WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume presents results

  1. Graphical presentation of participants' results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained by 19 participating dosimetry systems are presented in this section. Section 3 of the preceding report, ''Evaluation of the Results of the First IAEA Coordinated Research Program on Intercomparison for Individual Monitoring'', explains the format and conventions used for the graphical presentation. The system number appearing in the upper left hand corner of each page can be used to correlate the dosimeter design information found in Table 2 of the preceding report with the results. However, care should be used in drawing inferences from this correlation, since system performance depends on a number of factors other than detector selection and design characteristics. (orig.)

  2. Drishti: a volume exploration and presentation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Ajay

    2012-10-01

    Among several rendering techniques for volumetric data, direct volume rendering is a powerful visualization tool for a wide variety of applications. This paper describes the major features of hardware based volume exploration and presentation tool - Drishti. The word, Drishti, stands for vision or insight in Sanskrit, an ancient Indian language. Drishti is a cross-platform open-source volume rendering system that delivers high quality, state of the art renderings. The features in Drishti include, though not limited to, production quality rendering, volume sculpting, multi-resolution zooming, transfer function blending, profile generation, measurement tools, mesh generation, stereo/anaglyph/crosseye renderings. Ultimately, Drishti provides an intuitive and powerful interface for choreographing animations.

  3. Presentation of economic evaluation results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikledkaew, Usa

    2014-05-01

    The first HTA guidelines for Thailand included a chapter outlining a set of guidelines on how best to report the findings of health economic evaluations, based on a review of best practice and existing guidelines on the presentation of economic evaluation results from around the world. In this second edition of HTA guidelines for Thailand, the recommendations build on the first edition by using a case study to illustrate how the guidelines can be applied in a real research context. The guidelines propose that all reporting include ten key elements: defining the scope of the study, selection of comparator(s), defining the type of economic evaluation, measurement of costs, measurement of clinical effects, handling time in economic evaluation studies, handling uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, presentation of the results, discussion of the results, and disclosure of funding and authors conflict of interest.

  4. Presentation of the results 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Gaz de France (GDF) presents in a press kit the main results achieved in 1997. The European community has formulated a project of definition of rules concerning the natural gas market. Minima values for annual consumptions have been defined and the consumption and use of natural gas in EC countries is described. The financial results of GDF in 1997 are compared with previous years. Net sales grew by nearly 1 billion french francs to reach 55 billion. Overall sales were down by 4% but the share of natural gas in french energy consumption increased and sales to industrial users went up in particular due to new cogeneration plants installed in 1996. A comparison of gas prices in Europe is given for the years 1985 to 1998. The efforts of GDF to offer increased quality of services concerning in particular safety aspects as checking programs and installation of new safeguard appliances are described. The efforts of GDF to increase the energy market share of natural gas resulted in the development of new products like cogeneration, air conditioning and fuels for automotive needs. (C.B.)

  5. Presentation of RTE results 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    For RTE, the financial year 2003 was marked by a number of achievements: our financial performances registered a clear improvement, above objectives, with turnover growing strongly; net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002; the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%; and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years

  6. Presentation of RTE results 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, RTE recorded a clear improvement in its financial results, and continued its debt reduction programme. The financial year 2003 was marked by a clear improvement in RTE's financial performance: results exceeded objectives, with turnover growing strongly, net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002, the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%, and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years. Net income has almost tripled due to RTE's improved productivity completed by a significant rise in its turnover and stabilizing operating costs RTE's finances therefore remain healthy, enabling the company to continue its debt reduction programme. Satisfactory economic and financial rates of return. Deadlines facing RTE in 2004: in application of the second European Directive, adopted on 26 June 2003, RTE faces two major deadlines in 2004: - the implementation of the 2. phase in the process of opening up the French electricity market, - its legal independence. On 1 July 2004, the market will be opened up to competition for all professional customers. At that date RTE, like all other electricity transmission system operators (TSOs) in the European Union, should be a legally independent body. The new central role of TSOs in Europe: how are electricity transmission system operators in other EU countries organised?

  7. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-III Presentation of a fully automatic titration apparatus and of results supporting the theories given in the preceding parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    This paper forms Part III of a series in which the first two parts describe methods for evaluating titrations performed by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant. The great advantage of these methods is that they do not require an accurate calibration of the electrode system. This property makes the methods very suitable for routine work. e.g., in automatic analysis. An apparatus for performing such titrations automatically is presented. Further, results of titrations of monoprotic acids, a diprotic acid, an ampholyte, a mixture of an acid with its conjugate base, and mixtures of two acids with a small difference between the stability constants are given. Most of these titrations cannot be evaluated by the Gran or Hofstee methods but yield results having errors of the order of 0.1% if the methods proposed in Parts I and II of this series are employed. The advantages of the method of stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant combined with the proposed evaluation methods, in comparison with common methods such as titration to a preset pH, are that all the data are used in the evaluation, permitting a statistical treatment and giving better possibilities for tracing systematic errors.

  8. Solar neutrino results and present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbachev, V.V.; Abdurashitov, J.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.; Gurkina, P.P.; Ibragimova, T.V.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Khairnasov, N.G.; Knodel, T.V.; Mirmov, I.N.; Shikhin, A.A.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Yants, V.E.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Teasdale, W.A.; Cherry, M.L.; Cleveland, B.T.; Elliott, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    The solar neutrino capture rate measured by the Russian-American Gallium Experiment on a metallic gallium target SAGE during the time from January 1990 through December 2000 is 77.0 +6.2 -6.2 +3.5 -3.0 SNU, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The experimental procedures and data analysis are presented

  9. ISO Results Presented at International Astronomical Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Some of the work being presented is collected in the attached ESA Information Note N 25-97, ISO illuminates our cosmic ancestry. A set of six colour images illustrating various aspects have also been released and are available at http://www.estec.esa.nl/spdwww/iso1808.htm or in hard copy from ESA Public Relations Paris (fax:+33.1.5369.7690). These pictures cover: 1. Distant but powerful infrared galaxies 2. A scan across the milky way 3. Helix nebula: the shroud of a dead star 4. Supernova remnant Cassiopeia A 5. Trifid nebula: a dusty birthplace of stars 6. Precursors of stars and planets The International Astronomical Union provides a forum where astronomers from all over the world can develop astronomy in all its aspects through international co-operation. General Assemblies are held every three years. It is expected that over 1600 astronomers will attend this year's meeting, which is being held in Kyoto, Japan from 18-30 August. Further information on the meeting can be found at: www.tenmon.or.jp/iau97/ . ISO illuminates our cosmic ancestry The European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory, ISO, is unmatched in its ability to explore and analyse many of the universal processes that made our existence possible. We are children of the stars. Every atom in our bodies was created in cosmic space and delivered to the Sun's vicinity in time for the Earth's formation, during a ceaseless cycle of birth, death and rebirth among the stars. The most creative places in the sky are cool and dusty, and opaque even to the Hubble Space Telescope. Infrared rays penetrating the dust reveal to ISO hidden objects, and the atoms and molecules of cosmic chemistry. "ISO is reading Nature's recipe book," says Roger Bonnet, ESA's director of science. "As the world's only telescope capable of observing the Universe over a wide range of infrared wavelengths, ISO plays an indispensable part in astronomical discoveries that help to explain how we came to exist." This Information Note

  10. ARL Summer Student Research Symposium Volume I: Select Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    papers to an audience of ARL scientists and engineers, including the ARL Director and an ARL Fellows panel. This volume of the Summer Student Symposium...program. As an integral part of their summer study, all students are required to write a paper on their work which summarizes their major activity and its...end product. The program is conducted on two separate competitive levels: undergraduate and graduate. The format of the paper in both levels is the

  11. Spacelab experiment computer study. Volume 1: Executive summary (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. L.; Hodges, B. C.; Christy, J. O.

    1976-01-01

    A quantitative cost for various Spacelab flight hardware configurations is provided along with varied software development options. A cost analysis of Spacelab computer hardware and software is presented. The cost study is discussed based on utilization of a central experiment computer with optional auxillary equipment. Groundrules and assumptions used in deriving the costing methods for all options in the Spacelab experiment study are presented. The groundrules and assumptions, are analysed and the options along with their cost considerations, are discussed. It is concluded that Spacelab program cost for software development and maintenance is independent of experimental hardware and software options, that distributed standard computer concept simplifies software integration without a significant increase in cost, and that decisions on flight computer hardware configurations should not be made until payload selection for a given mission and a detailed analysis of the mission requirements are completed.

  12. 2017 ARL Summer Student Program. Volume 1: Symposium Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the...Laws Limits of Subpixel Motion Detection with a Video Camera The Effect of Imperceptible Noise Stimulation on the Spinal Reflex Solving...Research & Engineering Directorate The Effect of Imperceptible Noise Stimulation on the Spinal Reflex Special awards were presented to 2 of the

  13. Plasma Volume Expansion Resulting from Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Hahn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To quantify the degree of plasma volume expansion that occurs during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT. Methods. Twenty healthy volunteers (mean age, 28 years underwent IVGTTs in which 0.3 g/kg of glucose 30% was injected as a bolus over 1 min. Twelve blood samples were collected over 75 min. The plasma glucose and blood hemoglobin concentrations were used to calculate the volume distribution (Vd and the clearance (CL of both the exogenous glucose and the injected fluid volume. Results. The IVGTT caused a virtually instant plasma volume expansion of 10%. The half-life of the glucose averaged 15 min and the plasma volume expansion 16 min. Correction of the fluid kinetic model for osmotic effects after injection reduced CL for the infused volume by 85%, which illustrates the strength of osmosis in allocating fluid back to the intracellular fluid space. Simulations indicated that plasma volume expansion can be reduced to 60% by increasing the injection time from 1 to 5 min and reducing the glucose load from 0.3 to 0.2 g/kg. Conclusion. A regular IVGTT induced an acute plasma volume expansion that peaked at 10% despite the fact that only 50–80 mL of fluid were administered.

  14. Presentation of geometries and transient results of TRAC-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, A.; Lang, U.; Ruehle, R.

    1985-02-01

    The computer code TRAC is used to analyze the transient behaviour of nuclear reactors. The input of a TRAC-Calculation, as well as the produced result files serve for the graphical presentation of the geometries and transient results. This supports the search for errors during input generation and the understanding of complex processes by dynamic presentation of calculational result in colour. (orig.) [de

  15. African Primary Care Research: Quantitative analysis and presentation of results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on Primary Care Research Methods. The article describes types of continuous and categorical data, how to capture data in a spreadsheet, how to use descriptive and inferential statistics and, finally, gives advice on how to present the results in text, figures and tables. The article intends to help Master's level students with writing the data analysis section of their research proposal and presenting their results in their final research report. PMID:26245435

  16. Presentation of RELAP5 results on the personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamun, I.; Stritar, A.

    1991-01-01

    DrALF is a program for graphical presentation of RELAP5 results. Results may be displayed in two different forms, as graphs with different zoom capabilities and as drawings or nodalizations with different variables displayed on a background picture. (author)

  17. The history of NATO TNF policy: The role of studies, analysis and exercises conference proceedings. Volume 2: Papers and presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    This conference was organized to study and analyze the role of simulation, analysis, modeling, and exercises in the history of NATO policy. The premise was not that the results of past studies will apply to future policy, but rather that understanding what influenced the decision process -- and how -- would be of value. The structure of the conference was built around discussion panels. The panels were augmented by a series of papers and presentations focusing on particular TNF events, issues, studies, or exercises. The conference proceedings consist of three volumes. Volume 1 contains the conference introduction, agenda, biographical sketches of principal participants, and analytical summary of the presentations and panels. This volume contains a short introduction and the papers and presentations from the conference. Volume 3 contains selected papers by Brig. Gen. Robert C. Richardson III (Ret.). Individual papers in this volume were abstracted and indexed for the database.

  18. On the complementary presentation of results of risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhardt, J.; Bayer, A.

    1983-01-01

    The presentation of the loss of years of life provides the opportunity to illustrate in complementary way the mortality risks evaluated as part of risk studies. As phase A of the DRS (German risk study nuclear power plants) bears upon the results of the American ''Reactor Safety Study'' (WASH 1400) it does not contain that factor of failure which has only been determined in subsequent studies. Phase B intends to present the results of risk assessments increasingly in form of abridged lifetime. (orig.) [de

  19. Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 5. Nursing Track: Abstracts and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Management Education at a Military Hospital .................................................................. 29  Proceedings of the 2010 AFMS... education information is in Appendix C of this volume. Appendices D-L are copies of presentation slides from the plenary sessions.  Volume 2. This volume...women who have menstruation as compared to deployed women who do not have menstruation ? This study is a descriptive co relational research design. The

  20. Presenting simulation results in a nested loop plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rücker, Gerta; Schwarzer, Guido

    2014-12-12

    Statisticians investigate new methods in simulations to evaluate their properties for future real data applications. Results are often presented in a number of figures, e.g., Trellis plots. We had conducted a simulation study on six statistical methods for estimating the treatment effect in binary outcome meta-analyses, where selection bias (e.g., publication bias) was suspected because of apparent funnel plot asymmetry. We varied five simulation parameters: true treatment effect, extent of selection, event proportion in control group, heterogeneity parameter, and number of studies in meta-analysis. In combination, this yielded a total number of 768 scenarios. To present all results using Trellis plots, 12 figures were needed. Choosing bias as criterion of interest, we present a 'nested loop plot', a diagram type that aims to have all simulation results in one plot. The idea was to bring all scenarios into a lexicographical order and arrange them consecutively on the horizontal axis of a plot, whereas the treatment effect estimate is presented on the vertical axis. The plot illustrates how parameters simultaneously influenced the estimate. It can be combined with a Trellis plot in a so-called hybrid plot. Nested loop plots may also be applied to other criteria such as the variance of estimation. The nested loop plot, similar to a time series graph, summarizes all information about the results of a simulation study with respect to a chosen criterion in one picture and provides a suitable alternative or an addition to Trellis plots.

  1. 640-slice DVCT multi-dimensionally and dynamically presents changes in bladder volume and urine flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yunshan; Fang, Kewei; Mao, Chongwen; Xiang, Shutian; Wang, Jin; Li, Yingwen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the application of 640-slice dynamic volume computed tomography (DVCT) to excretory cystography and urethrography. A total of 70 healthy subjects were included in the study. Excretory cystography and urethrography using 640-slice DVCT was conducted to continuously record the motions of the bladder and the proximal female and male urethra. The patients' voiding process was divided into early, early to middle, middle, middle to late, and late voiding phases. The subjects were analyzed using DVCT and conventional CT. The cross-sectional areas of various sections of the male and female urethra were evaluated, and the average urine flow rate was calculated. The 640-slice DVCT technique was used to dynamically observe the urine flow rate and changes in bladder volume at all voiding phases. The urine volume detected by 640-slice DVCT exhibited no significant difference compared with the actual volume, and no significant difference compared with that determined using conventional CT. Furthermore, no significant difference in the volume of the bladder at each phase of the voiding process was detected between 640-slice DVCT and conventional CT. The results indicate that 640-slice DVCT can accurately evaluate the status of the male posterior urethra and female urethra. In conclusion, 640-slice DVCT is able to multi-dimensionally and dynamically present changes in bladder volume and urine flow rate, and could obtain similar results to conventional CT in detecting urine volume, as well as the status of the male posterior urethra and female urethra. PMID:29467853

  2. LHC experiments present new results at Quark Matter 2011 Conference

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office

    2011-01-01

    The three LHC experiments that study lead ion collisions all presented their latest results today at the annual Quark Matter conference, held this year in Annecy, France. The results are based on analysis of data collected during the last two weeks of the 2010 LHC run, when the LHC switched from protons to lead-ions. All experiments report highly subtle measurements, bringing heavy-ion physics into a new era of high precision studies.   Events recorded by the ALICE experiment from the first lead ion collisions (Nov-Dec 2010). “These results from the LHC lead ion programme are already starting bring new understanding of the primordial universe,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “The subtleties they are already seeing are very impressive.” In its infancy, just microseconds after the Big Bang, the universe consisted of a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP), the fundamental building blocks of matter. By colliding heavy ions, physicists can turn back time an...

  3. The alteration of gray matter volume in children with mental retardation: the differences between the patients presented with operation deficit predominantly and those presented with language deficit mainly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Xinyu; Jiang Xuexiang; Jin Chunhua; Zhang Yuanchao; Bai Zhenhua; Yi Xiaoli; Xiao Jiangxi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To detect the differences of grey matter volume between the patients with mental retardation (MR) presented clinically as operation deficit (OD) or as language deficit (LD) and the children with typical normal development using optimal VBM. The developmental connections between brain gray matter and language or operation skills were examined. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained from 9 children with mental retardation presented as OD predominantly and 11 children with mental retardation presented as LD mainly, as well as the age-matched control group (11 and 14 normal children,respectively) on a 1.5 T scanner. Voxel-based morphometry analysis with an optimization of spatial segmentation and normalization procedures was applied to compare the volume of grey matter between the two groups (OD VS.control; LD VS.control). Statistically, the total and local gray matter volumes were compared between the two groups with t test. Results: The total gray matter volume of OD group was [(1.030 ± 0.078) × 10 6 mm 3 ]. Compared to that of controls [(0.984 ± 0.058) × 10 6 mm 3 ], it was increased significantly (t=-2.6, P<0.05). And the gray matter volume in the posterior cingulated gyrus, left superior prefrontal gyrus, left cuneus, left middle prefrontal gyrus and the body of left caudate nucleus showed significantly increased. Meanwhile, the total gray matter volume of the MR children presented as LD [(1.002 ± 0.068) × 10 6 mm 3 ] showed significantly increased(t=-3.0, P<0.05) compared with that of control group [(0.957 ±0.057) × 10 6 mm 3 ]. The gray matter volume in bilateral thalami, the left inferior temporal gyrus,the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the left cerebellum of the LD group was more than that of normal children. Conclusion: As revealed by VBM, there are differences in alterations of gray matter volume between MR children presented with OD and with LD relative to control. (authors)

  4. The DIVA programme: General presentation and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Duc, B.

    2000-01-01

    The French 'Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique' (CEA/DRN, Nuclear Reactor Division) is carrying out a new programme devoted to the thermal-hydraulics of steam injectors. This programme was called DIVA. Both experimental and theoretical works are planned. Motivations, objectives, test facility and test section dimensioning of this new programme are presented. A first test series was just performed. The validation of the test section dimensioning and experimental procedures was obtained. These first experimental data are presented and preliminary analyses are given. (author)

  5. Presentation of the 1998 financial results of the Framatome group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignon, D.

    1999-01-01

    This document makes a statement of the activity of the Framatome group during the year 1998. The activities of the group are shared into two main sectors of comparable size: the energy sector (nuclear fuels, nuclear realizations, nuclear services and industrial equipments) and the connectors engineering sector (electronics, electricity, automotive industry, interconnections and microelectronics). The financial results show an important growth of the connectors engineering sector while the energy sector remained satisfactory. Results are detailed by sector and activity: energy (realizations and nuclear equipments, nuclear services, nuclear fuels and industrial equipments), connectors engineering, and research and development activity of the group. (J.S.)

  6. Presentation of RTE results 2003; Bilan electrique francais 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 2003, RTE recorded a clear improvement in its financial results, and continued its debt reduction programme. The financial year 2003 was marked by a clear improvement in RTE's financial performance: results exceeded objectives, with turnover growing strongly, net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002, the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%, and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years. Net income has almost tripled due to RTE's improved productivity completed by a significant rise in its turnover and stabilizing operating costs RTE's finances therefore remain healthy, enabling the company to continue its debt reduction programme. Satisfactory economic and financial rates of return. Deadlines facing RTE in 2004: in application of the second European Directive, adopted on 26 June 2003, RTE faces two major deadlines in 2004: - the implementation of the 2. phase in the process of opening up the French electricity market, - its legal independence. On 1 July 2004, the market will be opened up to competition for all professional customers. At that date RTE, like all other electricity transmission system operators (TSOs) in the European Union, should be a legally independent body. The new central role of TSOs in Europe: how are electricity transmission system operators in other EU countries organised?.

  7. Presentation of RTE results 2003; Presentation des resultats 2003 de RTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    For RTE, the financial year 2003 was marked by a number of achievements: our financial performances registered a clear improvement, above objectives, with turnover growing strongly; net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002; the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%; and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years.

  8. Cost-volume-profit and net present value analysis of health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, R A

    1998-08-01

    The adoption of any information system should be justified by an economic analysis demonstrating that its projected benefits outweigh its projected costs. Analysis differ, however, on which methods to employ for such a justification. Accountants prefer cost-volume-profit analysis, and economists prefer net present value analysis. The article explains the strengths and weaknesses of each method and shows how they can be used together so that well-informed investments in information systems can be made.

  9. Implementation of machine learning for high-volume manufacturing metrology challenges (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoney, Padraig; Kagalwala, Taher; Reis, Edward; Lazkani, Houssam; Hurley, Jonathan; Liu, Haibo; Kang, Charles; Isbester, Paul; Yellai, Naren; Shifrin, Michael; Etzioni, Yoav

    2018-03-01

    across 3 products. In the case of product C, it is found that the predicted Rs correlation to the e-test value is significantly improved utilizing spectra acquired at the e-test structure. This paper will explore the considerations required to enable use of machine learning derived metrology output to enable improved process monitoring and control. Further results from the FEOL and BEOL sectors will be presented, together with further discussion on future proliferation of machine learning based metrology solutions in high volume manufacturing.

  10. Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, E.C.

    1998-05-01

    On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

  11. Wind tunnel test IA300 analysis and results, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, P. B.; Beaufait, W. B.; Kitchens, L. L.; Pace, J. P.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of wind tunnel pressure data from the Space Shuttle wind tunnel test IA300 are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the effects of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) plumes on the integrated vehicle forebody pressure distributions, the elevon hinge moments, and wing loads. The results of this test will be combined with flight test results to form a new data base to be employed in the IVBC-3 airloads analysis. A secondary objective was to obtain solid plume data for correlation with the results of gaseous plume tests. Data from the power level portion was used in conjunction with flight base pressures to evaluate nominal power levels to be used during the investigation of changes in model attitude, eleveon deflection, and nozzle gimbal angle. The plume induced aerodynamic loads were developed for the Space Shuttle bases and forebody areas. A computer code was developed to integrate the pressure data. Using simplified geometrical models of the Space Shuttle elements and components, the pressure data were integrated to develop plume induced force and moments coefficients that can be combined with a power-off data base to develop a power-on data base.

  12. Summary of TMX-U results: 1984. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    The following areas are covered in this volume: (1) TREQ code, (2) Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo calculations, (3) vacuum and gas modeling, (4) TMX-U data analysis and formulary, (5) thermal barrier operation, (6) plasma stability, (7) MHD and beta limits, (8) lf fluctuations, (9) central-cell ion-cyclotron microinstability, (10) end-cell ion-cyclotron microinstability, and (11) hot electron microinstability. In addition, discussions on the following technological developments are given: (1) vacuum, (2) magnet, (3) fueling, (4) heating, (5) potential control technology, (6) diagnostic systems, and (7) computer systems

  13. Mars power system concept definition study. Volume 1: Study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Franklin D.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary top level study was completed to define power system concepts applicable to Mars surface applications. This effort included definition of power system requirements and selection of power systems with the potential for high commonality. These power systems included dynamic isotope, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cell, sodium sulfur battery, photovoltaic, and reactor concepts. Design influencing factors were identified. Characterization studies were then done for each concept to determine system performance, size/volume, and mass. Operations studies were done to determine emplacement/deployment maintenance/servicing, and startup/shutdown requirements. Technology development roadmaps were written for each candidate power system (included in Volume 2). Example power system architectures were defined and compared on a mass basis. The dynamic isotope power system and nuclear reactor power system architectures had significantly lower total masses than the photovoltaic system architectures. Integrated development and deployment time phasing plans were completed for an example DIPS and reactor architecture option to determine the development strategies required to meet the mission scenario requirements.

  14. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  15. Viscous wing theory development. Volume 1: Analysis, method and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, R. R.; Melnik, R. E.; Marconi, F.; Steinhoff, J.

    1986-01-01

    Viscous transonic flows at large Reynolds numbers over 3-D wings were analyzed using a zonal viscid-inviscid interaction approach. A new numerical AFZ scheme was developed in conjunction with the finite volume formulation for the solution of the inviscid full-potential equation. A special far-field asymptotic boundary condition was developed and a second-order artificial viscosity included for an improved inviscid solution methodology. The integral method was used for the laminar/turbulent boundary layer and 3-D viscous wake calculation. The interaction calculation included the coupling conditions of the source flux due to the wing surface boundary layer, the flux jump due to the viscous wake, and the wake curvature effect. A method was also devised incorporating the 2-D trailing edge strong interaction solution for the normal pressure correction near the trailing edge region. A fully automated computer program was developed to perform the proposed method with one scalar version to be used on an IBM-3081 and two vectorized versions on Cray-1 and Cyber-205 computers.

  16. Characterization of large volume HPGe detectors. Part II: Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, Bart; Reiter, Peter; Pascovici, Gheorghe

    2006-01-01

    Measurements on a 12-fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356keV γ-rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and digital signal processing electronics

  17. Freight Transportation Energy Use : Volume 1. Summary and Baseline Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-01

    The overall design of the TSC Freight Energy Model is presented. A hierarchical modeling strategy is used, in which detailed modal simulators estimate the performance characteristics of transportation network elements, and the estimates are input to ...

  18. Laser fusion study. Final report, volume I, study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The primary goal of this study was to devise, evaluate, and conceptually design a complete, end-to-end, alignment system capable of handling 30 to 32 Shiva amplifier chains to specified accuracies in space and time. A secondary goal was to accomplish the primary goal with an acceptably low development and procurement cost and with an acceptably high day-after-day performance reliability. This report presents such a system: it is comprised of sensors, actuating mechanisms, controls, and displays that perform well within the current art-state. (U.S.)

  19. PISA 2015 Results: Students' Financial Literacy. Volume IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) examines not just what students know in science, reading and mathematics, but what they can do with what they know. Results from PISA show educators and policy makers the quality and equity of learning outcomes achieved elsewhere, and allow them to learn from the policies and practices…

  20. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  1. TPX: Contractor preliminary design review. Volume 1, Presentation and design description. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, D.; Naumovich; Walstrom, P.; Clarkson, I.; Schultheiss, J.; Burger, A.

    1995-01-01

    This first volume of the five volume set begins with a CPDR overview and then details the PF magnet system, manufacturing R ampersand D, Westinghouse R ampersand D, the central solenoid, the PF 5 ring coil, the PF 6/7 ring coil, quality assurance, and the system design description

  2. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    effectivities more than a number of fixed essential characteristics. Luiz Artur Ferrareto (UFRGS, undertaking a theoretical proposal for categorizing radio content in four different levels of planning (segment, form, programming and content itself tries to “compare and contrast the practices of Brazilian commercial broadcasting companies to those used on the radio in the United States, a reference market for our national entrepreneurs”. Madalena Oliveira (University of Minho focuses on the current stage of communication researches in Portugal reflecting on the challenges for studying a culture based on listening in times of looking. Marko Ala-Fossi, (University of Tampere beginning with the statement that “radio evolution greatly depends not only on the cultural context of a country but also on the whole social, political, economic development of societies” gives us a projection on radio development around the world for the next decades. Closing the dossier, Rafael Duarte Oliveira Venancio (UFU assuming radio as language by definition and not as a device understands it as a section and an operating model in such language as it intersects the world. Another six articles, not enrolled in the dossier, round the edition off. Fernando de Tacca debates the category of “photocine” recurring to three recent Spanish productions. Gustavo Souza investigates the possibility of identifying a point of view in documentary movies while establishing a debate that joins the materialities of image and sound with the subjectivity resulting from interpretation. Vinicius Bandeira develops on the special duplicity present in the movies between what is and what is not subsumed by the camera. Neide Jallageas proposes the study of visual communication design from the first modelings, attempting especially to the radical propositions from the early XXth century avant-garde movement. Gilson Schwartz debates on the impact from the distribution of videogames as hegemonic cultural practice in

  3. Load monitoring program: Status and results report. Volume 1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    British Columbia Hydro conducts a monitoring program to provide information on customer needs and values for planning; to measure customer response, energy savings impacts, and load shape impacts due to changes in rate level, rate restructuring, and Power Smart programs; to estimate end-use consumption and load shapes by customer class; and to provide load information for distribution and system load studies. To achieve these objectives, the monitoring program tracks the characteristics and energy use patterns of a sample of BC Hydro residential, commercial, and industrial customers over a period of several years. The entire sample will be surveyed periodically to obtain information on changes in building characteristics, equipment stocks, and energy-use behavior and attitudes. A report is provided on the status of monitoring program activities and some results obtained in 1993/94. For the residential sector, the results include typical load profiles, end-user demographics, and extent of electric space heating and water heating. In the commercial sector, customers were divided into two main groups. The large-building group was relatively well organized in terms of energy needs and participated in Power Smart programs. The small-building group was relatively energy-inefficient and relatively unaware of Power Smart programs. 43 figs., 15 tabs

  4. First results on material identification and imaging with a large-volume muon tomography prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Vanini, S. [University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: sara.vanini@pd.infn.it; Benettoni, M. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bonomi, G. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Viesti, G. [University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Zumerle, G. [University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-06-11

    The muon tomography technique, based on the Multiple Coulomb Scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed recently as a tool to perform non-destructive assays of large-volume objects without any radiation hazard. In this paper we discuss experimental results obtained with a scanning system prototype, assembled using two large-area CMS Muon Barrel drift chambers. The capability of the apparatus to produce 3D images of objects and to classify them according to their density is presented. We show that the absorption of low-momentum muons in the scanned objects produces an underestimate of their scattering density, making the discrimination of materials heavier than lead more difficult.

  5. First results on material identification and imaging with a large-volume muon tomography prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN, Sez. di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [Dip. di Fisica G. Galilei, Universita di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [Universita di Brescia, I-25133 Brescia (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Pavia, Via Valotti 9, I-25133 Brescia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [Dip. di Fisica, Universita di Genova, Genova (Italy); INFN, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on the multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed recently as a tool to perform non-destructive assays of large volume objects without any radiation hazard. In this paper we present the experimental results obtained with a scanning system prototype, assembled using two large area CMS Muon Barrel drift chambers. The imaging capability of the apparatus is shown, and the possibility to discriminate among different materials is discussed in a specific case of detecting lead objects inside a metal matrix. This specific case is dictated by a need in safely handling scrap metal cargoes in the steel industry. (authors)

  6. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D A [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO{sub 2} and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request 22 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  7. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverjensky, D. A. [The John Hopkins Univ, Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Baltimore (United States)

    1992-12-31

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO{sub 2} and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request 22 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs.

  8. Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Volume 2, Thermal-hydraulic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, P.D.; Davis, C.B.; Callow, R.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Dobbe, C.A.; Beelman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research program to develop a methodology to assess the operational performance of Babcock and Wilcox plants and to apply this methodology on a trial basis. The methodology developed for analyzing Babcock and Wilcox plants integrated methods used in both thermal-hydraulics and human factors and compared results with information used in the assessment of risk. The integrated methodology involved an evaluation of a selected plant for each pressurized water reactor vendor during a limited number of transients. A plant was selected to represent each vendor, and three transients were identified for analysis. The plants were Oconee Unit 1 for Babcock and Wilcox, H.B. Robinson Unit 2 for Westinghouse, and Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 for Combustion Engineering. The three transients were a complete loss of all feedwater, a small-break loss-of-coolant accident, and a steam-generator overfill with auxiliary feedwater. Included in the integrated methodology was an assessment of the thermal-hydraulic behavior, including event timing, of the plants during the three transients. Thermal-hydraulic results are presented in this volume (Volume 2) of the report. 26 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Computational needs survey of NASA automation and robotics missions. Volume 1: Survey and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gloria J.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's operational use of advanced processor technology in space systems lags behind its commercial development by more than eight years. One of the factors contributing to this is that mission computing requirements are frequently unknown, unstated, misrepresented, or simply not available in a timely manner. NASA must provide clear common requirements to make better use of available technology, to cut development lead time on deployable architectures, and to increase the utilization of new technology. A preliminary set of advanced mission computational processing requirements of automation and robotics (A&R) systems are provided for use by NASA, industry, and academic communities. These results were obtained in an assessment of the computational needs of current projects throughout NASA. The high percent of responses indicated a general need for enhanced computational capabilities beyond the currently available 80386 and 68020 processor technology. Because of the need for faster processors and more memory, 90 percent of the polled automation projects have reduced or will reduce the scope of their implementation capabilities. The requirements are presented with respect to their targeted environment, identifying the applications required, system performance levels necessary to support them, and the degree to which they are met with typical programmatic constraints. Volume one includes the survey and results. Volume two contains the appendixes.

  10. Evaluation of a new software tool for the automatic volume calculation of hepatic tumors. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, S.; Mildenberger, P.; Pitton, M.; Thelen, M.; Schenk, A.; Bourquain, H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: computed tomography has become the preferred method in detecting liver carcinomas. The introduction of spiral CT added volumetric assessment of intrahepatic tumors, which was unattainable in the clinical routine with incremental CT due to complex planimetric revisions and excessive computing time. In an ongoing clinical study, a new software tool was tested for the automatic detection of tumor volume and the time needed for this procedure. Materials and methods: we analyzed patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). All patients underwent treatment with repeated transcatheter chemoembolization of the hepatic arteria. The volumes of the HCC lesions detected in CT were measured with the new software tool in HepaVison (MeVis, Germany). The results were compared with manual planimetric calculation of the volume performed by three independent radiologists. Results: our first results in 16 patients show a correlation between the automatically and the manually calculated volumes (up to a difference of 2 ml) of 96.8%. While the manual method of analyzing the volume of a lesion requires 2.5 minutes on average, the automatic method merely requires about 30 seconds of user interaction time. Conclusion: These preliminary results show a good correlation between automatic and manual calculations of the tumor volume. The new software tool requires less time for accurate determination of the tumor volume and can be applied in the daily clinical routine. (orig.) [de

  11. Finite elements volumes methods: applications to the Navier-Stokes equations and convergence results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emonot, P.

    1992-01-01

    In the first chapter are described the equations modeling incompressible fluid flow and a quick presentation of finite volumes method. The second chapter is an introduction to the finite elements volumes method. The box model is described and a method adapted to Navier-Stokes problems is proposed. The third chapter shows a fault analysis of the finite elements volumes method for the Laplacian problem and some examples in one, two, three dimensional calculations. The fourth chapter is an extension of the error analysis of the method for the Navier-Stokes problem

  12. Morphological pyramids in multiresolution MIP rendering of large volume data : Survey and new results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, J.B.T.M.

    We survey and extend nonlinear signal decompositions based on morphological pyramids, and their application to multiresolution maximum intensity projection (MIP) volume rendering with progressive refinement and perfect reconstruction. The structure of the resulting multiresolution rendering

  13. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1995-10-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ''like-new'' condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ''like-new'' condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report

  14. Feasibility study for biomass power plants in Thailand. Volume 2. appendix: Detailed financial analysis results. Export trade information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This study, conducted by Black and Veatch, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report presents a technical and commercial analysis for the development of three nearly identical electricity generating facilities (biomass steam power plants) in the towns of Chachgoengsao, Suphan Buri, and Pichit in Thailand. Volume 2 of the study contains the following appendix: Detailed Financial Analysis Results

  15. Information management system study results. Volume 2: IMS study results appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Computer systems program specifications are presented for the modular space station information management system. These are the computer program contract end item, data bus system, data bus breadboard, and display interface adapter specifications. The performance, design, tests, and qualification requirements are established for the implementation of the information management system. For Vol. 1, see N72-19972.

  16. A short introduction to cytogenetic studies in mammals with reference to the present volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphodatsky, A; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Stanyon, R

    2012-01-01

    Genome diversity has long been studied from the comparative cytogenetic perspective. Early workers documented differences between species in diploid chromosome number and fundamental number. Banding methods allowed more detailed descriptions of between-species rearrangements and classes of differentially staining chromosome material. The infusion of molecular methods into cytogenetics provided a third revolution, which is still not exhausted. Chromosome painting has provided a global view of the translocation history of mammalian genome evolution, well summarized in the contributions to this special volume. More recently, FISH of cloned DNA has provided details on defining breakpoint and intrachromosomal marker order, which have helped to document inversions and centromere repositioning. The most recent trend in comparative molecular cytogenetics is to integrate sequencing information in order to formulate and test reconstructions of ancestral genomes and phylogenomic hypotheses derived from comparative cytogenetics. The integration of comparative cytogenetics and sequencing promises to provide an understanding of what drives chromosome rearrangements and genome evolution in general. We believe that the contributions in this volume, in no small way, point the way to the next phase in cytogenetic studies. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Clinical determination of the volume of the neurocranium in infancy. A presentation of two new methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösch, D; Mösch, H P; Kaiser, G

    1983-05-01

    Two useful methods for the exact volumetric measurement of the neurocranium are introduced. Using these methods in a transversal study, mean ratio and range for normal boys and girls from birth to six months can be defined. Longitudinal studies and comparative literature research confirm the accuracy of these standard values. The application to pathological cases shows that hypogenesis of the neurocranium can be recognized earlier and more accurately by measuring the volume than by measuring the circumference of the head. Both methods are easy to apply and can be expected of every child. However, method B (dipping in the neurocranium and measuring the displaced water on a scale) has proved to be more accurate, simpler and faster.

  18. FY 1995 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by MSFC personnel in FY95. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. The information in this report may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  19. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark. Volume II: Summary Results of Exercise 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Olson, Andy M.

    2005-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) completed under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship a PWR main steam line break (MSLB) benchmark against coupled system three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic codes. Another OECD/NRC coupled-code benchmark was recently completed for a BWR turbine trip (TT) transient and is the object of the present report. Turbine trip transients in a BWR are pressurisation events in which the coupling between core space-dependent neutronic phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. The data made available from actual experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 plant make the present benchmark particularly valuable. While defining and coordinating the BWR TT benchmark, a systematic approach and level methodology not only allowed for a consistent and comprehensive validation process, but also contributed to the study of key parameters of pressurisation transients. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises, two initial states and five transient scenarios. The BWR TT Benchmark will be published in four volumes as NEA reports. CD-ROMs will also be prepared and will include the four reports and the transient boundary conditions, decay heat values as a function of time, cross-section libraries and supplementary tables and graphs not published in the paper version. BWR TT Benchmark - Volume I: Final Specifications was issued in 2001 [NEA/NSC/DOC(2001)]. The benchmark team [Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in co-operation with Exelon Nuclear and the NEA] has been responsible for coordinating benchmark activities, answering participant questions and assisting them in developing their models, as well as analysing submitted solutions and providing reports summarising the results for each phase. The benchmark team has also been involved in the technical aspects of the benchmark, including sensitivity studies for the different exercises. Volume II summarises the results for Exercise 1 of the

  20. FY 1996 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Waits, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This document presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by MSFC personnel in FY96. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. After being announced in STAR, all of the NASA series reports may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. The information in this report may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  1. Recent results on polarizations and the present status of the Fermilab polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokosawa, Akihiko.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results are reviewed on polarization phenomena in nucleon-nucleon scattering at intermediate energies. The present status of S = 0 dibaryon resonances is presented. The status of the Fermilab polarized beam program is presented, including the construction of polarized beam, two polarimeters being installed in the experimental hall, and the experimental program

  2. Analysis and presentation of experimental results with examples, problems and programs

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulides, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended as a guide to the analysis and presentation of experimental results. It develops various techniques for the numerical processing of experimental data, using basic statistical methods and the theory of errors. After presenting basic theoretical concepts, the book describes the methods by which the results can be presented, both numerically and graphically. The book is divided into three parts, of roughly equal length, addressing the theory, the analysis of data, and the presentation of results. Examples are given and problems are solved using the Excel, Origin, Python and R software packages. In addition, programs in all four languages are made available to readers, allowing them to use them in analyzing and presenting the results of their own experiments. Subjects are treated at a level appropriate for undergraduate students in the natural sciences, but this book should also appeal to anyone whose work involves dealing with experimental results.

  3. Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar": The Initial Classroom Presentation. An Introduction to Theatre, Volume 2. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetker, James; Englesman, Alan

    A set of lessons to introduce "Julius Caesar" to secondary school students unfamiliar with Shakespeare is provided in this teaching guide. Only a critical fraction of the play is covered in the lessons. First, a synopsis of a modern high school situation whose conflicts parallel those in "Julius Caesar" is presented; then,…

  4. The FODA-TDMA satellite access scheme - Presentation, study of the system, and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celandroni, Nedo; Ferro, Erina

    1991-12-01

    A description is given of FODA-TDMA, a satellite access scheme designed for mixed traffic. The study of the system is presented and the choice of some parameters is justified. A simplified analytic solution is found, describing the steady-state behavior of the system. Some results of the simulation tests for an already existing hardware environment are also presented for the channel speeds of 2 and 8 Mb/s, considering both the stationary and the transient cases. The results of the experimentation at 2 Mb/s on the satellite Eutelsat-F2 are also presented and compared with the results of the simulation.

  5. Searches for new physics: Les Houches recommendations for the presentation of LHC results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraml, S.; Allanach, B.C.; Mangano, M.; Roeck, A. de; Prosper, H.B.; Sekmen, S.; Balazs, C.; Barr, A.; Bechtle, P.; Belanger, G.; Belyaev, A.; Benslama, K.; Campanelli, M.; Cranmer, K.; Dolan, M.J.; Eifert, T.; Hewett, J.; Ismail, A.; Rizzo, T.; Ellis, J.R.; Felcini, M.; Heinemeyer, S.; Fuks, B.; Guadagnoli, D.; Gunion, J.F.; Kadastik, M.; Kraemer, M.; Lykken, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Martin, S.P.; Robens, T.; Tytgat, M.; Weiler, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC. (orig.)

  6. Searches for new physics: Les Houches recommendations for the presentation of LHC results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraml, S.; /LPSC, Grenoble; Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Mangano, M.; /CERN; Prosper, H.B.; /Florida State U.; Sekmen, S.; /CERN /Florida State U.; Balazs, C.; /Monash U.; Barr, A.; /Oxford U.; Bechtle, P.; /Bonn U.; Belanger, G.; /Annecy, LAPTH; Belyaev, A.; /Rutherford /Southampton U.; Benslama, K.; /Regina U.; Campanelli, M.; /University Coll. London; Cranmer, K.; /New York U., CCPP; De Roeck, A.; /CERN; Dolan, M.J.; /Durham U., IPPP; Eifert, T.; /SLAC; Ellis, J.R.; /King' s Coll. London /CERN; Felcini, M.; /Cantabria U., Santander; Fuks, B.; /Strasbourg, IPHC /Strasbourg, IReS; Guadagnoli, D.; /Orsay, LPT /Annecy, LAPTH; Gunion, J.F.; /UC, Davis /Cantabria U., Santander /SLAC /NICPB, Tallinn /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch. /Fermilab /Clermont-Ferrand U. /CERN /Clermont-Ferrand U. /Northern Illinois U. /Santa Barbara, KITP /SLAC /Dresden, Tech. U. /Gent U. /DESY

    2012-04-17

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC.

  7. Searches for New Physics: Les Houches Recommendations for the Presentation of LHC Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraml, S.; et al.

    2012-04-17

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC.

  8. Searches for New Physics: Les Houches Recommendations for the Presentation of LHC Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraml, S.; Allanach, B.C.; Mangano, M.; Prosper, H.B.; Sekmen, S.; Balazs, C.; Barr, A.; Bechtle, P.; Belanger, G.; Belyaev, A.; Kenslama, K.; Campanelli, M.; Cranmer, K.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M.J.; Ellis, J.R.; Felcini, M.; Fuks, B.; Guadagnoli, D.; Gunion, J.F.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hewett, J.; Ismail, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kraemer, M.; Lykken, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Martin, S.P.; Rizzo, T.; Robens, T.; Tytgat, M.; Weiler, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a set of recommendations for the presentation of LHC results on searches for new physics, which are aimed at providing a more efficient flow of scientific information between the experimental collaborations and the rest of the high energy physics community, and at facilitating the interpretation of the results in a wide class of models. Implementing these recommendations would aid the full exploitation of the physics potential of the LHC. (authors)

  9. Initial experience with a group presentation of study results to research participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite ethical imperatives, informing research participants about the results of the studies in which they take part is not often performed. This is due, in part, to the costs and burdens of communicating with each participant after publication of the results. Methods Following the closeout and publication of a randomized clinical trial of saw palmetto for treatment of symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, patients were invited back to the research center to participate in a group presentation of the study results. Results Approximately 10% of participants attended one of two presentation sessions. Reaction to the experience of the group presentation was very positive among the attendees. Conclusion A group presentation to research participants is an efficient method of communicating study results to those who desire to be informed and was highly valued by those who attended. Prospectively planning for such presentations and greater scheduling flexibility may result in higher attendance rates. Trial Registration Number Clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00037154

  10. Army Synthetic Validity Project Report of Phase 2 Results. Volume 2. Appendixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    to Equipment & Food o Personal Hygine - Field & Garrison (4) o Kitchen Equipment - Garrison o Field Preparation of Foods & Equipment o Food, Field...Results: Volume II: Appendi i 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Wise, Lauress L. (AIR); Peterson, Norman G.; Houston, Janis (PDRI); Hoffman, R. Gene Campbell, John...o Handling KIA o Personal Hygiene & Preventive Medicine Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of participants that identified the task as

  11. Maps of sharpness: a methodology to present results of quality control for mammographic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Henrique Jesus Quintino de; Marques, Marcio Alexandre; Frere, Annie France; Schiable, Homero; Marques, Paulo M. Azevedo; Irita, Ricardo Toshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    A new method for evaluating radiologic imaging systems quality is presented. This method intends to relate the numeric results from quality control procedures to the magnitude of shadow and penumbra in the image from given objects. This evaluation is based on a computer simulation and it can be performed for any system and any object placed in any location of the radiation field

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance. Present results and its application to renal pathology. Experimental study of hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and relaxation time measurement of experimental hydronephrosis in mice are presented. The study is preceded by a description of the physical principles underlying the phenomenon of nuclear magnetic resonance and of its biomedical applications and with a review of the clinical use of NMR imaging in renal pathology [fr

  13. Presenting results as dynamically generated co-authorship subgraphs in semantic digital library collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Powell

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Semantic web representations of data are by definition graphs, and these graphs can be explored using concepts from graph theory. This paper demonstrates how semantically mapped bibliographic metadata, combined with a lightweight software architecture and Web-based graph visualization tools, can be used to generate dynamic authorship graphs in response to typical user queries, as an alternative to more common text-based results presentations. It also shows how centrality measures and path analysis techniques from social network analysis can be used to enhance the visualization of query results. The resulting graphs require modestly more cognitive engagement from the user but offer insights not available from text.

  14. Does parent-child agreement vary based on presenting problems? Results from a UK clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleridou, Kalia; Patalay, Praveetha; Martin, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies are often found between child and parent reports of child psychopathology, nevertheless the role of the child's presenting difficulties in relation to these is underexplored. This study investigates whether parent-child agreement on the conduct and emotional scales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) varied as a result of certain child characteristics, including the child's presenting problems to clinical services, age and gender. The UK-based sample consisted of 16,754 clinical records of children aged 11-17, the majority of which were female (57%) and White (76%). The dataset was provided by the Child Outcomes Research Consortium , which collects outcome measures from child services across the UK. Clinicians reported the child's presenting difficulties, and parents and children completed the SDQ. Using correlation analysis, the main findings indicated that agreement varied as a result of the child's difficulties for reports of conduct problems, and this seemed to be related to the presence or absence of externalising difficulties in the child's presentation. This was not the case for reports of emotional difficulties. In addition, agreement was higher when reporting problems not consistent with the child's presentation; for instance, agreement on conduct problems was greater for children presenting with internalising problems. Lastly, the children's age and gender did not seem to have an impact on agreement. These findings demonstrate that certain child presenting difficulties, and in particular conduct problems, may be related to informant agreement and need to be considered in clinical practice and research. Trial Registration This study was observational and as such did not require trial registration.

  15. Some GCM simulation results on present and possible future climate in northern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeisaenen, J [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Meteorology

    1996-12-31

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change initiated in 1993 a project entitled `Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations`. The two basic aims of this project were to assess the skill of current general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating present climate at a regional level and to intercompare the regional response of various GCMs to increased greenhouse gas concentrations. The public data base established for the comparison included simulation results from several modelling centres, but most of the data were available in the form of time-averaged seasonal means only, and important quantities like precipitation were totally lacking in many cases. This presentation summarizes the intercomparison results for surface air temperature and sea level pressure in northern Europe. The quality of the control simulations and the response of the models to increased CO{sub 2} are addressed in both winter (December-February) and summer (June-August)

  16. Some GCM simulation results on present and possible future climate in northern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeisaenen, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Meteorology

    1995-12-31

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change initiated in 1993 a project entitled `Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations`. The two basic aims of this project were to assess the skill of current general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating present climate at a regional level and to intercompare the regional response of various GCMs to increased greenhouse gas concentrations. The public data base established for the comparison included simulation results from several modelling centres, but most of the data were available in the form of time-averaged seasonal means only, and important quantities like precipitation were totally lacking in many cases. This presentation summarizes the intercomparison results for surface air temperature and sea level pressure in northern Europe. The quality of the control simulations and the response of the models to increased CO{sub 2} are addressed in both winter (December-February) and summer (June-August)

  17. Interpretation and presentation of results. Chickens will come home to roost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, A; Donovan, B; Mant, A; Bridges-Webb, C

    1984-06-01

    Collecting information is an obsessional activity which can become an end in itself. Interpreting and presenting results in a way that others can learn from them requires reflection, selectivity and ability to accept criticism. In selecting the journal to which the article will be submitted, consider which has the most appropriate readership and ensure the article conforms to the requirements and style of that journal.

  18. An experimental result of estimating an application volume by machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuhito; Koshino, Makoto; Kimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we improved the usability of smartphones by automating a user's operations. We developed an intelligent system using machine learning techniques that periodically detects a user's context on a smartphone. We selected the Android operating system because it has the largest market share and highest flexibility of its development environment. In this paper, we describe an application that automatically adjusts application volume. Adjusting the volume can be easily forgotten because users need to push the volume buttons to alter the volume depending on the given situation. Therefore, we developed an application that automatically adjusts the volume based on learned user settings. Application volume can be set differently from ringtone volume on Android devices, and these volume settings are associated with each specific application including games. Our application records a user's location, the volume setting, the foreground application name and other such attributes as learning data, thereby estimating whether the volume should be adjusted using machine learning techniques via Weka.

  19. Advanced Presentation of BETHSY 6.2TC Test Results Calculated by RELAP5 and TRACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Prošek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today most software applications come with a graphical user interface, including U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE best-estimate reactor system code. The graphical user interface is called Symbolic Nuclear Analysis Package (SNAP. The purpose of the present study was to assess the TRACE computer code and to assess the SNAP capabilities for input deck preparation and advanced presentation of the results. BETHSY 6.2 TC test was selected, which is 15.24 cm equivalent diameter horizontal cold leg break. For calculations the TRACE V5.0 Patch 1 and RELAP5/MOD3.3 Patch 4 were used. The RELAP5 legacy input deck was converted to TRACE input deck using SNAP. The RELAP5 and TRACE comparison to experimental data showed that TRACE results are as good as or better than the RELAP5 calculated results. The developed animation masks were of great help in comparison of results and investigating the calculated physical phenomena and processes.

  20. Crop identification technology assessment for remote sensing. (CITARS) Volume 9: Statistical analysis of results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B. J.; Feiveson, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of CITARS data processing in raw form. Tables of descriptive statistics are given along with descriptions and results of inferential analyses. The inferential results are organized by questions which CITARS was designed to answer.

