). MTV{sub Cho} and MTV{sub NAA} were constructed based on volumes with high Cho and low NAA relative to values estimated from normal-appearing tissue. Results: The MRSI coverage of the brain was between 70% and 76%. The MTV{sub NAA} were almost entirely contained within the edema, and the correlation between the 2 volumes was significant (r=0.68, P=.001). In contrast, a considerable fraction of MTV{sub Cho} was outside of the edema (median, 33%) and for some patients it was also outside of the CTV{sub 46} and CTV{sub 60}. These untreated volumes were greater than 10% for 7 patients (37%) in the study, and on average more than one-third (34.3%) of the MTV{sub Cho} for these patients were outside of CTV{sub 60}. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of whole-brain MRSI for radiation therapy planning of GBM and revealed that areas of metabolically active tumor are not covered by standard RT volumes. The described integration of MTV into the RT system will pave the way to future clinical trials investigating outcomes in patients treated based on

  7. Entropy, color, and color rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Luke L A

    2012-12-01

    The Shannon entropy [Bell Syst. Tech J.27, 379 (1948)] of spectral distributions is applied to the problem of color rendering. With this novel approach, calculations for visual white entropy, spectral entropy, and color rendering are proposed, indices that are unreliant on the subjectivity inherent in reference spectra and color samples. The indices are tested against real lamp spectra, showing a simple and robust system for color rendering assessment. The discussion considers potential roles for white entropy in several areas of color theory and psychophysics and nonextensive entropy generalizations of the entropy indices in mathematical color spaces.

  8. ChromoStereoscopic rendering for trichromatic displays

    OpenAIRE

    Schemali, Leila; Eisemann, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The chromostereopsis phenomenom leads to a differing depth perception of different color hues, e.g., red is perceived slightly in front of blue. In chromostereoscopic rendering 2D images are produced that encode depth in color. While the natural chromostereopsis of our human visual system is rather low, it can be enhanced via ChromaDepth®glasses, which induce chromatic aberrations in one eye by refracting light of different wavelengths differently, hereby offsetting th...

  9. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  10. Green Infrastructure Checklists and Renderings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materials and checklists for Denver, CO to review development project plans for green infrastructure components, best practices for inspecting and maintaining installed green infrastructure. Also includes renderings of streetscape projects.

  11. Volume holographic imaging endoscopic design and construction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Isela D.; Han, Wanglei; Gordon, Michael; Rice, Photini; Barton, Jennifer K.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2017-05-01

    A reflectance volume holographic imaging (VHI) endoscope has been designed for simultaneous in vivo imaging of surface and subsurface tissue structures. Prior utilization of VHI systems has been limited to ex vivo tissue imaging. The VHI system presented in this work is designed for laparoscopic use. It consists of a probe section that relays light from the tissue sample to a handheld unit that contains the VHI microscope. The probe section is constructed from gradient index (GRIN) lenses that form a 1:1 relay for image collection. The probe has an outer diameter of 3.8 mm and is capable of achieving 228.1 lp/mm resolution with 660-nm Kohler illumination. The handheld optical section operates with a magnification of 13.9 and a field of view of 390 μm×244 μm. System performance is assessed through imaging of 1951 USAF resolution targets and soft tissue samples. The system has also passed sterilization procedures required for surgical use and has been used in two laparoscopic surgical procedures.

  12. Volume holographic imaging endoscopic design and construction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Isela D; Han, Wanglei; Gordon, Michael; Rice, Photini; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2017-05-01

    A reflectance volume holographic imaging (VHI) endoscope has been designed for simultaneous in vivo imaging of surface and subsurface tissue structures. Prior utilization of VHI systems has been limited to ex vivo tissue imaging. The VHI system presented in this work is designed for laparoscopic use. It consists of a probe section that relays light from the tissue sample to a handheld unit that contains the VHI microscope. The probe section is constructed from gradient index (GRIN) lenses that form a 1:1 relay for image collection. The probe has an outer diameter of 3.8 mm and is capable of achieving 228.1 ?? lp / mm resolution with 660-nm Kohler illumination. The handheld optical section operates with a magnification of 13.9 and a field of view of 390 ?? ? m × 244 ?? ? m . System performance is assessed through imaging of 1951 USAF resolution targets and soft tissue samples. The system has also passed sterilization procedures required for surgical use and has been used in two laparoscopic surgical procedures.

  13. Partial volume correction of whole body PET images using the wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Guerrieri, Luca; D'Ambrosio, Daniela; Franchi, Roberto; Boschi, Stefano; Marengo, Mario

    2008-04-01

    A general approach for partial volume correction of positron emission tomography (PET) images is introduced. The method is based on the merging of functional information from PET images and anatomical information using high resolution anatomical images. In order to decompose the PET and high resolution images the "á trous" algorithm was implemented. Results obtained with simulated and real patients images show a significant partial volume reduction and image enhancement. The relative errors in the partial volume corrected image are always less than 3,6% with respect to 16% of the original image.

  14. Scalable rendering on PC clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WYLIE,BRIAN N.; LEWIS,VASILY; SHIRLEY,DAVID NOYES; PAVLAKOS,CONSTANTINE

    2000-04-25

    This case study presents initial results from research targeted at the development of cost-effective scalable visualization and rendering technologies. The implementations of two 3D graphics libraries based on the popular sort-last and sort-middle parallel rendering techniques are discussed. An important goal of these implementations is to provide scalable rendering capability for extremely large datasets (>> 5 million polygons). Applications can use these libraries for either run-time visualization, by linking to an existing parallel simulation, or for traditional post-processing by linking to an interactive display program. The use of parallel, hardware-accelerated rendering on commodity hardware is leveraged to achieve high performance. Current performance results show that, using current hardware (a small 16-node cluster), they can utilize up to 85% of the aggregate graphics performance and achieve rendering rates in excess of 20 million polygons/second using OpenGL{reg_sign} with lighting, Gouraud shading, and individually specified triangles (not t-stripped).

  15. GPU PRO 3 Advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    GPU Pro3, the third volume in the GPU Pro book series, offers practical tips and techniques for creating real-time graphics that are useful to beginners and seasoned game and graphics programmers alike. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again brought together a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced GPU programming. With contributions by more than 50 experts, GPU Pro3: Advanced Rendering Techniques covers battle-tested tips and tricks for creating interesting geometry, realistic sha

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  17. Conservation of old renderings - the consolidation of rendering with loss of cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Tavares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of external renderings in the scope of conservation and restoration has acquired in the last years great methodological, scientific and technical advances. These renderings are important elements of the built structure, for besides possessing a protection function, they possess often a decorative function of great relevance for the image of the monument. The maintenance of these renderings implies the conservation of traditional constructive techniques and the use of compatible materials, as similar to the originals as possible. The main objective of this study is to define a methodology of conservative restoration using strategies of maintenance of renderings and traditional constructive techniques. The minimum intervention principle is maintained as well as the use of materials compatible with the original ones. This paper describes the technique and products used for the consolidation of the loss of cohesion. The testing campaign was developed under controlled conditions, in laboratory, and in situ in order to evaluate their efficacy for the consolidation of old renders. A set of tests is presented to evaluate the effectiveness of the process. The results are analysed and a reflection is added referring to the applicability of these techniques. Finally the paper presents a proposal for further research.

  18. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  19. A study of nasal cavity volume by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, Yasuyoshi (Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-04-01

    The nasal cavity volume in 69 healthy volunteers from 8 to 23 years old (17 males and 52 females) was studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Merits of MRI such as no radiation exposure, less artifact due to bone and air and measurement of intravascular blood flow; and demerits such as contraindication in users of heart pace-makers or magnetic clips, contraindication in people with claustrophobia and influence of environmental magnetic fields must be considered. A Magunetom M10 (Siemens), a superconduction device with 1.0 Tesla magnetic flux density was used. Enhanced patterns of T[sub 1], and pulse lines were photographed at 600 msec TR (repetition time) and 19 msec TE (echo time) using SE (spin echo) and short SE (spin echo), and 3 or 4 mm slices. Photographs were made of the piriform aperture, choana, superior-middle-inferior concha including the nasal meatus, the frontal sinus, maxillary sinus, cribriform plate, and upper surface of the palate. The line connecting the maximum depression point in the nasal root and the pontomedullary junction was selected by sagittal median section, because this corresponds well with the CM (canthomeatal) line which is useful in CT (computed tomography). The transverse section of the nasal cavity volume was traced by display console with an accessory MRI device and calculated by integration of the slice width. The increase of height and body weight neared a plateau at almost 16 years, whereas increase of nasal cavity volume continued until about 20 years. Pearson's coefficient of correlation and regression line were significant. There were no significant differences in these parameters between male and female groups. Comparatively strong correlation between nasal cavity volume, and age, height and body weight was statistically evident. (author).

  20. Rezūm System Water Vapor Treatment for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Validation of Convective Thermal Energy Transfer and Characterization With Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 3-Dimensional Renderings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynderse, Lance A; Hanson, Dennis; Robb, Richard A; Pacik, Dalibor; Vit, Viteslav; Varga, Gabriel; Wagrell, Lennart; Tornblom, Magnus; Cedano, Edwin Rijo; Woodrum, David A; Dixon, Christopher M; Larson, Thayne R

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate by magnetic resonance imaging the physical effects of convective thermal energy transfer with water vapor as a means of treating lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Sixty-five men with lower urinary tract symptoms were treated with the Rezūm System by transurethral intraprostatic injection of water vapor. A group of 45 of these men consented to undergo a series of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imagings of the prostate after treatment to monitor the size and location of ablative lesions, their time course of resolution, and the corresponding change in prostate tissue volume. Visualization was conducted at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Outcomes were available for 44 patients. Convective thermal lesions were limited to the transition zone and correlated with targeted treatment locations. At 1 week after treatment, the mean volume of ablative lesions was 8.2 cm(3) (0.5-24.0 cm(3)). At 6 months, whole prostate volume was reduced by a mean of 28.9% and transition zone volume by 38.0% as compared with baseline 1-week images. At 3 and 6 months after treatment, the lesion volumes had reduced by 91.5% and 95.1%, respectively. Lesions remained within the targeted treatment zone without compromising integrity of the bladder, rectum, or striated urinary sphincter. This imaging study confirms the delivery of convective water vapor technology to create thermal lesions in the prostate tissue. Lesions generated underwent near complete resolution by 3 and 6 months after treatment with a concomitant one-third reduction in overall prostate and transition zone volumes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MRT letter: Guided filtering of image focus volume for 3D shape recovery of microscopic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq

    2014-12-01

    In this letter, a shape from focus (SFF) method is proposed that utilizes the guided image filtering to enhance the image focus volume efficiently. First, image focus volume is computed using a conventional focus measure. Then each layer of image focus volume is filtered using guided filtering. In this work, the all-in-focus image, which can be obtained from the initial focus volume, is used as guidance image. Finally, improved depth map is obtained from the filtered image focus volume by maximizing the focus measure along the optical axis. The proposed SFF method is efficient and provides better depth maps. The improved performance is highlighted by conducting several experiments using image sequences of simulated and real microscopic objects. The comparative analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed SFF method. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Early diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging lesion volumes forecast final infarct size in DEFUSE 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Hayley M; Mlynash, Michael; Inoue, Manabu; Tipirneni, Aaryani; Liggins, John; Zaharchuk, Greg; Straka, Matus; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G; Albers, Gregory W

    2013-03-01

    It is hypothesized that early diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesions accurately estimate the size of the irreversibly injured core and thresholded perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) lesions (time to maximum of tissue residue function [Tmax] >6 seconds) approximate the volume of critically hypoperfused tissue. With incomplete reperfusion, the union of baseline DWI and posttreatment PWI is hypothesized to predict infarct volume. This is a substudy of Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution Study 2 (DEFUSE 2); all patients with technically adequate MRI scans at 3 time points were included. Baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI lesion volumes were determined by the RAPID software program. Final infarct volumes were assessed with 5-day fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and were corrected for edema. Reperfusion was defined on the basis of the reduction in PWI lesion volume between baseline and early follow-up MRI. DWI and PWI volumes were correlated with final infarct volumes. Seventy-three patients were eligible. Twenty-six patients with >90% reperfusion show a high correlation between early DWI volume and final infarct volume (r=0.95; PPWI (Tmax >6 seconds) volume and final infarct volume (r=0.86; P=0.002). Using all 73 patients, the union of baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI is highly correlated with final infarct volume (r=0.94; PPWI (Tmax >6 seconds) volumes provide a reasonable approximation of final infarct volume after endovascular therapy.

  3. SU-E-J-74: Evaluation of the Commercial Prototype Open Face Mask Used with Surface Rendering Imaging System for Proton Therapy Patients with Cancers of the Brain and Head: Successful Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamalui-Hunter, M; Li, Z

    2012-06-01

    Evaluation of the commercial prototype open face mask (Fibreplast, Q-FixTM) used with surface rendering imaging system (AlignRTTM, London, UK) for setup and monitoring of proton therapy patients with cancers of the brain and head. Fibreplastic open face masks were used with Base-of-Skull frame/moldcare pillow. Two sizes of the pre-made cutouts in the masks were investigated: leaveing open skin surface in the oval-shaped area between (I) upper lip and forehead boss, II) between mandible and forehead boss in superior-inferior direction; and between zygomatic (cheek-) bones/sphenoid bones laterally. Calibration of AlignRT system was verified with SRS cube phantom (VisionRT)and 2D X-ray patient positioning system (DIPS, IBA). The accuracy of translational shifts and rotations was a) verified using a head&neck phantom and b) tested using volunteers. Within AlignRT software, only the open area was used as ROI for the registration; the option 'Intracranial SRS' used for surface capture. For the isocenter determination accuracy within 0.3mm/0.2 degrees, the head&neck phantom registration was performed with the 0.5mm/0.5 degree accuracy; the volunteer tests showed the registration accuracy within 0.5mm ±0.2mm (1 s)/0.7±0.2 (1 s) degree. The simulation of the noise in the surface data such as eye blinking and attempts to swallow/chew was performed, with negligible effect on the registration. No significant differences between the study results between the masks of type (I) and (II) were noticed. The AlignRT surface rendering system has sufficient accuracy when used with the open face head&neck mask for localization/registration of the proton therapy patients with tumors of the head and brain. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Handbook of Optical Systems, Volume 2, Physical Image Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Wolfgang; Totzeck, Michael; Gross, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    Herbert Gross, born in 1955, joined Carl Zeiss in 1982 after finishing his physics degree as specialist for optical design. Since 1995 he has been working as head of the department of optical design, while also teaching as a lecturer in Aalen and Lausanne. The new handbook is an intuitive, didactically elegant approach to the subject of optical systems and is not competed by any other work on the market. The selected board of authors, all reputed industrial experts, guarantee the timeliness of the well coordinated, coherent chapters. The second volume presents a more rigorous physical description of the image formation in optical systems on the basis of first principles. Starting with wave equation and the theory of diffraction, readers are introduced in detail to the Fourier theory of optics, since this is a necessary assumption for an understanding of the finite resolution of optical systems, the basic optical quality criteria, the imaging in three dimensions, the influence of the illumination and the coherence and polarization properties of the light source. In particular, the connection between the geometrical and the wave optical models are explained and readers are able to understand the well-known simulation algorithms used in the calculation of the exact properties of modern optical systems.

  5. Volume Ray Casting with Peak Finding and Differential Sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Knoll, A.

    2009-11-01

    Direct volume rendering and isosurfacing are ubiquitous rendering techniques in scientific visualization, commonly employed in imaging 3D data from simulation and scan sources. Conventionally, these methods have been treated as separate modalities, necessitating different sampling strategies and rendering algorithms. In reality, an isosurface is a special case of a transfer function, namely a Dirac impulse at a given isovalue. However, artifact-free rendering of discrete isosurfaces in a volume rendering framework is an elusive goal, requiring either infinite sampling or smoothing of the transfer function. While preintegration approaches solve the most obvious deficiencies in handling sharp transfer functions, artifacts can still result, limiting classification. In this paper, we introduce a method for rendering such features by explicitly solving for isovalues within the volume rendering integral. In addition, we present a sampling strategy inspired by ray differentials that automatically matches the frequency of the image plane, resulting in fewer artifacts near the eye and better overall performance. These techniques exhibit clear advantages over standard uniform ray casting with and without preintegration, and allow for high-quality interactive volume rendering with sharp C0 transfer functions. © 2009 IEEE.

  6. 3D virtual rendering in thoracoscopic treatment of congenital malformation of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destro F.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital malformations of the lung (CML are rare but potentially dangerous congenital malformations. Their identification is important in order to define the most appropriate management. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 37 patients affected by CML treated in our Pediatric Surgery Unit in the last four years with minimally invasive surgery (MIS. Results: Prenatal diagnosis was possible in 26/37 patients. Surgery was performed in the first month of life in 3 symptomatic patients and between 6 and 12 months in the others. All patients underwent radiological evaluation prior to thoracoscopic surgery. Images collected were reconstructed using the VR render software. Discussion and conclusions: Volume rendering gives high anatomical resolution and it can be useful to guide the surgical procedure. Thoracoscopy should be the technique of choice because it is safe, effective and feasible. Furthermore it has the benefit of a minimal access technique and it can be easily performed in children.

  7. A hybrid rugosity mesostructure (HRM) for rendering fine haptic detail

    OpenAIRE

    Theoktisto Colmenares, Victor Arturo; Fairén González, Marta; Navazo Álvaro, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    The haptic rendering of surface mesostructure (fine relief features) in dense triangle meshes requires special structures, equipment, and high sampling rates for detailed perception of rugged models. Some approaches simulate haptic texture at a lower processing cost, but at the expense of fidelity of perception. We propose a better method for rendering fine surface detail by using image-based Hybrid Rugosity Mesostructures (HRMs), composed of paired maps of piece-wise heightfield displacement...

  8. Sketchy Rendering for Information Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J; Isenberg, P; Isenberg, T; Dykes, J; Boukhelifa, N; Slingsby, A

    2012-12-01

    We present and evaluate a framework for constructing sketchy style information visualizations that mimic data graphics drawn by hand. We provide an alternative renderer for the Processing graphics environment that redefines core drawing primitives including line, polygon and ellipse rendering. These primitives allow higher-level graphical features such as bar charts, line charts, treemaps and node-link diagrams to be drawn in a sketchy style with a specified degree of sketchiness. The framework is designed to be easily integrated into existing visualization implementations with minimal programming modification or design effort. We show examples of use for statistical graphics, conveying spatial imprecision and for enhancing aesthetic and narrative qualities of visualization. We evaluate user perception of sketchiness of areal features through a series of stimulus-response tests in order to assess users' ability to place sketchiness on a ratio scale, and to estimate area. Results suggest relative area judgment is compromised by sketchy rendering and that its influence is dependent on the shape being rendered. They show that degree of sketchiness may be judged on an ordinal scale but that its judgement varies strongly between individuals. We evaluate higher-level impacts of sketchiness through user testing of scenarios that encourage user engagement with data visualization and willingness to critique visualization design. Results suggest that where a visualization is clearly sketchy, engagement may be increased and that attitudes to participating in visualization annotation are more positive. The results of our work have implications for effective information visualization design that go beyond the traditional role of sketching as a tool for prototyping or its use for an indication of general uncertainty.

  9. Volumes of chronic traumatic frontal brain lesions measured by MR imaging and CBF tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeder, P.; Wirsen, A.; Bajc, M.; Schalen, W.; Sjoeholm, H.; Skeidsvoll, H.; Cronqvist, S.; Ingvar, D.H. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Neuroradiology University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1991-07-01

    The volumes (ml) of chronic traumatic frontal brain lesions were compared measured 'morphologically' with MR imaging (T1 and T2 weighted images) and 'functionally' with a tomographic rCBF technique (SPECT with {sup 133}Xe i.v.). The T1 volumes varied between 11 and 220 ml. The correlation between T1 and T2 volumes was 0.95, the T2 volumes being 33% larger than T1 volumes (p<0.001). The functional SPECT volumes were considerably larger (range 16-324 ml) than the MR volumes. The mean volume difference was 81% between T1 and SPECT images (p<0.001), and 35% between T2 and SPECT images (p<0.001). Correlations between the MR and SPECT volumes were also higher for T2 than T1 volumes. The volume difference is most likely explained by a functional decrease in regions around the lesion in which no morphologic change visible on MR images had taken place. MR and SPECT volume measurements were positively related to persistent lack of energy and personality changes, but only moderately related to duration of impaired consciousness and neuropsychologie outcome. (orig.).

  10. Estimate Landslide Volume with Genetic Algorithms and Image Similarity Method from Single Satellite Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ting-To

    2013-04-01

    It is important to acquire the volume of landslide in short period of time. For hazard mitigation and also emergency response purpose, the traditional method takes much longer time than expected. Due to the weather limit, traffic accessibility and many regulations of law, it take months to handle these process before the actual carry out of filed work. Remote sensing imagery can get the data as long as the visibility allowed, which happened only few day after the event. While traditional photometry requires a stereo pairs images to produce the post event DEM for calculating the change of volume. Usually have to wait weeks or even months for gathering such data, LiDAR or ground GPS measurement might take even longer period of time with much higher cost. In this study we use one post event satellite image and pre-event DTM to compare the similarity between these by alter the DTM with genetic algorithms. The outcome of smartest guess from GAs shall remove or add exact values of height at each location, which been converted into shadow relief viewgraph to compare with satellite image. Once the similarity threshold been make then the guessing work stop. It takes only few hours to finish the entire task, the computed accuracy is around 70% by comparing to the high resolution LiDAR survey at a landslide, southern Taiwan. With extra GCPs, the estimate accuracy can improve to 85% and also within few hours after the receiving of satellite image. Data of this demonstration case is a 5 m DTM at 2005, 2M resolution FormoSat optical image at 2009 and 5M LiDAR at 2010. The GAs and image similarity code is developed on Matlab at windows PC.

  11. Cryo-FIB-SEM serial milling and block face imaging: Large volume structural analysis of biological tissues preserved close to their native state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidavsky, Netta; Akiva, Anat; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Rechav, Katya; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve; Schertel, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Many important biological questions can be addressed by studying in 3D large volumes of intact, cryo fixed hydrated tissues (⩾10,000μm3) at high resolution (5-20nm). This can be achieved using serial FIB milling and block face surface imaging under cryo conditions. Here we demonstrate the unique potential of the cryo-FIB-SEM approach using two extensively studied model systems; sea urchin embryos and the tail fin of zebrafish larvae. We focus in particular on the environment of mineral deposition sites. The cellular organelles, including mitochondria, Golgi, ER, nuclei and nuclear pores are made visible by the image contrast created by differences in surface potential of different biochemical components. Auto segmentation and/or volume rendering of the image stacks and 3D reconstruction of the skeleton and the cellular environment, provides a detailed view of the relative distribution in space of the tissue/cellular components, and thus of their interactions. Simultaneous acquisition of secondary and back-scattered electron images adds additional information. For example, a serial view of the zebrafish tail reveals the presence of electron dense mineral particles inside mitochondrial networks extending more than 20μm in depth in the block. Large volume imaging using cryo FIB SEM, as demonstrated here, can contribute significantly to the understanding of the structures and functions of diverse biological tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the coronary arteries : anatomy of the coronary arteries and veins in three-dimensional imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; Wielopolski, P A; Rensing, B J; van Ooijen, P M; Oudkerk, M; de Feyter, P J

    Magnetic resonance imaging of coronary arteries will visualize, besides the arteries, the myocardium, blood in the cavities and cardiac veins. This will hamper the application of projectional visualization techniques such as those used in conventional coronary angiography. Volume rendering, a

  13. Accelerating Monte Carlo Renderers by Ray Histogram Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Delbracio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper details the recently introduced Ray Histogram Fusion (RHF filter for accelerating Monte Carlo renderers [M. Delbracio et al., Boosting Monte Carlo Rendering by Ray Histogram Fusion, ACM Transactions on Graphics, 33 (2014]. In this filter, each pixel in the image is characterized by the colors of the rays that reach its surface. Pixels are compared using a statistical distance on the associated ray color distributions. Based on this distance, it decides whether two pixels can share their rays or not. The RHF filter is consistent: as the number of samples increases, more evidence is required to average two pixels. The algorithm provides a significant gain in PSNR, or equivalently accelerates the rendering process by using many fewer Monte Carlo samples without observable bias. Since the RHF filter depends only on the Monte Carlo samples color values, it can be naturally combined with all rendering effects.

  14. Evaluation of various Deformable Image Registrations for Point and Volume Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Su Chul; Park, Seungwoo; Lee, Soon Sung; Jung, Haijo; Kim, Mi-Sook; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Ji, Young Hoon; Yi, Chul Young; Kim, Kum Bae

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) has a significant dosimetric impact in radiation treatment planning. We evaluated accuracy of various DIR algorithms using variations of the deformation point and volume. The reference image (Iref) and volume (Vref) was first generated with virtual deformation QA software (ImSimQA, Oncology System Limited, UK). We deformed Iref with axial movement of deformation point and Vref depending on the types of deformation that are the deformation1 is to increase the Vref (relaxation) and the deformation 2 is to decrease . The deformed image (Idef) and volume (Vdef) acquired by ImSimQA software were inversely deformed to Iref and Vref using DIR algorithms. As a result, we acquired deformed image (Iid) from Idef and volume (Vid) from Vdef. The DIR algorithms were the Horn Schunk optical flow (HS), Iterative Optical Flow (IOF), Modified Demons (MD) and Fast Demons (FD) with the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART) of MATLAB. The imag...

  15. Comparison of LV mass and volume measurements derived from electron beam tomography using cine imaging and angiographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songshou; Takasu, Junichiro; Child, Janis; Carson, Sivi; Oudiz, Ronald; Budoff, Matthew J

    2003-10-01

    To estimate the variation of left ventricular (LV) mass and volume measurement with cine and angiography by electron beam tomography (EBT). Sixty-three consecutive patients (41 men, 22 women; age range 46-91) referred for cardiac imaging for clinical indications underwent cine and coronary artery electron beam angiography (EBA) studies on the same day. The cine images consisted of 144 images (12 slices/level x 12 levels), taken 12 frames/s for a full cardiac cycle. The EBA images consisted of 50-70 slices triggered at end-systole, with an acquisition time of 100 ms/slice. Slice thickness was 8 mm for the cine images and 1.5 mm for the EBA images. A total volume of 120-180 ml of nonionic contrast was used for each subject. The LV mass (myocardial tissue volume), LV cavity volume and total LV volume (tissue + cavity) measurements were completed using the software from the EBT computer console (G.E., S. San Francisco, CA). The LV mass, cavity volume and total LV volumes at end-systole were 124.11 g, 45.66 and 163.86 ml when derived from the cine images and 130.74 g, 41.31 and 165.82 ml when derived from the EBA images. There were no significant differences between the cine and EBA-derived measurements, however the EBA-derived measurements showed slightly larger LV mass (mean 6.63 g), smaller cavity volume (mean -4.35 ml) and larger total LV volume (mean 1.96 ml, all p > 0.05) than did the cine-derived measurements. Based on case-by-case observations, these differences appear to be related to the higher spatial resolution of the thinner EBA images which allows better discrimination between papillary and trabecular muscle and LV. This leads to slightly smaller cavity size estimations and greater LV mass measurements. There was significant correlation between cine and EBA-derived measurements. Formulas were developed for relating the measurements made from the two modalities as follows: For LV mass: EBA value = 0.91 x cine value + 17.09, R = 0.95, p cine value - 6.91, R

  16. High dynamic range (HDR) virtual bronchoscopy rendering for video tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Teo; Choi, Jae

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a new rendering method based on high dynamic range (HDR) lighting and exposure control. This rendering method is applied to create video images for a 3D virtual bronchoscopy system. One of the main optical parameters of a bronchoscope's camera is the sensor exposure. The exposure adjustment is needed since the dynamic range of most digital video cameras is narrower than the high dynamic range of real scenes. The dynamic range of a camera is defined as the ratio of the brightest point of an image to the darkest point of the same image where details are present. In a video camera exposure is controlled by shutter speed and the lens aperture. To create the virtual bronchoscopic images, we first rendered a raw image in absolute units (luminance); then, we simulated exposure by mapping the computed values to the values appropriate for video-acquired images using a tone mapping operator. We generated several images with HDR and others with low dynamic range (LDR), and then compared their quality by applying them to a 2D/3D video-based tracking system. We conclude that images with HDR are closer to real bronchoscopy images than those with LDR, and thus, that HDR lighting can improve the accuracy of image-based tracking.

  17. Hybrid fur rendering: combining volumetric fur with explicit hair strands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Grønbeck; Falster, Viggo; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2016-01-01

    Hair is typically modeled and rendered using either explicitly defined hair strand geometry or a volume texture of hair densities. Taken each on their own, these two hair representations have difficulties in the case of animal fur as it consists of very dense and thin undercoat hairs in combination...... with coarse guard hairs. Explicit hair strand geometry is not well-suited for the undercoat hairs, while volume textures are not well-suited for the guard hairs. To efficiently model and render both guard hairs and undercoat hairs, we present a hybrid technique that combines rasterization of explicitly...... defined guard hairs with ray marching of a prismatic shell volume with dynamic resolution. The latter is the key to practical combination of the two techniques, and it also enables a high degree of detail in the undercoat. We demonstrate that our hybrid technique creates a more detailed and soft fur...

  18. Estimation of adipose compartment volumes in CT images of a mastectomy specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Abdullah-Al-Zubaer; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2016-03-01

    Anthropomorphic software breast phantoms have been utilized for preclinical quantitative validation of breast imaging systems. Efficacy of the simulation-based validation depends on the realism of phantom images. Anatomical measurements of the breast tissue, such as the size and distribution of adipose compartments or the thickness of Cooper's ligaments, are essential for the realistic simulation of breast anatomy. Such measurements are, however, not readily available in the literature. In this study, we assessed the statistics of adipose compartments as visualized in CT images of a total mastectomy specimen. The specimen was preserved in formalin, and imaged using a standard body CT protocol and high X-ray dose. A human operator manually segmented adipose compartments in reconstructed CT images using ITK-SNAP software, and calculated the volume of each compartment. In addition, the time needed for the manual segmentation and the operator's confidence were recorded. The average volume, standard deviation, and the probability distribution of compartment volumes were estimated from 205 segmented adipose compartments. We also estimated the potential correlation between the segmentation time, operator's confidence, and compartment volume. The statistical tests indicated that the estimated compartment volumes do not follow the normal distribution. The compartment volumes are found to be correlated with the segmentation time; no significant correlation between the volume and the operator confidence. The performed study is limited by the mastectomy specimen position. The analysis of compartment volumes will better inform development of more realistic breast anatomy simulation.

  19. Interacting with Stroke-Based Rendering on a Wall Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubert, Jens; Hanckock, Mark; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Tse, Edward; Isenberg, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    We introduce two new interaction techniques for creating and interacting with non-photorealistic images using stroke-based rendering. We provide bimanual control of a large interactive canvas through both remote pointing and direct touch. Remote pointing allows people to sit and interact at a

  20. Susceptibility contrast imaging of CO2-induced changes in the blood volume of the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H B; Toft, P B

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate changes in the regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in human subjects during rest and hypercapnia by MR imaging, and to compare the results from contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced susceptibility-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five healthy volunteers (aged...... in cerebral hemodynamics than noncontrast-enhanced imaging. The results of the deconvolution analysis suggested that perfusion calculation by conventional tracer kinetic methods may be impracticable because of nonlinear effects in contrast-enhanced MR imaging....

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  2. A recovery coefficient method for partial volume correction of PET images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srinivas, Shyam M; Dhurairaj, Thiruvenkatasamy; Basu, Sandip; Bural, Gonca; Surti, Suleman; Alavi, Abass

    2009-01-01

    Correction of the "partial volume effect" has been an area of great interest in the recent times in quantitative PET imaging and has been mainly studied with count recovery models based upon phantoms...

  3. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breebaart, Jeroen; Villemoes, Lars; Kjörling, Kristofer

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial) properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate "binaural parameters" that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  4. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Kjörling

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate “binaural parameters” that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  5. Evaluation of rapid volume changes of substrate-adherent cells by conventional microscopy 3D imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, F; Grygorczyk, R

    2004-09-01

    Precise measurement of rapid volume changes of substrate-adherent cells is essential to understand many aspects of cell physiology, yet techniques to evaluate volume changes with sufficient precision and high temporal resolution are limited. Here, we describe a novel imaging method that surveys the rapid morphology modifications of living, substrate-adherent cells based on phase-contrast, digital video microscopy. Cells grown on a glass substrate are mounted in a custom-designed, side-viewing chamber and subjected to hypotonic swelling. Side-view images of the rapidly swelling cell, and at the end of the assay, an image of the same cell viewed from a perpendicular direction through the substrate, are acquired. Based on these images, off-line reconstruction of 3D cell morphology is performed, which precisely measures cell volume, height and surface at different points during cell volume changes. Volume evaluations are comparable to those obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy (DeltaVolume microscopy without the need for cell staining or intense illumination to monitor cell volume make this system a promising new tool to investigate the fundamentals of cell volume physiology.

  6. Chromium Renderserver: Scalable and Open Source Remote RenderingInfrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Brian; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Brugger, Eric; Cook,Rich; Daniel, Jamison; Lewis, Ken; Owen, Jens; Southard, Dale

    2007-12-01

    Chromium Renderserver (CRRS) is software infrastructure thatprovides the ability for one or more users to run and view image outputfrom unmodified, interactive OpenGL and X11 applications on a remote,parallel computational platform equipped with graphics hardwareaccelerators via industry-standard Layer 7 network protocolsand clientviewers. The new contributions of this work include a solution to theproblem of synchronizing X11 and OpenGL command streams, remote deliveryof parallel hardware-accelerated rendering, and a performance analysis ofseveral different optimizations that are generally applicable to avariety of rendering architectures. CRRSis fully operational, Open Sourcesoftware.

  7. Real-Time Rendering of Teeth with No Preprocessing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Thode; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Jensen, Peter Dahl Ejby

    2012-01-01

    We present a technique for real-time rendering of teeth with no need for computational or artistic preprocessing. Teeth constitute a translucent material consisting of several layers; a highly scattering material (dentine) beneath a semitransparent layer (enamel) with a transparent coating (saliva......). In this study we examine how light interacts with this multilayered structure. In the past, rendering of teeth has mostly been done using image-based texturing or volumetric scans. We work with surface scans and have therefore developed a simple way of estimating layer thicknesses. We use scattering properties...

  8. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  9. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  10. Comparison of volume, four- and eight-channel head coils using standard and parallel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizewski, Elke R; Maderwald, Stefan; Wanke, Isabel; Goehde, Susanne; Forsting, Michael; Ladd, Mark E

    2005-08-01

    Array coils can potentially offer increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over standard coils adjacent to the array elements, while preserving the SNR at the center of the volume. The SNR advantage should theoretically increase with the number of array elements. Parallel acquisition techniques (PAT), on the other hand, can benefit acquisition times or spatial resolution at a cost to SNR as well as image quality. This study examines the question of whether SNR and image quality are still acceptable with two different array coils (four and eight channels) in conjunction with PAT when compared to standard imaging with a volume coil. All imaging was on a 1.5 T MR scanner. T2-weighted, FLAIR, diffusion-weighted, and time of flight (TOF) angiography images were performed with and without PAT in a phantom and in ten healthy volunteers. The phantom measurements demonstrated superior SNR for the eight-channel coil versus the four-channel and standard head coils. Using the eight-channel head coil for in vivo imaging, image quality with PAT (acceleration factor=2) was scored similar to images without PAT using the volume coil. The four-channel head coil suffered from inhomogeneity, lower SNR and poorer image quality when using PAT compared to standard imaging with the volume head coil. Both the in vivo and the phantom results indicate that the eight-channel head coil should be used for the highest quality brain images; this coil can be combined with PAT sequences for shorter acquisition time without a significant decrease in image quality relative to a volume coil without PAT.

  11. Generation of intra-oral-like images from cone beam computed tomography volumes for dental forensic image comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trochesset, Denise A; Serchuk, Richard B; Colosi, Dan C

    2014-03-01

    Identification of unknown individuals using dental comparison is well established in the forensic setting. The identification technique can be time and resource consuming if many individuals need to be identified at once. Medical CT (MDCT) for dental profiling has had limited success, mostly due to artifact from metal-containing dental restorations and implants. The authors describe a CBCT reformatting technique that creates images, which closely approximate conventional dental images. Using a i-CAT Platinum CBCT unit and standard issue i-CAT Vision software, a protocol is developed to reproducibly and reliably reformat CBCT volumes. The reformatted images are presented with conventional digital images from the same anatomic area for comparison. The authors conclude that images derived from CBCT volumes following this protocol are similar enough to conventional dental radiographs to allow for dental forensic comparison/identification and that CBCT offers a superior option over MDCT for this purpose. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. RenderToolbox3: MATLAB tools that facilitate physically based stimulus rendering for vision research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasly, Benjamin S; Cottaris, Nicolas P; Lichtman, Daniel P; Xiao, Bei; Brainard, David H

    2014-02-07

    RenderToolbox3 provides MATLAB utilities and prescribes a workflow that should be useful to researchers who want to employ graphics in the study of vision and perhaps in other endeavors as well. In particular, RenderToolbox3 facilitates rendering scene families in which various scene attributes and renderer behaviors are manipulated parametrically, enables spectral specification of object reflectance and illuminant spectra, enables the use of physically based material specifications, helps validate renderer output, and converts renderer output to physical units of radiance. This paper describes the design and functionality of the toolbox and discusses several examples that demonstrate its use. We have designed RenderToolbox3 to be portable across computer hardware and operating systems and to be free and open source (except for MATLAB itself). RenderToolbox3 is available at https://github.com/DavidBrainard/RenderToolbox3.

  13. Three-dimensional partial volume segmentation of multispectral magnetic resonance images using stochastic relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian; Atkins, M. Stella; Booth, Kellogg S.