  1. Presentations from the Aeroelastic Workshop - latest results from AeroOpt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartvig Hansen, M. (ed.)

    2011-10-15

    This report contains the slides of the presentations at the Aeroelastic Workshop held at Risoe-DTU for the wind energy industry in Denmark on October 27, 2011. The scientific part of the agenda at this workshop was 1) Detailed and reduced models of dynamic mooring system (Anders M. Hansen). 2) Bend-twist coupling investigation in HAWC2 (Taeseong Kim). 3) Q3UIC - A new aerodynamic airfoil tool including rotational effects (Nestor R. Garcia). 4) Influence of up-scaling on loads, control and aerodynamic modeling (Helge Aa. Madsen). 5) Aerodynamic damping of lateral tower vibrations (Bjarne S. Kallesoee). 6) Open- and closed-loop aeroservoelastic analysis with HAWCStab2 (Morten H. Hansen). 7) Design and test of a thick, flatback, high-lift multielement airfoil (Frederik Zahle). The presented results are mainly obtained in the EUDP project ''Aeroelastic Optimization of MW Wind Turbines (AeroOpt)''. (Author)

  2. [DESCRIPTION AND PRESENTATION OF THE RESULTS OF ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM PROCESSING USING AN INFORMATION MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myznikov, I L; Nabokov, N L; Rogovanov, D Yu; Khankevich, Yu R

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes to apply the informational modeling of correlation matrix developed by I.L. Myznikov in early 1990s in neurophysiological investigations, such as electroencephalogram recording and analysis, coherence description of signals from electrodes on the head surface. The authors demonstrate information models built using the data from studies of inert gas inhalation by healthy human subjects. In the opinion of the authors, information models provide an opportunity to describe physiological processes with a high level of generalization. The procedure of presenting the EEG results holds great promise for the broad application.

  3. The Quadrumafios electron cyclotron resonance ion source: presentation and analysis of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, A.; Briand, P.; Gaudart, G.; Klein, J.P.; Bourg, F.; Debernardi, J.; Mathonnet, J.M.; Melin, G.; Su, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The Quadrumafios electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been especially designed to permit physical studies of the plasma; this paper describes the source itself (which has been operated at 10 GHz in a first step), its preliminary performances, and the different diagnostics involved, which mainly concern the electron population (ECE, X rays, diamagnetism, microwave interferometer, and electron analyser). The results are presented and discussed: there is of course a close relationship between the parameters of the plasma and the performances of the source; this point will be discussed in the article. (authors). 5 refs., 9 figs

  4. Semiautomatic volume of interest drawing for 18F-FDG image analysis - method and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.J.; Baig, S.; Begent, R.H.J.; Francis, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Functional imaging of cancer adds important information to the conventional measurements in monitoring response. Serial 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), which indicates changes in glucose metabolism in tumours, shows great promise for this. However, there is a need for a method to quantitate alterations in uptake of FDG, which accounts for changes in tumour volume and intensity of FDG uptake. Selection of regions or volumes [ROI or volumes of interest (VOI)] by hand drawing, or simple thresholding, suffers from operator-dependent drawbacks. We present a simple, robust VOI growing method for this application. The method requires a single seed point within the visualised tumour and another in relevant normal tissue. The drawn tumour VOI is insensitive to the operator inconsistency and is, thus, a suitable basis for comparative measurements. The method is validated using a software phantom. We demonstrate the use of the method in the assessment of tumour response in 31 patients receiving chemotherapy for various carcinomas. Valid assessment of tumour response could be made 2-4 weeks after starting chemotherapy, giving information for clinical decision making which would otherwise have taken 9-12 weeks. Survival was predicted from FDG-PET 2-4 weeks after starting chemotherapy (p = 0.04) and after 9-12 weeks FDG-PET gave a better prediction of survival (p = 0.002) than CT or MRI (p = 0.015). FDG-PET using this method of analysis has potential as a routine tool for optimising use of chemotherapy and improving its cost effectiveness. It also has potential for increasing the accuracy of response assessment in clinical trials of novel therapies. (orig.)

  5. Patients' Experiences of Cancer Diagnosis as a Result of an Emergency Presentation: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Georgia; Sheringham, Jessica; Spencer-Hughes, Vicki; Ridge, Melanie; Lyons, Mairead; Williams, Charlotte; Fulop, Naomi; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Cancers diagnosed following visits to emergency departments (ED) or emergency admissions (emergency presentations) are associated with poor survival and may result from preventable diagnostic delay. To improve outcomes for these patients, a better understanding is needed about how emergency presentations arise. This study sought to capture patients' experiences of this diagnostic pathway in the English NHS. Eligible patients were identified in a service evaluation of emergency presentations and invited to participate. Interviews, using an open-ended biographical structure, captured participants' experiences of healthcare services before diagnosis and were analysed thematically, informed by the Walter model of Pathways to Treatment and NICE guidance in an iterative process. Twenty-seven interviews were conducted. Three typologies were identified: A: Rapid investigation and diagnosis, and B: Repeated cycles of healthcare seeking and appraisal without resolution, with two variants where B1 appears consistent with guidance and B2 has evidence that management was not consistent with guidance. Most patients' (23/27) experiences fitted types B1 and B2. Potentially avoidable breakdowns in diagnostic pathways caused delays when patients were conflicted by escalating symptoms and a benign diagnosis given earlier by doctors. ED was sometimes used as a conduit to rapid testing by primary care clinicians, although this pathway was not always successful. This study draws on patients' experiences of their diagnosis to provide novel insights into how emergency presentations arise. Through these typologies, we show that the typical experience of patients diagnosed through an emergency presentation diverges significantly from normative pathways even when there is no evidence of serious service failures. Consultations were not a conduit to diagnosis when they inhibited patients' capacity to appraise their own symptoms appropriately and when they resulted in a reluctance to seek

  6. Delayed Presentation of Traumatic Diaphragmatic Hernia: The Evaluation of Surgical Treatment Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sadrizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diaphragmatic hernia could be caused by congenital disorders, blunt trauma or penetrating injuries. The diagnosis of traumatic diaphragmatic hernia is normally neglected during the first presentation leading to late complications and considerably increased mortality and morbidity among the patients. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective, descriptive study, we reviewed the medical records of patients presented with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia who had undergone surgical operations between 1982-2015 in Ghaem Hospital and Omid Hospital affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The studied variables included age, gender, clinical symptoms, location of hernia, involved organs, type of imaging modalities, surgical techniques, length of hospital stay, mortality rate and surgical complications. Results: In this study, 38 patients were diagnosed with traumatic diaphragmatic hernia consisting of 28 men and 10 women. In total, 79% and 21% of the patients suffered from penetrating trauma and blunt trauma, respectively. In addition, left-sided, right-sided and bilateral hernias were present in 33%, 4% and 1% of the patients, respectively. The most frequently herniated organ was the stomach, and the most common clinical symptoms were abdominal pain (84% and dyspnea (53%. Initially, chest radiographs were performed on all the patients, and thoracotomy was performed to repair diaphragmatic tears in all the cases (100%. In this study, 3 patients had previously undergone Hartmann’s operation for gangrenous herniated colon, and devolvulation of gastric volvulus had also been performed on 3 patients. The main post-operative complications were reported to be pneumonia and respiratory insufficiency (2 cases, and the mean length of hospital stay was 6 days (5-8 days which was longer (1-2 months in patients with gangrenous bowel (3 patients. Furthermore, no mortality was reported during the course of hospitalization in these

  7. Linear regression metamodeling as a tool to summarize and present simulation model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Hawre; Dowd, Bryan; Sainfort, François; Kuntz, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    Modelers lack a tool to systematically and clearly present complex model results, including those from sensitivity analyses. The objective was to propose linear regression metamodeling as a tool to increase transparency of decision analytic models and better communicate their results. We used a simplified cancer cure model to demonstrate our approach. The model computed the lifetime cost and benefit of 3 treatment options for cancer patients. We simulated 10,000 cohorts in a probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) and regressed the model outcomes on the standardized input parameter values in a set of regression analyses. We used the regression coefficients to describe measures of sensitivity analyses, including threshold and parameter sensitivity analyses. We also compared the results of the PSA to deterministic full-factorial and one-factor-at-a-time designs. The regression intercept represented the estimated base-case outcome, and the other coefficients described the relative parameter uncertainty in the model. We defined simple relationships that compute the average and incremental net benefit of each intervention. Metamodeling produced outputs similar to traditional deterministic 1-way or 2-way sensitivity analyses but was more reliable since it used all parameter values. Linear regression metamodeling is a simple, yet powerful, tool that can assist modelers in communicating model characteristics and sensitivity analyses.

  8. Association of intradialytic hypotension and convective volume in hemodiafiltration: results from a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora-Bravo Franklin G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodiafiltration (HDF, as a convective blood purification technique, has been associated with favorable outcomes improved phosphate control, removal of middle-molecules such as Beta2-microglobulin and the occurrence of intradialytic hypotension (IDH as compared to diffusive techniques. The aim of this retrospective cohort study in dialysis patients receiving HDF in one urban dialysis facility in Mexico City was to investigate the occurrence of IDH during HDF treatments with varying convective volume prescriptions. Methods Subjects were stratified into equal groups of percentiles of convective volume prescription: Group 1 of 0 to 7.53 liters, group 2 of 7.54 to 14.8 liters, group 3 of 14.9 to 16.96 liters, group 4 of 16.97 to 18.9 liters, group 5 of 21 to 19.9 liters and group 6 of 21.1 to 30 liters. Logistic Regression with and without adjustment for confounding factors was used to evaluate factors associated with the occurrence of IDH. Results 2276 treatments of 154 patients were analyzed. IDH occurred during 239 HDF treatments (10.5% of all treatments. Group 1 showed 31 treatments (8.2% with IDH whereas group 6 showed IDH in only 15 sessions (4% of all treatments. Odds Ratio of IDH for Group 6 was 0.47 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.88 as compared to Group 1 after adjustment. Conclusions In summary the data of this retrospective cohort study shows an inverse correlation between the occurrence of IDH and convective volume prescription. Further research in prospective settings is needed to confirm these findings.

  9. One-at-a-time versus grouped presentation of mug book pictures: some surprising results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, H A; McAllister, H A

    2001-12-01

    Eyewitnesses to a simulated crime attempted to identify the perpetrator from a computerized mug book. The 208 mug book pictures were presented either 1 mug shot per page or in groups of 12 mug shots per page. Half of the mug books were arranged by similarity to the perpetrator as determined by a facial recognition algorithm, and half were randomly arranged. In contrast to past findings with photospreads, false-positive identifications were significantly higher using the one-at-a-time procedure than the grouped procedure. Results suggest that the best practice for mug books may be the use of groups of pictures per page rather than the one-at-a-time procedure long advocated by experts for use in lineups and photospreads.

  10. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neuroma. Volume changes and hearing results after 89-month median follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kranzinger, Manfred; Fastner, Gerd; Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix; Oberascher, Gerhard; Merz, Florian; Rahim, Hassan; Nairz, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate toxicity and local control following hypofractionated stereotactic radiation treatment with special focus on changes in tumor volume and hearing capacity. In all, 29 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated between 2001 and 2007 within a prospective radiation protocol (7 x 4 Gy ICRU dose). Median tumor volume was 0.9 ml. Follow-up started at 6 months and was repeated annually with MRI volumetry and audiometry. Hearing preservation was defined as preservation of Class A/B hearing according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (1995). No patient had any intervention after a median imaging follow-up of 89.5 months, one patient showed radiological progression. Transient increase of tumor volume developed in 17/29 patients, whereas 22/29 patients (75.9 %) presented with a volume reduction at last follow-up. A total of 21 patients were eligible for hearing evaluation. Mean pure tone average (PTA) deteriorated from 39.3 to 65.9 dB and mean speech discrimination score (SDS) dropped from 74.3 to 38.1 %. The 5-year actuarial Class A/B hearing preservation rate was 50.0 ± 14.4 %. Radiation increases only minimally, if at all, the hearing deterioration which emerges by observation alone. Presbyacusis is not responsible for this deterioration. Transient tumor enlargement is common. Today radiation of small- and medium-sized acoustic neuroma can be performed with different highly conformal techniques as fractionated treatment or single low-dose radiosurgery with equal results regarding tumor control, hearing preservation, and side effects. Hypofractionation is more comfortable for the patient than conventional regimens and represents a serious alternative to frameless radiosurgery. (orig.) [de

  11. Recent results from Fermilab E-687, charm particle decays, lifetimes and photoproduction dynamics: A compilation results presented at DPF 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Recent results on the semi-leptonic decay Decay D 0 → K - μ + ν μ ; charmed mesons; observation of the Decay Ω c 0 Σ + K - K - φ + ; the physics of charm lifetimes; and photoproduction of charmed hadrons. These papers have been cataloged separately

  12. EDF - 2005 Consolidated Annual Results - Analysts' Presentation. Consolidated financial statements at December 31, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    As the world's biggest electricity generator, the EDF Group covers every sector of expertise, from generation to trading and transmission grids. EDF builds on the expertise of its people, its R and D and engineering skills, its experience as a leading industry operator and the attentive support of its customers to deliver competitive solutions that successfully reconcile economic growth with climate protection. This document presents the 2005 annual results and Consolidated financial statements of the Group at 31 December 2005: Consolidated income statements, consolidated balance sheets, consolidated cash flow statements, variation in consolidated equity, notes (group accounting policies, impact of first-time application of IFRs, transition to standards IAS 32 and 39 concerning financial instruments, summary of accounting and valuation methods, public distribution concessions in France, significant events and transactions of 2005, impact of the law of august 9, 2004 on comparability, changes in the scope of consolidation, segment reporting, sales, fuel and energy purchases, other external expenses, contractual obligations and commitments entered into in the course of business, personnel expenses, other operating income and expenses, other income and expenses, financial result, income taxes, basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share, goodwill, other intangible assets, property, plant and equipment, investments in companies accounted for under the equity method, financial assets, inventories, including work-in-process, trade receivables, other receivables, cash and cash equivalents, available-for-sale assets and liabilities, equity, provisions, special concession liabilities, current and non-current financial liabilities, derivatives, other liabilities, related parties, greenhouse gas emission quotas, environment, subsequent events, scope of consolidation

  13. Portuguese Familial Hypercholesterolemia Study: presentation of the study and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbon, Mafalda; Rato, Quitéria

    2006-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused, in the majority of cases, by a partial or total lack of functional low density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR). Mutations in the LDLR gene lead to increased plasma cholesterol levels, resulting in cholesterol deposition in the arteries, thereby increasing the risk of premature coronary heart disease. The homozygous form of FH is rare but heterozygous FH is common, although underdiagnosed in many populations, including the Portuguese. In 1999 the Portuguese Familial Hypercholesterolemia Study was begun at the National Institute of Health. The aim of the Portuguese Familial H ypercholesterolemia Study is to perform an epidemiological study to determine the prevalence and distribution of FH in Portugal and to better understand the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease in these patients. The aim of the present work is to present the study's criteria and organization as well as its preliminary results. The study population consists of individuals of both sexes and all ages with a clinical diagnosis of FH, with biochemical and molecular characterization being performed. The clinical criteria used for the diagnosis of FH were adapted from those of the Simon Broome Heart Research Trust. The study is organized in five stages: 1. selection of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of FH; 2. completion of a clinical questionnaire and declaration of informed consent; 3. collection of blood samples; 4. biochemical characterization; 5. molecular study of three genes associated with the FH phenotype: LDLR, apolipoprotein B (APOB) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Between 1999 and June 2006 the LDLR gene and the APOB gene of 141 index cases (38 children and 103 adults) were studied. In 78 of these index cases (76 heterozygotes and two homozygotes) 50 different mutations in the LDLR gene were identified, and two unrelated individuals were found to have the ApoB3500 mutation

  14. Present status of Kyoto University reactor research result data base KURRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Takayuki

    1986-01-01

    The construction of KURRIP data base was begun in 1982, and in 1983, the data base concerning the literatures published in five years from 1978 to 1982 was set up in the Kyoto University Large Computer Center, and it has become available generally. In fiscal year 1984, the data concerning the literatures published from 1974 to 1977 and in 1983 were added. Moreover in this fiscal year, the work is carried out to input the data concerning the literatures published from 1970 to 1973 and in 1984. The data retrievable at present are those for ten years from 1974 to 1983. The results of having retrieved these data about a number of items are reported in this paper. The classification according to the places of employment of authors, the classification according to the kinds of literatures, the classification according to the languages used, the classification according to the installations used, the classification according to the fields of research, and the classification according to the magazines which printed the data are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  16. The new Inventory of Italian Glaciers: Present knowledge, applied methods and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiraglia, Claudio; Diolaiuti, Guglielmina; D'Agata, Carlo; Maragno, Davide; Baroni, Carlo; Mortara, Gianni; Perotti, Luigi; Bondesan, Aldino; Salvatore, Cristina; Vagliasindi, Marco; Vuillermoz, Elisa

    2013-04-01

    A new Glacier Inventory is an indispensable requirement in Italy due to the importance of evaluating the present glacier coverage and the recent changes driven by climate. Furthermore Alpine glaciers represent a not negligible water and touristic resource then to manage and promote them is needed to know their distribution, size and features. The first Italian Glacier Inventory dates back to 1959-1962. It was compiled by the Italian Glaciological Committee (CGI) in cooperation with the National Research Council (CNR); this first inventory was mainly based on field data coupled with photographs (acquired on the field) and high resolution maps. The Italian glaciation resulted to be spread into 754 ice bodies which altogether were covering 525 km2. Moreover in the Eighties a new inventory was compiled to insert Italian data into the World Glacier Inventory (WGI); aerial photos taken at the end of the Seventies (and in some cases affected by a high and not negligible snow coverage) were used as the main source of data. No other national inventory were compiled after that period. Nevertheless during the last decade the largest part of the Italian Alpine regions have produced regional and local glacier inventories which in several cases are also available and queried through web sites and web GIS application. The actual need is now to obtain a complete, homogeneous and contemporary picture of the Italian Glaciation which encompasses the already available regional and local data and all the new updated information coming from new sources of data (e.g.: orthophotos, satellite imagines, etc..). The challenge was accepted by the University of Milan, the EvK2CNR Committee and the Italian Glaciological Committee who, with the sponsorship of Levissima Spa, are presently working to compile the new updated Italian Glacier Inventory. The first project step is to produce a unique homogeneous glacier database including glacier boundary and surface area and the main fundamental

  17. Investigating the Present Day Cosmic Dust Flux at the Earth's Surface: Initial Results from the Kwajalein Micrometeorite Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Price, M. C.; Zolensky, M. E.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Russell, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of impact craters on the Long Duration Exposure Facility satellite indicate a present day micrometeoroid flux of approx. 30,000 tonnes [1 after 2]. But what portion of this material arrives at the Earth's surface as micrometeorites? Studies of available micrometeorite collections from deep sea sediments [e.g. 3], Greenland blue ice [e.g. 4] and the South Pole water well [e.g. 1] may be complicated by terrestrial weathering and, in some cases, collection bias (magnetic separation for deep sea sediments) and poorly constrained ages. We have recently set up a micrometeorite collection station on Kwajalein Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean, using high volume air samplers to collect particles directly from the atmosphere. By collecting in this way, the terrestrial age of the particles is known, the weathering they experience is minimal, and we are able to constrain particle arrival times. Collecting at this location also exploits the considerably reduced anthropogenic background [5]. Method: High volume air samplers were installed on top of the two-story airport building on Kwajalein. These were fitted with polycarbonate membrane filters with 5µm diameter perforations. The flow rates were set to 0.5m3/min, and filters were changed once a week. After collection, filters were washed to remove salt and concentrate particles [see 5] in preparation for analysis by SEM. Results and Discussion: A selection of filters have been prepared and surveyed. Due to their ease of identification our initial investigations have focused on particles resembling cosmic spherules. The spheres can be divided into three main groups: 1. Silicate spherules rich in Al, Ca, K and Na (to varying degrees), 2. Silicate spherules rich in Mg and Fe and 3. Fe-rich spherules. Group 1 spherules are often vesiculated and can occur as aggregates. They are similar in appearance and composition to volcanic microspheres [e.g. 6] and are thus likely terrestrial in

  18. Comparison of adrenal tumor treatment results by different volume of surgical interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy J. Semenov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years detection of various adrenal tumors has increased greatly. Total adrenalectomy remains the standart of surgical managment for adrenal tumors, although, the vast majority of these tumors turn out to be benign on the routine histological examination. Performing organ-sparing surgery would allow to avoid hormone insufficiency after total adrenalectomy. Aim: to compare results of adrenal tumors treatment by different volume of surgical interventions. Materials and methods. We evaluated the short-term results of 237 patients treatment with various adrenal tumors. Total adrenalectomy were performed on 206 cases, 31 patients undergone adrenal resection. There were analyzed intraoperative and postoperative complications, assessed the hormonal status of the patients, depending on the extent of surgical treatment. Besides, the long-term results were evaluated in 141 patients underwent total adrenalectomy and 30 patients after organ-sparing surgery. Moreover, we analyzed the percentage of recurrenses, assessed the hormonal status of the patients and the effectiveness of treatment. Results. Performing the organ-sparing operations doesn't increase the risk of intraoperative complications. In all patients with hormone-active tumors we found decline of pathologically increased hormone levels and trend to regress of clinical manifestations of the disease in early postoperative period. We found no difference in local recurrences in both groups, and its occurrence did not exceed 3.33%. Refractory postoperative adrenal insufficiency was observed only in corticosteroma patients in spite of surgery volume. In case of both side adrenal tumors there was no need in replacement therapy after total adrenalectomy from there one side and resection from the other. Conclusions. In cases of adrenal tumor performing organ-sparing operations is advisable, if there are no preoperative sings of malignancy.

  19. Absolute gravity change in Taiwan: Present result of geodynamic process investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricky Kao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity values at 24 sites over 2004 - 2016 measured with absolute gravimeters are used to study geodynamic processes in Taiwan. We model rain-induced grav­ity effects and other temporal effects of non-geodynamic origins to obtain residual gravity, which cannot be fully explained by GPS-derived vertical displacements. We explain the gravity changes associated with deposited debris, earthquake, volcanism and Moho deepening. Gravity changes of 53.37 and 23.38 μGal near Sinwulyu and Laonong Rivers are caused by typhoon Morakot, leading to estimated volumes of 6.0 × 105 and 3.6 × 105 m3 in deposited debris. The observed co-seismic gravity change near the epicenter of the M 6.9 Pingtung earthquake (26 December 2006 is 3.12 ± 0.99 μGal, consistent with a dislocation-based gravity change at the μGal level, thereby supplying a gravity constraint on the modeled fault parameters. The AG re­cord at the Tatun Volcano Group is the longest, but large temporal gravity effects here has led to a current gravity signal-to-noise ratio of less than one, which cannot convince a sinking magma chamber, but supply an error bound for gravity detections of long-term or transient magma movements. The gravity values at Ludao and Lanyu decline steadily at the rates of -2.20 and -0.50 μGal yr-1, consistent with the expected magma states of the two extinct volcanoes. The gravity rates at an uplifting site in central Taiwan and three subsiding sites in eastern Taiwan are negative, and are po­tentially caused by Moho deepening at a rate of -3.34 cm yr-1 and a combined Moho deepening and plate subduction at the rates of -0.18, -2.03, and -1.34 cm yr-1.

  20. Results of Long-term Measurement of 222Rn Volume Activity in Soil Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, K.; Matos, M.; Boem, R.; Stanys, T.; Hola, O.; Polaskova, A.

    1999-01-01

    Radon in the soil air was continuously monitored for four years. The measured volume activities differ one from another even three times. On the basis of the measured data the annual and average daily courses of the 222 Rn volume activity were studied for individual months. In annual courses the winter and also summer maxima of the 222 Rn volume activity were found out. The study of the average daily courses revealed that the oscillation of the 222 Rn volume activity about its average value during a day is only a few percent. For dry summer months a linear relation was found out between the changes of the 222 Rn volume activity and the changes of the atmospheric pressure in their average daily courses (Authors)

  1. Effect of Volume of Fluid Resuscitation on Metabolic Normalization in Children Presenting in Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakes, Katherine; Haukoos, Jason S; Deakyne, Sara J; Hopkins, Emily; Easter, Josh; McFann, Kim; Brent, Alison; Rewers, Arleta

    2016-04-01

    The optimal rate of fluid administration in pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is unknown. Our aim was to determine whether the volume of fluid administration in children with DKA influences the rate of metabolic normalization. We performed a randomized controlled trial conducted in a tertiary pediatric emergency department from December 2007 until June 2010. The primary outcome was time to metabolic normalization; secondary outcomes were time to bicarbonate normalization, pH normalization, overall length of hospital treatment, and adverse outcomes. Children between 0 and 18 years of age were eligible if they had type 1 diabetes mellitus and DKA. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous (IV) fluid at low volume (10 mL/kg bolus + 1.25 × maintenance rate) or high volume (20 mL/kg bolus + 1.5 × maintenance rate) (n = 25 in each). After adjusting for initial differences in bicarbonate levels, time to metabolic normalization was significantly faster in the higher-volume infusion group compared to the low-volume infusion group (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.9; p = 0.04). Higher-volume IV fluid infusion appeared to hasten, to a greater extent, normalization of pH (HR = 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.0; p = 0.01) than normalization of serum bicarbonate (HR = 1.2; 95% CI 0.6-2.3; p = 0.6). The length of hospital treatment HR (0.8; 95% CI 0.4-1.5; p = 0.5) and time to discharge HR (0.8; 95% CI 0.4-1.5; p = 0.5) did not differ between treatment groups. Higher-volume fluid infusion in the treatment of pediatric DKA patients significantly shortened metabolic normalization time, but did not change overall length of hospital treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01701557. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stratal Control Volumes and Stratal Control Trajectories: A New Method to Constrain, Understand and Reconcile Results from Stratigraphic Outcrop Analysis, Subsurface Analysis and Analogue and Numerical Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, P. M.; Steel, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Decoding a history of Earth's surface dynamics from strata requires robust quantitative understanding of supply and accommodation controls. The concept of stratigraphic solution sets has proven useful in this decoding, but application and development of this approach has so far been surprisingly limited. Stratal control volumes, areas and trajectories are new approaches defined here, building on previous ideas about stratigraphic solution sets, to help analyse and understand the sedimentary record of Earth surface dynamics. They may have particular application reconciling results from outcrop and subsurface analysis with results from analogue and numerical experiments. Stratal control volumes are sets of points in a three-dimensional volume, with axes of subsidence, sediment supply and eustatic rates of change, populated with probabilities derived from analysis of subsidence, supply and eustasy timeseries (Figure 1). These empirical probabilities indicate the likelihood of occurrence of any particular combination of control rates defined by any point in the volume. The stratal control volume can then by analysed to determine which parts of the volume represent relative sea-level fall and rise, where in the volume particular stacking patterns will occur, and how probable those stacking patterns are. For outcrop and subsurface analysis, using a stratal control area with eustasy and subsidence combined on a relative sea-level axis allows similar analysis, and may be preferable. A stratal control trajectory is a history of supply and accommodation creation rates, interpreted from outcrop or subsurface data, or observed in analogue and numerical experiments, and plotted as a series of linked points forming a trajectory through the stratal control volume (Figure 1) or area. Three examples are presented, one from outcrop and two theoretical. Much work remains to be done to build a properly representative database of stratal controls, but careful comparison of stratal

  3. Presentation of a methodology for measuring social acceptance of three hydrogen storage technologies and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirot, I.; Bigay, C. N.

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen storage is a key technology for the extensive use of H2 as energy carrier. As none of the current technologies satisfies all of the hydrogen storage attributes required by manufacturers and end users, there is intense research works aiming at developing viable solutions. A broad objective of the StorHy European project is to provide technological storage solutions, which are attractive from an economical, environmental and safety point of view. A specific sub-project is dedicated to the comparison of three different potential storage technologies for transport applications (compressed gas, cryogenic liquid, solid media). This evaluation is carried out in a harmonised way, based on common tools and assessment strategies that could be useful for decision makers and stakeholders. The assessment is achieved in a 'sustainable development' spirit, taking into consideration the technical, environmental, economical, safety and social requirements. The latter ones have newly emerged in such evaluations, based on the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) approach, and would require to be further studied. Hydrogen acceptability studies have been conducted in previous projects. They have been reviewed by LBST in the AcceptH2 project Public acceptance of Hydrogen Transport Technologies : Analysis and comparisons of existing studies (www. accepth2. com - August 2003). During these hydrogen acceptance surveys, mainly fuel cell bus passengers from demonstration projects around the world have been questioned. The work presented in this paper goes further in the methodology refinement as it focuses on the evaluation of hydrogen storage solutions. It proposes a methodological tool for efficient social evaluation of new technologies and associated preliminary results concerning France. In a global approach to sustainable development, the CEA has developed a new methodology to evaluate its current research projects : Multicriteria Analysis for Sustainable Industrial

  4. Prolactinomas may have unusual presentations resulting from massive extrasellar tumor extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marise Ribeiro de Sousa Berriel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of this case series is to report eight patients with giant prolactinomas emphasizing presentations and a treatment complication. The study group included six men and two women. The median age was 29 years (18–54 years; median serum prolactin level was 4,562 ng/ml (1,543–18,690 ng/ml; three patients (37.5% had panhypopituitarism; median tumor diameter was 50 mm (41–60 mm. Five patients (62.5% had visual field defects and three had improvement during treatment; six patients (75% reached prolactin normalization, with a median time of 10.5 months (7–84 months and median dose of 2.0 mg/week (1.0 to 3.0 mg/week. One patient presented as a true incidentaloma. One patient presented a cerebrospinal fluid leakage during medical treatment and refused surgery, however this resolved with conservative measures. This case series illustrate a rare subtype of macroprolactinomas, the importance of considering unusual presentations at the diagnosis, the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment and its possible complications.

  5. Cognitive Constraints on Multimedia Learning: When Presenting More Material Results in Less Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E.; Heiser, Julie; Lonn, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Presents research on and discusses the redundancy effect, consistent with a dual-channel theory of multimedia learning in which adding on-screen text can overload the visual information-processing channel, causing learners to split their visual attention between two sources. In research, lower transfer performance also occurred when interesting…

  6. Review on the present status of the German Risk Study: overall results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    An overview on the most important results of the German Risk Study (Phase A) is given. Besides plant design analysis, the description mainly refers to core melt accidents, radioactive release and accidental consequences depending on various types of containment failure. Thereby some differences or results compared to WASH 1400 are discussed

  7. Smaller Hippocampal Volume in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder : A Multisite ENIGMA-PGC Study: Subcortical Volumetry Results From Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logue, Mark W.; van Rooij, Sanne J H; Dennis, Emily L.; Davis, Sarah L.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Stevens, Jennifer S.; Densmore, Maria; Haswell, Courtney C.; Ipser, Jonathan; Koch, Saskia B.J.; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Lebois, Lauren A.M.; Peverill, Matthew; Baker, Justin T.; Boedhoe, Premika S W; Frijling, Jessie L.; Gruber, Staci A.; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Jahanshad, Neda; Koopowitz, Sheri; Levy, Ifat; Nawijn, Laura; O'Connor, Lauren; Olff, Miranda; Salat, David H.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Winternitz, Sherry R.; Wolff, Jonathan D.; Wolf, Erika J.; Wang, Xin; Wrocklage, Kristen; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Bryant, Richard A.; Geuze, Elbert; Jovanovic, Tanja; Kaufman, Milissa L.; King, Anthony P.; Krystal, John H.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Bennett, Maxwell; Lanius, Ruth; Liberzon, Israel; McGlinchey, Regina E.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Milberg, William P.; Miller, Mark W.; Ressler, Kerry J; Veltman, Dick J.; Stein, Dan J; Thomaes, Kathleen; Thompson, Paul M.; Morey, Rajendra A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Many studies report smaller hippocampal and amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but findings have not always been consistent. Here, we present the results of a large-scale neuroimaging consortium study on PTSD conducted by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium

  8. Patient-oriented presentation of results of radiological procedures using DICOM-compliant DVD media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Aberle, Denise R.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Lu, David S.; Dahlbom, Magdalena; McGill, D. Ric; McCoy, J. Michael

    2003-05-01

    Some institutions have adopted digital media such as CD ROMs to provide patients and referring physicians with results of radiological procedures. These systems require a computer to review the images and lack the supporting explanations and guidance for patients to properly understand the results. We developed a hybrid DVD encoding format that combines DICOM-compliant image storage format with video streams viewable on any consumer DVD players. The addition of the video material allows radiologists to provide explanations, disclaimers and guidance to the patients regarding the results of the study. The diagnostic report is also included on the DVD as a PDF file and as a set of video frames that can be viewed on a DVD player. The native high-resolution images are also included in DICOM format on the DVD and can be accessed by any workstation equipped with a DICOM viewer. The DVD that can be reviewed on any consumer DVD player overcomes the limitation of CD ROMS that require the use of a personal computer. The results of the radiological procedures become more accessible patients that could be reluctant or unable to use a computer. Also, live video clips add a more personalized note and allow radiologists to convey important messages to the patients. This is particularly useful for self-referred screening procedures where results should always be accompanied with education material and explanations of the findings.

  9. Presentations from the Aeroelastic Workshop – latest results from AeroOpt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    This report contains the slides of the presentations at the Aeroelastic Workshop held at Risø-DTU for the wind energy industry in Denmark on January 27, 2011. The scientific part of the agenda at this workshop was • Anisotropic beam element in HAWC2 for modelling of composite lay-ups (Taeseong Kim...... (Robert Mikkelsen) • Potential of fatigue and extreme load reductions on swept blades using HAWC2 (David Verelst) • Aeroelastic modal analysis of backward swept blades using HAWCStab2 (Morten H. Hansen) • Aeroelastic rotor design minimizing the loads (Christian Bak) • A small study of flat back airfoils...

  10. Factors affecting presentation and delay in patients with testicular cancer: results of a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, P; Mason, M D; Roberts, E

    1999-01-01

    A qualitative study was undertaken with men treated for testicular tumours, to ascertain how they interpreted their symptoms and the factors which influenced a decision to consult a physician. The research was undertaken with six men who had been diagnosed as having testicular tumours. Interviews were also conducted with four wives and one mother. The findings showed that giving men information on testicular cancer may not guarantee early presentation. Symptoms were not generally attributed to cancer and the one patient who practised self-examination had delayed seeking help for 6 months. The extent to which symptoms affected the patient's lifestyle was also a factor in the decision-making process, as was the checking of symptoms with other family members. Wives were often pivotal in persuading men to seek help. The discovery of testicular symptoms produced emotional responses which included embarrassment and fear of both cancer and castration. There was evidence of strong feelings of masculine identity bound up with the appearance of 'normal' genitals. Provider-delay was identified in four cases and was associated with misattribution of symptoms by physicians and the failure to initiate specialist referral. Delay was under-recorded in the hospital notes in all cases where presentation was not immediate.

  11. Smart fast blood counting of trace volumes of body fluids from various mammalian species using a compact custom-built microscope cytometer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Gao, Tingjuan; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Carrade-Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Dwyre, Denis M.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Cell counting in human body fluids such as blood, urine, and CSF is a critical step in the diagnostic process for many diseases. Current automated methods for cell counting are based on flow cytometry systems. However, these automated methods are bulky, costly, require significant user expertise, and are not well suited to counting cells in fluids other than blood. Therefore, their use is limited to large central laboratories that process enough volume of blood to recoup the significant capital investment these instruments require. We present in this talk a combination of a (1) low-cost microscope system, (2) simple sample preparation method, and (3) fully automated analysis designed for providing cell counts in blood and body fluids. We show results on both humans and companion and farm animals, showing that accurate red cell, white cell, and platelet counts, as well as hemoglobin concentration, can be accurately obtained in blood, as well as a 3-part white cell differential in human samples. We can also accurately count red and white cells in body fluids with a limit of detection ~3 orders of magnitude smaller than current automated instruments. This method uses less than 1 microliter of blood, and less than 5 microliters of body fluids to make its measurements, making it highly compatible with finger-stick style collections, as well as appropriate for small animals such as laboratory mice where larger volume blood collections are dangerous to the animal's health.

  12. The Past, Present, and Future of Research in Distance Education: Results of a Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngmin; Driscoll, Marcy P.; Nelson, David W.

    2005-01-01

    The articles published in four prominent distance education journals between 1997 and 2002 were categorized and the references cited were tallied. The study provides an opportunity to examine research topics, methods, and citation trends. The results can be used to review current research trends and to explore potential research directions.…

  13. Automated analysis of aircraft configurations for safe separation enabled by quantitative grading of results; presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jamison, Kevin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available perturbations of: • store mass and physical properties • ejector rack performance • aircraft release flight conditions • stations on aircraft • neighbouring stores – MIL-HDBK 1763: 271.4 – Results in a very large analysis matrix! From: Tutty, M...

  14. Acoustic detection of particles, the RAP experiment: present status and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassan, M; Buonomo, B; Coccia, E; Blair, D; D'Antonio, S; Monache, G Delle; Gioacchino, D Di; Fafone, V; Ligi, C; Marini, A; Mazzitelli, G; Modestino, G; Pizzella, G; Quintieri, L; Roccella, S; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Tripodi, P; Valente, P

    2006-01-01

    Cosmic ray events with rate and energy much higher than expected were detected by the ultracryogenic gravitational antenna Nautilus located at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, when it was operating in superconducting state. Mechanisms related to the superconductivity state of the material could be involved in such a way to enhance the conversion efficiency of the particle energy into vibrational energy of the detector. The RAP experiment has the aim to study the mechanical response of a small metallic resonant bar to short pulses of high energy electron beam, investigating the response of the bar both in normal and in superconducting state. The results obtained for an Al5056 bar down to a temperature of 4 K are reported and the preliminary results for a niobium bar at temperature below and above the superconducting-normal transition are also discussed

  15. Esophageal Replacement in Children: Presentation of 18 Cases and Results of Their Surgical Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delshad

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Esophageal replacement is indicated in certain circumstances including long gap esophageal atresia,severe strictures due to gastro-esophageal reflux (GER and caustic burns. We analyzed our results of 18 patients who underwent esophageal replacement in our university hospital. Methods:We reviewed esophageal replacements carried out in our department between June 1996 and August 2004.We report 18 patients(4 girls and 14 boys with ages ranging from 3.5 until 30 months.Fifteen patients had long gap atresia,two had strictures due to GER,and one case had caustic burn. Esophageal replacement was performed through an abdominal midline incision by one of three methods, namely: colon transposition in 15, gastric replacement in 2, and gastric tube in 1 case. Results: Leakage and stricture were the most common complications of esophageal replacement.Most deaths were due to aspiration pneumonia and congenital cardiac disease.Conclusion:Esophageal replacement has limited indications.It allows a good functional result,with adequate oral feeding and normal growth.

  16. Semantic Web Services Challenge, Results from the First Year. Series: Semantic Web And Beyond, Volume 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, C.; Margaria, T.; Lausen, H.; Zaremba, M.

    Explores trade-offs among existing approaches. Reveals strengths and weaknesses of proposed approaches, as well as which aspects of the problem are not yet covered. Introduces software engineering approach to evaluating semantic web services. Service-Oriented Computing is one of the most promising software engineering trends because of the potential to reduce the programming effort for future distributed industrial systems. However, only a small part of this potential rests on the standardization of tools offered by the web services stack. The larger part of this potential rests upon the development of sufficient semantics to automate service orchestration. Currently there are many different approaches to semantic web service descriptions and many frameworks built around them. A common understanding, evaluation scheme, and test bed to compare and classify these frameworks in terms of their capabilities and shortcomings, is necessary to make progress in developing the full potential of Service-Oriented Computing. The Semantic Web Services Challenge is an open source initiative that provides a public evaluation and certification of multiple frameworks on common industrially-relevant problem sets. This edited volume reports on the first results in developing common understanding of the various technologies intended to facilitate the automation of mediation, choreography and discovery for Web Services using semantic annotations. Semantic Web Services Challenge: Results from the First Year is designed for a professional audience composed of practitioners and researchers in industry. Professionals can use this book to evaluate SWS technology for their potential practical use. The book is also suitable for advanced-level students in computer science.

  17. Results and present status of the Japan-US collaboration on detector research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kasuke

    1985-02-01

    This is a summary report on the results of the Detector R and D work, which we have been carrying out these three years, under the Japan-U.S. collaboration on High Energy Physics. It is clear that there have been already many considerable progress and outputs in the activities, some of which are already applied to the actual detectors in various ways. It is foreseeable that more extensive development will be realized. It should also be better to emphasize that these detector R and D efforts will be very important for the further development of high energy physics in the near future. (author)

  18. Present status of TMI-2 plant and results of its research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Sadaaki; Yokomi, Michiro.

    1987-01-01

    In the accident occurred in the TMI-2 plant on March 28, 1979, the damage was caused in the reactor core, but there scarcely was the effect on the health and safety of general public around the power station. But in USA, it was decided to collect the data on the fuel, decontamination, waste management and so on of this plant and to advance the survey and research on the safety by the analysis and evaluation of the course of the accident mainly by GPUN, EPRI, NRC and DOE. Also in Japan, it was judged that the participation in this research would be useful for improving the reliability of Japanese nuclear power plants hereafter, and the Japan-USA agreement on TMI-2 research and development project was concluded on April 16, 1984. The activity plan in TMI-2 is divided into three stages. Phase 1 is the stage of stabilization, Phase 2 is the stage of taking fuel out, and Phase 3 is the stage of cleaning. At present, Phase 2 - 3 are in progress, and the taking-out and transport of fuel and decontamination are carried out. After finishing Phase 3, the TMI-2 plant is placed in the state of monitoring and preservation, which is scheduled in September, 1988. The final disposal of the plant will be determined thereafter. Decontamination, treatment of contaminated water and wastes, taking-out and transport of fuel, state of the reactor core and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. The present status and future growth of maintenance in US manufacturing: results from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoning; Siegel, David; Weiss, Brian A; Gamel, Ellen; Wang, Wei; Lee, Jay; Ni, Jun

    A research study was conducted (1) to examine the practices employed by US manufacturers to achieve productivity goals and (2) to understand what level of intelligent maintenance technologies and strategies are being incorporated into these practices. This study found that the effectiveness and choice of maintenance strategy were strongly correlated to the size of the manufacturing enterprise; there were large differences in adoption of advanced maintenance practices and diagnostics and prognostics technologies between small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Despite their greater adoption of maintenance practices and technologies, large manufacturing organizations have had only modest success with respect to diagnostics and prognostics and preventive maintenance projects. The varying degrees of success with respect to preventative maintenance programs highlight the opportunity for larger manufacturers to improve their maintenance practices and use of advanced prognostics and health management (PHM) technology. The future outlook for manufacturing PHM technology among the manufacturing organizations considered in this study was overwhelmingly positive; many manufacturing organizations have current and planned projects in this area. Given the current modest state of implementation and positive outlook for this technology, gaps, future trends, and roadmaps for manufacturing PHM and maintenance strategy are presented.

  20. Presentation of the results of a Bayesian automatic event detection and localization program to human analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, N.; Kebede, F.; Feitio, P.; Le Bras, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has been developing and testing NET-VISA (Arora et al., 2013), a Bayesian automatic event detection and localization program, and evaluating its performance in a realistic operational mode. In our preliminary testing at the CTBTO, NET-VISA shows better performance than its currently operating automatic localization program. However, given CTBTO's role and its international context, a new technology should be introduced cautiously when it replaces a key piece of the automatic processing. We integrated the results of NET-VISA into the Analyst Review Station, extensively used by the analysts so that they can check the accuracy and robustness of the Bayesian approach. We expect the workload of the analysts to be reduced because of the better performance of NET-VISA in finding missed events and getting a more complete set of stations than the current system which has been operating for nearly twenty years. The results of a series of tests indicate that the expectations born from the automatic tests, which show an overall overlap improvement of 11%, meaning that the missed events rate is cut by 42%, hold for the integrated interactive module as well. New events are found by analysts, which qualify for the CTBTO Reviewed Event Bulletin, beyond the ones analyzed through the standard procedures. Arora, N., Russell, S., and Sudderth, E., NET-VISA: Network Processing Vertically Integrated Seismic Analysis, 2013, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 103, 709-729.

  1. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma: present results and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Taulelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced lung cancer is reportedly poor in all histologic types. In non-small cell lung cancer, radiation therapy alone results in disappointing long-term survival. Three recent randomized trials, however, have shown a limited but significant improvement of survival with induction chemotherapy, though local control remained poor in these studies as well as in small-cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and late radiotherapy. Tow randomized trials focusing on small-cell lung cancer have recently shown significant benefit due to the combination of early concurrent mediastinal irradiation and chemotherapy, with major improvement in local control and a more than 40% 2-year survival rate. The concept of concurrent chemoradiotherapy has also been studied in non-small cell carcinoma with several pilot studies leading to both encouraging results and improved survival rate (up to 40% at 2 years). Ongoing phase III trials are comparing sequential versus concurrent chemoradiotherapy and will define the role of radical surgery after chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  2. Probing of Hermean Exosphere by ultraviolet spectroscopy: Instrument presentation, calibration philosophy and first lights results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, J. F.; Rouanet, N.; Maria, J. L.; Quémerais, E.; Mine, P. O.; Zuppella, P.; Suman, M.; Nicolosi, P.; Pelizzo, M. G.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.

    2017-11-01

    PHEBUS (Probing of Hermean Exosphere by Ultraviolet Spectroscopy) is a double spectrometer for the Extreme Ultraviolet range (55-155 nm) and the Far Ultraviolet range (145-315 nm) dedicated to the characterization of Mercury's exosphere composition and dynamics, and surface-exosphere connections. PHEBUS is part of the ESA BepiColombo cornerstone mission payload devoted to the study of Mercury. The BepiColombo mission consists of two spacecrafts: the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) and the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) on which PHEBUS will be mounted. PHEBUS is a French-led instrument implemented in a cooperative scheme involving Japan (detectors), Russia (scanner) and Italy (ground calibration). Before launch, PHEBUS team want to perform a full absolute calibration on ground, in addition to calibrations which will be made in-flight, in order to know the instrument's response as precisely as possible. Instrument overview and calibration philosophy are introduced along with the first lights results observed by a first prototype.

  3. Graded changes in enamel component volumes resulted from a short tooth bleaching procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Artemisa Fernanda Moura; Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes Ramos; Limeira Júnior, Francisco de Assis; de Moura, Mirella de Fátima Liberato; de Sousa, Frederico Barbosa

    2016-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that changes in enamel component volumes (mineral, organic, and water volumes, and permeability) are graded from outer to inner enamel after a short bleaching procedure. Extracted unerupted human third molars had half of their crowns bleached (single bleaching session, 3 × 15 min), and tooth shade changes in bleached parts were analyzed with a spectrophotometer. Ground sections were prepared, component volumes and permeability were quantified at histological points located at varying distances from the enamel surface (n=10 points/location), representing conditions before and after bleaching. Tooth shade changes were significant (pbleaching, except at the outer layers. Multiple analysis of covariances revealed that most of the variance of the change in enamel composition after bleaching was explained by the combination of the set of types of component volume (in decreasing order of relevance: mineral loss, organic gain, water gain, and decrease in permeability) with the set of distances from the enamel surface (graded from the enamel surface inward) (canonical R(2)=0.97; p99%). Changes in enamel composition after a short bleaching procedure followed a gradient within component volumes (mineral loss>organic gain>water gain>decrease in permeability) and decreased from the enamel surface inward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The presentation of the results of Alexander von Humboldt's voyage to Carlos IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Puig-Samper

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumen  Desde nuestras primeras investigaciones sobre la estancia de Alexander von Humboldt en España siempre nos sorprendió la ausencia de una mínima relación posterior del sabio prusiano con la corona española y sus autoridades. Iniciada una nueva investigación, encontramos que efectivamente se produjo el envío de un primer trabajo a Carlos IV desde Roma acompañado de una carta de gratitud por la protección recibida durante su viaje americano y de sumisión a la corona española, que ahora presentamos.   Summary Ever since our first research into Alexander von Humboldt's stay in Spain, the absence of an ensuing relationship between the wise Prussian and the Spanish Crown and Authorities had always surprised us. On starting new research, we found that indeed he sent his first work to Carlos IV from Rome accompanied by a letter of gratitude for the protection he had received during his American trip and submission to the Spanish Crown, which we now present. This first literary fruit of his voyage, which Alexander von Humboldt alluded to in the letter is the first instalment of his work Plantes Équinoxiales, Recueillies au Mexique, dans l’ile de Cuba, dans les provinces de Caracas, de Cumana etc., published in Paris in 1805.   Zusammenfassung Seit unseren ersten Forschungen über den Aufenthalt Alexander von Humboldts in Spanien hat uns das Fehlen einer hieran anschließenden Beziehung des preußischen Wissenschaftlers mit der spanischen Krone und ihren Behörden erstaunt. Im Laufe einer erneuten Aufnahme der Forschung, haben wir nun entdeckt, dass Humboldt in der Tat von Rom aus eine erste Arbeit an Karl IV gesandt hatte, zusammen mit einem Schreiben des Dankes (für den während der amerikanischen Reise erhaltenen Schutz sowie seiner Unterordnung unter die spanische Krone, das wir nun präsentieren. Das erste literarische Ergebnis seiner Reise, auf das Humboldt in diesem Brief verweist, ist der erste Faszikel seines Werkes

  5. [Cognitive rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis: preliminary results and presentation of a new program, PROCOG-SEP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissart, H; Leroy, M; Debouverie, M

    2010-04-01

    Although cognitive disorders are well-known in multiple sclerosis (MS), even in earlier stages of the disease, their management may be overlooked. Our objective was to elaborate and evaluate the efficiency of a remedial program (PROCOG-SEP) designed for MS patients. The evidence-based program proposes exercises to both stimulate preserved functions and develop new abilities compensating for cognitive disabilities. Twenty-four patients with MS participated in 10/2-hour PROCOG-SEP sessions over a 6-month period. A neuropsychologist recorded BCcog-SEP performances before and after the PROCOG-SEP program. In addition, the same neuropsychologist conducted psychoclinical interviews to complete the before and after cognitive evaluations. The statistical analysis used the t-test performed with Excel. Compared with the initial levels, subtests of BCcog-SEP showing improvement after PROCOG-SEP were: verbal memory (SRT), visuospatial memory (10/36), verbal fluency (animal categories) and response to conflicting orders. Also, individual psychological interviews tended to be in favor of a general improvement in quality of life (more social interactions for instance). To our knowledge, the management program we have elaborated is the first designed to improve cognitive deficits in MS. These encouraging results suggest possibilities for improving cognition and thus quality-of-life in MS patients. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Volume navigation with contrast enhanced ultrasound and image fusion for percutaneous interventions: first results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst Michael Jung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessing the feasibility and efficiency of interventions using ultrasound (US volume navigation (V Nav with real time needle tracking and image fusion with contrast enhanced (ce CT, MRI or US. METHODS: First an in vitro study on a liver phantom with CT data image fusion was performed, involving the puncture of a 10 mm lesion in a depth of 5 cm performed by 15 examiners with US guided freehand technique vs. V Nav for the purpose of time optimization. Then 23 patients underwent ultrasound-navigated biopsies or interventions using V Nav image fusion of live ultrasound with ceCT, ceMRI or CEUS, which were acquired before the intervention. A CEUS data set was acquired in all patients. Image fusion was established for CEUS and CT or CEUS and MRI using anatomical landmarks in the area of the targeted lesion. The definition of a virtual biopsy line with navigational axes targeting the lesion was achieved by the usage of sterile trocar with a magnetic sensor embedded in its distal tip employing a dedicated navigation software for real time needle tracking. RESULTS: The in vitro study showed significantly less time needed for the simulated interventions in all examiners when V Nav was used (p<0.05. In the study involving patients, in all 10 biopsies of suspect lesions of the liver a histological confirmation was achieved. We also used V Nav for a breast biopsy (intraductal carcinoma, for a biopsy of the abdominal wall (metastasis of ovarial carcinoma and for radiofrequency ablations (4 ablations. In 8 cases of inflammatory abdominal lesions 9 percutaneous drainages were successfully inserted. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous biopsies and drainages, even of small lesions involving complex access pathways, can be accomplished with a high success rate by using 3D real time image fusion together with real time needle tracking.

  7. Campaigned GPS on Present-Day Crustal Deformation in Northernmost Longitudinal Valley Preliminary Results, Hualien Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Longitudinal Valley in Eastern Taiwan sits at the collision suture between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates. Based on repeated GPS campaigned measurements from 25 stations six times in 2007 - 2009, we characterize the surface deformation in the northernmost Longitudinal Valley where the Coastal Range of the Philippine Sea plate turns northward diving under the Eurasian plate producing two major active faults: the Milun fault and the Longitudinal Valley fault. We reconstructed a GPS velocity field and conducted strain analyses and elastic block modeling. Our results suggest a rapid clockwise rotation of 33° Myr-1 and an eastward tectonic escape in the small Hualien City block (HUAL area of ~10 × 10 km, which is apparently detached from the regional rotating RYUK block defined by previous studies. We interpret it as being initiated locally by the northwest indentation of the Coastal Range, which pushed the HUAL block to move upward and eastward. According to our strain analyses, the HUAL block shows a significant internal elastic strain inside the Milun Tableland, the hanging wall of the Milun fault. No significant deformation was observed across the surface trace of the fault, indicating that the Milun fault is now probably locked in the near surface. The deformation in the footwall of the fault was accommodated by pure-shear strain with a major NNW-compression and a minor ENE-extension. The deformation in the hanging wall is characterized by simple-shear strain with ENE-extension in its northern part and little deformation in the southern part, separated by a little known NW-trending active fault zone (Dongmingyi fault, which needs further investigation.

  8. Evaluation of a laser scanner for large volume coordinate metrology: a comparison of results before and after factory calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrucci, M; Muralikrishnan, B; Sawyer, D; Phillips, S; Petrov, P; Yakovlev, Y; Astrelin, A; Milligan, S; Palmateer, J

    2014-01-01

    Large volume laser scanners are increasingly being used for a variety of dimensional metrology applications. Methods to evaluate the performance of these scanners are still under development and there are currently no documentary standards available. This paper describes the results of extensive ranging and volumetric performance tests conducted on a large volume laser scanner. The results demonstrated small but clear systematic errors that are explained in the context of a geometric error model for the instrument. The instrument was subsequently returned to the manufacturer for factory calibration. The ranging and volumetric tests were performed again and the results are compared against those obtained prior to the factory calibration. (paper)

  9. Comparison of Ecological Impacts of Postulated Oil Spills at Selected Alaskan Locations. Volume 2, Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    DISCUSSION TaMe 2-22 presents the results of the oil spill scenarios examined at St. Matthew Island without cleanup. 2-485 DIESEL-2 CRUDE BUNKER...include red fox, Arctic ground squirrel, lemmings, shrews , and voles. The Arctic fox, an inhabitant of both the terrestrial area and the pack ice, is... the time you ordered this report— which is only one of the hundreds of thou- sands in the NTIS information collection avail- able to you—and the

  10. MR coronary angiography with breath-hold targeted volumes : Preliminary clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geuns, R J; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruin, Hein G.; Rensing, B J; Hulshoff, Marc; van Ooijen, P M; de Feyter, P J; Oudkerk, M

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the clinical value of a magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography strategy involving a small targeted volume to image one coronary segment in a single breath hold for the detection of greater than 50% stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients referred for elective

  11. MR coronary angiography with breath-hold targeted volumes: preliminary clinical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); H.G. de Bruin (Hein); B.J.W.M. Rensing (Benno); M. Hulshoff (Maarten); P.M.A. van Ooijen (Peter); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To assess the clinical value of a magnetic resonance (MR) coronary angiography strategy involving a small targeted volume to image one coronary segment in a single breath hold for the detection of greater than 50% stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  12. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratland, Åse; Dueland, Svein; Hollywood, Donal; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile.

  13. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  14. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  15. Reduced left ventricular filling following blood volume extraction does not result in compensatory augmentation of cardiac mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Rachel; MacLeod, David; George, Keith; Oxborough, David; Shave, Rob; Stembridge, Mike

    2018-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? A reduction in left ventricular (LV) filling, and concomitant increase in heart rate, augments LV mechanics to maintain stroke volume (SV); however, the impact of reduced LV filling in isolation on SV and LV mechanics is currently unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? An isolated decrease in LV filling did not provoke a compensatory increase in mechanics to maintain SV; in contrast, LV mechanics and SV were reduced. These data indicate that when LV filling is reduced without changes in heart rate, LV mechanics do not compensate to maintain SV. An acute non-invasive reduction in preload has been shown to augment cardiac mechanics to maintain stroke volume and cardiac output. Such interventions induce concomitant changes in heart rate, whereas blood volume extraction reduces preload without changes in heart rate. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a preload reduction in isolation resulted in augmented stroke volume achieved via enhanced cardiac mechanics. Nine healthy volunteers (four female, age 29 ± 11 years) underwent echocardiography for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mechanics in a supine position at baseline and end extraction after the controlled removal of 25% of total blood volume (1062 ± 342 ml). Arterial blood pressure was monitored continuously by a pressure transducer attached to an indwelling radial artery catheter. Heart rate and total peripheral resistance were unchanged from baseline to end extraction, but systolic blood pressure was reduced (from 148 to 127 mmHg). From baseline to end extraction there were significant reductions in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (from 89 to 71 ml) and stroke volume (from 56 to 37 ml); however, there was no change in LV twist, basal or apical rotation. In contrast, LV longitudinal strain (from -20 to -17%) and basal circumferential strain (from -22 to -19%) were significantly reduced from

  16. NRC action plan developed as a result of the TMI-2 accident. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The Action Plan provides a comprehensive and integrated plan for all actions judged necessary by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to correct or improve the regulation and operation of nuclear facilities based on the experience from the accident at the Three Mile Island, Unit 2, nuclear facility and the official studies and investigations of the accident. The tables included in this volume list the recommendations from the various organizations and task forces investigating the accident at Three Mile Island. The tables are annotated to provide easy references to the associated parts of the Action Plan in Volume 1. The tables are also annotated to provide a shorthand indication of how the various recommendations are treated in the Action Plan

  17. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  18. Loss of benefits resulting from nuclear power plant outages. Volume 2. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehring, W.A.; Peerenboom, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    Appendices are presented which contain information concerning the loss of benefits resulting from a hypothetical derating or shutdown of Zion-1, Zion-2, Oconee-1, Oconee-2, Oconee-3, Prairie Island-1, Prairie Island-2, Browns Ferry-1, Browns Ferry-2, and Browns Ferry-3 reactors; review of the General Accounting Office's analysis of the economic impact of closing the Indian Point-1, Indian Point-2, and Indian Point-3 reactors; and review of the General Accounting Office's analysis of the financial effects of the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident

  19. Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents Performance and Cost Results from Multiple Air Force Demonstration Sites, Technology Demonstration Slide Presentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wiedemeier, Todd

    1999-01-01

    This slide presentation summarizes the results of natural attenuation treatability studies at 14 Air Force sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents and their associated biodegradation daughter products...

  20. Impact of the volume of gaseous phase in closed reactors on ANC results and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Clémentine; Delolme, Cécile; Lassabatere, Laurent; Blanc, Denise

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the geochemical behavior of polluted solid materials is often challenging and requires huge expenses of time and money. Nevertheless, given the increasing amounts of polluted solid materials and related risks for the environment, it is more and more crucial to understand the leaching of majors and trace metals elements from these matrices. In the designs of methods to quantify pollutant solubilization, the combination of experimental procedures with modeling approaches has recently gained attention. Among usual methods, some rely on the association of ANC and geochemical modeling. ANC experiments - Acid Neutralization Capacity - consists in adding known quantities of acid or base to a mixture of water and contaminated solid materials at a given liquid / solid ratio in closed reactors. Reactors are agitated for 48h and then pH, conductivity, redox potential, carbon, majors and heavy metal solubilized are quantified. However, in most cases, the amounts of matrix and water do not reach the total volume of reactors, leaving some space for air (gaseous phase). Despite this fact, no clear indication is given in standard procedures about the effect of this gaseous phase. Even worse, the gaseous phase is never accounted for when exploiting or modeling ANC data. The gaseous phase may exchange CO2 with the solution, which may, in turn, impact both pH and element release. This study lies within the most general framework for the use of geochemical modeling for the prediction of ANC results for the case of pure phases to real phase assemblages. In this study, we focus on the effect of the gaseous phase on ANC experiments on different mineral phases through geochemical modeling. To do so, we use PHREEQC code to model the evolution of pH and element release (including majors and heavy metals) when several matrices are put in contact with acid or base. We model the following scenarios for the gaseous phase: no gas, contact with the atmosphere (open system

  1. Marvel-ous Dwarfs: Results from Four Heroically Large Simulated Volumes of Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Ferah; Brooks, Alyson; Weisz, Daniel; Bellovary, Jillian; Christensen, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    We present results from high resolution, fully cosmological simulations of cosmic sheets that contain many dwarf galaxies. Together, they create the largest collection of simulated dwarf galaxies to date, with z=0 stellar masses comparable to the LMC or smaller. In total, we have simulated almost 100 luminous dwarf galaxies, forming a sample of simulated dwarfs which span a wide range of physical (stellar and halo mass) and evolutionary properties (merger history). We show how they can be calibrated against a wealth of observations of nearby galaxies including star formation histories, HI masses and kinematics, as well as stellar metallicities. We present preliminary results answering the following key questions: What is the slope of the stellar mass function at extremely low masses? Do halos with HI and no stars exist? What is the scatter in the stellar to halo mass relationship as a function of dwarf mass? What drives the scatter? With this large suite, we are beginning to statistically characterize dwarf galaxies and identify the types and numbers of outliers to expect.

  2. Cytogenetical effects of low doses: results obtained by N.N.Luchik and present-day problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Sevan'kaev, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of present status of the problem of quantitative assessment of cytogenetic effects low is presented. The importance of works of N.V. Luchik is demonstrated for the development of this field of radiobiology. The results of the author's own experimental and theoretical research on the regularities of induction of cytogenetical damage by low doses of ionising radiation are presented

  3. Biologic lung volume reduction in advanced upper lobe emphysema: phase 2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criner, Gerard J; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Strange, Charlie; Dransfield, Mark; Gotfried, Mark; Leeds, William; McLennan, Geoffrey; Refaely, Yael; Tewari, Sanjiv; Krasna, Mark; Celli, Bartolome

    2009-05-01

    Biologic lung volume reduction (BioLVR) is a new endobronchial treatment for advanced emphysema that reduces lung volume through tissue remodeling. Assess the safety and therapeutic dose of BioLVR hydrogel in upper lobe predominant emphysema. Open-labeled, multicenter phase 2 dose-ranging studies were performed with BioLVR hydrogel administered to eight subsegmental sites (four in each upper lobe) involving: (1) low-dose treatment (n = 28) with 10 ml per site (LD); and (2) high-dose treatment (n = 22) with 20 ml per site (HD). Safety was assessed by the incidence of serious medical complications. Efficacy was assessed by change from baseline in pulmonary function tests, dyspnea score, 6-minute walk distance, and health-related quality of life. After treatment there were no deaths and four serious treatment-related complications. A reduction in residual volume to TLC ratio at 12 weeks (primary efficacy outcome) was achieved with both LD (-6.4 +/- 9.3%; P = 0.002) and HD (-5.5 +/- 9.4%; P = 0.028) treatments. Improvements in pulmonary function in HD (6 mo: DeltaFEV(1) = +15.6%; P = 0.002; DeltaFVC = +9.1%; P = 0.034) were greater than in LD patients (6 mo: DeltaFEV(1) = +6.7%; P = 0.021; DeltaFVC = +5.1%; P = 0.139). LD- and HD-treated groups both demonstrated improved symptom scores and health-related quality of life. BioLVR improves physiology and functional outcomes up to 6 months with an acceptable safety profile in upper lobe predominant emphysema. Overall improvement was greater and responses more durable with 20 ml per site than 10 ml per site dosing. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00435253 and NCT 00515164).

  4. Fingolimod's Impact on MRI Brain Volume Measures in Multiple Sclerosis: Results from MS-MRIUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivadinov, Robert; Medin, Jennie; Khan, Nasreen; Korn, Jonathan R; Bergsland, Niels; Dwyer, Michael G; Chitnis, Tanuja; Naismith, Robert T; Alvarez, Enrique; Kinkel, Peter; Cohan, Stanley; Hunter, Samuel F; Silva, Diego; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2018-05-11

    Evidence is needed to understand the effect of fingolimod on slowing down brain atrophy progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in clinical practice. We investigated the effect of fingolimod on brain atrophy in MS patients with active disease (clinically and/or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) versus no evidence of active disease (NEAD). MS and clinical outcome and MRI in the United States (MS-MRIUS) is a multicenter, retrospective study that included 590 relapsing-remitting MS patients, who initiated fingolimod, and were followed for a median of 16 months. Patients with active disease at baseline (245, 41.5%) were defined as those who had one or more relapses in the year previous starting fingolimod, and/or displayed gadolinium enhancing lesions(s) at baseline MRI scan, whereas patients with NEAD at baseline (345, 58.5%) did not fulfill these criteria. Annualized percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and percentage lateral ventricle volume change (PLVVC) over the follow-up were analyzed in both groups. Over the follow-up, the rate of PBVC was -.38% in active disease and -.25% in NEAD patients (P = .076), whereas PLLVC was 1.76% in active disease and .28% in NEAD patients (P = .046). No changes in timed 25-foot walk (P = .619) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (P = .275) scores or MRI lesion accumulation (P > 0.08) were detected, although the active disease group had a higher proportion of relapses during the follow-up period (P = .02). The study provides real-world evidence that rate of brain atrophy in MS patients with underlying active disease and NEAD in fingolimod treated patients is below the established pathological cutoff for loss of whole brain volume (>-.4%) or expansion of lateral ventricles (> 3.5%). Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  5. Variation in Results of Volume Measurements of Stumps of Lower-Limb Amputees : A Comparison of 4 Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer-Wilzing, Vera G.; Bolt, Arjen; Geertzen, Jan H.; Emmelot, Cornelis H.; Baars, Erwin C.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    de Boer-Wilzing VG, Bolt A, Geertzen JH, Emmelot CH, Baars EC, Dijkstra PU. Variation in results of volume measurements of stumps of lower-limb amputees: a comparison of 4 methods. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011;92:941-6. Objective: To analyze the reliability of 4 methods (water immersion,

  6. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field

  7. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  8. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neuroma. Volume changes and hearing results after 89-month median follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranzinger, Manfred; Fastner, Gerd [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, radART - Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies, Salzburg (Austria); Oberascher, Gerhard [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Merz, Florian; Rahim, Hassan [Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Medical Radiation Protection Unit, Salzburg (Austria); Nairz, Olaf [Clinic Bad Trissl, Oberaudorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate toxicity and local control following hypofractionated stereotactic radiation treatment with special focus on changes in tumor volume and hearing capacity. In all, 29 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated between 2001 and 2007 within a prospective radiation protocol (7 x 4 Gy ICRU dose). Median tumor volume was 0.9 ml. Follow-up started at 6 months and was repeated annually with MRI volumetry and audiometry. Hearing preservation was defined as preservation of Class A/B hearing according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (1995). No patient had any intervention after a median imaging follow-up of 89.5 months, one patient showed radiological progression. Transient increase of tumor volume developed in 17/29 patients, whereas 22/29 patients (75.9 %) presented with a volume reduction at last follow-up. A total of 21 patients were eligible for hearing evaluation. Mean pure tone average (PTA) deteriorated from 39.3 to 65.9 dB and mean speech discrimination score (SDS) dropped from 74.3 to 38.1 %. The 5-year actuarial Class A/B hearing preservation rate was 50.0 ± 14.4 %. Radiation increases only minimally, if at all, the hearing deterioration which emerges by observation alone. Presbyacusis is not responsible for this deterioration. Transient tumor enlargement is common. Today radiation of small- and medium-sized acoustic neuroma can be performed with different highly conformal techniques as fractionated treatment or single low-dose radiosurgery with equal results regarding tumor control, hearing preservation, and side effects. Hypofractionation is more comfortable for the patient than conventional regimens and represents a serious alternative to frameless radiosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war die Evaluierung der Toxizitaet und der lokalen Tumorkontrolle einer hypofraktionierten stereotaktischen Bestrahlung mit besonderem Augenmerk auf Veraenderungen von Tumorvolumen und

  9. Associations Between Family Adversity and Brain Volume in Adolescence: Manual vs. Automated Brain Segmentation Yields Different Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Lyden

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Associations between brain structure and early adversity have been inconsistent in the literature. These inconsistencies may be partially due to methodological differences. Different methods of brain segmentation may produce different results, obscuring the relationship between early adversity and brain volume. Moreover, adolescence is a time of significant brain growth and certain brain areas have distinct rates of development, which may compromise the accuracy of automated segmentation approaches. In the current study, 23 adolescents participated in two waves of a longitudinal study. Family aggression was measured when the youths were 12 years old, and structural scans were acquired an average of 4 years later. Bilateral amygdalae and hippocampi were segmented using three different methods (manual tracing, FSL, and NeuroQuant. The segmentation estimates were compared, and linear regressions were run to assess the relationship between early family aggression exposure and all three volume segmentation estimates. Manual tracing results showed a positive relationship between family aggression and right amygdala volume, whereas FSL segmentation showed negative relationships between family aggression and both the left and right hippocampi. However, results indicate poor overlap between methods, and different associations between early family aggression exposure and brain volume depending on the segmentation method used.

  10. Associations between Family Adversity and Brain Volume in Adolescence: Manual vs. Automated Brain Segmentation Yields Different Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyden, Hannah; Gimbel, Sarah I; Del Piero, Larissa; Tsai, A Bryna; Sachs, Matthew E; Kaplan, Jonas T; Margolin, Gayla; Saxbe, Darby

    2016-01-01

    Associations between brain structure and early adversity have been inconsistent in the literature. These inconsistencies may be partially due to methodological differences. Different methods of brain segmentation may produce different results, obscuring the relationship between early adversity and brain volume. Moreover, adolescence is a time of significant brain growth and certain brain areas have distinct rates of development, which may compromise the accuracy of automated segmentation approaches. In the current study, 23 adolescents participated in two waves of a longitudinal study. Family aggression was measured when the youths were 12 years old, and structural scans were acquired an average of 4 years later. Bilateral amygdalae and hippocampi were segmented using three different methods (manual tracing, FSL, and NeuroQuant). The segmentation estimates were compared, and linear regressions were run to assess the relationship between early family aggression exposure and all three volume segmentation estimates. Manual tracing results showed a positive relationship between family aggression and right amygdala volume, whereas FSL segmentation showed negative relationships between family aggression and both the left and right hippocampi. However, results indicate poor overlap between methods, and different associations were found between early family aggression exposure and brain volume depending on the segmentation method used.

  11. Triangular SPECT system for 3-D total organ volume imaging: Design concept and preliminary imaging results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.B.; Anderson, J.; Covic, J.

    1985-01-01

    SPECT systems based on 2-D detectors for projection data collection and filtered back-projection image reconstruction have the potential for true 3-D imaging, providing contiguous slice images in any orientation. Anger camera-based SPECT systems have the natural advantage supporting planar imaging clinical procedures. However, current systems suffer from two drawbacks; poor utilization of emitted photons, and inadequate system design for SPECT. A SPECT system consisting of three rectangular cameras with radial translation would offer the variable cylindrical FOV of 25 cm to 40 cm diameter allowing close detector access to the object. This system would provide optimized imaging for both brain and body organs in terms of sensitivity and resolution. For brain imaging a tight detector triangle with fan beam collimation, matching detector UFOV to the head, allows full 2 π utilization of emitted photons, resulting in >4 times sensitivity increase over the single detector system. Minification of intrinsic detector resolution in fan beam collimation further improves system resolution. For body organ imaging the three detectors with parallel hole collimators, rotating in non-circular orbit, provide both improved resolution and three-fold sensitivity increase. Practical challenges lie in ensuring perfect image overlap from three detectors without resolution degradation and artifact generation in order to benefit from the above improvements. An experimental system has been developed to test the above imaging concept and we have successfully demonstrated the superior image quality of the overlapped images. Design concept will be presented with preliminary imaging results

  12. Customization of Advia 120 thresholds for canine erythrocyte volume and hemoglobin concentration, and effects on morphology flagging results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Carolyn N; Fry, Michael M

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to develop customized morphology flagging thresholds for canine erythrocyte volume and hemoglobin concentration [Hgb] on the ADVIA 120 hematology analyzer; compare automated morphology flagging with results of microscopic blood smear evaluation; and examine effects of customized thresholds on morphology flagging results. Customized thresholds were determined using data from 52 clinically healthy dogs. Blood smear evaluation and automated morphology flagging results were correlated with mean cell volume (MCV) and cellular hemoglobin concentration mean (CHCM) in 26 dogs. Customized thresholds were applied retroactively to complete blood (cell) count (CBC) data from 5 groups of dogs, including a reference sample group, clinical cases, and animals with experimentally induced iron deficiency anemia. Automated morphology flagging correlated more highly with MCV or CHCM than did blood smear evaluation; correlation with MCV was highest using customized thresholds. Customized morphology flagging thresholds resulted in more sensitive detection of microcytosis, macrocytosis, and hypochromasia than default thresholds.

  13. Gastrointestinal toxicity of vorinostat: reanalysis of phase 1 study results with emphasis on dose-volume effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bratland, Ase

    2011-04-08

    Abstract Background In early-phase studies with targeted therapeutics and radiotherapy, it may be difficult to decide whether an adverse event should be considered a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of the investigational systemic agent, as acute normal tissue toxicity is frequently encountered with radiation alone. We have reanalyzed the toxicity data from a recently conducted phase 1 study on vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with pelvic palliative radiotherapy, with emphasis on the dose distribution within the irradiated bowel volume to the development of DLT. Findings Of 14 eligible patients, three individuals experienced Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events grade 3 gastrointestinal and related toxicities, representing a toxicity profile vorinostat has in common with radiotherapy to pelvic target volumes. For each study patient, the relative volumes of small bowel receiving radiation doses between 6 Gy and 30 Gy at 6-Gy intervals (V6-V30) were determined from the treatment-planning computed tomography scans. The single patient that experienced a DLT at the second highest dose level of vorinostat, which was determined as the maximum-tolerated dose, had V6-V30 dose-volume estimates that were considerably higher than any other study patient. This patient may have experienced an adverse radiation dose-volume effect rather than a toxic effect of the investigational drug. Conclusions When reporting early-phase trial results on the tolerability of a systemic targeted therapeutic used as potential radiosensitizing agent, radiation dose-volume effects should be quantified to enable full interpretation of the study toxicity profile. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00455351

  14. Prediction of the Individual Wave Overtopping Volumes of a Wave Energy Converter using Experimental Testing and First Numerical Model Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Victor, L.; Troch, P.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    For overtopping wave energy converters (WECs) a more efficient energy conversion can be achieved when the volumes of water, wave by wave, that enter their reservoir are known and can be predicted. A numerical tool is being developed using a commercial CFD-solver to study and optimize...... nearshore 2Dstructure. First numerical model results are given for a specific test with regular waves, and are compared with the corresponding experimental results in this paper....

  15. The reactive transport benchmark proposed by GdR MoMaS: presentation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrayrou, J. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides et des Solides, UMR ULP-CNRS 7507, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Lagneau, V. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geosciences, 77 - Fontainebleau (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present here the actual context of reactive transport modelling and the major numerical challenges. GdR MoMaS proposes a benchmark on reactive transport. We present this benchmark and some results obtained on it by two reactive transport codes HYTEC and SPECY. (authors)

  16. International Workshop on Exotic Hadronic Atoms, Deeply Bound Kaonic Nuclear States and Antihydrogen : Present Results, Future Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Widmann, E; Curceanu, C; Trento 2006; Trento06

    2006-01-01

    These are the miniproceedings of the workshop "Exotic hadronic atoms, deeply bound kaonic nuclear states and antihydrogen: present results, future challenges," which was held at the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Studies (ECT*), Trento (Italy), June 19-24, 2006. The document includes a short presentation of the topics, the list of participants, and a short contribution from each speaker.

  17. The reactive transport benchmark proposed by GdR MoMaS: presentation and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrayrou, J.; Lagneau, V.

    2007-01-01

    We present here the actual context of reactive transport modelling and the major numerical challenges. GdR MoMaS proposes a benchmark on reactive transport. We present this benchmark and some results obtained on it by two reactive transport codes HYTEC and SPECY. (authors)

  18. [The shutdown point and the output volume limit (OVL) in the present situation of healthcare in Hungary (or a little economics for practicing physicians)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresz, Miklós

    2008-09-07

    In the present situation of health care, financing has become so complicated that the treating doctor has to know not only his profession but also has to consider the different regulations, laws and book of rules. The work of the physician cannot be carried out only through the fact that he is a master of his art, that is healing. All healing practice, diagnostic abilities, intuition, empathy and other things are in vain: if he is not familiar with the basics of financing he can lead his institution to insolvency. This article tries to give a view of a small part of financing, the output volume limit (OVL) from another aspect. According to the basics of economy and general rules of leadership it tries to show up the practical difficulties of the output volume limit. The study enlightens that by defining the output volume limit one has to consider the shutdown point of the hospital and knowing this, the actual output volume limit should be defined in the way that it does not make the proper activity of the hospital completely impossible.

  19. Investigation results on water quality and volume of flowing-in water to the Yotsugi slag heap site. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, Masaki; Taki, Tomihiro; Takimoto, Sadao; Makita, A.

    2000-05-01

    Mining water flowing into the Yotsugi slag heap site at the Ningyo-toge Environment Technical Center is exhausted to a common river after carrying out the treatment of uranium and radium in the mining water at the previously settled mining water treatment facility and confirming it to be less than management target value on the river water within the site boundary regulated by the agreement on environmental conservation with Okayama prefecture and Kami-saihara mura. In order to elucidate some required treatment on every water system flowing-in the heap site as a part of reduction of flowing volume on taking action of the heap site, an investigation on its water quality and volume was carried out. As a result, it was confirmed on water quality that uranium values of every river were all less than their target values but radium values of them were all over their target values which necessitated conventional water treatment. And, on water volume, it was confirmed that flowing water volume from the exposed excavation site was reduced about 40% in comparison with same rain-fall before removing from rain water. (G.K.)

  20. Scintigraphic and MR perfusion imaging in preoperative evaluation for lung volume reduction surgery. Pilot study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johkoh, Takeshi; Mueller, N.L.; Kavanagh, P.V

    2000-01-01

    To compare MR perfusion imaging with perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary emphysema being considered for lung volume reduction surgery. Six patients with pulmonary emphysema and two normal individuals were evaluated by MR perfusion imaging, perfusion scintigraphy, and selective bilateral pulmonary angiography. MR images were obtained with an enhanced fast gradient recalled echo with three-dimensional Fourier transformation technique (efgre 3D) (6.3/1.3; flip angle, 30 deg C; field of view, 45-48 cm; matrix, 256 x 160). The presence or absence of perfusion defects in each segment was evaluated by two independent observers. Using angiography as the gold standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR perfusion imaging in detecting focal perfusion abnormalities were 90%, 87%, and 89%, respectively, while those of perfusion scintigraphy were 71%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of MR perfusion imaging was significantly higher than that of scintigraphy (p<0.001, McNemar test). There was good agreement between two observers for MR perfusion imaging (kappa statistic, 0.66) and only moderate agreement for perfusion scintigraphy (kappa statistic, 0.51). MR perfusion imaging is superior to perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal perfusion in patients with pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  1. Annual Systems Engineering Conference: Focusing on Improving Performance of Defense Systems Programs (10th). Volume 3. Thursday Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-25

    Directorate Otherwise… The real reason dinosaurs became extinct. 1 USAF Type Certification of Commercial Derivative Aircraft Thomas Morgan Technical...spatial reasoning scores Medical School acceptance – 66% of music majors accepted (highest %) – 44% of biochemistry majors accepted More results Music and

  2. TRIPOLI I: energy-dependent three-dimensional Monte Carlo Program. Volume I. Conception and presentation of the TRIPOLI I System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, S.; Nimal, J.C.

    In its present version TRIPOLI/1/ is an energy dependent three-dimensional program which treats the slowing down and diffusion of neutrons for source problems. The version presented here is essentially oriented towards reactor shielding problems. It is written in FORTRAN for IBM (series 360) computer. This volume is devoted to a summary of the essential characteristics of the program as well as to a description of the constants required for the description of the chaining together of the work to be carried out

  3. Associations between Family Adversity and Brain Volume in Adolescence: Manual vs. Automated Brain Segmentation Yields Different Results

    OpenAIRE

    Lyden, Hannah; Gimbel, Sarah I.; Del Piero, Larissa; Tsai, A. Bryna; Sachs, Matthew E.; Kaplan, Jonas T.; Margolin, Gayla; Saxbe, Darby

    2016-01-01

    Associations between brain structure and early adversity have been inconsistent in the literature. These inconsistencies may be partially due to methodological differences. Different methods of brain segmentation may produce different results, obscuring the relationship between early adversity and brain volume. Moreover, adolescence is a time of significant brain growth and certain brain areas have distinct rates of development, which may compromise the accuracy of automated segmentation appr...

  4. Open Scenario Study, Phase I. Volume 1. Assessment Overview and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    review of resources and requirements necessary to implement the response and improving civil military relations. Money Laudering Presents local...or money ? C. PHASE ONE APPROACH To systematically address these kinds of questions, IDA pursued a three-part approach that included reviewing the...their organizations a significant amount of time or money ? B. INTERVIEW QUESTIONS The final sponsor-approved version of the interview questions

  5. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 2: Methodology and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3)

  6. Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository--Volume 2: Methodology and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R.; Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K.; Rath, J.S.

    1998-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

  7. Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding in Different Case Volume Workplaces: Results of a Nationwide Inquiry in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Rácz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a national survey to evaluate the recent endoscopic treatment and drug therapy of peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB patients and to compare practices in high and low case volume Hungarian workplaces. A total of 62 gastroenterology units participated in the six-month study. A total of 3033 PUB cases and a mean of 8.15±3.9 PUB cases per month per unit were reported. In the 23 high case volume units (HCV, there was a mean of 12.9±5.4 PUB cases/month, whereas in the 39 low case volume units (LCV, a mean of 5.3±2.9 PUB cases/month were treated during the study period. In HCV units, endoscopic therapies for Forrest Ia, Ib, and IIa ulcers were significantly more often used than in LCV units (86% versus 68%; P=0.001. Among patients with stigmata of recent haemorrhage (Forrest I, II, bolus + continuous infusion PPI was given significantly more frequently in HCV than in LCV units (49.6% versus 33.2%; P=0.001. Mortality in HCV units was less than in LCV units (2.7% versus 4.3%; P=0.023. The penetration of evidence-based recommendations for PUB management is stronger in HCV units resulting lower mortality.

  8. Testicular volume and masculine identity in men with unilateral cryptorchidism: results of a community-based survey in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Min Eui; Lee, Nam Kyu; Park, Young Ho

    2003-10-01

    We determined the influence of cryptorchidism on testicular volume and masculine identity in young men living in a community. Of the 27,202 men aged 20 years dwelling in the community, we randomly selected a 10% sampling fraction of whom 2,080 men (a response rate of 77.0%) agreed to participate in the study. All volunteers underwent a standard evaluation, including a detailed medical history and physical examination. For the evaluation of the influence of cryptorchidism on masculine identity, we used the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI). Among participants, 38 (1.8%) had cryptorchidism or a history of surgery for cryptorchidism (right 15, left 21, bilateral 2). In total, 29 had had undergone surgery (mean age at the time of operation; 8.9+/-3.9 years, range; 2-19 years). Of 25 men who had undergone orchiopexy due to unilateral cryptorchidism, the testicular volume of the affected side was significantly smaller than that of the contralateral side. Of the 36 patients with unilateral cryptorchidism, the contralateral testicular volume of men who had undergone orchiopexy was not different with that of those who had undergone orchiectomy or had not undergone surgery. When we compared the scores for masculinity and femininity using the BSRI between men with and without testis in the scrotum, there were no differences between the two groups. Our results demonstrate that delayed orchiopexy does not improve the testicular volume of the affected side or the masculine identity in men with unilateral cryptorchidism. In addition, these findings suggest that there is a need to increase the awareness of cryptorchidism among all parties involved in the health care of children.

  9. Hazard Ranking System evaluation of CERCLA [Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act] inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 1, Evaluation methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.; Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to formally document the individual site Hazard Ranking System (HRS) evaluations conducted as part of the preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI) activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that describe the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program addressing the cleanup of inactive waste sites. These orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The methodology includes six parts: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the HRS methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 34 refs., 43 figs., 47 tabs

  10. Hazard Ranking System evaluation of CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act) inactive waste sites at Hanford: Volume 1, Evaluation methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenner, R.D.; Cramer, K.H.; Higley, K.A.; Jette, S.J.; Lamar, D.A.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Sherwood, D.R.; Van Houten, N.C.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to formally document the individual site Hazard Ranking System (HRS) evaluations conducted as part of the preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI) activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. These activities were carried out pursuant to the DOE orders that describe the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program addressing the cleanup of inactive waste sites. These orders incorporate the US Environmental Protection Agency methodology, which is based on the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). The methodology includes six parts: PA/SI, remedial investigation/feasibility study, record of decision, design and implementation of remedial action, operation and monitoring, and verification monitoring. Volume 1 of this report discusses the CERCLA inactive waste-site evaluation process, assumptions, and results of the HRS methodology employed. Volume 2 presents the data on the individual CERCLA engineered-facility sites at Hanford, as contained in the Hanford Inactive Site Surveillance (HISS) Data Base. Volume 3 presents the data on the individual CERCLA unplanned-release sites at Hanford, as contained in the HISS Data Base. 34 refs., 43 figs., 47 tabs.

  11. Results of the quality control treatments plans in volume arc therapy modulated for thirty treated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenoglietto, P.; Ailleres, N.; Simeon, S.; Santoro, L.; Dubois, J.B.; Azria, D.

    2009-01-01

    The intensity modulated radiotherapy (I.M.R.T.) provided by voluminal arc therapy was implemented at the Val d'Aurelle regional center against cancer in november 2008. In May 2009 more than 30 patients have benefited from this technique in our institution and for each of them, the dosimetry planing has been checked under the accelerator before the treatment. The analysis of these results of measures under accelerators equipped of 120 leave collimators and for optimizations realised with the Rapid-arc computer code from Varian. The issue of a treatment in intensity modulation by voluminal arc therapy gives satisfying results falling within the range of those previously found in conventional I.M.R.T.. Besides, the quality control is faster because of lesser number of beams to verify. (N.C.)

  12. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  13. Structural Area Inspection Frequency Evaluation (SAIFE). Volume 5. Results of Model Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    serlV ice 11 i Stot’)’ .i ’ base~d Otil narrow -bodly at ir-c t’a ftA wh ich have fewer 0 1 euient~s than thle hypothet i cal widve - A body aircaf...kP1 c u TABLE 14. DL40MRATION RESULTS .M WING - SPAR, FMD Defects Per Million Flight Hours Crack Detected Preflight 0.00 0104 Service 0.00 0.49 Phase

  14. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase II report. Volume II: study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Kaletta, G.R.; Waganer, L.M.; Carosella, L.A.; Conlee, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    In this second phase the impact of unscheduled maintenance, several vacuum wall arrangements, and maintenance of other reactor interfacing subsystems and maintenance equipment are added to the evaluation of the maintainability of the fusion power reactor concepts. Four concepts are normalized to common performance parameters and evaluated for their capability to achieve availability and cost of electricity goals considering both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. The results of this evaluation are used to generate a series of maintainability design guidelines and to select the more desirable features and design options which are used to configure a preliminary reactor concept having improved maintainability

  15. Loss of benefits resulting from nuclear-power-plant outages. Volume 1. Approach and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buehring, W.A.; Peerenboom, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    This report discusses and analyzes some of the important consequences of nuclear-power-plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that may help the Nuclear Regulatory Commission make decisions involving nuclear-power-plant licensing and operation. The consequences include increased costs of system generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed case studies to investigate the effects of hypothetical nuclear-plant shutdowns. The studies developed quantitative measures of both short- and long-term economic, fuel use, and reliability effects that could result from the unavailability of nuclear generating units. Results showed that production costs (fuel costs plus operation and maintenance costs) increase significantly whenever an operating reactor is shut down. Production-cost increases ranged from less than 10% to over 60%; the normalized increases for the first year of reactor outage ranged from $0.125 million per MWe-year to $0.33 million per MWe-year

  16. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  17. Models of cognitive behavior in nuclear power plant personnel. A feasibility study: summary of results. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.; Hanes, L.F.

    1986-07-01

    This report summarizes the results of a feasibility study to determine if the current state of models of human cognitive activities can serve as the basis for improved techniques for predicting human error in nuclear power plants emergency operations. Based on the answer to this question, two subsequent phases of research are planned. Phase II is to develop a model of cognitive activities, and Phase III is to test the model. The feasibility study included an analysis of the cognitive activities that occur in emergency operations and an assessment of the modeling concepts/tools available to capture these cognitive activities. The results indicated that a symbolic processing (or artificial intelligence) model of cognitive activities in nuclear power plants is both desirable and feasible. This cognitive model can be built upon the computational framework provided by an existing artificial intelligence system for medical problem solving, called Caduceus. The resulting cognitive model will increase the capability to capture the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessment studies. Volume 1 summarizes the major findings and conclusions of the study. Volume 2 provides a complete description of the methods and results, including a synthesis of the cognitive activities that occur during emergency operations, and a literature review on cognitive modeling relevant to nuclear power plants. 19 refs

  18. Experimental results from a large volume active target made of glass capillaries and liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, P.; Buontempo, S.; Brunner, J.; De Jong, M.; Fabre, J.P.; Frenkel, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Golovkin, S.; Gregoire, G.; Hoepfner, K.; Konijn, J.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Kushnirenko, A.; Martellotti, G.; Mazzoni, M.A.; Medvedkov, A.; Michel, L.; Mondardini, M.R.; Panman, J.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Y.; Riccardi, F.; Siegmund, W.P.; Strack, R.; Tyukov, V.; Vasilchenko, V.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Winter, K.; Wong, H.; Zymin, K.

    1995-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of high-resolution tracking with an active target made of glass capillaries filled with organic liquid scintillator. This technique allows real time detection of short-lived particle decays. In this paper, we report on experimental results obtained from an active target having 2 x 2 cm 2 cross section and 180 cm length, installed in front of the CHORUS detector and exposed to the CERN Wide Band Neutrino Beam. The detector consists of 5.1 x 10 5 capillaries with 20 μm inner diameter, read out by a single optoelectronic chain and a Megapixel CCD. Details on tests in the neutrino beam will be reported. First neutrino interactions have been detected. (orig.)

  19. Present Status And First Results of the Final Focus Beam Line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  20. Presentation of laboratory test results in patient portals: influence of interface design on risk interpretation and visual search behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccaro, Paolo; Vigo, Markel; Balatsoukas, Panagiotis; van der Veer, Sabine N; Hassan, Lamiece; Williams, Richard; Wood, Grahame; Sinha, Smeeta; Buchan, Iain; Peek, Niels

    2018-02-12

    Patient portals are considered valuable instruments for self-management of long term conditions, however, there are concerns over how patients might interpret and act on the clinical information they access. We hypothesized that visual cues improve patients' abilities to correctly interpret laboratory test results presented through patient portals. We also assessed, by applying eye-tracking methods, the relationship between risk interpretation and visual search behaviour. We conducted a controlled study with 20 kidney transplant patients. Participants viewed three different graphical presentations in each of low, medium, and high risk clinical scenarios composed of results for 28 laboratory tests. After viewing each clinical scenario, patients were asked how they would have acted in real life if the results were their own, as a proxy of their risk interpretation. They could choose between: 1) Calling their doctor immediately (high interpreted risk); 2) Trying to arrange an appointment within the next 4 weeks (medium interpreted risk); 3) Waiting for the next appointment in 3 months (low interpreted risk). For each presentation, we assessed accuracy of patients' risk interpretation, and employed eye tracking to assess and compare visual search behaviour. Misinterpretation of risk was common, with 65% of participants underestimating the need for action across all presentations at least once. Participants found it particularly difficult to interpret medium risk clinical scenarios. Participants who consistently understood when action was needed showed a higher visual search efficiency, suggesting a better strategy to cope with information overload that helped them to focus on the laboratory tests most relevant to their condition. This study confirms patients' difficulties in interpreting laboratories test results, with many patients underestimating the need for action, even when abnormal values were highlighted or grouped together. Our findings raise patient safety

  1. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bambade, P; Amann, J; Angal-Kalinin, D; Apsimon, R; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Bai, S; Bellomo, P; Bett, D; Blair, G; Bolzon, B; Boogert, S; Boorman, G; Burrows, P N; Christian, G; Coe, P; Constance, B; Delahaye, J P; Deacon, L; Elsen, E; Faus-Golfe, A; Fukuda, M; Gao, J; Geffroy, N; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Guler, H; Hayano, H; Heo, A Y; Honda, Y; Huang, J Y; Hwang, W H; Iwashita, Y; Jeremie, A; Jones, J; Kamiya, Y; Karataev, P; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Kim, S H; Komamiya, S; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Lam, B; Lyapin, A; Masuzawa, M; McCormick, D; Molloy, S; Naito, T; Nakamura, T; Nelson, J; Okamoto, D; Okugi, T; Oroku, M; Park, Y J; Parker, B; Paterson, E; Perry, C; Pivi, M; Raubenheimer, T; Renier, Y; Resta-Lopez, J; Rimbault, C; Ross, M; Sanuki, T; Scarfe, A; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Spencer, C; Suehara, T; Sugahara, R; Swinson, C; Takahashi, T; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Tomas, R; Urakawa, J; Urner, D; Verderi, M; Wang, M H; Warden, M; Wendt, M; White, G; Wittmer, W; Wolski, A; Woodley, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamanaka, T; Yan, Y; Yoda, H; Yokoya, K; Zhou, F; Zimmermann, F; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.13.042801

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  2. A Systematic Review of Barriers to Breast Cancer Care in Developing Countries Resulting in Delayed Patient Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Within the developing world, many personal, sociocultural, and economic factors cause delayed patient presentation, a prolonged interval from initial symptom discovery to provider presentation. Understanding these barriers to care is crucial to optimizing interventions that pre-empt patient delay. Methods. A systematic review was conducted querying: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, J East, CAB, African Index Medicus, and LiLACS. Of 763 unique abstracts, 122 were extracted for full review and 13 included in final analysis. Results. Studies posed variable risks of bias and produced mixed results. There is strong evidence that lower education level and lesser income status contribute to patient delay. There is weaker and, sometimes, contradictory evidence that other factors may also contribute. Discussion. Poverty emerges as the underlying common denominator preventing earlier presentation in these settings. The evidence for sociocultural variables is less strong, but may reflect current paucity of high-quality research. Conflicting results may be due to heterogeneity of the developing world itself. Conclusion. Future research is required that includes patients with and without delay, utilizes a validated questionnaire, and controls for potential confounders. Current evidence suggests that interventions should primarily increase proximal and affordable healthcare access and secondarily enhance breast cancer awareness, to productively reduce patient delay.

  3. Interleukin production by neonatal spleen cells during and as a result of antigen presentation: The effect of ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, D.; Gershon, H.

    1989-01-01

    Antigen presentation by neonatal murine spleen cells and the production of lymphokines and interleukins involved in the stimulation of a T-helper-2 (TH2) cell line (D10-G4.1) were studied as were the effects of ultra violet (UV)-irradiation on this system. Neonatal spleen cells are less capable than adult cells of performing the initial steps of the immune response required for antigen dependent activation of TH2 cells. These steps include soluble antigen processing and presentation and as a result reduced production of IL-4 and IL-1-Inducer Factor (IL-1-IF) by the T-helper cells and reduced production of IL-1 and IL-2 by the antigen presenting cell population. Spontaneous membrane IL-1 activity is low in the neonate, however, when exposed to IL-1-IF they can express adult levels. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the antigen presenting population has a damaging effect on all the above mentioned processes. Antigen processing and presentation, induction of D10 IL-4 production and proliferation, and IL-2 production demonstrate two different age related patterns of UV-irradiation induced damage: a dose dependent inhibition when adult cells are irradiated and an inverse effect in which low doses of irradiation were more inhibitory than higher doses when neonatal cells are irradiated. However, the secretion and membrane expression of IL-1 by both age groups are directly and totally inhibited by the range of UV-irradiation doses used and cannot be reinduced with a supplement of a crude IL-1-IF. While the capacity to produced IL-1 is totally destroyed by UV-irradiation, the ability to produce IL-2 remains intact and remains responsive to an IL-2-Inducer activity during proper antigen presentation. The low responses of neonatal antigen presenting spleen cell populations and the damaging effect of UV on both neonatal and adult responses are not due to the induction of suppressor factors

  4. Results of temperature test 6 in the Asse salt mine. Volume 1 - Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feddersen, H.; Flach, D.; Flentge, I.

    1986-01-01

    In the year 1985 a heater test with a mean heat load of 50 kW was carried out in the Asse salt mine for 78 days. Its main aims were to investigate possible fracturing of the rock; investigations on the transport of brine and gases; comparison of the measured mechanical stresses and temperatures, as compared to those determined by numerical methods. The evaluation of the measurement results was impeded by premature failure of some of the heaters, which proved to be a handicap to the symmetry of the experiment. It was possible, nevertheless, to find a good agreement between the measured and the numerically calculated temperatures. The mechanical stress measurements showed, as compared to the 2D-FE-calculations, that the measured stresses lay within the expected range. Fracturing was detected by means of seismic observations, especially after termination of the heating. Brine transport was ascertained using geoelectric four point -and self-potential measurements. The staining test showed no sharp fracturing of the rock salt, but a loosened-up zone at the grain boundaries impregnated with staining oil

  5. Developing maintainability for tokamak fusion power systems. Phase I report. Volume I. Study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, H.S.

    1977-10-01

    The overall purpose of the study is to identify design features of tokamak fusion power reactors which contribute to the achievement of high levels of maintainability. In this first phase, the principal emphasis is on scheduled maintenance whose frequency is determined by the life of the reactor first wall/blanket. Remote operations are baselined. Five conceptual reactor designs have been analyzed. Each concept is characterized by the size of the replaceable first wall/blanket module--large, intermediate, small--and whether access to the module was from the outside of the reactor, the inside of the reactor or a combination of both. The study results are expressed in terms of availability (scheduled maintenance downtime), the costs of maintenance (capital and recurring) and the percent effect of maintenance on the cost of electricity. During this first phase, the study benefitted significantly by the critical review of the feasibility of maintenance functions and the time-to-perform estimates by numerous persons involved in nuclear maintenance and remote operations

  6. Quantifying History. Volume testing results of Punic artisanal workshops in the Bay of Cádiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Sáez Romero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Production and commerce of fish by-products was for the western area of the Mediterranean and its Atlantic appendix a key resource during Antiquity. Specifically, its production and trade was a main ingredient of the economy of the Bay of Cádiz and the Phoenician-Punic city of Gadir. The importance of fishing, salt and salted fish resulted in the creation of an important network of productive infrastructure, mainly of many fish-salting facilities and pottery workshops (where transport amphorae were manufactured. The exponential growth of archaeological data available on this infrastructure and local amphorae in the last decades now provides a precise picture of the territorial model and the morphology of these industrial centers, as well as the formal evolution of the transport clay vessels. An approach to one of the stages of greater grandeur of this maritime-based economy is discussed in this paper, focusing on the analysis of the evidence dating from the 5th century BC of the Bay of Cádiz. Based on the data of pottery workshops and fish-salting facilities, a theoretical quantification of the standardization of forms, dimensions and weights of local amphorae and the procilities and pottery workshops (where transport amphorae were ductivity of these infrastructures (number of amphorae produced, quantities of fish and salt needed, etc. is proposed.

  7. Closed Versus Open Supracondylar Fractures of the Humerus in Children: A Comparison of Clinical and Radiographic Presentation and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewine, Eliza; Kim, Jaehon M; Miller, Patricia E; Waters, Peter M; Mahan, Susan T; Snyder, Brian; Hedequist, Daniel; Bae, Donald S

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the presentation and postoperative results of children treated for open and closed, completely displaced type III supracondylar humerus fractures (SCFs). Thirty patients with open and 66 patients with closed, completely displaced type III SCFs were evaluated. Open fractures underwent irrigation and debridement, and all patients were treated by open or closed reduction and pin fixation. Medical records were reviewed to obtain demographic information as well as preoperative and postoperative clinical data regarding mechanism of injury, neurovascular status, associated injuries, postoperative range of motion, infections, and pain. Radiographs were evaluated to quantify displacement, Baumann's angle, humeral capitellar angle, position of the anterior humeral line, and adequacy of reduction. Outcomes were assessed using Flynn criteria. Mean clinical follow-up for the open and closed fracture groups was 8.9 and 5.7 months, respectively. Both groups were similar with respect to age, sex distribution, weight and body mass index, laterality of involvement, and mechanism of injury. At presentation, 35% of closed SCFs and 23% of open SCFs presented with abnormal neurovascular status. There was a higher prevalence of diminished/absent pulses or distal limb ischemia in patients with open injuries (27%) compared with closed fractures (18%). Conversely, severely displaced closed fractures were more commonly associated with nerve injury/palsy at presentation (35%) than those with open fractures (23%). Spontaneous nerve recovery was seen in 87% within 3 to 6 months. Postoperative loss of reduction and malunion were more common in the closed fracture group. However, 84% of patients achieved good-to-excellent results by Flynn criteria, with no appreciable difference based upon open versus closed fractures. With timely wound and fracture treatment, the clinical and radiographic results of children treated for open SCFs is similar to

  8. Toward the harmonization of result presentation for the eosin-5'-maleimide binding test in the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Linda; Greenwood, David; Heimpel, Hermann; Noel, Nigel; Whiteway, Alastair; King, May-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) Binding test measures reduced mean channel fluorescence (MCF) reading of EMA-labeled red cells (EMA-RBCs) from patients with hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Reporting test results can be either in the actual MCF reading or as a ratio by normalization of the test MCF result to the mean MCF value of six normal controls. The latter format has potential for universal reporting. We analyzed three years' archival MCF data from HS and non-HS patient groups for establishment of reference ranges of ratios for normal adults and HS. A prospective study used FC500 and FACS Canto II cytometers to analyze contemporaneously EMA-RBCs from several patient groups and normal donors. Statistical analyses of the prospective data determined the cut-off values, and the sensitivity and specificity for HS respectively for the MCF and the ratio result presentations. The effect of using fewer than six normal controls for the ratio denominator was explored. The FC500 gave a mean ratio of 0.782 (SD=0.086) in HS patients with an optimal cut-off ratio of 0.918 (98.7% specificity, 95.6% sensitivity), and gray area ratio of 0.868-0.918. The Canto II gave a mean ratio of 0.774 (SD=0.085) with an optimal cut-off ratio of 0.925 (97.1% specificity and 100% sensitivity), and gray area ratio of 0.859-0.925. Harmonization of result presentation is feasible with no apparent constraint by instrument design. Interpretation of gray-area data requires an assessment of patient's clinical presentation and family history or performing a family study. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  9. Long-term results of preventive embolization of renal angiomyolipomas: evaluation of predictive factors of volume decrease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocquelet, A.; Cornelis, F.; Le Bras, Y.; Meyer, M.; Tricaud, E.; Lasserre, A.S.; Grenier, N. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pellegrin, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Urology and Vascular Imaging, Bordeaux (France); Ferriere, J.M.; Robert, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pellegrin, Urology Service, Bordeaux (France)

    2014-08-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of selective arterial embolization (SAE) of angiomyolipomas based on the percentage volume reduction after embolization and to identify predictive factors of volume decrease. Patients receiving prophylactic SAE of renal angiomyolipomas were included retrospectively over 3 years. The volume change after SAE and haemorrhagic or surgical events were recorded. Initial tumour volume, percentage tumour fat content, mean tumour density, embolic agent used, number of angiomyolipomas and tuberous sclerosis disease were evaluated as predictive factors of volume decrease. A total of 19 patients with 39 angiomyolipomas were included with median follow-up of 28 months (interquartile range 21-37 months). All treatments were technically successful (92 % primary and 8 % secondary). No distal bleeding or any increase in size or surgical nephrectomy after SAE was recorded. Mean volume reduction was 72 % (±24 %). Volumes before SAE (R{sup 2} = 0.276; p = 0.001), percentage fat content (R{sup 2} = 0.612; p < 0.0001) and mean angiomyolipoma density (R{sup 2} = 0.536; p < 0.0001) were identified as predictive factors of volume decrease. In multivariate regression, only percentage fat content influenced volume decreases. SAE is an efficient treatment for angiomyolipoma devascularisation and volume reduction. A significant reduction of volume is modulated by the initial volume and tissue composition of the tumour. (orig.)