    1994-05-01

    An algorithm has been developed which uses stochastic relaxation in three dimensions to segment brain tissues from images acquired using multiple echo sequences from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The initial volume data is assumed to represent a locally dependent Markov random field. Partial volume estimates for each voxel are obtained yielding fractional composition of multiple tissue types for individual voxels. A minimum of user intervention is required to train the algorithm by requiring the manual outlining of regions of interest in a sample image from the volume. Segmentations obtained from multiple echo sequences are determined independently and then combined by forming the product of the probabilities for each tissues type. The implementation has been parallelized using a dataflow programming environment to reduce the computational burden. The algorithm has been used to segment 3D MRI data sets using multiple sclerosis lesions, gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid as the partial volumes. Results correspond well with manual segmentations of the same data.

  14. Count-based quantitation of functional renal volume by SPECT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, M. A.; Narayanan, M.; Bohyer, C.; Licho, R.; Fung, L. C. T.

    1998-08-01

    The quantitation of absolute renal functional volume is of interest because many pathological processes are known to affect the growth and parenchymal volume of kidneys. Unlike thresholding and edge-detection methods, the count-based method of volume quantitation is not highly sensitive to boundary definition. In this investigation, count-based kidney volume quantitation was compared to that of fixed threshold-based estimation with and without including attenuation and scatter compensation in the reconstruction. The Alderson Organ Scanning Phantom kidneys were filled with a Tc-99m solution and placed in the Organ scanning phantom. Inserts shaped like the pelvis region of the kidneys were used to vary kidney volume. Emission imaging of the Tc-99m, and transmission imaging of a Gd-153 line source were performed by a triple-headed SPECT system. Without compensating for attenuation and scatter, the count-based method significantly under-estimated kidney volume. When attenuation and scatter compensation were included, count-based volume quantitation was more accurate than volume estimation with a fixed threshold adapted to the image acquisition and reconstruction strategies employed.

  15. Architecture for high performance stereoscopic game rendering on Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, Julien; Sanderson, Hugh; Shetty, Sampath

    2014-03-01

    Stereoscopic gaming is a popular source of content for consumer 3D display systems. There has been a significant shift in the gaming industry towards casual games for mobile devices running on the Android™ Operating System and driven by ARM™ and other low power processors. Such systems are now being integrated directly into the next generation of 3D TVs potentially removing the requirement for an external games console. Although native stereo support has been integrated into some high profile titles on established platforms like Windows PC and PS3 there is a lack of GPU independent 3D support for the emerging Android platform. We describe a framework for enabling stereoscopic 3D gaming on Android for applications on mobile devices, set top boxes and TVs. A core component of the architecture is a 3D game driver, which is integrated into the Android OpenGL™ ES graphics stack to convert existing 2D graphics applications into stereoscopic 3D in real-time. The architecture includes a method of analyzing 2D games and using rule based Artificial Intelligence (AI) to position separate objects in 3D space. We describe an innovative stereo 3D rendering technique to separate the views in the depth domain and render directly into the display buffer. The advantages of the stereo renderer are demonstrated by characterizing the performance in comparison to more traditional render techniques, including depth based image rendering, both in terms of frame rates and impact on battery consumption.

  16. Real-time Cloth Rendering with Fiber-level Detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kui; Yuksel, Cem

    2017-07-26

    Modeling cloth with fiber-level geometry can produce highly realistic details. However, rendering fiber-level cloth models not only has a high memory cost but it also has a high computation cost even for offline rendering applications. In this paper we present a real-time fiber-level cloth rendering method for current GPUs. Our method procedurally generates fiber-level geometric details on-the-fly using yarn-level control points for minimizing the data transfer to the GPU. We also reduce the rasterization operations by collectively representing the fibers near the center of each ply that form the yarn structure. Moreover, we employ a level-of-detail strategy to minimize or completely eliminate the generation of fiber-level geometry that would have little or no impact on the final rendered image. Furthermore, we introduce a simple self-shadow computation method that allows lighting with self-shadows using relatively low-resolution shadow maps. We also provide a simple distance-based ambient occlusion approximation as well as an ambient illumination precomputation approach. Finally, we discuss how to use a physical-based shading model with our fiber-level cloth rendering method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by comparing our simplified fiber geometry to procedurally generated references and display knitwear containing more than a hundred million individual fiber curves at real-time frame rates with shadows and ambient occlusion.

  17. The quality of three-dimensional images reconstructed with volume-scan CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimbashi, Takeshi; Sakurai, Nobuaki; Watanabe, Norimitsu (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Takagi, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Yutaka

    1993-05-01

    Volume-scan CT is based on slip-ring technology which leads to continuous scanning. It permits remarkable reduction in scanning time, which is especially meaningful where children and elderly patients are concerned. One scan takes one second, with a maximum continuous time of 50 seconds. Slice widths of 2, 3, 5 and 100 mm can be selected and table changed from 1.5 to 20 mm/second. The reconstruction index is 1 to 10 mm, and reconstruction time about 10 seconds. As both the patient and table are moved simultaneously, it is possible to scan a wide area in a short time. Volume-scan CT is suitable for three-dimensional (3-D) images because of the good continuity of slices. The authors reconstructed 3-D phantom images using both ordinary CT and volume-scan CT, and then compared the quality of these images. Under the condition of 3 mm slice width and 3 mm/sec table speed, the 3-D images reconstructed with volume-scan CT were clearly better than those reconstructed using ordinary CT. The quality of both has improved after interpolation. In particular, the periorbital and zygomatic areas of 3-D images reconstructed with volume-scan CT are quite natural. When a phantom was scanned under the condition of 10 mm slice width and 10 mm/sec table speed, the quality of 3-D image reconstructed with ordinary CT was not sufficient to be distinct. Even under interpolation, the quality of image was not natural. Useful images could not be obtained when the phantom was moving. It was found that volume-scan CT is suitable for reconstruction of 3-D images. (author).

  18. Cover Image, Volume 118, Number 10, October 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiachen; Zhou, Yangzhong; Liu, Jiaqi; Chen, Jia; Chen, Weisheng; Zhao, Sen; Wu, Zhihong; Wu, Nan

    2017-10-01

    Cover: The cover image, by Jiachen Lin et al., is based on the Prospects Article, Progress and Application of CRISPR/Cas Technology in Biological and Biomedical Investigation, DOI: 10.1002/jcb.26198. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Method and system for determining a volume of an object from two-dimensional images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [Knoxville, TN; Schlicher, Bob G [Portsmouth, NH

    2010-08-10

    The invention provides a method and a computer program stored in a tangible medium for automatically determining a volume of three-dimensional objects represented in two-dimensional images, by acquiring at two least two-dimensional digitized images, by analyzing the two-dimensional images to identify reference points and geometric patterns, by determining distances between the reference points and the component objects utilizing reference data provided for the three-dimensional object, and by calculating a volume for the three-dimensional object.

  20. Pineal gland volume in primary insomnia and healthy controls: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumb, Jan M; Schilling, Claudia; Enning, Frank; Haddad, Leila; Paul, Franc; Lederbogen, Florian; Deuschle, Michael; Schredl, Michael; Nolte, Ingo

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the relation between pineal volume and insomnia. Melatonin promotes sleep processes and, administered as a drug, it is suitable to improve primary and secondary sleep disorders in humans. Recent magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest that human plasma and saliva melatonin levels are partially determined by the pineal gland volume. This study compares the pineal volume in a group of patients with primary insomnia to a group of healthy people without sleep disturbance. Pineal gland volume (PGV) was measured on the basis of high-resolution 3 Tesla MRI (T1-magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo) in 23 patients and 27 controls, matched for age, gender and educational status. Volume measurements were performed conventionally by manual delineation of the pineal borders in multi-planar reconstructed images. Pineal gland volume was significantly smaller (P Pineal volume appears to be reduced in patients with primary insomnia compared to healthy controls. Further studies are needed to clarify whether low pineal volume is the basis or the consequence of functional sleep changes to elucidate the molecular pathology for the pineal volume loss in primary insomnia. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Hybrid Rugosity Mesostructures (HRMs) for fast and accurate rendering of fine haptic detail

    OpenAIRE

    Theoktisto, Víctor; Fairén González, Marta; Navazo Álvaro, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The haptic rendering of surface mesostructure (fine relief features) in dense triangle meshes requires special structures, equipment, and high sampling rates for detailed perception of rugged models. Low cost approaches render haptic texture at the expense of fidelity of perception. We propose a faster method for surface haptic rendering using image-based Hybrid Rugosity Mesostructures (HRMs), paired maps with per-face heightfield displacements and normal maps, which are layered on top of a m...

  2. Ultrasonic Sensor-Based Personalized Multichannel Audio Rendering for Multiview Broadcasting Services

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Guk Kim; Sang-Taeck Moon; Seung Ho Choi; Hong Kook Kim

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic sensor-based personalized multichannel audio rendering method is proposed for multiview broadcasting services. Multiview broadcasting, a representative next-generation broadcasting technique, renders video image sequences captured by several stereoscopic cameras from different viewpoints. To achieve realistic multiview broadcasting, multichannel audio that is synchronized with a user’s viewpoint should be rendered in real time. For this reason, both a real-time person-tracking t...

  3. Multi-sample parallel estimation in volume holographic correlator for remote sensing image recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunli; Tan, Qiaofeng; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2009-11-23

    Based on volume holographic correlator, a multi-sample parallel estimation method is proposed to implement remote sensing image recognition with high accuracy. The essential steps of the method including image preprocessing, estimation curves fitting, template images preparation and estimation equation establishing are discussed in detail. The experimental results show the validity of the multi-sample parallel estimation method, and the recognition accuracy is improved by increasing the sample numbers.

  4. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yong; Xie, Zhentian; Li, Ye; Xu, Duan; Vigneron, Daniel; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2011-07-28

    In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF) field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  5. Resonant Mode Reduction in Radiofrequency Volume Coils for Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In a multimodal volume coil, only one mode can generate homogeneous Radiofrequency (RF field for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The existence of other modes may increase the volume coil design difficulties and potentially decreases coil performance. In this study, we introduce common-mode resonator technique to high and ultrahigh field volume coil designs to reduce the resonant mode while maintain the homogeneity of the RF field. To investigate the design method, the common-mode resonator was realized by using a microstrip line which was split along the central to become a pair of parallel transmission lines within which common-mode currents exist. Eight common-mode resonators were placed equidistantly along the circumference of a low loss dielectric cylinder to form a volume coil. Theoretical analysis and comparison between the 16-strut common-mode volume coil and a conventional 16-strut volume coil in terms of RF field homogeneity and efficiency was performed using Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD method at 298.2 MHz. MR imaging experiments were performed by using a prototype of the common-mode volume coil on a whole body 7 Tesla scanner. FDTD simulation results showed the reduced number of resonant modes of the common-mode volume coil over the conventional volume coil, while the RF field homogeneity of the two type volume coils was kept at the same level. MR imaging of a water phantom and a kiwi fruit showing the feasibility of the proposed method for simplifying the volume coil design is also presented.

  6. Physically based rendering: from theory to implementation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pharr, Matt; Humphreys, Greg, Ph. D

    2010-01-01

    ... rendering algorithm variations. This book is not only a textbook for students, but also a useful reference book for practitioners in the field. The second edition has been extended with sections on Metropolis light transport, subsurface scattering, precomputed light transport, and more. Per Christensen Senior Software Developer, RenderMan Products,...

  7. Democratizing rendering for multiple viewers in surround VR systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2012-03-01

    We present a new approach for how multiple users\\' views can be rendered in a surround virtual environment without using special multi-view hardware. It is based on the idea that different parts of the screen are often viewed by different users, so that they can be rendered from their own view point, or at least from a point closer to their view point than traditionally expected. The vast majority of 3D virtual reality systems are designed for one head-tracked user, and a number of passive viewers. Only the head tracked user gets to see the correct view of the scene, everybody else sees a distorted image. We reduce this problem by algorithmically democratizing the rendering view point among all tracked users. Researchers have proposed solutions for multiple tracked users, but most of them require major changes to the display hardware of the VR system, such as additional projectors or custom VR glasses. Our approach does not require additional hardware, except the ability to track each participating user. We propose three versions of our multi-viewer algorithm. Each of them balances image distortion and frame rate in different ways, making them more or less suitable for certain application scenarios. Our most sophisticated algorithm renders each pixel from its own, optimized camera perspective, which depends on all tracked users\\' head positions and orientations. © 2012 IEEE.

  8. Optimization-Based Wearable Tactile Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alvaro G; Lobo, Daniel; Chinello, Francesco; Cirio, Gabriel; Malvezzi, Monica; Martin, Jose San; Prattichizzo, Domenico; Otaduy, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Novel wearable tactile interfaces offer the possibility to simulate tactile interactions with virtual environments directly on our skin. But, unlike kinesthetic interfaces, for which haptic rendering is a well explored problem, they pose new questions about the formulation of the rendering problem. In this work, we propose a formulation of tactile rendering as an optimization problem, which is general for a large family of tactile interfaces. Based on an accurate simulation of contact between a finger model and the virtual environment, we pose tactile rendering as the optimization of the device configuration, such that the contact surface between the device and the actual finger matches as close as possible the contact surface in the virtual environment. We describe the optimization formulation in general terms, and we also demonstrate its implementation on a thimble-like wearable device. We validate the tactile rendering formulation by analyzing its force error, and we show that it outperforms other approaches.

  9. Moisture movements in render on brick wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Munch, Thomas Astrup; Thorsen, Peter Schjørmann

    2003-01-01

    A three-layer render on brick wall used for building facades is studied in the laboratory. The vertical render surface is held in contact with water for 24 hours simulating driving rain while it is measured with non-destructive X-ray equipment every hour in order to follow the moisture front...... through the render and into the brick. The test specimen is placed between the source and the detector. The test specimens are all scanned before they are exposed to water. In that way the loss of counts from the dry scan to the wet scan qualitatively shows the presence of water. The results show nearly...... no penetration of water through the render and into the brick, and the results are independent of the start condition of the test specimens. Also drying experiments are performed. The results show a small difference in the rate of drying, in favour of the bricks without render....

  10. Cover Image, Volume 173A, Number 12, December 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Isabel; Soldatos, Ariane; Davids, Mariska; Vilboux, Thierry; Toro, Camilo; David, Karen L; Ferreira, Carlos R; Nehrebecky, Michele; Snow, Joseph; Thurm, Audrey; Heller, Theo; Macnamara, Ellen F; Gunay-Aygun, Meral; Zein, Wadih M; Gahl, William A; Malicdan, May Christine V

    2017-12-01

    The cover image, by Isabel Hardee et al., is based on the Clinical Report Defective ciliogenesis in INPP5E-related Joubert syndrome, DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.38376. Design Credit: Darryl Leja. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cover Image, Volume 118, Number 9, September 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, R; Sneha, P; Rivera Madrid, Renata; Doss, C George Priya; Singh, Pooja; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2017-09-01

    Cover: The cover image, by R. Priya et al., is based on the Article Molecular Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Arabidopsis Thaliana Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase Gene: A Comparison with Bixa orellana and Crocus Sativus, DOI: 10.1002/jcb.25919. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Images in Language: Metaphors and Metamorphoses. Visual Learning. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Andras, Ed.; Nyiri, Kristof, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Learning and teaching are faced with radically new challenges in today's rapidly changing world and its deeply transformed communicational environment. We are living in an era of images. Contemporary visual technology--film, video, interactive digital media--is promoting but also demanding a new approach to education: the age of visual learning…

  13. High Resolution Imaging Using Phase Retrieval. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    25. pp. 5?3-578. 195;4 tamned from random perturbations of the constraint func- 181 K. Deimling. .Vonltnear Functional Analisis , Noe% Nork Springer...plane data of Figure 1(b) and corresponding image, Figure lie). The transform was also multiplied by aperture H to obtain the aperture plane dato of

  14. Cover Image, Volume 113, Number 12, December 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabou, Hanen; Desrosiers, Mélissa; Winckler, Céline; Fouquet, Stéphane; Auregan, Gwenaëlle; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Sahel, José-Alain; Dalkara, Deniz

    2016-12-01

    Cover Legend A schematic representation of cell transduction with AAV particles. The cover image, by Deniz Dalkara et al., is based on the Article Insight into the mechanisms of enhanced retinal transduction by the engineered AAV2 capsid variant -7m8, DOI: 10.1002/bit.26031. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cover Image, Volume 118, Number 12, December 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Duo; Liu, Chang; Li, Zhigang; Wang, Yumei; Wang, Wenjing; Wu, Xiujuan; Wang, Kang; Miao, Wei; Li, Li; Peng, Luying

    2017-12-01

    Cover: The cover image, by Duo Wang et al., is based on the Article Regulation of Histone Acetylation on Expression Profiles of Potassium Channels During Cardiomyocyte Differentiation From Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells, DOI: 10.1002/jcb.26102. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cover Image, Volume 119, Number 1, January 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Infante, Nestor; Ilhuicatzi-Alvarado, Damaris; Torres-Martínez, Marilu; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; Nava-Acosta, Raúl; González-González, Edith; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2018-01-01

    Cover: The cover image, by Nestor Rubio-Infante et al., is based on the Article The Macrophage Activation Induced by Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Protoxin Involves ERK1/2 and p38 Pathways and the Interaction with Cell-Surface-HSP70, DOI: 10.1002/jcb.26216. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Registration of clinical volumes to beams-eye-view images for real-time tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jonathan H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Lewis, John H.; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross I., E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors combine the registration of 2D beam’s eye view (BEV) images and 3D planning computed tomography (CT) images, with relative, markerless tumor tracking to provide automatic absolute tracking of physician defined volumes such as the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: During treatment of lung SBRT cases, BEV images were continuously acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operating in cine mode. For absolute registration of physician-defined volumes, an intensity based 2D/3D registration to the planning CT was performed using the end-of-exhale (EoE) phase of the four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). The volume was converted from Hounsfield units into electron density by a calibration curve and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for each beam geometry. Using normalized cross correlation between the DRR and an EoE BEV image, the best in-plane rigid transformation was found. The transformation was applied to physician-defined contours in the planning CT, mapping them into the EPID image domain. A robust multiregion method of relative markerless lung tumor tracking quantified deviations from the EoE position. Results: The success of 2D/3D registration was demonstrated at the EoE breathing phase. By registering at this phase and then employing a separate technique for relative tracking, the authors are able to successfully track target volumes in the BEV images throughout the entire treatment delivery. Conclusions: Through the combination of EPID/4DCT registration and relative tracking, a necessary step toward the clinical implementation of BEV tracking has been completed. The knowledge of tumor volumes relative to the treatment field is important for future applications like real-time motion management, adaptive radiotherapy, and delivered dose calculations.

  18. Unbiased estimation of the liver volume by the Cavalieri principle using magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Buenyamin E-mail: bsahin@omu.edu.tr; Emirzeoglu, Mehmet; Uzun, Ahmet; Incesu, Luetfi; Bek, Yueksel; Bilgic, Sait; Kaplan, Sueleyman

    2003-08-01

    Objective: It is often useful to know the exact volume of the liver, such as in monitoring the effects of a disease, treatment, dieting regime, training program or surgical application. Some non-invasive methodologies have been previously described which estimate the volume of the liver. However, these preliminary techniques need special software or skilled performers and they are not ideal for daily use in clinical practice. Here, we describe a simple, accurate and practical technique for estimating liver volume without changing the routine magnetic resonance imaging scanning procedure. Materials and methods: In this study, five normal livers, obtained from cadavers, were scanned by 0.5 T MR machine, in horizontal and sagittal planes. The consecutive sections, in 10 mm thickness, were used to estimate the whole volume of the liver by means of the Cavalieri principle. The volume estimations were done by three different performers to evaluate the reproducibility. Results: There are no statistical differences between the performers and real liver volumes (P>0.05). There is also high correlation between the estimates of performers and the real liver volume (r=0.993). Conclusion: We conclude that the combination of MR imaging with the Cavalieri principle is a non-invasive, direct and unbiased technique that can be safely applied to estimate liver volume with a very moderate workload per individual.

  19. Reduced striatal volumes in Parkinson’s disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitcher Toni L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence and extent of structural changes in the brain as a consequence of Parkinson’s disease (PD is still poorly understood. Methods High-resolution 3-tesla T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance images in sixty-five PD and 27 age-matched healthy control participants were examined. Putamen, caudate, and intracranial volumes were manually traced in the axial plane of 3D reconstructed images. Striatal nuclei volumes were normalized to intracranial volume for statistical comparison. Disease status was assessed using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and Hoehn and Yahr scale. Cognitive status was assessed using global status tests and detailed neuropsychological testing. Results Both caudate and putamen volumes were smaller in PD brains compared to controls after adjusting for age and gender. Caudate volumes were reduced by 11% (p = 0.001 and putamen volumes by 8.1% (p = 0.025. PD striatal volumes were not found to be significantly correlated with cognitive or motor decline. Conclusion Small, but significant reductions in the volume of both the caudate and putamen occur in PD brains. These reductions are independent of the effects of age and gender, however the relation of these reductions to the functional loss of dopamine, which is characteristic of PD, remains unclear.

  20. To render time sensible: transmissibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Emerling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review-essay of Keith Moxey’s Visual Time: The Image in History (2013 addresses recent theoretical work on images, historiography, and temporality. It does so by critiquing preexisting methodological issues such as linear chronology, ekphrasis, and contemporaneity. In addition to reviewing how Moxey deals with the problematic of temporality in art historical practice, this review-essay develops its own methodological approach through the concept of transmissibility. Transmissibility is a theoretical methodology for how to approach the relation between temporality and artworks that draws on the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. Transmissibility stems from a desire to arrive at an art history capable of articulating the complex epistemic and aesthetic power of an artwork. In other words, an artwork as a material, expressive reality, a conjunction of content and expression, statement and visibility, sensible and intelligible. It remains to us as art historians to think a philosophy of history wherein artworks embody transmissibility (survival, anachronism, memory, becoming: the full complexity of temporality.

  1. Blood volume fraction imaging of the human lung using intravoxel incoherent motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, Flavio; Meyer, Cord; Phys, Dipl; Breuer, Felix A; Triphan, Simon; Choli, Morwan; Phys, Dipl; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-05-01

    To present a technique for non-contrast-enhanced in vivo imaging of the blood volume fraction of the human lung. The technique is based on the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) approach. However, a substantial novelty is introduced here: the need for external diffusion sensitizing gradients is eliminated by exploiting the internal magnetic field gradients typical of the lung tissue, due to magnetic susceptibility differences at air/tissue interfaces. A single shot turbo spin-echo sequence with stimulated-echo preparation and electrocardiograph synchronization was used for acquisition. Two images were acquired in a single breath-hold of 10 seconds duration: one reference image and one blood-suppressed image. The blood volume fraction was quantified using a two-compartment signal decay model, as given by the IVIM theory. Experiments were performed at 1.5T in eight healthy volunteers. Values of the blood volume fraction obtained within the lung parenchyma (36 ± 16%) are in good agreement with previous reports, obtained using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (33%), and show relatively good reproducibility. The presented technique offers a robust way to quantify the blood volume fraction of the human lung parenchyma without using contrast agents. Image acquisition can be accomplished in a single breath-hold and could be suitable for clinical applications on patients with lung diseases. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2015;41:1454-1464. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ribbon scanning confocal for high-speed high-resolution volume imaging of brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Watson

    Full Text Available Whole-brain imaging is becoming a fundamental means of experimental insight; however, achieving subcellular resolution imagery in a reasonable time window has not been possible. We describe the first application of multicolor ribbon scanning confocal methods to collect high-resolution volume images of chemically cleared brains. We demonstrate that ribbon scanning collects images over ten times faster than conventional high speed confocal systems but with equivalent spectral and spatial resolution. Further, using this technology, we reconstruct large volumes of mouse brain infected with encephalitic alphaviruses and demonstrate that regions of the brain with abundant viral replication were inaccessible to vascular perfusion. This reveals that the destruction or collapse of large regions of brain micro vasculature may contribute to the severe disease caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Visualization of this fundamental impact of infection would not be possible without sampling at subcellular resolution within large brain volumes.

  3. Forearm Muscle Volumes Can Be Accurately Quantified From High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Eng, Carolyn M.; Abrams, Geoff D.; Smallwood, Laura R.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2007-01-01

    Upper extremity musculoskeletal modeling is becoming increasingly sophisticated, creating a growing need for subject-specific muscle size parameters. One method for determining subject-specific muscle volume is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MRI-derived muscle volumes in the human forearm across a variety of muscle sizes and shapes. Seventeen cadaveric forearms were scanned using a fast spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence with hig...

  4. Comparison of Three Methods for the Estimation of Pineal Gland Volume Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazi Acer; Ahmet Turan Ilıca; Ahmet Tuncay Turgut; Özlem Özçelik; Birdal Yıldırım; Mehmet Turgut

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of t...

  5. 3D Pathology Volumetric Technique: A Method for Calculating Breast Tumour Volume from Whole-Mount Serial Section Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Clarke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumour size, most commonly measured by maximum linear extent, remains a strong predictor of survival in breast cancer. Tumour volume, proportional to the number of tumour cells, may be a more accurate surrogate for size. We describe a novel “3D pathology volumetric technique” for lumpectomies and compare it with 2D measurements. Volume renderings and total tumour volume are computed from digitized whole-mount serial sections using custom software tools. Results are presented for two lumpectomy specimens selected for tumour features which may challenge accurate measurement of tumour burden with conventional, sampling-based pathology: (1 an infiltrative pattern admixed with normal breast elements; (2 a localized invasive mass separated from the in situ component by benign tissue. Spatial relationships between key features (tumour foci, close or involved margins are clearly visualized in volume renderings. Invasive tumour burden can be underestimated using conventional pathology, compared to the volumetric technique (infiltrative pattern: 30% underestimation; localized mass: 3% underestimation for invasive tumour, 44% for in situ component. Tumour volume approximated from 2D measurements (i.e., maximum linear extent, assuming elliptical geometry, was seen to overestimate volume compared to the 3D volumetric calculation (by a factor of 7x for the infiltrative pattern; 1.5x for the localized invasive mass.

  6. Image scale measurement with correlation filters in a volume holographic optical correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianxiang; Cao, Liangcai; He, Qingsheng; Jin, Guofan

    2013-08-01

    A search engine containing various target images or different part of a large scene area is of great use for many applications, including object detection, biometric recognition, and image registration. The input image captured in realtime is compared with all the template images in the search engine. A volume holographic correlator is one type of these search engines. It performs thousands of comparisons among the images at a super high speed, with the correlation task accomplishing mainly in optics. However, the inputted target image always contains scale variation to the filtering template images. At the time, the correlation values cannot properly reflect the similarity of the images. It is essential to estimate and eliminate the scale variation of the inputted target image. There are three domains for performing the scale measurement, as spatial, spectral and time domains. Most methods dealing with the scale factor are based on the spatial or the spectral domains. In this paper, a method with the time domain is proposed to measure the scale factor of the input image. It is called a time-sequential scaled method. The method utilizes the relationship between the scale variation and the correlation value of two images. It sends a few artificially scaled input images to compare with the template images. The correlation value increases and decreases with the increasing of the scale factor at the intervals of 0.8~1 and 1~1.2, respectively. The original scale of the input image can be measured by estimating the largest correlation value through correlating the artificially scaled input image with the template images. The measurement range for the scale can be 0.8~4.8. Scale factor beyond 1.2 is measured by scaling the input image at the factor of 1/2, 1/3 and 1/4, correlating the artificially scaled input image with the template images, and estimating the new corresponding scale factor inside 0.8~1.2.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging quality and volumes of brain structures from live and postmortem imaging of California sea lions with clinical signs of domoic acid toxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Eric W; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Pussini, Nicola; Battey, Thomas W K; Barakos, Jerome; Dennison, Sophie; Colegrove, Kathleen; Gulland, Frances

    2010-09-17

    Our goal in this study was to compare magnetic resonance images and volumes of brain structures obtained alive versus postmortem of California sea lions Zalophus californianus exhibiting clinical signs of domoic acid (DA) toxicosis and those exhibiting normal behavior. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images of postmortem-intact brains, up to 48 h after death, provided similar quality to images acquired from live sea lions. Volumes of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) of the cerebral hemispheres were similar to volumes calculated from images acquired when the sea lions were alive. However, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes decreased due to leakage. Hippocampal volumes from postmortem-intact images were useful for diagnosing unilateral and bilateral atrophy, consequences of DA toxicosis. These volumes were similar to the volumes in the live sea lion studies, up to 48 h postmortem. Imaging formalin-fixed brains provided some information on brain structure; however, images of the hippocampus and surrounding structures were of poorer quality compared to the images acquired alive and postmortem-intact. Despite these issues, volumes of cerebral GM and WM, as well as the hippocampus, were similar to volumes calculated from images of live sea lions and sufficient to diagnose hippocampal atrophy. Thus, postmortem MRI scanning (either intact or formalin-fixed) with volumetric analysis can be used to investigate the acute, chronic and possible developmental effects of DA on the brain of California sea lions.

  8. A flexible and accurate digital volume correlation method applicable to high-resolution volumetric images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bing; Wang, Bo

    2017-10-01

    Digital volume correlation (DVC) is a powerful technique for quantifying interior deformation within solid opaque materials and biological tissues. In the last two decades, great efforts have been made to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the DVC algorithm. However, there is still a lack of a flexible, robust and accurate version that can be efficiently implemented in personal computers with limited RAM. This paper proposes an advanced DVC method that can realize accurate full-field internal deformation measurement applicable to high-resolution volume images with up to billions of voxels. Specifically, a novel layer-wise reliability-guided displacement tracking strategy combined with dynamic data management is presented to guide the DVC computation from slice to slice. The displacements at specified calculation points in each layer are computed using the advanced 3D inverse-compositional Gauss-Newton algorithm with the complete initial guess of the deformation vector accurately predicted from the computed calculation points. Since only limited slices of interest in the reference and deformed volume images rather than the whole volume images are required, the DVC calculation can thus be efficiently implemented on personal computers. The flexibility, accuracy and efficiency of the presented DVC approach are demonstrated by analyzing computer-simulated and experimentally obtained high-resolution volume images.

  9. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  10. Digital volume imaging of the PEFC gas diffusion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL; Shim, Eunkyoung [NC ST

    2010-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a key role in the overall performance/durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Of profound importance, especially in the context of water management and flooding phenomena, is the influence of the underlying pore morphology and wetting characteristics Of the GDL microstructure. In this article, we present the digital volumetric imaging (DVI) technique in order to generate the 3-D carbon paper GDL microstructure. The internal pore structure and the local microstructural variations in terms of fiber alignment and fiber/binder distributions are investigated using the several 3-D thin sections of the sample obtained from DVI.

  11. Combining MRI with PET for partial volume correction improves image-derived input functions in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Eleanor; Buonincontri, Guido [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Izquierdo, David [Athinoula A Martinos Centre, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (United States); Methner, Carmen [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, Rob C [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ansorge, Richard E [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kreig, Thomas [Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Carpenter, T Adrian [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sawiak, Stephen J [Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-29

    Kinetic modelling in PET requires the arterial input function (AIF), defined as the time-activity curve (TAC) in plasma. This measure is challenging to obtain in mice due to low blood volumes, resulting in a reliance on image-based methods for AIF derivation. We present a comparison of PET- and MR-based region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain image-derived AIFs from the left ventricle (LV) of a mouse model. ROI-based partial volume correction (PVC) was performed to improve quantification.

  12. Image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer: bladder volume variation and its relation to margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muren, Ludvig; Redpath, Anthony Thomas; Lord, Hannah

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The cor......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To control and account for bladder motion is a major challenge in radiotherapy (RT) of bladder cancer. This study investigates the relation between bladder volume variation and margins in conformal and image-guided RT (IGRT) for this disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS......: The correlation between the relative bladder volume (RBV, defined as repeat scan volume/planning scan volume) and the margins required to account for internal motion was first studied using a series of 20 bladder cancer patients with weekly repeat CT scanning during treatment. Both conformal RT (CRT) and IGRT...... were simulated; in the latter translational movement of the bladder was accounted for by isocentre shifting. Further analysis of bladder volumes and margins was performed using a second series of eight patients with twice-weekly repeat CT scanning. In an attempt to control bladder volume variation...

  13. Volume and Surface Measurements from Tomographic Images: in Vivo Validation of AN Unsupervised Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyassin, Abdalmajeid Musa

    The maximum unit normal component method (MUNC) used for surface area measurement and the divergence theorem algorithm (DTA) used for volume measurement were evaluated in vitro and validated in vivo. To evaluate these methods in vitro, their accuracy and precision were investigated at varying conditions of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), sampling, volume averaging, and orientation. These algorithms were also enhanced to provide interactive surface area and volume measurements for regions bounded by orthogonal cut planes. The in vitro evaluations showed that a minimum SNR of 6:1 was necessary to provide accurate surface area and volume measurements. This test also revealed surface area measurements were more sensitive to noise than volume measurement. Sampling tests showed that at least twelve samples across the shortest dimension of simulated objects are necessary to provide accurate surface area and volume measurements. Volume averaging tests, however, revealed that at least seven voxels across the diameter (51.44 mm) of a computed tomography wooden sphere image are necessary for accurate surface area and volume measurements. Orientation tests indicated that the accuracy of the measured surface area and volume was primarily dependent on the number of samples across the shortest dimension of the object. Interactive measurement tests proved that the enhanced algorithms can provide accurate and precise interactive surface area and volume measurements. To validate the investigated algorithms in vivo, an unsupervised method incorporating these algorithms was developed for measuring surface area and volume of the urinary bladder using dual-echo, T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Accuracy and precision of the unsupervised method in estimating urine volumes in vivo for nine normal subjects were volume measured using the DTA method compares well with the volume measured by a proven voxel counting method. The MUNC method for measuring surface area is shown superior to a

  14. Space Object and Light Attribute Rendering (SOLAR) Projection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-08

    style emulation system called the Space Object and Light Attribute Rendering (SOLAR) Projection System. On- orbit dy- namics and control with sensor...Figure 3: SOLAR system installation process Figure 4: Images of the SOLAR system daytime simulator. Stars, planets and satellites are shown with the...generation orbit determination systems for RSO tracking and characterization. Mr. Moyer has developed excellent working relationship with his Air

  15. Cine MR imaging in mitral valve prolapse; Study on mitral regurgitation and left atrial volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumai, Toshihiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-02-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the ability of cine MR imaging to evaluate the direction, timing, and severity of mitral regurgitation in patients with mitral valve prolapse (MVP). The population of this study was 33 patients with MVP diagnosed by two-dimensional echocardiography and 10 patients with rheumatic mitral valve disease (MSR) for comparison. 7 patients with MVP and 5 with MSR had atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure as complications. Mitral regurgitation was graded for severity by color Doppler flow imaging in all patients. Direction and size of systolic flow void in the left atrium were analyzed by contiguous multilevel cine MR images and the maximum volumes of flow void and left atrium were measured. Although flow void was found at the center of the left atrium in most of MSR, it was often directed along the postero-caudal atrial wall in anterior leaflet prolapse and along the anterocranial atrial wall in posterior leaflet prolapse. In MVP, the maximum volume of flow void was often seen in late systole. The maximum volume of flow void and that of left atrium were significantly larger in patients with atrial fibrillation and/or history of congestive heart failure. The length and volume of flow void were increased with clinical severity and degree of regurgitation determined by color Doppler flow imaging. Thus cine MR imaging provides a useful means for detection and semiquantitative evaluation of mitral regurgitation in subjects with MVP. (author).

  16. A study of nasal cavity volume in patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Kenichi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Nasal cavity volume was studied in 11 patients with cleft lip and palate by magnetic resonance imaging. The areas of horizontal sections of the nasal cavity on the cleft and non-cleft sides were measured with the help of a personal computer and image analyzing software. Nasal cavity volume was determined by integrated volume calculation. The volume of each side was measured before and after cleft lip repair. Before cleft lip repair nasal cavity volume on the non-cleft side was larger than on the cleft side. However there was no significant difference in the volume of the cleft and non-cleft sides after cleft lip repair. (author)

  17. Impact of image denoising on image quality, quantitative parameters and sensitivity of ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Ahmed E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikoubashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Kim, Jong Hyo [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institute of Convergence Technology, Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To examine the impact of denoising on ultra-low-dose volume perfusion CT (ULD-VPCT) imaging in acute stroke. Simulated ULD-VPCT data sets at 20 % dose rate were generated from perfusion data sets of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kVp/180 mAs. Four data sets were generated from each ULD-VPCT data set: not-denoised (ND); denoised using spatiotemporal filter (D1); denoised using quanta-stream diffusion technique (D2); combination of both methods (D1 + D2). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was measured in the resulting 100 data sets. Image quality, presence/absence of ischemic lesions, CBV and CBF scores according to a modified ASPECTS score were assessed by two blinded readers. SNR and qualitative scores were highest for D1 + D2 and lowest for ND (all p ≤ 0.001). In 25 % of the patients, ND maps were not assessable and therefore excluded from further analyses. Compared to original data sets, in D2 and D1 + D2, readers correctly identified all patients with ischemic lesions (sensitivity 1.0, kappa 1.0). Lesion size was most accurately estimated for D1 + D2 with a sensitivity of 1.0 (CBV) and 0.94 (CBF) and an inter-rater agreement of 1.0 and 0.92, respectively. An appropriate combination of denoising techniques applied in ULD-VPCT produces diagnostically sufficient perfusion maps at substantially reduced dose rates as low as 20 % of the normal scan. (orig.)