  10. Present status and first results of the final focus beam line at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.

  11. The Influence of Hospital Volume on Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietelink, Lieke; Henneman, Daniel; van Leersum, Nicoline J; de Noo, Mirre; Manusama, Eric; Tanis, Pieter J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Wouters, Michel W J M

    2016-04-01

    This population-based study evaluates the association between hospital volume and CRM (circumferential resection margin) involvement, adjusted for other confounders, in rectal cancer surgery. A low hospital volume (risk of CRM involvement (odds ratio=1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.11). To evaluate the association between hospital volume and CRM (circumferential resection margin) involvement in rectal cancer surgery. To guarantee the quality of surgical treatment of rectal cancer, the Association of Surgeons of the Netherlands has stated a minimal annual volume standard of 20 procedures per hospital. The influence of hospital volume has been examined for different outcome variables in rectal cancer surgery. Its influence on the pathological outcome (CRM) however remains unclear. As long-term outcomes are best predicted by the CRM status, this parameter is of essential importance in the debate on the justification of minimal volume standards in rectal cancer surgery. Data from the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (2011-2012) were used. Hospital volume was divided into 3 groups, and baseline characteristics were described. The influence of hospital volume on CRM involvement was analyzed, in a multivariate model, between low- and high-volume hospitals, according to the minimal volume standards. This study included 5161 patients. CRM was recorded in 86% of patients. CRM involvement was 11% in low-volume group versus 7.7% and 7.9% in the medium- and high-volume group (P≤0.001). After adjustment for relevant confounders, the influence of hospital volume on CRM involvement was still significant odds ratio (OR) = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.11). The outcomes of this pooled analysis support minimal volume standards in rectal cancer surgery. Low hospital volume was independently associated with a higher risk of CRM involvement (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.12-2.11).

  12. [The long-term results of the application of the combined rehabilitative treatment in the patients presenting with knee osteoarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, A N; Purigа, A O; Yurova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The rehabilitative treatment of the patients suffering from knee osteoarthrosis (OA) up-to-date remains one of the most important medical and social problems of modern medicine due to the high prevalence of this disease, heavy morbidity, and the significant deterioration of the quality of the patients' life. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long-term results of the combined application of radon and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with knee OA. The study involved 75 patients at the age from 35 to 62 years with the confirmed diagnosis of stage II and III knee osteoarthrosis. They were divided into 3 groups. Those comprising the main group received extracorporeal shock-wave therapy in combination with the treatment based on the use of radon baths. The patients included in the group of comparison were given a course of radon therapy alone while the patients of the control group received the standard treatment including physiotherapy, magnetic therapy, and the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The study has demonstrated the high effectiveness of the combined application of the radon baths and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy that was manifested as the substantial decrease of pain intensity, the increased range of motion in the knee joints, and the improvement of the general quality of life. These beneficial effects persisted during a period of up to 12 months. The stable remission was documented in 82% of the patients comprising the main group. The data obtained give reason to recommend the method employed in the present study for the extensive practical application at different stages of medical rehabilitation of the patients presenting with knee osteoarthrosis.

  13. Early Expansion of the Intracranial CSF Volume After Palliative Whole-Brain Radiotherapy: Results of a Longitudinal CT Segmentation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanghera, Paul; Gardner, Sandra L.; Scora, Daryl; Davey, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess cerebral atrophy after radiotherapy, we measured intracranial cerebrospinal fluid volume (ICSFV) over time after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and compared it with published normal-population data. Methods and Materials: We identified 9 patients receiving a single course of WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks) for ipsilateral brain metastases with at least 3 years of computed tomography follow-up. Segmentation analysis was confined to the tumor-free hemi-cranium. The technique was semiautomated by use of thresholds based on scanned image intensity. The ICSFV percentage (ratio of ICSFV to brain volume) was used for modeling purposes. Published normal-population ICSFV percentages as a function of age were used as a control. A repeated-measures model with cross-sectional (between individuals) and longitudinal (within individuals) quadratic components was fitted to the collected data. The influence of clinical factors including the use of subependymal plate shielding was studied. Results: The median imaging follow-up was 6.25 years. There was an immediate increase (p < 0.0001) in ICSFV percentage, which decelerated over time. The clinical factors studied had no significant effect on the model. Conclusions: WBRT immediately accelerates the rate of brain atrophy. This longitudinal study in patients with brain metastases provides a baseline against which the potential benefits of more localized radiotherapeutic techniques such as radiosurgery may be compared.

  14. Effectiveness of quantitative MAA SPECT/CT for the definition of vascularized hepatic volume and dosimetric approach: phantom validation and clinical preliminary results in patients with complex hepatic vascularization treated with yttrium-90-labeled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Etienne; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Laffont, Sophie; Pracht, Marc; Mesbah, Habiba; Porée, Philippe; Ardisson, Valérie; Bourguet, Patrick; Clement, Bruno; Boucher, Eveline

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) analysis for vascularized volume measurements in the use of the yttrium-90-radiolabeled microspheres (TheraSphere). A phantom study was conducted for the validation of SPECT/CT volume measurement. SPECT/CT quantitative analysis was used for the measurement of the volume of distribution of the albumin macroaggregates (MAA; i.e., the vascularized volume) in the liver and the tumor, and the total activity contained in the liver and the tumor in four consecutive patients presenting with a complex liver vascularization referred for a treatment with TheraSphere. SPECT/CT volume measurement proved to be accurate (mean error <7%) and reproducible (interobserver concordance 0.99). For eight treatments, in cases of complex hepatic vascularization, the hepatic volumes based on angiography and CT led to a relative overestimation or underestimation of the vascularized hepatic volume by 43.2 ± 32.7% (5-87%) compared with SPECT/CT analyses. The vascularized liver volume taken into account calculated from SPECT/CT data, instead of angiography and CT data, results in modifying the activity injected for three treatments of eight. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT allows us to calculate the absorbed dose in the tumor and in the healthy liver, leading to doubling of the injected activity for one treatment of eight. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for volume measurements. It provides a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients presenting with complex hepatic vascularization, in particular for calculating the vascularized liver volume, the activity to be injected and the absorbed doses. Studies should be conducted to assess the role of quantitative MAA/SPECT CT in therapeutic planning.

  15. A Study of Job Demands and Curriculum Development in Agricultural Training Related to the Muskegon County Wastewater Management System. Final Report. Volume II. Task Analysis Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Harold S.; And Others

    This is the second volume of a four-volume report of a research project designed to (1) identify job needs for agricultural occupations which will result from the Muskegon County Wastewater Management System and perform a task analysis on each occupation, (2) develop instructional modules and determine their place in either high school or 2-year…

  16. Distribution of hemoglobinopathies in patients presenting for electrophoresis and comparison of result with High performance liquid chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Jha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nearly 226 million carriers of thalassemias and abnormal hemoglobin are present worldwide according to the World Health Organization (WHO. The laboratory plays an important role in the investigation of the thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies. Cellulose acetate electrophoresis at alkaline pH and diagnosis based mainly on visual impression of thickness of band may miss the thalassemic trait patients. The aim of this study was to find out different hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia presenting in our hospital and to compare electrophoresis results with HPLC.Materials and Methods: This study was performed in the hematopathology section of Department of Pathology of Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital on cases sent for electrophoresis during 18 months period from October 2013 to March 2015 and included hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias identified by either electrophoresis or HPLC. 97 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria and thus were included in the study. Electrophoresis at alkaline pH was done in all whereas HPLC was performed in 27 cases.Results: A sharp peak of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias was seen in Tharu community though other communities are also affected. Thalassemia trait was the most common diagnosis (26.8% followed by sickle cell anemia (21.6%.  Electrophoresis was efficient in detecting some alpha thalassemia variants but missed many cases of beta thalassemia trait.Conclusion: Beta Thalassemia trait and sickle cell anemia both are common in Nepal , along with some other hemoglobinopathies  A sharp peak of hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias are seen in Tharu community. These abnormal hemoglobins and thalassemias are mainly seen in Terai region. Electrophoresis fails to quantify hemoglobin percentage and thus is not appropriate test in beta thalassemia screening. 

  17. The WELSONS experiment: overview and presentation of first results on the surface atmospheric boundary-layer in semiarid Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Frangi

    Full Text Available This study presents the preliminary results of the local energy budget and dynamic characteristics of the surface atmospheric boundary-layer (SBL during the WELSONS (wind erosion and losses of soil nutrients in semiarid Spain experiment. Some Mediterranean regions suffer land degradation by wind erosion as a consequence of their particular soil and climate conditions and inappropriate agricultural practice. In Spain, where land degradation by water erosion is well known, the lack of field studies to quantify soils losses by wind erosion resulted in the European Community organizing a scientific program for this specific issue. The European programme known as WELSONS was devoted to study the wind erosion process in central Aragon (NE Spain. This multidisciplinary experiment, which began in 1996 and finished in 1998, was carried out over an agricultural soil which was left fallow. Within the experimental field, two plots were delimited where two tillage treatments were applied, a mould-board ploughing (or conventional tillage denoted CT and chisel ploughing (reduced tillage denoted RT. This was to study on bare soil the influence of tillage method on surface conditions, saltation flux, vertical dust flux, erosion rates, dynamics characteristics such as friction velocity, roughness length, etc., and energy budget. The partitioning of the available energy, resulting from the dynamics of the SBL, are quite different over the two plots because of their own peculiar soil and surface properties. The first results show that the RT treatment seems to provide a wind erosion protection. Because of the long data recording time and particular phenomena (formation of a crust at the soil surface, very dry conditions, high wind speed for instance, these microclimatological data acquired during the WELSONS programmes may be helpful to test atmospheric boundary-layer models coupled with soil models.

    Key words: Hydrology (desertification - Meterology and

  18. The WELSONS experiment: overview and presentation of first results on the surface atmospheric boundary-layer in semiarid Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Frangi

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the preliminary results of the local energy budget and dynamic characteristics of the surface atmospheric boundary-layer (SBL during the WELSONS (wind erosion and losses of soil nutrients in semiarid Spain experiment. Some Mediterranean regions suffer land degradation by wind erosion as a consequence of their particular soil and climate conditions and inappropriate agricultural practice. In Spain, where land degradation by water erosion is well known, the lack of field studies to quantify soils losses by wind erosion resulted in the European Community organizing a scientific program for this specific issue. The European programme known as WELSONS was devoted to study the wind erosion process in central Aragon (NE Spain. This multidisciplinary experiment, which began in 1996 and finished in 1998, was carried out over an agricultural soil which was left fallow. Within the experimental field, two plots were delimited where two tillage treatments were applied, a mould-board ploughing (or conventional tillage denoted CT and chisel ploughing (reduced tillage denoted RT. This was to study on bare soil the influence of tillage method on surface conditions, saltation flux, vertical dust flux, erosion rates, dynamics characteristics such as friction velocity, roughness length, etc., and energy budget. The partitioning of the available energy, resulting from the dynamics of the SBL, are quite different over the two plots because of their own peculiar soil and surface properties. The first results show that the RT treatment seems to provide a wind erosion protection. Because of the long data recording time and particular phenomena (formation of a crust at the soil surface, very dry conditions, high wind speed for instance, these microclimatological data acquired during the WELSONS programmes may be helpful to test atmospheric boundary-layer models coupled with soil models.Key words: Hydrology (desertification - Meterology and atmospheric

  19. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibmer, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Albrecht, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Kruschewski, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks ≥20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  20. Impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Volkova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal carcinoma.Subjects and methods. Four hundred and fifty-three patients with pT1–3aN0M0 renal cell carcinoma and normally functioning secondkidney who had undergone radical nephrectomy (n = 226 (49.9 % or kidney resection (n = 227 (50.1 % were selected for the investigation. The patient groups who had undergone different-volume operations were matched for gender, age, body mass index (BMI, side of involvement, tumor sizes, and baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR (p > for all. The median baseline Charlson index and the rate of ASA classes III–IV operative risk were significantly higher in candidates for radical nephrectomy (p < 0.05 for all, the rate of diseases affecting kidney function, pT1a category, and G1 anaplasia were higher in the kidney resection group (p < 0.0001. The median follow-up was 50 (12–224 months.Results. Within 28 days postsurgery, the rate of acute renal dysfunction (ARD was 36.2 %. The independent risk factors of ARD were kidney resection (risk ratio (RR = 0.210; 95 % confidence interval (CI 0.115–0.288; р < 0.0001 and ischemia time (RR = 0.012; 95 % CI 0.004–0.021; p = 0.004. The degree of ARD after kidney resection was significantly lower than that following radical nephrectomy (p < 0.0001. In the late postoperative period, the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD Stage ≥ III was 38.4 %. Its independent risk factors were low baseline GFR (RR = 0.003; 95 % CI 0.002–0.005; p < 0.0001, radical nephrectomy (RR = 0.195; 95 % CI 0.093–0.298; p < 0.0001, and ARD (RR = 0.281; 95 % CI 0.187–0.376; p = 0.0001. Ten-year specific and cardiospecific survival rates in all the patients were 98.5 and 94.9 %, respectively, and unrelated to surgical volume. The independent predictors of poor cardiospecific survival were BMI, Charlson index, and ASA risk

  1. Impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Volkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the impact of surgical volume on functional results and cardiospecific survival rates in patients with clinically localized renal carcinoma.Subjects and methods. Four hundred and fifty-three patients with pT1–3aN0M0 renal cell carcinoma and normally functioning secondkidney who had undergone radical nephrectomy (n = 226 (49.9 % or kidney resection (n = 227 (50.1 % were selected for the investigation. The patient groups who had undergone different-volume operations were matched for gender, age, body mass index (BMI, side of involvement, tumor sizes, and baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR (p > for all. The median baseline Charlson index and the rate of ASA classes III–IV operative risk were significantly higher in candidates for radical nephrectomy (p < 0.05 for all, the rate of diseases affecting kidney function, pT1a category, and G1 anaplasia were higher in the kidney resection group (p < 0.0001. The median follow-up was 50 (12–224 months.Results. Within 28 days postsurgery, the rate of acute renal dysfunction (ARD was 36.2 %. The independent risk factors of ARD were kidney resection (risk ratio (RR = 0.210; 95 % confidence interval (CI 0.115–0.288; р < 0.0001 and ischemia time (RR = 0.012; 95 % CI 0.004–0.021; p = 0.004. The degree of ARD after kidney resection was significantly lower than that following radical nephrectomy (p < 0.0001. In the late postoperative period, the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD Stage ≥ III was 38.4 %. Its independent risk factors were low baseline GFR (RR = 0.003; 95 % CI 0.002–0.005; p < 0.0001, radical nephrectomy (RR = 0.195; 95 % CI 0.093–0.298; p < 0.0001, and ARD (RR = 0.281; 95 % CI 0.187–0.376; p = 0.0001. Ten-year specific and cardiospecific survival rates in all the patients were 98.5 and 94.9 %, respectively, and unrelated to surgical volume. The independent predictors of poor cardiospecific survival were BMI, Charlson index, and ASA risk

  2. Extreme value paradigm for the effect of size of target volume on end results in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    In clinical radiation oncology, it is commonly reported that complications of normal tissue occur more readily at larger field sizes for a given dose and recurrence of disease is observed more frequently from the larger tumors for a given dose. Cognate phenomena have long been observed in the study of the strength of materials. That is, the larger specimens will fracture under less applied stress, breakdown under less applied voltage, corrode in a shorter time, etc. The statistical theory of extreme values has provided both a rational explanation and a technique for exploitation of these ''size effects'' on the likelihood of specimen failure. This theory describes the relation which exists between the parameters (in particular, the location parameter) of the frequency distributions of the extreme values [smallest x(1) and largest x(n)] in a sample from a population of observations xi and the sample size n. It is shown in the present paper that the clinical failure phenomena are not inconsistent with the statistical theory of extreme values. The paper presents heuristic comparisons of the predictions of this theory with the received clinical observations of the effect of the size of the volume of irradiated tissues on the likelihood of occurrence of the misadventures of clinical radiation oncology: recurrence of disease and complication of normal tissue. The concordance of observations and predictions is acceptable. The quality and quantity of the currently available data have precluded the construction of any apodictic representations

  3. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  4. KMWin – A Convenient Tool for Graphical Presentation of Results from Kaplan-Meier Survival Time Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Arnd; Ziepert, Marita; Scholz, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of clinical studies often necessitates multiple graphical representations of the results. Many professional software packages are available for this purpose. Most packages are either only commercially available or hard to use especially if one aims to generate or customize a huge number of similar graphical outputs. We developed a new, freely available software tool called KMWin (Kaplan-Meier for Windows) facilitating Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis. KMWin is based on the statistical software environment R and provides an easy to use graphical interface. Survival time data can be supplied as SPSS (sav), SAS export (xpt) or text file (dat), which is also a common export format of other applications such as Excel. Figures can directly be exported in any graphical file format supported by R. Results On the basis of a working example, we demonstrate how to use KMWin and present its main functions. We show how to control the interface, customize the graphical output, and analyse survival time data. A number of comparisons are performed between KMWin and SPSS regarding graphical output, statistical output, data management and development. Although the general functionality of SPSS is larger, KMWin comprises a number of features useful for survival time analysis in clinical trials and other applications. These are for example number of cases and number of cases under risk within the figure or provision of a queue system for repetitive analyses of updated data sets. Moreover, major adjustments of graphical settings can be performed easily on a single window. Conclusions We conclude that our tool is well suited and convenient for repetitive analyses of survival time data. It can be used by non-statisticians and provides often used functions as well as functions which are not supplied by standard software packages. The software is routinely applied in several clinical study groups. PMID:22723912

  5. KMWin--a convenient tool for graphical presentation of results from Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnd Gross

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of clinical studies often necessitates multiple graphical representations of the results. Many professional software packages are available for this purpose. Most packages are either only commercially available or hard to use especially if one aims to generate or customize a huge number of similar graphical outputs. We developed a new, freely available software tool called KMWin (Kaplan-Meier for Windows facilitating Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis. KMWin is based on the statistical software environment R and provides an easy to use graphical interface. Survival time data can be supplied as SPSS (sav, SAS export (xpt or text file (dat, which is also a common export format of other applications such as Excel. Figures can directly be exported in any graphical file format supported by R. RESULTS: On the basis of a working example, we demonstrate how to use KMWin and present its main functions. We show how to control the interface, customize the graphical output, and analyse survival time data. A number of comparisons are performed between KMWin and SPSS regarding graphical output, statistical output, data management and development. Although the general functionality of SPSS is larger, KMWin comprises a number of features useful for survival time analysis in clinical trials and other applications. These are for example number of cases and number of cases under risk within the figure or provision of a queue system for repetitive analyses of updated data sets. Moreover, major adjustments of graphical settings can be performed easily on a single window. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that our tool is well suited and convenient for repetitive analyses of survival time data. It can be used by non-statisticians and provides often used functions as well as functions which are not supplied by standard software packages. The software is routinely applied in several clinical study groups.

  6. The Influence of Hospital Volume on Circumferential Resection Margin Involvement: Results of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, Lieke; Henneman, Daniel; van Leersum, Nicoline J.; de Noo, Mirre; Manusama, Eric; Tanis, Pieter J.; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    This population-based study evaluates the association between hospital volume and CRM (circumferential resection margin) involvement, adjusted for other confounders, in rectal cancer surgery. A low hospital volume ( <20 cases/year) was independently associated with a higher risk of CRM involvement

  7. Smaller Hippocampal Volume in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Multisite ENIGMA-PGC Study: Subcortical Volumetry Results From Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Mark W.; van Rooij, Sanne J.H.; Dennis, Emily L.; Davis, Sarah L.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Stevens, Jennifer S.; Densmore, Maria; Haswell, Courtney C.; Ipser, Jonathan; Koch, Saskia B.J.; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Lebois, Lauren A.M.; Peverill, Matthew; Baker, Justin T.; Boedhoe, Premika S.W.; Frijling, Jessie L.; Gruber, Staci A.; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Jahanshad, Neda; Koopowitz, Sheri; Levy, Ifat; Nawijn, Laura; O’Connor, Lauren; Olff, Miranda; Salat, David H.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Winternitz, Sherry R.; Wolff, Jonathan D.; Wolf, Erika J.; Wang, Xin; Wrocklage, Kristen; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Bryant, Richard A.; Geuze, Elbert; Jovanovic, Tanja; Kaufman, Milissa L.; King, Anthony P.; Krystal, John H.; Lagopoulos, Jim; Bennett, Maxwell; Lanius, Ruth; Liberzon, Israel; McGlinchey, Regina E.; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Milberg, William P.; Miller, Mark W.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Veltman, Dick J.; Stein, Dan J.; Thomaes, Kathleen; Thompson, Paul M.; Morey, Rajendra A.

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many studies report smaller hippocampal and amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but findings have not always been consistent. Here, we present the results of a large-scale neuroimaging consortium study on PTSD conducted by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC)–Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) PTSD Working Group. METHODS We analyzed neuroimaging and clinical data from 1868 subjects (794 PTSD patients) contributed by 16 cohorts, representing the largest neuroimaging study of PTSD to date. We assessed the volumes of eight subcortical structures (nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, thalamus, and lateral ventricle). We used a standardized image-analysis and quality-control pipeline established by the ENIGMA consortium. RESULTS In a meta-analysis of all samples, we found significantly smaller hippocampi in subjects with current PTSD compared with trauma-exposed control subjects (Cohen’s d = −0.17, p = .00054), and smaller amygdalae (d = −0.11, p = .025), although the amygdala finding did not survive a significance level that was Bonferroni corrected for multiple subcortical region comparisons (p < .0063). CONCLUSIONS Our study is not subject to the biases of meta-analyses of published data, and it represents an important milestone in an ongoing collaborative effort to examine the neurobiological underpinnings of PTSD and the brain’s response to trauma. PMID:29217296

  8. Safety assessment methodologies for near surface disposal facilities. Results of a co-ordinated research project (ISAM). Volume 1: Review and enhancement of safety assessment approaches and tools. Volume 2: Test cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    the Safety Guide on 'Safety Assessment for Near Surface Disposal of Radioactive Waste' (Safety Standards Series No. WS-G- 1.1). The report of this CRP is presented in two volumes; Volume 1 contains a summary and a complete description of the ISAM project methodology and Volume 2 presents the application of the methodology to three hypothetical test cases

  9. KMWin--a convenient tool for graphical presentation of results from Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Arnd; Ziepert, Marita; Scholz, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of clinical studies often necessitates multiple graphical representations of the results. Many professional software packages are available for this purpose. Most packages are either only commercially available or hard to use especially if one aims to generate or customize a huge number of similar graphical outputs. We developed a new, freely available software tool called KMWin (Kaplan-Meier for Windows) facilitating Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis. KMWin is based on the statistical software environment R and provides an easy to use graphical interface. Survival time data can be supplied as SPSS (sav), SAS export (xpt) or text file (dat), which is also a common export format of other applications such as Excel. Figures can directly be exported in any graphical file format supported by R. On the basis of a working example, we demonstrate how to use KMWin and present its main functions. We show how to control the interface, customize the graphical output, and analyse survival time data. A number of comparisons are performed between KMWin and SPSS regarding graphical output, statistical output, data management and development. Although the general functionality of SPSS is larger, KMWin comprises a number of features useful for survival time analysis in clinical trials and other applications. These are for example number of cases and number of cases under risk within the figure or provision of a queue system for repetitive analyses of updated data sets. Moreover, major adjustments of graphical settings can be performed easily on a single window. We conclude that our tool is well suited and convenient for repetitive analyses of survival time data. It can be used by non-statisticians and provides often used functions as well as functions which are not supplied by standard software packages. The software is routinely applied in several clinical study groups.

  10. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins

  11. Childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark 1979-1994: incidence, clinical features and laboratory results at presentation in 48 children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Milman, N; Byg, K E

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To describe the incidence, clinical presentation and paraclinical findings in childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark, 1979-1994. METHODS: Patients (n = 5536) with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis were drawn from the nationwide Patient Registry; 81 patients were ... examination (glucose, albumin, haemoglobin) was normal in 96% of the patients; the patient with nephrocalcinosis had albuminuria and haematuria. CONCLUSION: The incidence of sarcoidosis in Danish children is low and increases with age. Sarcoidosis in young children may present clinical features...... that are different from the appearance of those in older children and often constitute a diagnostic challenge. In older children, the clinical appearance has many features in common with the presentation in adults....

  12. Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

    2014-11-01

    Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

  13. Yoga Meditation Practitioners Exhibit Greater Gray Matter Volume and Fewer Reported Cognitive Failures: Results of a Preliminary Voxel-Based Morphometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Froeliger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hatha yoga techniques, including physical postures (asanas, breathing exercises (pranayama, and meditation, involve the practice of mindfulness. In turn, yoga meditation practices may induce the state of mindfulness, which, when evoked recurrently through repeated practice, may accrue into trait or dispositional mindfulness. Putatively, these changes may be mediated by experience-dependent neuroplastic changes. Though prior studies have identified differences in gray matter volume (GMV between long-term mindfulness practitioners and controls, no studies to date have reported on whether yoga meditation is associated with GMV differences. The present study investigated GMV differences between yoga meditation practitioners (YMP and a matched control group (CG. The YMP group exhibited greater GM volume in frontal, limbic, temporal, occipital, and cerebellar regions; whereas the CG had no greater regional greater GMV. In addition, the YMP group reported significantly fewer cognitive failures on the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ, the magnitude of which was positively correlated with GMV in numerous regions identified in the primary analysis. Lastly, GMV was positively correlated with the duration of yoga practice. Results from this preliminary study suggest that hatha yoga practice may be associated with the promotion of neuroplastic changes in executive brain systems, which may confer therapeutic benefits that accrue with repeated practice.

  14. Smaller Hippocampal Volume in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Multisite ENIGMA-PGC Study: Subcortical Volumetry Results From Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Mark W; van Rooij, Sanne J H; Dennis, Emily L; Davis, Sarah L; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Stevens, Jennifer S; Densmore, Maria; Haswell, Courtney C; Ipser, Jonathan; Koch, Saskia B J; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh; Lebois, Lauren A M; Peverill, Matthew; Baker, Justin T; Boedhoe, Premika S W; Frijling, Jessie L; Gruber, Staci A; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan; Jahanshad, Neda; Koopowitz, Sheri; Levy, Ifat; Nawijn, Laura; O'Connor, Lauren; Olff, Miranda; Salat, David H; Sheridan, Margaret A; Spielberg, Jeffrey M; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Winternitz, Sherry R; Wolff, Jonathan D; Wolf, Erika J; Wang, Xin; Wrocklage, Kristen; Abdallah, Chadi G; Bryant, Richard A; Geuze, Elbert; Jovanovic, Tanja; Kaufman, Milissa L; King, Anthony P; Krystal, John H; Lagopoulos, Jim; Bennett, Maxwell; Lanius, Ruth; Liberzon, Israel; McGlinchey, Regina E; McLaughlin, Katie A; Milberg, William P; Miller, Mark W; Ressler, Kerry J; Veltman, Dick J; Stein, Dan J; Thomaes, Kathleen; Thompson, Paul M; Morey, Rajendra A

    2018-02-01

    Many studies report smaller hippocampal and amygdala volumes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but findings have not always been consistent. Here, we present the results of a large-scale neuroimaging consortium study on PTSD conducted by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC)-Enhancing Neuroimaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) PTSD Working Group. We analyzed neuroimaging and clinical data from 1868 subjects (794 PTSD patients) contributed by 16 cohorts, representing the largest neuroimaging study of PTSD to date. We assessed the volumes of eight subcortical structures (nucleus accumbens, amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, thalamus, and lateral ventricle). We used a standardized image-analysis and quality-control pipeline established by the ENIGMA consortium. In a meta-analysis of all samples, we found significantly smaller hippocampi in subjects with current PTSD compared with trauma-exposed control subjects (Cohen's d = -0.17, p = .00054), and smaller amygdalae (d = -0.11, p = .025), although the amygdala finding did not survive a significance level that was Bonferroni corrected for multiple subcortical region comparisons (p < .0063). Our study is not subject to the biases of meta-analyses of published data, and it represents an important milestone in an ongoing collaborative effort to examine the neurobiological underpinnings of PTSD and the brain's response to trauma. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Target volume for postoperative radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: Results from a prospective trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kępka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Bujko, Magdalena; Matecka-Nowak, Mirosława; Salata, Andrzej; Janowski, Henryk; Rogowska, Danuta; Cieślak-Żerańska, Ewa; Komosińska, Katarzyna; Zawadzka, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: A previous prospective trial reported that three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for pN2 NSCLC patients using a limited clinical target volume (CTV) had a late morbidity rate and pulmonary function that did not differ from those observed in pN1 patients treated with surgery without PORT. The aim of this study was to assess locoregional control and localization of failure in patients treated with PORT. Materials and methods: The pattern of locoregional failure was evaluated retrospectively in 151 of 171 patients included in the PORT arm. The CTV included the involved lymph node stations and those with a risk of invasion >10%. Competing risk analysis was used to assess the incidence of locoregional failure and its location outside the CTV. Results: Overall survival at 5 years was 27.1% with a median follow-up of 67 months for 40 living patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of locoregional failure was 19.4% (95% CI: 18.2–20.5%) including a failure rate of 2% (95% CI: 0–17%) in locations outside or at the border of the CTV. Conclusions: The use of limited CTV was associated with acceptable risk of geographic miss. Overall locoregional control was similar to that reported by other studies using PORT for pN2 patients

  16. Clinical outcomes according to symptom presentation in patients with acute myocardial infarction: Results from the FAST-MI 2010 registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puymirat, Etienne; Aissaoui, Nadia; Bonello, Laurent; Cayla, Guillaume; Labèque, Jean-Noel; Nallet, Olivier; Motreff, Pascal; Varenne, Olivier; Schiele, François; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    Atypical clinical presentation in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is not uncommon; most studies suggest that it is associated with unfavorable prognosis. Long-term clinical impact differs according to predominant symptom presentation (typical chest pain, atypical chest pain, syncope, cardiac arrest, or dyspnea) in AMI patients. FAST-MI 2010, a nationwide French registry, included 4169 patients with AMI in 213 centers at the end of 2010 (76% of active centers). Demographics, medical history, hospital management, and outcomes were compared according to predominant symptom presentation. Typical chest pain with no other symptom was reported in 3020 patients (68% in STEMI patients, 76% in NSTEMI patients). Atypical chest pain, dyspnea, syncope, and cardiac arrest were reported in 11%, 11%, 5%, and 1%, respectively. Patients with atypical clinical presentation had a higher cardiovascular risk profile and received fewer medications and a less invasive strategy. Using Cox multivariate analysis, atypical chest pain was not associated with higher death rate at 3 years (HR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.69-1.33, P = 0.78), whereas cardiac arrest (HR: 2.44, 95% CI: 1.00-5.97, P = 0.05), syncope (HR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.18-2.46, P = 0.005), and dyspnea (HR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.31-2.10, P clinical presentation is observed in about 20% of AMI patients. Cardiac arrest, dyspnea, and syncope represent independent predictors of long-term mortality in STEMI and NSTEMI populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. "Prevalence of Thyrotoxicosis: Clinical presentation and results of treatment in 384 patients with Goiter under 18 years "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Moayeri H

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Goiter is common among growing children and adolescents but thyrotoxicosis is a rare thyroid disorder in this age prevalence of thyrotoxicosis and clinical presentation in prevalence of thyrotoxicosis and clinical presentation of the disease among children and adolescents of the disease among children and adolescents presenting for goiter at the clinics of pediatric presenting for goiter at the clinics of pediatric Endocrinology of Tehran and Iran University of medical sciences and private offices. In a retrospective study the medical records of 424 patients with goiter were studied of whom 384 (285F, 99M and goiter and records available for review. All patients were examined by pediatric endocrinologist and their goiters were classified according to WHO criteria. Total T4, TSH, T3 and T3RU were measured. Out of the 384 cases that were diagnosed as goiter, 320 were euthyroid (83.4%, 49 were hypothyroid (12.7% and 15 were hyperthyroid (3.9%. Ninety-three percent of the hyperthyroid patients had graves’ disease and seven percent of them had toxic adenoma. The most common presenting feature in thyrotoxic patients was goiter. Sustained remission with medical treatment alone was attained in 46% with a mean treatment duration of 2.9 years. The comparison was made between the findings of this study and those of western countries indicating that the incidence of hyperthyroidism in Iranian pediatric population is not as high as in North America but is higher than in Europe. Clinical presentation, response to treatment and etiologic causes of the disease in our study was similar to other studies.

  18. Childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark 1979-1994: incidence, clinical features and laboratory results at presentation in 48 children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Milman, N; Byg, K E

    2004-01-01

    .7-15). In 1979-1994 the incidence was 0.29 per 100000 person-years incidence was 0.06 in children weight loss, abdominal discomfort, respiratory symptoms, lymphadenopathy......AIM: To describe the incidence, clinical presentation and paraclinical findings in childhood sarcoidosis in Denmark, 1979-1994. METHODS: Patients (n = 5536) with a diagnosis of sarcoidosis were drawn from the nationwide Patient Registry; 81 patients were ... examination (glucose, albumin, haemoglobin) was normal in 96% of the patients; the patient with nephrocalcinosis had albuminuria and haematuria. CONCLUSION: The incidence of sarcoidosis in Danish children is low and increases with age. Sarcoidosis in young children may present clinical features...

  19. Performance evaluation of the technical capabilities of DOE sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste. Volume 2: Technical basis and discussion of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.D.; Gruebel, M.M.; Hospelhorn, M.B.

    1996-03-01

    A team of analysts designed and conducted a performance evaluation to estimate the technical capabilities of fifteen Department of Energy sites for disposal of mixed low-level waste (i.e., waste that contains both low-level radioactive materials and hazardous constituents). Volume 1 summarizes the process for selecting the fifteen sites, the methodology used in the evaluation, and the conclusions derived from the evaluation. Volume 2 first describes the screening process used to determine the sites to be considered in the PEs. This volume then provides the technical details of the methodology for conducting the performance evaluations. It also provides a comparison and analysis of the overall results for all sites that were evaluated. Volume 3 contains detailed evaluations of the fifteen sites and discussions of the results for each site

  20. Robust, accurate, and non-contacting vibration measurement systems: Supplemental appendices presenting comparison measurements of the robust laser interferometer and typical accelerometer systems. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodenow, T.C.; Shipman, R.L.; Holland, H.M.

    1995-06-01

    Epoch Engineering, Incorporated (EEI) has completed a series of vibration measurements comparing their newly-developed Robust Laser Interferometer (RLI) with accelerometer-based instrumentation systems. EEI has successfully demonstrated, on several pieces of commonplace machinery, that non-contact, line-of-sight measurements are practical and yield results equal to or, in some cases, better than customary field implementations of accelerometers. The demonstration included analysis and comparison of such phenomena as nonlinearity, transverse sensitivity, harmonics, and signal-to-noise ratio. Fast Fourier Transformations were performed on the accelerometer and the laser system outputs to provide a comparison basis. The RLI was demonstrated, within the limits o the task, to be a viable, line-of-sight, non-contact alternative to accelerometer systems. Several different kinds of machinery were instrumented and. compared, including a small pump, a gear-driven cement mixer, a rotor kit, and two small fans. Known machinery vibration sources were verified and RLI system output file formats were verified to be compatible with commercial computer programs used for vibration monitoring and trend analysis. The RLI was also observed to be less subject to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and more capable at very low frequencies. This document, Volume 2, provides the appendices to this report

  1. TEMPEST: A three-dimensional time-dependent computer program for hydrothermal analysis: Volume 2, Assessment and verification results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyler, L.L.; Trent, D.S.; Budden, M.J.

    1983-09-01

    During the course of the TEMPEST computer code development a concurrent effort was conducted to assess the code's performance and the validity of computed results. The results of this work are presented in this document. The principal objective of this effort was to assure the code's computational correctness for a wide range of hydrothermal phenomena typical of fast breeder reactor application. 47 refs., 94 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Delayed Presentation of Isolated Complete Pancreatic Transection as a Result of Sport-Related Blunt Trauma to the Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Healey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blunt abdominal trauma is a rare but well-recognized cause of pancreatic transection. A delayed presentation of pancreatic fracture following sport-related blunt trauma with the coexisting diagnostic pitfalls is presented. Case Report: A 17-year-old rugby player was referred to our specialist unit after having been diagnosed with traumatic pancreatic transection, having presented 24 h after a sporting injury. Despite haemodynamic stability, at laparotomy he was found to have a diffuse mesenteric hematoma involving the large and small bowel mesentery, extending down to the sigmoid colon from the splenic flexure, and a large retroperitoneal hematoma arising from the pancreas. The pancreas was completely severed with the superior border of the distal segment remaining attached to the splenic vein that was intact. A distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation and evacuation of the retroperitoneal hematoma was performed. Discussion/Conclusion: Blunt pancreatic trauma is a serious condition. Diagnosis and treatment may often be delayed, which in turn may drastically increase morbidity and mortality. Diagnostic difficulties apply to both paraclinical and radiological diagnostic methods. A high index of suspicion should be maintained in such cases, with a multi-modality diagnostic approach and prompt surgical intervention as required.

  3. The volume effect in radiation-related late small bowel complications. Results of a clinical study of the EORTC Radiotherapy Cooperative Group in patients treated for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letschert, J.G.J.; Lebesque, J.V.; Aleman, B.M.P.; Bartelink, H.; Bosset, J.F.; Horiot, J.C.; Cionini, L.; Hamers, J.P.; Leer, J.W.H.; van Glabbele, M.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the correlation between irradiated small bowel volume and late occurring small bowel complications. Methods: Small bowel volumes in the high-dose region were measured using orthogonal barium films for 203 patients treated for rectal carcinoma with pelvic postoperative radiotherapy to 50 Gy in an EORTC multicentric study. Results: The 5-year estimate of lat pelvic small bowel obstruction requiring surgery was 11%. No correlation between the irradiated small bowel volume and obstruction was detected. The actuarial 5-year estimate of chronic diarrhea varied from 31% in patients with irradiated small bowel volumes below 77 cm 3 to 42% in patients with volumes over 328 cm 3 . This correlation was significant in the univariate and multivariate analysis (p=0.025). The type of rectal surgery significantly influenced the incidence of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption, the actuarial 5-year estimate being 49% and 26% after low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection, respectively (p=0.04). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that there is a volume-effect in radiation-induced diarrhea atr a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. No volume-effect for small bowel obstruction was detected at this dose-level in pelvic postoperative radiotherapy. A review of the literature data on small bowel obstruction indicates that the volume effect at this dose level can only be demonstrated in patients who were treated with extended field radiotherapy (estimated small bowel volume 800 cm 3 ) after intra-abdominal surgery. (author). 22 refs., 5 tabs

  4. Enhancing memory for lists by grouped presentation and rehearsal: a pilot study in healthy subjects with unexpected results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Christian; Stojanovic, Jelena; Elger, Christian E

    2009-12-01

    List learning is probably the most established paradigm for the psychometric evaluation of episodic memory deficits in different neuropsychiatric conditions including epilepsy. Strategies which are capable of increasing the test performance might be promising candidates for a therapeutic improvement of daily memory performance. Based on the classical 'temporal grouping effect' we wanted to evaluate the memory-enhancing potential of disentangling perceiving, rehearsing and encoding by temporally grouped presentation and group-wise reproduction during acquisition. According to the ethical principle of subsidiary the study was performed in healthy adolescents (N=126) before setting-up a patient study. Subjects had to learn a list of 12 semantically unrelated nouns and a list of 12 figures during two acquisition trials under one of four experimental conditions defined by the size of presented item groups (GS): GS=1 (single items, i.e., 12 x 1 item), GS=3 (4 x 3 items), GS=6 (2 x 6 items), and GS=12 (standard presentation mode, i.e., 1 x 12 items). Repeated measures MANOVA confirmed a positive effect of smaller GS on acquisition performance but the grouping condition obtained no effect on immediate and delayed free recall or on yes/no recognition. For verbal retention, GS=12 even showed a tendency toward an advantage as compared to GS=3. Although appearing reasonable and promising, facilitating acquisition during list learning by temporal grouping and grouped overt rehearsal turned out to be ineffective with regard to long-term memory encoding and retrieval. A strategy however which fails in healthy subjects is unlikely to obtain a therapeutic potential in patients with memory deficits.

  5. The albatross plot: A novel graphical tool for presenting results of diversely reported studies in a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sean; Jones, Hayley E; Martin, Richard M; Lewis, Sarah J; Higgins, Julian P T

    2017-09-01

    Meta-analyses combine the results of multiple studies of a common question. Approaches based on effect size estimates from each study are generally regarded as the most informative. However, these methods can only be used if comparable effect sizes can be computed from each study, and this may not be the case due to variation in how the studies were done or limitations in how their results were reported. Other methods, such as vote counting, are then used to summarize the results of these studies, but most of these methods are limited in that they do not provide any indication of the magnitude of effect. We propose a novel plot, the albatross plot, which requires only a 1-sided P value and a total sample size from each study (or equivalently a 2-sided P value, direction of effect and total sample size). The plot allows an approximate examination of underlying effect sizes and the potential to identify sources of heterogeneity across studies. This is achieved by drawing contours showing the range of effect sizes that might lead to each P value for given sample sizes, under simple study designs. We provide examples of albatross plots using data from previous meta-analyses, allowing for comparison of results, and an example from when a meta-analysis was not possible. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Porcelain Bladder as a Result of Urinary Schistosomiasis. Presentation of a Clinical Case with a Multidisciplinary Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmel Chávez Troya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uro-genital schistosomiasis is one of the parasite infections suffered by inhabitants of underdeveloped countries. This disease, as some other parasite infections, is increasing its incidence in some other as a consequence of higher population mobility. A case of a 35 year old woman is presented who was admitted to Malange General Hospital complaining of hypo-gastric pain, chills and final intermittent hematuria she had had for two monhs. After some lab tests, it was confirmed the presence of Schistosomas eggs in a urine sample and calcification of the bladder in porcelain form observed in a simple abdominal radiography. With the diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis, she was treated with praziquantel at 40 mg per kg in a single dose. The patient came back a week later and afterwards for follow up. She is currently cured and doing her routines.

  7. Symbolic universes between present and future of Europe. First results of the map of European societies' cultural milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Sergio; Fini, Viviana; Mannarini, Terri; Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro; Avdi, Evrinomi; Battaglia, Fiorella; Castro-Tejerina, Jorge; Ciavolino, Enrico; Cremaschi, Marco; Kadianaki, Irini; Kharlamov, Nikita A; Krasteva, Anna; Kullasepp, Katrin; Matsopoulos, Anastassios; Meschiari, Claudia; Mossi, Piergiorgio; Psinas, Polivios; Redd, Rozlyn; Rochira, Alessia; Santarpia, Alfonso; Sammut, Gordon; Valsiner, Jaan; Valmorbida, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the framework, method and main findings of an analysis of cultural milieus in 4 European countries (Estonia, Greece, Italy, and UK). The analysis is based on a questionnaire applied to a sample built through a two-step procedure of post-hoc random selection from a broader dataset based on an online survey. Responses to the questionnaire were subjected to multidimensional analysis-a combination of Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We identified 5 symbolic universes, that correspond to basic, embodied, affect-laden, generalized worldviews. People in this study see the world as either a) an ordered universe; b) a matter of interpersonal bond; c) a caring society; d) consisting of a niche of belongingness; e) a hostile place (others' world). These symbolic universes were also interpreted as semiotic capital: they reflect the capacity of a place to foster social and civic development. Moreover, the distribution of the symbolic universes, and therefore social and civic engagement, is demonstrated to be variable across the 4 countries in the analysis. Finally, we develop a retrospective reconstruction of the distribution of symbolic universes as well as the interplay between their current state and past, present and future socio-institutional scenarios.

  8. Symbolic universes between present and future of Europe. First results of the map of European societies' cultural milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Viviana; Mannarini, Terri; Veltri, Giuseppe Alessandro; Avdi, Evrinomi; Battaglia, Fiorella; Castro-Tejerina, Jorge; Ciavolino, Enrico; Cremaschi, Marco; Kadianaki, Irini; Kharlamov, Nikita A.; Krasteva, Anna; Kullasepp, Katrin; Matsopoulos, Anastassios; Meschiari, Claudia; Mossi, Piergiorgio; Psinas, Polivios; Redd, Rozlyn; Rochira, Alessia; Santarpia, Alfonso; Sammut, Gordon; Valsiner, Jaan; Valmorbida, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the framework, method and main findings of an analysis of cultural milieus in 4 European countries (Estonia, Greece, Italy, and UK). The analysis is based on a questionnaire applied to a sample built through a two-step procedure of post-hoc random selection from a broader dataset based on an online survey. Responses to the questionnaire were subjected to multidimensional analysis–a combination of Multiple Correspondence Analysis and Cluster Analysis. We identified 5 symbolic universes, that correspond to basic, embodied, affect-laden, generalized worldviews. People in this study see the world as either a) an ordered universe; b) a matter of interpersonal bond; c) a caring society; d) consisting of a niche of belongingness; e) a hostile place (others’ world). These symbolic universes were also interpreted as semiotic capital: they reflect the capacity of a place to foster social and civic development. Moreover, the distribution of the symbolic universes, and therefore social and civic engagement, is demonstrated to be variable across the 4 countries in the analysis. Finally, we develop a retrospective reconstruction of the distribution of symbolic universes as well as the interplay between their current state and past, present and future socio-institutional scenarios. PMID:29298349

  9. Fission product release under severe accidental conditions: general presentation of the program and synthesis of VERCORS 1-6 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducros, G.; Malgouyres, P.P.; Kissane, M.; Boulaud, D.; Durin, M.

    2001-01-01

    The French Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute (IPSN) launched the HEVA-VERCORS program in 1983, in collaboration with Electricite de France (EDF). This program is devoted to the source term of fission products (FP) released from PWR fuel samples during a sequence representative of a severe accident. The analytical experiments are conducted in a shielded hot cell of the LAMA facility of the Grenoble center of CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique); as simplified tests addressing a limited number of phenomena, they give results complementary to those of the more global in-pile PHEBUS experiments. Six VERCORS tests have been conducted from 1989-1994 with higher fuel temperatures (up to 2600 K) compared with the earlier HEVA tests in order, in particular, to quantify better the release of lower volatile FPs. This paper gives an overview of the experimental facility, a synthesis of FP release from these tests and exhibits, as an example, some specific results of the VERCORS 6 test, performed with high burn-up fuel (60 GWd tU -1 ). The on-going VERCORS HT-RT program, designed to reach fuel liquefaction temperatures, is described before conclusions are drawn

  10. Environmental and ice volume changes based on seismic stratigraphy in Sabrina Coast, East Antarctica: Preliminary results from NBP1402

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez-Vasquez, R. A.; Frederick, B.; Saustrup, S., Sr.; Domack, E. W.; Lavoie, C.; Shevenell, A.; Blankenship, D. D.; Leventer, A.

    2014-12-01

    In 2014, the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer (NBP1402) sailed to a virtually unexplored continental shelf along the Sabrina Coast, East Antarctica. The shelf contains the sedimentary record of environmental and ice volume changes within the Aurora Subglacial Basin (ASB), which is presently occupied by ~7 m sea level-rise equivalent of ice. We acquired 750 km of high-resolution seismic data proximal to the Reynolds Trough and Moscow University Ice Shelf glacial systems west of the Dalton Ice Tongue using dual 45/45 cu. in. G.I. guns and a 24 ch. streamer with 3.125 m groups providing a vertical resolution of ~3 m simultaneously with CHIRP data. These are the first images of this margin acquired and show a remarkable set of sequence stratigraphic transitions. Crystalline basement is at the seafloor landward and buried seaward with a transition to smoother reflection interface. Reflective sedimentary strata overlie the basement, dip seaward, and are capped by a landward-dipping regional angular unconformity. Above this are a series of transparent seismic facies that, along with the middle to outer shelf seafloor, dip landward towards a shelf-oblique glacial trough. The older, seaward-dipping strata include a deeper series of units that display at least three stratal architectures interpreted to be shelf deltas implying a pre-glacial, fluvial environment within the drainage basin. Above these sequences, the seismic facies transition to surfaces exhibiting significant erosion, small u-shaped valleys, and channel fill sequences, all of which are reminiscent of temperate glacial features. We interpret these sequences as including sub-ice tunnel valleys and grounding zone wedges with interspersed non-glacial to pro-glacial deposits. Increasing glaciogenic facies upsection suggests a gradual fluvial to glacial transition and increasing glacial extent with time. The subsequent transition to ice sheets is marked by erosion to basement landward and the angular unconformity seaward

  11. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  12. Experimental focal neocortical epilepsy is associated with reduced white matter volume growth : results from multiparametric MRI analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, Wim; van Meer, Maurits P A; van der Marel, Kajo; Zwartbol, René; Viergever, Max A.; Braun, Kees P J; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Focal epilepsy has recently been associated with remote white matter damage, including reduced white matter volume. Longitudinal assessment of these white matter changes, in relation to functional mechanisms and consequences, may be ideally done by in vivo neuroimaging in well-controlled

  13. In-Swath Spray Deposition Characteristics of a Low Drift Nozzle for Low Volume Aerial Application - Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CP flat-fan nozzles with selectable tips were evaluated for droplet spectra and coverage using water sensitive papers placed in the spray swath. This study used low application volumes (1, 2, and 3 GPA) at a certain spray application height as measured precisely by laser mounted in the aircraft. No...

  14. Presentation of the results of 1993-1994 of the peat production research area; Turvetuotanto - tutkimusalueen katsaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinonen, A.

    1996-12-31

    The development target of the peat production research area of the Biomass research programme is to improve the competitivity of peat by reducing the production costs by 20 % (5-6 FIM/MWh) from the level of 1992 and to reduce the environmental load. The main targets of peat production, by which the target can be met, are ditching and preparation technologies, drying technology, machine technology, methodology, integration of wood harvesting and peat production, and application of the results of the Optimiturve research programme in practice. The objectives of the peat production research are possible to meet if the partial targets are met. Increment of the open-ditch distance from 20 m to 60 m reduces the production costs by 5.0 %, increment of the rate of utilization of solar radiation from 30 % to 40 % reduces the production costs by 8 %, reduction of the amount of residual peat from 3000 MWh to 1500 MWh reduces the costs by 6.5 %, development of light and firesafe machines by 3 %, and integrated harvesting of wood by 3 %. Meeting of the partial targets reduces the production costs by 24 %. The main research areas of peat production will be carried out further. The total funding of the peat production researches in 1993-1994 was 19.4 million FIM (9.7 million FIM/a). The share of the total funding of the research organization projects has been 6.7 million FIM and that of the company projects 12.7 million FIM. The share of the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry of the funding has been 9.0 million FIM (46 %)

  15. Sensitivity of volumetric modulated arc therapy patient specific QA results to multileaf collimator errors and correlation to dose volume histogram based metrics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, Linda

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the impact of systematic multileaf collimator (MLC) positional errors on gamma analysis results used for quality assurance (QA) of Rapidarc treatments. In addition, this study evaluates the relationship of these gamma analysis results and clinical dose volume histogram metrics (DVH) for Rapidarc treatment plans.

  16. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program: Volume 1, The analysis and its results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report provides cost estimates for the fifth evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans. The total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is estimated at $32.1 to $38.2 billion (expressed in constant 1986 dollars) over the entire life of the system...or $1.5 to $1.6 billion more than that of the authorized system (i.e., the system without an MRS facility). The current estimate of the total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is $3.8 to $5.4 billion higher than the estimate for the same system in the 1986 TSLCC analysis. In the case with the maximum increase, nearly all of the higher cost is due to a $5.2-billion increase in the costs of development and evaluation (D and E); all other system costs are essentially unchanged. The cost difference between the improved-performance system and the authorized system is smaller than the difference estimated in last year's TSLCC analysis. Volume 2 presents the detailed results for the 1987 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost (TSLCC). It consists of four sections: Section A presents the yearly flows of waste between waste-management facilities for the 12 aggregate logistics cases that were studied; Section B presents the annual total-system costs for each of the 30 TSLCC cases by major cost category; Section C presents the annual costs for the disposal of 16,000 canisters of defense high-level waste (DHLW) by major cost category for each of the 30 TSLCC cases; and Section D presents a summary of the cost-allocation factors that were calculated to determine the defense waste share of the total-system costs

  17. The volume and type of unhealthy bus shelter advertising around schools in Perth, Western Australia: Results from an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Ashleigh; Edmunds, Melinda; Pierce, Hannah; Stoneham, Melissa J

    2018-03-05

    Exposure to advertising for unhealthy food, alcohol and gambling has been shown to influence children and adolescents' behaviours and attitudes. This exploratory study aimed to assess the volume and type of unhealthy bus shelter advertisements near schools in five local government areas in Perth, Western Australia and to monitor whether the volume of unhealthy advertisements varied seasonally. The 29 local governments in the Perth metropolitan region were contacted seeking information regarding the locations of bus shelters featuring advertisements in their local government area. Five local governments provided sufficient information for an audit of the bus shelter advertisements in their area to be conducted. Every bus shelter within 500 m of a school was photographed and the type of advertisement recorded. The advertisements in the food, non-alcoholic beverage, alcohol, or gambling categories were then classified as being healthy, moderate, or unhealthy. This process was carried out in June, September, December 2016, and March 2017 to ascertain whether the type of advertisements displayed changed depending on the season. Of the 293 advertisements recorded over the four audits, 31% featured unhealthy products, 3% moderate, and <1% healthy. Only two of the 293 advertisements were classified as being healthy. Seasonal variation in the volume of unhealthy advertisements was not identified. SO WHAT?: Western Australian school students are regularly exposed to unhealthy bus shelter advertisements. Stricter regulation of outdoor advertising is needed to ensure that young people are protected from the influence of unhealthy industries. © 2018 Australian Health Promotion Association.

  18. European Registry of Carotid Artery Stenting: results from a prospective registry of eight high volume EUROPEAN institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabile, Eugenio; Garg, Pallav; Cremonesi, Alberto; Bosiers, Marc; Reimers, Bernhard; Setacci, Carlo; Cao, Piergiorgio; Schmidt, Andrej; Sievert, Horst; Peeters, Patrick; Nikas, Dimitry; Werner, Martin; de Donato, Gianmarco; Parlani, Giambattista; Castriota, Fausto; Hornung, Marius; Mauri, Laura; Rubino, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is the standard revascularization therapy to prevent stroke in patients with carotid artery disease. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) could be considered a potential alternative in patients at high surgical risk. Recent clinical trials have challenged this concept due a relatively high incidence of post-CAS adverse events, which occurred in low volume centers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes associated with neuroprotected CAS in selected high volume centers. From January 2007 to December 2007, 1,611 patients underwent neuroprotected CAS in eight European Centers. For each patients, clinical, procedural, and one month follow-up data from all patients have been collected. An independent clinical events committee adjudicated the events. Overall in hospital death was 0.06% (one patient), whereas in-hospital stroke was 0.49% (eight patients). Between hospital discharge and 30 days three additional patients died (0.18%) and 10 patients experienced a stroke (0.67%). Overall 30 days mortality was 0.24% (four patients) and stroke incidence 1.12% (18 patients). The 30 day stroke/death rate was 1.36%. CAS is a reasonable alternative to CEA to treat carotid artery atherosclerosis in well-experienced high volume centers. These data suggest that future prospective trials comparing CAS and CEA outcomes should include only centers highly experienced in both treatment modalities. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Interobserver variability in gross tumor volume delineation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 1207 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Won Sup [Korea University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang Min [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There has been increasing use of external beam radiotherapy for localized treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with both palliative and curative intent. Quality control of target delineation in primary HCC is essential to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the primary tumor while preserving adjacent healthy organs. We analyzed interobserver variability in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for HCC. Twelve radiation oncologists specializing in liver malignancy participated in a multi-institutional contouring dummy-run study of nine HCC cases and independently delineated GTV on the same set of provided computed tomography images. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. To quantify the interobserver variability of GTV delineations, the ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume (STAPLE), the ratio of the common and encompassing volumes, and the coefficient of variation were calculated. The median kappa agreement level was 0.71 (range 0.28-0.86). The ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume ranged from 0.19 to 1.93 (median 0.94) for all cases. The ratio of the common and encompassing volumes ranged from 0.001 to 0.56 (median 0.25). The coefficient of variation for GTV delineation ranged from 8 to 57 % (median 26 %). The interobserver variability in target delineation of HCC GTV in this study is noteworthy. Multi-institution studies involving radiotherapy for HCC require appropriate quality assurance programs for target delineation. (orig.) [German] Die externe kurative Strahlentherapie ist zunehmend bei der lokalisierten Behandlung hepatozellulaerer Karzinome (HCC) in palliativer und kurativer Absicht in Gebrauch. Eine Qualitaetskontrolle der Zielabgrenzung beim primaeren HCC ist entscheidend, um die passende Dosis fuer die

  20. Chronic Use of Aspirin and Total White Matter Lesion Volume: Results from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Andrea; Ammann, Eric; Espeland, Mark A; Kelley, Brendan J; Manson, JoAnn E; Wallace, Robert; Robinson, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between aspirin and subclinical cerebrovascular heath, we evaluated the effect of chronic aspirin use on white matter lesions (WML) volume among women. Chronic aspirin use was assessed in 1365 women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Differences in WML volumes between aspirin users and nonusers were assessed with linear mixed models. A number of secondary analyses were performed, including lobe-specific analyses, subgroup analyses based on participants' overall risk of cerebrovascular disease, and a dose-response relationship analysis. The mean age of the women at magnetic resonance imaging examination was 77.6 years. Sixty-one percent of participants were chronic aspirin users. After adjusting for demographic variables and comorbidities, chronic aspirin use was nonsignificantly associated with 4.8% (95% CI: -6.8%, 17.9%) larger WML volumes. These null findings were confirmed in secondary and sensitivity analyses, including an active comparator evaluation where aspirin users were compared to users of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or acetaminophen. There was a nonsignificant difference in WML volumes between aspirin users and nonusers. Further, our results suggest that chronic aspirin use may not have a clinically significant effect on WML volumes in women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Hypo- and hypernatremia results in inaccurate erythrocyte mean corpuscular volume measurement in vitro, when using Sysmex XE 2100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipsen, Jens Peter; Madsen, Kirsten Vikkelsø

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Automated hematology analyzers dilute patient erythrocytes with an isoosmotic diluent before quantitating the erythrocyte mean cell volume (MCV). However, if patient plasma osmolality differs from the diluent, water will cross the erythrocytes membrane and establish a new equilibrium...... across the membrane. Since the new equilibrium is reached before the measurement of the MCV, the measured MCV may not reflect the true MCV in vivo. AIM: Calculation of the theoretical change in MCV at changed P-Sodium/P-Osmolality and to investigate if the automated blood cell counter Sysmex XE 2100...

  2. Presentation of a 3D conformal radiotherapy technique for head-and-neck tumors resulting in substantial protection of the parotid glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnt, T.; Janich, M.; Gerlach, R.; Haensgen, G.; Goetz, U.; Chiricuta, I.C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this study was to improve the irradiation technique for the treatment of head-and-neck tumors and, in particular, to make use of the advantages found in modern 3D planning to protect the parotid glands. Patients and methods: for this investigation the 3D dataset of a standard patient with oropharyngeal carcinoma of UICC stage IVA was used. In the CT scans (slice thickness 5 mm) the planning target volume (PTV), the boost volume and both parotids were delineated. Three different techniques were calculated for two different dose levels (50 Gy for PTV and 64 Gy for boost volume, using single doses of 2 Gy). For technique 1 (T1) a parallel opposed field photon/electron irradiation was designed, for technique 2 (T2) an opposed/arc field irradiation was employed, and for technique 3 (T3) a combination of a static coplanar and arc field irradiation was designed. The sum doses D min , D max and D mean for PTV, boost volume, and ipsilateral and contralateral parotid gland were evaluated, and the time needed for calculation of the plans was also determined. Results: for all techniques used, the calculated doses in the PTV (D min 5.6 ± 0.1 Gy, D max 73.7 ± 0.1 Gy, and D mean 57.9 ± 0.5 Gy) and in the boost volume (D min 46.9 ± 1.5 Gy, D max 73.8 ± 0.12 Gy, and D mean 65.8 ± 0.9 Gy) were equal. Significant differences were found regarding the three different techniques, e.g., for the ipsilateral parotid gland D min (T1 = 47.4, T2 = 50.6, and T3 = 38.4 Gy) as well as for the contralateral parotid gland D min (T1 = 42.1, T2 = 44.2, and T3 = 17.8 Gy) and D mean (T1 = 51.3, T2 = 52.8, and T3 = 32.6 Gy). Regarding the three different techniques, significant differences were found in favor of T3. The determined planning times were as follows: T1 = 90, T2 = 60, and T3 = 90 min. Conclusion: the combination of static coplanar and arc field technique (T3) resulted in a substantially better protection as compared to both other techniques. This was especially the

  3. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Summary of results. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, D.W. [ed.; Staple, B.D.; Daniel, S.L. [and others

    1995-07-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry and Grand Gulf, were selected as the plants to be studied by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). This report documents the work performed during the analysis of the Grand Gulf plant. A phased approach was used for the overall study. In Phase 1, the objectives were to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenario frequencies and risks, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. It was in Phase 1 that the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to allow the analysts to better represent the plant as it transitions from power operation to nonpower operation than was possible with the traditional technical specification divisions of modes of operation. This phase consisted of a coarse screening analysis performed for all POSs, including seismic and internal fire and flood for some POSs. In Phase 2, POS 5 (approximately cold shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the Phase 1 study. The scope of the Level 1 study includes plant damage state analysis and uncertainty analysis and is documented in a multi-volume NUREG/CR report (i.e., NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4, respectively. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. The Level 2/3 study of the traditional internal events is documented in Volume 6, and a summary of the results for all analyses is documented in Volume 1.

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Summary of results. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Staple, B.D.; Daniel, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry and Grand Gulf, were selected as the plants to be studied by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). This report documents the work performed during the analysis of the Grand Gulf plant. A phased approach was used for the overall study. In Phase 1, the objectives were to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenario frequencies and risks, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. It was in Phase 1 that the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to allow the analysts to better represent the plant as it transitions from power operation to nonpower operation than was possible with the traditional technical specification divisions of modes of operation. This phase consisted of a coarse screening analysis performed for all POSs, including seismic and internal fire and flood for some POSs. In Phase 2, POS 5 (approximately cold shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the Phase 1 study. The scope of the Level 1 study includes plant damage state analysis and uncertainty analysis and is documented in a multi-volume NUREG/CR report (i.e., NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4, respectively. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. The Level 2/3 study of the traditional internal events is documented in Volume 6, and a summary of the results for all analyses is documented in Volume 1

  5. Genetic influences on individual differences in longitudinal changes in global and subcortical brain volumes: Results of the ENIGMA plasticity working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Rachel M; Panizzon, Matthew S; Glahn, David C; Hibar, Derrek P; Hua, Xue; Jahanshad, Neda; Abramovic, Lucija; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Franz, Carol E; Hansell, Narelle K; Hickie, Ian B; Koenis, Marinka M G; Martin, Nicholas G; Mather, Karen A; McMahon, Katie L; Schnack, Hugo G; Strike, Lachlan T; Swagerman, Suzanne C; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Wen, Wei; Gilmore, John H; Gogtay, Nitin; Kahn, René S; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kremen, William S; Thompson, Paul M; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2017-09-01

    Structural brain changes that occur during development and ageing are related to mental health and general cognitive functioning. Individuals differ in the extent to which their brain volumes change over time, but whether these differences can be attributed to differences in their genotypes has not been widely studied. Here we estimate heritability (h 2 ) of changes in global and subcortical brain volumes in five longitudinal twin cohorts from across the world and in different stages of the lifespan (N = 861). Heritability estimates of brain changes were significant and ranged from 16% (caudate) to 42% (cerebellar gray matter) for all global and most subcortical volumes (with the exception of thalamus and pallidum). Heritability estimates of change rates were generally higher in adults than in children suggesting an increasing influence of genetic factors explaining individual differences in brain structural changes with age. In children, environmental influences in part explained individual differences in developmental changes in brain structure. Multivariate genetic modeling showed that genetic influences of change rates and baseline volume significantly overlapped for many structures. The genetic influences explaining individual differences in the change rate for cerebellum, cerebellar gray matter and lateral ventricles were independent of the genetic influences explaining differences in their baseline volumes. These results imply the existence of genetic variants that are specific for brain plasticity, rather than brain volume itself. Identifying these genes may increase our understanding of brain development and ageing and possibly have implications for diseases that are characterized by deviant developmental trajectories of brain structure. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4444-4458, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Integrated system for production of neutronics and photonics calculational constants. Volume XVI. Tabular and graphical presentation of 175 neutron group constants derived from the LLL evaluated neutron data library (ENDL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plechaty, E.F.; Cullen, D.E.; Howerton, R.J.; Kimlinger, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    As of February 3, 1975, 175 neutron group constants had been derived from the Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) at LLL. In this volume, tables and graphs of the constants are presented along with the conventions used in their preparation. (U.S.)

  7. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air. Volume 3, Results from exposure of spent fuel to fluorine-contaminated air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Thomas, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    The Behavior of Spent Fuel in Storage (BSFS) Project has conducted research to develop data on spent nuclear fuel (irradiated U0 2 ) that could be used to support design, licensing, and operation of dry storage installations. Test Series B conducted by the BSFS Project was designed as a long-term study of the oxidation of spent fuel exposed to air. It was discovered after the exposures were completed in September 1990 that the test specimens had been exposed to an atmosphere of bottled air contaminated with an unknown quantity of fluorine. This exposure resulted in the test specimens reacting with both the oxygen and the fluorine in the oven atmospheres. The apparent source of the fluorine was gamma radiation-induced chemical decomposition of the fluoro-elastomer gaskets used to seal the oven doors. This chemical decomposition apparently released hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor into the oven atmospheres. Because the Test Series B specimens were exposed to a fluorine-contaminated oven atmosphere and reacted with the fluorine, it is recommended that the Test Series B data not be used to develop time-temperature limits for exposure of spent nuclear fuel to air. This report has been prepared to document Test Series B and present the collected data and observations

  8. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air. Volume 3, Results from exposure of spent fuel to fluorine-contaminated air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Thomas, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    The Behavior of Spent Fuel in Storage (BSFS) Project has conducted research to develop data on spent nuclear fuel (irradiated U0{sub 2}) that could be used to support design, licensing, and operation of dry storage installations. Test Series B conducted by the BSFS Project was designed as a long-term study of the oxidation of spent fuel exposed to air. It was discovered after the exposures were completed in September 1990 that the test specimens had been exposed to an atmosphere of bottled air contaminated with an unknown quantity of fluorine. This exposure resulted in the test specimens reacting with both the oxygen and the fluorine in the oven atmospheres. The apparent source of the fluorine was gamma radiation-induced chemical decomposition of the fluoro-elastomer gaskets used to seal the oven doors. This chemical decomposition apparently released hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor into the oven atmospheres. Because the Test Series B specimens were exposed to a fluorine-contaminated oven atmosphere and reacted with the fluorine, it is recommended that the Test Series B data not be used to develop time-temperature limits for exposure of spent nuclear fuel to air. This report has been prepared to document Test Series B and present the collected data and observations.

  9. Nr 257 - Opinion presented on the behalf of the Commission of sustainable development and land planning on the finance bill for 2013 (nr 235), Volumes 1-10, ecology, sustainable development and planning, regional policies, research and higher education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabal, Jacques; Sermier, Jean-Marie; Gaillard, Genevieve; Baupin, Denis; Pauvros, Remi; Benisti, Jacques Alain; Fromantin, Jean-Christophe; Calmette, Alain; Plisson, Philippe; Ginesy, Charles-Ange

    2012-01-01

    This huge document comprises ten volumes which present and discuss public programs (objectives, strategies, plans, and actions), public finances, economic activity data and evolutions, debates by commissions, and amendments on different issues. A first set of issues deals with ecology, sustainable development and planning: protection of the environment and risk prevention (volume 1), and then with sustainable development policies (vol. 2), landscapes, water, biodiversity, and geographic and cartographic information (vol. 3), ecological transition (vol. 4), road, railway and water transports (vol. 5), air transports (vol. 6), maritime affairs (vol. 7). The next volume addresses regional policies (vol. 8). The last parts concern research and higher education: research in the field of sustainable development (vol. 9) and in the fields of environments and resources (vol. 10)

  10. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallner Kent E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. Methods 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66 or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59. All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. Results The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively. Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR ( Conclusion Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes.

  11. Lung volumes, ventricular function and pulmonary arterial flow in children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Koch, Arne [Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay - Molecular and Biological Imaging, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Goetzelt, Knut; Vogelberg, Christian [University Clinics Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Policlinic for Pediatrics - Pediatric Pulmonology, Dresden (Germany); Hahn, Gabriele [University Clinics Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Institute and Policlinic for Radiology - Pediatric Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Fitze, Guido [University Clinics Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Clinic and Policlinic for Pediatric Surgery, Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    To compare MRI-based functional pulmonary and cardiac measurements in the long-term follow-up of children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) with age- and body size-matched healthy controls. Twelve children who received immediate postnatal surgery for closure of isolated left-sided CDH were included and received basic medical examinations, pulmonary function testing and echocardiography. MRI included measurement of lung volume, ventricular function assessment and velocity-encoded imaging of the pulmonary arteries and was compared with the data for 12 healthy children matched for age and body size. While patients' clinical test results were not suspicious, comparison between the MRI data for patients and those for healthy controls revealed significant differences. In patients, the volumes of the left lungs were increased and the tidal volume was larger on the right side. While the stroke volumes of both ventricles were reduced, heart rate and ejection fraction were increased. Flow, acceleration time and cross-sectional area of the left pulmonary artery were reduced. Functional MRI detected pulmonary and cardiac findings in the late follow-up of CDH children which may be missed by standard clinical methods and might be relevant for decisions regarding late outcome and treatment. (orig.)

  12. Lung volumes, ventricular function and pulmonary arterial flow in children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Koch, Arne; Götzelt, Knut; Hahn, Gabriele; Fitze, Guido; Vogelberg, Christian

    2010-07-01

    To compare MRI-based functional pulmonary and cardiac measurements in the long-term follow-up of children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) with age- and body size-matched healthy controls. Twelve children who received immediate postnatal surgery for closure of isolated left-sided CDH were included and received basic medical examinations, pulmonary function testing and echocardiography. MRI included measurement of lung volume, ventricular function assessment and velocity-encoded imaging of the pulmonary arteries and was compared with the data for 12 healthy children matched for age and body size. While patients' clinical test results were not suspicious, comparison between the MRI data for patients and those for healthy controls revealed significant differences. In patients, the volumes of the left lungs were increased and the tidal volume was larger on the right side. While the stroke volumes of both ventricles were reduced, heart rate and ejection fraction were increased. Flow, acceleration time and cross-sectional area of the left pulmonary artery were reduced. Functional MRI detected pulmonary and cardiac findings in the late follow-up of CDH children which may be missed by standard clinical methods and might be relevant for decisions regarding late outcome and treatment.

  13. Lung volumes, ventricular function and pulmonary arterial flow in children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia: long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolmaali, Nasreddin; Koch, Arne; Goetzelt, Knut; Vogelberg, Christian; Hahn, Gabriele; Fitze, Guido

    2010-01-01

    To compare MRI-based functional pulmonary and cardiac measurements in the long-term follow-up of children operated on for left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) with age- and body size-matched healthy controls. Twelve children who received immediate postnatal surgery for closure of isolated left-sided CDH were included and received basic medical examinations, pulmonary function testing and echocardiography. MRI included measurement of lung volume, ventricular function assessment and velocity-encoded imaging of the pulmonary arteries and was compared with the data for 12 healthy children matched for age and body size. While patients' clinical test results were not suspicious, comparison between the MRI data for patients and those for healthy controls revealed significant differences. In patients, the volumes of the left lungs were increased and the tidal volume was larger on the right side. While the stroke volumes of both ventricles were reduced, heart rate and ejection fraction were increased. Flow, acceleration time and cross-sectional area of the left pulmonary artery were reduced. Functional MRI detected pulmonary and cardiac findings in the late follow-up of CDH children which may be missed by standard clinical methods and might be relevant for decisions regarding late outcome and treatment. (orig.)

  14. MR-based cerebral blood volume maps as a diagnostic tool of stroke: results of a clinical pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacklaender, T.; Hofer, M.; Binkofski, F.; Reichenbach, J.; Moedder, U.

    1996-01-01

    In this study the sensitivity of proving a stroke using regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were investigated. Another aim was to evaluate the strength of the ischaemia. Seven patients were examined during the acute phase of a stroke, eight during the subacute or chronically stage. To calculate rCBV-maps of one slice low dosed Gd-DTPA was injected as a bolus. Using the relaxation-effect the obtained signal intensity-time curves were converted pixel-wise to rCBV images. For the region of the infarction rCBV ratios were calculated relative to the corresponding area in the contralateral hemisphere. Only 63% of the investigations carried out during the acute phase were utilizable. In all those cases a decrease of rCBV was found. The infarct area could only be visually recognized if the rCBV ratio was lower than 0.7. The ratios of completely and partical necrotic areas of the infarctions were 0.481 and 1.028 respectively. With a p=0.0015 these values are even statistically different. During the acute stage the sensitivity of the rCBV measurement was not as high as that of morphological MR imaging. However, rCBV maps make it possible to estimate the strength of the ischaemia even during the first hours. (orig./MG) [de

  15. cExternal beam radiation results in minimal changes in post void residual urine volumes during the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orio, Peter F III; Merrick, Gregory S; Allen, Zachariah A; Butler, Wayne M; Wallner, Kent E; Kurko, Brian S; Galbreath, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of external beam radiation therapy (XRT) on weekly ultrasound determined post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes in patients with prostate cancer. 125 patients received XRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. XRT was delivered to the prostate only (n = 66) or if the risk of lymph node involvement was greater than 10% to the whole pelvis followed by a prostate boost (n = 59). All patients were irradiated in the prone position in a custom hip-fix mobilization device with an empty bladder and rectum. PVR was obtained at baseline and weekly. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated as predictors for weekly PVR changes. The mean patient age was 73.9 years with a mean pre-treatment prostate volume of 53.3 cc, a mean IPSS of 11.3 and a mean baseline PVR of 57.6 cc. During treatment, PVR decreased from baseline in both cohorts with the absolute difference within the limits of accuracy of the bladder scanner. Alpha-blockers did not predict for a lower PVR during treatment. There was no significant difference in mean PVR urine volumes or differences from baseline in either the prostate only or pelvic radiation groups (p = 0.664 and p = 0.458, respectively). Patients with a larger baseline PVR (>40 cc) had a greater reduction in PVR, although the greatest reduction was seen between weeks one and three. Patients with a small PVR (<40 cc) had no demonstrable change throughout treatment. Prostate XRT results in clinically insignificant changes in weekly PVR volumes, suggesting that radiation induced bladder irritation does not substantially influence bladder residual urine volumes

  16. Treatment with a belly-board device significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated and results in low acute toxicity in adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Joseph; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Horan, Gail; McCloy, Roisin; Buckney, Steve; O'Neill, Louise; Faul, Clare

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine whether treatment prone on a belly-board significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated in women receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer, and to prospectively study acute small bowel toxicity using an accepted recording instrument. Material and methods: Thirty-two gynecologic patients underwent simulation with CT scanning supine and prone. Small bowel was delineated on every CT slice, and treatment was prone on the belly-board using 3-5 fields-typically Anterior, Right and Left Lateral, plus or minus Lateral Boosts. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy and all treatments were delivered in 1.8 Gy fractions. Concomitant Cisplatin was administered in 13 patients with cervical carcinoma. Comparison of small bowel dose-volumes was made between supine and prone, with each subject acting as their own matched pair. Acute small bowel toxicity was prospectively measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria: Version 2.0. Results: Treatment prone on the belly-board significantly reduced the volume of small bowel receiving ≥100; ≥95; ≥90; and ≥80% of the prescribed dose, but not ≥50%. This was found whether volume was defined in cubic centimeters or % of total small bowel volume. Of 29 evaluable subjects, 2 (7%) experienced 1 episode each of grade 3 diarrhoea. All other toxicity events were grade 2 or less and comprised diarrhoea (59%), abdominal pain or cramping (48%), nausea (38%), anorexia (17%), vomiting (10%). There were no Grade 4 events and no treatment days were lost due to toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment prone on a belly-board device results in significant small bowel sparing, during adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. The absence of Grade 4 events or Treatment Days Lost compares favorably with the published literature

  17. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions. Volume 1, Results from bellows tested in 'like-new' conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Sandia National Laboratories. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen bellows have been tested, all in the 'like-new' condition. (Additional tests are planned of bellows that have been subjected to corrosion.) The tests showed that bellows are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  18. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study. Volume 1. Summary of environmental effects, Savannah River Plant. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladden, J.B.; Lower, M.W.; Mackey, H.E.; Specht, W.L.; Wilde, E.W.

    1985-07-01

    This volume summarizes the technical content of Volumes II through XI of the annual report. Volume II provides a description of the SRP environment, facilities, and operation, and presents the objectives and design for the CCWS. Volume III presents information on water quality of SRP surface waters. Results of radionuclide and heavy metal transport studies are presented in Volume IV. Volume V contains findings from studies of wetland plant communities. Volume VI presents findings from studies of the lower food chain components of SRP aquatic habitats. The results of fisheries studies are reported in Volume VII. Studies of semi-aquatic vertebrate populations are reported in Volume VIII. Water-fowl utilization of SRP habitats is discussed in Volume IX. The status of endangered species that utilize SRP aquatic habitats is presented in Volume X. The findings from studies of Parr Pond ecosystem are presented in Volume XI

  19. The long-term impact of early life poverty on orbitofrontal cortex volume in adulthood: results from a prospective study over 25 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Nathalie E; Boecker, Regina; Hohm, Erika; Zohsel, Katrin; Buchmann, Arlette F; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Baumeister, Sarah; Hohmann, Sarah; Wolf, Isabella; Plichta, Michael M; Esser, Günter; Schmidt, Martin; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2015-03-01

    Converging evidence has highlighted the association between poverty and conduct disorder (CD) without specifying neurobiological pathways. Neuroimaging research has emphasized structural and functional alterations in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) as one key mechanism underlying this disorder. The present study aimed to clarify the long-term influence of early poverty on OFC volume and its association with CD symptoms in healthy participants of an epidemiological cohort study followed since birth. At age 25 years, voxel-based morphometry was applied to study brain volume differences. Poverty (0=non-exposed (N=134), 1=exposed (N=33)) and smoking during pregnancy were determined using a standardized parent interview, and information on maternal responsiveness was derived from videotaped mother-infant interactions at the age of 3 months. CD symptoms were assessed by diagnostic interview from 8 to 19 years of age. Information on life stress was acquired at each assessment and childhood maltreatment was measured using retrospective self-report at the age of 23 years. Analyses were adjusted for sex, parental psychopathology and delinquency, obstetric adversity, parental education, and current poverty. Individuals exposed to early life poverty exhibited a lower OFC volume. Moreover, we replicated previous findings of increased CD symptoms as a consequence of childhood poverty. This effect proved statistically mediated by OFC volume and exposure to life stress and smoking during pregnancy, but not by childhood maltreatment and maternal responsiveness. These findings underline the importance of studying the impact of early life adversity on brain alterations and highlight the need for programs to decrease income-related disparities.

  20. Left main bronchus compression as a result of tuberculous lymphnode compression of the right-sided airways with right lung volume loss in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, S; Van Wyk, M J; Goussard, P; Gie, R P

    2014-03-01

    The superior mediastinal space is confined by the sterno-manubrium anteriorly and the vertebral column posterior. An abnormal relationship between the superior mediastinal structures may result in compression of the left main bronchus. In patients with right-sided pneumonectomy an exaggerated compensatory response may lead to stretching and compression of the remainder of the intra-thoracic airway. Lymphobronchial TB mimics pneumonectomy when it causes compression of the bronchus intermedius, between nodal lymphnode groups with resultant volume loss in the right lung and displacement of the mediastinum to the right. The left main bronchus may be at risk of compression due to rotation and displacement of the major vessels. To report pediatric cases of right-sided lymphobronchial TB with volume loss, demonstrate the use of angle measurements to quantify mediastinal dynamics and support a pathogenetic theory for left main bronchus compression. CT scans in children with TB and right lung volume loss, were compared retrospectively with controls using angle measurements based on descriptions of the aorta-carinal syndrome and the post-pneumonectomy syndrome. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare groups. The "Pulmonary bifurcation angle" between the main pulmonary arteries reached statistical significance (P = 0.025). The "Pulmonary outflow tract rotation" angle (pulmonary trunk with the mid sagittal plane) approached statistical significance (P = 0.078). The left main bronchus ranged from complete obliteration in two patients to 0.7 cm. In 16 of 30 patients the size was reduced to less than 75% of expected. In children with right lung volume loss from TB, the compression of the contralateral bronchus is due to narrowing of the pulmonary artery bifurcation angle as the main trunk rotates towards the midline. This is comparable to the post-pneumonectomy syndrome. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Endochondral fracture healing with external fixation in the Sost knockout mouse results in earlier fibrocartilage callus removal and increased bone volume fraction and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, A; Yu, N Y C; Peacock, L; Mikulec, K; Kramer, I; Kneissel, M; McDonald, M M; Little, D G

    2015-02-01

    Sclerostin deficiency, via genetic knockout or anti-Sclerostin antibody treatment, has been shown to cause increased bone volume, density and strength of calluses following endochondral bone healing. However, there is limited data on the effect of Sclerostin deficiency on the formative early stage of fibrocartilage (non-bony tissue) formation and removal. In this study we extensively investigate the early fibrocartilage callus. Closed tibial fractures were performed on Sost(-/-) mice and age-matched wild type (C57Bl/6J) controls and assessed at multiple early time points (7, 10 and 14days), as well as at 28days post-fracture after bony union. External fixation was utilized, avoiding internal pinning and minimizing differences in stability stiffness, a variable that has confounded previous research in this area. Normal endochondral ossification progressed in wild type and Sost(-/-) mice with equivalent volumes of fibrocartilage formed at early day 7 and day 10 time points, and bony union in both genotypes by day 28. There were no significant differences in rate of bony union; however there were significant increases in fibrocartilage removal from the Sost(-/-) fracture calluses at day 14 suggesting earlier progression of endochondral healing. Earlier bone formation was seen in Sost(-/-) calluses over wild type with greater bone volume at day 10 (221%, p<0.01). The resultant Sost(-/-) united bony calluses at day 28 had increased bone volume fraction compared to wild type calluses (24%, p<0.05), and the strength of the fractured Sost(-/-) tibiae was greater than that that of wild type fractured tibiae. In summary, bony union was not altered by Sclerostin deficiency in externally-fixed closed tibial fractures, but fibrocartilage removal was enhanced and the resultant united bony calluses had increased bone fraction and increased strength. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Opinion presented on the behalf of the economic affairs commission on the finance bill for 2012: Volume 2: industry and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fioraso, G.

    2011-01-01

    The first part of this report deals with the actions of the French industrial policy as they are defined in the 2012 finance bill. The author (from the opposition party) presents the content of an action in favour of industrial firms within a program of firm and job development, and analyses its financing. She explains why she considers this policy as inadequate: lack of support for innovating small and medium enterprises, and lack of efficiency of public support. She proposes measures to support these innovating enterprises and to tighten the relationship between research and industry by the creation of industrial ecosystems. She presents Grenoble as an example of innovation in research and industry. The second part deals with energy. She presents various programs and actions, and analyses their financing. She discusses the consequences of the French situation with respect to nuclear energy, discusses the ways to struggle against climate change (priority to energy efficiency policies, investment in the development of the green sector, research and development in the carbon capture and storage techniques), and presents the development of the green sector as a way to phase out nuclear

  3. Radio-anatomy Atlas for delineation SIRIADE web site: features and 1 year results; Site de radio-anatomie et d'aide a la delineation (SIRIADE): presentation et bilan a un an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisa, F. [Centre Jean-Bernard, Clinique Victor-Hugo, 72 - Le Mans (France); Pointreau, Y. [Clinique d' oncologie radiotherapie, Centre Henry-S.-Kaplan, CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)

    2010-07-01

    3-D conformal radiotherapy is based on accurate target volumes delineation. Radio-anatomy knowledge's are useful but sometimes difficult to obtain. Moreover, the sources of recommendations for volume definition are disparate. We thus developed a free radio-anatomy web site dedicated to volumes delineation for radiation-oncologists (www.siriade.org). This web site is a search engine allowing to access to delineation characteristics of main tumours illustrated with clinical cases. It does not aim to provide guidelines. Its main purpose is to provide an iconographic training support with frequent up-datings. We present the features of this web site and one year connexion statistics. (authors)

  4. Mean corpuscular volume of control red blood cells determines the interpretation of eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) test result in infants aged less than 6 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepiela, Olga; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Bystrzycka, Weronika; Łukasik, Jan; Kotuła, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    Eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test is a flow cytometric test used to detect hereditary spherocytosis (HS). To perform the test sample from patients, 5-6 reference samples of red blood are needed. Our aim was to investigate how the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) of red blood cells influences on the value of fluorescence of bounded EMA dye and how the choice of reference samples affects the test result. EMA test was performed in peripheral blood from 404 individuals, including 31 children suffering from HS. Mean fluorescence channel of EMA-RBCs was measured with Cytomics FC500 flow cytometer. Mean corpuscular volume of RBCs was assessed with LH750 Beckman Coulter. Statistical analysis was performed using Graph Pad Prism. The correlation Spearman coefficient between mean channel of fluorescence of EMA-RBCs and MCV was r = 0.39, p < 0.0001. Interpretation of EMA test depends on MCV of the reference samples. If reference blood samples have lower MCV than the patients MCV, EMA test result might be negative. Due to different MCV values of RBCs in infancy and ca. Three months later, EMA test in neonates might be interpreted falsely negative. Samples from children younger than 3 months old had EMA test result 86.1 ± 11.7 %, whereas same samples that analyzed 4.1 ± 2.1 later had results of 75.4 ± 4.5 %, p < 0.05. Mean fluorescence of EMA-bound RBC depends on RBC's volume. MCV of reference samples affects EMA test results; thus, we recommend selection of reference samples with MCV in range of ±2 fL compared to MCV of patient RBC's.

  5. Ablation of clinically relevant kidney tissue volumes by high-intensity focused ultrasound: Preliminary results of standardized ex-vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Axel; Peters, Kristina; Knoll, Thomas; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Alken, Peter; Jenne, Jürgen W; Michel, Maurice Stephan

    2006-11-01

    To investigate strategies to achieve confluent kidney-tissue ablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Our model of the perfused ex-vivo porcine kidney was used. Tissue ablation was performed with an experimental HIFU device (Storz Medical, Kreuzlingen, Switzerland). Lesion-to-lesion interaction was investigated by varying the lesion distance (5 to 2.5 mm), generator power (300, 280, and 260 W), cooling time (10, 20, and 30 seconds), and exposure time (4, 3, and 2 seconds). The lesion rows were analyzed grossly and by histologic examination (hematoxylin-eosin and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide staining). It was possible to achieve complete homogeneous ablation of a clinically relevant tissue volume but only by meticulous adjustment of the exposure parameters. Minimal changes in these parameters caused changes in lesion formation with holes within the lesions and lesion-to-lesion interaction. Our preliminary results show that when using this new device, HIFU can ablate a large tissue volume homogeneously in perfused ex-vivo porcine tissue under standardized conditions with meticulous adjustment of exposure parameters. Further investigations in vivo are necessary to test whether large tissue volumes can be ablated completely and reliably despite the influence of physiologic tissue and organ movement.

  6. Requirements for a Device-Based Training and Testing Program for M1 Gunnery. Volume 2. Detailed Analyses and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    ACTIVITY 11. ASSESS RESULTS OF ENCAGENENT TC GNU IDR M Alien battle dauge/c<iua1ttis Check/adJuit MRS Dtttratiw If and how crm ihould bt... UfO Of ring« lino con fco obiorvod on CRT. Kongo It not innounctd, but oppaor on CRT diti oroo. U(0 of ringt lint con bo obior»td on CRT

  7. Fuel model studies. Comparison of our present version of GAPCON-THERMAL-2 with results from the EPRI code comparison study. Partial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.; Jansson, L.

    1978-08-01

    Runs with our present version of GAPCON-THERMAL-2 have been compared to results from the EPRI code comparison study. Usually also our version of GAPCON predicts high temperatures, 100-300 K or 10-15% higher than average code predictions and experimental results. The well-known temperaturegas release instablility is found also with GAPCON. In this case one identifies the gas release limits 1400 deg C and 1700 deg C as instablility points. (author)

  8. The rank-heat plot is a novel way to present the results from a network meta-analysis including multiple outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroniki, Areti Angeliki; Straus, Sharon E; Fyraridis, Alexandros; Tricco, Andrea C

    2016-08-01

    To present a novel and simple graphical approach to improve the presentation of the treatment ranking in a network meta-analysis (NMA) including multiple outcomes. NMA simultaneously compares many relevant interventions for a clinical condition from a network of trials, and allows ranking of the effectiveness and/or safety of each intervention. There are numerous ways to present the NMA results, which can challenge their interpretation by research users. The rank-heat plot is a novel graph that can be used to quickly recognize which interventions are most likely the best or worst interventions with respect to their effectiveness and/or safety for a single or multiple outcome(s) and may increase interpretability. Using empirical NMAs, we show that the need for a concise and informative presentation of results is imperative, particularly as the number of competing treatments and outcomes in an NMA increases. The rank-heat plot is an efficient way to present the results of ranking statistics, particularly when a large amount of data is available, and it is targeted to users from various backgrounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fatigue 󈨛. Papers presented at the International Conference on Fatigue and Fatigue Threshold (3rd) Held in Charlottesville, Virginia on June 28-July 3, 1987. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-15

    Behavior - HEINRICH KEMPER, BRIGITTE WEISS AND ROLAND STICKLER Absolute Fatigue Thresholds in Metallic 801 Materials - J.A. LEWIS Thermometrical ...concepts are very closed, and that the threshold dependence on R ratio results from closure. Similar observations were made Blom (5) for 2024 aluminium ...Ti-8A1-IMo-1V alloy, and type 303 stainless steel as well as aluminium alloys 7005-T591 and 5083-H321. Coincidental relationships were noted between

  10. FARO test L-14 on fuel coolant interaction and quenching. Comparison report, volume 1 + 2, analysis of the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annunziato, A.; Addabbo, C.; Yerkess, A.; Silverii, R.; Brewka, W.; Leva, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a comparative analysis of the results from the ISP-39 exercise promoted by OECD-CSNI in the frame of the NEA activities. ISP-39 has been conceived to benchmark the predictive capabilities of computer codes used in the evaluation of fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) and quenching phenomenologies of relevance in water cooled reactors severe accidents safety analysis. The ISP-39 reference case is FARO test L-14, a non-energetic FCI test performed under realistic melt composition and prototypical accident conditions in the FARO experimental installation (Ispra, Italy). Thirteen research organizations from ten countries participated in the exercise submitting 15 prediction calculations with 8 different codes or code versions (COMETA, MC3D, IVA, IFCI, JASMINE, TEXAS, THIRMAL, VAPEX). ISP-39 was conducted as an open exercise. Conclusions are given concerning code capabilities, users effect and sensitivity analyses, numerical accuracy quantification of the predictions, code improvements, general considerations

  11. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  12. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  13. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency's strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended

  14. Prof. Samuel ting presents results from AMS experiment at CERN main auditorium. Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS1) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    Geneva 3 April 2013. The international team running the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) today announced the first results in its search for dark matter. The results, presented by AMS spokesperson Professor Samuel Ting in a seminar at CERN, are to be published in the journal Physical Review Letters. They report the observation of an excess of positrons in the cosmic ray flux

  15. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of 137 Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997

  16. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  17. Opinion presented on behalf of the Economical Affairs Commission on the finance bill for 2010 (n. 1946) - Volume II: Sustainable ecology, development and planning. Industry and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-10-01

    This report of the French National Assembly first presents the different programmes and actions related to energy and industry for which credits are foreseen in the French finance bill for 2010: development of firms and employment, energy policy, after-mining policy, struggle against climate change, management of ecology, energy, sustainable development, and sea policies, research in the field of energy and sustainable development and planning. The author then outlines the importance of the creation of conditions for a green growth in order to cope with an unprecedented crisis which ruins industrial employment. This implies the support of strategic sectors (energy-efficient building, evolution towards green chemistry, photovoltaic solar energy, renewable heat, innovating vehicles), the implementation of new priorities (smart grids, management of raw materials), and the emergence of ecological technologies promoted by the new tools of a climate policy (carbon tax introduction, improvement of carbon markets). It also implies an industrial output for research by means of a networking of actors (development of competitiveness poles, participation to European partnerships), and a reinforcement of the industrial horizon in the research policy (patenting, start-up development, support to innovating small and middle-sized companies, implementation of a true French capital-risk sector)

  18. SCIENTIFIC PRESENTATIONS of the 11. MEETING OF THE MANAGEMENT STEERING COMMITTEE OF THE RIKEN BNL COLLABORATION (RBRC SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE, VOLUME 11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkyusho,'' (RIKEN) The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including hard QCD/spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) physics through nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The agreement was extended in 2002 for another five year period. This 11th steering group meeting consisted of a series of reports on current activities and future perspectives. Presentation titles and authors included: 'RBRC operations and accomplishments' by Nicholas P. Samios, 'Theoretical physics at RIKEN-BNL Center: strong interactions and QCD' by Larry McLerran, 'RBRC experimental group and Wako base', by Hideto En'yo, 'The QCDOC project overview and status' by Norman H. Christ, 'RHIC spin physics' by Gerry Bunce, 'RHIC heavy ion progam' by Yasuyuki Akiba, 'RIKEN's current status and future plans' by Samuel Aronson, 'Procedure for proposing renewal of the collaboration agreement in 2007' by Chiharu Shimoyamada, and 'New direction of RPRC beyond JFY 2007' by Nicholas P. Samios

  19. The impact of bladder neck sparing on urinary continence during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy; Results from a high volume centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Serdar Gozen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effects of bladder neck reconstruction techniques on early continence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. Materials and methods: This non-randomized retrospective study analyzed prospectively collected data concerning LRP. In total, 3107 patients underwent LRP between March 1999 and December 2016. Exclusion criteria were preoperative urinary incontinence, previous history of external beam radiotherapy, co-morbities which may affect urinary continence such as diabetes mellitus and/or neurogenic disorders, irregular followup, and follow-up shorter than 24 months. All patients were divided into one of three groups, posterior reconstruction being performed in Group 1 (n = 112, anterior reconstruction in Group 2 (n = 762, and bladder neck sparing (BNS in Group 3 (n = 987. Demographic and pre-, peri-, and postoperative data were collected. Multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors affecting early continence after LRP. Results: 1861 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean follow-up period was 48.12 ± 29.8 months, and subjects’ mean age was 63.6 ± 6.2 years. There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of demographic or preoperative data. Postoperative data, including oncological outcomes, were similar among the groups. The level of early continence was higher in Group 3 than in the other groups (p < 0.001. Multivariate analyses identified BNS and age as parameters significantly affecting early continence levels after LRP (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively. Bladder neck reconstruction provided less earlier continence than BNS.

  20. Factors associated with presenting late or with advanced HIV disease in the Netherlands, 1996–2014: results from a national observational cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Coul, Eline L M; van Sighem, Ard; Brinkman, Kees; van Benthem, Birgit H; van der Ende, Marchina E; Geerlings, Suzanne; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Early testing for HIV and entry into care are crucial to optimise treatment outcomes of HIV-infected patients and to prevent spread of HIV. We examined risk factors for presentation with late or advanced disease in HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands. Methods HIV-infected patients registered in care between January 1996 and June 2014 were selected from the ATHENA national observational HIV cohort. Risk factors for late presentation and advanced disease were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Furthermore, geographical differences and time trends were examined. Results Of 20 965 patients, 53% presented with late-stage HIV infection, and 35% had advanced disease. Late presentation decreased from 62% (1996) to 42% (2013), while advanced disease decreased from 46% to 26%. Late presentation only declined significantly among men having sex with men (MSM; p Netherlands), and location of HIV diagnosis (hospital 3.27; 2.94 to 3.63, general practitioner 1.66; 1.50 to 1.83, antenatal screening 1.76; 1.38 to 2.34 vs sexually transmitted infection clinic). No association was found for socioeconomic status or level of urbanisation. Compared with Amsterdam, 2 regions had higher adjusted odds and 2 regions had lower odds of late presentation. Results were highly similar for advanced disease. Conclusions Although the overall rate of late presentation is declining in the Netherlands, targeted programmes to reduce late HIV diagnoses remain needed for all risk groups, but should be prioritised for heterosexual males, migrant populations, people aged ≥50 years and certain regions in the Netherlands. PMID:26729389

  1. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose–Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45–50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy for tumor; α/β = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV (± 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 (±30) cm 3 , and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 (±14) cm 3 . The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 (±13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 (±20) Gy, 76 (±16) Gy, 70 (±9) Gy, and 60 (±9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19–87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable

  2. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  3. The role of informal dimensions of safety in high-volume organisational routines: an ethnographic study of test results handling in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Suzanne; Checkland, Katherine; Bowie, Paul; Guthrie, Bruce

    2017-04-27

    The handling of laboratory, imaging and other test results in UK general practice is a high-volume organisational routine that is both complex and high risk. Previous research in this area has focused on errors and harm, but a complementary approach is to better understand how safety is achieved in everyday practice. This paper ethnographically examines the role of informal dimensions of test results handling routines in the achievement of safety in UK general practice and how these findings can best be developed for wider application by policymakers and practitioners. Non-participant observation was conducted of high-volume organisational routines across eight UK general practices with diverse organisational characteristics. Sixty-two semi-structured interviews were also conducted with the key practice staff alongside the analysis of relevant documents. While formal results handling routines were described similarly across the eight study practices, the everyday structure of how the routine should be enacted in practice was informally understood. Results handling safety took a range of local forms depending on how different aspects of safety were prioritised, with practices varying in terms of how they balanced thoroughness (i.e. ensuring the high-quality management of results by the most appropriate clinician) and efficiency (i.e. timely management of results) depending on a range of factors (e.g. practice history, team composition). Each approach adopted created its own potential risks, with demands for thoroughness reducing productivity and demands for efficiency reducing handling quality. Irrespective of the practice-level approach adopted, staff also regularly varied what they did for individual patients depending on the specific context (e.g. type of result, patient circumstances). General practices variably prioritised a legitimate range of results handling safety processes and outcomes, each with differing strengths and trade-offs. Future safety

  4. Quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in medical journal advertising: a comparative study in Australia, Malaysia and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitry Agnes I

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Journal advertising is used by pharmaceutical companies to disseminate medicine information to doctors. The quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in Australia and the US has been questioned in several studies. No recent evidence is available on the quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in journal advertising in Australia and the US and no Malaysian data have been published. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in journal advertising in these three countries. Methods A consecutive sample of 85 unique advertisements from each country was selected from journal advertising published between January 2004 to December 2006. Claims, references and the presentation of risk results in medical journal advertising were compared between the three countries. Results Less than one-third of the claims were unambiguous claims (Australia, 30%, Malaysia 17%, US, 23%. In Malaysia significantly less unambiguous claims were provided than in Australia and the US (P Conclusions The majority of claims were vague suggesting poor quality of claims in journal advertising in these three countries. Evidence from a randomized controlled trial, systematic review or meta- analysis was commonly cited to support claims. However, the more frequent use of data that have not been published and independently reviewed in the US compared to Australia and Malaysia raises questions on the quality of references in the US. The use of relative rather than absolute benefits may overemphasize the benefit of medicines which may leave doctors susceptible to misinterpreting information.