  18. Three-dimensional rendering of segmented object using matlab - biomed 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey R; Barrett, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional rendering of microscopic objects is a difficult and challenging task that often requires specialized image processing techniques. Previous work has been described of a semi-automatic segmentation process of fluorescently stained neurons collected as a sequence of slice images with a confocal laser scanning microscope. Once properly segmented, each individual object can be rendered and studied as a three-dimensional virtual object. This paper describes the work associated with the design and development of Matlab files to create three-dimensional images from the segmented object data previously mentioned. Part of the motivation for this work is to integrate both the segmentation and rendering processes into one software application, providing a seamless transition from the segmentation tasks to the rendering and visualization tasks. Previously these tasks were accomplished on two different computer systems, windows and Linux. This transition basically limits the usefulness of the segmentation and rendering applications to those who have both computer systems readily available. The focus of this work is to create custom Matlab image processing algorithms for object rendering and visualization, and merge these capabilities to the Matlab files that were developed especially for the image segmentation task. The completed Matlab application will contain both the segmentation and rendering processes in a single graphical user interface, or GUI. This process for rendering three-dimensional images in Matlab requires that a sequence of two-dimensional binary images, representing a cross-sectional slice of the object, be reassembled in a 3D space, and covered with a surface. Additional segmented objects can be rendered in the same 3D space. The surface properties of each object can be varied by the user to aid in the study and analysis of the objects. This inter-active process becomes a powerful visual tool to study and understand microscopic objects.

  19. ARC Code TI: SLAB Spatial Audio Renderer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SLAB is a software-based, real-time virtual acoustic environment rendering system being developed as a tool for the study of spatial hearing. SLAB is designed to...

  20. Cone beam computed tomography images fusion in predicting lung ablation volumes: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardi, Anna Maria; Petrillo, Mario; Xhepa, Genti; Laganà, Domenico; Piacentino, Filippo; Floridi, Chiara; Duka, Ejona; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2016-02-01

    Recently different software with the ability to plan ablation volumes have been developed in order to minimize the number of attempts of positioning electrodes and to improve a safe overall tumor coverage. To assess the feasibility of three-dimensional cone beam computed tomography (3D CBCT) fusion imaging with "virtual probe" positioning, to predict ablation volume in lung tumors treated percutaneously. Pre-procedural computed tomography contrast-enhanced scans (CECT) were merged with a CBCT volume obtained to plan the ablation. An offline tumor segmentation was performed to determine the number of antennae and their positioning within the tumor. The volume of ablation obtained, evaluated on CECT performed after 1 month, was compared with the pre-procedural predicted one. Feasibility was assessed on the basis of accuracy evaluation (visual evaluation [VE] and quantitative evaluation [QE]), technical success (TS), and technical effectiveness (TE). Seven of the patients with lung tumor treated by percutaneous thermal ablation were selected and treated on the basis of the 3D CBCT fusion imaging. In all cases the volume of ablation predicted was in accordance with that obtained. The difference in volume between predicted ablation volumes and obtained ones on CECT at 1 month was 1.8 cm(3) (SD ± 2, min. 0.4, max. 0.9) for MW and 0.9 cm(3) (SD ± 1.1, min. 0.1, max. 0.7) for RF. Use of pre-procedural 3D CBCT fusion imaging could be useful to define expected ablation volumes. However, more patients are needed to ensure stronger evidence. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  1. Imaged based estimation of food volume using circular referents in dietary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wenyan; Yue, Yaofeng; Fernstrom, John D; Yao, Ning; Sclabassi, Robert J; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Sun, Mingui

    2012-03-01

    Measuring food volume (portion size) is a critical component in both clinical and research dietary studies. With the wide availability of cell phones and other camera-ready mobile devices, food pictures can be taken, stored or transmitted easily to form an image based dietary record. Although this record enables a more accurate dietary recall, a digital image of food usually cannot be used to estimate portion size directly due to the lack of information about the scale and orientation of the food within the image. The objective of this study is to investigate two novel approaches to provide the missing information, enabling food volume estimation from a single image. Both approaches are based on an elliptical reference pattern, such as the image of a circular pattern (e.g., circular plate) or a projected elliptical spotlight. Using this reference pattern and image processing techniques, the location and orientation of food objects and their volumes are calculated. Experiments were performed to validate our methods using a variety of objects, including regularly shaped objects and food samples.

  2. PET imaging in a longitudinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma study: association with tumor volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Maija; Jaervenpaeae, Ritva (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)), email: maija.rossi@pshp.fi; Korkola, Pasi (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)); Pertovaara, Hannu (Dept. of Oncology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)); Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Tampere Medical School, Tampere (Finland)); Wu, Xingchen (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Dept. of Oncology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)); Eskola, Hannu (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Tampere Univ. of Technology, Tampere (Finland)); Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa (Dept. of Oncology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Tampere Medical School, Tampere (Finland))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Computed tomography (CT) is generally used in the evaluation of the treatment response of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. Instead of morphological images, positron emission tomography (PET) shows metabolic information that is connected to tumor activity, cell proliferation rate, and, thus, prognosis. Purpose. To determine the prognostic value of PET for tumor volume reduction measured by CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) along with clinical characteristics in NHL patients. Material and Methods. We imaged 21 B-cell type NHL patients using whole-body 18F-FDG-PET at the onset and the completion of treatment and at six-month follow-up. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) was calculated. Morphological tumor volume calculations were assessed using both MRI and CT. Additionally, patients underwent thorough clinical examination including several laboratory tests. Results. A high SUV{sub max} was able to predict significant tumor volume reduction at the beginning of treatment, but the relation to pure tumor volume was poor. Conclusion. The SUV{sub max} values derived from FDG-PET seemed to correlate with volume changes but not with their absolute values or laboratory tests. Unlike MRI and CT, FDG-PET showed the disappearance of active tumors after treatment

  3. Comparison of EM-based and level set partial volume segmentations of MR brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagare, Hemant D.; Chen, Yunmei; Fulbright, Robert K.

    2008-03-01

    EM and level set algorithms are competing methods for segmenting MRI brain images. This paper presents a fair comparison of the two techniques using the Montreal Neurological Institute's software phantom. There are many flavors of level set algorithms for segmentation into multiple regions (multi-phase algorithms, multi-layer algorithms). The specific algorithm evaluated by us is a variant of the multi-layer level set algorithm. It uses a single level set function for segmenting the image into multiple classes and can be run to completion without restarting. The EM-based algorithm is standard. Both algorithms have the capacity to model a variable number of partial volume classes as well as image inhomogeneity (bias field). Our evaluation consists of systematically changing the number of partial volume classes, additive image noise, and regularization parameters. The results suggest that the performances of both algorithms are comparable across noise, number of partial volume classes, and regularization. The segmentation errors of both algorithms are around 5 - 10% for cerebrospinal fluid, gray and white matter. The level set algorithm appears to have a slight advantage for gray matter segmentation. This may be beneficial in studying certain brain diseases (Multiple Sclerosis or Alzheimer's disease) where small changes in gray matter volume are significant.

  4. Extracellular volume imaging by magnetic resonance imaging provides insights into overt and sub-clinical myocardial pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugander, Martin; Oki, Abiola J; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Kellman, Peter; Greiser, Andreas; Aletras, Anthony H; Sibley, Christopher T; Chen, Marcus Y; Bandettini, W Patricia; Arai, Andrew E

    2012-05-01

    Conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance can detect myocardial infarction and some forms of non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis. However, quantitative imaging of extracellular volume fraction (ECV) may be able to detect subtle abnormalities such as diffuse fibrosis or post-infarct remodelling of remote myocardium. The aims were (1) to measure ECV in myocardial infarction and non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis, (2) to determine whether ECV varies with age, and (3) to detect sub-clinical abnormalities in 'normal appearing' myocardium remote from regions of infarction. Cardiac magnetic resonance ECV imaging was performed in 126 patients with T1 mapping before and after injection of gadolinium contrast. Conventional LGE images were acquired for the left ventricle. In patients with a prior myocardial infarction, the infarct region had an ECV of 51 ± 8% which did not overlap with the remote 'normal appearing' myocardium that had an ECV of 27 ± 3% (P infarctions increased as left ventricular ejection fraction decreased (r = -0.50, P = 0.02). Extracellular volume fraction imaging can quantitatively characterize myocardial infarction, atypical diffuse fibrosis, and subtle myocardial abnormalities not clinically apparent on LGE images. Taken within the context of prior literature, these subtle ECV abnormalities are consistent with diffuse fibrosis related to age and changes remote from infarction.

  5. Extracellular volume imaging by magnetic resonance imaging provides insights into overt and sub-clinical myocardial pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugander, Martin; Oki, Abiola J.; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Kellman, Peter; Greiser, Andreas; Aletras, Anthony H.; Sibley, Christopher T.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Arai, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Conventional late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance can detect myocardial infarction and some forms of non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis. However, quantitative imaging of extracellular volume fraction (ECV) may be able to detect subtle abnormalities such as diffuse fibrosis or post-infarct remodelling of remote myocardium. The aims were (1) to measure ECV in myocardial infarction and non-ischaemic myocardial fibrosis, (2) to determine whether ECV varies with age, and (3) to detect sub-clinical abnormalities in ‘normal appearing’ myocardium remote from regions of infarction. Methods and results Cardiac magnetic resonance ECV imaging was performed in 126 patients with T1 mapping before and after injection of gadolinium contrast. Conventional LGE images were acquired for the left ventricle. In patients with a prior myocardial infarction, the infarct region had an ECV of 51 ± 8% which did not overlap with the remote ‘normal appearing’ myocardium that had an ECV of 27 ± 3% (P myocardial infarctions increased as left ventricular ejection fraction decreased (r = −0.50, P = 0.02). Conclusion Extracellular volume fraction imaging can quantitatively characterize myocardial infarction, atypical diffuse fibrosis, and subtle myocardial abnormalities not clinically apparent on LGE images. Taken within the context of prior literature, these subtle ECV abnormalities are consistent with diffuse fibrosis related to age and changes remote from infarction. PMID:22279111

  6. Handling Motion-Blur in 3D Tracking and Rendering for Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngmin; Lepetit, Vincent; Woo, Woontack

    2012-09-01

    The contribution of this paper is two-fold. First, we show how to extend the ESM algorithm to handle motion blur in 3D object tracking. ESM is a powerful algorithm for template matching-based tracking, but it can fail under motion blur. We introduce an image formation model that explicitly consider the possibility of blur, and shows its results in a generalization of the original ESM algorithm. This allows to converge faster, more accurately and more robustly even under large amount of blur. Our second contribution is an efficient method for rendering the virtual objects under the estimated motion blur. It renders two images of the object under 3D perspective, and warps them to create many intermediate images. By fusing these images we obtain a final image for the virtual objects blurred consistently with the captured image. Because warping is much faster than 3D rendering, we can create realistically blurred images at a very low computational cost.

  7. Extended gray level co-occurrence matrix computation for 3D image volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Nurulazirah M.; Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti Octorina

    2017-02-01

    Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) is one of the main techniques for texture analysis that has been widely used in many applications. Conventional GLCMs usually focus on two-dimensional (2D) image texture analysis only. However, a three-dimensional (3D) image volume requires specific texture analysis computation. In this paper, an extended 2D to 3D GLCM approach based on the concept of multiple 2D plane positions and pixel orientation directions in the 3D environment is proposed. The algorithm was implemented by breaking down the 3D image volume into 2D slices based on five different plane positions (coordinate axes and oblique axes) resulting in 13 independent directions, then calculating the GLCMs. The resulted GLCMs were averaged to obtain normalized values, then the 3D texture features were calculated. A preliminary examination was performed on a 3D image volume (64 x 64 x 64 voxels). Our analysis confirmed that the proposed technique is capable of extracting the 3D texture features from the extended GLCMs approach. It is a simple and comprehensive technique that can contribute to the 3D image analysis.

  8. Performance Assessment of Three Rendering Engines in 3D Computer Graphics Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žan Vidmar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was the determination of testing conditions and visual and numerical evaluation of renderings made with three different rendering engines in Maya software, which is widely used for educational and computer art purposes. In the theoretical part the overview of light phenomena and their simulation in virtual space is presented. This is followed by a detailed presentation of the main rendering methods and the results and limitations of their applications to 3D objects. At the end of the theoretical part the importance of a proper testing scene and especially the role of Cornell box are explained. In the experimental part the terms and conditions as well as hardware and software used for the research are presented. This is followed by a description of the procedures, where we focused on the rendering quality and time, which enabled the comparison of settings of different render engines and determination of conditions for further rendering of testing scenes. The experimental part continued with rendering a variety of simple virtual scenes including Cornell box and virtual object with different materials and colours. Apart from visual evaluation, which was the starting point for comparison of renderings, a procedure for numerical estimation and colour deviations of renderings using the selected regions of interest in the final images is presented.

  9. Total internal reflection fluorescence based multiplane localization microscopy enables super-resolved volume imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Partha Pratim; Hess, Samuel T.

    2017-05-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) based geometry is attractive for super-resolution localization microscopy. Although the traditional TIRF configuration enables near-surface 2D imaging, it is not capable of imaging multiple axial planes. We propose a simultaneous multiplane imaging based localization encoded (SMILE) technique in the TIRF configuration that utilizes point spread function (PSF) information (PSF size, corresponding to single molecules located at the focal plane and off-focal planes, and the detected photons per PSF) to reconstruct a near-surface volume stack. The natural spread of the detection PSFs (far from the specimen-coverslip interface) is used to fix the axial locations of single molecules, and the corresponding photon count determines their localization precision. The proposed SMILE microscopy technique enables super-resolved volume reconstruction based on 2D recorded data.

  10. Comparison of Three Methods for the Estimation of Pineal Gland Volume Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Acer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of the current paper was to determine the pineal gland volume using stereological methods and by the region of interest (ROI on MRI. In this paper, the pineal gland volumes were calculated in a total of 62 subjects (36 females, 26 males who were free of any pineal lesions or tumors. The mean ± SD pineal gland volumes of the point-counting, planimetry, and ROI groups were 99.55±51.34, 102.69±40.39, and 104.33±40.45 mm3, respectively. No significant difference was found among the methods of calculating pineal gland volume (P>0.05. From these results, it can be concluded that each technique is an unbiased, efficient, and reliable method, ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pineal gland volume estimation.

  11. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of pineal gland volume using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Niyazi; Ilıca, Ahmet Turan; Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Ozçelik, Ozlem; Yıldırım, Birdal; Turgut, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Pineal gland is a very important neuroendocrine organ with many physiological functions such as regulating circadian rhythm. Radiologically, the pineal gland volume is clinically important because it is usually difficult to distinguish small pineal tumors via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although many studies have estimated the pineal gland volume using different techniques, to the best of our knowledge, there has so far been no stereological work done on this subject. The objective of the current paper was to determine the pineal gland volume using stereological methods and by the region of interest (ROI) on MRI. In this paper, the pineal gland volumes were calculated in a total of 62 subjects (36 females, 26 males) who were free of any pineal lesions or tumors. The mean ± SD pineal gland volumes of the point-counting, planimetry, and ROI groups were 99.55 ± 51.34, 102.69 ± 40.39, and 104.33 ± 40.45 mm(3), respectively. No significant difference was found among the methods of calculating pineal gland volume (P > 0.05). From these results, it can be concluded that each technique is an unbiased, efficient, and reliable method, ideally suitable for in vivo examination of MRI data for pineal gland volume estimation.

  12. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate: Repeatability of Volume and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Andriy; Vangel, Mark G; Tempany, Clare M; Fennessy, Fiona M

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of a region of interest (ROI) volume and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in standard-of-care 3 T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate obtained with the use of endorectal coil. This prospective study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, with institutional review board approval and written informed consent. Men with confirmed or suspected treatment-naive prostate cancer scheduled for mpMRI were offered a repeat mpMRI within 2 weeks. Regions of interest corresponding to the whole prostate gland, the entire peripheral zone (PZ), normal PZ, and suspected tumor ROI (tROI) on axial T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced subtract, and ADC images were annotated and assessed using Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) v2. Repeatability of the ROI volume for each of the analyzed image types and mean ROI ADC was summarized with repeatability coefficient (RC) and RC%. A total of 189 subjects were approached to participate in the study. Of 40 patients that gave initial agreement, 15 men underwent 2 mpMRI examinations and completed the study. Peripheral zone tROIs were identified in 11 subjects. Tumor ROI volume was less than 0.5 mL in 8 of 11 subjects. PI-RADS categories were identical between baseline-repeat studies in 11/15 subjects and differed by 1 point in 4/15. Peripheral zone tROI volume RC (RC%) was 233 mm (71%) on axial T2-weighted, 422 mm (112%) on ADC, and 488 mm (119%) on dynamic contrast-enhanced subtract. Apparent diffusion coefficient ROI mean RC (RC%) were 447 × 10 mm/s (42%) in PZ tROI and 471 × 10 mm/s (30%) in normal PZ. Significant difference in repeatability of the tROI volume across series was observed (P < 0.005). The mean ADC RC% was lower than volume RC% for tROI ADC (P < 0.05). PI-RADS v2 overall assessment was highly repeatable. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging sequences differ in volume measurement

  13. VOLUME STUDY WITH HIGH DENSITY OF PARTICLES BASED ON CONTOUR AND CORRELATION IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Yu. Nikolaeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study is the techniques of particle statistics evaluation, in particular, processing methods of particle images obtained by coherent illumination. This paper considers the problem of recognition and statistical accounting for individual images of small scattering particles in an arbitrary section of the volume in case of high concentrations. For automatic recognition of focused particles images, a special algorithm for statistical analysis based on contouring and thresholding was used. By means of the mathematical formalism of the scalar diffraction theory, coherent images of the particles formed by the optical system with high numerical aperture were simulated. Numerical testing of the method proposed for the cases of different concentrations and distributions of particles in the volume was performed. As a result, distributions of density and mass fraction of the particles were obtained, and the efficiency of the method in case of different concentrations of particles was evaluated. At high concentrations, the effect of coherent superposition of the particles from the adjacent planes strengthens, which makes it difficult to recognize images of particles using the algorithm considered in the paper. In this case, we propose to supplement the method with calculating the cross-correlation function of particle images from adjacent segments of the volume, and evaluating the ratio between the height of the correlation peak and the height of the function pedestal in the case of different distribution characters. The method of statistical accounting of particles considered in this paper is of practical importance in the study of volume with particles of different nature, for example, in problems of biology and oceanography. Effective work in the regime of high concentrations expands the limits of applicability of these methods for practically important cases and helps to optimize determination time of the distribution character and

  14. Sigmoid Colon Elongation Evaluation by Volume Rendering Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla SENAYLI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigmoid colons have various measurements, shapes, and configurations for individuals. In this subject there are rare clinical trials to answer the question of sigmoidal colon maldevelopment predicting a risk for volvulus. Therefore, sigmoid colon measurement may be beneficial to decide for volvulus. In a study, sigmoid colon diameters were evaluated during abdominal surgeries and it was found that median length was 47 cm and median vertical mesocolon length was 13 cm. We report a 14-year-old female patient who has a sigmoidal colon measured as nearly 54 cm. We used tomographic equipments for this evaluation. We know that MRI technique was used for this purpose but, there has not been data for MRI predicting the sigmoidal volvulus. We hope that our findings by this evaluation can contribute to insufficient literature of sigmoidal elongation. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 71-73

  15. Tracking Regional Tissue Volume and Function Change in Lung Using Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the 24-hour redistribution and reabsorption of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid delivered to the lung during a bronchoscopic procedure in normal volunteers. In this work we utilize image-matching procedures to correlate fluid redistribution and reabsorption to changes in regional lung function. Lung CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. Each subject was scanned at four time points before and after BAL procedure. Image registration was performed to align images at different time points and different inflation levels. The resulting dense displacement fields were utilized to track tissue volume changes and reveal deformation patterns of local parenchymal tissue quantitatively. The registration accuracy was assessed by measuring landmark matching errors, which were on the order of 1 mm. The results show that quantitative-assessed fluid volume agreed well with bronchoscopist-reported unretrieved BAL volume in the whole lungs (squared linear correlation coefficient was 0.81. The average difference of lung tissue volume at baseline and after 24 hours was around 2%, which indicates that BAL fluid in the lungs was almost absorbed after 24 hours. Regional lung-function changes correlated with the presence of BAL fluid, and regional function returned to baseline as the fluid was reabsorbed.

  16. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  17. Reduced Pineal Volume in Alzheimer Disease: A Retrospective Cross-sectional MR Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Teruyuki; Imai, Ayu; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Kato, Yuka; Shibata, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kaeko; Yokota, Hajime; Yamada, Kei; Narumoto, Jin

    2017-07-26

    Purpose To evaluate pineal volume in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy control subjects and to correlate the findings with results of cognitive testing and brain parenchymal volumes. Materials and Methods The ethics committee approved this retrospective study. The participants included 63 patients with AD, 33 patients with MCI, and 24 healthy control subjects. There were 36 men and 84 women, with a mean age (±standard deviation) of 76.7 years ± 7.6. The pineal gland volume and pineal parenchymal volume were measured by using three-dimensional volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (T1-weighted magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo sequence; spatial resolution, 0.9 × 0.98 × 0.98 mm). With age and total intracranial volume as covariates, analysis of covariance with the Bonferroni post hoc test was performed to compare the pineal volume among the AD, MCI, and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify predictor variables associated with pineal volume. Results The mean pineal gland volume in patients with AD (72.3 mm(3) ± 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 61.5 mm(3), 83.1 mm(3)) was significantly smaller than that in control subjects (102.1 mm(3) ± 9.0; 95% CI: 84.4 mm(3), 119.9 mm(3)) (P = .019). The mean pineal parenchymal volume in patients with AD (63.8 mm(3) ± 4.2; 95% CI: 55.4 mm(3), 72.1 mm(3)) was significantly smaller than that in patients with MCI (81.7 mm(3) ± 5.8; 95% CI: 70.3 mm(3), 93.1 mm(3); P = .044) and control subjects (89.1 mm(3) ± 6.9; 95% CI: 75.4 mm(3), 102.9 mm(3); P = .009). Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that the Mini-Mental State Examination score and total intracranial volume were significant independent predictors of both pineal gland volume and pineal parenchymal volume (P Pineal volume reduction showed correlation with cognitive decline and thus might be useful to predict cognitive decline in patients with AD. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  18. Glandular breast tissue volume by magnetic resonance imaging in 100 healthy peripubertal girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugl, Louise; Hagen, Casper P; Mieritz, Mikkel G

    2016-01-01

    , and endometrial thickness were assessed by TAUS. RESULTS: Glandular breast tissue volume was positively associated with Tanner stages (r = 0.858, P ...BACKGROUND: Appearance of glandular breast tissue may be difficult to distinguish from fat tissue by palpation, especially in obese girls. To our knowledge, validation of the clinical assessment of pubertal breast stages by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has never been performed. Our objective...... was to report normative data of glandular breast tissue volume and validate the clinical evaluation of pubertal breast staging by MRI of breast tissue and to evaluate circulating reproductive hormone levels and estrogen-dependent transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) parameters as markers of glandular breast tissue...

  19. Illustrative context-preserving exploration of volume data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Stefan; Grimm, Sören; Kanitsar, Armin; Gröller, M Eduard

    2006-01-01

    In volume rendering, it is very difficult to simultaneously visualize interior and exterior structures while preserving clear shape cues. Highly transparent transfer functions produce cluttered images with many overlapping structures, while clipping techniques completely remove possibly important context information. In this paper, we present a new model for volume rendering, inspired by from illustration. It provides a means of interactively inspecting the interior of a volumetric data set in a feature-driven way which retains context information. The context-preserving volume rendering model uses a function of shading intensity, gradient magnitude, distance to the eye point, and previously accumulated opacity to selectively reduce the opacity in less important data regions. It is controlled by two user-specified parameters. This new method represents an alternative to conventional clipping techniques, sharing their easy and intuitive user control, but does not suffer from the drawback of missing context information.

  20. Haptic rendering for simulation of fine manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dangxiao; Zhang, Yuru

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the latest progress in six degrees of freedom (6-DoF) haptic rendering with the focus on a new approach for simulating force/torque feedback in performing tasks that require dexterous manipulation skills. One of the major challenges in 6-DoF haptic rendering is to resolve the conflict between high speed and high fidelity requirements, especially in simulating a tool interacting with both rigid and deformable objects in a narrow space and with fine features. The book presents a configuration-based optimization approach to tackle this challenge. Addressing a key issue in man

  1. Blender cycles lighting and rendering cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Iraci, Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth guide full of step-by-step recipes to explore the concepts behind the usage of Cycles. Packed with illustrations, and lots of tips and tricks; the easy-to-understand nature of the book will help the reader understand even the most complex concepts with ease.If you are a digital artist who already knows your way around Blender, and you want to learn about the new Cycles' rendering engine, this is the book for you. Even experts will be able to pick up new tips and tricks to make the most of the rendering capabilities of Cycles.

  2. A New Approach to the Visual Rendering of Mantle Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, B. K.; Pratt, M. J.; Turk, M.; Hannasch, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Visualization of mantle tomographic models requires a range of subjective aesthetic decisions that are often made subconsciously or unarticulated by authors. Many of these decisions affect the interpretations of the model, and therefore should be articulated and understood. In 2D these decisions are manifest in the choice of colormap, including the data values associated with the neutral/transitional colorband, as well as the correspondence between the extrema in the colormap and the parameters of the extrema. For example, we generally choose warm color signifying slow- and cool colors signifying fast velocities (or perturbations), but where is the transition, and the color gradients from transition to extrema? In 3D, volumes are generally rendered by choosing an isosurface of a velocity perturbation (relative to a model at each depth) and coloring it slow to fast. The choice of isosurface is arbitrary or guided by a researcher's intuition, again strongly affecting (or driven by) the interpretation. Here, we present a different approach to 3-D rendering of tomography models, using true volumetric rendering with "yt", a python package for visualization and analysis of data. In our approach, we do not use isosurfaces; instead, we render the extrema in the tomographic model as the most opaque, with an opacity function that touches zero (totally transparent) at dynamically selected values, or at the average value at each depth. The intent is that the most robust aspects of the model are visually clear, and the visualization emphasizes the nature of the interfaces between regions as well as the form of distinct mantle regions. Much of the current scientific discussion in upper mantle tomography focuses on the nature of interfaces, so we will demonstrate how decisions in the definition of the transparent regions influence interpretation of tomographic models. Our aim is to develop a visual language for tomographic visualization that can help focus geodynamic questions.

  3. PET-guided delineation of radiation therapy treatment volumes: a survey of image segmentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); El Naqa, Issam [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Historically, anatomical CT and MR images were used to delineate the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The capabilities offered by modern radiation therapy units and the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners stimulated the development of biological PET imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning with the aim to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the tumour. One of the most difficult issues facing PET-based treatment planning is the accurate delineation of target regions from typical blurred and noisy functional images. The major problems encountered are image segmentation and imperfect system response function. Image segmentation is defined as the process of classifying the voxels of an image into a set of distinct classes. The difficulty in PET image segmentation is compounded by the low spatial resolution and high noise characteristics of PET images. Despite the difficulties and known limitations, several image segmentation approaches have been proposed and used in the clinical setting including thresholding, edge detection, region growing, clustering, stochastic models, deformable models, classifiers and several other approaches. A detailed description of the various approaches proposed in the literature is reviewed. Moreover, we also briefly discuss some important considerations and limitations of the widely used techniques to guide practitioners in the field of radiation oncology. The strategies followed for validation and comparative assessment of various PET segmentation approaches are described. Future opportunities and the current challenges facing the adoption of PET-guided delineation of target volumes and its role in basic and clinical research are also addressed. (orig.)

  4. Animation framework using volume visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wenxuan; Wang, Hongli

    2004-03-01

    As the development of computer graphics, scientific visualization and advanced imaging scanner and sensor technology, high quality animation making of volume data set has been a challenging in industries. A simple animation framework by using current volume visualization techniques is proposed in this paper. The framework consists of two pipelines: one is surface based method by using marching cubes algorithm, the other is volume rendering method by using shear-warp method. The volume visualization results can not only be used as key frame sources in the animation making, but also can be directly used as animation when the volume visualization is in stereoscopic mode. The proposed framework can be applied into fields such as medical education, film-making and archaeology.

  5. Tutorial for Collecting and Processing Images of Composite Structures to Determine the Fiber Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Lindsey

    2017-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite structures have become more common in aerospace components due to their light weight and structural efficiency. In general, the strength and stiffness of a composite structure are directly related to the fiber volume fraction, which is defined as the fraction of fiber volume to total volume of the composite. The most common method to measure the fiber volume fraction is acid digestion, which is a useful method when the total weight of the composite, the fiber weight, and the total weight can easily be obtained. However, acid digestion is a destructive test, so the material will no longer be available for additional characterization. Acid digestion can also be difficult to machine out specific components of a composite structure with complex geometries. These disadvantages of acid digestion led the author to develop a method to calculate the fiber volume fraction. The developed method uses optical microscopy to calculate the fiber area fraction based on images of the cross section of the composite. The fiber area fraction and fiber volume fraction are understood to be the same, based on the assumption that the shape and size of the fibers are consistent in the depth of the composite. This tutorial explains the developed method for optically determining fiber area fraction performed at NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. Unifying the analyses of anatomical and diffusion tensor images using volume-preserved warping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Dongrong; Hao, Xuejun; Bansal, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To introduce a framework that automatically identifies regions of anatomical abnormality within anatomical MR images and uses those regions in hypothesis-driven selection of seed points for fiber tracking with diffusion tensor (DT) imaging (DTI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Regions of interest...... (ROIs) are first extracted from MR images using an automated algorithm for volume-preserved warping (VPW) that identifies localized volumetric differences across groups. ROIs then serve as seed points for fiber tracking in coregistered DT images. Another algorithm automatically clusters and compares....... CONCLUSION: Our framework automatically detects volumetric abnormalities in anatomical MRIs to aid in generating a priori hypotheses concerning anatomical connectivity that then can be tested using DTI. Additionally, automation enhances the reliability of ROIs, fiber tracking, and fiber clustering....

  7. Unifying the analyses of anatomical and diffusion tensor images using volume-preserved warping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Dongrong; Hao, Xuejun; Bansal, Ravi

    2007-01-01

    morphologies of detected fiber bundles. We tested our framework using datasets from a group of patients with Tourette's syndrome (TS) and normal controls. RESULTS: Our framework automatically identified regions of localized volumetric differences across groups and then used those regions as seed points......PURPOSE: To introduce a framework that automatically identifies regions of anatomical abnormality within anatomical MR images and uses those regions in hypothesis-driven selection of seed points for fiber tracking with diffusion tensor (DT) imaging (DTI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Regions of interest...... (ROIs) are first extracted from MR images using an automated algorithm for volume-preserved warping (VPW) that identifies localized volumetric differences across groups. ROIs then serve as seed points for fiber tracking in coregistered DT images. Another algorithm automatically clusters and compares...

  8. Forearm Muscle Volumes Can Be Accurately Quantified From High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Carolyn M.; Abrams, Geoff D.; Smallwood, Laura R.; Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2007-01-01

    Upper extremity musculoskeletal modeling is becoming increasingly sophisticated, creating a growing need for subject-specific muscle size parameters. One method for determining subject-specific muscle volume is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MRI-derived muscle volumes in the human forearm across a variety of muscle sizes and shapes. Seventeen cadaveric forearms were scanned using a fast spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence with high isotropic spatial resolution (1 mm3 voxels) on a 3T MR system. Pronator teres (PT), extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), and brachioradialis (BR) muscles were manually segmented allowing volume to be calculated. Forearms were then dissected, muscles isolated, and muscle masses obtained, which allowed computation of muscle volume. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,1) and absolute volume differences were used to compare measurement methods. There was excellent agreement between the anatomical and MRI-derived muscle volumes (ICC = 0.97, relative error = 12.8%) when all 43 muscles were considered together. When individual muscles were considered, there was excellent agreement between measurement methods for PT (ICC = 0.97, relative error = 8.4%), ECRB (ICC = 0.93, relative error = 7.7%), and FCU (ICC = 0.91, relative error = 9.8%), and fair agreement for EPL (ICC = 0.68, relative error = 21.6%) and BR (ICC = 0.93, relative error = 17.2%). Thus, while MRI-based measurements of muscle volume produce relatively small errors in some muscles, muscles with high surface area-to-volume ratios may predispose them to segmentation error, and, therefore, the accuracy of these measurements may be unacceptable. PMID:17521657

  9. Muscle geometry affects accuracy of forearm volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Carolyn M; Abrams, Geoff D; Smallwood, Laura R; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2007-01-01

    Upper extremity musculoskeletal modeling is becoming increasingly sophisticated, creating a growing need for subject-specific muscle size parameters. One method for determining subject-specific muscle volume is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MRI-derived muscle volumes in the human forearm across a variety of muscle sizes and shapes. Seventeen cadaveric forearms were scanned using a fast-spoiled gradient echo pulse sequence with high isotropic spatial resolution (1mm(3) voxels) on a 3T MR system. Pronator teres (PT), extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), and brachioradialis (BR) muscles were manually segmented allowing volume to be calculated. Forearms were then dissected, muscles isolated, and muscle masses obtained, which allowed computation of muscle volume. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC(2,1)) and absolute volume differences were used to compare measurement methods. There was excellent agreement between the anatomical and MRI-derived muscle volumes (ICC = 0.97, relative error = 12.8%) when all 43 muscles were considered together. When individual muscles were considered, there was excellent agreement between measurement methods for PT (ICC = 0.97, relative error = 8.4%), ECRB (ICC = 0.93, relative error = 7.7%), and FCU (ICC = 0.91, relative error = 9.8%), and fair agreement for EPL (ICC = 0.68, relative error = 21.6%) and BR (ICC = 0.93, relative error = 17.2%). Thus, while MRI-based measurements of muscle volume produce relatively small errors in some muscles, muscles with high surface area-to-volume ratios may predispose them to segmentation error, and, therefore, the accuracy of these measurements may be unacceptable.

  10. A novel magnetic resonance imaging segmentation technique for determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma tumor volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjodh; Zhou, Zhiping; Tisnado, Jamie; Haque, Sofia; Peck, Kyung K; Young, Robert J; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Thakur, Sunitha B; Souweidane, Mark M

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurately determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumor volume is clinically important. The aims of the current study were to 1) measure DIPG volumes using methods that require different degrees of subjective judgment; and 2) evaluate interobserver agreement of measurements made using these methods. METHODS Eight patients from a Phase I clinical trial testing convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of a therapeutic antibody were included in the study. Pre-CED, post-radiation therapy axial T2-weighted images were analyzed using 2 methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment (picture archiving and communication system [PACS] polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods) and 1 method requiring a low degree of subjective judgment (k-means clustering segmentation) to determine tumor volumes. Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were calculated to assess interobserver agreement. RESULTS The CCCs of measurements made by 2 observers with the PACS polygon and the Volume Viewer auto-contour methods were 0.9465 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.8472) and 0.7514 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.3143), respectively. Both were considered poor agreement. The CCC of measurements made using k-means clustering segmentation was 0.9938 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.9772), which was considered substantial strength of agreement. CONCLUSIONS The poor interobserver agreement of PACS polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods highlighted the difficulty in consistently measuring DIPG tumor volumes using methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment. k-means clustering segmentation, which requires a low degree of subjective judgment, showed better interobserver agreement and produced tumor volumes with delineated borders.

  11. Rendering Visible: Painting and Sexuate Subjectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I examine Luce Irigaray's aesthetic of sexual difference, which she develops by extrapolating from Paul Klee's idea that the role of painting is to render the non-visible rather than represent the visible. This idea is the premise of her analyses of phenomenology and psychoanalysis and their respective contributions to understanding…

  12. Color rendering indices in global illumination methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler-Moroder, David; Dür, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Human perception of material colors depends heavily on the nature of the light sources used for illumination. One and the same object can cause highly different color impressions when lit by a vapor lamp or by daylight, respectively. Based on state-of-the-art colorimetric methods we present a modern approach for calculating color rendering indices (CRI), which were defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) to characterize color reproduction properties of illuminants. We update the standard CIE method in three main points: firstly, we use the CIELAB color space, secondly, we apply a Bradford transformation for chromatic adaptation, and finally, we evaluate color differences using the CIEDE2000 total color difference formula. Moreover, within a real-world scene, light incident on a measurement surface is composed of a direct and an indirect part. Neumann and Schanda1 have shown for the cube model that interreflections can influence the CRI of an illuminant. We analyze how color rendering indices vary in a real-world scene with mixed direct and indirect illumination and recommend the usage of a spectral rendering engine instead of an RGB based renderer for reasons of accuracy of CRI calculations.

  13. Real-time rendering of river networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Q.; Smelik, R.M.; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Realistic rendering of water bodies such as rivers and oceans has proven to be one of the most difficult challenges in computer graphics. This challenge can be split into two main problems: simulating the movement of water and simulating the optical properties of water. This poster focuses on the

  14. MRI-guided brain PET image filtering and partial volume correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jianhua; Chu-Shern Lim, Jason; Townsend, David W.

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) image quantification is a challenging problem due to limited spatial resolution of acquired data and the resulting partial volume effects (PVE), which depend on the size of the structure studied in relation to the spatial resolution and which may lead to over or underestimation of the true tissue tracer concentration. In addition, it is usually necessary to perform image smoothing either during image reconstruction or afterwards to achieve a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, an isotropic Gaussian filtering (GF) is used for this purpose. However, the noise suppression is at the cost of deteriorating spatial resolution. As hybrid imaging devices such as PET/MRI have become available, the complementary information derived from high definition morphologic images could be used to improve the quality of PET images. In this study, first of all, we propose an MRI-guided PET filtering method by adapting a recently proposed local linear model and then incorporate PVE into the model to get a new partial volume correction (PVC) method without parcellation of MRI. In addition, both the new filtering and PVC are voxel-wise non-iterative methods. The performance of the proposed methods were investigated with simulated dynamic FDG brain dataset and 18F-FDG brain data of a cervical cancer patient acquired with a simultaneous hybrid PET/MR scanner. The initial simulation results demonstrated that MRI-guided PET image filtering can produce less noisy images than traditional GF and bias and coefficient of variation can be further reduced by MRI-guided PET PVC. Moreover, structures can be much better delineated in MRI-guided PET PVC for real brain data.

  15. A multiresolution image based approach for correction of partial volume effects in emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussion, N; Hatt, M; Lamare, F; Bizais, Y; Turzo, A; Rest, C Cheze-Le; Visvikis, D [INSERM U650, Laboratoire du Traitement de l' Information Medicale (LaTIM), CHU Morvan, Brest (France)

    2006-04-07

    Partial volume effects (PVEs) are consequences of the limited spatial resolution in emission tomography. They lead to a loss of signal in tissues of size similar to the point spread function and induce activity spillover between regions. Although PVE can be corrected for by using algorithms that provide the correct radioactivity concentration in a series of regions of interest (ROIs), so far little attention has been given to the possibility of creating improved images as a result of PVE correction. Potential advantages of PVE-corrected images include the ability to accurately delineate functional volumes as well as improving tumour-to-background ratio, resulting in an associated improvement in the analysis of response to therapy studies and diagnostic examinations, respectively. The objective of our study was therefore to develop a methodology for PVE correction not only to enable the accurate recuperation of activity concentrations, but also to generate PVE-corrected images. In the multiresolution analysis that we define here, details of a high-resolution image H (MRI or CT) are extracted, transformed and integrated in a low-resolution image L (PET or SPECT). A discrete wavelet transform of both H and L images is performed by using the 'a trous' algorithm, which allows the spatial frequencies (details, edges, textures) to be obtained easily at a level of resolution common to H and L. A model is then inferred to build the lacking details of L from the high-frequency details in H. The process was successfully tested on synthetic and simulated data, proving the ability to obtain accurately corrected images. Quantitative PVE correction was found to be comparable with a method considered as a reference but limited to ROI analyses. Visual improvement and quantitative correction were also obtained in two examples of clinical images, the first using a combined PET/CT scanner with a lymphoma patient and the second using a FDG brain PET and corresponding T1

  16. Neuromagnetic Source Analysis Using Magnetic Resonance Images for the Construction of Source and Volume Conductor Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Menninghaus, Elisabeth; Steinsträter, Olaf; Wienbruch, Christian; Gißler, Hans Martin; Elbert, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Sources of the somatosensory evoked fields (SEF) for one subject were estimated using constraints from the magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the same subject. A realistic volume conductor model was shaped corresponding to the inside of the skull. Sources were restricted to a dipole patch riding on the surface of the cortex, reconstructed from the individual MRI. Such a patch can be considered as a uniformly activated cortical area giving rise to distributed currents which flow perpendicular ...

  17. Analysis of eyepoint locations and accuracy of rendered depth in binocular head-mounted displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaissie, Laurent; Rolland, Jannick P.; Bochenek, Grace M.

    1999-05-01

    Accuracy of rendered depth in virtual environments includes the correct specification of the eyepoints from which a stereoscopic pair of images is rendered. Rendered depth errors should be minimized for any virtual environment. It is however critical if perception is the object of study in such environments, or augmented reality environments are created where virtual objects must be registered with their real counterparts. Based on fundamental optical principles, the center of the entrance pupil is the eyepoint location that minimizes rendered depth errors over the entire field of view if eyetracking is enable. Because binocular head mounted displays (HMDs) have typically no eyetracking capability, the change in eyepoints location associate with eye vergence in HMDs is not accounted for. To predict the types and the magnitude of rendered depth errors that thus result, we conducted a theoretical investigation of rendered depth errors linked to natural eye movements in virtual environments for three possible eyepoints locations: the center of the entrance pupil, the nodal point, and the center of rotation of the eye. Results show that, while the center of rotation yields minimal rendered depth errors at the gaze point, it also yields rendered angular errors around the gaze point, not previously reported.

  18. Probabilistic Characterization of Partial Volume Effects in Imaging of Rectangular Objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskaya, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-06

    In imaging, a partial volume effect refers to the problem that arises when the system resolution is low relative to the size of the object being imaged [1, 2]. In this setting, it is likely that most voxels occupied by the object are only partially covered, and that the fraction covered in each voxel is low. This makes the problem of object detection and image segmentation very difficult because the algorithms designed for these purposes rely on pixel summary statistics. If the area covered by the object is very low in relatively many of the total number of the voxels the object occupies, these summary statistics may not reach the thresholds required to detect this object. It is thus important to understand the extent of partial volume effect for a given object size and resolution. This technical report focuses on rectangular objects and derives the probability distributions for three quantities for such objects: 1) the number of fully covered voxels, 2) the number of partially covered voxels, and 3) the fractions of the total volume covered in the partially covered voxels. The derivations are first shown for 2-D settings and are then extended to 3-D settings.

  19. Phase correlation applied to the 3D registration of CT and CBCT image volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Daniel; O'Brien, Daniel J; León-Vintró, Luis; McClean, Brendan; McBride, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a 3D phase correlation algorithm was investigated to test feasibility for use in determining the anatomical changes that occur throughout a patient's radiotherapy treatment. The algorithm determines the transformations between two image volumes through analysis in the Fourier domain and has not previously been used in radiotherapy for 3D registration of CT and CBCT volumes. Various known transformations were applied to a patient's prostate CT image volume to create 12 different test cases. The mean absolute error and standard deviation were determined by evaluating the difference between the known contours and those calculated from the registration process on a point-by-point basis. Similar evaluations were performed on images with increasing levels of noise added. The improvement in structure overlap offered by the algorithm in registering clinical CBCT to CT images was evaluated using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). A mean error of 2.35 (σ = 1.54) mm was calculated for the 12 deformations applied. When increasing levels of noise were introduced to the images, the mean errors were observed to rise up to a maximum increase of 1.77 mm. For CBCT to CT registration, maximum improvements in the DSC of 0.09 and 0.46 were observed for the bladder and rectum, respectively. The Fourier-based 3D phase correlation registration algorithm investigated displayed promising results in CT to CT and CT to CBCT registration, offers potential in terms of efficiency and robustness to noise, and is suitable for use in radiotherapy for monitoring patient anatomy throughout treatment. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased left temporal lobe volume of panic patients measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, R.R.; Del-Ben, C.M.; Araujo, D.; Crippa, J.A.; Graeff, F.G. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Neurologia e Psicologia Medica]. E-mail: fgraeff@keynet.com.br; Santos, A.C. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica Medica; Guimaraes, F.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacologia

    2003-07-01

    Reported neuroimaging studies have shown functional and morphological changes of temporal lobe structures in panic patients, but only one used a volumetric method. The aim of the present study was to determine the volume of temporal lobe structures in patients with panic disorder, measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven panic patients and eleven controls matched for age, sex, handedness, socioeconomic status and years of education participated in the study. The mean volume of the left temporal lobe of panic patients was 9% smaller than that of controls (t{sub 21} = 2.37, P = 0.028). In addition, there was a trend (P values between 0.05 and 0.10) to smaller volumes of the right temporal lobe (7%, t{sub 21} = 1.99, P = 0.06), right amygdala (8%, t{sub 21} = 1.83, P = 0.08), left amygdala (5%, t{sub 21} = 1.78, P 0.09) and left hippocampus (9%, t{sub 21} = 1.93, P = 0.07) in panic patients compared to controls. There was a positive correlation between left hippocampal volume and duration of panic disorder (r = 0.67, P = 0.025), with recent cases showing more reduction than older cases. The present results show that panic patients have a decreased volume of the left temporal lobe and indicate the presence of volumetric abnormalities of temporal lobe structures. (author)

  1. Lung volume assessments in normal and surfactant depleted lungs: agreement between bedside techniques and CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albu, Gergely; Petak, Ferenc; Zand, Tristan; Hallbäck, Magnus; Wallin, Mats; Habre, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Bedside assessment of lung volume in clinical practice is crucial to adapt ventilation strategy. We compared bedside measures of lung volume by helium multiple-breath washout technique (EELVMBW,He) and effective lung volume based on capnodynamics (ELV) to those assessed from spiral chest CT scans (EELVCT) under different PEEP levels in control and surfactant-depleted lungs. Lung volume was assessed in anaesthetized mechanically ventilated rabbits successively by measuring i) ELV by analyzing CO2 elimination traces during the application of periods of 5 consecutive alterations in inspiratory/expiratory ratio (1:2 to 1.5:1), ii) measuring EELVMBW,He by using helium as a tracer gas, and iii) EELVCT from CT scan images by computing the normalized lung density. All measurements were performed at PEEP of 0, 3 and 9 cmH2O in random order under control condition and following surfactant depletion by whole lung lavage. Variables obtained with all techniques followed sensitively the lung volume changes with PEEP. Excellent correlation and close agreement was observed between EELVMBW,He and EELVCT (r = 0.93, p lungs, whereas this difference was not evidenced following surfactant depletion. These findings resulted in somewhat diminished but still significant correlations between ELV and EELVCT (r = 0.58, p Lung volume assessed with bedside techniques allow the monitoring of the changes in the lung aeration with PEEP both in normal lungs and in a model of acute lung injury. Under stable pulmonary haemodynamic condition, ELV allows continuous lung volume monitoring, whereas EELVMBW,He offers a more accurate estimation, but intermittently.

  2. Breast and Tumour Volume Measurements in Breast Cancer Patients Using 3-D Automated Breast Volume Scanner Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagendijk, M; Vos, E L; Ramlakhan, K P; Verhoef, C; Koning, A H J; van Lankeren, W; Koppert, L B

    2018-01-03

    The resection volume in relation to the breast volume is known to influence cosmetic outcome following breast-conserving therapy. It was hypothesised that three-dimensional ultrasonography (3-D US) could be used to preoperatively assess breast and tumour volume and show high association with histopathological measurements. Breast volume by the 3D-US was compared to the water displacement method (WDM), mastectomy specimen weight, 3-D MRI and three different calculations for breast volume on mammography. Tumour volume by the 3-D US was compared to the histopathological tumour volume and 3-D MRI. Relatedness was based on the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Bland-Altman plots were used to graphically display the agreement for the different assessment techniques. All measurements were performed by one observer. A total of 36 patients were included, 20 and 23 for the evaluation of breast and tumour volume (ductal invasive carcinomas), respectively. 3-D US breast volume showed 'excellent' association with WDM, ICC 0.92 [95% CI (0.80-0.97)]. 3-D US tumour volume showed a 'excellent' association with histopathological tumour volume, ICC 0.78 [95% CI (0.55-0.91)]. Bland-Altman plots showed an increased overestimation in lager tumour volumes measured by 3-D MRI compared to histopathological volume. 3-D US showed a high association with gold standard WDM for the preoperative assessment of breast volume and the histopathological measurement of tumour volume. 3-D US is an patient-friendly preoperative available technique to calculate both breast volume and tumour volume. Volume measurements are promising in outcome prediction of intended breast-conserving treatment.

  3. Imaging features of automated breast volume scanner: Correlation with molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feng-Yang; Lu, Qing; Huang, Bei-Jian; Xia, Han-Sheng; Yan, Li-Xia; Wang, Xi; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the imaging features obtained by an automated breast volume scanner (ABVS) and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. We examined 303 malignant breast tumours by ABVS for specific imaging features and by immunohistochemical analysis to determine the molecular subtype. ABVS imaging features, including retraction phenomenon, shape, margins, echogenicity, post-acoustic features, echogenic halo, and calcifications were analysed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine the significant predictive factors of the molecular subtypes. By univariate logistic regression analysis, the predictive factors of the Luminal-A subtype (n=128) were retraction phenomenon (odds ratio [OR]=10.188), post-acoustic shadowing (OR=5.112), and echogenic halo (OR=3.263, Pimaging features, especially retraction phenomenon, have a strong correlation with the molecular subtypes, expanding the scope of ultrasound in identifying breast cancer subtypes with confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. GPU accelerated OCT processing at megahertz axial scan rate and high resolution video rate volumetric rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yifan; Wong, Kevin; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-03-01

    In this report, we describe how to highly optimize a CUDA based platform to perform real time optical coherence tomography data processing and 3D volumetric rendering using commercially-available cost-effective graphic processing units (GPUs). The maximum complete attainable axial scan processing rate (including memory transfer and rendering frame) was 2.2 megahertz for 16 bits pixel depth and 2048 pixels/A-scan, the maximum 3D volumetric rendering speed is 23 volumes/second (size:1024×256×200). To the best of our knowledge, this is the fastest processing rate reported to date with single-chip GPU and the first implementation of real time video rate volumetric OCT processing and rendering that is capable of matching the ultrahigh-speed OCT acquisition rates.

  5. Six Degrees of Freedom Implicit Haptic Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Moustakas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Part 13: AI Applications - Mobile Applications; International audience; This paper introduces a six degrees of freedom haptic rendering scheme based on an implicit support plane mapping representation of the object geometries. The proposed scheme enables, under specific assumptions, the analytical reconstruction of the rigid 3D object’s surface, using the equations of the support planes and their respective distance map. As a direct consequence, the problem of calculating the force feedback c...

  6. Three-dimensional Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging on an Automated Breast Volume Scanning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuqi; Nasief, Haidy G; Kohn, Sarah; Milkowski, Andy; Clary, Tom; Barnes, Stephen; Barbone, Paul E; Hall, Timothy J

    2017-11-01

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging has demonstrated utility in breast imaging, but it is typically performed with handheld transducers and two-dimensional imaging. Two-dimensional (2D) elastography images tissue stiffness of only a plane and hence suffers from errors due to out-of-plane motion, whereas three-dimensional (3D) data acquisition and motion tracking can be used to track out-of-plane motion that is lost in 2D elastography systems. A commercially available automated breast volume scanning system that acquires 3D ultrasound data with precisely controlled elevational movement of the 1D array ultrasound transducer was employed in this study. A hybrid guided 3D motion-tracking algorithm was developed that first estimated the displacements in one plane using a modified quality-guided search method, and then performed an elevational guided-search for displacement estimation in adjacent planes. To assess the performance of the method, 3D radiofrequency echo data were acquired with this system from a phantom and from an in vivo human breast. For both experiments, the axial displacement fields were smooth and high cross-correlation coefficients were obtained in most of the tracking region. The motion-tracking performance of the new method was compared with a correlation-based exhaustive-search method. For all motion-tracking volume pairs, the average motion-compensated cross-correlation values obtained by the guided-search motion-tracking method were equivalent to those by the exhaustive-search method, and the computation time was about a factor of 10 lesser. Therefore, the proposed 3D ultrasound elasticity imaging method was a more efficient approach to produce a high quality of 3D ultrasound strain image.

  7. Thermal error analysis and compensation for digital image/volume correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bing

    2018-02-01

    Digital image/volume correlation (DIC/DVC) rely on the digital images acquired by digital cameras and x-ray CT scanners to extract the motion and deformation of test samples. Regrettably, these imaging devices are unstable optical systems, whose imaging geometry may undergo unavoidable slight and continual changes due to self-heating effect or ambient temperature variations. Changes in imaging geometry lead to both shift and expansion in the recorded 2D or 3D images, and finally manifest as systematic displacement and strain errors in DIC/DVC measurements. Since measurement accuracy is always the most important requirement in various experimental mechanics applications, these thermal-induced errors (referred to as thermal errors) should be given serious consideration in order to achieve high accuracy, reproducible DIC/DVC measurements. In this work, theoretical analyses are first given to understand the origin of thermal errors. Then real experiments are conducted to quantify thermal errors. Three solutions are suggested to mitigate or correct thermal errors. Among these solutions, a reference sample compensation approach is highly recommended because of its easy implementation, high accuracy and in-situ error correction capability. Most of the work has appeared in our previously published papers, thus its originality is not claimed. Instead, this paper aims to give a comprehensive overview and more insights of our work on thermal error analysis and compensation for DIC/DVC measurements.

  8. 3D-CT imaging processing for qualitative and quantitative analysis of maxillofacial cysts and tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia; Antunes, Jose Leopoldo Ferreira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odotologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate spiral-computed tomography (3D-CT) images of 20 patients presenting with cysts and tumors in the maxillofacial complex, in order to compare the surface and volume techniques of image rendering. The qualitative and quantitative appraisal indicated that the volume technique allowed a more precise and accurate observation than the surface method. On the average, the measurements obtained by means of the 3D volume-rendering technique were 6.28% higher than those obtained by means of the surface method. The sensitivity of the 3D surface technique was lower than that of the 3D volume technique for all conditions stipulated in the diagnosis and evaluation of lesions. We concluded that the 3D-CT volume rendering technique was more reproducible and sensitive than the 3D-CT surface method, in the diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of maxillofacial lesions, especially those with intra-osseous involvement. (author)

  9. Spatial and temporal skin blood volume and saturation estimation using a multispectral snapshot imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewerlöf, Maria; Larsson, Marcus; Salerud, E. Göran

    2017-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can estimate the spatial distribution of skin blood oxygenation, using visible to near-infrared light. HSI oximeters often use a liquid-crystal tunable filter, an acousto-optic tunable filter or mechanically adjustable filter wheels, which has too long response/switching times to monitor tissue hemodynamics. This work aims to evaluate a multispectral snapshot imaging system to estimate skin blood volume and oxygen saturation with high temporal and spatial resolution. We use a snapshot imager, the xiSpec camera (MQ022HG-IM-SM4X4-VIS, XIMEA), having 16 wavelength-specific Fabry-Perot filters overlaid on the custom CMOS-chip. The spectral distribution of the bands is however substantially overlapping, which needs to be taken into account for an accurate analysis. An inverse Monte Carlo analysis is performed using a two-layered skin tissue model, defined by epidermal thickness, haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation, melanin concentration and spectrally dependent reduced-scattering coefficient, all parameters relevant for human skin. The analysis takes into account the spectral detector response of the xiSpec camera. At each spatial location in the field-of-view, we compare the simulated output to the detected diffusively backscattered spectra to find the best fit. The imager is evaluated for spatial and temporal variations during arterial and venous occlusion protocols applied to the forearm. Estimated blood volume changes and oxygenation maps at 512x272 pixels show values that are comparable to reference measurements performed in contact with the skin tissue. We conclude that the snapshot xiSpec camera, paired with an inverse Monte Carlo algorithm, permits us to use this sensor for spatial and temporal measurement of varying physiological parameters, such as skin tissue blood volume and oxygenation.

  10. Automated measurements of metabolic tumor volume and metabolic parameters in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orologas, F.; Saitis, P.; Kallergi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung tumors or inflammatory lung disease could greatly benefit in terms of treatment and follow-up by PET/CT quantitative imaging, namely measurements of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The purpose of this study was the development of an unsupervised or partially supervised algorithm using standard image processing tools for measuring MTV, SUV, and TLG from lung PET/CT scans. Automated metabolic lesion volume and metabolic parameter measurements were achieved through a 5 step algorithm: (i) The segmentation of the lung areas on the CT slices, (ii) the registration of the CT segmented lung regions on the PET images to define the anatomical boundaries of the lungs on the functional data, (iii) the segmentation of the regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images based on adaptive thresholding and clinical criteria, (iv) the estimation of the number of pixels and pixel intensities in the PET slices of the segmented ROIs, (v) the estimation of MTV, SUVs, and TLG from the previous step and DICOM header data. Whole body PET/CT scans of patients with sarcoidosis were used for training and testing the algorithm. Lung area segmentation on the CT slices was better achieved with semi-supervised techniques that reduced false positive detections significantly. Lung segmentation results agreed with the lung volumes published in the literature while the agreement between experts and algorithm in the segmentation of the lesions was around 88%. Segmentation results depended on the image resolution selected for processing. The clinical parameters, SUV (either mean or max or peak) and TLG estimated by the segmented ROIs and DICOM header data provided a way to correlate imaging data to clinical and demographic data. In conclusion, automated MTV, SUV, and TLG measurements offer powerful analysis tools in PET/CT imaging of the lungs. Custom-made algorithms are often a better approach than the manufacturer

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus 3-Dimensional Laser Scanning for Breast Volume Assessment After Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Benjamin H L; Watson, David I; Fosh, Beverley; Yip, Jia Miin; Kleinig, Pakan; Dean, Nicola Ruth

    2017-04-01

    There are several methods available for measuring breast volume in the clinical setting, but the comparability and accuracy of different methods is not well described. The ideal breast volume measurement technique should be low cost, comfortable for the patient, have no ionizing radiation and be non-invasive. Prospective cohort study comparing a 3-dimensional (3D) laser scanner versus noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for breast volume assessment. Subjects were women undergoing breast reconstruction with autologous fat graft. Both types of scan were performed the day before fat grafting and at 6 months postoperatively. Pearson correlations and Bland-Altman tests were performed to compare the assessment methods. Eighteen patients underwent preoperative breast MRI and 3D laser scanning. Eighteen patients also underwent assessment 6 months after surgery. The total number of breasts scanned for comparison was 36, with a total of 72 comparisons for analysis. There was a strong linear association between the 2 methods using a Pearson correlation (r = 0.79; P breast volume. Given the convenience of laser scanning and potential for lower cost compared with MRI, this technique should be considered for quantifying outcomes after complex breast reconstruction when the equipment is available.

  12. Semiautomatic quantification of carotid plaque volume with three-dimensional ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir A; Koudelka, Christian; Goldstein, Carly; Zhao, Limin; Yokemick, John; Dux, Moira; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Lal, Brajesh K

    2017-05-01

    Vessel wall volume (VWV) assessed by three-dimensional duplex ultrasound (3DUS) imaging provides a more comprehensive measure of plaque burden than conventional two-dimensional measures of diameter stenosis. We previously demonstrated that manual outlining of the arterial lumen-intima boundary and outer wall boundary can be performed reliably on images obtained with a commercially available 3D-DUS transducer. Manual segmentation, however, is time consuming (∼45 minutes), limiting its clinical translation. We have developed a semiautomatic algorithm (manual selection of the carotid bifurcation image with subsequent automatic plaque outlining) to outline carotid plaques on 3DUS data sets. In this study, we investigated the accuracy, reproducibility, reliability, and time taken by this algorithm. 3DUS data sets from 30 patients with asymptomatic ≥50% carotid stenosis underwent manual outlining of lumen-intima boundary and outer wall boundary to measure VWV. Two observers implemented a semiautomatic segmentation algorithm. The algorithm's accuracy was compared with manual outlining using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and modified-Hausdorff distance (MHD) were used to quantify the geometric similarity of the outlines. We also compared results after an intermediate stage of the algorithm vs the complete algorithm. Reproducibility and the least amount of detectable change in plaque volume were computed for each method. Intraobserver and interobserver metrics for each method were computed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variability (CV), minimum detectable change (MDC), and standard error of measurement (SEM) of the VWV. Plaque volume estimates obtained from the semiautomatic algorithm were accurate compared with manual outlining. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.76 (P < .001), and measurements were geometrically similar (DSC, 0.85; MHD, 0.48 mm). The algorithm was more

  13. Evaluation of Neonatal Lung Volume Growth by Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Melissa A; Walkup, Laura L; Tkach, Jean A; Higano, Nara S; Lim, Foong Yen; Haberman, Beth; Woods, Jason C; Kingma, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate postnatal lung volume in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and determine if a compensatory increase in lung volume occurs during the postnatal period. Using a novel pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging method for imaging neonatal lungs, the postnatal lung volumes in infants with CDH were determined and compared with prenatal lung volumes obtained via late gestation magnetic resonance imaging. Infants with left-sided CDH (2 mild, 9 moderate, and 1 severe) were evaluated. The total lung volume increased in all infants, with the contralateral lung increasing faster than the ipsilateral lung (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 3.0 mL/week vs 3.4 ± 2.1 mL/week, P = .005). In contrast to prenatal studies, the volume of lungs of infants with more severe CDH grew faster than the lungs of infants with more mild CDH (Spearman's ρ=-0.086, P = .01). Although the contralateral lung volume grew faster in both mild and moderate groups, the majority of total lung volume growth in moderate CDH came from increased volume of the ipsilateral lung (42% of total lung volume increase in the moderate group vs 32% of total lung volume increase in the mild group, P = .09). Analysis of multiple clinical variables suggests that increased weight gain was associated with increased compensatory ipsilateral lung volume growth (ρ = 0.57, P = .05). These results suggest a potential for postnatal catch-up growth in infants with pulmonary hypoplasia and suggest that weight gain may increase the volume growth of the more severely affected lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Uterine volume and endometrial thickness in healthy girls evaluated by ultrasound (3-dimensional) and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Casper P; Mouritsen, Annette; Mieritz, Mikkel G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report normative data on uterine volume and endometrial thickness in girls, according to pubertal stages; to evaluate factors that affect uterine volume; and to compare transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of a nested......). Uterine volume: ellipsoid TAUS (n = 112) and 3-dimensional TAUS (n = 111); ellipsoid MRI (n = 61). Endometrial thickness: TAUS (n = 110) and MRI (n = 60). RESULT(S): Uterine volume and endometrial thickness were positively correlated with pubertal stages; e.g., ellipsoid TAUS: r = 0.753, and endometrium......: ellipsoid volume (r = 0.891) and endometrial thickness (r = 0.540). Uterine volume was larger in TAUS compared with MRI; mean difference across the measured range: 7.7 (5.2-10.2) cm(3). Agreement was best for small uteri. CONCLUSION(S): Uterine volume and endometrial thickness increased as puberty...

  15. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  16. Imaging of Volume Phase Gratings in a Photosensitive Polymer, Recorded in Transmission and Reflection Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sabel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Volume phase gratings, recorded in a photosensitive polymer by two-beam interference exposure, are studied by means of optical microscopy. Transmission gratings and reflection gratings, with periods in the order of 10 μm down to 130 nm, were investigated. Mapping of holograms by means of imaging in sectional view is introduced to study reflection-type gratings, evading the resolution limit of classical optical microscopy. In addition, this technique is applied to examine so-called parasitic gratings, arising from interference from the incident reference beam and the reflected signal beam. The appearance and possible avoidance of such unintentionally recorded secondary structures is discussed.

  17. Haptic rendering foundations, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ming C

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, human beings have dreamed of a virtual world where it is possible to interact with synthetic entities as if they were real. It has been shown that the ability to touch virtual objects increases the sense of presence in virtual environments. This book provides an authoritative overview of state-of-theart haptic rendering algorithms and their applications. The authors examine various approaches and techniques for designing touch-enabled interfaces for a number of applications, including medical training, model design, and maintainability analysis for virtual prototyping, scienti

  18. Motor de deferred render para XNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Fortún, Gabriel de la

    2013-01-01

    Este proyecto propone una arquitectura alternativa de renderizado para el motor de desarrollo de videojuegos XNA. Esta arquitectura utilizará el modelo de renderizado en diferido (deferred render) en lugar de usar las funciones habituales del motor de XNA. En concreto, se utilizará deferred shading aunque sería sencillo pasar a deferred lighting para utilizar materiales más complejos. El desarrollo de esta arquitectura se realizará en tres pasos principales. En el primer paso será necesar...

  19. GPU Pro 4 advanced rendering techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    GPU Pro4: Advanced Rendering Techniques presents ready-to-use ideas and procedures that can help solve many of your day-to-day graphics programming challenges. Focusing on interactive media and games, the book covers up-to-date methods producing real-time graphics. Section editors Wolfgang Engel, Christopher Oat, Carsten Dachsbacher, Michal Valient, Wessam Bahnassi, and Sebastien St-Laurent have once again assembled a high-quality collection of cutting-edge techniques for advanced graphics processing unit (GPU) programming. Divided into six sections, the book begins with discussions on the abi

  20. 7 CFR 981.54 - Payment to handlers for services rendered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment to handlers for services rendered. 981.54 Section 981.54 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Volume Regulation § 981.54 Payment to handlers for...

  1. Processing-in-Memory Enabled Graphics Processors for 3D Rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Chenhao; Song, Shuaiwen; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Weigong; Fu, Xin

    2017-02-06

    The performance of 3D rendering of Graphics Processing Unit that convents 3D vector stream into 2D frame with 3D image effects significantly impact users’ gaming experience on modern computer systems. Due to the high texture throughput in 3D rendering, main memory bandwidth becomes a critical obstacle for improving the overall rendering performance. 3D stacked memory systems such as Hybrid Memory Cube (HMC) provide opportunities to significantly overcome the memory wall by directly connecting logic controllers to DRAM dies. Based on the observation that texel fetches significantly impact off-chip memory traffic, we propose two architectural designs to enable Processing-In-Memory based GPU for efficient 3D rendering.

  2. Multi-Grained Level of Detail for Rendering Complex Meshes Using a Hierarchical Seamless Texture Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niski, K; Purnomo, B; Cohen, J

    2006-11-06

    Previous algorithms for view-dependent level of detail provide local mesh refinements either at the finest granularity or at a fixed, coarse granularity. The former provides triangle-level adaptation, often at the expense of heavy CPU usage and low triangle rendering throughput; the latter improves CPU usage and rendering throughput by operating on groups of triangles. We present a new multiresolution hierarchy and associated algorithms that provide adaptive granularity. This multi-grained hierarchy allows independent control of the number of hierarchy nodes processed on the CPU and the number of triangles to be rendered on the GPU. We employ a seamless texture atlas style of geometry image as a GPU-friendly data organization, enabling efficient rendering and GPU-based stitching of patch borders. We demonstrate our approach on both large triangle meshes and terrains with up to billions of vertices.

  3. Three-dimensional registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Brandt, Eric; Wen, Di; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Alian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests high-resolution, high-contrast, [Formula: see text] intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and three-dimensional (3-D) registration methods to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, color, and fluorescent cryo-image volumes with optional registered cryo-histology. A specialized registration method matched IVOCT pullback images acquired in the catheter reference frame to a true 3-D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter registration model including a polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Multiple assessments suggested that the registration error was better than the [Formula: see text] spacing between IVOCT image frames. Tests on a digital synthetic phantom gave a registration error of only [Formula: see text] (signed distance). Visual assessment of randomly presented nearby frames suggested registration accuracy within 1 IVOCT frame interval ([Formula: see text]). This would eliminate potential misinterpretations confronted by the typical histological approaches to validation, with estimated 1-mm errors. The method can be used to create annotated datasets and automated plaque classification methods and can be extended to other intravascular imaging modalities.

  4. Measurement of ventricular volumes by cine magnetic resonance imaging in complex congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Tateno, Shigeru; Tobita, Kimimasa; Hamada, Hiromichi; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi [Chiba Children`s Hospital (Japan)

    1995-01-01

    Along with the remarkable improvement in surgical results for complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) in recent years, it has become increasingly important for pediatric cardiologist and cardiovascular surgeons to evaluate ventricular volumes in CCHD accurately to develop a proper strategy for treating these patients. However, the validity of geometric formulas to derive volumes in various morphological types of abnormal ventricles like those in CCHD has been problematic. This study assessed the validity and usefulness of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for measuring right and left ventricular volumes using Simpson`s rule in children with CCHD. Twenty-eight patients with CCHD (group A), children ranging in age from 4 months to 8 years (average 2.4 years) and 10 patients with morphologically normal ventricles (control; group B), ranging in age from 1 to 6 years (average 2.7 years) were evaluated. Cine MRI was performed by the GRASS methods (gradient recalled acquisition in steady state) at 0.5 T. The whole heart was encompassed by contiguous 7 or 10 mm transverse section. Ventricular volumes were calculated by adding luminal areas determined in each section at end-diastole and end-systole (EDV and ESV). Cine MRI findings of the right and left ventricular volumes were compared with those on ventriculogram. All cine MRI studies were considered diagnostic. Comparison of the RVEDV, RVESV, LVEDV and LVESV in both groups yielded a good correlation between cine MRI (Y) and ventriculography (X): RVEDV; Y=0.98X-0.49, r=0.98, RVESV; Y=0.89X+2.2, r=0.95, LVEDV; Y=0.97X+0.59, r=0.97, LVESV; Y=0.91X+0.56, r=0.95, Group B: RVEDV; Y=0.87X+4.9, r=0.93, RVESV; Y=0.91X+1.7, r=0.90, LVEDV; Y=1.1X-3.0, r=0.97, LVESV; Y=0.91X+0.6, r=0.93. These findigns indicate that cine MRI provides a suitable non-invasive means of quantifying right ventricular volume and left ventricular volumes in children with CCHD. (author).

  5. Estimation of the Lateral Ventricles Volumes from a 2D Image and Its Relationship with Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Chaarani; Cyrille, Capel; Jadwiga, Zmudka; Joel, Daouk; Fichten, Anthony; Catherine, Gondry-Jouet; Roger, Bouzerar; Olivier, Balédent

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This work suggests a fast estimation method of the lateral ventricles volume from a 2D image and then determines if this volume is correlated with the cerebrospinal fluid flow at the aqueductal and cerebral levels in neurodegenerative diseases. Materials and Methods. FForty-five elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (19), normal pressure hydrocephalus (13), and vascular dementia (13) were involved and underwent anatomical and phase contrast MRI scans. Lateral ventricles and stroke volumes were assessed on anatomical and phase contrast scans, respectively. A common reference plane was used to calculate the lateral ventricles' area on 2D images. Results. The largest volumes were observed in hydrocephalus patients. The linear regression between volumes and areas was computed, and a strong positive correlation was detected (R 2 = 0.9). A derived equation was determined to represent the volumes for any given area. On the other hand, no significant correlations were detected between ventricles and stroke volumes (R 2 ≤ 0.15). Conclusion. Lateral ventricles volumes are significantly proportional to the 2D reference section area and could be used for patients' follow-up even if 3D images are unavailable. The cerebrospinal fluid fluctuations in brain disorders may depend on many physiological parameters other than the ventricular morphology. PMID:24151585

  6. Estimation of the Lateral Ventricles Volumes from a 2D Image and Its Relationship with Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaarani Bader

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This work suggests a fast estimation method of the lateral ventricles volume from a 2D image and then determines if this volume is correlated with the cerebrospinal fluid flow at the aqueductal and cerebral levels in neurodegenerative diseases. Materials and Methods. FForty-five elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease (19, normal pressure hydrocephalus (13, and vascular dementia (13 were involved and underwent anatomical and phase contrast MRI scans. Lateral ventricles and stroke volumes were assessed on anatomical and phase contrast scans, respectively. A common reference plane was used to calculate the lateral ventricles’ area on 2D images. Results. The largest volumes were observed in hydrocephalus patients. The linear regression between volumes and areas was computed, and a strong positive correlation was detected (R2=0.9. A derived equation was determined to represent the volumes for any given area. On the other hand, no significant correlations were detected between ventricles and stroke volumes (R2≤0.15. Conclusion. Lateral ventricles volumes are significantly proportional to the 2D reference section area and could be used for patients’ follow-up even if 3D images are unavailable. The cerebrospinal fluid fluctuations in brain disorders may depend on many physiological parameters other than the ventricular morphology.

  7. Regional very low cerebral blood volume predicts hemorrhagic transformation better than diffusion-weighted imaging volume and thresholded apparent diffusion coefficient in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Christensen, Søren; Butcher, Kenneth S; Gordon, Ian; Parsons, Mark W; Desmond, Patricia M; Barber, P Alan; Levi, Christopher R; Bladin, Christopher F; De Silva, Deidre A; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    Currently, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volume is the most useful magnetic resonance imaging predictor of hemorrhagic transformation (HT). Preliminary studies have suggested that very low cerebral blood volume (VLCBV) predicts HT. We compared HT prediction by VLCBV and DWI using data from the EPITHET study. Normal-percentile CBV values were calculated from the nonstroke hemisphere. Whole-brain masks with CBV thresholds of the <0, 2.5, 5, and 10th percentiles were created. The volume of tissue with VLCBV was calculated within the acute DWI ischemic lesion. HT was graded as per ECASS criteria. HT occurred in 44 of 91 patients. Parenchymal hematoma (PH) occurred in 13 (4 symptomatic) and asymptomatic hemorrhagic infarction (HI) in 31. The median volume of VLCBV was significantly higher in cases with PH. VLCBV predicted HT better than DWI lesion volume and thresholded apparent diffusion coefficient lesion volume in receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression. A cutpoint at 2 mL VLCBV with the <2.5th percentile had 100% sensitivity for PH and, in patients treated with tissue plasminogen activator, defined a population with a 43% risk of PH (95% CI, 23% to 66%, likelihood ratio=16). VLCBV remained an independent predictor of PH in multivariate analysis with traditional clinical risk factors for HT. VLCBV predicted HT after thrombolysis better than did DWI or apparent diffusion coefficient volume in this large patient cohort. The advantage was greatest in patients with smaller DWI volumes. Prediction was better in patients who recanalized. If validated in an independent cohort, the addition of VLCBV to prethrombolysis decision making may reduce the incidence of HT.

  8. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-step preparation and image-based counting of minute volumes of human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J; Gao, Tingjuan; Chu, Kaiqin; Lane, Stephen M; Matthews, Dennis L; Dwyre, Denis M; Hood, James; Tatsukawa, Keith; Heifetz, Laurence; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2014-08-21

    Current flow-based blood counting devices require significant medical infrastructure and are not appropriate for field use. In this article we report on the development of a sample preparation, measurement, and analysis method that permits automated and accurate counting of red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets, as well as allowing a 3-part differential of the WBCs to be performed on extremely small volumes of whole blood. This method is compatible with portable instrumentation that can be deployed in the field. The method consists of serially diluting blood samples first with sodium dodecyl sulfate dissolved in phosphate buffered saline, then in acridine orange dissolved in phosphate buffered saline, followed by fluorescence and dark field imaging with low magnification objectives. Image analysis is performed to extract cell counts and differentials. We performed a paired analysis of 20 volunteers with complete blood count values both within and beyond the normal reference range using a commercial automated hematology analyzer and the image-based method, with the new method achieving accuracies comparable to that of the commercial system. Because the sample preparation and imaging are simple and inexpensive to implement, this method has applications for pediatrics, clinician offices, and global health in regions that do not have access to central hematology laboratories.

  10. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low dose cardiac CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Songtao; Bluemke, David A.; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has been well validated and allows quantification of myocardial fibrosis in comparison to overall mass of the myocardium. Unfortunately, CMRI is relatively expensive and is contraindicated in patients with intracardiac devices. Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for detection of scar and myocardial stress/rest perfusion. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the potential of low dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. A novel framework was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation, which consists of three main steps. First, a shape constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation for post-contrast image. Second, the symmetric Demons deformable registrations method was applied to register pre-contrast to post-contrast images. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 7 clinical low dose CCT datasets with pre-contrast and post-contrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. Relationship between trabecular texture features of CT images and an amount of bone cement volume injection in percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Gye Rae; Choi, Hyung Guen; Shin, Kyu-Chul; Lee, Sung J.