  5. Opinion presented on behalf of the Economic Affairs Commission on the Finance bill for 2011 (n. 2824), volume 2 Ecology, Sustainable Development and Land Planning, industry and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In her introduction, the author gives a description of the difficult context and situation faced by the industrial sector in France, notably because of the growing activity of emerging countries like China, India or Brazil, but also because of the weakness of research industrial valorization and of the innovation policy (losing the manufacturing capacity leads to losing the capacity for innovation). Then, after a critic of the current policy (reform of the professional tax, a boosting plan with limited results), she comments the contents of public programmes concerning firm and job development, energy, the steering of ecology, energy, sustainable development and sea policies, research in energy and sustainable development and land planning. She comments ways and tools aimed at supporting industrial jobs through innovation: the FSI (strategic investment fund), the competitiveness poles, specific aids to small and medium sized enterprises, tax credit related to research activities. She addresses the energy sector, questioning the French supremacy in the nuclear energy and the increase of electricity price, and criticizing the management of the development of renewable energies (high expenses for no industrial development)

  6. Concurrent Alzheimer's pathology in patients with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus: correlation of high-volume lumbar puncture results, cortical brain biopsies, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeraniec, I Jonathan; Bond, Aaron E; Lopes, M Beatriz; Jane, John A

    2016-02-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) remains most often a clinical diagnosis and has been widely considered responsive to the placement of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt. The high incidence of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) with NPH symptoms leads to poorer outcomes than would be expected in patients with NPH alone. This article reviews a series of patients operated on for presumed NPH in whom preoperative high-volume lumbar puncture (HVLP) and intraoperative cortical brain biopsies were performed. The data derived from these procedures were then used to understand the incidence of AD in patients presenting with NPH symptoms and to analyze the efficacy of HVLP in patients with NPH and patients with concurrent AD (NPH+AD). A review of the outcomes of shunt surgery is provided. The cases of all patients who underwent placement of a CSF shunt for NPH from 1998 to 2013 at the University of Virginia by the senior author were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who underwent HVLP and patients who underwent cortical brain biopsies were stratified based on the biopsy results into an NPH-only group and an NPH+AD group. The HVLP results and outcomes were then compared in these 2 groups. From 1998 to 2013, 142 patients underwent shunt operations because of a preoperative clinical diagnosis of NPH. Of the patients with a shunt who had a diagnosis of NPH, 105 (74%) received HVLPs. Of 142 shunt-treated patients with NPH, 27 (19%) were determined to have concomitant Alzheimer's pathology based on histopathological findings at the time of shunting. Patients who underwent repeat biopsies had an initial positive outcome. After they clinically deteriorated, they underwent repeat biopsies during shunt interrogation, and 13% of the repeat biopsies demonstrated Alzheimer's pathology. Improvements in gait and cognition did not reach significance between the NPH and NPH+AD groups. In total, 105 patients underwent HVLP before shunt placement. In the NPH cohort, 44.6% of patients

  7. Quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in medical journal advertising: a comparative study in Australia, Malaysia and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Noordin; Vitry, Agnes I; Roughead, Elizabeth E

    2010-05-29

    Journal advertising is used by pharmaceutical companies to disseminate medicine information to doctors. The quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in Australia and the US has been questioned in several studies. No recent evidence is available on the quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in journal advertising in Australia and the US and no Malaysian data have been published. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of claims, references and the presentation of risk results in journal advertising in these three countries. A consecutive sample of 85 unique advertisements from each country was selected from journal advertising published between January 2004 to December 2006. Claims, references and the presentation of risk results in medical journal advertising were compared between the three countries. Less than one-third of the claims were unambiguous claims (Australia, 30%, Malaysia 17%, US, 23%). In Malaysia significantly less unambiguous claims were provided than in Australia and the US (P review or meta-analysis (Australia, 84%, Malaysia, 81%, US, 76%) with journal articles being the most commonly cited references in all countries. Data on file were significantly more likely to be cited in the US (17%) than in Australia (2%) and Malaysia (4%) (P countries. Evidence from a randomized controlled trial, systematic review or meta- analysis was commonly cited to support claims. However, the more frequent use of data that have not been published and independently reviewed in the US compared to Australia and Malaysia raises questions on the quality of references in the US. The use of relative rather than absolute benefits may overemphasize the benefit of medicines which may leave doctors susceptible to misinterpreting information.

  8. Factors associated with presenting late or with advanced HIV disease in the Netherlands, 1996-2014: results from a national observational cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op de Coul, Eline L M; van Sighem, Ard; Brinkman, Kees; van Benthem, Birgit H; van der Ende, Marchina E; Geerlings, Suzanne; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-04

    Early testing for HIV and entry into care are crucial to optimise treatment outcomes of HIV-infected patients and to prevent spread of HIV. We examined risk factors for presentation with late or advanced disease in HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands. HIV-infected patients registered in care between January 1996 and June 2014 were selected from the ATHENA national observational HIV cohort. Risk factors for late presentation and advanced disease were analysed by multivariable logistic regression. Furthermore, geographical differences and time trends were examined. Of 20,965 patients, 53% presented with late-stage HIV infection, and 35% had advanced disease. Late presentation decreased from 62% (1996) to 42% (2013), while advanced disease decreased from 46% to 26%. Late presentation only declined significantly among men having sex with men (MSM; p Netherlands), and location of HIV diagnosis (hospital 3.27; 2.94 to 3.63, general practitioner 1.66; 1.50 to 1.83, antenatal screening 1.76; 1.38 to 2.34 vs sexually transmitted infection clinic). No association was found for socioeconomic status or level of urbanisation. Compared with Amsterdam, 2 regions had higher adjusted odds and 2 regions had lower odds of late presentation. Results were highly similar for advanced disease. Although the overall rate of late presentation is declining in the Netherlands, targeted programmes to reduce late HIV diagnoses remain needed for all risk groups, but should be prioritised for heterosexual males, migrant populations, people aged ≥ 50 years and certain regions in the Netherlands. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Collisions in the LHC workshop held in Cracow from 18 to 18 May 2007. The main subject of the workshop was to present the newest results of research provided at CERN LHC collider. Additionally some theoretical models and methods used for presented data analysis were discussed

  10. 2006 Global Demilitarization Symposium Volume 1 Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-04

    Quantify Your ISO 14001 EMS Dr. George Thompson, CCS Table of Contents 2006 Global Demil Symposium & Exhibition A Great Demil Success Story...AFSC.ARMY.MIL (309)782- 8583 Mr. Mitch Lindsay CH2M Hill 215 South State Street, Suite 1000 Salt Lake City UT 84111 mitch.lindsay@ch2m.com (435)901...Munitions & Logistics Readiness Center DSN 793- 8583 /COMM 309-782- 8583 Email lou.ligeno@us.army.mil Stockpile Status As of the end of March, 2006

  11. Volume holographic memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Denz

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume holography represents a promising alternative to existing storage technologies. Its parallel data storage leads to high capacities combined with short access times and high transfer rates. The design and realization of a compact volume holographic storage demonstrator is presented. The technique of phase-coded multiplexing implemented to superimpose many data pages in a single location enables to store up to 480 holograms per storage location without any moving parts. Results of analog and digital data storage are shown and real time optical image processing is demonstrated.

  12. [Literature review and presentation of our own research results regarding the effects on bone of tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib and nilotinib used in the treatment of oncohematological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János; Horváth, Péter; Kövesdi, Andrea; Lakatos, Gergely; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Tóbiás, Bálint; Árvai, Kristóf; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are widely used for treatment of certain oncohematological diseases. Several clinical studies have confirmed that specific BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors alter the physiological process of bone tissue in a complex and unclearly identified manner. Since these treatments are being given to more and more patients, and the therapy takes decades or lasts even lifelong, it is justifiable to obtain more detailed knowledge of the molecular background of these mechanisms. In this article the authors summarize preliminary research results and human clinical observations on imatinib and nilotinib which are related to bone metabolism, and present the results of their own experiments in in vitro osteoblast cultures. Based on the presented results, the effects of imatinib and nilotinib on bone cells depend on the concentration of imatinib and nilotinib, the maturation stage of the cells and the distribution ratio of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. In this study the authors firstly prepared a stop-gap, comprehensive review in the Hungarian literature, regarding the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on bone metabolism. In addition they firstly performed whole transcriptome analysis on osteoblasts in order to obtain a better understanding of the cellular molecular mechanisms. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(36), 1429-1437.

  13. CERN Library | Tord Ekelöf presents the proceedings of the Nobel Symposium on the Higgs Boson Discovery and Other Recent LHC Results | 12 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Thursday, 12 June 2014 at 16:00 in the Library (52-1-052).   The “Nobel Symposium on LHC results” took place at Krusenberg mansion, Uppsala, Sweden on 13-17 May 2013. The aim of the Symposium was to give an overview of the latest experimental and theoretical results pertaining to the LHC programme but also to give an occasion to ponder over the implications of these results in the broader context of the past, present and future evolution of the field of Particle Physics. “Nobel Symposium 154: The Higgs Boson Discovery and Other Recent LHC Results”, ed. by Tord Ekelöf, Physica Scripta T154, IOP, 2013, ISBN 9789789789781. * Coffee will be served from 15:30 * E-proceedings available here.

  14. Inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vink, A.A.; Roza, L.; Moodycliffe, A.M.; Shreedhar, V.

    1997-01-01

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase, which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosomes treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function

  15. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  16. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera; Kruger, Jens; Moller, Torsten; Hadwiger, Markus

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined

  17. Psychological and personality factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus, presenting the rationale and exploratory results from The Maastricht Study, a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dooren, Fleur E P; Denollet, Johan; Verhey, Frans R J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strong longitudinal evidence exists that psychological distress is associated with a high morbidity and mortality risk in type 2 diabetes. Little is known about the biological and behavioral mechanisms that may explain this association. Moreover, the role of personality traits...... in these associations is still unclear. In this paper, we first describe the design of the psychological part of The Maastricht Study that aims to elucidate these mechanisms. Next, we present exploratory results on the prevalence of depression, anxiety and personality traits in type 2 diabetes. Finally, we briefly....... Personality traits were measured by the DS14 and Big Five personality questionnaires. Type 2 diabetes was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of depression, anxiety and personality with type 2 diabetes, adjusted for age, sex...

  18. [The results of the combined application of extracorporeal shock-wave therapy and radon baths during the rehabilitative treatment of the patients presenting with gonarthrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, A N; Puriga, A O; Yurova, O V

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the leading diseases of the musculoskeletal system and the main cause of arthritic joint damage. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the combined application of radon baths and shock-wave therapy in the patients suffering from knee OA. The study involved 75 patients at the age of 35 to 62 years with the confirmed diagnosis of stage II and III gonarthrosis; they were divided into 3 groups. The patients of the main group received the combined treatment including extracorporeal shock-wave therapy and radon baths The patients comprising the group of comparison were given the course of radon therapy alone while those in the control group were offered the standard treatment including physiotherapy, magnetic therapy, and NSAIDs. The study has demonstrated the high effectiveness of the combined application of the radon baths and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy for the rehabilitation of the patients with deforming arthrosis of the knee that was apparent from the substantial decrease of pain syndrome, the increase of the range of motions in the knee joints, and the overall improvement of the quality of life. These beneficial changes persisted for a period of up to 6 months. The results of the present study give reason to recommend the proposed method of the remedial treatment for the wide practical application as a component in the framework of the medical rehabilitation programs.

  19. Pancreatic gross tumor volume contouring on computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Results of an international contouring conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A; Heerkens, Hanne D; Paulson, Eric S; Meijer, Gert J; Kotte, Alexis N; Knechtges, Paul; Parikh, Parag J; Bassetti, Michael F; Lee, Percy; Aitken, Katharine L; Palta, Manisha; Myrehaug, Sten; Koay, Eugene J; Portelance, Lorraine; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Erickson, Beth A

    Accurate identification of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma is challenging. We sought to understand differences in GTV delineation using pancreatic computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twelve attending radiation oncologists were convened for an international contouring symposium. All participants had a clinical and research interest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CT and MRI scans from 3 pancreatic cases were used for contouring. CT and MRI GTVs were analyzed and compared. Interobserver variability was compared using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdorff distances, and Jaccard indices. Mann-Whitney tests were used to check for significant differences. Consensus contours on CT and MRI scans and constructed count maps were used to visualize the agreement. Agreement regarding the optimal method to determine GTV definition using MRI was reached. Six contour sets (3 from CT and 3 from MRI) were obtained and compared for each observer, totaling 72 contour sets. The mean volume of contours on CT was significantly larger at 57.48 mL compared with a mean of 45.76 mL on MRI, P = .011. The standard deviation obtained from the CT contours was significantly larger than the standard deviation from the MRI contours (P = .027). The mean DSC was 0.73 for the CT and 0.72 for the MRI (P = .889). The conformity index measurement was similar for CT and MRI (P = .58). Count maps were created to highlight differences in the contours from CT and MRI. Using MRI as a primary image set to define a pancreatic adenocarcinoma GTV resulted in smaller contours compared with CT. No differences in DSC or the conformity index were seen between MRI and CT. A stepwise method is recommended as an approach to contour a pancreatic GTV using MRI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations on daily or alternate day schedule outside the linear quadratic model: Proof of concept and early results. A substitute to volume fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Kumar, Narendra; Tripathi, Manjul; Oinam, Arun S; Ahuja, Chirag K; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kaur, Rupinder; Bhatt, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery (DFGKRS) on a daily schedule beyond the linear quadratic (LQ) model, for large volume arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Between 2012-16, 14 patients of large AVMs (median volume 26.5 cc) unsuitable for surgery or embolization were treated in 2-3 of DFGKRS sessions. The Leksell G frame was kept in situ during the whole procedure. 86% (n = 12) patients had radiologic evidence of bleed, and 43% (n = 6) had presented with a history of seizures. 57% (n = 8) patients received a daily treatment for 3 days and 43% (n = 6) were on an alternate day (2 fractions) regimen. The marginal dose was split into 2 or 3 fractions of the ideal prescription dose of a single fraction of 23-25 Gy. The median follow up period was 35.6 months (8-57 months). In the three-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 8.9-11.5 Gy, while in the two-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 11.3-15 Gy at 50% per fraction. Headache (43%, n = 6) was the most common early postoperative complication, which was controlled with short course steroids. Follow up evaluation of at least three years was achieved in seven patients, who have shown complete nidus obliteration in 43% patients while the obliteration has been in the range of 50-99% in rest of the patients. Overall, there was a 67.8% reduction in the AVM volume at 3 years. Nidus obliteration at 3 years showed a significant rank order correlation with the cumulative prescription dose (p 0.95, P value 0.01), with attainment of near-total (more than 95%) obliteration rates beyond 29 Gy of the cumulative prescription dose. No patient receiving a cumulative prescription dose of less than 31 Gy had any severe adverse reaction. In co-variate adjusted ordinal regression, only the cumulative prescription dose had a significant correlation with common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) severity (P value 0.04), independent of age, AVM volume

  1. Conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis according to FITS concept: presentation of the method and preliminary, short term radiological and clinical results based on SOSORT and SRS criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Conservative scoliosis therapy according to the FITS Concept is applied as a unique treatment or in combination with corrective bracing. The aim of the study was to present author's method of diagnosis and therapy for idiopathic scoliosis FITS-Functional Individual Therapy of Scoliosis and to analyze the early results of FITS therapy in a series of consecutive patients. Methods The analysis comprised separately: (1) single structural thoracic, thoracolumbar or lumbar curves and (2) double structural scoliosis-thoracic and thoracolumbar or lumbar curves. The Cobb angle and Risser sign were analyzed at the initial stage and at the 2.8-year follow-up. The percentage of patients improved (defined as decrease of Cobb angle of more than 5 degrees), stable (+/- 5 degrees), and progressed (increase of Cobb angle of more than 5 degrees) was calculated. The clinical assessment comprised: the Angle of Trunk Rotation (ATR) initial and follow-up value, the plumb line imbalance, the scapulae level and the distance from the apical spinous process of the primary curve to the plumb line. Results In the Group A: (1) in single structural scoliosis 50,0% of patients improved, 46,2% were stable and 3,8% progressed, while (2) in double scoliosis 50,0% of patients improved, 30,8% were stable and 19,2% progressed. In the Group B: (1) in single scoliosis 20,0% of patients improved, 80,0% were stable, no patient progressed, while (2) in double scoliosis 28,1% of patients improved, 46,9% were stable and 25,0% progressed. Conclusion Best results were obtained in 10-25 degrees scoliosis which is a good indication to start therapy before more structural changes within the spine establish. PMID:22122964

  2. Conservative treatment of idiopathic scoliosis according to FITS concept: presentation of the method and preliminary, short term radiological and clinical results based on SOSORT and SRS criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białek Marianna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conservative scoliosis therapy according to the FITS Concept is applied as a unique treatment or in combination with corrective bracing. The aim of the study was to present author's method of diagnosis and therapy for idiopathic scoliosis FITS-Functional Individual Therapy of Scoliosis and to analyze the early results of FITS therapy in a series of consecutive patients. Methods The analysis comprised separately: (1 single structural thoracic, thoracolumbar or lumbar curves and (2 double structural scoliosis-thoracic and thoracolumbar or lumbar curves. The Cobb angle and Risser sign were analyzed at the initial stage and at the 2.8-year follow-up. The percentage of patients improved (defined as decrease of Cobb angle of more than 5 degrees, stable (+/- 5 degrees, and progressed (increase of Cobb angle of more than 5 degrees was calculated. The clinical assessment comprised: the Angle of Trunk Rotation (ATR initial and follow-up value, the plumb line imbalance, the scapulae level and the distance from the apical spinous process of the primary curve to the plumb line. Results In the Group A: (1 in single structural scoliosis 50,0% of patients improved, 46,2% were stable and 3,8% progressed, while (2 in double scoliosis 50,0% of patients improved, 30,8% were stable and 19,2% progressed. In the Group B: (1 in single scoliosis 20,0% of patients improved, 80,0% were stable, no patient progressed, while (2 in double scoliosis 28,1% of patients improved, 46,9% were stable and 25,0% progressed. Conclusion Best results were obtained in 10-25 degrees scoliosis which is a good indication to start therapy before more structural changes within the spine establish.

  3. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  4. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  5. Resultados de la ileocistoplastia ortotópica en pacientes con tumor vesical Orthotopic ileocystoplasty results in patient presenting vesical tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo García García

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. El cáncer de la vejiga es considerado un problema de salud tanto en Cuba como en el mundo. La cistectomía radical y sus variantes terapéuticas tienen la finalidad de curar o controlar la enfermedad, y conllevan la creación de un reservorio lo más semejante posible a la vejiga, por lo que se trabaja en la creación y perfeccionamiento de neovejigas a partir de un segmentointestinal. El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar los resultados de la ileocistoplastia ortotópica como procedimiento derivativo de la orina, después de la cistectomía total. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y prospectivo de 40 pacientes tratados en el Hospital «Hermanos Ameijeiras», en La Habana, entre los años 2000 y 2008. La fuente de información fueron los expedientes clínicos de los pacientes, y los datos se procesaron por medios automatizados. RESULTADOS. La mayor incidencia se encontró en los pacientes con 65 años de edad. La enuresis fue la forma de incontinencia urinaria que predominó y la mayoría de los pacientes tenían micciones voluntarias. Siete pacientes presentaron hidronefrosis y las fístulas del reservorio se relacionaron con la radioterapia. La mortalidad fue del 7,5 %. CONCLUSIONES. La ileocistoplastia ortotópica es un sustituto vesical aceptable en los pacientes con tumores vesicales.INTRODUCTION: The bladder cancer is considered a health problem in Cuba and worldwide. The aim of radical cystectomy and its therapeutical variants is to cure or control the disease and it is necessary the creation of a reservoir very similar to bladder and nowadays it is working in creation and improvement of the neo-bladders from an intestinal segment. The aim of present research was to assess the orthotopic ileocystoplasty results as urine derivative procedure after total cystectomy. METHODS: A prospective, retrospective and descriptive study was conducted in 40 patients seen in "Hermanos Ameijeiras

  6. Investigation of partial volume effect in different PET/CT systems: a comparison of results using the madeira phantom and the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipiga, L.; Sydoff, M.; Zvonova, I.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) is a quantitative technique used for diagnosing various diseases and for monitoring treatment response for different types of tumours. However, the accuracy of the data is limited by the spatial resolution of the system. In addition, the so-called partial volume effect (PVE) causes a blurring of image structures, which in turn may cause an underestimation of activity of a structure with high-activity content. In this study, a new phantom, MADEIRA (Minimising Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) for activity quantification in PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used to investigate the influence on the PVE by lesion size and tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) in four different PET/CT systems. These measurements were compared with data from measurements with the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom. The results with the MADEIRA phantom showed that the activity concentration (AC) values were closest to the true values at low ratios of TBR (<10) and reduced to 50 % of the actual AC values at high TBR (30-35). For all scanners, recovery of true values became closer to 1 with an increasing diameter of the lesion. The MADEIRA phantom showed good agreement with the results obtained from measurements with the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom but allows for a wider range of possibilities in measuring image quality parameters. (authors)

  7. African-American (AA) men with local-regional prostate cancer (PC) present with higher prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels than whites: results of RTOG 94-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Winter, K.; Sause, W.; Gallagher, M.J.; Perez, C.; Bondy, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To use pretreatment serum PSA levels as an 20), gleason score (2-5,6-7,7-10), race (whites and AAs), and two interactions viz (a) PSA by race (p=0.0012) and (b) PSA by total gleason score (p=0.0001). When race was replaced by educational status, or income, or both, the fits (0.8246,0.8197, and 0.7815, respectively) were not as good as the fit with race in the model. Conclusion: The findings of this nation-wide prospective registration study with a high percentage of AA patient participation confirms previous, smaller, geographically-limited studies (1,2,3) results that AA patients with non-metastatic PC present with a higher mean PSA values than whites. The multivariate findings imply that, for each level of total gleason score, there is a higher percentage of whites with PSA levels 20. Education and/or income as surrogates of sociological status could not completely explain the racial differences. Other reasons for health-care barriers among AAs need to be identified

  8. Sparse PDF Volumes for Consistent Multi-Resolution Volume Rendering

    KAUST Repository

    Sicat, Ronell Barrera

    2014-12-31

    This paper presents a new multi-resolution volume representation called sparse pdf volumes, which enables consistent multi-resolution volume rendering based on probability density functions (pdfs) of voxel neighborhoods. These pdfs are defined in the 4D domain jointly comprising the 3D volume and its 1D intensity range. Crucially, the computation of sparse pdf volumes exploits data coherence in 4D, resulting in a sparse representation with surprisingly low storage requirements. At run time, we dynamically apply transfer functions to the pdfs using simple and fast convolutions. Whereas standard low-pass filtering and down-sampling incur visible differences between resolution levels, the use of pdfs facilitates consistent results independent of the resolution level used. We describe the efficient out-of-core computation of large-scale sparse pdf volumes, using a novel iterative simplification procedure of a mixture of 4D Gaussians. Finally, our data structure is optimized to facilitate interactive multi-resolution volume rendering on GPUs.

  9. Effectiveness of a Mentor-Implemented Violence Prevention Intervention for Assault-Injured Youth Presenting to the Emergency Department: Results of a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tina L.; Haynie, Denise; Brenner, Ruth; Wright, Joseph L.; Chung, Shang-en; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Context The emergency department has been described as a promising setting to initiate interventions with assault-injured youth to reduce the risk of re-injury and reactive perpetration. Efforts to intervene have received little study. Objective To assess the impact of a mentor-implemented violence prevention intervention on reducing aggression, fighting and re-injury among assault-injured youth. Design Randomized controlled trial Setting Two large urban hospital emergency departments Participants Youth age 10–15 presenting with peer assault injury were recruited and randomly assigned to intervention and comparison groups. Intervention Intervention youth received a mentor who implemented a 6 session problem-solving curriculum while parents received 3 home visits with a health educator to discuss family needs and facilitate service use and parental monitoring. The comparison group received a list of community resources with 2 follow-up phone calls to facilitate service use. Main Outcome Measures Youth and parents were interviewed at baseline and 6 months to assess attitudes about violence, risk factors, fighting and repeat injury. Results 227 families were recruited with 23% refusing participation and 4% partial interview completion. 166 families were enrolled with 87 randomized to the intervention group and 79 in the comparison group; 118 (71%) completed both youth and parent follow-up interviews and 113 had usable data. Intervention and comparison groups were not significantly different at baseline on demographics or risk factors except for increased knife carrying and less deviant peers in the intervention group. After adjustment for baseline differences, there was a trend toward significant program effect including reducing misdemeanor activity (rate ratio 0.29, confidence interval 0.08–0.98), youth-reported aggression scores (rate ratio .63, 0.4–1.00) and increasing youth self efficacy (beta=2.28, pmentor-implemented program with assault-injured youth

  10. Low tidal volume and high positive end-expiratory pressure mechanical ventilation results in increased inflammation and ventilator-associated lung injury in normal lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Caron M; Xu, Da-Zhong; Lu, Qi; Cheng, Yunhui; Pisarenko, Vadim; Doucet, Danielle; Brown, Margaret; Aisner, Seena; Zhang, Chunxiang; Deitch, Edwin A; Delphin, Ellise

    2010-06-01

    Protective mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume (Vt) and low plateau pressure reduces mortality and decreases the length of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation that will protect normal lungs during major surgical procedures of long duration may improve postoperative outcomes. We performed an animal study comparing 3 ventilation strategies used in the operating room in normal lungs. We compared the effects on pulmonary mechanics, inflammatory mediators, and lung tissue injury. Female pigs were randomized into 3 groups. Group H-Vt/3 (n = 6) was ventilated with a Vt of 15 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW)/positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 3 cm H(2)O, group L-Vt/3 (n = 6) with a Vt of 6 mL/kg PBW/PEEP of 3 cm H(2)O, and group L-Vt/10 (n = 6) with a Vt of 6 mL/kg PBW/PEEP of 10 cm H(2)O, for 8 hours. Hemodynamics, airway mechanics, arterial blood gases, and inflammatory markers were monitored. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for inflammatory markers and protein concentration. The right lower lobe was assayed for mRNA of specific cytokines. The right lower lobe and right upper lobe were evaluated histologically. In contrast to groups H-Vt/3 and L-Vt/3, group L-Vt/10 exhibited a 6-fold increase in inflammatory mediators in BAL (P ventilation with high PEEP resulted in increased production of inflammatory markers. Low PEEP resulted in lower levels of inflammatory markers. High Vt/low PEEP resulted in less histologic lung injury.

  11. Beneficiation-hydroretort processing of US oil shales: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-01-01

    This report has been divided into three volumes. Volume I describes the MRI beneficiation work. In addition, Volume I presents the results of joint beneficiation-hydroretorting studies and provides an economic analysis of the combined beneficiation-hydroretorting approach for processing Eastern oil shales. Volume II presents detailed results of hydroretorting tests made by HYCRUDE/IGT on raw and beneficiated oil shales prepared by MRI. Volume III comprises detailed engineering design drawings and supporting data developed by the Roberts and Schaefer Company, Engineers and Contractors, Salt Lake City, Utah, in support of the capital and operating costs for a conceptual beneficiation plant processing an Alabama oil shale.

  12. Two cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for low-volume stage II seminoma: results of a retrospective, single-center case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Leonhartsberger, Nicolai; Stöhr, Brigitte; Horninger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    To report on the oncological outcome and toxicity of patients treated with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for low-volume metastatic stage II seminoma. We retrospectively identified a case series of 15 patients with seminoma stage IIA (26.7%) and IIB (73.3%) who underwent chemotherapy consisting of 2 cycles of cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (PEB) (cisplatin 20 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, etoposide 100 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, bleomycin 30 mg on days 1, 8 and 15) according to patient preference (refusing a 3rd cycle of PEB) or institutional practice in the last decades. Complete staging before chemotherapy was available in all patients. Patient age, the side and diameter of the primary tumor, the size of the lymph nodes before and after chemotherapy, acute and late toxicity of chemotherapy, the incidence of second malignancies, the relapse-free rate and cancer-specific mortality were recorded. Chemotherapy was well tolerated and no episode of febrile neutropenia occurred. Thrombocytopenia grade 4 was not seen in any patient, while leukopenia grade 4 was observed in 4 (26.6%) patients. The mean (range) lymph node size decreased significantly from 2.54 cm (1.1-4.0) before chemotherapy to 0.75 cm (0.4-2.2) after chemotherapy (p < 0.001). After a median (range) follow-up of 60 (13-185) months, no patient had relapsed, no patient had died as a result of seminoma and second malignancy was seen in only 1 (6.6%) patient. These excellent long-term results from a retrospective case series of 2 cycles of PEB in stage IIA/IIB seminoma patients represent a hint for further research with a view to reducing treatment burden. However, these incidental findings should be studied in prospective trials prior to drawing any conclusions. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Annex to Volume 3. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for Coast Guard Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    95 B.2. Percentage of members who experienced sexual quid pro quo in the past year...Volume 3 B.2. Percentage of members who experienced sexual quid pro quo in the past year Table B.2 Percentage of members who experienced sexual quid ... SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE U.S. MILITARY Annex to Volume 3. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for

  14. Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Annex to Volume 2. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for Department of Defense Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Workplace role of the offender(s) among men who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year, by service... Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Annex to Volume 2 Table B.10.f Workplace role of the offender(s) among men who experienced... SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE U.S. MILITARY Annex to Volume 2. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace

  15. Psychological and personality factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus, presenting the rationale and exploratory results from The Maastricht Study, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, Fleur E P; Denollet, Johan; Verhey, Frans R J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Sep, Simone J S; Henry, Ronald M A; Kremers, Stef P J; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Schaper, Nicolaas C; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Koster, Annemarie; Pouwer, Frans; Schram, Miranda T

    2016-01-27

    Strong longitudinal evidence exists that psychological distress is associated with a high morbidity and mortality risk in type 2 diabetes. Little is known about the biological and behavioral mechanisms that may explain this association. Moreover, the role of personality traits in these associations is still unclear. In this paper, we first describe the design of the psychological part of The Maastricht Study that aims to elucidate these mechanisms. Next, we present exploratory results on the prevalence of depression, anxiety and personality traits in type 2 diabetes. Finally, we briefly discuss the importance of these findings for clinical research and practice. We measured psychological distress and depression using the MINI diagnostic interview, the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 questionnaires in the first 864 participants of The Maastricht Study, a large, population-based cohort study. Personality traits were measured by the DS14 and Big Five personality questionnaires. Type 2 diabetes was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of depression, anxiety and personality with type 2 diabetes, adjusted for age, sex and education level. Individuals with type 2 diabetes had higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms, odds ratios (95 % CI) were 3.15 (1.49; 6.67), 1.73 (0.83-3.60), 1.50 (0.72-3.12), for PHQ-9 ≥ 10, current depressive disorder and GAD-7 ≥ 10, respectively. Type D personality, social inhibition and negative affectivity were more prevalent in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios were 1.95 (1.23-3.10), 1.35 (0.93-1.94) and 1.70 (1.14-2.51), respectively. Individuals with type 2 diabetes were less extraverted, less conscientious, less agreeable and less emotionally stable, and similar in openness to individuals without type 2 diabetes, although effect sizes were small. Individuals with type 2 diabetes experience more psychological distress and have different personality traits compared to individuals

  16. [Correlation between childhood traumatic stress and present drug abuse: results of a nationwide survey of drug addiction rehabilitation facilities in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeno, Mitsuru; Morita, Nobuaki; Ikeda, Tomohiro; Koda, Minoru; Abe, Yukie; Endo, Keiko; Yabe, Yohko; Hirai, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koji; Aikawa, Yuzo; Senoo, Eiichi; Nakatani, Yoji

    2009-12-01

    Child abuse is known to correlate with drug abuse and interferes with recovery from substance-related disorders. To determine the prevalence and severity of child abuse among drug addicts, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey of residents and outpatients at drug addiction rehabilitation centers (DARC) in Japan. A total of 445 participants gave informed consent and completed a self-reporting questionnaire. Sixty-eight percent of participants had experienced some kind of child abuse by the time they reached junior high school. The kinds of abuse experienced were physical (53.7%), psychological (60.4%), sexual (5.4%) abuse and neglect (24.5%). Comparison of female and male participants revealed that more female than male participants had experienced psychological (76.9% vs. 58.2%) and sexual (17.5% vs. 4.0%) abuse. Comparison of participants who had experienced some kind of child abuse ("Abused" group 68.3%) and those who had not experienced abuse ("Non-abused" group 24.3%) revealed that the "Abused" group was younger than the "Non-abused" group (35.7 SD9.0 vs. 39.7 SD10.8). Participants in the "Abused" group were found to have more severe psychological difficulties than those in the "Non-abused" group for the following: anxiety (73.0% vs. 61.1%), delusional atmosphere (48.0% vs. 28.7%), lack of energy (53.9% vs. 40.7%), ideas of persecution (48.7% vs. 29.6%), depression (62.2% vs. 43.5%) and suicidal ideation in the previous year (50.7% vs. 24.3%). The present results suggest that additional program that prepared to care the drug addicts who experienced child abuse and are experiencing suicidal ideation is needed. Furthermore, intervention for families with risk factors for child abuse should be developed in order to prevent the victim from suffering not only from post traumatic stress disorder but also from substance related disorders.

  17. Assessing the Impact and Effectiveness of the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Program. 2004 Survey Results. Volume I: Evaluation of the ATE Program Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Carl E.; Gullickson, Arlen R.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents results from the fifth annual survey of Advanced Technological Education (ATE) projects, centers, and articulation partnerships. ATE has approximately 220 active awards. Of these, 163 ATE-funded projects, centers, and articulation partnerships were asked to participate in the 2004 survey. During the survey administration…

  18. Aperiodic Volume Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Tim D.

    Presented in this thesis is an investigation into aperiodic volume optical devices. The three main topics of research and discussion are the aperiodic volume optical devices that we call computer-generated volume holograms (CGVH), defects within periodic 3D photonic crystals, and non-periodic, but ordered 3D quasicrystals. The first of these devices, CGVHs, are designed and investigated numerically and experimentally. We study the performance of multi-layered amplitude computer-generated volume holograms in terms of efficiency and angular/frequency selectivity. Simulation results show that such aperiodic devices can increase diffraction efficiency relative to periodic amplitude volume holograms while maintaining angular and wavelength selectivity. CGVHs are also designed as voxelated volumes using a new projection optimization algorithm. They are investigated using a volumetric diffraction simulation and a standard 3D beam propagation technique as well as experimentally. Both simulation and experiment verify that the structures function according to their design. These represent the first diffractive structures that have the capacity for generating arbitrary transmission and reflection wave fronts and that provide the ability for multiplexing arbitrary functionality given different illumination conditions. Also investigated and discussed in this thesis are 3D photonic crystals and quasicrystals. We demonstrate that these devices can be fabricated using a femtosecond laser direct writing system that is particularly appropriate for fabrication of such arbitrary 3D structures. We also show that these devices can provide 3D partial bandgaps which could become complete bandgaps if fabricated using high index materials or by coating lower index materials with high index metals. Our fabrication method is particularly suited to the fabrication of engineered defects within the periodic or quasi-periodic systems. We demonstrate the potential for fabricating defects within

  19. Reliability of tumor volume estimation from MR images in patients with malignant glioma. Results from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6662 Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit B.; Blume, Jeffrey D.; Herman, Benjamin; Peck, Donald; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Levering, Anthony; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable assessment of tumor growth in malignant glioma poses a common problem both clinically and when studying novel therapeutic agents. We aimed to evaluate two software-systems in their ability to estimate volume change of tumor and/or edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant gliomas. Twenty patients with malignant glioma were included from different sites. Serial post-operative MR images were assessed with two software systems representative of the two fundamental segmentation methods, single-image fuzzy analysis (3DVIEWNIX-TV) and multi-spectral-image analysis (Eigentool), and with a manual method by 16 independent readers (eight MR-certified technologists, four neuroradiology fellows, four neuroradiologists). Enhancing tumor volume and tumor volume plus edema were assessed independently by each reader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), variance components, and prediction intervals were estimated. There were no significant differences in the average tumor volume change over time between the software systems (p > 0.05). Both software systems were much more reliable and yielded smaller prediction intervals than manual measurements. No significant differences were observed between the volume changes determined by fellows/neuroradiologists or technologists.Semi-automated software systems are reliable tools to serve as outcome parameters in clinical studies and the basis for therapeutic decision-making for malignant gliomas, whereas manual measurements are less reliable and should not be the basis for clinical or research outcome studies. (orig.)

  20. Idiopathic infantile arterial calcification in a 12-year-old girl presenting as chronic mesenteric ischemia: imaging findings and angioplasty results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Edwin; Owen, Richard; Bruce, Garth; Wiebe, Sheldon

    2011-01-01

    We report an unusual case of chronic mesenteric ischemia presenting in a 12-year-old girl with idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis (IIAC). This is the first reported case in the literature of chronic mesenteric ischemia in the setting of IIAC. The girl presented with a classical history of postprandial abdominal pain. Imaging demonstrated significant stenoses of the celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). Angioplasty of the celiac axis and SMA was attempted, with successful dilation of the SMA only. At 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups, the child's symptoms had almost resolved. This case report has three important ramifications: chronic mesenteric ischemia is a possible clinical presentation in children with IACC, pre-angioplasty imaging is important in guiding treatment approach, and angioplasty was effective in this case of chronic mesenteric ischemia and offers hope for other similarly affected children. (orig.)

  1. Idiopathic infantile arterial calcification in a 12-year-old girl presenting as chronic mesenteric ischemia: imaging findings and angioplasty results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Edwin; Owen, Richard [University of Alberta, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton (Canada); Bruce, Garth [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Pediatrics, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon (Canada); Wiebe, Sheldon [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Medical Imaging, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    We report an unusual case of chronic mesenteric ischemia presenting in a 12-year-old girl with idiopathic infantile arterial calcinosis (IIAC). This is the first reported case in the literature of chronic mesenteric ischemia in the setting of IIAC. The girl presented with a classical history of postprandial abdominal pain. Imaging demonstrated significant stenoses of the celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA). Angioplasty of the celiac axis and SMA was attempted, with successful dilation of the SMA only. At 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups, the child's symptoms had almost resolved. This case report has three important ramifications: chronic mesenteric ischemia is a possible clinical presentation in children with IACC, pre-angioplasty imaging is important in guiding treatment approach, and angioplasty was effective in this case of chronic mesenteric ischemia and offers hope for other similarly affected children. (orig.)

  2. Clinical presentation and course of bleeding events in patients with venous thromboembolism, treated with apixaban or enoxaparin and warfarin. Results from the AMPLIFY trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleker, Suzanne M; Cohen, Alexander T; Büller, Harry R; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Gallus, Alexander S; Raskob, Gary E; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Curto, Madelyn; Sisson, Melanie; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2016-11-30

    Apixaban, a direct acting oral anticoagulant (DOAC), was found to be non-inferior to and safer as enoxaparin followed by warfarin for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in the AMPLIFY trial. Information is needed on how bleeding events with DOACs present and develop. In this post-hoc analysis, the clinical presentation and course of all major and clinically relevant non major (CRNM) bleeding events in the AMPLIFY trial were blindly classified by three investigators, using pre-designed classification schemes containing four categories. Odds ratios (OR) for classifying as category three or four (representing a more severe clinical presentation and course) were calculated between apixaban and enoxaparin/warfarin. In total, 63 major and 311 CRNM bleeding events were classified. Of the major bleeds, a more severe clinical presentation occurred in 28.5 % of apixaban versus 44.9 % of enoxaparin/warfarin related recipients (OR 0.49, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.14-1.78). A severe clinical course was observed in 14.3 % and in 12.2 %, respectively (OR 1.19, 95 %CI 0.21-6.69). Of the CRNM bleeding events, a more severe clinical presentation and extent of clinical care was found in 25 % of apixaban recipients compared to 22.7 % in the enoxaparin/warfarin group (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 0.65-1.97). The clinical presentation and course of major and CRNM bleeds were similar in apixaban and enoxaparin/warfarin treated patients. This finding should reassure physicians and patients that even in the absence of a specific reversal agent, apixaban is a convenient and safe choice for VTE.

  3. The effect of major adverse renal cardiovascular event (MARCE) incidence, procedure volume, and unit cost on the hospital savings resulting from contrast media use in inpatient angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuffel, Eric; McCullough, Peter A; Todoran, Thomas M; Brilakis, Emmanouil S; Palli, Swetha R; Ryan, Michael P; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2018-04-01

    To determine the net economic impact of switching from low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) to iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM; iodixanol) in patients undergoing inpatient coronary or peripheral angioplasty in the United States (US). A budget impact model (BIM) was developed from a hospital perspective. Nationally representative procedural and contrast media prevalence rates, along with MARCE (major adverse renal cardiovascular event) incidence and episode-related cost data were derived from Premier Hospital Data (October 2014 to September 2015). A previously estimated relative risk reduction in MARCE associated with IOCM usage (9.3%) was applied. The higher cost of IOCM was included when calculating the net impact estimates at the aggregate, hospital type, and per hospital levels. One-way (±25%) and probabilistic sensitivity analyses identified the model's most important inputs. Based on weighted analysis, 513,882 US inpatient angioplasties and 35,610 MARCE cases were estimated annually. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" strategy increases contrast media cost, but prevents 2,900 MARCE events. The annual budget impact was an estimated saving of $30.71 million, aggregated across all US hospitals, $6,316 per hospital, or $60 per procedure. Net savings were maintained across all univariate sensitivity analyses. While MARCE/event-free cost differential was the most important factor driving total net savings for hospitals in the Northeast and West, procedural volume was important in the Midwest and rural locations. Switching to an "IOCM only" strategy from a "LOCM only" approach yields substantial net global savings to hospitals, both at the national level and within hospital sub-groups. Hospital administrators should maintain awareness of the factors that are likely to be more influential for their hospital and recognize that purchasing on the basis of lower contrast media cost may result in higher overall costs for patients undergoing inpatient

  4. Influence of department volume on survival for ovarian cancer: results from a prospective quality assurance program of the Austrian Association for Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marth, Christian; Hiebl, Sonja; Oberaigner, Willi; Winter, Raimund; Leodolter, Sepp; Sevelda, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Austrian Association for Gynecologic Oncology initiated in 1998 a prospective quality assurance program for patients with ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors predicting overall survival especially under consideration of department volume. All Austrian gynecological departments were invited to participate in the quality assurance program. A questionnaire was sent out that included birth date, histology, date of diagnosis, stage, and basic information on primary treatment. Description of comorbidity was not requested. Patient life status was assessed in a passive way. We did record linkage between each patient's name and birth date and the official mortality data set collected by Statistics Austria. No data were available on progression-free survival. Patients treated between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2004 were included in the analysis. Mortality dates were available to December 31, 2006. Data were analyzed by means of classical statistical methods. Cut-off point for departments was 24 patients per year. A total of 1948 patients were evaluable. Approximately 75% of them were treated at institutions with fewer than 24 new patients per year. Patient characteristics were grossly similar for both department types. Multivariate analysis confirmed established prognostic factors such as International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) stage, lymphadenectomy, age, grading, and residual disease. In addition, we found small departments (<24 patients per year) to have a negative effect on overall survival (hazards ratio, 1.38: 95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.7; and P < 0.001). The results indicate that in Austria, rules prescribing minimum department case load can further improve survival for patients with ovarian cancer.

  5. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  6. VOLUMNECT: measuring volumes with Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Griné, Miguel; Gameiro, Duarte; Costeira, João. Paulo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a solution to volume measurement object packing using 3D cameras (such as the Microsoft KinectTM). We target application scenarios, such as warehouses or distribution and logistics companies, where it is important to promptly compute package volumes, yet high accuracy is not pivotal. Our application auto- matically detects cuboid objects using the depth camera data and computes their volume and sorting it allowing space optimization. The proposed methodology applies to a point cloud simple computer vision and image processing methods, as connected components, morphological operations and Harris corner detector, producing encouraging results, namely an accuracy in volume measurement of 8mm. Aspects that can be further improved are identified; nevertheless, the current solution is already promising turning out to be cost effective for the envisaged scenarios.

  7. Reports from dissemination and feed-back workshops with presentation of Volante results from WP1 and WP2, and response from local, regional, and national stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Pia; Vesterager, Jens Peter; Kristensen, Søren Bech Pilgaard

    2014-01-01

    The report constitutes an overview of the dissemination and feed-back workshops in the Volante case study countries: Netherlands, Romania, Austria, Greece and Denmark. The workshops were conducted based on the presentation of findings from WP1 and WP2 to national, regional and local stakeholders...

  8. Risk factors and outcomes for late presentation for HIV-positive persons in Europe: results from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe Study (COHERE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Casabona, Jordi; Castagna, Antonella; Costagliola, Dominique; Dabis, Francois; de Wit, Stéphane; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Furrer, Hansjakob; Johnson, Anne M.; Lazanas, Marios K.; Leport, Catherine; Moreno, Santiago; Obel, Niels; Post, Frank A.; Reekie, Joanne; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Suarez-Lozano, Ignacio; Torti, Carlo; Warszawski, Josiane; Zangerle, Robert; Fabre-Colin, Céline; Kjaer, Jesper; Chene, Genevieve; Grarup, Jesper; Kirk, Ole; Lundgren, Jens; Sabin, Miriam; Johnson, Anne; Lazanas, Mario; Post, Frank; Suarez-Loano, Ignacio; Johnson, Hansjakob Furrer Anne; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; de Wolf, Frank; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner; Gibb, Diana; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara; del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have monitored late presentation (LP) of HIV infection over the European continent, including Eastern Europe. Study objectives were to explore the impact of LP on AIDS and mortality. LP was defined in Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) as HIV

  9. Association between hospital procedure volume and early complications after pacemaker implantation: results from a large, unselected, contemporary cohort of the German nationwide obligatory external quality assurance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Bernd; Tasche, Karl; Barnewold, Linda; Heller, Günther; Schmidt, Boris; Bordignon, Stefano; Chun, K R Julian; Fürnkranz, Alexander; Mehta, Rajendra H

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated an inverse relationship between cardioverter-defibrillator implantation volume and complication rates, suggesting better outcomes for higher volume centres. However, the association of institutional procedural volume with patient outcomes for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation remains less known, especially in decentralized implantation systems. We performed retrospective examination of data on patients undergoing PPM from the German obligatory quality assurance programme (2007-12) to evaluate the relationship of hospital PPM volume (categorized into quintiles of their mean annual volume) with risk-adjusted in-hospital surgical complications (composite of pneumothorax, haemothorax, pericardial effusion, or pocket haematoma, all requiring intervention, or device infection) and pacemaker lead dislocation. Overall 430 416 PPM implantations were documented in 1226 hospitals. Systems included dual (72.8%) and single (25.8%) chamber PPM and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices (1.1%). Complications included surgical (0.92%), and ventricular (0.99%), and atrial (1.22%) lead dislocation. Despite an increase in relatively complex procedures (dual chamber, CRT), there was a significant decrease in the procedural and fluoroscopy times and complications from lowest to highest implantation volume quintiles (P for trend <0.0001). The greatest difference was observed between the lowest (1-50 implantations/year-reference group) and the second-lowest (51-90 implantations/year) quintile: surgical complications [odds ratio (OR) 0.69; confidence interval (CI) 0.60-0.78], atrial lead dislocations (OR 0.69; CI 0.59-0.80), and ventricular lead dislocations (OR 0.73; CI 0.63-0.84). Hospital annual PPM volume was directly related to indication-based implantation of relatively more complex PPM and yet inversely with procedural times and rates of early surgical complications and lead dislocations. Thus, our data suggest better performance and lower

  10. Risk Factors, Clinical Presentation, and Outcomes in Overdose With Acetaminophen Alone or With Combination Products: Results From the Acute Liver Failure Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serper, Marina; Wolf, Michael S; Parikh, Nikhil A; Tillman, Holly; Lee, William M; Ganger, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is the most common cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the west. It is unknown if APAP overdose in combination with diphenhydramine or opioids confers a different clinical presentation or prognosis. Study objectives were to compare (1) baseline patient characteristics; (2) initial clinical presentation; and (3) clinical outcomes among patients with ALF due to APAP alone or in combination with diphenhydramine or opioids. We analyzed 666 cases of APAP-related liver failure using the Acute Liver Failure Study Group database from 1998 to 2012. The database contains detailed demographic, laboratory, and clinical outcome data, including hemodialysis, transplantation, and death and in-hospital complications such as arrhythmia and infection. The final sample included 666 patients with APAP liver injury. A total 30.3% of patients were overdosed with APAP alone, 14.1% with APAP/diphenhydramine, and 56.6% with APAP/opioids. Patients taking APAP with opioids were older, had more comorbidities, and were more likely to have unintentional overdose (all Ppresentation, 58% in the APAP/opioid group had advanced encephalopathy as compared with 43% with APAP alone (P=0.001) The APAP/diphenhydramine group presented with the highest serum aminotransferase levels, no differences in laboratory values were noted at 3 days postenrollment. No significant differences were observed in clinical outcomes among the groups. Most patients with APAP-induced ALF were taking APAP combination products. There were significant differences in patient characteristics and clinical presentation based on the type of product ingested, however, there were no differences noted in delayed hepatotoxicity or clinical outcomes.

  11. Effectiveness of specific prophylaxis of infections diseases presenting danger to ruminants in the area radiocontaminated as a result of Chernobyl' accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budarkov, V.A.; Zenkin, A.S.; Gavrilin, V.A.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Chevelev, S.F.; Zubairov, R.M.; Yunusova, R.M.; Il'ina, A.P.; Grekhova, N.V.; Surgucheva, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Iodine-131 influence on immune reactivity and vaccination effectiveness for sheep in the area of natural insufficiency has been experimentally estimated. The results have demonstrated the development of alterations in immunity status along with abnormalities in thyroid structure and functional state for the ruminants in the radiocontaminated area. The data on immunization effectiveness (as a result of anthrax and virus disease vaccination) have been estimated in comparison to the rate of thyroid damage. 5 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  12. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - delivery presentation; Labor - delivery presentation; Occiput posterior; Occiput anterior; Brow presentation ... The mother can walk, rock, and try different delivery positions during labor to help encourage the baby ...

  13. Is there a correlation between operative results and change in ventricular volume after shunt placement? A study of 60 cases of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, U.; Graewe, A.; Hajdukova, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Warener Strasse 7, 12683, Berlin (Germany); Paris, S.; Stockheim, D.; Mutze, S. [Department of Radiology, Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Warener Strasse 7, 12683, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    In patients with communicating or normal-pressure hydrocephalus, ventricular volume decreases following implantation of differential pressure valves. We implanted hydrostatic (Miethke dual-switch) valves in 60 patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) between September 1997 and December 2001. The patients underwent CT 1 year after operation, and we measured the Evans index. Although 83% of the patients showed no change in ventricular volume as assessed by this index, 72% nevertheless showed good to excellent and 16% satisfactory clinical improvement, while 12% showed no improvement. Moderate or marked reduction in ventricular size was observed in 17%, of whom 40% of these patients showed good to excellent and 20% satisfactory clinical improvement; 40% showed unsatisfactory improvement. The favourable outcome following implantation of a hydrostatic shunt thus did not correlate with decreased ventricular volume 1 year after operation, better outcomes being observed in patients with little or no alteration in ventricular size than in those with a marked decrease. Postoperative change in ventricular volume in NPH thus does not have the same significance as in patients with high-pressure hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  14. Is there a correlation between operative results and change in ventricular volume after shunt placement? A study of 60 cases of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, U.; Graewe, A.; Hajdukova, A.; Paris, S.; Stockheim, D.; Mutze, S.

    2003-01-01

    In patients with communicating or normal-pressure hydrocephalus, ventricular volume decreases following implantation of differential pressure valves. We implanted hydrostatic (Miethke dual-switch) valves in 60 patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) between September 1997 and December 2001. The patients underwent CT 1 year after operation, and we measured the Evans index. Although 83% of the patients showed no change in ventricular volume as assessed by this index, 72% nevertheless showed good to excellent and 16% satisfactory clinical improvement, while 12% showed no improvement. Moderate or marked reduction in ventricular size was observed in 17%, of whom 40% of these patients showed good to excellent and 20% satisfactory clinical improvement; 40% showed unsatisfactory improvement. The favourable outcome following implantation of a hydrostatic shunt thus did not correlate with decreased ventricular volume 1 year after operation, better outcomes being observed in patients with little or no alteration in ventricular size than in those with a marked decrease. Postoperative change in ventricular volume in NPH thus does not have the same significance as in patients with high-pressure hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  15. Genetic influences on individual differences in longitudinal changes in global and subcortical brain volumes : Results of the ENIGMA plasticity working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Rachel M; Panizzon, Matthew S; Glahn, David C; Hibar, Derrek P; Hua, Xue; Jahanshad, Neda; Abramovic, Lucija; De Zubicaray, Greig I; Franz, Carol E; Hansell, Narelle K; Hickie, Ian B; Koenis, Marinka M G; Martin, Nicholas G; Mather, Karen A; McMahon, Katie L; Schnack, Hugo G; Strike, Lachlan T; Swagerman, Suzanne C; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Wen, Wei; Gilmore, John H; Gogtay, Nitin; Kahn, René S; Sachdev, Perminder S; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Kremen, William S; Thompson, Paul M; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2017-01-01

    Structural brain changes that occur during development and ageing are related to mental health and general cognitive functioning. Individuals differ in the extent to which their brain volumes change over time, but whether these differences can be attributed to differences in their genotypes has not

  16. Preliminary Results Regarding the Present Morphometric Characters of Thermal Rudd, Scardinius racovitzai Müller 1958 from Pețea Spring Natural Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoraş Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The precarious temperature regime, associated with the negative influence of other environmental and biotic factors, represents a major risk for the survival of the thermal rudd from the lake Ochiul Mare, located in the Pârâul Peţea natural reserve. Therefore, a complex morphometric and body geometry analysis was conducted on specimens collected in 2013 in order to define the variability of the present population. The relatively small sample size is due to legislative restrictions on collecting endangered species, so statistical methods of analysis were applied to increase confidence in the assertions.