    2001-06-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a surgical procedure that was introduced for the treatment of compression fracture of the vertebrae. This procedure includes puncturing vertebrae and filling with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Recent studies have shown that the procedure could provide structural reinforcement for the osteoporotic vertebrae while being minimally invasive and safe with immediate pain relief. However, treatment failures due to disproportionate PMMA volume injection have been reported as one of complications in vertebroplasty. It is believed that control of PMMA volume is one of the most critical factors that can reduce the incidence of complications. In this study, appropriate amount of PMMA volume was assessed based on the imaging data of a given patient under the following hypotheses: (1) a relationship can be drawn between the volume of PMMA injection and textural features of the trabecular bone in preoperative CT images and (2) the volume of PMMA injection can be estimated based on 3D reconstruction of postoperative CT images. Gray-level run length analysis was used to determine the textural features of the trabecular bone. The width of trabecular (T-texture) and the width of intertrabecular spaces (I-texture) were calculated. The correlation between PMMA volume and textural features of patient's CT images was also examined to evaluate the appropriate PMMA amount. Results indicated that there was a strong correlation between the actual PMMA injection volume and the area of the intertrabecular space and that of trabecular bone calculated from the CT image (correlation coefficient, requals0.96 and requals-0.95, respectively). T- texture (requals-0.93) did correlate better with the actual PMMA volume more than the I-texture (requals0.57). Therefore, it was demonstrated that appropriate PMMA injection volume could be predicted based on the textural analysis for better clinical management of the osteoporotic spine.

  12. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm. A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors.

  13. Segmentation of interest region in medical volume images using geometric deformable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myungeun; Cho, Wanhyun; Kim, Sunworl; Park, Soonyoung; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present a new segmentation method using the level set framework for medical volume images. The method was implemented using the surface evolution principle based on the geometric deformable model and the level set theory. And, the speed function in the level set approach consists of a hybrid combination of three integral measures derived from the calculus of variation principle. The terms are defined as robust alignment, active region, and smoothing. These terms can help to obtain the precise surface of the target object and prevent the boundary leakage problem. The proposed method has been tested on synthetic and various medical volume images with normal tissue and tumor regions in order to evaluate its performance on visual and quantitative data. The quantitative validation of the proposed segmentation is shown with higher Jaccard's measure score (72.52%-94.17%) and lower Hausdorff distance (1.2654 mm-3.1527 mm) than the other methods such as mean speed (67.67%-93.36% and 1.3361mm-3.4463 mm), mean-variance speed (63.44%-94.72% and 1.3361 mm-3.4616 mm), and edge-based speed (0.76%-42.44% and 3.8010 mm-6.5389 mm). The experimental results confirm that the effectiveness and performance of our method is excellent compared with traditional approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimating cardiac fiber orientations in pig hearts using registered ultrasound and MR image volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormer, James D.; Meng, Yuguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Jiang, Rong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2017-03-01

    Heart fiber mechanics can be important predictors in current and future cardiac function. Accurate knowledge of these mechanics could enable cardiologists to provide a diagnosis before conditions progress. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI) has been used to determine cardiac fiber orientations. Ultrasound is capable of providing anatomical information in real time, enabling a physician to quickly adjust parameters to optimize image scans. If known fiber orientations from a template heart measured using DTI can be accurately deformed onto a cardiac ultrasound volume, fiber orientations could be estimated for the patient without the need for a costly MR scan while still providing cardiologists valuable information about the heart mechanics. In this study, we apply the method to pig hearts, which are a close representation of human heart anatomy. Experiments from pig hearts show that the registration method achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.819 +/- 0.050 between the ultrasound and deformed MR volumes and that the proposed ultrasound-based method is able to estimate the cardiac fiber orientation in pig hearts.

  15. C-arm flat detector computed tomography parenchymal blood volume imaging: the nature of parenchymal blood volume parameter and the feasibility of parenchymal blood volume imaging in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V

    2015-09-01

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) measurements allow assessment of cerebral haemodynamics in the neurointerventional suite. This paper explores the feasibility of C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV imaging and the relationship between the C-arm CT PBV and the MR-PWI-derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameters in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Twenty-six patients with DCI following aneurysmal SAH underwent a research C-arm CT PBV scan using a biplane angiography system and contemporaneous MR-PWI scan as part of a prospective study. Quantitative whole-brain atlas-based volume-of-interest analysis in conjunction with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman tests was performed to explore the agreement between C-arm CT PBV and MR-derived CBV and CBF measurements. All patients received medical management, while eight patients (31%) underwent selective intra-arterial chemical angioplasty. Colour-coded C-arm CT PBV maps were 91% sensitive and 100% specific in detecting the perfusion abnormalities. C-arm CT rPBV demonstrated good agreement and strong correlation with both MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF measurements; the agreement and correlation were stronger for MR-rCBF relative to MR-rCBV and improved for C-arm CT PBV versus the geometric mean of MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF. Analysis of weighted means showed that the C-arm CT PBV has a preferential blood flow weighting (≈ 60% blood flow and ≈ 40% blood volume weighting). C-arm CT PBV imaging is feasible in DCI following aneurysmal SAH. PBV is a composite perfusion parameter incorporating both blood flow and blood volume weightings. That PBV has preferential (≈ 60%) blood flow weighting is an important finding, which is of clinical significance when interpreting the C-arm CT PBV maps, particularly in the setting of acute brain ischemia.

  16. C-arm flat detector computed tomography parenchymal blood volume imaging: the nature of parenchymal blood volume parameter and the feasibility of parenchymal blood volume imaging in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamran, Mudassar; Byrne, James V. [University of Oxford, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) parenchymal blood volume (PBV) measurements allow assessment of cerebral haemodynamics in the neurointerventional suite. This paper explores the feasibility of C-arm computed tomography (CT) PBV imaging and the relationship between the C-arm CT PBV and the MR-PWI-derived cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) parameters in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) patients developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Twenty-six patients with DCI following aneurysmal SAH underwent a research C-arm CT PBV scan using a biplane angiography system and contemporaneous MR-PWI scan as part of a prospective study. Quantitative whole-brain atlas-based volume-of-interest analysis in conjunction with Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman tests was performed to explore the agreement between C-arm CT PBV and MR-derived CBV and CBF measurements. All patients received medical management, while eight patients (31 %) underwent selective intra-arterial chemical angioplasty. Colour-coded C-arm CT PBV maps were 91 % sensitive and 100 % specific in detecting the perfusion abnormalities. C-arm CT rPBV demonstrated good agreement and strong correlation with both MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF measurements; the agreement and correlation were stronger for MR-rCBF relative to MR-rCBV and improved for C-arm CT PBV versus the geometric mean of MR-rCBV and MR-rCBF. Analysis of weighted means showed that the C-arm CT PBV has a preferential blood flow weighting (∼60 % blood flow and ∼40 % blood volume weighting). C-arm CT PBV imaging is feasible in DCI following aneurysmal SAH. PBV is a composite perfusion parameter incorporating both blood flow and blood volume weightings. That PBV has preferential (∼60 %) blood flow weighting is an important finding, which is of clinical significance when interpreting the C-arm CT PBV maps, particularly in the setting of acute brain ischemia. (orig.)

  17. 3D volume reconstruction from serial breast specimen radiographs for mapping between histology and 3D whole specimen imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertzanidou, Thomy; Hipwell, John H; Reis, Sara; Hawkes, David J; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak; Dalmis, Mehmet; Vreemann, Suzan; Platel, Bram; van der Laak, Jeroen; Karssemeijer, Nico; Hermsen, Meyke; Bult, Peter; Mann, Ritse

    2017-03-01

    In breast imaging, radiological in vivo images, such as x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are used for tumor detection, diagnosis, and size determination. After excision, the specimen is typically sliced into slabs and a small subset is sampled. Histopathological imaging of the stained samples is used as the gold standard for characterization of the tumor microenvironment. A 3D volume reconstruction of the whole specimen from the 2D slabs could facilitate bridging the gap between histology and in vivo radiological imaging. This task is challenging, however, due to the large deformation that the breast tissue undergoes after surgery and the significant undersampling of the specimen obtained in histology. In this work, we present a method to reconstruct a coherent 3D volume from 2D digital radiographs of the specimen slabs. To reconstruct a 3D breast specimen volume, we propose the use of multiple target neighboring slices, when deforming each 2D slab radiograph in the volume, rather than performing pairwise registrations. The algorithm combines neighborhood slice information with free-form deformations, which enables a flexible, nonlinear deformation to be computed subject to the constraint that a coherent 3D volume is obtained. The neighborhood information provides adequate constraints, without the need for any additional regularization terms. The volume reconstruction algorithm is validated on clinical mastectomy samples using a quantitative assessment of the volume reconstruction smoothness and a comparison with a whole specimen 3D image acquired for validation before slicing. Additionally, a target registration error of 5 mm (comparable to the specimen slab thickness of 4 mm) was obtained for five cases. The error was computed using manual annotations from four observers as gold standard, with interobserver variability of 3.4 mm. Finally, we illustrate how the reconstructed volumes can be used to map histology images to a 3D specimen

  18. Phase contrast imaging reveals low lung volumes and surface areas in the developing marsupial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon J Simpson

    Full Text Available Marsupials are born with immature lungs when compared to eutherian mammals and rely, to various extents, on cutaneous gas exchange in order to meet metabolic requirements. Indeed, the fat-tailed dunnart is born with lungs in the canalicular stage of development and relies almost entirely on the skin for gas exchange at birth; consequently undergoing the majority of lung development in air. Plane radiographs and computed tomography data sets were acquired using phase contrast imaging with a synchrotron radiation source for two marsupial species, the fat-tailed dunnart and the larger tammar wallaby, during the first weeks of postnatal life. Phase contrast imaging revealed that only two lung sacs contain air after the first hour of life in the fat-tailed dunnart. While the lung of the tammar wallaby was comparatively more developed, both species demonstrated massive increases in air sac number and architectural complexity during the postnatal period. In addition, both the tammar wallaby and fat-tailed dunnart had lower lung volumes and parenchymal surface areas than were expected from morphometrically determined allometric equations relating these variables to body mass during the neonatal period. However, lung volume is predicted to scale with mass as expected after the neonatal marsupial reaches a body mass of ∼1 g and no longer relies on the skin for gas exchange. Decreased lung volume in the marsupial neonate further supports the maxim that cutaneous gas exchange occurs in the marsupial neonate because the respiratory apparatus is not yet capable of meeting the gas exchange requirements of the newborn.

  19. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was -40.4% (range: -79.5%-+11.7%) in mice, and -72.9% (range: -100%-+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p=0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MR360: Mixed Reality Rendering for 360° Panoramic Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Taehyun; Petikam, Lohit; Allen, Benjamin; Chalmers, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a novel immersive system called MR360 that provides interactive mixed reality (MR) experiences using a conventional low dynamic range (LDR) 360° panoramic video (360-video) shown in head mounted displays (HMDs). MR360 seamlessly composites 3D virtual objects into a live 360-video using the input panoramic video as the lighting source to illuminate the virtual objects. Image based lighting (IBL) is perceptually optimized to provide fast and believable results using the LDR 360-video as the lighting source. Regions of most salient lights in the input panoramic video are detected to optimize the number of lights used to cast perceptible shadows. Then, the areas of the detected lights adjust the penumbra of the shadow to provide realistic soft shadows. Finally, our real-time differential rendering synthesizes illumination of the virtual 3D objects into the 360-video. MR360 provides the illusion of interacting with objects in a video, which are actually 3D virtual objects seamlessly composited into the background of the 360-video. MR360 was implemented in a commercial game engine and tested using various 360-videos. Since our MR360 pipeline does not require any pre-computation, it can synthesize an interactive MR scene using a live 360-video stream while providing realistic high performance rendering suitable for HMDs.

  1. Validation of a colour rendering index based on memory colours

    OpenAIRE

    Smet, Kevin; Jost-Boissard, Sophie; Ryckaert, Wouter; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a colour rendering index based on memory colours is investigated in comparison with the current CIE Colour Rendering Index, the NIST Colour Quality Scale and visual appreciation results obtained at CNRS at Lyon University for a set of 3000K and 4000K LED light sources. The Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients between each colour rendering metric and the two sets of visual results were calculated. It was found that the memory colour based colour render...

  2. Sexual dimorphism of volume reduction but not cognitive deficit in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: A combined diffusion tensor imaging, cortical thickness and brain volume study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Treit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has revealed abnormalities in brain volumes, cortical thickness and white matter microstructure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD; however, no study has reported all three measures within the same cohort to assess the relative magnitude of deficits, and few studies have examined sex differences. Participants with FASD (n = 70; 30 females; 5–32 years and healthy controls (n = 74; 35 females; 5–32 years underwent cognitive testing and MRI to assess cortical thickness, regional brain volumes and fractional anisotropy (FA/mean diffusivity (MD of white matter tracts. A significant effect of group, age-by-group, or sex-by-group was found for 9/9 volumes, 7/39 cortical thickness regions, 3/9 white matter tracts, and 9/10 cognitive tests, indicating group differences that in some cases differ by age or sex. Volume reductions for several structures were larger in males than females, despite similar deficits of cognition in both sexes. Correlations between brain structure and cognitive scores were found in females of both groups, but were notably absent in males. Correlations within a given MRI modality (e.g. total brain volume and caudate volume were prevalent in both the control and FASD groups, and were more numerous than correlations between measurement types (e.g. volumes and diffusion tensor imaging in either cohort. This multi-modal MRI study finds widespread differences of brain structure in participants with prenatal alcohol exposure, and to a greater extent in males than females which may suggest attenuation of the expected process of sexual dimorphism of brain structure during typical development.

  3. 3D registration of intravascular optical coherence tomography and cryo-image volumes for microscopic-resolution validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, David; Mehanna, Emile; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Wen, Di; Brandt, Eric; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; Chamie, Daniel; Yamamoto, Hirosada; Fujino, Yusuke; Farmazilian, Ali; Patel, Jaymin; Costa, Marco; Bezerra, Hiram G; Wilson, David L

    2016-02-27

    High resolution, 100 frames/sec intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) can distinguish plaque types, but further validation is needed, especially for automated plaque characterization. We developed experimental and 3D registration methods, to provide validation of IVOCT pullback volumes using microscopic, brightfield and fluorescent cryo-image volumes, with optional, exactly registered cryo-histology. The innovation was a method to match an IVOCT pull-back images, acquired in the catheter reference frame, to a true 3D cryo-image volume. Briefly, an 11-parameter, polynomial virtual catheter was initialized within the cryo-image volume, and perpendicular images were extracted, mimicking IVOCT image acquisition. Virtual catheter parameters were optimized to maximize cryo and IVOCT lumen overlap. Local minima were possible, but when we started within reasonable ranges, every one of 24 digital phantom cases converged to a good solution with a registration error of only +1.34±2.65μm (signed distance). Registration was applied to 10 ex-vivo cadaver coronary arteries (LADs), resulting in 10 registered cryo and IVOCT volumes yielding a total of 421 registered 2D-image pairs. Image overlays demonstrated high continuity between vascular and plaque features. Bland-Altman analysis comparing cryo and IVOCT lumen area, showed mean and standard deviation of differences as 0.01±0.43 mm2. DICE coefficients were 0.91±0.04. Finally, visual assessment on 20 representative cases with easily identifiable features suggested registration accuracy within one frame of IVOCT (±200μm), eliminating significant misinterpretations introduced by 1mm errors in the literature. The method will provide 3D data for training of IVOCT plaque algorithms and can be used for validation of other intravascular imaging modalities.

  4. Dual-Energy CT in Hemorrhagic Progression of Cerebral Contusion: Overestimation of Hematoma Volumes on Standard 120-kV Images and Rectification with Virtual High-Energy Monochromatic Images after Contrast-Enhanced Whole-Body Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodanapally, U K; Shanmuganathan, K; Issa, G; Dreizin, D; Guang, L; Sudini, K; Fleiter, T R

    2018-02-08

    In patients with hemorrhagic contusions, hematoma volumes are overestimated on follow-up standard 120-kV images obtained after contrast-enhanced whole-body CT. We aimed to retrospectively determine hemorrhagic progression of contusion rates on 120-kV and 190-keV images derived from dual-energy CT and the magnitude of hematoma volume overestimation. We retrospectively analyzed admission and follow-up CT studies in 40 patients with hemorrhagic contusions. After annotating the contusions, we measured volumes from admission and follow-up 120-kV and 190-keV images using semiautomated 3D segmentation. Bland-Altman analysis was used for hematoma volume comparison. On 120-kV images, hemorrhagic progression of contusions was detected in 24 of the 40 patients, while only 17 patients had hemorrhagic progression of contusions on 190-keV images ( P = .008). Hematoma volumes were systematically overestimated on follow-up 120-kV images (9.68 versus 8 mm 3 ; mean difference, 1.68 mm 3 ; standard error, 0.37; P images. There was no significant difference in volumes between admission 120-kV and 190-keV images. Mean and median percentages of overestimation were 29% (95% CI, 18-39) and 22% (quartile 3 - quartile 1 = 36.8), respectively. The 120-kV images, which are comparable with single-energy CT images, significantly overestimated the hematoma volumes, hence the rate of hemorrhagic progression of contusions, after contrast-enhanced whole-body CT. Hence, follow-up of hemorrhagic contusions should be performed on dual-energy CT, and 190-keV images should be used for the assessment of hematoma volumes. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Clip art rendering of smooth isosurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroila, Matei; Eisemann, Elmar; Hart, John

    2008-01-01

    Clip art is a simplified illustration form consisting of layered filled polygons or closed curves used to convey 3D shape information in a 2D vector graphics format. This paper focuses on the problem of direct conversion of smooth surfaces, ranging from the free-form shapes of art and design to the mathematical structures of geometry and topology, into a clip art form suitable for illustration use in books, papers and presentations. We show how to represent silhouette, shadow, gleam and other surface feature curves as the intersection of implicit surfaces, and derive equations for their efficient interrogation via particle chains. We further describe how to sort, orient, identify and fill the closed regions that overlay to form clip art. We demonstrate the results with numerous renderings used to illustrate the paper itself.

  6. Assessment of intraorbital structure volume using a numerical segmentation image technique (NSI): the fatty tissue and the eyeball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majos, Agata; Grzelak, Piotr; Młynarczyk, Wojciech; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of the degree of exophthalmos is one of the main methods used in the assessment of pathological processes that occur in the orbital space and is widely used. However, this only provides initial information about the volume relations between the intraorbital structures. The aims of our work were as follows: to draw up a new computer application, namely the numerical segmentation image (NSI) technique, for the automatic calculation of the volume of the intraorbital structures on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images, to determine its usefulness in the segmentation of fatty tissue and the eyeball and to estimate their volume in relation to the degree of exophthalmos. A total of 45 patients (90 orbits) were included in the study. All the patients underwent MRI examination of the orbits by a 1.5 T scanner using a head coil. The degree of exophthalmos was determined clinically and radiologically in relation to the interzygomatic line. Quantitative assessment of the eyeball and fatty tissue was made using an NSI application. The influence of fatty tissue volume on the degree of exophthalmos was determined as being statistically significant (r = 0.367, p = 0.000374) but was smaller in comparison with the relationship between total eye muscle volume and degree of exophthalmos; eyeball volume was found to have the least influence (r = 0.344, p = 0.000374). Two eyeballs of significantly smaller volume were found in the group of 90 orbits analysed. The NSI technique is a clinically useful application, providing objective data calculated individually for each orbit. A credible protocol for estimating the degree of exophthalmos on the basis of the NSI technique should include the eye muscle volume, fatty tissue volume and, in cases where eyeball pathologies coexist, the eyeball volume as well.

  7. The general solution to HDR rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, John

    2012-03-01

    Our High-Dynamic-Range (HDR) world is the result of nonuniform illumination. We like to believe that 21st century technology makes it possible to accurately reproduce any scene. On further study, we find that scene rendition remains a best compromise. Despite all the remarkable accomplishments in digital imaging, we cannot capture and reproduce the light in the world exactly. With still further study, we find that accurate reproduction is not necessary. We need an interdisciplinary study of image making - painting, photography and image processing - to find the general solution. HDR imaging would be very confusing, without two observations that resolve many paradoxes. First, optical veiling glare, that depends on the scene content, severely limits the range of light on cameras' sensors, and on retinas. Second, the neural spatial image processing in human vision counteracts glare with variable scene dependent responses. The counter actions of these optical and neural processes shape the goals of HDR imaging. Successful HDR increases the apparent contrast of details lost in the shadows and highlights of conventional images. They change the spatial relationships by altering the local contrast of edges and gradients. The goal of HDR imaging is displaying calculated appearance, rather than accurate light reproduction. By using this strategy we can develop universal algorithms that process all images, LDR and HDR, achromatic and color, by mimicking human vision. The study of the general solution for HDR imaging incorporates painting photography, vision research, color constancy and digital image processing.

  8. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction; Lungenemphysem. Bildgebung bei endoskopischer Lungenvolumenreduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storbeck, B. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schroeder, T.H. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology; Weber, C. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  9. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Ahmed E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, University Hospital Tuebingen, Department for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Brockmann, Carolin; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A.; Wiesmann, Martin [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Medical-IT Convergence Technology Research, Advanced Institute of Convergence Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p <.05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. (orig.)

  10. Region-Based Partial Volume Correction Techniques for PET Imaging: Sinogram Implementation and Robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Sattarivand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose. Limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET requires partial volume correction (PVC. Region-based PVC methods are based on geometric transfer matrix implemented either in image-space (GTM or sinogram-space (GTMo, both with similar performance. Although GTMo is slower, it more closely simulates the 3D PET image acquisition, accounts for local variations of point spread function, and can be implemented for iterative reconstructions. A recent image-based symmetric GTM (sGTM has shown improvement in noise characteristics and robustness to misregistration over GTM. This study implements the sGTM method in sinogram space (sGTMo, validates it, and evaluates its performance. Methods. Two 3D sphere and brain digital phantoms and a physical sphere phantom were used. All four region-based PVC methods (GTM, GTMo, sGTM, and sGTMo were implemented and their performance was evaluated. Results. All four PVC methods had similar accuracies. Both noise propagation and robustness of the sGTMo method were similar to those of sGTM method while they were better than those of GTMo method especially for smaller objects. Conclusion. The sGTMo was implemented and validated. The performance of the sGTMo in terms of noise characteristics and robustness to misregistration is similar to that of the sGTM method and improved compared to the GTMo method.

  11. Intercomparison of four reconstruction techniques for positron volume imaging with rotating planar detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reader, A.J.; Visvikis, D.; Erlandsson, K.; Ott, R.J.; Flower, M.A. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    1998-04-01

    Four reconstruction techniques for positron volume imaging have been evaluated for scanners based on rotating planar detectors using measured and simulated data. The four techniques compared are backproject then filter (BPF), the 3D reprojection (3D RP) method for 3D filtered backprojection (FBP), Fourier rebinning (FORE) in conjunction with 2D FBP (FORE+2D FBP) and 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (3D OSEM). The comparison was based on image resolution and on the trade-off between contrast and noise. In general FORE+2D FBP offered a better contrast-noise trade-off than 3D RP, whilst 3D RP offered a better trade-off than BPF. Unlike 3D RP, FORE+2D FBP did not suffer any contrast degradation effect at the edges of the axial field of view, but was unable to take as much advantage from high-accuracy data as the other methods. 3D OSEM gave the best contrast at the expense of greater image noise. BPF, which demonstrated generally inferior contrast-noise behaviour due to use of only a subset of the data, gave more consistent spatialresolution over the field of view than the projection-data based methods, and was best at taking full advantage of high-accuracy data. (author)

  12. Inter-observer reproducibility and analysis of gastric volume measurements and gastric emptying assessed with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruehauf, H; Menne, D; Kwiatek, M A; Forras-Kaufman, Z; Kaufman, E; Goetze, O; Fried, M; Schwizer, W; Fox, M

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides direct, non-invasive measurements of gastric function and emptying. The inter-observer variability (IOV) of MR volume measurements and the most appropriate analysis of MR data have not been established. To assess IOV of total gastric volume (TGV) and gastric content volume (GCV) measurements from MR images and the ability of standard power exponential (PowExp), and a novel linear exponential (LinExp) model to describe MR data.   Ten healthy volunteers received three different volumes of a liquid nutrient test meal (200-800 mL) on 3 days in a randomized order. Magnetic resonance scans were acquired using a 1.5T system every 1-5 min for 60 min. Total gastric volume and GCV were measured independently by three observers. Volume data were fitted by PowExp and LinExp models to assess postprandial volume change and gastric emptying half time (T(50) ). An initial rise in GCV and TGV was often observed after meal ingestion, thereafter GCV and TGV decreased in an approximately linear fashion. Inter-observer variability decreased with greater volumes from 12% at 200 mL to 6% at 600 and 800 mL. Inter-observer variability for T(50) was <5%. PowExp and LinExp models provided comparable estimates of T(50) ; however, only LinExp described dynamic volume change in the early postprandial period. Gastric MR provides quantitative measurements of postprandial volume change with low IOV, unless the stomach is nearly empty. The novel LinExp model describes the dynamic volume changes in the early postprandial period more accurately than the PowExp model used in existing gastric emptying studies. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Resolution-independent surface rendering using programmable graphics hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loop, Charles T.; Blinn, James Frederick

    2008-12-16

    Surfaces defined by a Bezier tetrahedron, and in particular quadric surfaces, are rendered on programmable graphics hardware. Pixels are rendered through triangular sides of the tetrahedra and locations on the shapes, as well as surface normals for lighting evaluations, are computed using pixel shader computations. Additionally, vertex shaders are used to aid interpolation over a small number of values as input to the pixel shaders. Through this, rendering of the surfaces is performed independently of viewing resolution, allowing for advanced level-of-detail management. By individually rendering tetrahedrally-defined surfaces which together form complex shapes, the complex shapes can be rendered in their entirety.

  14. Early Diffusion Weighted Imaging and Perfusion Weighted Imaging Lesion Volumes Forecast Final Infarct Size in DEFUSE 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Hayley M.; Mlynash, Michael; Inoue, Manabu; Tipirneni, Aaryani; Liggins, John; Zaharchuk, Greg; Straka, Matus; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G; Albers, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is hypothesized that early DWI lesions accurately estimate the size of the irreversibly injured core and thresholded PWI lesions (Tmax > 6 seconds) approximate the volume of critically hypoperfused tissue. With incomplete reperfusion, the union of baseline DWI and post-treatment PWI is hypothesized to predict infarct volume. Methods This is a substudy of DEFUSE 2; all patients with technically adequate MRI scans at three time points were included. Baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI lesion volumes were determined by the RAPID software program. Final infarct volumes were assessed with Day 5 FLAIR and corrected for edema. Reperfusion was defined based on the reduction in PWI lesion volume between baseline and early follow-up MRI. DWI and PWI volumes were correlated with final infarct volumes. Results 73 patients were eligible. 26 patients with >90% reperfusion show a high correlation between early DWI volume and final infarct volume (r = 0.95, p PWI (Tmax >6 sec) volume and final infarct volume (r = 0.86, p = 0.002). Using all 73 patients, the union of baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI is highly correlated with final infarct volume (r = 0.94, p PWI (Tmax > 6 sec) volumes provide a reasonable approximation of final infarct volume following endovascular therapy. PMID:23390119

  15. Dataset Curation through Renders and Ontology Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    5.2: Examples of 3 businesses with their names blurred. Can you predict what they sell? Starting from left they are: Sushi Restaurant, Bench store...restaurants of some type, the third sells furniture, in particular store benches (middle image). It is clear that the text in the image can be extremely...transcrip- tion would fail. (b) The text can be misleading. In this image the available text is part of the Burger King restaurant that is behind the gas

  16. Apparent diffusion coefficients in GEC ESTRO target volumes for image guided adaptive brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haack, Soeren (Dept. of Clinical Engineering, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)), E-mail: Soeren.haack@stab.rm.dk; Morre Pedersen, Erik (Dept. of Radiology, Aarhus Sygehus, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Jespersen, Sune N. (Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Kallehauge, Jesper F. (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari (Dept. of Oncology Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    Background and purpose. T2 weighted MRI is recommended for image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in cervical cancer. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and the derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) may add additional biological information on tumour cell density. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of the ADC within target volumes as recommended by GEC-ESTRO: Gross Tumour Volume at BT (GTVBT), High-Risk Clinical Tumour Volume (HR-CTV) and Intermediate-Risk Clinical Target Volume (IR-CTV) and to evaluate the change of diffusion between fractions of IGABT. Material and methods. Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were examined by MRI before their first (BT1) and second (BT2) fraction of IGABT, resulting in a total of 30 MR examinations including both T2 weighted and DWI sequences. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) was calculated by use of three levels of b-values (0, 600, 1000 s/mm2). ADC maps were constructed and fused with the GEC ESTRO target contours. The mean ADC value within each target volume was calculated. Furthermore, volumes of low diffusion (ADClow) were defined based on an ADC threshold of 1.2 x 10-3 mm2/s, and overlap with target volumes was evaluated. Change of ADC level in target volumes and change of ADClow volume from BT1 to BT2 was also evaluated. Results. The mean ADC was significantly lower in GTVBT than in HR-CTV (p<0.001) which again was significantly lower than in IR-CTV (p<0.001). There was no significant change of the ADClow volume or ADC level within each target structure between BT1 and BT2 (p=0.242). All three GEC-ESTRO volumes contained volumes with low diffusion. The GTVBT contained 37.2% volume of low diffusion, HR-CTV 20.3% and IR-CTV 10.8%. Conclusion. With DWI we were able to find a significant difference in ADC-values for the three different GEC ESTRO targets. This supports the assumption that the target volumes used for dose prescription in IGABT contain tissues with

  17. Apparent diffusion coefficients in GEC ESTRO target volumes for image guided adaptive brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Søren; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Jespersen, Sune N; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    2010-10-01

    T2 weighted MRI is recommended for image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) in cervical cancer. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and the derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) may add additional biological information on tumour cell density. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of the ADC within target volumes as recommended by GEC-ESTRO: Gross Tumour Volume at BT (GTV(BT)), High-Risk Clinical Tumour Volume (HR-CTV) and Intermediate-Risk Clinical Target Volume (IR-CTV) and to evaluate the change of diffusion between fractions of IGABT. Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were examined by MRI before their first (BT1) and second (BT2) fraction of IGABT, resulting in a total of 30 MR examinations including both T2 weighted and DWI sequences. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) was calculated by use of three levels of b-values (0, 600, 1000 s/mm(2)). ADC maps were constructed and fused with the GEC ESTRO target contours. The mean ADC value within each target volume was calculated. Furthermore, volumes of low diffusion (ADC(low)) were defined based on an ADC threshold of 1.2 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, and overlap with target volumes was evaluated. Change of ADC level in target volumes and change of ADC(low) volume from BT1 to BT2 was also evaluated. The mean ADC was significantly lower in GTV(BT) than in HR-CTV (p<0.001) which again was significantly lower than in IR-CTV (p<0.001). There was no significant change of the ADC(low) volume or ADC level within each target structure between BT1 and BT2 (p=0.242). All three GEC-ESTRO volumes contained volumes with low diffusion. The GTV(BT) contained 37.2% volume of low diffusion, HR-CTV 20.3% and IR-CTV 10.8%. With DWI we were able to find a significant difference in ADC-values for the three different GEC ESTRO targets. This supports the assumption that the target volumes used for dose prescription in IGABT contain tissues with different characteristics, with the tumour (GTV

  18. Slice-to-volume parametric image registration models with applications to MRI-guided cardiac procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L. W. Lorraine; Ebrahimi, Mehran

    2017-03-01

    A mathematical formulation for intensity-based slice-to-volume registration is proposed. The approach is flexible and accommodates various regularization schemes, similarity measures, and optimizers. The framework is evaluated by registering 2D and 3D cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained in vivo, aimed at real- time MR-guided applications. Rigid-body and affine transformations are used to validate the parametric model. Target registration error (TRE), Jaccard, and Dice indices are used to evaluate the algorithm and demonstrate the accuracy of the registration scheme on both simulated and clinical data. Registration with the affine model appeared to be more robust than with the rigid model in controlled cases. By simply extending the rigid model to an affine model, alignment of the cardiac region generally improved, without the need for complex dissimilarity measures or regularizers.

  19. The complex aerodynamic footprint of desert locusts revealed by large-volume tomographic particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Schanz, Daniel; Geisler, Reinhard; Schröder, Andreas; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2015-07-06

    Particle image velocimetry has been the preferred experimental technique with which to study the aerodynamics of animal flight for over a decade. In that time, hardware has become more accessible and the software has progressed from the acquisition of planes through the flow field to the reconstruction of small volumetric measurements. Until now, it has not been possible to capture large volumes that incorporate the full wavelength of the aerodynamic track left behind during a complete wingbeat cycle. Here, we use a unique apparatus to acquire the first instantaneous wake volume of a flying animal's entire wingbeat. We confirm the presence of wake deformation behind desert locusts and quantify the effect of that deformation on estimates of aerodynamic force and the efficiency of lift generation. We present previously undescribed vortex wake phenomena, including entrainment around the wing-tip vortices of a set of secondary vortices borne of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear layer behind the flapping wings. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. A method of minimum volume simplex analysis constrained unmixing for hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinlin; Lan, Jinhui; Zeng, Yiliang; Wu, Hongtao

    2017-07-01

    The signal recorded by a low resolution hyperspectral remote sensor from a given pixel, letting alone the effects of the complex terrain, is a mixture of substances. To improve the accuracy of classification and sub-pixel object detection, hyperspectral unmixing(HU) is a frontier-line in remote sensing area. Unmixing algorithm based on geometric has become popular since the hyperspectral image possesses abundant spectral information and the mixed model is easy to understand. However, most of the algorithms are based on pure pixel assumption, and since the non-linear mixed model is complex, it is hard to obtain the optimal endmembers especially under a highly mixed spectral data. To provide a simple but accurate method, we propose a minimum volume simplex analysis constrained (MVSAC) unmixing algorithm. The proposed approach combines the algebraic constraints that are inherent to the convex minimum volume with abundance soft constraint. While considering abundance fraction, we can obtain the pure endmember set and abundance fraction correspondingly, and the final unmixing result is closer to reality and has better accuracy. We illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm in unmixing simulated data and real hyperspectral data, and the result indicates that the proposed method can obtain the distinct signatures correctly without redundant endmember and yields much better performance than the pure pixel based algorithm.

  1. Avoiding symmetry-breaking spatial non-uniformity in deformable image registration via a quasi-volume-preserving constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganj, Iman; Reuter, Martin; Sabuncu, Mert R; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    The choice of a reference image typically influences the results of deformable image registration, thereby making it asymmetric. This is a consequence of a spatially non-uniform weighting in the cost function integral that leads to general registration inaccuracy. The inhomogeneous integral measure--which is the local volume change in the transformation, thus varying through the course of the registration--causes image regions to contribute differently to the objective function. More importantly, the optimization algorithm is allowed to minimize the cost function by manipulating the volume change, instead of aligning the images. The approaches that restore symmetry to deformable registration successfully achieve inverse-consistency, but do not eliminate the regional bias that is the source of the error. In this work, we address the root of the problem: the non-uniformity of the cost function integral. We introduce a new quasi-volume-preserving constraint that allows for volume change only in areas with well-matching image intensities, and show that such a constraint puts a bound on the error arising from spatial non-uniformity. We demonstrate the advantages of adding the proposed constraint to standard (asymmetric and symmetrized) demons and diffeomorphic demons algorithms through experiments on synthetic images, and real X-ray and 2D/3D brain MRI data. Specifically, the results show that our approach leads to image alignment with more accurate matching of manually defined neuroanatomical structures, better tradeoff between image intensity matching and registration-induced distortion, improved native symmetry, and lower susceptibility to local optima. In summary, the inclusion of this space- and time-varying constraint leads to better image registration along every dimension that we have measured it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. GPU-based multi-volume ray casting within VTK for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgi, Mohammadmehdi; Lindseth, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Multi-volume visualization is important for displaying relevant information in multimodal or multitemporal medical imaging studies. The main objective with the current study was to develop an efficient GPU-based multi-volume ray caster (MVRC) and validate the proposed visualization system in the context of image-guided surgical navigation. Ray casting can produce high-quality 2D images from 3D volume data but the method is computationally demanding, especially when multiple volumes are involved, so a parallel GPU version has been implemented. In the proposed MVRC, imaginary rays are sent through the volumes (one ray for each pixel in the view), and at equal and short intervals along the rays, samples are collected from each volume. Samples from all the volumes are composited using front to back α-blending. Since all the rays can be processed simultaneously, the MVRC was implemented in parallel on the GPU to achieve acceptable interactive frame rates. The method is fully integrated within the visualization toolkit (VTK) pipeline with the ability to apply different operations (e.g., transformations, clipping, and cropping) on each volume separately. The implemented method is cross-platform (Windows, Linux and Mac OSX) and runs on different graphics card (NVidia and AMD). The speed of the MVRC was tested with one to five volumes of varying sizes: 128(3), 256(3), and 512(3). A Tesla C2070 GPU was used, and the output image size was 600 × 600 pixels. The original VTK single-volume ray caster and the MVRC were compared when rendering only one volume. The multi-volume rendering system achieved an interactive frame rate (> 15 fps) when rendering five small volumes (128 (3) voxels), four medium-sized volumes (256(3) voxels), and two large volumes (512(3) voxels). When rendering single volumes, the frame rate of the MVRC was comparable to the original VTK ray caster for small and medium-sized datasets but was approximately 3 frames per second slower for large datasets. The

  3. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use

  4. Comparison of imaging-based gross tumor volume and pathological volume determined by whole-mount serial sections in primary cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang,1,* Jing Hu,1,* Jianping Li,1 Ning Wang,1 Weiwei Li,1 Yongchun Zhou,1 Junyue Liu,1 Lichun Wei,1 Mei Shi,1 Shengjun Wang,2 Jing Wang,2 Xia Li,3 Wanling Ma4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the accuracy of imaging-based gross tumor volume (GTV compared with pathological volume in cervical cancer.Methods: Ten patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–II cervical cancer were eligible for investigation and underwent surgery in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT scans were taken the day before surgery. The GTVs under MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT (GTV-MRI, GTV-PET, GTV-CT were calculated automatically by Eclipse treatment-planning systems. Specimens of excised uterine cervix and cervical cancer were consecutively sliced and divided into whole-mount serial sections. The tumor border of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was outlined under a microscope by an experienced pathologist. GTV through pathological image (GTV-path was calculated with Adobe Photoshop.Results: The GTVs (average ± standard deviation delineated and calculated under CT, MRI, PET, and histopathological sections were 19.41 ± 11.96 cm3, 12.66 ± 10.53 cm3, 11.07 ± 9.44 cm3, and 10.79 ± 8.71 cm3, respectively. The volume of GTV-CT or GTV-MR was bigger than GTV-path, and the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05. Spearman correlation analysis showed that GTV-CT, GTV-MRI, and GTV-PET were significantly correlated with GTV-path (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference in the lesion coverage factor among the three modalities.Conclusion: The present study showed that GTV defined under 40% of maximum standardized

  5. Dual-scanning optical coherence elastography for rapid imaging of two tissue volumes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qi; Frewer, Luke; Wijesinghe, Philip; Hamzah, Juliana; Ganss, Ruth; Allen, Wes M.; Sampson, David D.; Curatolo, Andrea; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2017-02-01

    In many applications of optical coherence elastography (OCE), it is necessary to rapidly acquire images in vivo, or within intraoperative timeframes, over fields-of-view far greater than can be achieved in one OCT image acquisition. For example, tumour margin assessment in breast cancer requires acquisition over linear dimensions of 4-5 centimetres in under 20 minutes. However, the majority of existing techniques are not compatible with these requirements, which may present a hurdle to the effective translation of OCE. To increase throughput, we have designed and developed an OCE system that simultaneously captures two 3D elastograms from opposite sides of a sample. The optical system comprises two interferometers: a common-path interferometer on one side of the sample and a dual-arm interferometer on the other side. This optical system is combined with scanning mechanisms and compression loading techniques to realize dual-scanning OCE. The optical signals scattered from two volumes are simultaneously detected on a single spectrometer by depth-encoding the interference signal from each interferometer. To demonstrate dual-scanning OCE, we performed measurements on tissue-mimicking phantoms containing rigid inclusions and freshly isolated samples of murine hepatocellular carcinoma, highlighting the use of this technique to visualise 3D tumour stiffness. These findings indicate that our technique holds promise for in vivo and intraoperative applications.