  17. Editorial Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilan Avrichir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dear Readers, It is with great satisfaction and sense of responsibility that I hand over to our community the third issue of Volume 11 of Internext, the first one in which I was the editor-in-chief. Last October, the Program of Master's and Doctoral Program in International Management (PMDGI coordination, giving continuity to the rotation policy of editors, assigned me the function. My satisfaction and a sense of responsibility are heightened by the fact that Anpad has recently released a new Spell ranking of national academic journals based on their impact factors, and in that ranking Internext is  in the first quartile among the 97 ranked journals. In the criterion of citations per document, Internext ranked 4th among all Brazilian Business journals! Of course, the merit of the impact of Intenext, evidenced by the Spell classification, does not belong to the publisher who just took office, but to those who preceded me: Felipe Borini and Eduardo Spers. To both of them, and the rest of the editorial team, especially the never tiring  Dennys Rosseto and Jackeline Ferreira, my recognition for their  dedication and competence and my commitment to do everything within my reach to maintain and evolve the quality of the work that have done. In this issue, as in the previous ones, Internext features  six articles that constitute important additions to the stock of knowledge about internationalization of business in emerging countries. In a context of intense discussion of the implications of protectionist measures for national industries, Yolanda Carbajal-Suárez and María Esther Morales-Fajardo carry out a timely analysis of the development of the automotive sector in Brazil and Mexico, with an emphasis on the impact of trade agreements negotiated between the two governments on export and competitiveness of these sectors. One of the provocative conclusions they reached in "The automotive sector in Mexico and Brazil - An analysis from the

  18. Detailed computational fluid dynamics calculations in order to assess respective safety issues regarding existing nuclear power plant. Interpretation and presentation of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The results of analysis showed that in case of injection of cold water to loops water temperature stratification in the pipes will occur if all the RCPs (Reactor Coolant Pump) are stopped. This water temperature stratification can lead to temperature misreading by sensors if they are located improperly, and may lead to wrong operation of PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock) protection system. Therefore, results of current analysis can be used to choose the correct locations for temperature sensors to be installed in order to determine whether PTS protection system should be activated

  19. Insulin gene mutations resulting in early-onset diabetes: marked differences in clinical presentation, metabolic status, and pathogenic effect through endoplasmic reticulum retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meur, Gargi; Simon, Albane; Harun, Nasret

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Heterozygous mutations in the human preproinsulin (INS) gene are a cause of nonsyndromic neonatal or early-infancy diabetes. Here, we sought to identify INS mutations associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) or nonautoimmune diabetes in mid-adult life, and to explore...... the molecular mechanisms involved. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The INS gene was sequenced in 16 French probands with unexplained MODY, 95 patients with nonautoimmune early-onset diabetes (diagnosed at ... with early-onset diabetes whose clinical presentation is compatible with MODY. These led to the production of (pre)proinsulin molecules with markedly different trafficking properties and effects on ER stress, demonstrating a range of molecular defects in the beta-cell....

  20. Effectiveness of a mentor-implemented, violence prevention intervention for assault-injured youths presenting to the emergency department: results of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tina L; Haynie, Denise; Brenner, Ruth; Wright, Joseph L; Chung, Shang-en; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    The goal was to assess the impact of a mentor-implemented, violence prevention intervention in reducing aggression, fighting, and reinjury among assault-injured youths. In a randomized, controlled trial performed in the emergency departments of 2 large urban hospitals, 10- to 15-year-old youths who presented with peer assault injuries were recruited and randomly assigned to intervention and comparison groups. In the intervention group, youths received a mentor, who implemented a 6-session problem-solving curriculum, and parents received 3 home visits with a health educator, to discuss family needs and to facilitate service use and parental monitoring. The comparison group received a list of community resources, with 2 follow-up telephone calls to facilitate service use. Youths and parents were interviewed at baseline and at 6 months, for assessment of attitudes about violence, risk factors, fighting, and repeat injury. A total of 227 families were recruited, with 23% refusing participation and 4% providing partial interview completion. A total of 166 families were enrolled, with 87 assigned to the intervention group and 79 to the comparison group; 118 (71%) completed both youth and parent follow-up interviews, and 113 had usable data. The intervention and comparison groups were not significantly different at baseline with respect to demographic features or risk factors, except for increased knife-carrying and fewer deviant peers in the intervention group. After adjustment for baseline differences, there was a trend toward significant program effects, including reduced misdemeanor activity and youth-reported aggression scores and increased youth self-efficacy. Program impact was associated with the number of intervention sessions received. A community-based, mentor-implemented program with assault-injured youths who presented to the emergency department trended in the direction of decreased violence, with reduced misdemeanors and increased self-efficacy.

  1. Constitutive mass balance relations between chemical composition, volume, density, porosity, and strain in metasomatic hydrochemical systems: Results on weathering and pedogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, George H.; Dietrich, William E.

    1987-03-01

    Relations characterizing the chemical, physical, and mechanical changes resulting from metasomatic hydrochemical processes are developed using mass balance models which formally link chemical composition to bulk density, mineral density, volumetric properties, porosity, and amount of deformation (strain). Rigorous analysis of aqueous solute transport effects is then made possible in a variety of porous media flow environments including chemical weathering, pedogenesis (soil formation), diagenesis, ore deposition and enrichment, and metamorphism. Application of these linear constitutive relations to chemical weathering profiles shows that immobile and locally mobile chemical elements, with masses conserved on the scale of soil profiles, can be accurately identified from analysis of appropriate data arrays and then used as natural geochemical tracers to infer the nature and extent of hydrochemical weathering processes and volume changes during pedogenesis. Assumptions commonly made in the past about the supposed immobility of certain elements, e.g., Ti and Zr, become unnecessary. Quantitative differentiation between the effects of residual and supergene fractionation is then easily made. These methods are applied to Ni-rich laterites developed by weathering of ultramafic rocks, showing that during ordinary residual enrichment, Ni is concentrated by as much as 4× protolith peridotite concentrations. This occurs simply by silicate mineral dissolution and removal of chemical elements other than Ni ( e.g., Mg) with a corresponding reduction in saprolite density and increase in bulk porosity without significant deformation. In contrast, laterites with mineable concentrations of Ni which are similarly undeformed (such as the Nickel Mountain Mine in Riddle, Oregon) have experienced, in addition to residual enrichment, strong supergene enrichment by fractionation of ore elements between a leached zone from which Ni is extracted and a complementary enriched zone positioned

  2. Excluding infection through procalcitonin testing improves outcomes of congestive heart failure patients presenting with acute respiratory symptoms: results from the randomized ProHOSP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Kutz, Alexander; Grolimund, Eva; Haubitz, Sebastian; Demann, Désirée; Vögeli, Alaadin; Hitz, Fabienne; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Falconnier, Claudine; Hoess, Claus; Henzen, Christoph; Marlowe, Robert J; Zimmerli, Werner; Mueller, Beat

    2014-08-20

    We sought to determine whether exclusion of infection and antibiotic stewardship with the infection biomarker procalcitonin improves outcomes in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients presenting to emergency departments with respiratory symptoms and suspicion of respiratory infection. We performed a secondary analysis of patients with a past medical history of CHF formerly included in a Swiss multicenter randomized-controlled trial. The trial compared antibiotic stewardship according to a procalcitonin algorithm or state-of-the-art guidelines (controls). The primary endpoint was a 30-day adverse outcome (death, intensive care unit admission); the secondary endpoints included a 30-day antibiotic exposure. In the 110/233 analyzed patients (47.2%) with low initial procalcitonin (<0.25 μg/L), suggesting the absence of systemic bacterial infection, those randomized to procalcitonin guidance (n=50) had a significantly lower adverse outcome rate compared to controls (n=60): 4% vs. 20% (absolute difference -16.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -28.4% to -3.6%, P=0.01), and significantly reduced antibiotic exposure [days] (mean 3.7 ± 4.0 vs. 6.5 ± 4.4, difference -2.8 [95% CI, -4.4 to -1.2], P<0.01). When initial procalcitonin was ≥0.25 μg/L, procalcitonin-guided patients had significantly reduced antibiotic exposure due to early stop of therapy without any difference in adverse outcomes (25.8% vs. 24.6%, difference [95% CI] 1.2% [-14.5% to 16.9%, P=0.88]). CHF patients presenting to the emergency department with respiratory symptoms and suspicion for respiratory infection had decreased antibiotic exposure and improved outcomes when procalcitonin measurement was used to exclude bacterial infection and guide antibiotic treatment. These data provide further evidence for the potential harmful effects of antibiotic / fluid treatment when used instead of diuretics and heart failure medication in clinically symptomatic CHF patients without underlying infection. Copyright

  3. Risk factors and outcomes for late presentation for HIV-positive persons in Europe: results from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe Study (COHERE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Casabona, Jordi; Castagna, Antonella; Costagliola, Dominique; Dabis, Francois; De Wit, Stéphane; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Furrer, Hansjakob; Johnson, Anne M; Lazanas, Marios K; Leport, Catherine; Moreno, Santiago; Obel, Niels; Post, Frank A; Reekie, Joanne; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Suarez-Lozano, Ignacio; Torti, Carlo; Warszawski, Josiane; Zangerle, Robert; Fabre-Colin, Céline; Kjaer, Jesper; Chene, Genevieve; Grarup, Jesper; Kirk, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have monitored late presentation (LP) of HIV infection over the European continent, including Eastern Europe. Study objectives were to explore the impact of LP on AIDS and mortality. LP was defined in Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) as HIV diagnosis with a CD4 count HIV diagnosis among persons presenting for care between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2011. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with LP and Poisson regression to explore the impact on AIDS/death. 84,524 individuals from 23 cohorts in 35 countries contributed data; 45,488 were LP (53.8%). LP was highest in heterosexual males (66.1%), Southern European countries (57.0%), and persons originating from Africa (65.1%). LP decreased from 57.3% in 2000 to 51.7% in 2010/2011 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.96; 95% CI 0.95-0.97). LP decreased over time in both Central and Northern Europe among homosexual men, and male and female heterosexuals, but increased over time for female heterosexuals and male intravenous drug users (IDUs) from Southern Europe and in male and female IDUs from Eastern Europe. 8,187 AIDS/deaths occurred during 327,003 person-years of follow-up. In the first year after HIV diagnosis, LP was associated with over a 13-fold increased incidence of AIDS/death in Southern Europe (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 13.02; 95% CI 8.19-20.70) and over a 6-fold increased rate in Eastern Europe (aIRR 6.64; 95% CI 3.55-12.43). LP has decreased over time across Europe, but remains a significant issue in the region in all HIV exposure groups. LP increased in male IDUs and female heterosexuals from Southern Europe and IDUs in Eastern Europe. LP was associated with an increased rate of AIDS/deaths, particularly in the first year after HIV diagnosis, with significant variation across Europe. Earlier and more widespread testing, timely referrals after testing positive, and improved retention in care strategies are required to further

  4. Risk factors and outcomes for late presentation for HIV-positive persons in Europe: results from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe Study (COHERE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Mocroft

    Full Text Available Few studies have monitored late presentation (LP of HIV infection over the European continent, including Eastern Europe. Study objectives were to explore the impact of LP on AIDS and mortality.LP was defined in Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE as HIV diagnosis with a CD4 count <350/mm(3 or an AIDS diagnosis within 6 months of HIV diagnosis among persons presenting for care between 1 January 2000 and 30 June 2011. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with LP and Poisson regression to explore the impact on AIDS/death. 84,524 individuals from 23 cohorts in 35 countries contributed data; 45,488 were LP (53.8%. LP was highest in heterosexual males (66.1%, Southern European countries (57.0%, and persons originating from Africa (65.1%. LP decreased from 57.3% in 2000 to 51.7% in 2010/2011 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.96; 95% CI 0.95-0.97. LP decreased over time in both Central and Northern Europe among homosexual men, and male and female heterosexuals, but increased over time for female heterosexuals and male intravenous drug users (IDUs from Southern Europe and in male and female IDUs from Eastern Europe. 8,187 AIDS/deaths occurred during 327,003 person-years of follow-up. In the first year after HIV diagnosis, LP was associated with over a 13-fold increased incidence of AIDS/death in Southern Europe (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 13.02; 95% CI 8.19-20.70 and over a 6-fold increased rate in Eastern Europe (aIRR 6.64; 95% CI 3.55-12.43.LP has decreased over time across Europe, but remains a significant issue in the region in all HIV exposure groups. LP increased in male IDUs and female heterosexuals from Southern Europe and IDUs in Eastern Europe. LP was associated with an increased rate of AIDS/deaths, particularly in the first year after HIV diagnosis, with significant variation across Europe. Earlier and more widespread testing, timely referrals after testing positive, and

  5. Analysis of radioactivity levels in the surrounding of the Aube storage plant (F.M.A.-V.C.). year 2007. Presentation, results and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The study had three objectives: to collect information that explain the impact of the Aube storage center (C.S.A.) on environment and allow to evaluate the consequences for man, secondly, to build a referential for any future inquiry or follow-up, thirdly, to allow to the local commission of information to elaborate an information towards the side residents and local actors that take into account their questions. Trees, waters, sediments, soils, grass, products of gardens and vineyards were the object of sampling, their dosimetry is given in this report. Other dosimetry measures were made along the nuclear site and the results are equally in this report. (N.C.)

  6. Comparing oncology clinical programs by use of innovative designs and expected net present value optimization: Which adaptive approach leads to the best result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Tom; Marchenko, Olga; Anisimov, Vladimir; Ivanova, Anastasia; Jennison, Christopher; Perevozskaya, Inna; Song, Guochen

    2017-01-01

    Designing an oncology clinical program is more challenging than designing a single study. The standard approaches have been proven to be not very successful during the last decade; the failure rate of Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials in oncology remains high. Improving a development strategy by applying innovative statistical methods is one of the major objectives of a drug development process. The oncology sub-team on Adaptive Program under the Drug Information Association Adaptive Design Scientific Working Group (DIA ADSWG) evaluated hypothetical oncology programs with two competing treatments and published the work in the Therapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science journal in January 2014. Five oncology development programs based on different Phase 2 designs, including adaptive designs and a standard two parallel arm Phase 3 design were simulated and compared in terms of the probability of clinical program success and expected net present value (eNPV). In this article, we consider eight Phase2/Phase3 development programs based on selected combinations of five Phase 2 study designs and three Phase 3 study designs. We again used the probability of program success and eNPV to compare simulated programs. For the development strategies, we considered that the eNPV showed robust improvement for each successive strategy, with the highest being for a three-arm response adaptive randomization design in Phase 2 and a group sequential design with 5 analyses in Phase 3.

  7. The use of fused PET/CT images for patient selection and radical radiotherapy target volume definition in patients with non-small cell lung cancer: Results of a prospective study with mature survival data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Everitt, Sarah; Bayne, Mike; Ball, David; Plumridge, Nikki; Binns, David; Herschtal, Alan; Cruickshank, Deborah; Bressel, Mathias; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study investigated the impact of radiotherapy (RT)-planning FDG-PET/CT on management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Patients still eligible for radical RT after conventional staging underwent RT-planning PET/CT and, if disease was still treatable to 60 Gy, they entered our planning study, where visually-contoured tumour volumes derived with and without PET information were compared. If PET/CT detected advanced disease, palliative therapy was given. Overall survival (OS) for palliative and curative patients was compared. Results: Of 76 eligible patients, only 50 (66%) received radical chemoRT after PET/CT while 26 (34%) received palliative therapies because PET/CT detected advanced disease. Without PET, FDG-avid tumour would reside outside the planning target volume (PTV) in 36% of radical cases and in 25% 95% prescribed dose. OS for all patients was 56.8% and 24.9% at 1 and 4 years, respectively. OS for patients given chemoRT was 77.5% and 35.6% at 1 and 4 years, respectively and was 32% for stage IIIA patients at 4 years. OS for patients treated palliatively was inferior (P < 0.001); 16.3% and 4.1% at 1 and 4 years, respectively. Conclusions: Planning PET/CT frequently changed management and was associated with excellent survival. Survival data from this study were presented in part at the 2011 World Lung Cancer Conference, Amsterdam and planning data at the 2010 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Chicago

  8. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Late Presentation for HIV-Positive Persons in Europe: Results from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe Study (COHERE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens D.; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Casabona, Jordi; Castagna, Antonella; Costagliola, Dominique; Dabis, Francois; De Wit, Stéphane; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Furrer, Hansjakob; Johnson, Anne M.; Lazanas, Marios K.; Leport, Catherine; Moreno, Santiago; Obel, Niels; Post, Frank A.; Reekie, Joanne; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Suarez-Lozano, Ignacio; Torti, Carlo; Warszawski, Josiane; Zangerle, Robert; Fabre-Colin, Céline; Kjaer, Jesper; Chene, Genevieve; Grarup, Jesper; Kirk, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies have monitored late presentation (LP) of HIV infection over the European continent, including Eastern Europe. Study objectives were to explore the impact of LP on AIDS and mortality. Methods and Findings LP was defined in Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) as HIV diagnosis with a CD4 count Europe among homosexual men, and male and female heterosexuals, but increased over time for female heterosexuals and male intravenous drug users (IDUs) from Southern Europe and in male and female IDUs from Eastern Europe. 8,187 AIDS/deaths occurred during 327,003 person-years of follow-up. In the first year after HIV diagnosis, LP was associated with over a 13-fold increased incidence of AIDS/death in Southern Europe (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR] 13.02; 95% CI 8.19–20.70) and over a 6-fold increased rate in Eastern Europe (aIRR 6.64; 95% CI 3.55–12.43). Conclusions LP has decreased over time across Europe, but remains a significant issue in the region in all HIV exposure groups. LP increased in male IDUs and female heterosexuals from Southern Europe and IDUs in Eastern Europe. LP was associated with an increased rate of AIDS/deaths, particularly in the first year after HIV diagnosis, with significant variation across Europe. Earlier and more widespread testing, timely referrals after testing positive, and improved retention in care strategies are required to further reduce the incidence of LP. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:24137103

  9. Present and future connection of Asian-Pacific Oscillation to large-scale atmospheric circulations and East Asian rainfall: results of CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Botao; Xu, Ying; Shi, Ying

    2018-01-01

    The summer Asian-Pacific oscillation (APO), one of the major modes of climate variability over the Asian-Pacific sector, has a pronounced effect on variations of large-scale atmospheric circulations and climate. This study evaluated the capability of 30 state-of-the-art climate models among the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) in simulating its association with the atmospheric circulations over the Asian-Pacific region and the precipitation over East Asia. Furthermore, their future connections under the RCP8.5 scenario were examined. The evaluation results show that 5 out of 30 climate models can well capture the observed APO-related features in a comprehensive way, including the strengthened South Asian high (SAH), deepened North Pacific trough (NPT) and northward East Asian jet (EAJ) in the upper troposphere; an intensification of the Asian low and the North Pacific subtropical high (NPSH) as well as a northward shift of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) in the lower troposphere; and a decrease in East Asian summer rainfall (EASR) under the positive APO phase. Based on the five CMIP5 models' simulations, the dynamic linkages of the APO to the SAH, NPT, AL, and NPSH are projected to maintain during the second half of the twenty-first century. However, its connection with the EASR tends to reduce significantly. Such a reduction might result from the weakening of the linkage of the APO to the meridional displacement of the EAJ and WPSH as a response to the warming scenario.

  10. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 2: Country reports. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Funding for the RCM by the Government of Japan is gratefully acknowledged. The IAEA wishes to thank S. Kobayashi for his efforts in support of the CRP. The IAEA extends its appreciation to the Japanese National Institute of Radiological Sciences for acting as the technical secretariat to co-ordinate the work of data compilation. Specifically, the IAEA acknowledges the contributions of H. Kawamura, G. Tanaka and T. Koyanagi. Appreciation is also extended to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences for the valuable contribution they made to the CRP as hosts for the RCMS. The IAEA officers responsible for this publication were A. Moiseev and R.V. Griffith of the Division of Radiation and Waste Safety. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries

  11. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

    1993-10-01

    This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

  12. Presentation of the Results from the Project of Making Base Documents for Low-Emission Development Strategy for Croatia Until 2030 with an Outlook to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelavic, V.; Delija, V.; Herencic, L.

    2016-01-01

    Paris Climate Agreement is United Nations' Framework Convention on Climate Change way of encouraging countries to prepare Low-Emission development strategies and shows that climate change require long-term development strategies that support sustainable development, with the purpose of limiting the increase of global temperature to the maximal 2 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. The starting point of EU's policy towards low-emission economy is a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80-95 percent by 2050. In accordance with that goal, The European Council adopted a climate-energy framework 2030 in October 2014, which sets a goal of reducing emissions - 40 percent by 2030. It also sets a goal of renewable energy sources share of up to 27 percent and an indicative goal of reducing energy consumption - 27 percent. At this moment, a process of accepting and consultations for regulatory climate-energy framework is taking part, as well as a change of greenhouse gas market directive, distribution of load on countries regulation and calculations of emissions from the sector of Land use, Land-use Change and Forestry (LULUCF) regulation. In 2015, The Ministry of Environment and Energy has started a project of making base documents for Low-Emission Development Strategy until 2030 with an outlook to 2050. This strategy applies to every economy and human activity sector and is especially linked to energy sector, industrial, transport, agriculture, forestry and waste management sectors. In the process of making base documents for the Strategy, a number of scenarios were analysed, models for simulations and optimisation were applied and an integral model for national greenhouse gas projections was developed. The Strategy outlines three scenarios: Reference scenario represents the application of the existing legislation while the other two scenarios present a transition towards low-emission economy: Gradual Transition Scenario (NU1) and Strong Transition Scenario

  13. Clinical presentation and management of stable coronary artery disease: insights from the international prospective CLARIFY registry - results from the Greek national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarouni, Eftihia; Voudris, Vassilis; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Hamilos, Michalis; Steg, P Gabriel; Fox, Kim M; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Vardas, Panos E

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent worldwide, yet there is a paucity of data regarding the clinical characteristics and management of outpatients with stable CAD. In this paper, we report the baseline data of the Greek cohort and we compare our national data with the global results of the entire registry, as well as the results from the western European countries. CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,283 patients from 45 countries in 4 continents were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010; of these, 14,726 were from western European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) and 559 patients were enrolled in Greece. Compared to their counterparts in western Europe and the entire cohort, Greeks were younger (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, respectively), more predominantly male (p<0.0039, p<0.0001), with a higher body mass index (p<0.0002, p<0.0001) and a larger waist circumference (p<0.0001, p<0.0001), as well as a higher prevalence of family history of CAD (p<0.0008, 0.0005), hyperlipidemia (p<0.0001, p<0.0001) and smoking (p<0.0001, p<0.0001). Noninvasive testing (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, respectively) and coronary angiography (p<0.0001, 0.0013) along with surgical revascularization (CABG) (p<0.0001, 0.0088) were performed more often in Greece. Antiplatelets, b-blockers and lipid lowering medications were used to an equal extent in Greece as in the other two cohorts. There are substantial differences in demographics, clinical profiles and treatment in patients with stable CAD within the data set, which are also observed for Greek data. Interestingly, these differences are consistent in relation to the global

  14. Severe accident experiments on PLINIUS platform. Results of first experiments on COLIMA facility related to VVER-440. Presentation of planned VULCANO and KROTOS tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piluso, P.; Boccaccio, E.; Bonnet, J.-M.; Journeau, C.; Fouquart, P.; Magallon, D.; Ivanov, I.; Mladenov, I.; Kalchev, S.; Grudev, P.; Alsmeyer, H.; Fluhrer, B.; Leskovar, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the hypothetical case of a nuclear reactor severe accident, the reactor core could melt and form a mixture of nuclear fuel (UO 2 + Fission Products), metallic or oxidized cladding + steel, called c orium , of highly refractory oxides (UO 2 , ZrO 2 ) and metallic or oxidized steel, that could eventually flow out of the vessel and mix with the substrate decomposition products (generally oxides such as SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , CaO, Fe 2 O 3 ). The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has launched a R and D programme aimed at providing the tools for improving the mastering of severe accidents. It encompasses the development of models and codes, performance of experiments in simulant and prototypic materials and the analysis of international experiments. The experiments with prototypic corium (i.e. material containing depleted UO 2 ) are performed in the PLINIUS experimental platform at CEA Cadarache. It comprises the VULCANO facility for 50-100 kg tests (corium-material interactions, corium solidification etc.), the COLIMA facility for smaller scale (∼1 kg) experiments, the VITI facility for corium properties measurement and the KROTOS facility for corium-water interaction (a few kg). In the framework of the 5 th European Framework Programme, free trans-national access to these facilities has been offered to EU and Associated States researchers. For the first PLINIUS access, COLIMA experiments have been conducted with a Bulgarian Team (TU/SOFIA, BAS/INRNE and NPP/KOZLODUY). This series of tests was devoted to experimental studies on fission products release and corium behaviour in the late phase in a hypothetic case of severe accident in a PWR type VVER-440. The COLIMA experimental results are consistent with previous experiments on irradiated fuels (VERCORS, PHEBUS) with small differences for some fission products and show new results for the remaining corium. For the second visit, scientific users from FZK in Germany were selected to validate the COMET core

  15. German register for detection of late sequelae after radiotherapy for children and adolescents (RiSK): present status and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelling, T.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Pape, H.; Ruebe, C.; Meyer, F.M.; Martini, C.; Timmermann, B.; Asadpour, B.; Kortmann, R.D.; Beck, J.D.; Langer, T.; Paulides, M.

    2007-01-01

    Undoubtedly, radiotherapy is an important treatment strategy for many malignancies in paediatric oncology. However, sufficient data about late side effects do not exist. There is a lack of information about radiation dose-effect relationships in view of late side effects in childhood and adolescence. Late effects after radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence have mainly been characterized retrospectively with small patient numbers. Many of these analyses are limited due to little information about organ dose levels and older radiation techniques in some cases. Therefore the German Group of Paediatric Radiation Oncology (APRO) established the ''Register for the evaluation of late side effects after radiation in childhood and adolescence (RiSK)''. Aim of this prospective multicentric register study is to evaluate irradiation dose effect relationships of organs and part of organs with respect to late effects. The feasibility of RiSK has already been shown and first results have recently been published. The characterization of late effects after cancer therapy in childhood is of rising interest. In Germany, several study groups like the ''Late Effects Surveillance System'' (LESS) or the working group ''Quality of life'' examine different aspects of late effects. In the United States of America, the ''Childhood Cancer Survivor Study'' has been established to characterize retrospectively the health status of 5-year-survivors of childhood cancer. In these studies, more than 12,000 patients were evaluated by questionnaires regarding their health status. For radiotherapy, this study is not able to give detailed information about late side effects due to rare data about radiation doses and organ dose levels. To our knowledge, ''RiSK'' is the only multicentric study that evaluates radiation associated side effects prospectively with detailed information about organ dose levels. (orig.)

  16. German register for detection of late sequelae after radiotherapy for children and adolescents (RiSK): present status and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelling, T.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany); Pape, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Ruebe, C. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Univ. Saarland, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Meyer, F.M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Clinic of Augsburg (Germany); Martini, C. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Univ. Hospitals Freiburg (Germany); Timmermann, B. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Asadpour, B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Univ. Hospital Aachen (Germany); Kortmann, R.D. [Dept. of Radiotherapy of the Univ. Hospital Leipzig (Germany); Beck, J.D.; Langer, T.; Paulides, M. [LESS Center, Univ. Children' s Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Undoubtedly, radiotherapy is an important treatment strategy for many malignancies in paediatric oncology. However, sufficient data about late side effects do not exist. There is a lack of information about radiation dose-effect relationships in view of late side effects in childhood and adolescence. Late effects after radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence have mainly been characterized retrospectively with small patient numbers. Many of these analyses are limited due to little information about organ dose levels and older radiation techniques in some cases. Therefore the German Group of Paediatric Radiation Oncology (APRO) established the 'Register for the evaluation of late side effects after radiation in childhood and adolescence (RiSK)'. Aim of this prospective multicentric register study is to evaluate irradiation dose effect relationships of organs and part of organs with respect to late effects. The feasibility of RiSK has already been shown and first results have recently been published. The characterization of late effects after cancer therapy in childhood is of rising interest. In Germany, several study groups like the 'Late Effects Surveillance System' (LESS) or the working group 'Quality of life' examine different aspects of late effects. In the United States of America, the 'Childhood Cancer Survivor Study' has been established to characterize retrospectively the health status of 5-year-survivors of childhood cancer. In these studies, more than 12,000 patients were evaluated by questionnaires regarding their health status. For radiotherapy, this study is not able to give detailed information about late side effects due to rare data about radiation doses and organ dose levels. To our knowledge, 'RiSK' is the only multicentric study that evaluates radiation associated side effects prospectively with detailed information about organ dose levels. (orig.)

  17. Performing of recent real scale cable fire experiments and presentation of the results in the frame of the international collaborative fire modeling project ICFMP. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosser, Dietmar; Riese, Olaf; Klingenberg, Mark

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the Fire Risk Research Program, the German iBMB (Institut fuer Baustoffe, Massivbau und Brandschutz) of Braunschweig University of Technology and GRS (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagenund Reaktorsicherheit mbH) are participating in an International Collaborative Fire Modeling Project (ICFMP) to assess and validate fire computer codes for nuclear power plant applications. This assessment is being conducted through benchmarking and validation exercises. The tests are simulating cable fires scenarios in a single compartment. The goal of the actual cable fire series is to investigate the effects of a natural fire to vertically routed cables (worst case) with different cable insulation material (PVC and FRNC). Another important aspect of cable fire is the risk of function failure. Therefore in the test series the short circuit and the conduction loss of cables are measured. This report includes a first description of the experimental results for test 1 - test 4 of the International Collaborative Fire Model Project conducted in December 2003 at the iBMB in Germany. The experimental data are reported on the International Collaborative Fire Model Project - Platform. The measured data shall be the basis for fire simulations. The tests show that the FRNC cables have significantly better characteristics in case of fire. No substantial flame spread takes place even in case of preheating. PVC cables could be ignited with a burner output of 50 kW, in contrary, the FRNC cables could be ignited at burner output of 150 kW. The preheating has a complex effect on the fire behavior of the cables. It may occur that gases are pyrolysed which are not ignited during the phase of preheating. These gases are transported from the cable surrounding and may leave the fire room. Short circuits occur first in case ''conductor to conductor'' and later in case ''conductor to tray''. The time periods until short circuits occur are strongly dependent on the preheating of the cables. In case of

  18. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 26: Results of the SeaWiFS Data Analysis Round-Robin, July 1994 (DARR-1994)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Siegel, David A.; Obrien, Margaret C.; Sorensen, Jen C.; Konnoff, Daniel A.; Brody, Eric A.; Mueller, James L.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Rhea, W. Joseph

    1995-01-01

    The accurate determination of upper ocean apparent optical properties (AOP's) is essential for the vicarious calibration of the sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS) instrument and the validation of the derived data products. To evaluate the role that data analysis methods have upon values of derived AOP's, the first Data Analysis Round-Robin (DARR-94) workshop was sponsored by the SeaWiFS Project during 21-23 July, 1994. The focus of this intercomparison study was the estimation of the downwelling irradiance spectrum just beneath the sea surface, E(sub d)(0(sup -), lambda); the upwelling nadir radiance just beneath the sea surface, L(sub u)(0(sup -), lambda); and the vertical profile of the diffuse attenuation coefficient spectrum, K(sub d)(z, lambda). In the results reported here, different methodologies from four research groups were applied to an identical set of 10 spectroradiometry casts in order to evaluate the degree to which data analysis methods influence AOP estimation, and whether any general improvements can be made. The overall results of DARR-94 are presented in Chapter 1 and the individual methods of the four groups are presented in Chapters 2-5. The DARR-94 results do not show a clear winner among data analysis methods evaluated. It is apparent, however, that some degree of outlier rejection is required in order to accurately estimate L(sub u)(0(sup -), lambda) or E(sub d)(0(sup -), lambda). Furthermore, the calculation, evaluation and exploitation of confidence intervals for the AOP determinations needs to be explored. That is, the SeaWiFS calibration and validation problem should be recast in statistical terms where the in situ AOP values are statistical estimates with known confidence intervals.

  19. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  20. Results of combustion and emissions testing when co-firing blends of binder-enhanced densified refuse-derived fuel (b-dRDF) pellets and coal in a 440 MW{sub e} cyclone fired combustor. Volume 3: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlsson, O.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains the data resulting from the co-firing of b-dRDF pellets and coal in a 440-MW{sub e} cyclone-fired combustor. These tests were conducted under a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The CRADA partners included the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Otter Tail Power Company, Green Isle Environmental, Inc., XL Recycling Corporation, and Marblehead Lime Company. The report is made up of three volumes. This volume contains other supporting information, along with quality assurance documentation and safety and test plans. With this multi-volume approach, readers can find information at the desired level of detail, depending on individual interest or need.

  1. Volume of emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, P; Whimster, W F

    1981-01-01

    A method of determining the volume of emphysema in excised lungs is presented, with its validation. This method is based on macroscopic point counting using a perforated grid but only the holes (points) overlying emphysema need be counted to produce results within a percentage standard error of 5%. Application of the method shows that an adequate assessment of emphysema cannot be made from one lung slice alone, and that the amount of emphysema found in one lung cannot be used to predict the a...

  2. CERN presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Presentation by CERN (10 minutes each) Rolf Landua - Education and Outreach Salvatore Mele - Open Access Jean-Yves Le Meur - Digital Library in Africa Francois Fluckiger - Open Source/Standards (tbc) Tim Smith - Open Data for Science Tullio Basiglia - tbc

  3. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has entered the pelvis. If the presenting part lies above the ischial spines, the station is reported ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  4. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  5. Variable volume combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  6. The Application of Le Chatelier – Brown Principle for Interpretation of the Results of the LongLasting Fluctuations of the Electric Strength in Minor Volumes of Electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Glagolev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses a Le Chatelier – Brown principle to describe a balanced state in various physical problems. The Le Chatelier – Brown principle applications are demonstrated in problems of chemical thermodynamics, mechanics, electrodynamics as well as in descriptions of biosphere processes. The paper defines an inverse correlation for the Kullback's measure values of fluctuations of the electric strength in minor volumes of electrolytes on the density of entropy production in the environment. It shows that influence of dissipative processes on isolated electrolytic cell can be described using the Le Chatelier – Brown principle. The correlation coefficient of Kullback's measure values and density of entropy production in transformation of the Sun radiation into the Earth surface thermal radiation is calculated.

  7. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Symposium on Physics of Elementary Interactions in the LHC Era held in Warsaw from 21 to 22 April 2008. The main subject of the workshop was to present the progress in CERN LHC collider project. Additionally some satellite activities in field of education, knowledge and technology transfer in the frame of CERN - Poland cooperation were shown

  8. Presentation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froejmark, M.

    1992-10-01

    The report presents a wide, easily understandable description of presentation technique and man-machine communication. General fundamentals for the man-machine interface are illustrated, and the factors that affect the interface are described. A model is presented for describing the operators work situation, based on three different levels in the operators behaviour. The operator reacts routinely in the face of simple, known problems, and reacts in accordance with predetermined plans in the face of more complex, recognizable problems. Deep fundamental knowledge is necessary for truly complex questions. Today's technical status and future development have been studied. In the future, the operator interface will be based on standard software. Functions such as zooming, integration of video pictures, and sound reproduction will become common. Video walls may be expected to come into use in situations in which several persons simultaneously need access to the same information. A summary of the fundamental rules for the design of good picture ergonomics and design requirements for control rooms are included in the report. In conclusion, the report describes a presentation technique within the Distribution Automation and Demand Side Management area and analyses the know-how requirements within Vattenfall. If different systems are integrated, such as geographical information systems and operation monitoring systems, strict demands are made on the expertise of the users for achieving a user-friendly technique which is matched to the needs of the human being. (3 figs.)

  9. Technical presentation

    CERN Document Server

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  10. Integers annual volume 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Landman, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ""Integers"" is a refereed online journal devoted to research in the area of combinatorial number theory. It publishes original research articles in combinatorics and number theory. This work presents all papers of the 2013 volume in book form.

  11. Re: Cytoreductive Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer and Low Volume Skeletal Metastases: Results of a Feasibility and Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel Heidenreich

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT is currently the standard treatment for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa (1. Survival improvement after cytoreductive surgery is well known for kidney, breast, colon and ovarian cancers. The survival benefit of cytoreductive radical prostatectomy (CRP for mPCa was first hypothesized in a SEER-based study (2. Heidenreich et al. recently reported survival outcomes of CRP for mPCa. In the present study, 23 mPCa patients with less than 3 bone metastases, no visceral or extensive LN metastases and PSA less than 1.0 ng /mL after ADT were included. Control group (CG consisted of 38 mPCa patients treated with ADT alone. CRP and CG were equal with respect to patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and comorbidities. All patients had 50 mg bicalutamide with LHRH agonists at least for 6 months before surgery. Patients, who did not have PSA progression, were recommended to continue another 2 years of ADT before treatment stopped. When compared with CG, median time to castration resistance was statistically significantly longer in CRP group (40 vs 29 months, p=.014. At a median follow-up of 3 years, overall survival rates were 91.3% and 78.9% for CRP and CG, respectively (p=0.048. Cancer-specific survival rates were 95.6% and 84.2% for CRP and CG, respectively (p=0.043. Median clinical progression-free survival (PFS (range was 38.6 and 26.5 months in CRP and CGs, respectively (p= 0.032. This was the first case-control study that showed that CRP combined with ADT might offer better survival outcomes than ADT alone in mPCa patients. In spite of retrospective design and small cohort, the results are promising. There is an ongoing clinical trial testing the treatment efficacy of primary tumor in mPCa patients. This trial is going to compare efficacy of ADT therapy and ADT combined with either CRP or radiation (NCT01751438. SEER study was not a case-control study. This study further enhanced the hypothesis of

  12. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Rogalla, Patrik; Hilbig, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences. (orig.)

  13. Site Environmental Report for 1998 Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Volume II of the Site Environment Report for 1998 is provided by Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory as a supplemental appendix to the report printed in volume I. Volume II contains the environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate summary results in the main report for routine and non routine activities at the Laboratory (except for groundwater sampling data, which may be found in the reports referred to in chapter 6). Data presented in the tables are given in International System of Units (SI) units of measure

  14. Technical presentation

    CERN Document Server

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  15. NPR hazards review: (Phase 1, Production only appendixes). Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.R.; Trumble, R.E.

    1962-08-15

    The NPR Hazards Review is being issued in a series of volumes. Volume 1, which has already been published, was of the nature of an expanded summary. It included the results of hazards analyses with some explanatory material to put the results in context. Volume 2 presents results of reviews made after the preparation of Volume 1. It also contains supporting material and details not included in Volume 1. Volumes 1 and 2 together provide a nearly complete ``Design Hazards Review of the NPR.`` However, certain remaining problems still exist and are to be the subject of a continuing R&D program. These problems and programs are discussed in Appendix H. Neither Volume 1 nor Volume 2 treat operational aspects of reactor hazards in detail. This area of concern will be the primary subject of a third volume of the NPR Hazards Review. This third volume, to be prepared and issued at a later date, may also contain information supplementing Volumes 1 and 2.

  16. Analytical Results for 35 Mine-Waste Tailings Cores and Six Bed-Sediment Samples, and An Estimate of the Volume of Contaminated Material at Buckeye Meadow on Upper Basin Creek, Northern Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, David L.; Church, Stan E.; Finney, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acid-generation and toxic-metal solubilization. Flotation-mill tailings in the meadow below the Buckeye mine, hereafter referred to as the Buckeye mill-tailings site, have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of Basin Creek, Montana. Basin Creek is one of three tributaries to the Boulder River in the study area; bed sediments and waters draining from the Buckeye mine have also been implicated. Geochemical analysis of 35 tailings cores and six bed-sediment samples was undertaken to determine the concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb,and Zn present in these materials. These elements are environmentally significant, in that they can be toxic to fish and/or the invertebrate organisms that constitute their food. A suite of one-inch cores of dispersed flotation-mill tailings and underlying premining material was taken from a large, flat area north of Basin Creek near the site of the Buckeye mine. Thirty-five core samples were taken and divided into 204 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy) using a mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements listed above are present at moderate to very high concentrations (arsenic to 63,000 ppm, silver to 290 ppm, cadmium to 370 ppm, copper to 4,800 ppm, lead to 93,000 ppm, and zinc to 23,000 ppm). Volume calculations indicate that an estimated 8,400 metric tons of contaminated material are present at the site. Six bed-sediment samples were also subjected to the mixed-acid total digestion, and a warm (50°C) 2M HCl-1% H2O2 leach and analyzed by ICP-AES. Results indicate that bed sediments of Basin Creek are only slightly impacted by past mining above the Buckeye-Enterprise complex, moderately impacted at the upper (eastern

  17. A dual-action, low-volume bowel cleanser administered the day before colonoscopy: results from the SEE CLEAR II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Philip O; Rex, Douglas K; Epstein, Michael; Grandhi, Nav K; Vanner, Stephen; Hookey, Lawrence C; Alderfer, Vivian; Joseph, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    Optimal bowel preparation is vital for the efficacy and safety of colonoscopy. The inconvenience, discomfort, required consumption of large volumes of product, and potential adverse effects associated with some bowel preparations deter patients from colonoscopy and may provide inadequate cleansing. A dual-action, non-phosphate, natural orange-flavored, low-volume preparation containing sodium picosulfate and magnesium citrate (P/MC) is currently being reviewed for bowel cleansing. This was a phase 3, randomized, multicenter, assessor-blinded, prespecified non-inferiority, head-to-head study to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of day-before administration of P/MC vs. 2L polyethylene glycol solution and two 5-mg bisacodyl tablets (2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets (HalfLytely and Bisacodyl Tablets Bowel Prep Kit)) in adult patients preparing for colonoscopy (SEE CLEAR II Study). The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate the non-inferiority of P/MC to 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets in overall colon cleansing using a modified Aronchick scale. In addition, efficacy in the ascending, mid (transverse and descending), and recto-sigmoid segments of colon was evaluated using a modified Ottawa scale. Patient acceptability and tolerability of the bowel preparations were assessed via a standard questionnaire. Safety was assessed based on the monitoring of adverse events (AEs) and meaningful findings on clinical evaluations including physical examinations, vital sign measurements, and electrocardiograms (ECGs). A total of 603 patients were randomized to receive either P/MC (n = 300) or 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets (n = 303). Based on the Aronchick scale, successful overall cleansing was similar in patients receiving P/MC (83.0%) and patients receiving 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets (79.7%). P/MC demonstrated non-inferiority to 2L PEG-3350 and bisacodyl tablets in overall cleansing of the colon, as measured by the Aronchick scale

  18. Quantifying Uncertainty in Soil Volume Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A.D.; Hays, D.C.; Johnson, R.L.; Durham, L.A.; Winters, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proper planning and design for remediating contaminated environmental media require an adequate understanding of the types of contaminants and the lateral and vertical extent of contamination. In the case of contaminated soils, this generally takes the form of volume estimates that are prepared as part of a Feasibility Study for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites and/or as part of the remedial design. These estimates are typically single values representing what is believed to be the most likely volume of contaminated soil present at the site. These single-value estimates, however, do not convey the level of confidence associated with the estimates. Unfortunately, the experience has been that pre-remediation soil volume estimates often significantly underestimate the actual volume of contaminated soils that are encountered during the course of remediation. This underestimation has significant implications, both technically (e.g., inappropriate remedial designs) and programmatically (e.g., establishing technically defensible budget and schedule baselines). Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) has developed a joint Bayesian/geostatistical methodology for estimating contaminated soil volumes based on sampling results, that also provides upper and lower probabilistic bounds on those volumes. This paper evaluates the performance of this method in a retrospective study that compares volume estimates derived using this technique with actual excavated soil volumes for select Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Maywood properties that have completed remedial action by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District. (authors)

  19. The determination of blood volume in horses using stable isotope 50Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Nobuhiko; Kunugiyama, Iwao; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Inoue, Megumi; Furukawa, Yoshinori; Hiraga, Atsushi; Yamanobe, Akira; Kubo, Katsuyoshi.

    1991-01-01

    A method using stable isotope 50 Cr was presented to determine equine blood volumes accurately in the field. The erythrocyte labelled with 50 Cr was injected intravenously, then small amount of blood was collected at regular intervals, and the erythrocyte volume was measured from dilution rate of 50 Cr. A blood volume was calculated from the erythrocyte volume and the packed cell volume (PCV). The present results suggested that the optimum time of collecting blood at rest was 2 h after injection of tagged blood. The red cell volumes and the total blood volumes of fifteen thoroughbred horses measured by the 50 Cr method were 46.6±9.9 and 133±17 ml/kg body weight, respectively. The mean red cell volume of stallion was larger than mare (t-test, p<0.05), and three was no significant difference in the blood volume. (author)

  20. The determination of blood volume in horses using stable isotope sup 50 Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Nobuhiko; Kunugiyama, Iwao; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Inoue, Megumi; Furukawa, Yoshinori (Kitasato Univ., Towada, Aomori (Japan). School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences); Hiraga, Atsushi; Yamanobe, Akira; Kubo, Katsuyoshi

    1991-05-01

    A method using stable isotope {sup 50}Cr was presented to determine equine blood volumes accurately in the field. The erythrocyte labelled with {sup 50}Cr was injected intravenously, then small amount of blood was collected at regular intervals, and the erythrocyte volume was measured from dilution rate of {sup 50}Cr. A blood volume was calculated from the erythrocyte volume and the packed cell volume (PCV). The present results suggested that the optimum time of collecting blood at rest was 2 h after injection of tagged blood. The red cell volumes and the total blood volumes of fifteen thoroughbred horses measured by the {sup 50}Cr method were 46.6+-9.9 and 133+-17 ml/kg body weight, respectively. The mean red cell volume of stallion was larger than mare (t-test, p<0.05), and three was no significant difference in the blood volume. (author).

  1. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 3: Graphical data book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A graphical presentation of the aerodynamic data acquired during coannular nozzle performance wind tunnel tests is given. The graphical data consist of plots of nozzle gross thrust coefficient, fan nozzle discharge coefficient, and primary nozzle discharge coefficient. Normalized model component static pressure distributions are presented as a function of primary total pressure, fan total pressure, and ambient static pressure for selected operating conditions. In addition, the supersonic cruise configuration data include plots of nozzle efficiency and secondary-to-fan total pressure pumping characteristics. Supersonic and subsonic cruise data are given.

  2. Lighting design for globally illuminated volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yubo; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2013-12-01

    With the evolution of graphics hardware, high quality global illumination becomes available for real-time volume rendering. Compared to local illumination, global illumination can produce realistic shading effects which are closer to real world scenes, and has proven useful for enhancing volume data visualization to enable better depth and shape perception. However, setting up optimal lighting could be a nontrivial task for average users. There were lighting design works for volume visualization but they did not consider global light transportation. In this paper, we present a lighting design method for volume visualization employing global illumination. The resulting system takes into account view and transfer-function dependent content of the volume data to automatically generate an optimized three-point lighting environment. Our method fully exploits the back light which is not used by previous volume visualization systems. By also including global shadow and multiple scattering, our lighting system can effectively enhance the depth and shape perception of volumetric features of interest. In addition, we propose an automatic tone mapping operator which recovers visual details from overexposed areas while maintaining sufficient contrast in the dark areas. We show that our method is effective for visualizing volume datasets with complex structures. The structural information is more clearly and correctly presented under the automatically generated light sources.

  3. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 1: Design layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    The design layouts and detailed design drawings of coannular exhaust nozzle models for a supersonic propulsion system are presented. The layout drawings show the assembly of the component parts for each configuration. A listing of the component parts is also given.

  4. Utilization of the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve results in protective conventional ventilation comparable to high frequency oscillatory ventilation in an animal model of acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe S. Rossi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Studies comparing high frequency oscillatory and conventional ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome have used low values of positive end-expiratory pressure and identified a need for better recruitment and pulmonary stability with high frequency. OBJECTIVE: To compare conventional and high frequency ventilation using the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve as the determinant of positive end-expiratory pressure to obtain similar levels of recruitment and alveolar stability. METHODS: After lung lavage of adult rabbits and lower inflection point determination, two groups were randomized: conventional (positive end-expiratory pressure = lower inflection point; tidal volume=6 ml/kg and high frequency ventilation (mean airway pressures= lower inflection point +4 cmH2O. Blood gas and hemodynamic data were recorded over 4 h. After sacrifice, protein analysis from lung lavage and histologic evaluation were performed. RESULTS: The oxygenation parameters, protein and histological data were similar, except for the fact that significantly more normal alveoli were observed upon protective ventilation. High frequency ventilation led to lower PaCO2 levels. DISCUSSION: Determination of the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve is important for setting the minimum end expiratory pressure needed to keep the airways opened. This is useful when comparing different strategies to treat severe respiratory insufficiency, optimizing conventional ventilation, improving oxygenation and reducing lung injury. CONCLUSIONS: Utilization of the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve in the ventilation strategies considered in this study resulted in comparable efficacy with regards to oxygenation and hemodynamics, a high PaCO2 level and a lower pH. In addition, a greater number of normal alveoli were found after protective conventional ventilation in an animal model of acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  5. History of CERN. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krige, J.

    1996-01-01

    The present volume continues the story of the history of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, concentrating on the years between the mid 1960s and the late 1970s. Whereas the first two volumes were the product of a team of historians, this book is rather a collection of studies by authors with very different professional backgrounds and institutional locations. It also differs from the predecessor volumes in the fact that it consists of distinct case studies dealing with a number of issues deemed important. The first part of this volume, containing contributions by historians of science, perceives the laboratory as being at the node of a complex of interconnected relationships between scientists and science managers on the staff, the users in the member states, and the governments which were called upon to finance the laboratory. In part 2 the physical results, obtained at CERN, are surveyed, while in part 3 two chapters are presented, one on engineering and technology, and the other on the research and development of electronic position detectors

  6. On the development of a theory of traveler attitude-behavior interrelationships. Volume 3 : executive summary : overview of methods, results, and conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    The executive summary of this Final Report offers an overview of : methods, results, and conclusions which support the development of a : theory of traveler attitude-behavior interrelationships. Such a theory : will be useful in the design of transpo...

  7. Estimating traffic volume on Wyoming low volume roads using linear and logistic regression methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Apronti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traffic volume is an important parameter in most transportation planning applications. Low volume roads make up about 69% of road miles in the United States. Estimating traffic on the low volume roads is a cost-effective alternative to taking traffic counts. This is because traditional traffic counts are expensive and impractical for low priority roads. The purpose of this paper is to present the development of two alternative means of cost-effectively estimating traffic volumes for low volume roads in Wyoming and to make recommendations for their implementation. The study methodology involves reviewing existing studies, identifying data sources, and carrying out the model development. The utility of the models developed were then verified by comparing actual traffic volumes to those predicted by the model. The study resulted in two regression models that are inexpensive and easy to implement. The first regression model was a linear regression model that utilized pavement type, access to highways, predominant land use types, and population to estimate traffic volume. In verifying the model, an R2 value of 0.64 and a root mean square error of 73.4% were obtained. The second model was a logistic regression model that identified the level of traffic on roads using five thresholds or levels. The logistic regression model was verified by estimating traffic volume thresholds and determining the percentage of roads that were accurately classified as belonging to the given thresholds. For the five thresholds, the percentage of roads classified correctly ranged from 79% to 88%. In conclusion, the verification of the models indicated both model types to be useful for accurate and cost-effective estimation of traffic volumes for low volume Wyoming roads. The models developed were recommended for use in traffic volume estimations for low volume roads in pavement management and environmental impact assessment studies.