  6. Automatic extraction of myocardial mass and volumes using parametric images from dynamic nongated PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harms, Hendrik Johannes; Hansson, Nils Henrik Stubkjær; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) is used to quantify molecular processes in vivo. However, measurements of left-ventricular (LV) mass and volumes require electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated PET data. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of measuring LV geometry using non......-gated dynamic cardiac PET. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with aortic-valve stenosis and 10 healthy controls (HC) underwent a 27-min 11C-acetate PET/CT scan and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). HC were scanned twice to assess repeatability. Parametric images of uptake rate K1 and the blood pool were......) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). PET measurements were compared with CMR. RESULTS: High and linear correlations were found for LV mass (r=0.95), ESV (r=0.93) and EDV (r=0.90), and slightly lower for SV (r=0.74), LVEF (r=0.81) and WT(r=0.78). Bland Altman analyses showed significant differences for m...

  7. Calibration of a dedicated software for 3D rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrantes, Marcos E.S.; Felix, Warley F.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F., E-mail: marcos.nuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: warleyferreirafelix@gmail.com, E-mail: mdora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Faculdade Ciencias Medicas de Minas Gerais (FCMMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    With the increasing use of 3D reconstruction techniques, to assist in diagnosis, dedicated programs are being widely used. For this they must be calibrated in order to encounter the values of the real volumes of the human tissues. The purpose of this work is to indicate correction and calibration values for true volumes, read in a 3D reconstruction system dedicated, using DICOM images of Computed Tomography. This work utilized a PMMA thorax phantom associated with the DICOM image and the volume found by a program of a tomograph. The physical volume of the PMMA phantom found was 10359.0 cm³. For the volumes found according to the structures of interest, the values are 11005.5 cm³, 10249.3 cm³ and 10205.1 cm³ and the correction values are -6.2%, +1.1% e +1.5% respectively for tissues: pulmonary, bony and soft tissues. The procedure performed can be used for calibration in other 3D reconstruction programs, observing the necessary corrections and the methodology used. (author)

  8. Simulation-based partial volume correction for dopaminergic PET imaging. Impact of segmentation accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Ye; Winz, Oliver H. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vernaleken, Ingo [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics; Goedicke, Andreas [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; High Tech Campus, Philips Research Lab., Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rota Kops, Elena [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine-4

    2015-07-01

    Partial volume correction (PVC) is an essential step for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, PVELab, a freely available software, is evaluated for PVC in {sup 18}F-FDOPA brain-PET, with a special focus on the accuracy degradation introduced by various MR-based segmentation approaches. Methods Four PVC algorithms (M-PVC; MG-PVC; mMG-PVC; and R-PVC) were analyzed on simulated {sup 18}F-FDOPA brain-PET images. MR image segmentation was carried out using FSL (FMRIB Software Library) and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) packages, including additional adaptation for subcortical regions (SPM{sub L}). Different PVC and segmentation combinations were compared with respect to deviations in regional activity values and time-activity curves (TACs) of the occipital cortex (OCC), caudate nucleus (CN), and putamen (PUT). Additionally, the PVC impact on the determination of the influx constant (K{sub i}) was assessed. Results Main differences between tissue-maps returned by three segmentation algorithms were found in the subcortical region, especially at PUT. Average misclassification errors in combination with volume reduction was found to be lowest for SPM{sub L} (PUT < 30%) and highest for FSL (PUT > 70%). Accurate recovery of activity data at OCC is achieved by M-PVC (apparent recovery coefficient varies between 0.99 and 1.10). The other three evaluated PVC algorithms have demonstrated to be more suitable for subcortical regions with MG-PVC and mMG-PVC being less prone to the largest tissue misclassification error simulated in this study. Except for M-PVC, quantification accuracy of K{sub i} for CN and PUT was clearly improved by PVC. Conclusions The regional activity value of PUT was appreciably overcorrected by most of the PVC approaches employing FSL or SPM segmentation, revealing the importance of accurate MR image segmentation for the presented PVC framework. The selection of a PVC approach should be adapted to the anatomical

  9. Estimation of changes in volume of individual lower-limb muscles using magnetic resonance imaging (during bed-rest).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavý, D L; Miokovic, T; Rittweger, J; Felsenberg, D

    2011-01-01

    Muscle size in the lower limb is commonly assessed in neuromuscular research as it correlates with muscle function and some approaches have been assessed for their ability to provide valid estimates of muscle volume. Work to date has not examined the ability of different measurement approaches (such as cross-sectional area (CSA) measures on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging) to accurately track changes in muscle volume as a result of an intervention, such as exercise, injury or disuse. Here we assess whether (a) the percentage change in muscle CSA in 17 lower-limb muscles during 56 days bed-rest, as assessed by five different algorithms, lies within 0.5% of the muscle volume change and (b) the variability of the outcome measure is comparable to that of muscle volume. We find that an approach selecting the MR image with the highest muscle CSA and then a series of CSA measures, the number of which depended upon the muscle considered, immediately distal and proximal, provided an acceptable estimate of the muscle volume change. In the vastii, peroneal, sartorius and anterior tibial muscle groups, accurate results can be attained by increasing the spacing between CSA measures, thus reducing the total number of MR images and hence the measurement time. In the two heads of biceps femoris, semimembranosus and gracilis, it is not possible to reduce the number of CSA measures and the entire muscle volume must be evaluated. Using these approaches one can reduce the number of CSA measures required to estimate changes in muscle volume by ~60%. These findings help to attain more efficient means to track muscle volume changes in interventional studies.

  10. Digital electronics for 256 anode Hamamatsu H9500 PSPMT arrays in full-volume Compton imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. T.; Grudberg, P. M.; Warburton, W. K.

    2014-07-01

    Ziock et al.'s [1] recent Monte Carlo study of a proposed ``full-volume'' Compton Imaging Camera concluded that simultaneously locating a Compton scatter event's multiple interaction points within a single large scintillator crystal might be possible at 1 mm spatial resolution using a coded aperture mask sandwiched between two light guides and coupled to a position sensitive photomultiplier (PSPMT) to record the output light pattern. The method promises high efficiency at a relatively low cost. They are currently developing a lower resolution prototype using a large cubic scintillator (25.4 cm/side) whose masked face will be tiled with 25 Hamamatsu H9500 PSPMTs (6,400 outputs). XIA has contracted to develop and produce the readout electronics, which present several significant design challenges, including capturing all 6,400 anode outputs individually, with single photon sensitivity, in a compact format that will fit behind the tiled PSPMTs. 10,000 event/sec operation is desired, as is a cost of less than about 50/channel. In our approach, each PSPMT front end integrates the 256 anode signals and 8-1 multiplexes them to 32 differential outputs that are digitized in a PXI card using 4 octal 50 MHz ADCs. The multiplexers run at 8 MHz, sampling each anode at 1 MHz, which becomes the image frame rate. The ADC signals are demultiplexed and digitally filtered to extract the number of photons in each pixel in the full 2-D image. The design has been completed and built and is undergoing evaluation tests at the single PSPMT level.

  11. Effects of radiation dose reduction in Volume Perfusion CT imaging of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Brockmann, Carolin; Yang, Zepa; Kim, Changwon; Afat, Saif; Pjontek, Rastislav; Nikobashman, Omid; Brockmann, Marc A; Kim, Jong Hyo; Wiesmann, Martin

    2015-12-01

    To examine the influence of radiation dose reduction on image quality and sensitivity of Volume Perfusion CT (VPCT) maps regarding the detection of ischemic brain lesions. VPCT data of 20 patients with suspected ischemic stroke acquired at 80 kV and 180 mAs were included. Using realistic reduced-dose simulation, low-dose VPCT datasets with 144 mAs, 108 mAs, 72 mAs and 36 mAs (80 %, 60 %, 40 % and 20 % of the original levels) were generated, resulting in a total of 100 datasets. Perfusion maps were created and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements were performed. Qualitative analyses were conducted by two blinded readers, who also assessed the presence/absence of ischemic lesions and scored CBV and CBF maps using a modified ASPECTS-score. SNR of all low-dose datasets were significantly lower than those of the original datasets (p < .05). All datasets down to 72 mAs (40 %) yielded sufficient image quality and high sensitivity with excellent inter-observer-agreements, whereas 36 mAs datasets (20 %) yielded poor image quality in 15 % of the cases with lower sensitivity and inter-observer-agreements. Low-dose VPCT using decreased tube currents down to 72 mAs (40 % of original radiation dose) produces sufficient perfusion maps for the detection of ischemic brain lesions. • Perfusion CT is highly accurate for the detection of ischemic brain lesions • Perfusion CT results in high radiation exposure, therefore low-dose protocols are required • Reduction of tube current down to 72 mAs produces sufficient perfusion maps.

  12. Efficient visibility-driven medical image visualisation via adaptive binned visibility histogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younhyun; Kim, Jinman; Kumar, Ashnil; Feng, David Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2016-07-01

    'Visibility' is a fundamental optical property that represents the observable, by users, proportion of the voxels in a volume during interactive volume rendering. The manipulation of this 'visibility' improves the volume rendering processes; for instance by ensuring the visibility of regions of interest (ROIs) or by guiding the identification of an optimal rendering view-point. The construction of visibility histograms (VHs), which represent the distribution of all the visibility of all voxels in the rendered volume, enables users to explore the volume with real-time feedback about occlusion patterns among spatially related structures during volume rendering manipulations. Volume rendered medical images have been a primary beneficiary of VH given the need to ensure that specific ROIs are visible relative to the surrounding structures, e.g. the visualisation of tumours that may otherwise be occluded by neighbouring structures. VH construction and its subsequent manipulations, however, are computationally expensive due to the histogram binning of the visibilities. This limits the real-time application of VH to medical images that have large intensity ranges and volume dimensions and require a large number of histogram bins. In this study, we introduce an efficient adaptive binned visibility histogram (AB-VH) in which a smaller number of histogram bins are used to represent the visibility distribution of the full VH. We adaptively bin medical images by using a cluster analysis algorithm that groups the voxels according to their intensity similarities into a smaller subset of bins while preserving the distribution of the intensity range of the original images. We increase efficiency by exploiting the parallel computation and multiple render targets (MRT) extension of the modern graphical processing units (GPUs) and this enables efficient computation of the histogram. We show the application of our method to single-modality computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance

  13. Quantification of intervertebral disc volume properties below spine fusion, using magnetic resonance imaging, in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violas, Philippe; Estivalezes, Erik; Briot, Jérome; Sales de Gauzy, Jérome; Swider, Pascal

    2007-07-01

    Prospective clinical study. A quantification of volume and hydration variation of the intervertebral discs, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in the lumbar spine before and after surgery performed in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). To evaluate an objective quantification of volume and hydration of intervertebral discs below spine fusion in scoliosis surgery. Repercussion of long spine fusion on the free lower lumbar spine is one of the major concerns of scoliosis surgery. However, the evolution of lumbar intervertebral disc below thoracolumbar fusions remains unknown. MRI performed in the clinical protocol, concerned 28 patients having an idiopathic scoliosis. They underwent posterior instrumentations. MRI was obtained before surgery, after surgery at 3 months and for 15 patients at 1 year. MRI data were posttreated using a custom-made image processing software to semiautomatically derive volume properties of disc, anulus fibrosus, and nucleus pulposus. The nucleus-disc volume ratio was also an indicator of the hydration level. The reliability of the three-dimensional reconstruction process was initially verified using an intraoperator reproducibility test. Original preoperative data on disc volume properties were then derived. Postoperative volume variations were quantified in discs below spine fusion taking into account the level of the arthrodesis and the disc location. It showed that the postoperative volume criteria increased significantly for nucleus, disc, and nucleus-disc volume ratio and some magnitude modulation could be conditioned by the location of surgical instrumentation. Some stabilization or reduction depending on disc level and arthrodesis size between 3 months and 1 year is observed in the follow-up. It tended to prove that the recovery of balance physiologic positioning and inherent biomechanical loads could induce a restored hydration of disc, which should favor the remodeling of free segments. This work was the first report

  14. Measuring the colour of rendering mortars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaerts, Yves; Meulebroeck, Wendy; Verdonck, Ann; de Bouw, Michael

    2014-05-01

    When restoring decorative mortar layers on historic façades, professionals need to determine the colour of these finishes in order to select an appropriate repair mortar. Currently, the appearance of these renders is only assessed from a subjective point of view. To match with the aesthetic aspects of the façade, contractors must constantly adjust their repair mortar composition to avoid a patchwork of different colours, which is detrimental for heritage. This time-consuming (trial-and-error) methodology can be excluded by evaluating `colour' with an objective numerical approach. The challenge of the research was to define and evaluate optimal material dependent boundary conditions for measuring the colour of nonhomogeneous mortars. Four samples with different scale of heterogeneity were measured by two spectrocolorimeters, both with a diffuse illumination geometry. The results were plotted in CIE-L*a*b* colour space. By calculating the colour difference (ΔE*), the influence of measuring with or without specular component was evaluated. We discovered the minimal number of measuring points depends on the scale of heterogeneity and the aperture area. The less homogeneous the mortar sample is and the smaller the aperture area, the more unique measuring points are required. Therefore, it is recommended to choose an aperture head of 25 mm or more to reduce the number of measurements, making your work time-efficient. However, in order to obtain accurate measurements on site, a portable optical spectrum analyser can be used with a 6 mm-diameter aperture, a viewing angle of 10°, SCI mode, illumination source D65, considering a minimum of 15 unique measuring points.

  15. Assessment of the volume of intraorbital structures using the numerical segmentation image technique (NSI): the extraocular muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majos, Agata; Grzelak, Piotr; Młynarczyk, Wojciech; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the use of computer systems has allowed numerical analysis of medical images to be introduced and has speeded up the conversion of numerical data into clinically valuable information. The creation of a software application that could almost automatically calculate the volume of anatomical structures imaged by MRI has seemed possible. The aim of our study was to determine the clinical usefulness of an numerical segmentation image technique (NSI) software application in estimating the volume of extraocular muscles. The study group was formed of 45 patients (90 orbits). All the patients underwent MRI examinations of the orbits by a 1.5 T scanner using a head coil. The degree of exophthalmos was determined clinically and radiologically in relation to the interzygomatic line. The quantitative assessment of all eye muscles was carried out using the NSI application, a new software program introduced by the authors. A close correlation between muscle volume and the degree of exophthalmos was revealed and confirmed by statistical analysis (r = 0.543, p = 3.13396E-08) in agreement with other papers. The NSI software program is an application which offers a reliable and precise estimation of eye muscle volume. It is therefore useful in the diagnosis of the pathological processes leading to exophthalmos. It has special clinical value for monitoring discrete volume changes of muscles during treatment.

  16. Daily Prostate Volume and Position Monitoring Using Implanted Gold Markers and On-Board Imaging during Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kašaová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate prostate volume changes and prostate motions during radiotherapy. Methods: In 2010, twenty-five patients were treated for prostate cancer by external beam radiotherapy with implanted fiducial markers. Coordinates of three gold markers on kilovoltage images were calculated daily. Volume changes in target structure were observed through changes in intermarker distances. Differences in patient position between laser-tattoo alignment and gold marker localization were evaluated. Intrafraction motion was assessed by measuring marker displacement on kilovoltage images acquired before and after fraction delivery. Results: Prostate shrinkage was observed in 60% of patients. The average shrinkage was 7% of the prostate’s initial volume. Corrections after laser-tattoo alignment remained mostly below 1 cm. The difference between marker centroid position on the actual images and the planning images was 2 ± 1 mm on average. The extension of intrafraction movements was 7.6 ± 0.2 mm on average. Conclusions: In our retrospective study, the possibility for prostate volume changes during radiotherapy was revealed. Intrafraction movements turned out to be the limiting factor in safety margin reduction.

  17. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 5: an international multicenter reliability study using computerized MRI erosion volume measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F

    2003-01-01

    Scoring erosions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one method of estimating damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it has limitations. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and inter-reader reliability of computer assisted erosion volume estimation...

  18. Brain Volumes at Term-Equivalent Age in Preterm Infants : Imaging Biomarkers for Neurodevelopmental Outcome through Early School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keunen, Kristin; Išgum, Ivana; van Kooij, Britt J M; Anbeek, Petronella; van Haastert, Ingrid C; Koopman-Esseboom, Corine; van Stam, Petronella C; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Viergever, Max A; de Vries, Linda S; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J N L

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between brain volumes at term and neurodevelopmental outcome through early school age in preterm infants. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred twelve preterm infants (born mean gestational age 28.6 ± 1.7 weeks) were studied prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging

  19. Edge-aided virtual view rendering for multiview video plus depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muddala, Suryanarayana M.; Sjöström, Mârten; Olsson, Roger; Tourancheau, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    Depth-Image-Based Rendering (DIBR) of virtual views is a fundamental method in three dimensional 3-D video applications to produce different perspectives from texture and depth information, in particular the multi-view-plus-depth (MVD) format. Artifacts are still present in virtual views as a consequence of imperfect rendering using existing DIBR methods. In this paper, we propose an alternative DIBR method for MVD. In the proposed method we introduce an edge pixel and interpolate pixel values in the virtual view using the actual projected coordinates from two adjacent views, by which cracks and disocclusions are automatically filled. In particular, we propose a method to merge pixel information from two adjacent views in the virtual view before the interpolation; we apply a weighted averaging of projected pixels within the range of one pixel in the virtual view. We compared virtual view images rendered by the proposed method to the corresponding view images rendered by state-of-theart methods. Objective metrics demonstrated an advantage of the proposed method for most investigated media contents. Subjective test results showed preference to different methods depending on media content, and the test could not demonstrate a significant difference between the proposed method and state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Spatial sound rendering of a playing xylophone for the telepresence application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Madsen, Esben; Hoffmann, Pablo F.

    2013-01-01

    and spatial properties of the sound field created by a xylophone as a distributed sound source were analyzed. Xylophone recordings were performed using different microphone configurations: one and two-channel recording setups are implemented. One-channel recording technique with binaural synthesis for spatial...... played at the student's location is required at the teacher’s site. This paper presents a comparison of different recording techniques for a spatial xylophone sound rendering, focusing on the horizontal width of the xylophone auditory image. The directivity pattern of the xylophone was measured...... xylophone sound rendering is proposed. The recorded signal is processed in order to define multiple virtual sources which are spatially distributed for the auditory width representation of the virtual xylophone. The results of the analyzed recording and rendering techniques are compared in terms...

  1. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography for Breast Target Volume Delineation in Prone and Supine Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, Elise M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Care Centre, Westmead Hospital, Westmead (Australia); Boxer, Miriam M. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Chan, Christine [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer A. [School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba (Australia); Koh, Eng-Siew [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Lim, Karen [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Papadatos, George [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether T2-weighted MRI improves seroma cavity (SC) and whole breast (WB) interobserver conformity for radiation therapy purposes, compared with the gold standard of CT, both in the prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eleven observers (2 radiologists and 9 radiation oncologists) delineated SC and WB clinical target volumes (CTVs) on T2-weighted MRI and CT supine and prone scans (4 scans per patient) for 33 patient datasets. Individual observer's volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume overlap index, center of mass shift, and Hausdorff distances. An average cavity visualization score was also determined. Results: Imaging modality did not affect interobserver variation for WB CTVs. Prone WB CTVs were larger in volume and more conformal than supine CTVs (on both MRI and CT). Seroma cavity volumes were larger on CT than on MRI. Seroma cavity volumes proved to be comparable in interobserver conformity in both modalities (volume overlap index of 0.57 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.54-0.60) for CT supine and 0.52 (95% CI 0.48-0.56) for MRI supine, 0.56 (95% CI 0.53-0.59) for CT prone and 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.59) for MRI prone); however, after registering modalities together the intermodality variation (Dice similarity coefficient of 0.41 (95% CI 0.36-0.46) for supine and 0.38 (0.34-0.42) for prone) was larger than the interobserver variability for SC, despite the location typically remaining constant. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging interobserver variation was comparable to CT for the WB CTV and SC delineation, in both prone and supine positions. Although the cavity visualization score and interobserver concordance was not significantly higher for MRI than for CT, the SCs were smaller on MRI, potentially owing to clearer SC definition, especially on T2-weighted MR images.

  2. Immersive Photography Renders 360 degree Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    An SBIR contract through Langley Research Center helped Interactive Pictures Corporation, of Knoxville, Tennessee, create an innovative imaging technology. This technology is a video imaging process that allows real-time control of live video data and can provide users with interactive, panoramic 360 views. The camera system can see in multiple directions, provide up to four simultaneous views, each with its own tilt, rotation, and magnification, yet it has no moving parts, is noiseless, and can respond faster than the human eye. In addition, it eliminates the distortion caused by a fisheye lens, and provides a clear, flat view of each perspective.

  3. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Exercise 5: an international multicenter reliability study using computerized MRI erosion volume measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bird, P; Ejbjerg, B; McQueen, F

    2003-01-01

    . The volume estimation method was more time consuming, taking roughly 5 times as long as the scoring method. Computerized MRI erosion volume measurements are feasible, with high intra-observer and inter-occasion reliabilities. Despite high ICC, the inter-observer reliability is not sufficient for multicenter......Scoring erosions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one method of estimating damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but it has limitations. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility and inter-reader reliability of computer assisted erosion volume estimation...... in patients with RA. Intra-reader and inter-occasion reliability was also assessed, and different slice thicknesses were compared in terms of erosion volume estimation. A 3 mm slice thickness 3D gradient-echo sequence followed by a 1 mm sequence was performed at baseline and repeated within 24 h...

  4. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leong, Andrew F. T.; Islam, M. Sirajul; Kitchen, Marcus J. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Fouras, Andreas [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Wallace, Megan J.; Hooper, Stuart B. [Ritchie Centre and Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash University, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. Methods: The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions {approx}16.2 {mu}m). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Results: Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. Conclusions: This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using

  5. Commissioning and quality assurance of the X-ray volume Imaging system of an image-guided radiotherapy capable linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An Image-Guided Radiotherapy-capable linear accelerator (Elekta Synergy was installed at our hospital, which is equipped with a kV x-ray volume imaging (XVI system and electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT. The objective of this presentation is to describe the results of commissioning measurements carried out on the XVI facility to verify the manufacturer′s specifications and also to evolve a QA schedule which can be used to test its performance routinely. The QA program consists of a series of tests (safety features, geometric accuracy, and image quality. These tests were found to be useful to assess the performance of the XVI system and also proved that XVI system is very suitable for image-guided high-precision radiation therapy.

  6. MATLAB code to estimate landslide volume from single remote sensed image using genetic algorithm and imagery similarity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Shiuan; Yu, Teng-To; Lee, Shing-Tsz; Peng, Wen-Fei; Lin, Wei-Ling; Li, Pei-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Information regarding the scale of a hazard is crucial for the evaluation of its associated impact. Quantitative analysis of landslide volume immediately following the event can offer better understanding and control of contributory factors and their relative importance. Such information cannot be gathered for each landslide event, owing to limitations in obtaining useable raw data and the necessary procedures of each applied technology. Empirical rules are often used to predict volume change, but the resulting accuracy is very low. Traditional methods use photogrammetry or light detection and ranging (LiDAR) to produce a post-event digital terrain model (DTM). These methods are both costly and time-intensive. This study presents a technique to estimate terrain change volumes quickly and easily, not only reducing waiting time but also offering results with less than 25% error. A genetic algorithm (GA) programmed MATLAB is used to intelligently predict the elevation change for each pixel of an image. This deviation from the pre-event DTM becomes a candidate for the post-event DTM. Thus, each changed DTM is converted into a shadow relief image and compared with a single post-event remotely sensed image for similarity ranking. The candidates ranked in the top two thirds are retained as parent chromosomes to produce offspring in the next generation according to the rules of GAs. When the highest similarity index reaches 0.75, the DTM corresponding to that hillshade image is taken as the calculated post-event DTM. As an example, a pit with known volume is removed from a flat, inclined plane to demonstrate the theoretical capability of the code. The method is able to rapidly estimate the volume of terrain change within an error of 25%, without the delays involved in obtaining stereo image pairs, or the need for ground control points (GCPs) or professional photogrammetry software.

  7. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Image Sequence Influences the Relationship between Bone Marrow Lesions Volume and Pain: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral bone marrow lesions (BMLs are related to structural and symptomatic osteoarthritis progression. However, it is unclear how sequence selection influences a quantitative BML measurement and its construct validity. We compared quantitative assessment of BMLs on intermediate-weighted fat suppressed (IW FS turbo spin echo and 3-dimensional dual echo steady state (3D DESS sequences. We used a customized software to measure 30 knees’ (24- and 48-month MR images BMLs on both sequences. The results showed that the IW FS sequences have much larger BML volumes (median: IW FS = 1840 mm3; DESS = 191 mm3 and BML volume change (between 24 and 48 months than DESS sequence and demonstrate more BML volume change. The 24-month BML volume on IW FS is correlated with BML volume on DESS (rs = 0.83. BML volume change on IW FS is not significantly correlated with change on DESS. The 24-month WOMAC pain is correlated with the 24-month BMLs on IW FS (rs = 0.39 but not DESS. The change in WOMAC pain is correlated with BML volume change on IW FS (rs = 0.37 but not DESS. Overall, BML quantification on IW FS offers better validity and statistical power than BML quantification on a 3D DESS sequence.

  9. Prospective motion correction in 2D multishot MRI using EPI navigators and multislice-to-volume image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoinkiss, Daniel Christopher; Porter, David Andrew

    2017-12-01

    Prospective motion correction reduces artifacts in MRI by correcting for subject motion in real time, but techniques are limited for multishot 2-dimensional (2D) sequences. This study addresses this limitation by using 2D echo-planar imaging (EPI) slice navigator acquisitions together with a multislice-to-volume image registration. The 2D-EPI navigators were integrated into 2D imaging sequences to allow a rapid, real-time motion correction based on the registration of three navigator slices to a reference volume. A dedicated slice-iteration scheme was used to limit mutual spin-saturation effects between navigator and image data. The method was evaluated using T2 -weighted spin echo and multishot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) sequences, and its motion-correction capabilities were compared with those of periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER). Validation was performed in vivo using a well-defined motion protocol. Data acquired during subject motion showed residual motion parameters within ±0.5 mm and ±0.5°, and demonstrated a substantial improvement in image quality compared with uncorrected scans. In a comparison to PROPELLER, the proposed technique preserved a higher level of anatomical detail in the presence of subject motion. EPI-navigator-based prospective motion correction using multislice-to-volume image registration can substantially reduce image artifacts, while minimizing spin-saturation effects. The method can be adapted for use in other 2D MRI sequences and promises to improve image quality in routine clinical examinations. Magn Reson Med 78:2127-2135, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  10. Dose-volume analysis of target volume and critical structures in computed tomography image-based multicatheter high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Akiyama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate dose-volume relationships of target volume and critical structures in computed tomography (CT image-based brachytherapy for head and neck cancer. Material and methods : Thirty-seven patients with mobile tongue, floor of mouth, and base of tongue cancer treated with brachytherapy (post-operative alone and as a boost after external beam radiotherapy [EBRT], or definitive alone or as a boost after EBRT were selected. Treatment plans were made using post-implant CT images. The fractionation schedule was 7-15 × 3-5 Gy for post-operative (with or without EBRT, 14-15 × 3 Gy for definitive alone, and 5-10 × 3 Gy for boost treatments. For the target volume, V 100 , D 90 , and dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR were calculated. For the mandible, spinal cord and salivary glands doses to specified volumes were reported. Results : The median values of V 100 and D 90 were 89.9% and 99.9%, respectively; the median values of DNR was 0.46. The median D 2cm 3 of the mandible and spinal cord were 48.3% and 5.8%, respectively. The ipsilateral median D 2cm 3 of parotid and submandibular glands were 6.4% and 12.5%, whereas on the contralateral side, the corresponding values were 5.3% and 7.0%, respectively. Conclusions : Using conformal treatment planning, it was desirable to keep the dose to the mandible, spinal cord, and salivary glands at an acceptable level. The quantitative plan evaluation may help us find correlations between dosimetric parameters and clinical outcome, which may lead to improve the quality of the treatment, but it requires longer follow-up and results from other studies.

  11. High volume image guided injections and structured rehabilitation in shoulder impingement syndrome: a retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Ghozlan, Asser; Price, Jessica; Perry, John; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background the aim was to establish the effect of a high volume-image guided injection and structured rehabilitation (HVIGI&SR) on both pain and function in shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Methods 44 participants treated between January 2008 and January 2012 with a >3 month history of recalcitrant ultrasound-confirmed SIS were sent a retrospective questionnaire. All participants had received a HVIGI under ultrasound-guidance consisting of 20 mls of Marcaine with 50 mg of hydrocortisone, followed by a period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation. The validated Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score was used to establish the change in the score between 1 week pre-injection and 3 weeks post-injection, along with an 11-point pain scale. Results 59% of participants responded. There was a clinically and statistically significant decrease in the SPADI score of 58.7 ± 29.9 (p<0.01). 76% of participants had an improvement in their score of over 50% from their initial score. There was a clinically and statistically significant improvement in pain of 5.19 ± 2.62 (p<0.01) on the numerical rating scale of pain. Conclusion HVIGI&SR should be considered for short-term treatment of SIS as it showed a significant improvement in both pain and function. A prolonged period of physiotherapist-led rehabilitation can then be undertaken for long term benefits. PMID:26605194

  12. Pulmonary blood volume imaging with dual-energy computed tomography: Spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagspiel, K.D., E-mail: kdh2n@virginia.edu [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Flors, L.; Housseini, A.M.; Phull, A. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Ali Ahmad, E. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Department of Radiology, Minia University, Minia (Egypt); Bozlar, U.; Norton, P.T. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Bonatti, H.J.R. [Department of Surgery, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Dual-energy (DE) pulmonary blood volume (PBV) computed tomography (CT) has recently become available on clinical CT systems. The underlying physical principle of DECT is the fact that the photoelectric effect is strongly dependent on the CT energies resulting in different degrees of x-ray attenuation for different materials at different energy levels. DECT thus enables the characterization and quantification of iodine within tissues via imaging at different x-ray energies and analysis of attenuation differences. Technical approaches to DECT include dual-source scanners acquiring two scans with different energy levels simultaneously, and single-source CT scanners using sandwich detectors or rapid voltage switching. DE PBV CT enables the creation of iodine maps of the pulmonary parenchyma. Experience to date shows that these studies can provide additional physiological information in patients with acute or chronic pulmonary embolism beyond the pure morphological assessment a standard CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) provides. It appears also to be promising for the evaluation of patients with obstructive airways disease. This article reviews the physics and technical aspects of DE PBV CT as well as the appearance of normal and abnormal lung tissue on these studies. Special consideration is given to pitfalls and artefacts.

  13. Adrenal gland volume assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, E; Unlu, B S; Yildiz, Y; Beker-Acay, M; Kacar, E; Turamanlar, O; Tulmac, O B; Seven, A; Ozuguz, U

    2016-01-01

    To determine adrenal gland volume (AGV) in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) by comparison with healthy control subjects and to investigate the relationship between AGV and hormonal status. AGV was measured on transverse sections of T1-weighted MRI imaging data in 27 PCOS patients and 40 age-matched control subjects for this prospectively designed study. A comparative analysis of AGV in PCOS and controls was performed and possible correlations between AGV and hormonal parameters were evaluated. PCOS patients had significantly larger AGV compared to controls ((11.7±4.4 cm(3), 7.2±1.9 cm(3), respectively, PAGV and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, 17-OH progesterone, and total and free testosterone levels in the PCOS group (r=+0.51, +0.48, +0.43, +0.62, respectively; P valuesAGV was significantly negatively correlated with LH and LH/FSH ratio in the PCOS group (r= -0.55, P=0.02; r=-0.51, P=0.01, respectively). PCOS patients have significantly increased AGV as well as a positive correlation of AGV and androgens. We conclude that the assessment of AGV with MRI shows a significant correlation with the androgenic activity of the gland, and that hypertrophy of the adrenal gland may be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing viewing procedures of breast tomosynthesis image volumes using eye tracking combined with a free response human observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nystrom, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate four different viewing procedures as part of improving viewing conditions of breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes. The procedures consisted of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14 and 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate a lesion, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. The results indicate that there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different viewing procedures, however the medium cine loop speed seemed to be the preferred viewing procedure in terms of total analyze time and dwell time.

  15. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods : This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI exams were acquired at diagnosis (D, first (B1, and third (B3 brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE and MRI contouring (VC, which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results: Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20% was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions : The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation.

  16. Super-resolution reconstruction in frequency, image, and wavelet domains to reduce through-plane partial voluming in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour, Ali, E-mail: ali.gholipour@childrens.harvard.edu; Afacan, Onur; Scherrer, Benoit; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Department of Radiology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aganj, Iman [Radiology Department, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02129 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Sahin, Mustafa [Department of Neurology, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To compare and evaluate the use of super-resolution reconstruction (SRR), in frequency, image, and wavelet domains, to reduce through-plane partial voluming effects in magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: The reconstruction of an isotropic high-resolution image from multiple thick-slice scans has been investigated through techniques in frequency, image, and wavelet domains. Experiments were carried out with thick-slice T2-weighted fast spin echo sequence on the Academic College of Radiology MRI phantom, where the reconstructed images were compared to a reference high-resolution scan using peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), structural similarity image metric (SSIM), mutual information (MI), and the mean absolute error (MAE) of image intensity profiles. The application of super-resolution reconstruction was then examined in retrospective processing of clinical neuroimages of ten pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) to reduce through-plane partial voluming for improved 3D delineation and visualization of thin radial bands of white matter abnormalities. Results: Quantitative evaluation results show improvements in all evaluation metrics through super-resolution reconstruction in the frequency, image, and wavelet domains, with the highest values obtained from SRR in the image domain. The metric values for image-domain SRR versus the original axial, coronal, and sagittal images were PSNR = 32.26 vs 32.22, 32.16, 30.65; SSIM = 0.931 vs 0.922, 0.924, 0.918; MI = 0.871 vs 0.842, 0.844, 0.831; and MAE = 5.38 vs 7.34, 7.06, 6.19. All similarity metrics showed high correlations with expert ranking of image resolution with MI showing the highest correlation at 0.943. Qualitative assessment of the neuroimages of ten TSC patients through in-plane and out-of-plane visualization of structures showed the extent of partial voluming effect in a real clinical scenario and its reduction using SRR. Blinded expert evaluation of image resolution in

  17. Evaluation of labor-intensity while rendering audit services

    OpenAIRE

    Шигун, Марія Михайлівна; Гаргола, Ю. Г.

    2015-01-01

    The necessity of setting qualification requirements to the experts of audit firms who are not auditors by profession but are engaged in the process of rendering audit services has been grounded. The specificity of evaluating labor-intensity while rendering audit services has been disclosed.

  18. Emotion rendering in auditory simulations of imagined walking styles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Rodá, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated how different emotional states of a walker can be rendered and recognized by means of footstep sounds synthesis algorithms. In a first experiment, participants were asked to render, according to imagined walking scenarios, five emotions (aggressive, happy, neutral, sad...

  19. Extreme Simplification and Rendering of Point Sets using Algebraic Multigrid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, Dennie; Telea, Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel approach for extreme simplification of point set models in the context of real-time rendering. Point sets are often rendered using simple point primitives, such as oriented discs. However efficient, simple primitives are less effective in approximating large surface areas. A large

  20. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  1. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  2. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  3. A comparison of automated versus manual segmentation of breast UST transmission images to measure breast volume and sound speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Westerberg, Katelyn

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) is an emerging breast imaging modality that can be used to quantitatively measure breast density. However, the sound speed images that are used in this analysis must first be segmented in order to accurately parse any quantitative information. Previously, this segmentation has been done manually, but this is time consuming, especially when dealing with a large number of images that must be masked. An automated masking algorithm has been developed that applies thresholding and morphological operators to UST attenuation images to automatically create masks that separate the breast tissue from the water bath. An initial set of images was tested using this algorithm to fine tune settings and very good agreement was achieved. However, when the optimized settings were applied to a larger dataset of 286 images, the robustness of the algorithm was tested. The manual masks measured a larger volume (921 cm3) than the automated masks (713 cm3), but fortunately, the difference in mean sound speed was much smaller (1449 m/s versus 1448 m/s). A majority of the automated masks (72.7%) had a measured Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of greater than 0.8 which indicates that there was good to great overlap in the volumes of tissue created by the automated method. This algorithm shows promise to be used as a tool to quickly and effectively measure breast density.

  4. Rendering 3D graphics as an aid to stylized line drawings in perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Arandjus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to study the issue of drawing 2D objects and environments in perspective and attempted to ease the process of drawing them with the aid of three-dimensional computer graphics. The goal of the research was to develop the method, which would exclude the need to trace three-dimensional models, which many digital artists use as a guide when making drawings. The need to trace has been eliminated by finding a procedure to render three-dimensional models to appear drawn – to appear drawn by an artist who has a stylized line style. After researching various techniques of rendering, Sketchup was used to make and apply a Sketchup style which emulated a line style. After that, various tests were performed using computer measurements and questionnaires to determine if the observers could distinguish between three-dimensional renders and two-dimensional drawings. The results have shown that very few participants notice three-dimensional graphics rendered with Sketchup. Even among the few observers who did notice the presence of three-dimensional models, none detected even half. The results confirmed the adequateness of the methodology, which enables a more correct creation of element in perspective and convinces the observers that the entire image is stylistically uniform hand drawn image.

  5. Accuracy of rendered depth in head-mounted displays: role of eyepoint location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaissie, Laurent; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2000-06-01

    Eyetracking is typically not available in head-mounted displays, and eye motions are thus simply ignored when 2D virtual images are displayed, giving rise to rendered depth errors in generating stereoscopic image pairs in head- mounted displays. We present an investigation and quantification of rendered depth errors linked to natural eye movements in binocular head-mounted displays, or Albertian errors, for three possible eyepoint locations: the center of the entrance pupil, the nodal point, and the center of rotation. Theoretical computations based on the intersection of chief rays concluded that, while the center of rotation yields minimal depth errors if no eyetracking is used, rendered angular errors may in some cases be significant (i.e. up to six degrees). Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we suggest that the center of entrance pupil be chosen for far field applications. The center of rotation of the eye should be chosen for near field applications under the assumption that they emphasize position accuracy versus angular accuracy. Preventing or minimizing rendered depth errors may be required for some high accuracy tasks related, for example, to medical or military visualization.

  6. Gross tumor volume dependency on phase sorting methods of four-dimensional computed tomography images for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Yong; Lim, Sang Wook; Ma, Sun Young; Yu, Je Sang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To see the gross tumor volume (GTV) dependency according to the phase selection and reconstruction methods, we measured and analyzed the changes of tumor volume and motion at each phase in 20 cases with lung cancer patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images in 20 cases of 19 patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. The 4D-CT images were reconstructed by the maximum intensity projection (MIP) and the minimum intensity projection (Min-IP) method after sorting phase as 40%–60%, 30%–70%, and 0%–90%. We analyzed the relationship between the range of motion and the change of GTV according to the reconstruction method. The motion ranges of GTVs are statistically significant only for the tumor motion in craniocaudal direction. The discrepancies of GTV volume and motion between MIP and Min-IP increased rapidly as the wider ranges of duty cycles are selected. As narrow as possible duty cycle such as 40%–60% and MIP reconstruction was suitable for lung cancer if the respiration was stable. Selecting the reconstruction methods and duty cycle is important for small size and for large motion range tumors.

  7. Conversion of a Surface Model of a Structure of Interest into a Volume Model for Medical Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmad ISTEPHAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Volumetric medical image datasets contain vital information for noninvasive diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis. However, direct and unlimited query of such datasets is hindered due to the unstructured nature of the imaging data. This study is a step towards the unlimited query of medical image datasets by focusing on specific Structures of Interest (SOI. A requirement in achieving this objective is having both the surface and volume models of the SOI. However, typically, only the surface model is available. Therefore, this study focuses on creating a fast method to convert a surface model to a volume model. Three methods (1D, 2D and 3D are proposed and evaluated using simulated and real data of Deep Perisylvian Area (DPSA within the human brain. The 1D method takes 80 msec for DPSA model; about 4 times faster than 2D method and 7.4 fold faster than 3D method, with over 97% accuracy. The proposed 1D method is feasible for surface to volume conversion in computer aided diagnosis, treatment planning and prognosis systems containing large amounts of unstructured medical images.

  8. Robust unsupervised segmentation of infarct lesion from diffusion tensor MR images using multiscale statistical classification and partial volume voxel reclassification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Tian, Jie; Li, Enzhong; Dai, Jianping

    2004-12-01

    Manual region tracing method for segmentation of infarction lesions in images from diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is usually used in clinical works, but it is time consuming. A new unsupervised method has been developed, which is a multistage procedure, involving image preprocessing, calculation of tensor field and measurement of diffusion anisotropy, segmentation of infarction volume based on adaptive multiscale statistical classification (MSSC), and partial volume voxel reclassification (PVVR). The method accounts for random noise, intensity overlapping, partial volume effect (PVE), and intensity shading artifacts, which always appear in DT-MR images. The proposed method was applied to 20 patients with clinically diagnosed brain infarction by DT-MRI scans. The accuracy and reproducibility in terms of identifying the infarction lesion have been confirmed by clinical experts. This automatic segmentation method is promising not only in detecting the location and the size of infarction lesion in stroke patient but also in quantitatively analyzing diffusion anisotropy of lesion to guide clinical diagnoses and therapy.

  9. Decreased right heart blood volume determined by magnetic resonance imaging: evidence of central underfilling in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Søndergaard, Lise; Møgelvang, J

    1995-01-01

    as the cardiac output (CO) multiplied by the central circulation time, was significantly decreased (1.47 vs. 1.81 L, P blood volume (4.43 vs. 3.64 L, P plasma volume (4.05 vs. 3.27 L, P ...Whether the central blood volume is reduced or expanded in cirrhosis is still under debate. Accordingly, the current study was undertaken to assess the volume of the heart cavities. Ten cirrhotic patients and matched controls had their right and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes (RVDV and LVDV...... mL, NS), and left atrial volume (70 vs. 57 mL, P = .08) were normal or slightly increased. The right ejection fraction (68% vs. 53%, P blood volume (CBV), assessed...

  10. Calculation of Lung Cancer Volume of Target Based on Thorax Computed Tomography Images using Active Contour Segmentation Method for Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Yosandha, Fiet; Adi, Kusworo; Edi Widodo, Catur

    2017-06-01

    In this research, calculation process of the lung cancer volume of target based on computed tomography (CT) thorax images was done. Volume of the target calculation was done in purpose to treatment planning system in radiotherapy. The calculation of the target volume consists of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the target volume was done by adding the target area on each slices and then multiply the result with the slice thickness. Calculations of area using of digital image processing techniques with active contour segmentation method. This segmentation for contouring to obtain the target volume. The calculation of volume produced on each of the targets is 577.2 cm3 for GTV, 769.9 cm3 for CTV, 877.8 cm3 for PTV, 618.7 cm3 for OAR 1, 1,162 cm3 for OAR 2 right, and 1,597 cm3 for OAR 2 left. These values indicate that the image processing techniques developed can be implemented to calculate the lung cancer target volume based on CT thorax images. This research expected to help doctors and medical physicists in determining and contouring the target volume quickly and precisely.

  11. Image data processing system requirements study. Volume 1: Analysis. [for Earth Resources Survey Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honikman, T.; Mcmahon, E.; Miller, E.; Pietrzak, L.; Yorsz, W.

    1973-01-01

    Digital image processing, image recorders, high-density digital data recorders, and data system element processing for use in an Earth Resources Survey image data processing system are studied. Loading to various ERS systems is also estimated by simulation.

  12. Analysis of information for cerebrovascular disorders obtained by 3D MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kohki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Medical Science; Yoshioka, Naoki; Watanabe, Fumio; Shiono, Takahiro; Sugishita, Morihiro; Umino, Kazunori

    1995-12-01

    Recently, it becomes easy to analyze information obtained by 3D MR imaging due to remarkable progress of fast MR imaging technique and analysis tool. Six patients suffered from aphasia (4 cerebral infarctions and 2 bleedings) were performed 3D MR imaging (3D FLASH-TR/TE/flip angle; 20-50 msec/6-10 msec/20-30 degrees) and their volume information were analyzed by multiple projection reconstruction (MPR), surface rendering 3D reconstruction, and volume rendering 3D reconstruction using Volume Design PRO (Medical Design Co., Ltd.). Four of them were diagnosed as Broca`s aphasia clinically and their lesions could be detected around the cortices of the left inferior frontal gyrus. Another 2 patients were diagnosed as Wernicke`s aphasia and the lesions could be detected around the cortices of the left supramarginal gyrus. This technique for 3D volume analyses would provide quite exact locational information about cerebral cortical lesions. (author).

  13. Bubble formation in shear-thinning fluids: Laser image measurement and a novel correlation for detached volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser image system has been established to quantify the characteristics of growing bubbles in quiescent shear-thinning fluids. Bubble formation mechanism was investigated by comparing the evolutions of bubble instantaneous shape, volume and surface area in two shear-thinning liquids with those in Newtonian liquid. The effects of solution mass concentration, gas chamber volume and orifice diameter on bubble detachment volume are discussed. By dimensional analysis, a single bubble volume detached within a moderate gas flowrate range was developed as a function of Reynolds number ,Re, Weber number, We, and gas chamber number, Vc, based on the orifice diameter. The results reveal that the generated bubble presents a slim shape due to the shear-thinning effect of the fluid. Bubble detachment volume increases with the solution mass concentration, gas chamber volume and orifice diameter. The results predicted by the present correlation agree better with the experimental data than the previous ones within the range of this paper.

  14. Noninvasive, low-noise, fast imaging of blood volume and deoxygenation changes in muscles using light-emitting diode continuous-wave imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuanqing; Lech, Gwen; Nioka, Shoko; Intes, Xavier; Chance, Britton

    2002-08-01

    This article focuses on optimizing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a three-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) near-infrared continuous-wave (cw) imager and its application to in vivo muscle metabolism measurement. The shot-noise limited SNR is derived and calculated to be 2 x104 for the physiological blood concentrations of muscle. Aiming at shot-noise limited SNR performance and fast imaging, we utilize sample and hold circuits to reduce high-frequency noise. These circuits have also been designed to be parallel integrating, through which SNR of 2 x103 and 2 Hz imaging acquisition rate have been achieved when the probe is placed on a muscle model. The noise corresponds to 2 x10-4 optical density error, which suggests an in vitro resolution of 15. 4 nM blood volume and 46.8 nM deoxygenation changes. A 48 dB digital gain control circuit with 256 steps is employed to enlarge the dynamic range of the imager. We utilize cuff ischemia as a living model demonstration and its results are reported. The instrument is applied during exercise to measure the changes of blood volume and deoxygenation, which provides important information about muscle metabolism. We find that the primary source of noise encountered during exercise experiment is from the random motion of muscle. The results demonstrate that the LED cw imager is ideal for the noninvasive study of muscle metabolism.

  15. Opacity-driven volume clipping for slice of interest (SOI) visualisation of multi-modality PET-CT volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younhyun; Kim, Jinman; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2014-01-01

    Multi-modality positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging depicts biological and physiological functions (from PET) within a higher resolution anatomical reference frame (from CT). The need to efficiently assimilate the information from these co-aligned volumes simultaneously has resulted in 3D visualisation methods that depict e.g., slice of interest (SOI) from PET combined with direct volume rendering (DVR) of CT. However because DVR renders the whole volume, regions of interests (ROIs) such as tumours that are embedded within the volume may be occluded from view. Volume clipping is typically used to remove occluding structures by `cutting away' parts of the volume; this involves tedious trail-and-error tweaking of the clipping attempts until a satisfied visualisation is made, thus restricting its application. Hence, we propose a new automated opacity-driven volume clipping method for PET-CT using DVR-SOI visualisation. Our method dynamically calculates the volume clipping depth by considering the opacity information of the CT voxels in front of the PET SOI, thereby ensuring that only the relevant anatomical information from the CT is visualised while not impairing the visibility of the PET SOI. We outline the improvements of our method when compared to conventional 2D and traditional DVR-SOI visualisations.

  16. A three-dimensional model-based partial volume correction strategy for gated cardiac mouse PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Tyler; Thorn, Stephanie; Kordos, Myra; DaSilva, Jean; Beanlands, Rob S. B.; deKemp, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    Quantification in cardiac mouse positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is limited by the imaging spatial resolution. Spillover of left ventricle (LV) myocardial activity into adjacent organs results in partial volume (PV) losses leading to underestimation of myocardial activity. A PV correction method was developed to restore accuracy of the activity distribution for FDG mouse imaging. The PV correction model was based on convolving an LV image estimate with a 3D point spread function. The LV model was described regionally by a five-parameter profile including myocardial, background and blood activities which were separated into three compartments by the endocardial radius and myocardium wall thickness. The PV correction was tested with digital simulations and a physical 3D mouse LV phantom. In vivo cardiac FDG mouse PET imaging was also performed. Following imaging, the mice were sacrificed and the tracer biodistribution in the LV and liver tissue was measured using a gamma-counter. The PV correction algorithm improved recovery from 50% to within 5% of the truth for the simulated and measured phantom data and image uniformity by 5-13%. The PV correction algorithm improved the mean myocardial LV recovery from 0.56 (0.54) to 1.13 (1.10) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections. The mean image uniformity was improved from 26% (26%) to 17% (16%) without (with) scatter and attenuation corrections applied. Scatter and attenuation corrections were not observed to significantly impact PV-corrected myocardial recovery or image uniformity. Image-based PV correction algorithm can increase the accuracy of PET image activity and improve the uniformity of the activity distribution in normal mice. The algorithm may be applied using different tracers, in transgenic models that affect myocardial uptake, or in different species provided there is sufficient image quality and similar contrast between the myocardium and surrounding structures.

  17. Unconscious neural processing differs with method used to render stimuli invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Victor Fogelson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual stimuli can be kept from awareness using various methods. The extent of processing that a given stimulus receives in the absence of awareness is typically used to make claims about the role of consciousness more generally. The neural processing elicited by a stimulus, however, may also depend on the method used to keep it from awareness, and not only on whether the stimulus reaches awareness. Here we report that the method used to render an image invisible has a dramatic effect on how category information about the unseen stimulus is encoded across the human brain. We collected fMRI data while subjects viewed images of faces and tools, that were rendered invisible using either continuous flash suppression (CFS or chromatic flicker fusion (CFF. In a third condition, we presented the same images under normal fully visible viewing conditions. We found that category information about visible images could be extracted from patterns of fMRI responses throughout areas of neocortex known to be involved in face or tool processing. However, category information about stimuli kept from awareness using CFS could be recovered exclusively within occipital cortex, whereas information about stimuli kept from awareness using CFF was also decodable within temporal and frontal regions. We conclude that unconsciously presented objects are processed differently depending on how they are rendered subjectively invisible. Caution should therefore be used in making generalizations on the basis of any one method about the neural basis of consciousness or the extent of information processing without consciousness.

  18. ACCELERATION RENDERING METHOD ON RAY TRACING WITH ANGLE COMPARISON AND DISTANCE COMPARISON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana liliana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In computer graphics applications, to produce realistic images, a method that is often used is ray tracing. Ray tracing does not only model local illumination but also global illumination. Local illumination count ambient, diffuse and specular effects only, but global illumination also count mirroring and transparency. Local illumination count effects from the lamp(s but global illumination count effects from other object(s too. Objects that are usually modeled are primitive objects and mesh objects. The advantage of mesh modeling is various, interesting and real-like shape. Mesh contains many primitive objects like triangle or square (rare. A problem in mesh object modeling is long rendering time. It is because every ray must be checked with a lot of triangle of the mesh. Added by ray from other objects checking, the number of ray that traced will increase. It causes the increasing of rendering time. To solve this problem, in this research, new methods are developed to make the rendering process of mesh object faster. The new methods are angle comparison and distance comparison. These methods are used to reduce the number of ray checking. The rays predicted will not intersect with the mesh, are not checked weather the ray intersects the mesh. With angle comparison, if using small angle to compare, the rendering process will be fast. This method has disadvantage, if the shape of each triangle is big, some triangles will be corrupted. If the angle to compare is bigger, mesh corruption can be avoided but the rendering time will be longer than without comparison. With distance comparison, the rendering time is less than without comparison, and no triangle will be corrupted.

  19. First Order Statistics of Speckle around a Scatterer Volume Density Edge and Edge Detection in Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic imaging plays an important role in medical imaging. But the images exhibit a granular structure, commonly known as speckle. The speckle tends to mask the presence of low-contrast lesions and reduces the ability of a human observer to resolve fine details. Our interest in this research is to examine the problem of edge detection and come up with methods for improving the visualization of organ boundaries and tissue inhomogeneity edges. An edge in an image can be formed either by acoustic impedance change or by scatterer volume density change (or both). The echo produced from these two kinds of edges has different properties. In this work, it has been proved that the echo from a scatterer volume density edge is the Hilbert transform of the echo from a rough impedance boundary (except for a constant) under certain conditions. This result can be used for choosing the correct signal to transmit to optimize the performance of edge detectors and characterizing an edge. The signal to noise ratio of the echo produced by a scatterer volume density edge is also obtained. It is found that: (1) By transmitting a signal with high bandwidth ratio and low center frequency, one can obtain a higher signal to noise ratio. (2) For large area edges, the farther the transducer is from the edge, the larger is the signal to noise ratio. But for small area edges, the nearer the transducer is to the edge, the larger is the signal to noise ratio. These results enable us to maximize the signal to noise ratio by adjusting these parameters. (3) The signal to noise ratio is not only related to the ratio of scatterer volume densities at the edge, but also related to the absolute value of scatterer volume densities. Some of these results have been proved through simulation and experiment. Different edge detection methods have been used to detect simulated scatterer volume density edges to compare their performance. A so-called interlaced array method has been developed for speckle

  20. Brain pathology in first-episode psychosis: magnetization transfer imaging provides additional information to MRI measurements of volume loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gary; Cercignani, Mara; Chu, Elvina M; Barnes, Thomas R E; Barker, Gareth J; Joyce, Eileen M; Ron, Maria A

    2010-01-01

    Loss of brain volume in first-episode psychosis can be detected using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but subtle changes--not leading to reduction in volume--that may contribute to clinical and cognitive abnormalities, may go undetected. Magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), a technique more sensitive to subtle neuropathological changes than conventional MRI, could yield important information on the extent and nature of structural abnormalities. Forty-eight patients (33 males) from a population-based sample with first-episode psychosis (41 with schizophrenia and 7 with schizoaffective psychosis) and 47 healthy volunteers (27 males) were studied. Differences in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and white and grey matter volumes between groups were investigated. In patients, MTR was reduced in right entorhinal cortex, fusiform, dentate and superior frontal gyri and in left superior frontal and inferior/rostral cingulate gyri. Grey matter volume was reduced in right insula, frontal operculum and middle and superior temporal gyri and in left middle temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume increases were seen in patients in the superior frontal gyrus. White matter volume loss was found adjacent to grey matter loss. In patients MTR was lower in all areas of volumetric differences between groups suggesting that both changes may be related. Similar findings were observed when patients with schizoaffective psychosis were removed from the analysis. The correlations between clinical and MRI parameters did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. MTI frontal and temporal abnormalities suggesting neuroaxonal and myelin changes were more extensive in our patients than those detected with conventional MRI. Our findings also suggest that there is regional variation in the severity of structural brain abnormalities.

  1. Volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging in C-arm flat-detector CT for high image quality at reduced dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolditz, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A

    2010-06-01

    A novel method for flat-detector computed tomography was developed to enable volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging at high resolution, low noise, and reduced dose. For this, a full low-dose overview (OV) scan and a local high-dose scan of a VOI are combined. The first scan yields an overview of the whole object and enables the selection of an arbitrary VOI. The second scan of that VOI assures high image quality within the interesting volume. The combination of the two consecutive scans is based on a forward projection of the reconstructed OV volume that was registered to the VOI. The artificial projection data of the OV scan are combined with the measured VOI data in the raw data domain. Different projection values are matched by an appropriate transformation and weighting. The reconstruction is performed with a standard Feldkamp-type algorithm. In simulations, the combination of OV scan and VOI scan was investigated on a mathematically described phantom. In measurements, spatial resolution and noise were evaluated with image quality phantoms. Modulation transfer functions and noise values were calculated. Measurements of an anthropomorphic head phantom were used to validate the proposed method for realistic applications, e.g., imaging stents. In Monte Carlo simulations, 3D dose distributions were calculated and dose values were assessed quantitatively. By the proposed combination method, an image is generated which covers the whole object and provides the VOI at high image quality. In the OV image, a resolution of 0.7 lp/mm (line pairs per millimeter) and noise of 63.5 HU were determined. Inside the VOI, resolution was increased to 2.4 lp/mm and noise was decreased to 18.7 HU. For the performed measurements, the cumulative dose was significantly reduced in comparison to conventional scans by up to 93%. The dose of a high-quality scan, for example, was reduced from 97 to less than 7 mGy, while keeping image quality constant within the VOI. The proposed VOI application

  2. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use of visualisation techniques to assist the shoulder replacement process. This motivated the need for a flexible environment within which to test and develop new visualisation and also image processin...

  3. An investigation of kV CBCT image quality and dose reduction for volume-of-interest imaging using dynamic collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, David, E-mail: david.parsons@dal.ca, E-mail: james.robar@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada); Robar, James L., E-mail: david.parsons@dal.ca, E-mail: james.robar@cdha.nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work was to investigate the improvements in image quality and dose reduction for volume-of-interest (VOI) kilovoltage-cone beam CT (CBCT) using dynamic collimation. Methods: A prototype iris aperture was used to track a VOI during a CBCT acquisition. The current aperture design is capable of 1D translation as a function of gantry angle and dynamic adjustment of the iris radius. The aperture occupies the location of the bow-tie filter on a Varian On-Board Imager system. CBCT and planar image quality were investigated as a function of aperture radius, while maintaining the same dose to the VOI, for a 20 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom with a 9 mm diameter bone insert centered on isocenter. Corresponding scatter-to-primary ratios (SPR) were determined at the detector plane with Monte Carlo simulation using EGSnrc. Dose distributions for various sizes VOI were modeled using a dynamic BEAMnrc library and DOSXYZnrc. The resulting VOI dose distributions were compared to full-field distributions. Results: SPR was reduced by a factor of 8.4 when decreasing iris diameter from 21.2 to 2.4 cm (at isocenter). Depending upon VOI location and size, dose was reduced to 16%–90% of the full-field value along the central axis plane and down to 4% along the axis of rotation, while maintaining the same dose to the VOI compared to full-field techniques. When maintaining constant dose to the VOI, this change in iris diameter corresponds to a factor increase of approximately 1.6 in image contrast and a factor decrease in image noise of approximately 1.2. This results in a measured gain in contrast-to-noise ratio by a factor of approximately 2.0. Conclusions: The presented VOI technique offers improved image quality for image-guided radiotherapy while sparing the surrounding volume of unnecessary dose compared to full-field techniques.

  4. Multimodal partial volume correction: Application to [11C]PIB PET/MRI myelin imaging in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecchi, Elisabetta; Veronese, Mattia; Bodini, Benedetta; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Battaglini, Marco; Stankoff, Bruno; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2017-12-01

    The [11C]PIB PET tracer, originally developed for amyloid imaging, has been recently repurposed to quantify demyelination and remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin PET imaging, however, is limited by its low resolution that deteriorates the quantification accuracy of white matter (WM) lesions. Here, we introduce a novel partial volume correction (PVC) method called Multiresolution-Multimodal Resolution-Recovery (MM-RR), which uses the wavelet transform and a synergistic statistical model to exploit MRI structural images to improve the resolution of [11C]PIB PET myelin imaging. MM-RR performance was tested on a phantom acquisition and in a dataset comprising [11C]PIB PET and MR T1- and T2-weighted images of 8 healthy controls and 20 MS patients. For the control group, the MM-RR PET images showed an average increase of 5.7% in WM uptake while the grey-matter (GM) uptake remained constant, resulting in +31% WM/GM contrast. Furthermore, MM-RR PET binding maps correlated significantly with the mRNA expressions of the most represented proteins in the myelin sheath (R2 = 0.57 ± 0.09). In the patient group, MM-RR PET images showed sharper lesion contours and significant improvement in normal-appearing tissue/WM-lesion contrast compared to standard PET (contrast improvement > +40%). These results were consistent with MM-RR performances in phantom experiments.

  5. Volume of interest CBCT and tube current modulation for image guidance using dynamic kV collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, David, E-mail: david.parsons@dal.ca, E-mail: james.robar@nshealth.ca [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada); Robar, James L., E-mail: david.parsons@dal.ca, E-mail: james.robar@nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work is the development of a novel blade collimation system enabling volume of interest (VOI) CBCT with tube current modulation using the kV image guidance source on a linear accelerator. Advantages of the system are assessed, particularly with regard to reduction and localization of dose and improvement of image quality. Methods: A four blade dynamic kV collimator was developed to track a VOI during a CBCT acquisition. The current prototype is capable of tracking an arbitrary volume defined by the treatment planner for subsequent CBCT guidance. During gantry rotation, the collimator tracks the VOI with adjustment of position and dimension. CBCT image quality was investigated as a function of collimator dimension, while maintaining the same dose to the VOI, for a 22.2 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom with a 9 mm diameter bone insert centered on isocenter. Dose distributions were modeled using a dynamic BEAMnrc library and DOSXYZnrc. The resulting VOI dose distributions were compared to full-field CBCT distributions to quantify dose reduction and localization to the target volume. A novel method of optimizing x-ray tube current during CBCT acquisition was developed and assessed with regard to contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and imaging dose. Results: Measurements show that the VOI CBCT method using the dynamic blade system yields an increase in contrast-to-noise ratio by a factor of approximately 2.2. Depending upon the anatomical site, dose was reduced to 15%–80% of the full-field CBCT value along the central axis plane and down to less than 1% out of plane. The use of tube current modulation allowed for specification of a desired SNR within projection data. For approximately the same dose to the VOI, CNR was further increased by a factor of 1.2 for modulated VOI CBCT, giving a combined improvement of 2.6 compared to full-field CBCT. Conclusions: The present dynamic blade system provides significant improvements in CNR for the same

  6. Real-time rendering for integral photography that uses extended fractional view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaka, Kazuhisa

    2009-02-01

    A real-time method for rendering integral photography (IP) that uses the extended fractional view technique is described. To make an IP image by using CG technology, hundreds of still pictures from different camera positions need to be taken, and the images have to be synthesized by using other software. This is because CG applications do not have a special rendering mode that is required for the extended fractional view approach when the directions of the rays are not uniform. Hence, considerable processing time is needed to synthesize one IP image using the method, which is not suitable for real-time applications such as games. Therefore, new high-speed rendering software was written using C++. It runs on a typical Windows PC. Its main function is to trace the path of each ray, which is emitted from each subpixel of a liquid crystal display (LCD) and refracted by a fly's eye lens. A subpixel is used instead of a pixel because a pixel on a color LCD is made up of three subpixels, one each for red, green and blue, and their positions are different. If there is an object on either side of the extension line of the ray, the coordinates of the intersection are calculated, and visibility is determined by z-buffering. If the intersection is visible, the color is acquired and pasted on the subpixels of the LCD. I confirmed that a simple 3D moving object, which consists of several polygons, could be rendered at more than two frames per second, and a full-parallax moving image could be obtained by using IP.

  7. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation; Obtencao de volumes tumorais em pilhas de imagens PET usando tecnicas de segmentacao de imagens coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE) Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F., E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Cordeiro, Landerson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments.

  8. Three-dimensional range data compression using computer graphics rendering pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song

    2012-06-20

    This paper presents the idea of naturally encoding three-dimensional (3D) range data into regular two-dimensional (2D) images utilizing computer graphics rendering pipeline. The computer graphics pipeline provides a means to sample 3D geometry data into regular 2D images, and also to retrieve the depth information for each sampled pixel. The depth information for each pixel is further encoded into red, green, and blue color channels of regular 2D images. The 2D images can further be compressed with existing 2D image compression techniques. By this novel means, 3D geometry data obtained by 3D range scanners can be instantaneously compressed into 2D images, providing a novel way of storing 3D range data into its 2D counterparts. We will present experimental results to verify the performance of this proposed technique.

  9. Immersive Molecular Visualization with Omnidirectional Stereoscopic Ray Tracing and Remote Rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, John E; Sherman, William R; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Immersive molecular visualization provides the viewer with intuitive perception of complex structures and spatial relationships that are of critical interest to structural biologists. The recent availability of commodity head mounted displays (HMDs) provides a compelling opportunity for widespread adoption of immersive visualization by molecular scientists, but HMDs pose additional challenges due to the need for low-latency, high-frame-rate rendering. State-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations produce terabytes of data that can be impractical to transfer from remote supercomputers, necessitating routine use of remote visualization. Hardware-accelerated video encoding has profoundly increased frame rates and image resolution for remote visualization, however round-trip network latencies would cause simulator sickness when using HMDs. We present a novel two-phase rendering approach that overcomes network latencies with the combination of omnidirectional stereoscopic progressive ray tracing and high performance rasterization, and its implementation within VMD, a widely used molecular visualization and analysis tool. The new rendering approach enables immersive molecular visualization with rendering techniques such as shadows, ambient occlusion lighting, depth-of-field, and high quality transparency, that are particularly helpful for the study of large biomolecular complexes. We describe ray tracing algorithms that are used to optimize interactivity and quality, and we report key performance metrics of the system. The new techniques can also benefit many other application domains.

  10. Experiencing "Macbeth": From Text Rendering to Multicultural Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisin, Gail

    1993-01-01

    Shows how one teacher used innovative methods in teaching William Shakespeare's "Macbeth." Outlines student assignments including text renderings, rewriting a scene from the play, and creating a multicultural scrapbook for the play. (HB)

  11. Partitioning of biocides between water and inorganic phases of render

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanczyk, Michal; Bollmann, Ulla E.; Bester, Kai

    , the partitioning of biocides between water and inorganic phases of render was studied. In this study the partitioning constants of benzoisothiazolinone, carbendazim, dichlorooctylisothiazolinone, diuron, iodocarb, isoproturon, irgarol, mecoprop, methylisothiazolinone, octylisothiazolinone, terbutryn...

  12. CMR in patients with severe myocarditis: diagnostic value of quantitative tissue markers including extracellular volume imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunski, Ulf K; Lund, Gunnar K; Stehning, Christian; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Bohnen, Sebastian; Adam, Gerhard; Blankenberg, Stefan; Muellerleile, Kai

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of T2, T1, and extracellular volume (ECV) quantification as novel quantitative tissue markers in comparison with standard "Lake-Louise" cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) criteria to diagnose myocarditis. Novel approaches using T2 and T1 mapping may overcome the limitations of signal intensity-based parameters, which would potentially result in a better diagnostic accuracy compared with standard CMR techniques in suspected myocarditis. CMR was performed in 104 patients with myocarditis and 21 control subjects at 1.5-T. Patients with myocarditis underwent CMR 2 weeks (interquartile range: 1 to 7 weeks) after presentation with new-onset heart failure (n = 66) or acute chest pain (n = 38). T2 and T1 mapping were implemented into a standard protocol including T2-weighted (T2w), early gadolinium enhancement (EGE) CMR, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR. T2 quantification was performed using a free-breathing, navigator-gated multiecho sequence. T1 quantification was performed using the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence before and after administration of 0.075 mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine. T2, T1, and ECV maps were generated using a plug-in for the OsiriX software (Pixmeo, Bernex, Switzerland) to calculate mean global myocardial T2, T1, and ECV values. The diagnostic accuracies of conventional CMR were 70% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 61% to 77%) for T2w CMR, 59% (95% CI: 56% to 73%) for EGE, and 67% (95% CI: 59% to 75%) for LGE. The diagnostic accuracies of mapping techniques were 63% (95% CI: 53% to 73%) for myocardial T2, 69% (95% CI: 60% to 76%) for native myocardial T1, and 76% (95% CI: 68% to 82%) for global myocardial ECV. The diagnostic accuracy of CMR was significantly improved to 90% (95% CI: 84% to 95%) by a stepwise approach, using the presence of LGE and myocardial ECV ≥27% as diagnostic criteria, compared with 79% (95% CI: 71% to 85%; p = 0.0043) for the Lake-Louise criteria. In patients

  13. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: volume phase holographic grating performance testing and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Meyer, Elliot; Wright, Shelley A.; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Simard, Luc

    2014-07-01

    Maximizing the grating efficiency is a key goal for the first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) currently being designed to sample the diffraction limit of the TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope). Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings have been shown to offer extremely high efficiencies that approach 100% for high line frequencies (i.e., 600 to 6000l/mm), which has been applicable for astronomical optical spectrographs. However, VPH gratings have been less exploited in the near-infrared, particularly for gratings that have lower line frequencies. Given their potential to offer high throughputs and low scattered light, VPH gratings are being explored for IRIS as a potential dispersing element in the spectrograph. Our team has procured near-infrared gratings from two separate vendors. We have two gratings with the specifications needed for IRIS current design: 1.51-1.82μm (H-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 4000 and 1.19-1.37μm (J-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 8000. The center wavelengths for each grating are 1.629μm and 1.27μm, and the groove densities are 177l/mm and 440l/mm for H-band R=4000 and J-band R=8000, respectively. We directly measure the efficiencies in the lab and find that the peak efficiencies of these two types of gratings are quite good with a peak efficiency of ~88% at the Bragg angle in both TM and TE modes at H-band, and 90.23% in TM mode, 79.91% in TE mode at J-band for the best vendor. We determine the drop in efficiency off the Bragg angle, with a 20-23% decrease in efficiency at H-band when 2.5° deviation from the Bragg angle, and 25%-28% decrease at J-band when 5° deviation from the Bragg angle.

  14. Detection of Prion Proteins and TSE Infectivity in the Rendering and Biodiesel Manufacture Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.; Keller, B.; Oleschuk, R. [Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-03-15

    This paper addresses emerging issues related to monitoring prion proteins and TSE infectivity in the products and waste streams of rendering and biodiesel manufacture processes. Monitoring is critical to addressing the knowledge gaps identified in 'Biodiesel from Specified Risk Material Tallow: An Appraisal of TSE Risks and their Reduction' (IEA's AMF Annex XXX, 2006) that prevent comprehensive risk assessment of TSE infectivity in products and waste. The most important challenge for monitoring TSE risk is the wide variety of sample types, which are generated at different points in the rendering/biodiesel production continuum. Conventional transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) assays were developed for specified risk material (SRM) and other biological tissues. These, however, are insufficient to address the diverse sample matrices produced in rendering and biodiesel manufacture. This paper examines the sample types expected in rendering and biodiesel manufacture and the implications of applying TSE assay methods to them. The authors then discuss a sample preparation filtration, which has not yet been applied to these sample types, but which has the potential to provide or significantly improve TSE monitoring. The main improvement will come from transfer of the prion proteins from the sample matrix to a matrix compatible with conventional and emerging bioassays. A second improvement will come from preconcentrating the prion proteins, which means transferring proteins from a larger sample volume into a smaller volume for analysis to provide greater detection sensitivity. This filtration method may also be useful for monitoring other samples, including wash waters and other waste streams, which may contain SRM, including those from abattoirs and on-farm operations. Finally, there is a discussion of emerging mass spectrometric methods, which Prusiner and others have shown to be suitable for detection and characterisation of prion proteins (Stahl

  15. MR-based automatic delineation of volumes of interest in human brain PET images using probability maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Karina; Hasselbalch, Steen G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an observer-independent approach for automatic generation of volume-of-interest (VOI) brain templates to be used in emission tomography studies of the brain. The method utilizes a VOI probability map created on the basis of a database of several...... subjects' MR-images, where VOI sets have been defined manually. High-resolution structural MR-images and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding PET-images (in terms of (18)F-altanserin binding) from 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with mild cognitive impairment were included for the analysis. A template including...... delineation of the VOI set. The approach was also shown to work equally well in individuals with pronounced cerebral atrophy. Probability-map-based automatic delineation of VOIs is a fast, objective, reproducible, and safe way to assess regional brain values from PET or SPECT scans. In addition, the method...

  16. A novel optical microscope for imaging large embryos and tissue volumes with sub-cellular resolution throughout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Gail; Trägårdh, Johanna; Amor, Rumelo; Dempster, John; Reid, Es; Amos, William Bradshaw

    2016-09-23

    Current optical microscope objectives of low magnification have low numerical aperture and therefore have too little depth resolution and discrimination to perform well in confocal and nonlinear microscopy. This is a serious limitation in important areas, including the phenotypic screening of human genes in transgenic mice by study of embryos undergoing advanced organogenesis. We have built an optical lens system for 3D imaging of objects up to 6 mm wide and 3 mm thick with depth resolution of only a few microns instead of the tens of microns currently attained, allowing sub-cellular detail to be resolved throughout the volume. We present this lens, called the Mesolens, with performance data and images from biological specimens including confocal images of whole fixed and intact fluorescently-stained 12.5-day old mouse embryos.

  17. Different approaches to synovial membrane volume determination by magnetic resonance imaging: manual versus automated segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    1997-01-01

    or synovial membrane volume, e.g. no systematic errors were found. The inter-MRI variation, evaluated in three knees and three wrists, was higher than by manual segmentation, particularly due to sensitivity to malalignment artefacts. Examination of test objects proved the high accuracy of the general...... methodology for volume determinations (maximal error 6.3%). Preceded by the determination of reproducibility and the optimal threshold at the available MR unit, automated 'threshold' segmentation appears to be acceptable when changes rather than absolute values of synovial membrane volumes are most important...

  18. A volume of intersection approach for on-the-fly system matrix calculation in 3D PET image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougovski, A.; Hofheinz, F.; Maus, J.; Schramm, G.; Will, E.; van den Hoff, J.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is the evaluation of on-the-fly volume of intersection computation for system’s geometry modelling in 3D PET image reconstruction. For this purpose we propose a simple geometrical model in which the cubic image voxels on the given Cartesian grid are approximated with spheres and the rectangular tubes of response (ToRs) are approximated with cylinders. The model was integrated into a fully 3D list-mode PET reconstruction for performance evaluation. In our model the volume of intersection between a voxel and the ToR is only a function of the impact parameter (the distance between voxel centre to ToR axis) but is independent of the relative orientation of voxel and ToR. This substantially reduces the computational complexity of the system matrix calculation. Based on phantom measurements it was determined that adjusting the diameters of the spherical voxel size and the ToR in such a way that the actual voxel and ToR volumes are conserved leads to the best compromise between high spatial resolution, low noise, and suppression of Gibbs artefacts in the reconstructed images. Phantom as well as clinical datasets from two different PET systems (Siemens ECAT HR+ and Philips Ingenuity-TF PET/MR) were processed using the developed and the respective vendor-provided (line of intersection related) reconstruction algorithms. A comparison of the reconstructed images demonstrated very good performance of the new approach. The evaluation showed the respective vendor-provided reconstruction algorithms to possess 34-41% lower resolution compared to the developed one while exhibiting comparable noise levels. Contrary to explicit point spread function modelling our model has a simple straight-forward implementation and it should be easy to integrate into existing reconstruction software, making it competitive to other existing resolution recovery techniques.

  19. Partial volume correction of PET-imaged tumor heterogeneity using expectation maximization with a spatially varying point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, David L; Flynn, Ryan T; Holden, James E; Nickles, Robert J; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneities observed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are frequently compromised of partial volume effects which may affect treatment prognosis, assessment, or future implementations such as biologically optimized treatment planning (dose painting). This paper presents a method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged heterogeneous tumors. A point source was scanned on a GE Discover LS at positions of increasing radii from the scanner’s center to obtain the spatially varying point spread function (PSF). PSF images were fit in three dimensions to Gaussian distributions using least squares optimization. Continuous expressions were devised for each Gaussian width as a function of radial distance, allowing for generation of the system PSF at any position in space. A spatially varying partial volume correction (SV-PVC) technique was developed using expectation maximization (EM) and a stopping criterion based on the method’s correction matrix generated for each iteration. The SV-PVC was validated using a standard tumor phantom and a tumor heterogeneity phantom, and was applied to a heterogeneous patient tumor. SV-PVC results were compared to results obtained from spatially invariant partial volume correction (SINV-PVC), which used directionally uniform three dimensional kernels. SV-PVC of the standard tumor phantom increased the maximum observed sphere activity by 55 and 40% for 10 and 13 mm diameter spheres, respectively. Tumor heterogeneity phantom results demonstrated that as net changes in the EM correction matrix decreased below 35%, further iterations improved overall quantitative accuracy by less than 1%. SV-PVC of clinically observed tumors frequently exhibited changes of ±30% in regions of heterogeneity. The SV-PVC method implemented spatially varying kernel widths and automatically determined the number of iterations for optimal restoration, parameters which are arbitrarily chosen in SINV-PVC. Comparing SV-PVC to SINV

  20. Effect of weight loss on magnetic resonance imaging estimation of liver fat and volume in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Niraj S; Doycheva, Iliana; Peterson, Michael R; Hooker, Jonathan; Kisselva, Tatiana; Schnabl, Bernd; Seki, Ekihiro; Sirlin, Claude B; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about how weight loss affects magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liver fat and volume or liver histology in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We measured changes in liver fat and liver volume associated with weight loss by using an advanced MRI method. We analyzed data collected from a previous randomized controlled trial in which 43 adult patients with biopsy-proven NASH underwent clinical evaluation, biochemical tests, and MRI and liver biopsy analyses at the start of the study and after 24 weeks. We compared data between patients who did and did not have at least 5% decrease in body mass index (BMI) during the study period. Ten of 43 patients had at least a 5% decrease in BMI during the study period. These patients had a significant decrease in liver fat, which was based on MRI proton density fat fraction estimates (18.3% ± 7.6% to 13.6% ± 13.6%, P = .03), a relative 25.5% reduction. They also had a significant decrease in liver volume (5.3%). However, no significant changes in levels of alanine aminotransferase or aspartate aminotransferase were observed with weight loss. Thirty-three patients without at least 5% decrease in BMI had insignificant increases in estimated liver fat fraction and liver volume. A reduction in BMI of at least 5% is associated with significant decrease in liver fat and volume in patients with biopsy-proven NASH. These data should be considered in assessing effect size in studies of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or obesity that use MRI-estimated liver fat and volume as end points. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Linking the serotonin transporter gene, family environments, hippocampal volume and depression onset: A prospective imaging gene × environment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Keriann; Olsson, Craig A; Youssef, George J; Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Yücel, Murat; Sheeber, Lisa B; Foley, Debra L; Allen, Nicholas B

    2015-11-01

    A single imaging gene-environment (IGxE) framework that is able to simultaneously model genetic, neurobiological, and environmental influences on psychopathology outcomes is needed to improve understanding of how complex interrelationships between allelic variation, differences in neuroanatomy or neuroactivity, and environmental experience affect risk for psychiatric disorder. In a longitudinal study of adolescent development we demonstrate the utility of such an IGxE framework by testing whether variation in parental behavior at age 12 altered the strength of an imaging genetics pathway, involving an indirect association between allelic variation in the serotonin transporter gene to variation in hippocampal volume and consequent onset of major depressive disorder by age 18. Results were consistent with the presence of an indirect effect of the serotonin transporter S-allele on depression onset via smaller left and right hippocampal volumes that was significant only in family environments involving either higher levels of parental aggression or lower levels of positive parenting. The previously reported finding of S-allele carriers' increased risk of depression in adverse environments may, therefore, be partly because of the effects of these environments on a neurobiological pathway from the serotonin transporter gene to depression onset that proceeds through variation in hippocampal volume. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Noninvasive Femur Bone Volume Estimation Based on X-Ray Attenuation of a Single Radiographic Image and Medical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiattisin, Supaporn; Chamnongthai, Kosin

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is an indicator of osteoporosis that is an increasingly serious disease, particularly for the elderly. To calculate BMD, we need to measure the volume of the femur in a noninvasive way. In this paper, we propose a noninvasive bone volume measurement method using x-ray attenuation on radiography and medical knowledge. The absolute thickness at one reference pixel and the relative thickness at all pixels of the bone in the x-ray image are used to calculate the volume and the BMD. First, the absolute bone thickness of one particular pixel is estimated by the known geometric shape of a specific bone part as medical knowledge. The relative bone thicknesses of all pixels are then calculated by x-ray attenuation of each pixel. Finally, given the absolute bone thickness of the reference pixel, the absolute bone thickness of all pixels is mapped. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on 300 subjects were performed. We found that the method provides good estimations of real BMD values of femur bone. Estimates shows a high linear correlation of 0.96 between the volume Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) of CT-SCAN and computed vBMD (all PCT-SCAN.

  3. Architecture and data processing alternatives for the tse computer. Volume 4: Image rotation using tse operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, M. H.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The tse computer's capability of achieving image congruence between temporal and multiple images with misregistration due to rotational differences is reported. The coordinate transformations are obtained and a general algorithms is devised to perform image rotation using tse operations very efficiently. The details of this algorithm as well as its theoretical implications are presented. Step by step procedures of image registration are described in detail. Numerous examples are also employed to demonstrate the correctness and the effectiveness of the algorithms and conclusions and recommendations are made.

  4. Patient-bounded extrapolation using low-dose priors for volume-of-interest imaging in C-arm CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Y.; Maier, A.; Berger, M.; Hornegger, J. [Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Bauer, S. [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim 91301 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging with C-arm systems provides anatomical information in a predefined 3D target region at a considerably low x-ray dose. However, VOI imaging involves laterally truncated projections from which conventional reconstruction algorithms generally yield images with severe truncation artifacts. Heuristic based extrapolation methods, e.g., water cylinder extrapolation, typically rely on techniques that complete the truncated data by means of a continuity assumption and thus appear to be ad-hoc. It is our goal to improve the image quality of VOI imaging by exploiting existing patient-specific prior information in the workflow. Methods: A necessary initial step prior to a 3D acquisition is to isocenter the patient with respect to the target to be scanned. To this end, low-dose fluoroscopic x-ray acquisitions are usually applied from anterior–posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) views. Based on this, the patient is isocentered by repositioning the table. In this work, we present a patient-bounded extrapolation method that makes use of these noncollimated fluoroscopic images to improve image quality in 3D VOI reconstruction. The algorithm first extracts the 2D patient contours from the noncollimated AP and ML fluoroscopic images. These 2D contours are then combined to estimate a volumetric model of the patient. Forward-projecting the shape of the model at the eventually acquired C-arm rotation views gives the patient boundary information in the projection domain. In this manner, we are in the position to substantially improve image quality by enforcing the extrapolated line profiles to end at the known patient boundaries, derived from the 3D shape model estimate. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on eight clinical datasets with different degrees of truncation. The proposed algorithm achieved a relative root mean square error (rRMSE) of about 1.0% with respect to the reference reconstruction on

  5. Low dose, low noise, and high resolution volume of interest (VOI) imaging in C-arm flat-detector CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolditz, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A.

    2010-04-01

    The high flexibility of C-arm flat-detector computed tomography (FDCT) is used in a volume of interest (VOI) imaging method to handle the challenges of increasing spatial resolution, reducing noise and saving dose. A low-dose overview scan of the object and a high-dose scan of an arbitrary VOI are combined. The first scan is adequate for orientation to select the VOI and the second scan assures high image quality in the VOI. The combination is based on a forward projection of the reconstructed overview volume and the measured VOI data in the raw data domain. Differences in the projection values are matched before a standard Feldkamp-type reconstruction is performed. In simulations, spatial resolution, noise and contrast detectability were evaluated. Measurements of an anthropomorphic phantom were used to validate the proposed method for realistic application. In Monte Carlo dose simulations the dose reduction potential was investigated. By combination of the two scans an image is generated which covers the whole object and provides the actual VOI at high image quality. Spatial resolution was increased whereas noise was decreased from outside to inside the VOI, e.g. for the simulations from 0.8 lp/mm to 3.0 lp/mm and from 39 HU to 18 HU, respectively. Simultaneously, the cumulative dose for this two-scan procedure was significantly reduced in comparison to a conventional high dose scan, e.g. for the performed simulations and measurements by about 95 %. The proposed VOI approach offers significant benefits with respect to high-resolution and low-contrast imaging of a VOI at reduced dose.

  6. Knowledge-based reconstruction for measurement of right ventricular volumes on cardiovascular magnetic resonance images in a mixed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterman, Elise D; Budde, Ricardo P J; Robbers-Visser, Daniëlle; van Domburg, Ron T; Helbing, Willem A

    2017-09-01

    Follow-up of right ventricular performance is important for patients with congenital heart disease. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is optimal for this purpose. However, observer-dependency of manual analysis of right ventricular volumes limit its use. Knowledge-based reconstruction is a new semiautomatic analysis tool that uses a database including knowledge of right ventricular shape in various congenital heart diseases. We evaluated whether knowledge-based reconstruction is a good alternative for conventional analysis. To assess the inter- and intra-observer variability and agreement of knowledge-based versus conventional analysis of magnetic resonance right ventricular volumes, analysis was done by two observers in a mixed group of 22 patients with congenital heart disease affecting right ventricular loading conditions (dextro-transposition of the great arteries and right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit) and a group of 17 healthy children. We used Bland-Altman analysis and coefficient of variation. Comparison between the conventional method and the knowledge-based method showed a systematically higher volume for the latter group. We found an overestimation for end-diastolic volume (bias -40 ± 24 mL, r = .956), end-systolic volume (bias -34 ± 24 mL, r = .943), stroke volume (bias -6 ± 17 mL, r = .735) and an underestimation of ejection fraction (bias 7 ± 7%, r = .671) by knowledge-based reconstruction. The intra-observer variability of knowledge-based reconstruction varied with a coefficient of variation of 9% for end-diastolic volume and 22% for stroke volume. The same trend was noted for inter-observer variability. A systematic difference (overestimation) was noted for right ventricular size as assessed with knowledge-based reconstruction compared with conventional methods for analysis. Observer variability for the new method was comparable to what has been reported for the right ventricle in children and congenital

  7. Improvement in Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatch after Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction: Quantitative Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sei Won; Lee, Sang Min; Shin, So Youn; Park, Tai Sun; Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Namkug; Hong, Yoonki; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Seo, Joon Beom

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) increases ventilation and therefore improves ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) mismatch. Materials and Methods All patients provided written informed consent to be included in this study, which was approved by the Institutional Review Board (2013-0368) of Asan Medical Center. The physiologic changes that occurred after BLVR were measured by using xenon-enhanced ventilation and iodine-enhanced perfusion dual-energy computed tomography (CT). Patients with severe emphysema plus hyperinflation who did not respond to usual treatments were eligible. Pulmonary function tests, the 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) test, quality of life assessment, and dual-energy CT were performed at baseline and 3 months after BLVR. The effect of BLVR was assessed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Twenty-one patients were enrolled in this study (median age, 68 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], 0.75 L ± 0.29). After BLVR, FEV1 (P lung volume (-0.39 L ± 0.44), both ventilation per voxel (P lung volume reduction of 50% or greater had significantly better improvement in FEV1 (P = .02) and ventilation per voxel (P = .03) than patients with lung volume reduction of less than 50%. V/Q mismatch also improved after BLVR (P = .005), mainly owing to the improvement in ventilation. Conclusion The dual-energy CT analyses showed that BLVR improved ventilation and V/Q mismatch. This increased lung efficiency may be the primary mechanism of improvement after BLVR, despite the reduction in lung volume. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  8. Surgeon assessment of renal preservation with partial nephrectomy provides information comparable to measurement of volume preservation with 3-dimensional image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Conrad M; Boelkins, Bradley; Culver, Shannon; Mammen, Leena; Kahnoski, Richard J; Lane, Brian R

    2014-05-01

    The strongest predictors of renal function after partial nephrectomy are the preoperative glomerular filtration rate and the amount of preserved parenchyma. Measuring volume preservation by 3-dimensional imaging is accurate but time-consuming. Percent functional volume preservation was designed to replace surgeon assessment of volume preservation with a less labor intensive, objective assessment. We compared volume preservation with 3-dimensional imaging, percent functional volume preservation and surgeon assessment of volume preservation as predictors of renal function after partial nephrectomy. We calculated volume preservation with 3-dimensional imaging, percent functional volume preservation and surgeon assessment of volume preservation in 41 patients with preoperative and postoperative cross-sectional imaging available. Surgeon assessment was validated internally in another 75 patients. Short-term and long-term renal function was assessed with univariate and multivariate linear regression models. Median parenchymal preservation was 85% (range 37% to 105%) by 3-dimensional imaging, 91% (range 51% to 114%) by percent functional preservation and 88% (range 45% to 99%) by surgeon assessment. Each method strongly correlated with nadir glomerular filtration rate (r(2) = 0.75, 0.65 and 0.78) and latest glomerular filtration rate (r(2) = 0.65, 0.66 and 0.67, respectively, each p analysis revealed that age, preoperative glomerular filtration rate, renal nephrometry score and each assessment were significant predictors of renal function (p analysis parenchymal preservation was the strongest predictor (p comparable to those of more time intensive alternatives. We propose that surgeon assessment of volume preservation should be routinely reported to facilitate analysis of partial nephrectomy outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Can horizontally oriented breast tomosynthesis image volumes or the use of a systematic search strategy improve interpretation? An eye tracking and free response human observer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lång, Kristina; Zackrisson, Sophia; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Andersson, Ingvar; Förnvik, Daniel; Tingberg, Anders; Timberg, Pontus

    2011-03-01

    Our aim was to evaluate if there is a benefit in diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of viewing breast tomosynthesis (BT) image volumes presented horizontally oriented, but also to evaluate the use of a systematic search strategy where the breast is divided, and analyzed consecutively, into two sections. These image presentations were compared to regular vertical image presentation. All methods were investigated using viewing procedures consisting of free scroll volume browsing, and a combination of initial cine loops at three different frame rates (9, 14, 25 fps) terminated upon request followed by free scroll volume browsing if needed. Fifty-five normal BT image volumes in MLO view were collected. In these, simulated lesions (20 masses and 20 clusters of microcalcifications) were randomly inserted, creating four unique image sets for each procedure. Four readers interpreted the cases in a random order. Their task was to locate the lesions, mark and assign a five level confidence scale. The diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Jackknife Free Receiver Operating Characteristics (JAFROC). Time efficiency and visual search behavior were also investigated using eye tracking. Results indicate there was no statistically significant difference in JAFROC FOM between the different image presentations, although visual search was more time efficient when viewing horizontally oriented image volumes in medium cine loops.

  10. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of a water-jet for low volume harvesting of fat tissue for regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobek Christoph

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV measurements of a water-jet for water-assisted liposuction (WAL are carried out to investigate the distribution of velocity and therefore momentum and acting force on the human sub-cutaneous fat tissue. These results shall validate CFD simulations and force sensor measurements of the water-jet and support the development of a new WAL device that is able to harvest low volumes of fat tissue for regenerative medicine even gentler than regular WAL devices.

  11. A study of partial volume effect on SPECT imaging using myocardial phantom. With HCM (ASH) model myocardial phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoguchi, Masahisa [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-05-01

    In order to evaluate simultaneously both myocardial perfusion and regional wall motion using ECG-gated myocardial SPECT imaging, correction for the partial volume effect (PVE) should be performed. For the quantitative analysis of myocardial SPECT imaging in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), we formed a new phantom simulating HCM with various septal wall thicknesses and estimated PVE using the recovery coefficient (RC). The value of RC in all phantoms increased with increasing thickness of the septal wall reaching a plateau at 25 mm for the cylindrical phantom and 25 mm for the Ep-phantom. Compared with the RC value, the PMMA-phantom had little influence on PVE. Therefore, our results suggested that the count in the septal wall could be underestimated if PVE was corrected by the value obtained for the cylindrical phantom. In conclusion, our new phantom simulating HCM was useful in assessing PVE in the hypertrophic septal wall. (author)

  12. Research study on stellar X-ray imaging experiment, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, H. H.; Vanspeybroeck, L. P.

    1972-01-01

    The use of microchannel plates as focal plane readout devices and the evaluation of mirrors for X-ray telescopes applied to stellar X-ray imaging is discussed. The microchannel plate outputs were either imaged on a phosphor screen which was viewed by a low light level vidicon or on a wire array which was read out by digitally processing the output of a charge division network attached to the wires. A service life test which was conducted on two image intensifiers is described.

  13. Prioritization of brain MRI volumes using medical image perception model and tumor region segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Irfan; Ejaz, Naveed; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present study is to explore prioritization methods in diagnostic imaging modalities to automatically determine the contents of medical images. In this paper, we propose an efficient prioritization of brain MRI. First, the visual perception of the radiologists is adapted to identify salient regions. Then this saliency information is used as an automatic label for accurate segmentation of brain lesion to determine the scientific value of that image. The qualitative and quantitative results prove that the rankings generated by the proposed method are closer to the rankings created by radiologists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative assessment of statistical brain MR image segmentation algorithms and their impact on partial volume correction in PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Habib; Ruest, Torsten; Schoenahl, Frederic; Montandon, Marie-Louise

    2006-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided partial volume effect correction (PVC) in brain positron emission tomography (PET) is now a well-established approach to compensate the large bias in the estimate of regional radioactivity concentration, especially for small structures. The accuracy of the algorithms developed so far is, however, largely dependent on the performance of segmentation methods partitioning MRI brain data into its main classes, namely gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A comparative evaluation of three brain MRI segmentation algorithms using simulated and clinical brain MR data was performed, and subsequently their impact on PVC in 18F-FDG and 18F-DOPA brain PET imaging was assessed. Two algorithms, the first is bundled in the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2) package while the other is the Expectation Maximization Segmentation (EMS) algorithm, incorporate a priori probability images derived from MR images of a large number of subjects. The third, here referred to as the HBSA algorithm, is a histogram-based segmentation algorithm incorporating an Expectation Maximization approach to model a four-Gaussian mixture for both global and local histograms. Simulated under different combinations of noise and intensity non-uniformity, MR brain phantoms with known true volumes for the different brain classes were generated. The algorithms' performance was checked by calculating the kappa index assessing similarities with the "ground truth" as well as multiclass type I and type II errors including misclassification rates. The impact of image segmentation algorithms on PVC was then quantified using clinical data. The segmented tissues of patients' brain MRI were given as input to the region of interest (RoI)-based geometric transfer matrix (GTM) PVC algorithm, and quantitative comparisons were made. The results of digital MRI phantom studies suggest that the use of HBSA produces the best performance for WM classification

  15. Improved workflow for quantification of left ventricular volumes and mass using free-breathing motion corrected cine imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Russell; Olivieri, Laura; O'Brien, Kendall; Kellman, Peter; Xue, Hui; Hansen, Michael

    2016-02-25

    Traditional cine imaging for cardiac functional assessment requires breath-holding, which can be problematic in some situations. Free-breathing techniques have relied on multiple averages or real-time imaging, producing images that can be spatially and/or temporally blurred. To overcome this, methods have been developed to acquire real-time images over multiple cardiac cycles, which are subsequently motion corrected and reformatted to yield a single image series displaying one cardiac cycle with high temporal and spatial resolution. Application of these algorithms has required significant additional reconstruction time. The use of distributed computing was recently proposed as a way to improve clinical workflow with such algorithms. In this study, we have deployed a distributed computing version of motion corrected re-binning reconstruction for free-breathing evaluation of cardiac function. Twenty five patients and 25 volunteers underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for evaluation of left ventricular end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and end-diastolic mass. Measurements using motion corrected re-binning were compared to those using breath-held SSFP and to free-breathing SSFP with multiple averages, and were performed by two independent observers. Pearson correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots tested agreement across techniques. Concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis tested inter-observer variability. Total scan plus reconstruction times were tested for significant differences using paired t-test. Measured volumes and mass obtained by motion corrected re-binning and by averaged free-breathing SSFP compared favorably to those obtained by breath-held SSFP (r = 0.9863/0.9813 for EDV, 0.9550/0.9685 for ESV, 0.9952/0.9771 for mass). Inter-observer variability was good with concordance correlation coefficients between observers across all acquisition types suggesting substantial agreement. Both motion

  16. Correction for Partial Volume Effect Is a Must, Not a Luxury, to Fully Exploit the Potential of Quantitative PET Imaging in Clinical Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alavi, Abass; Werner, Thomas J; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2017-01-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) is considered as one of the major degrading factors impacting image quality and hampering the accuracy of quantitative PET imaging in clinical oncology. This effect is the consequence of the limited spatial resolution of whole-body PET scanners, which results...

  17. Developing a Tile-Based Rendering Method to Improve Rendering Speed of 3D Geospatial Data with HTML5 and WebGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokchan Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A dedicated plug-in has been installed to visualize three-dimensional (3D city modeling spatial data in web-based applications. However, plug-in methods are gradually becoming obsolete, owing to their limited performance with respect to installation errors, unsupported cross-browsers, and security vulnerability. Particularly, in 2015, the NPAPI service was terminated in most existing web browsers except Internet Explorer. To overcome these problems, the HTML5/WebGL (next-generation web standard, confirmed in October 2014 technology emerged. In particular, WebGL is able to display 3D spatial data without plug-ins in browsers. In this study, we attempted to identify the requirements and limitations of displaying 3D city modeling spatial data using HTML5/WebGL, and we propose alternative ways based on the bin-packing algorithm that aggregates individual 3D city modeling data including buildings in tile units. The proposed method reduces the operational complexity and the number and volume of transmissions required for rendering processing to improve the speed of 3D data rendering. The proposed method was validated on real data for evaluating its effectiveness in 3D visualization of city modeling data in web-based applications.

  18. Volume digital image correlation to assess displacement field in compression loaded bread crumb under X-ray microtomography

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present an original approach to assess structural changes during bread crumb compression using a mechanical testing bench coupled to 3D X-ray microtomography. X-ray images taken at different levels of compression of the bread crumb are processed using image analysis. A subset-based digital volume correlation method is used to achieve the 3D displacement field. Within the limit of the approach, deterministic search strategy is implemented for solving subset displacement in each deformed image with regards to the undeformed one. The predicted displacement field in the transverse directions shows differences that depend on local cell arrangement as confirmed by finite element analysis. The displacement component in the loading direction is affected by the magnitude of imposed displacement and shows more regular change. Large displacement levels in the compression direction are in good agreement with the imposed experimental displacement. The results presented here are promising in a sense of possible identification of local foam properties. New insights are expected to achieve better understanding of structural heterogeneities in the overall perception of the product. Industrial relevance: Texture evaluation of cereal product is an important aspect for testing consumer acceptability of new designed products. Mechanical evaluation of backed products is a systemic route for determining texture of cereal based product. From the industrial viewpoint, mechanical evaluation allows saving both time and cost compared to panel evaluation. We demonstrate that better understanding of structural changes during texture evaluation can be achieved in addition to texture evaluation. Sensing structural changes during bread crumb compression is achievable by combining novel imaging technique and processing based on image analysis. We present thus an efficient way to predict displacements during compression of freshly baked product. This method can be used in different

  19. Dronedarone does not affect infarct volume as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in a porcine model of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Josefine; Utpatel, Kirsten; Wolke, Carmen; Evert, Matthias; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Bukowska, Alicja; Goette, Andreas; Lendeckel, Uwe; Peters, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Dronedarone has been demonstrated to be harmful in patients with recent decompensated heart failure. Furthermore, a PALLAS study reported that dronedarone therapy increases mortality rates in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation. Although a pathophysiological explanation for these finding remains to be elucidated, the long term effects of dronedarone on myocardial structure and stability have been suggested. The aim of the present study was to determine whether dronedarone therapy affects left ventricular (LV) function in a chronic model of myocardial infarction (MI). An anterior MI was induced in 16 pigs. Of these animals, eight pigs were then treated with dronedarone for 1 week prior to, and 4 weeks following MI, the remaining pigs served as controls. LV angiography was performed 4 weeks after MI to determine the LV ejection fraction (LVEF). A post‑mortem magnetic resonance imaging scan of the LV was then performed on the two groups (n=6) to determine the volume and size of the induced MI. Dronedarone therapy did not affect systemic and intracardiac hemodynamic parameters or LVEF during the follow‑up assessment. Of note, dronedarone had no negative effect on the total infarct volume and size and did not induce lethal proarrhythmic effects following the induced anterior MI. Therefore, the results suggested that dronedarone did not increase the volume or size of induced anterior MI and did not affect LV performance. Thus, dronedarone therapy was observed to be safe in a porcine model of anterior MI.

  20. Correlating 2D histological slice with 3D MRI image volume using smart phone as an interactive tool for muscle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eresen, Aydin; Li, Peng; Ji, Jim Xiuquan

    2014-01-01

    In muscle dystrophy studies, registration of histological image with MRI image volume enables cross validation of MRI biomarkers using pathological result. However, correlation of 2D histology slice with 3D MRI volume is technically challenging due to the potentially non-orthogonal slice plane and incomplete or distorted histological slice. This paper presents an efficient method to directly perform the 2D-3D registration. The method is unique in that it uses smart phone as a navigation tool for initial alignment followed by an overlap invariant mutual information-based refinement. Experimental results using animal muscle samples images from a 3T MRI and HE stained histological images show that the proposed method is capable of aligning the histological slice with an oblique slice in MR volume.

  1. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of effective ablated volume following high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Z Fite

    Full Text Available Under magnetic resonance (MR guidance, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is capable of precise and accurate delivery of thermal dose to tissues. Given the excellent soft tissue imaging capabilities of MRI, but the lack of data on the correlation of MRI findings to histology following HIFU, we sought to examine tumor response to HIFU ablation to determine whether there was a correlation between histological findings and common MR imaging protocols in the assessment of the extent of thermal damage. Female FVB mice (n = 34, bearing bilateral neu deletion tumors, were unilaterally insonated under MR guidance, with the contralateral tumor as a control. Between one and five spots (focal size 0.5 × 0.5 × 2.5 mm3 were insonated per tumor with each spot receiving approximately 74.2 J of acoustic energy over a period of 7 seconds. Animals were then imaged on a 7T MR scanner with several protocols. T1 weighted images (with and without gadolinium contrast were collected in addition to a series of T2 weighted and diffusion weighted images (for later reconstruction into T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient maps, immediately following ablation and at 6, 24, and 48 hours post treatment. Animals were sacrificed at each time point and both insonated/treated and contralateral tumors removed and stained for NADH-diaphorase, caspase 3, or with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E. We found the area of non-enhancement on contrast enhanced T1 weighted imaging immediately post ablation correlated with the region of tissue receiving a thermal dose CEM43 ≥ 240 min. Moreover, while both tumor T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient values changed from pre-ablation values, contrast enhanced T1 weighted images appeared to be more senstive to changes in tissue viability following HIFU ablation.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of effective ablated volume following high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Brett Z; Wong, Andrew; Liu, Yu; Mahakian, Lisa M; Tam, Sarah M; Aina, Olulanu; Hubbard, Neil E; Borowsky, Alexander; Cardiff, Robert D; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2015-01-01

    Under magnetic resonance (MR) guidance, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of precise and accurate delivery of thermal dose to tissues. Given the excellent soft tissue imaging capabilities of MRI, but the lack of data on the correlation of MRI findings to histology following HIFU, we sought to examine tumor response to HIFU ablation to determine whether there was a correlation between histological findings and common MR imaging protocols in the assessment of the extent of thermal damage. Female FVB mice (n = 34), bearing bilateral neu deletion tumors, were unilaterally insonated under MR guidance, with the contralateral tumor as a control. Between one and five spots (focal size 0.5 × 0.5 × 2.5 mm3) were insonated per tumor with each spot receiving approximately 74.2 J of acoustic energy over a period of 7 seconds. Animals were then imaged on a 7T MR scanner with several protocols. T1 weighted images (with and without gadolinium contrast) were collected in addition to a series of T2 weighted and diffusion weighted images (for later reconstruction into T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient maps), immediately following ablation and at 6, 24, and 48 hours post treatment. Animals were sacrificed at each time point and both insonated/treated and contralateral tumors removed and stained for NADH-diaphorase, caspase 3, or with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). We found the area of non-enhancement on contrast enhanced T1 weighted imaging immediately post ablation correlated with the region of tissue receiving a thermal dose CEM43 ≥ 240 min. Moreover, while both tumor T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient values changed from pre-ablation values, contrast enhanced T1 weighted images appeared to be more senstive to changes in tissue viability following HIFU ablation.

  4. Percent predicted lung volume changes on fetal magnetic resonance imaging throughout gestation in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Hester F; Barnewolt, Carol E; Wilson, Jay M; Zurakowski, David; Connolly, Susan A; Estroff, Judy A; Zalieckas, Jill; Smithers, C Jason; Buchmiller, Terry L

    2017-06-01

    Percent predicted lung volume (PPLV)15%, 31% dropped below 15%, having similar ECMO use as the high-risk cohort, but trending toward greater survival (p=0.09). Those with first and final PPLV>15% had significantly less ECMO use (p=0.015) and greater survival (p15%, as clinical outcomes tend to mirror the lowest PPLV. Treatment study LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Organization and visualization of medical images in radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lorang, T

    2001-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy, various imaging equipment is used to acquire views from inside human bodies. Tomographic imaging equipment is acquiring stacks of cross-sectional images, software implementations derive three-dimensional volumes from planar images to allow for visualization of reconstructed cross-sections at any orientation and location and higher-level visualization systems allow for transparent views and surface rendering. Of upcoming interest in radiotherapy is mutual information, the integration of information from multiple imaging equipment res. from the same imaging equipment at different time stamps and varying acquisition parameters. Huge amounts of images are acquired nowadays at radiotherapy centers, requiring organization of images with respect to patient, acquisition and equipment to allow for visualization of images in a comparative and integrative manner. Especially for integration of image information from different equipment, geometrical information is required to allow for registration...

  6. Subcortical volume and white matter integrity abnormalities in major depressive disorder: findings from UK Biobank imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xueyi; Reus, Lianne M; Cox, Simon R; Adams, Mark J; Liewald, David C; Bastin, Mark E; Smith, Daniel J; Deary, Ian J; Whalley, Heather C; McIntosh, Andrew M

    2017-07-17

    Previous reports of altered grey and white matter structure in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) have been inconsistent. Recent meta-analyses have, however, reported reduced hippocampal grey matter volume in MDD and reduced white matter integrity in several brain regions. The use of different diagnostic criteria, scanners and imaging sequences may, however, obscure further anatomical differences. In this study, we tested for differences in subcortical grey matter volume (n = 1157) and white matter integrity (n = 1089) between depressed individuals and controls in the subset of 8590 UK Biobank Imaging study participants who had undergone depression assessments. Whilst we found no significant differences in subcortical volumes, significant reductions were found in depressed individuals versus controls in global white matter integrity, as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) (β = -0.182, p = 0.005). We also found reductions in FA in association/commissural fibres (β = -0.184, pcorrected = 0.010) and thalamic radiations (β = -0.159, pcorrected = 0.020). Tract-specific FA reductions were also found in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (β = -0.194, pcorrected = 0.025), superior thalamic radiation (β = -0.224, pcorrected = 0.009) and forceps major (β = -0.193, pcorrected = 0.025) in depression (all betas standardised). Our findings provide further evidence for disrupted white matter integrity in MDD.

  7. Graphics processing unit accelerated optical coherence tomography processing at megahertz axial scan rate and high resolution video rate volumetric rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yifan; Wong, Kevin; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2013-02-01

    In this report, we describe how to highly optimize a computer unified device architecture based platform to perform real-time processing of optical coherence tomography interferometric data and three-dimensional (3-D) volumetric rendering using a commercially available, cost-effective, graphics processing unit (GPU). The maximum complete attainable axial scan processing rate, including memory transfer and displaying B-scan frame, was 2.24 MHz for 16 bits pixel depth and 2048 fast Fourier transform size; the maximum 3-D volumetric rendering rate, including B-scan, en face view display, and 3-D rendering, was ~23 volumes/second (volume size: 1024×256×200). To the best of our knowledge, this is the fastest processing rate reported to date with a single-chip GPU and the first implementation of real-time video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography (OCT) processing and rendering that is capable of matching the acquisition rates of ultrahigh-speed OCT.

  8. Graphics processing unit accelerated optical coherence tomography processing at megahertz axial scan rate and high resolution video rate volumetric rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yifan; Wong, Kevin; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-02-01

    In this report, we describe how to highly optimize a computer unified device architecture based platform to perform real-time processing of optical coherence tomography interferometric data and three-dimensional (3-D) volumetric rendering using a commercially available, cost-effective, graphics processing unit (GPU). The maximum complete attainable axial scan processing rate, including memory transfer and displaying B-scan frame, was 2.24 MHz for 16 bits pixel depth and 2048 fast Fourier transform size; the maximum 3-D volumetric rendering rate, including B-scan, en face view display, and 3-D rendering, was ˜23 volumes/second (volume size: 1024×256×200). To the best of our knowledge, this is the fastest processing rate reported to date with a single-chip GPU and the first implementation of real-time video-rate volumetric optical coherence tomography (OCT) processing and rendering that is capable of matching the acquisition rates of ultrahigh-speed OCT.

  9. Solar Collector With Image-Forming Mirror Cavity to Irradiate Small Central Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, Don; Castle, Charles; Bonoetti, Joseph A.

    2001-01-01

    A unique solar thermal chamber has been designed and fabricated to produce the maximum concentration of solar energy and higher temperature possible. Its primary purpose was for solar plasma propulsion experiments and related material specimen testing above 3000 K. The design not only maximized solar concentration, but also, minimized infrared heat loss. This paper provides the underlying theory and operation of the chamber and initial optical correlation to the actual fabricated hardware. The chamber is placed at the focal point of an existing primary concentrator with a 2.74 m (9 ft) focal length. A quartz lens focuses a small sun image at the inlet hole of the mirrored cavity. The lens focuses two image planes at prescribed positions; the sun at the cavity's entrance hole and the primary concentrator at the junction plane of two surfaces that form the cavity chamber. The back half is an ellipsoid reflector that produces a 1.27 cm diameter final sun image. The image is "suspended in space," 7.1 cm away from the nearest cavity surface, to minimize thermal and contaminate damage to the mirror surfaces. A hemisphere mirror makes up the front chamber and has its center of curvature at the target image, where rays leaving the target are reflected back upon themselves, minimizing radiation losses.

  10. Remote parallel rendering for high-resolution tiled display walls

    KAUST Repository

    Nachbaur, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 IEEE. We present a complete, robust and simple to use hardware and software stack delivering remote parallel rendering of complex geometrical and volumetric models to high resolution tiled display walls in a production environment. We describe the setup and configuration, present preliminary benchmarks showing interactive framerates, and describe our contributions for a seamless integration of all the software components.

  11. Factors affecting extension workers in their rendering of effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting extension workers in their rendering of effective service to pre and post-settled farmers in government initiated and supported farming small, micro ... that extension workers be capacitated on specialisation, production, management, mentoring, monitoring and evaluation in order for them to deliver quality

  12. Virtual Environment of Real Sport Hall and Analyzing Rendering Quality