  8. Search Results | Page 764 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 7631 - 7640 of 9581 ... Judith D. Mitchell, University of Victoria ... The papers in this volume were selected from presentations made in a number of ... The past 50 years, however, have seen the forests of Southeast Asia largely disappear.

  9. Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1, Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1993-12-01

    This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

  10. The efficacy and safety of lixivaptan in outpatients with heart failure and volume overload: results of a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Jalal K; Orlandi, Cesare; Abraham, William T

    2012-06-01

    Volume overload is the dominant feature of decompensated heart failure (HF) and it often results in adverse clinical outcomes. Vasopressin receptor antagonists such as lixivaptan may provide effective volume unloading. This study assessed weight loss after 1 day and 8 weeks of treatment with lixivaptan in outpatients with HF and volume overload. This phase II, 8-week, multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group study randomized participants (2:1) to receive lixivaptan 100 mg or placebo once daily (in addition to standard HF therapy). Body weight and cardiovascular assessments were made at baseline, Day 1 (not cardiovascular), Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 8, and 7 days post-treatment. The Trail-making Test, part B (TMT-B) and the Medical Outcomes Survey 6-item cognitive function scale (MOS-6) were assessed at baseline and Week 4. The study randomized 170 participants (lixivaptan, n = 111; placebo, n = 59). Most (97.1%) were receiving pharmacological therapy for HF at baseline. Demographic characteristics were generally similar between the two groups. Body weight decreased significantly from baseline to Day 1 with lixivaptan vs. placebo (least-square mean change ± standard error: - 0.38 ± 0.08 kg vs. +0.13 ± 0.11 kg; P overload, lixivaptan 100 mg once daily, when added to standard therapy, reduced body weight, improved dyspnoea and orthopnoea, and was well tolerated. NCT01055912.

  11. LANDSAT-4 Science Characterization Early Results. Volume 4: Applications. [agriculture, soils land use, geology, hydrology, wetlands, water quality, biomass identification, and snow mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. L. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The excellent quality of TM data allows researchers to proceed directly with applications analyses, without spending a significant amount of time applying various corrections to the data. The early results derived of TM data are discussed for the following applications: agriculture, land cover/land use, soils, geology, hydrology, wetlands biomass, water quality, and snow.

  12. US/French Joint Research Program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation. Volume 1. Phase-1 normalization results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyant, F.J.; Buckalew, W.H.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

    1986-06-01

    As part of the ongoing multi-year joint NRC/CEA international cooperative test program to investigate the dose-damage equivalence of gamma and beta radiation on polymer base materials, dosimetry and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) specimens were exchanged, irradiated, and evaluated for property changes at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). The purpose of this Phase-1 test series was to normalize and cross-correlate the results obtained by one research center to the other, in terms of exposure (1.0 MeV accelerated electrons and 60 Co gammas) and postirradiation testing (ultimate elongation and tensile strength, hardness, and density) techniques. The dosimetry and material specimen results indicate good agreement between the two countries regarding the exposure conditions and postirradiation evaluation techniques employed

  13. Injected Hyaluronidase Reduces the Volume of Exogenous Hyaluronate Fillers in Mice and Results in Clinical Improvement in a Patient with Pretibial Myxedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Menzinger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyaluronidases are essential for the breakdown of hyaluronate (HA in tissues and may be used to prevent the adverse effects of HA fillers. Objectives: We explored the effect of hyaluronidase on exogenous and endogenous HA in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods: HA fillers were incubated with different concentrations of hyaluronidase and visualized by electrophoresis. HA fillers were injected in the skin of hairless mice, and 4 h later hyaluronidase was injected in the papules of exogenous HA. Hyaluronidase was injected in the nodule of pretibial myxedema of a male patient with Graves' disease. Skin sections of mice and of the patient were performed, and a skin ultrasound system was used to monitor the evolution of skin lesions. Results: Hyaluronidase showed a degrading effect on HA with increasing concentrations. Hyaluronidase injection significantly decreased the content of exogenous HA within 3 days. Intralesional injection of hyaluronidase resulted in dissolution of the nodule of pretibial myxedema with no recurrence during 3 months. Conclusion. These results show that the injection of hyaluronidase is capable of degrading exogenous HA in mouse skin and endogenous HA in human skin in vivo and may be a therapeutic option for skin diseases characterized by abnormal accumulation of HA.

  14. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 6: SPS technology requirements and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Volume 6 of the SPS Concept Definition Study is presented and also incorporates results of NASA/MSFC in-house effort. This volume includes a supporting research and technology summary. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are as follows: (1) Executive Summary; (2) SPS System Requirements; (3) SPS Concept Evolution; (4) SPS Point Design Definition; (5) Transportation and Operations Analysis; and Volume 7, SPS Program Plan and Economic Analysis.

  15. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 5. Assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centner, B.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents (liquid and gaseous) in connection with the implementation of the Belgian scenario for the management of PWR waste. Both individual and collective doses have been estimated for a critical group of the population living around the nuclear power plants concerned. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management wastes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  16. Model aerodynamic test results for two variable cycle engine coannular exhaust systems at simulated takeoff and cruise conditions. Comprehensive data report. Volume 2: Tabulated aeroynamic data book 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Tabulated data from wind tunnel tests conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic performance of an advanced coannular exhaust nozzle for a future supersonic propulsion system are presented. Tests were conducted with two test configurations: (1) a short flap mechanism for fan stream control with an isentropic contoured flow splitter, and (2) an iris fan nozzle with a conical flow splitter. Both designs feature a translating primary plug and an auxiliary inlet ejector. Tests were conducted at takeoff and simulated cruise conditions. Data were acquired at Mach numbers of 0, 0.36, 0.9, and 2.0 for a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. At simulated supersonic cruise, both configurations demonstrated good performance, comparable to levels assumed in earlier advanced supersonic propulsion studies. However, at subsonic cruise, both configurations exhibited performance that was 6 to 7.5 percent less than the study assumptions. At takeoff conditions, the iris configuration performance approached the assumed levels, while the short flap design was 4 to 6 percent less. Data are provided through test run 25.

  17. EPMA present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.

    2002-01-01

    In electron probe microanalysis the objective has always been to gain the maximum information from a sample. To this end efforts have been directed at increasing detection efficiency, reducing the size of the excitation volume, analysing more difficult specimens and improving the accuracy of quantitative measurements whilst, at the same time, attempting to minimize the complexity of the analysis. The present paper comments on the progress that has been made in this areas, focuses on the latest hardware and software developments taking place and looks forward to how these may impact on the technique of EPMA. (author)

  18. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach

  19. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

  20. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE), Version 5.0: Models and Results Database (MAR-D) reference manual. Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, K.D.; Skinner, N.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of several microcomputer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), primarily for nuclear power plants. The primary function of MAR-D is to create a data repository for completed PRAs and Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs) by providing input, conversion, and output capabilities for data used by IRRAS, SARA, SETS, and FRANTIC software. As probabilistic risk assessments and individual plant examinations are submitted to the NRC for review, MAR-D can be used to convert the models and results from the study for use with IRRAS and SARA. Then, these data can be easily accessed by future studies and will be in a form that will enhance the analysis process. This reference manual provides an overview of the functions available within MAR-D and step-by-step operating instructions

  1. Upfront Chemotherapy and Involved-Field Radiotherapy Results in More Relapses Than Extended Radiotherapy for Intracranial Germinomas: Modification in Radiotherapy Volume Might Be Needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jin Ho.; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Seung Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Cho, Byung-Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcome of upfront chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (CRT) and the outcome of the use of extended radiotherapy (RT) only for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: Of 81 patients with tissue-confirmed intracranial germinoma, 42 underwent CRT and 39 underwent RT only. For CRT, one to five cycles of upfront chemotherapy was followed by involved-field or extended-field RT, for which the dose was dependent on the M stage. For RT only, all 39 patients underwent craniospinal RT alone. The median follow-up was 68 months. Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate was 100% and 92.5% for RT alone and 92.9% and 92.9% for CRT, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 100.0% for RT and 88.1% for CRT (p = 0.0279). No recurrences developed in patients given RT, but four relapses developed in patients who had received CRT-three in the brain and one in the spine. Only one patient achieved complete remission from salvage treatment. The proportion of patients requiring hormonal replacement was greater for patients who received RT than for those who had received CRT (p = 0.0106). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that the better quality of life provided by CRT was compensated for by the greater rate of relapse. The possible benefit of including the ventricles in involved-field RT after upfront chemotherapy, specifically for patients with initial negative seeding, should be addressed in a prospective study

  2. Measurable inhomogeneities in stock trading volume flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortines, A. A. G.; Riera, R.; Anteneodo, C.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the statistics of volumes of shares traded in stock markets. We show that the stochastic process of trading volumes can be understood on the basis of a mixed Poisson process at the microscopic time level. The beta distribution of the second kind (also known as q-gamma distribution), that has been proposed to describe empirical volume histograms, naturally results from our analysis. In particular, the shape of the distribution at small volumes is governed by the degree of granularity in the trading process, while the exponent controlling the tail is a measure of the inhomogeneities in market activity. Furthermore, the present case furnishes empirical evidence of how power law probability distributions can arise as a consequence of a fluctuating intrinsic parameter.

  3. Persistently better treatment planning results of intensity-modulated (IMRT) over conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in prostate cancer patients with significant variation of clinical target volume and/or organs-at-risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenoglietto, Pascal; Laliberte, Benoit; Allaw, Ali; Ailleres, Norbert; Idri, Katia; Hay, Meng Huor; Moscardo, Carmen Llacer; Gourgou, Sophie; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Azria, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dose coverage of planning and clinical target volume (PTV, CTV), and organs-at-risk (OAR) between intensity-modulated (3D-IMRT) and conventional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) before and after internal organ variation in prostate cancer. Methods and materials: We selected 10 patients with clinically significant interfraction volume changes. Patients were treated with 3D-IMRT to 80 Gy (minimum PTV dose of 76 Gy, excluding rectum). Fictitious, equivalent 3D-CRT plans (80 Gy at isocenter, with 95% isodose (76 Gy) coverage of PTV, with rectal blocking above 76 Gy) were generated using the same planning CT data set ('CT planning'). The plans were then also applied to a verification CT scan ('CT verify') obtained at a different moment. PTV, CTV, and OAR dose coverage were compared using non-parametric tests statistics for V95, V90 (% of the volume receiving ≥95 or 90% of the dose) and D50 (dose to 50% of the volume). Results: Mean V95 of the PTV for 'CT planning' was 94.3% (range, 88-99) vs 89.1% (range, 84-94.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.005), respectively. Mean V95 of the CTV for 'CT verify' was 97% for both 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT. Mean D50 of the rectum for 'CT planning' was 26.8 Gy (range, 22-35) vs 43.5 Gy (range, 33.5-50.5) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.0002), respectively. For 'CT verify', this D50 was 31.1 Gy (range, 16.5-44) vs 44.2 Gy (range, 34-55) for 3D-IMRT and 3D-CRT (p = 0.006), respectively. V95 of the rectum was 0% for both plans for 'CT planning', and 2.3% (3D-IMRT) vs 2.1% (3D-CRT) for 'CT verify' (p = non-sig.). Conclusion: Dose coverage of the PTV and OAR was better with 3D-IMRT for each patient and remained so after internal volume changes

  4. International Benchmark on Pressurised Water Reactor Sub-channel and Bundle Tests. Volume II: Benchmark Results of Phase I: Void Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Adam; Avramova, Maria; Velazquez-Lozada, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    results were achieved by codes that used either turbulent mixing or dispersion terms for modelling cross-flow. It was also noted that, for the bundle cases, some of the codes did not correctly calculate the bundle-averaged thermal equilibrium quality, and this may indicate an inability to predict the correct void fraction. A time shift was noted in the void fraction results for the temperature increase transient cases, indicating that the test apparatus may have experienced unexpected heat transfer between the downcomer and test section. This heat transfer is only expected to be of significance in the transient test cases, as the steady-state cases allow the system to reach thermal equilibrium

  5. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

  6. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM

  7. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Volume 1. The analysis and its results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the fourth evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The total-system cost for the reference authorized-system program is estimated to be 24 to 32 billion (1985) dollars. The total-system cost for the reference improved-performance system is estimated to be 26 to 34 billion dollars. A number of sensitivity cases were analyzed. For the authorized system, the costs for the sensitivity cases studied range from 21 to 39 billion dollars. For the improved-performance system, which includes a facility for monitored retrievable storage, the total-system cost in the sensitivity cases is estimated to be as high as 41 billion dollars. The factors that affect costs more than any other single factor for both the authorized and the improved-performance systems are delays in repository startup. A preliminary analysis of the impact of extending the burnup of nuclear fuel in the reactor was also performed; its results indicate that the impact is insignificant: the total-system cost is essentially unchanged from the comparable constant-burnup cases. The current estimate of the the total-system cost for the reference authorized system is zero to 3 billion dollars (9%) higher than the estimate for the reference system in the January 1985 TSLCC analysis

  8. SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max; Greenblatt, Jeffrey; Donovan, Sally; Nelson, James; Mileva, Ana; Johnston, Josiah; Kammen, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    This study provides an updated analysis of long-term energy system scenarios for California consistent with the State meeting its 2050 climate goal, including detailed analysis and assessment of electricity system build-out, operation, and costs across the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) region. Four key elements are found to be critical for the State to achieve its 2050 goal of 80 percent greenhouse (GHG) reductions from the 1990 level: aggressive energy efficiency; clean electricity; widespread electrification of passenger vehicles, building heating, and industry heating; and large-scale production of low-carbon footprint biofuels to largely replace petroleum-based liquid fuels. The approach taken here is that technically achievable energy efficiency measures are assumed to be achieved by 2050 and aggregated with the other key elements mentioned above to estimate resultant emissions in 2050. The energy and non-energy sectors are each assumed to have the objective of meeting an 80 percent reduction from their respective 1990 GHG levels for the purposes of analysis. A different partitioning of energy and non-energy sector GHG greenhouse reductions is allowed if emission reductions in one sector are more economic or technically achievable than in the other. Similarly, within the energy or non-energy sectors, greater or less than 80 percent reduction from 1990 is allowed for sub-sectors within the energy or non-energy sectors as long as the overall target is achieved. Overall emissions for the key economy-wide scenarios are considered in this report. All scenarios are compliant or nearly compliant with the 2050 goal. This finding suggests that multiple technical pathways exist to achieve the target with aggressive policy support and continued technology development of largely existing technologies.

  9. Small-Volume Injections: Evaluation of Volume Administration Deviation From Intended Injection Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Chen, Michael I; Claure, Rebecca E; Drover, David R; Efron, Bradley; Fitch, William L; Hammer, Gregory B

    2017-10-01

    regression model. Analysis of variance was used to determine whether the absolute log proportional error differed by the intended injection volume. Interindividual and intraindividual deviation from the intended injection volume was also characterized. As the intended injection volumes decreased, the absolute log proportional injection volume error increased (analysis of variance, P standard deviations of the log proportional errors for injection volumes between physicians and pediatric PACU nurses; however, the difference in absolute bias was significantly higher for nurses with a 2-sided significance of P = .03. Clinically significant dose variation occurs when injecting volumes ≤0.5 mL. Administering small volumes of medications may result in unintended medication administration errors.

  10. Safety and efficacy of vertebroplasty: Early results of a prospective one-year case series of osteoporosis patients in an academic high-volume center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diel Peter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vertebroplasty (VP is a cost-efficient alternative to kyphoplasty. However, it is considered inferior when it comes to maintaining safety and in vertebral body (VB height restoration. We assess the safety and efficacy of VP in alleviating pain, improving quality of life (QoL, and restoring alignment. Materials and Methods: In a prospective monocenter case series, from April 2007 until July 2008, 1,422 vertebroplasties were performed, during 307 interventions, in 279 patients with traumatic, lytic, and osteoporotic fractures with 28 repeat interventions, for new fractures after the primary surgery, in 28 patients. The 226 interventions (n=203 patients done for osteoporotic fractures were analyzed for demographics, treatment and radiographic details, pain alleviation, QoL improvement [NASS and Euroqol (EQ-5D] and complications. Results: Osteoporotic patient sample consisted of 77.8% (n=158 females with a median age of 78 years and 45 males who had the same median age. Around 69% of these patients were ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists grade 3 and above. On an average there were 1.8 VBs fractured and five VBs treated,whereas the most frequently performed cementations were in six (35.6%, n=80 or five (19.6%, n=44 levels. About 36.5%, (n=414 of the interventions were localized at the thoraco-lumbar junction (Th12-L2. On applying the Genant classification, there was a slight height reduction in 13.1% (n=29, a medium loss in 34.3% (n=78, and a severe loss of height in 52.6% (n=119. The pre-operative pain was assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS and decreased from 56.7 to 41.4 pts after two months. Accordingly, the QoL on the EQ-5D measure (0.6 to 1 improved from 0.32 pts before surgery to 0.58 pts after two months. The pre-operative Beck index (anterior height/posterior height improved from a mean of 0.66 preoperative to 0.80 post-operative and remained stable at two months post-operatively. There were cement leakages in 33% of

  11. Preserving Sharp Edges with Volume Clipping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termeer, M.A.; Oliván Bescós, J.; Telea, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Volume clipping is a useful aid for exploring volumetric datasets. To maximize the effectiveness of this technique, the clipping geometry should be flexibly specified and the resulting images should not contain artifacts due to the clipping techniques. We present an improvement to an existing

  12. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG). Volume 4, appendix C: Identification from utility visits of present and future approaches to integration of DSG into distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Visits to four utilities concerned with the use of DSG power sources on their distribution networks yielded useful impressions of present and future approaches to the integration of DSGs into electrical distribution network. Different approaches to future utility systems with DSG are beginning to take shape. The new DSG sources will be in decentralized locations with some measure of centralized control. The utilities have yet to establish firmly the communication and control means or their organization. For the present, the means for integrating the DSGs and their associated monitoring and control equipment into a unified system have not been decided.

  13. Reachable volume RRT

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a new technique that allows one to efficiently restrict sampling to feasible/reachable regions of the planning space even for high degree of freedom and highly constrained problems. However, they have so far only been applied to graph-based sampling-based planners. In this paper we develop the methodology to apply reachable volumes to tree-based planners such as Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs). In particular, we propose a reachable volume RRT called RVRRT that can solve high degree of freedom problems and problems with constraints. To do so, we develop a reachable volume stepping function, a reachable volume expand function, and a distance metric based on these operations. We also present a reachable volume local planner to ensure that local paths satisfy constraints for methods such as PRMs. We show experimentally that RVRRTs can solve constrained problems with as many as 64 degrees of freedom and unconstrained problems with as many as 134 degrees of freedom. RVRRTs can solve problems more efficiently than existing methods, requiring fewer nodes and collision detection calls. We also show that it is capable of solving difficult problems that existing methods cannot.

  14. Reachable volume RRT

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy; Thomas, Shawna; Amato, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a new technique that allows one to efficiently restrict sampling to feasible/reachable regions of the planning space even for high degree of freedom and highly constrained problems. However, they have so far only been applied to graph-based sampling-based planners. In this paper we develop the methodology to apply reachable volumes to tree-based planners such as Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs). In particular, we propose a reachable volume RRT called RVRRT that can solve high degree of freedom problems and problems with constraints. To do so, we develop a reachable volume stepping function, a reachable volume expand function, and a distance metric based on these operations. We also present a reachable volume local planner to ensure that local paths satisfy constraints for methods such as PRMs. We show experimentally that RVRRTs can solve constrained problems with as many as 64 degrees of freedom and unconstrained problems with as many as 134 degrees of freedom. RVRRTs can solve problems more efficiently than existing methods, requiring fewer nodes and collision detection calls. We also show that it is capable of solving difficult problems that existing methods cannot.

  15. 7th Annual CMMI Technology Conference and User Group - Investigation, Measures and Lessons Learned about the Relationship between CMMI Process Capability and Project or Program Performance. Volume 2. Wednesday Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Inc. (LSI) Process Definition Modes Beginner Mode: • Assumes user has little or no experience • Includes training material • Includes process guidance...Maturity? NDIA Conference - 51 12-15 November 2007 Process Improvement Flowchart Collect Data Analyze Data Define Process Improvement Process...15 November 2007 ROI Process Flowchart Present to Management Track Actual Costs Estimate Change Benefits Change Approved? No Yes Determine Scope

  16. Beyond the floor effect on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--4th Ed. (WISC-IV): calculating IQ and Indexes of subjects presenting a floored pattern of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, A; Pezzuti, L; Hulbert, S

    2015-05-01

    It is now widely known that children with severe intellectual disability show a 'floor effect' on the Wechsler scales. This effect emerges because the practice of transforming raw scores into scaled scores eliminates any variability present in participants with low intellectual ability and because intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are limited insofar as they do not measure scores lower than 40. Following Hessl et al.'s results, the present authors propose a method for the computation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--4th Ed. (WISC-IV)'s IQ and Indexes in intellectually disabled participants affected by a floored pattern of results. The Italian standardization sample (n = 2200) for the WISC-IV was used. The method presented in this study highlights the limits of the 'floor effect' of the WISC-IV in children with serious intellectual disability who present a profile with weighted scores of 1 in all the subtests despite some variability in the raw scores. Such method eliminates the floor effect of the scale and therefore makes it possible to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the WISC-IV's Indexes in these participants. The Authors reflect on clinical utility of this method and on the meaning of raw score of 0 on subtest. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Information management system study results. Volume 1: IMS study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The information management system (IMS) special emphasis task was performed as an adjunct to the modular space station study, with the objective of providing extended depth of analysis and design in selected key areas of the information management system. Specific objectives included: (1) in-depth studies of IMS requirements and design approaches; (2) design and fabricate breadboard hardware for demonstration and verification of design concepts; (3) provide a technological base to identify potential design problems and influence long range planning (4) develop hardware and techniques to permit long duration, low cost, manned space operations; (5) support SR&T areas where techniques or equipment are considered inadequate; and (6) permit an overall understanding of the IMS as an integrated component of the space station.

  18. Opinion presented on the behalf of the Commission for Economic Affairs on the finance bill project for 2015 (nr 2234) - Volume III - ecology, sustainable development and mobility - energy. Nr 2262

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battistel, Marie-Noelle

    2014-01-01

    After a presentation of budgetary allocations for energy, this report discusses the participation of agriculture to energy transition, particularly with the emergence of farmers who are also energy producers (development of photovoltaic on agricultural hangars, development of anaerobic digestion supported by public policies), and the development of a French model of anaerobic digestion oriented towards circular economy (reasons for supporting anaerobic digestion, solutions to boost the sector). The last part addresses the management of consumption by farmers and how to take a new energy problematic into account: as agriculture is a sector highly dependent on energy and with a high consumption of fossil energies, efforts are made to reduce this consumption and improve energy efficiency by means of the energy performance plan

  19. Clinical presentation of juvenile Huntington disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruocco Heloísa H.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical presentation a group of patients with juvenile onset of Huntington disease. METHOD: All patients were interviewed following a structured clinical questioner. Patients were genotyped for the trinucleotide cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG repeat in the Huntington Disease gene. High resolution brain MRI was performed in all patients. RESULTS: We identified 4 patients with juvenile onset of disease among 50 patients with Huntington disease followed prospectively in our Neurogenetics clinic. Age at onset varied from 3 to 13 years, there were 2 boys, and 3 patients had a paternal inheritance of the disease. Expanded Huntington disease allele sizes varied from 41 to 69 trinucleotide repeats. The early onset patients presented with rigidity, bradykinesia, dystonia, dysarthria, seizures and ataxia. MRI showed severe volume loss of caudate and putamen nuclei (p=0.001 and reduced cerebral and cerebellum volumes (p=0.01. CONCLUSION: 8% of Huntington disease patients seen in our clinic had juvenile onset of the disease. They did not present with typical chorea as seen in adult onset Huntington disease. There was a predominance of rigidity and bradykinesia. Two other important clinical features were seizures and ataxia, which related with the imaging findings of early cortical atrophy and cerebellum volume loss.

  20. FY 2000 report on the results of the model project on facilities for the effective utilization of industrial waste from industrial complex. Separate Volume 3; 2000 nendo Kogyo danchi sangyo haikibutsu yuko riyo setsubi model jigyo. Dai 3 Bunsatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    For the purpose of promoting the effective utilization of industrial waste as petroleum substitution energy resource and reducing the consumption of fossil fuels in Thailand, a model project on facilities for the effective utilization of industrial waste from industrial complex was worked on, and the FY 2000 results were reported. In Separate Volume 3, drawings of the following were included: furnace, free board spray nozzle, dispersion air nozzle, secondary burner, sand make-up conveyor, sand discharge gate, boiler, silencer for boiler safety valve, steam header, steam accumulator, gas cooling tower, refuse drainage storage tank, small sized drainage pump, pressure tank, flue gas duct, air damper, incombustible conveyor 2, sand circulation system bag filter, weighing bridge, fan starter panel, control panel, control panel, local switch box, distributed control system, field instrument, flue gas analyzer. (NEDO)

  1. Comparative evaluation of CT-based and respiratory-gated PET/CT-based planning target volume (PTV) in the definition of radiation treatment planning in lung cancer: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Meregalli, Sofia; Niespolo, Rita [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); Zorz, Alessandra; De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina; Crespi, Andrea [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Brenna, Sarah [University of Milan-Bicocca, School of Radiation Oncology, Monza (Italy); Gardani, Gianstefano [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare planning target volume (PTV) defined on respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (RG-PET/CT) to PTV based on ungated free-breathing CT and to evaluate if RG-PET/CT can be useful to personalize PTV by tailoring the target volume to the lesion motion in lung cancer patients. Thirteen lung cancer patients (six men, mean age 70.0 years, 1 small cell lung cancer, 12 non-small cell lung cancer) who were candidates for radiation therapy were prospectively enrolled and submitted to RG-PET/CT. Ungated free-breathing CT images obtained during a PET/CT study were visually contoured by the radiation oncologist to define standard clinical target volumes (CTV1). Standard PTV (PTV1) resulted from CTV1 with the addition of 1-cm expansion of margins in all directions. RG-PET/CT images were contoured by the nuclear medicine physician and radiation oncologist according to a standardized institutional protocol for contouring gated images. Each CT and PET image of the patient's respiratory cycle phases was contoured to obtain the RG-CT-based CTV (CTV2) and the RG-PET/CT-based CTV (CTV3), respectively. RG-CT-based and RG-PET/CT-based PTV (PTV2 and PTV3, respectively) were then derived from gated CTVs with a margin expansion of 7-8 mm in head to feet direction and 5 mm in anterior to posterior and left to right direction. The portions of gated PTV2 and PTV3 geometrically not encompassed in PTV1 (PTV2 out PTV1 and PTV3 out PTV1) were also calculated. Mean ± SD CTV1, CTV2 and CTV3 were 30.5 ± 33.2, 43.1 ± 43.2 and 44.8 ± 45.2 ml, respectively. CTV1 was significantly smaller than CTV2 and CTV3 (p = 0.017 and 0.009 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant difference was found between CTV2 and CTV3. Mean ± SD of PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 were 118.7 ± 94.1, 93.8 ± 80.2 and 97.0 ± 83.9 ml, respectively. PTV1 was significantly larger than PTV2 and PTV3 (p = 0.038 and 0.043 with Student's t test, respectively). No

  2. Modeling the economics of LLW volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, M.H.; Witzig, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Generators of low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) are under pressure to implement volume reduction (VR) programs for political and economic reasons. Political reasons include the appearance of generating less waste or meeting quotas. Economic reasons include avoiding high disposal costs and associated surcharges. Volume reduction results in less total volume over which fixed disposal costs are allocated and therefore higher unit costs for disposal. As numerous small compacts are developed, this often overlooked effect becomes more pronounced. The described model presents two unique significant features. First, a feedback loop considers the impact of VR on disposal rates, and second, it appeals to logic without extensive knowledge of VR technology or computer modeling. The latter feature is especially useful in conveying information to students and nontechnical decision makers, demonstrating the impact of each of a complicated set of variables with reproducible results

  3. Finite volume at two-loops in chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijnens, Johan; Rössler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the finite volume corrections to meson masses and decay constants in two and three flavour Chiral Perturbation Theory to two-loop order. The analytical results are compared with the existing result for the pion mass in two-flavour ChPT and the partial results for the other quantities. We present numerical results for all quantities.

  4. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  5. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL's environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present

  6. Opinion presented on the behalf of the Commission for Foreign Affairs on the 2015 on the finance bill project for 2015 (nr 2234), Volume V - ecology, sustainable development and mobility - Nr 2263

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Borgne, Pierre-Yves

    2014-01-01

    This report first gives an overview of the main data related to the climate issue: impacts of greenhouse gases, consequences of the increase of energy consumption after 1945, an always increasing level of global emissions, the coal challenge among fossil energies (some countries are using high quantities of coal, notably China and India), uneven emission levels with respect to the energy consumption level and the energy mix (concentration of emissions in a small number of countries, very different emission levels per capita, different levels of energy efficiency and energy mixes, general development of renewable energies). The second part addresses the EU energy-climate strategy: a new framework for 2030, three major and immediate challenges (energy supply security, recovery of the carbon market, and control of the economic mechanisms of the renewable sector). The third part discusses, the perspective of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference: the identified objective, an already allocated budget and an already well advanced preparation, the rather positive results of the New York Climate Summit of September 2014, the important steps (the Lima conference and the national contributions), the contribution of the IPCC and of the Global Carbon Project, and the fact that negotiations will be difficult and will depend on China and US commitments

  7. Pragmatics & Language Learning. Volume 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen, Ed.; Félix-Brasdefer, J. César, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains a selection of papers presented at the 2014 International Conference of Pragmatics and Language Learning at Indiana University. It includes fourteen papers on a variety of topics, with a diversity of first and second languages, and a wide range of methods used to collect pragmatic data in L2 and FL settings. This volume is…

  8. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fout, Nathaniel [UC DAVIS; Ma, Kwan - Liu [UC DAVIS

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  9. Military Compensation: Past, Present and Future. Volume 1. Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    culinary equipment, chairs, tables, cooks, cooks’ helpers, and food -- to fulfill the mission of providing food sustenance to that force regardless of...Comparability. The feasi- bility of utilizing total compensation as the basis for comparison depends on the "state of the art " capability of...Services seek to retain -- who pre bent to pursue enlight- ment in the science and art of warfare. These persons would tend * to become disillusioned

  10. 7th Annual CMMI Technology Conference Volume 3 Thursday Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-15

    Banking, Insurance • Assessed at CMM level 4, Certified to ISO 9001, 27001 . Currently under compliance review of SoX, processes aligned to CMMI level 3...and ISO 9001-2000, Mr. Mark Scott, Harris Corporation Formal Process Definition with Industry Standards, Mr. Chris Armstrong, Armstrong Process...implementation of CMMI, agile software development methods, ISO and six-sigma. She is the author of Change on Demand: The Science of Turbo Charging Change in

  11. Lung volume recruitment in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Srour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. OBJECTIVES: Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. METHODS: We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. RESULTS: There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9-190.3 and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72-311 over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001 and PCF (p = 0.042. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  12. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume 1. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. This introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volume II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP.

  13. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume 1. Program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. This introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volume II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP

  14. The spectral volume method as applied to transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClarren, Ryan G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new spatial discretization for transport problems: the spectral volume method. This method, rst developed by Wang for computational fluid dynamics, divides each computational cell into several sub-cells and enforces particle balance on each of these sub-cells. Also, these sub-cells are used to build a polynomial reconstruction in the cell. The idea of dividing cells into many cells is a generalization of the simple corner balance and other similar schemes. The spectral volume method preserves particle conservation and preserves the asymptotic diffusion limit. We present results from the method on two transport problems in slab geometry using discrete ordinates and second through sixth order spectral volume schemes. The numerical results demonstrate the accuracy and preservation of the diffusion limit of the spectral volume method. Future work will explore possible bene ts of the scheme for high-performance computing and for resolving diffusive boundary layers. (author)

  15. Videoradiography of patients with habitual snoring and/or sleep apnea. Technical description and presentation of videoradiographic results during sleep concerning occurrence of apnea, type of apnea, and site of obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillarp, B.; Nylander, G.; Rosen, I.; Wickstroem, O.

    1995-01-01

    The videoradiographic examination described was designed for habitual snorers and sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) patients and was performed during wakefulness and sleep. During wakefulness the purpose was to reveal any dysfunction in deglutiton and speech as well as morphologic abnormalities. The purpose during sleep, which usually was induced by low-dose midazolam intravenously, was to reveal the site and form of obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea patients and the site of snoring in habitual snorers. The preoperative results of 104 patients are presented. In 57 patients who had apneas, the occurrence and type of apnea could be determined. A continuous recording over some minutes gave a rough estimate of the degree of SAS and mean duration of apnea. Although much information on SAS can be obtained by this method, it cannot replace polygraphic sleep recording in the investigation of habitual snorers and SAS patients. However, these 2 methods are complementary and can be performed simultaneously as polygraphic videoradiography. (orig.)

  16. Behavioural present value

    OpenAIRE

    Krzysztof Piasecki

    2013-01-01

    Impact of chosen behavioural factors on imprecision of present value is discussed here. The formal model of behavioural present value is offered as a result of this discussion. Behavioural present value is described here by fuzzy set. These considerations were illustrated by means of extensive numerical case study. Finally there are shown that in proposed model the return rate is given, as a fuzzy probabilistic set.

  17. Helium-induced blistering and volume swelling in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of helium-induced blistering are presented. The goal of the research was to examine the mechanisms involved in blistering by observing the microstructure of the implanted region using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In particular, the volume swelling was measured as a function of the implant depth, and compared to experimental skin thicknesses in order to determine if the skin separated at the maximum volume swelling, or at the end of the swelling profile

  18. Analysis of technologies for natural gas transportation in Brazil: results comparison of the application of payback and NPV (Net Present Value) methods; Analise de tecnologias de transporte de gas natural no Brasil: comparacao dos resultados da aplicacao dos metodos 'payback' e VPL (Valor Presente Liquido)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baioco, Juliana Souza; Santarem, Clarissa Andrade [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo; Bone, Rosemarie Broeker; Ferreira Filho, Virgilio Jose Martins [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Industrial

    2008-07-01

    The increased demand for natural gas leads to global integration of markets, leading to decisions that cover the various technologies of transportation, noting the specific locations. The transport of natural gas considered more traditional (Liquefied Natural Gas and Pipeline) often unviable economically areas of operation due to cost. In this case, there are alternative technologies to reduce those costs. The article is to compare the technologies of transport, using the methodology of the Net Present Value (VPL) to identify one that has more positive VPL, which is the most profitable. Thus, in search of validate the results of SUBERO et al. (2004) for gas transport by Pipelines, Liquefied Natural Gas and Compressed Natural Gas. In addition, they are compared these results with the method of VPL and with the economic analysis presented in using the payback period of CHANG (2001) and SANTAREM et al. (2007). It was found that the results obtained in Brazil were identical to those obtained by CHANG (2001) and SUBERO et al. (2007), saving only some differences in magnitude due to the specific characteristics of the Brazilian economy. In other words, for the Brazilian case, the technology of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) was the most economically viable with the method of VPL, followed by technology, Pipeline and Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), regardless of the interest rates of 10% and 6.5% and periods of 20 and 30 years. The contribution of this work is to show that despite of the method, payback or VPL, the various alternatives for transporting natural gas to Brazil have the same ranking and economic viability. (author)

  19. Ion Formation Resulting from Freezing, Thawing, and Collisional Processes in Plumes Emitted from Planetary Bodies: Implications for Plume Chemistry and the Detection of Trace Organics Present in Enceladus Geysers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, J. L.; Wiley, J. S.; Thomas, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Icy plumes emitted into space from Enceladus and other planetary bodies offer the intriguing possibility of sampling the composition of subsurface liquid reservoirs that may comprise habitable zones of particular astrobiological significance in our solar system. Mass spectrometric sampling of plume materials enables the detection of molecules that facilitate an assessment of the extent of chemical and biological evolution that may have occurred in a subsurface sea. In laboratory experiments we have investigated the physical and chemical processes that occur in the complex plume environment that lead to ionization of trace organic constituents, both as a result of the freezing of liquid droplets and the thawing of icy particles. We also demonstrate that collisions between icy particles lead to triboelectric charging. Subsequent discharges between oppositely charged particles result not only in the ionization of trace organics but to chemical reactions between molecular components present in the particles. For example, nitriles react with water to form amides and acids. In particular, icy particles doped with small amounts of aminoacetonitrile and water lead to the formation of the simplest amino acid glycine. The implications which these observations may have for sampling plume composition from orbit in a future mission to Enceladus will be discussed.

  20. Estimating forest biomass and volume using airborne laser data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ross; Krabill, William; Tonelli, John

    1988-01-01

    An airborne pulsed laser system was used to obtain canopy height data over a southern pine forest in Georgia in order to predict ground-measured forest biomass and timber volume. Although biomass and volume estimates obtained from the laser data were variable when compared with the corresponding ground measurements site by site, the present models are found to predict mean total tree volume within 2.6 percent of the ground value, and mean biomass within 2.0 percent. The results indicate that species stratification did not consistently improve regression relationships for four southern pine species.

  1. Rectangular maximum-volume submatrices and their applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mikhalev, Aleksandr; Oseledets, I.V.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a definition of the volume of a general rectangular matrix, which is equivalent to an absolute value of the determinant for square matrices. We generalize results of square maximum-volume submatrices to the rectangular case, show a connection of the rectangular volume with an optimal experimental design and provide estimates for a growth of coefficients and an approximation error in spectral and Chebyshev norms. Three promising applications of such submatrices are presented: recommender systems, finding maximal elements in low-rank matrices and preconditioning of overdetermined linear systems. The code is available online.

  2. Rectangular maximum-volume submatrices and their applications

    KAUST Repository

    Mikhalev, Aleksandr

    2017-10-18

    We introduce a definition of the volume of a general rectangular matrix, which is equivalent to an absolute value of the determinant for square matrices. We generalize results of square maximum-volume submatrices to the rectangular case, show a connection of the rectangular volume with an optimal experimental design and provide estimates for a growth of coefficients and an approximation error in spectral and Chebyshev norms. Three promising applications of such submatrices are presented: recommender systems, finding maximal elements in low-rank matrices and preconditioning of overdetermined linear systems. The code is available online.

  3. Energy and Environment : volume 1

    OpenAIRE

    ANDRE, Michel; SAMARAS, Zissis; JACOB, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    This book is part of a set of six books called the 'Research for Innovative Transports' set. This collection presents an update of the latest academic and applied research, case studies, best practices and user perspectives on transport carried out in Europe and worldwide. The volumes are made up of a selection of the best papers presented at TRA2014. In this volume 1, recent research works are reported around the triptych : 'transport, energy and environment', which demonstrates that vehicl...

  4. Quantum volume hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme for parallel spatially multimode quantum memory for light. The scheme is based on a counterpropagating quantum signal wave and a strong classical reference wave as in a classical volume hologram and therefore can be called a quantum volume hologram. The medium for the hologram consists of a spatially extended ensemble of atoms placed in a magnetic field. The write-in and readout of this quantum hologram is as simple as that of its classical counterpart and consists of a single-pass illumination. In addition, we show that the present scheme for a quantum hologram is less sensitive to diffraction and therefore is capable of achieving a higher density of storage of spatial modes as compared to previous proposals. We present a feasibility study and show that experimental implementation is possible with available cold atomic samples. A quantum hologram capable of storing entangled images can become an important ingredient in quantum information processing and quantum imaging.

  5. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

  6. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Jim G.

    2013-01-01

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure

  7. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current

  8. Volume dependence of N-body bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Sebastian; Lee, Dean

    2018-04-01

    We derive the finite-volume correction to the binding energy of an N-particle quantum bound state in a cubic periodic volume. Our results are applicable to bound states with arbitrary composition and total angular momentum, and in any number of spatial dimensions. The only assumptions are that the interactions have finite range. The finite-volume correction is a sum of contributions from all possible breakup channels. In the case where the separation is into two bound clusters, our result gives the leading volume dependence up to exponentially small corrections. If the separation is into three or more clusters, there is a power-law factor that is beyond the scope of this work, however our result again determines the leading exponential dependence. We also present two independent methods that use finite-volume data to determine asymptotic normalization coefficients. The coefficients are useful to determine low-energy capture reactions into weakly bound states relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Using the techniques introduced here, one can even extract the infinite-volume energy limit using data from a single-volume calculation. The derived relations are tested using several exactly solvable systems and numerical examples. We anticipate immediate applications to lattice calculations of hadronic, nuclear, and cold atomic systems.

  9. [Clinical and economical comparison between in-house (Make) and outsourcing (Buy) management of the cardiac catheterization laboratory from two high-volume diagnostic and interventional centers: immediate and 6-month results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varbella, Ferdinando; Minniti, Davide; Belli, Riccardo; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Tomassini, Francesco; Gagnor, Andrea; Gambino, Alfonso; Tizzani, Emanuele; Montali, Nicolò; Ceruti, Michele; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2014-04-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) are widespread procedures in the Italian Healthcare System, but concerns are raised about their economic sustainability. In the last decade, public hospitals have outsourced the PCI services (building and maintaining the technological instruments and the personnel) "buying" them from private companies (Buy) rather than building and maintaining them through public expenditure (Make). The aim of this study was to compare the economic and clinical impact of these two management solutions (Buy and Make) in two community hospitals located in the Turin metropolitan area (Italy). We conducted: 1) a quantitative assessment in order to compare differences in the economic impact between Buy and Make for providing PCI; 2) a qualitative assessment comparing the clinical characteristics of two inpatient populations undergoing PCI and then analyzing the efficacy of the procedure in-hospital and at 6-month follow-up. Between January and June 2010, a total of 332 patients underwent PCI at the "degli Infermi" Hospital in Rivoli and 340 at the "Maria Vittoria" Hospital in Turin (Italy). There were no significant differences between the two populations neither about the clinical characteristics nor in procedural efficacy (either immediate or at follow-up). For 600 units of diagnostic-therapeutic pathway, the net present value at a discount rate of 3.5% of the Make project is higher than that of the Buy by €278.402,25, and is therefore the less convenient of the two solutions. The Buy solution is still the more convenient of the two at volumes <700 units. Our findings show that the Buy solution, if tailored to the specific local needs, provides access to sophisticated technology without making worse quality of services and may save capital expenditure below 700 PCI/years.

  10. Comparing Volumes of Prisms and Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Natalya

    2012-01-01

    Students' experience in using formulas for volumes is often limited to substituting numbers into given formulas. An activity presented in this article may help students make connections between the formulas for volumes of prisms and volumes of pyramids. In addition, some interesting facts from number theory arise, demonstrating strong connections…

  11. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  12. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P standard deviation: CECT versus PET/CT 32.48 cm(3) ± 36.63 versus 32.21 cm(3) ± 37.09; P > 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal

  13. Transform coding for hardware-accelerated volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2007-01-01

    Hardware-accelerated volume rendering using the GPU is now the standard approach for real-time volume rendering, although limited graphics memory can present a problem when rendering large volume data sets. Volumetric compression in which the decompression is coupled to rendering has been shown to be an effective solution to this problem; however, most existing techniques were developed in the context of software volume rendering, and all but the simplest approaches are prohibitive in a real-time hardware-accelerated volume rendering context. In this paper we present a novel block-based transform coding scheme designed specifically with real-time volume rendering in mind, such that the decompression is fast without sacrificing compression quality. This is made possible by consolidating the inverse transform with dequantization in such a way as to allow most of the reprojection to be precomputed. Furthermore, we take advantage of the freedom afforded by off-line compression in order to optimize the encoding as much as possible while hiding this complexity from the decoder. In this context we develop a new block classification scheme which allows us to preserve perceptually important features in the compression. The result of this work is an asymmetric transform coding scheme that allows very large volumes to be compressed and then decompressed in real-time while rendering on the GPU.

  14. Generalized Partial Volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Mutual Information (MI) and normalized mutual information (NMI) are popular choices as similarity measure for multimodal image registration. Presently, one of two approaches is often used for estimating these measures: The Parzen Window (PW) and the Generalized Partial Volume (GPV). Their theoret...... of view as well as w.r.t. computational complexity. Finally, we present algorithms for both approaches for NMI which is comparable in speed to Sum of Squared Differences (SSD), and we illustrate the differences between PW and GPV on a number of registration examples....

  15. Changes of pituitary gland volume in Kennedy disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, C C; Teismann, I K; Konrad, C; Heindel, W L; Schiffbauer, H

    2013-12-01

    Kennedy disease is a rare X-linked neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the androgen-receptor gene. Apart from neurologic signs, this mutation can cause a partial androgen insensitivity syndrome with typical alterations of gonadotropic hormones produced by the pituitary gland. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the impact of Kennedy disease on pituitary gland volume under the hypothesis that endocrinologic changes caused by partial androgen insensitivity may lead to morphologic changes (ie, hypertrophy) of the pituitary gland. Pituitary gland volume was measured in sagittal sections of 3D T1-weighted 3T-MR imaging data of 8 patients with genetically proven Kennedy disease and compared with 16 healthy age-matched control subjects by use of Multitracer by a blinded, experienced radiologist. The results were analyzed by a univariant ANOVA with total brain volume as a covariant. Furthermore, correlation and linear regression analyses were performed for pituitary volume, patient age, disease duration, and CAG repeat expansion length. Intraobserver reliability was evaluated by means of the Pearson correlation coefficient. Pituitary volume was significantly larger in patients with Kennedy disease (636 [±90] mm(3)) than in healthy control subjects (534 [±91] mm(3)) (P = .041). There was no significant difference in total brain volume (P = .379). Control subjects showed a significant decrease in volume with age (r = -0.712, P = .002), whereas there was a trend to increasing gland volume in patients with Kennedy disease (r = 0.443, P = .272). Gland volume correlated with CAG repeat expansion length in patients (r = 0.630, P = .047). The correlation coefficient for intraobserver reliability was 0.94 (P pituitary volume that correlated with the CAG repeat expansion length. This could reflect hypertrophy as the result of elevated gonadotropic hormone secretion caused by the androgen receptor mutation with partial

  16. Phonons: Theory and experiments II. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruesch, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present second volume titled as ''Phonons: Theory and Experiments II'', contains, a thorough study of experimental techniques and the interpretation of experimental results. This three-volume set tries to bridge the gap between theory and experiment, and is addressed to those working in both camps in the vast field of dynamical properties of solids. Topics presented in the second volume include; infrared-, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy, interaction of X-rays with phonons, and inelastic neutron scattering. In addition an account is given of some other techniques, including ultrasonic methods, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, point contact spectroscopy, and spectroscopy of surface phonons, thin films and adsorbates. Both experimental aspects and theoretical concepts necessary for the interpretation of experimental data are discussed. An attempt is made to present the descriptive as well as the analytical aspects of the topics. Simple models are often used to illustrate the basic concepts and more than 100 figures are included to illustrate both theoretical and experimental results. Many chapters contain a number of problems with hints and results giving additional information

  17. A survey of electric and hybrid vehicles simulation programs. Volume 2: Questionnaire responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, J.; Heimburger, D. A.; Metcalfe, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The data received in a survey conducted within the United States to determine the extent of development and capabilities of automotive performance simulation programs suitable for electric and hybrid vehicle studies are presented. The survey was conducted for the Department of Energy by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume 1 of this report summarizes and discusses the results contained in Volume 2.

  18. Terminal Posterior Tilted Implants Planned as a Sinus Graft Alternative for Fixed Full-Arch Implant-Supported Maxillary Restoration: A Case Series with 10- to 19-Year Results on 44 Consecutive Patients Presenting for Routine Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Yvan; Sullivan, Richard M

    2017-02-01

    Posterior maxillary tilted implants are gaining prevalence as an alternative to sinus grafts supporting fixed maxillary restorations. This paper reports long-term results after loading using this technique. Consecutive patients presenting for either routine hygiene maintenance or unplanned emergency care who had received tilted implants as a sinus graft alternative to support fixed fully implant-supported restoration of an edentulous maxilla and were followed for a minimum of 10 years from initial implant placement were included in this evaluation. Forty-four patients were identified: 40 with bilateral tilted implants and 4 with one tilted and one axial posterior implant. Eight patients received one-piece fixed porcelain-to-gold screw-retained restorations, and thirty-six patients received a fully implant-supported patient-removable Marius Bridge. Seventy-nine out of 84 originally loaded posterior tilted implants survived a minimum of 10 years loading; one tilted implant was lost at 10 years. Eight additional posterior implants were placed for either these lost tilted posterior implants or as proactive supplemental support; one of these replacement tilted implants survived for at least 10 years and is included in the data. All patients have maintained continuous fixed function throughout the follow-up period. Forty-one out of 44 patients continue with the original restoration, 33 without modification or removal of the fixed restoration or implant-connecting bar. One porcelain-to-gold and seven Marius Bridges had framework modifications to accommodate additional implants; 3 Marius Bridge restorations were replaced with a newer generation. Within the limits of this retrospective study, the results show that continuous fixed function of fully implant-supported maxillary restorations using posterior tilted implants in terminal positions of support as a sinus graft alternative combined with axial anterior implants is possible over a prolonged period. Loss of a posterior

  19. Tumor Volume Changes on 1.5 Tesla Endorectal MRI During Neoadjuvant Androgen Suppression Therapy for Higher-Risk Prostate Cancer and Recurrence in Men Treated Using Radiation Therapy Results of the Phase II CALGB 9682 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Halabi, Susan; Tempany, Clare; Titelbaum, David; Philips, George K.; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Sanford, Ben; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We prospectively determined whether the change in tumor volume (TV) during 2 months of neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (nAST) measured using conventional 1.5 Tesla endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) was associated with the risk of recurrence after radiation (RT) and 6 months of AST. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 180 men with clinical stage T1c-T3cN0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were registered. Fifteen were found to be ineligible and the institutional MR radiologist could not assess the TV in 32, leaving 133 for analysis. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether a significant association existed between eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST and time to recurrence adjusting for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score (8 to 10 or 7 vs. 6 or less) and stage (T3 vs. T1-2). Results: After a median follow up of 6.7 years and adjusting for known prognostic factors, there was a significant increase in the risk of PSA failure (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.025) in men with eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST. Specifically, adjusted estimates of PSA failure were significantly higher (p = 0.032) in men with, compared with men without, eMRI-defined TV progression reaching 38% vs. 19%, respectively, by 5 years. Conclusion: Eradicating intraprostatic hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) by maximizing local control and randomized trials assessing whether survival is improved when agents active against HRPC are combined with maximal local therapy are needed in men who progress based on eMRI during nAST

  20. Use of a theoretical equation of state to interpret time-dependent free volume in polymer glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curro, J.G.; Lagasse, R.R.; Simha, R.

    1981-01-01

    Many physical properties of polymer glasses change spontaneously during isothermal aging by a process commonly modeled as collapse of free volume. The model has not been verified rigorously because free volume cannot be unambiguously measured. In the present investigation we tentatively identify the free-volume fraction with the fraction of empty sites in the equation of state of Simha and Somcynsky. With this theory, volume recovery measurements can be analyzed to yield directly the time-dependent, free-volume fraction. Using this approach, recent volume measurements on poly(methyl methacrylate) are analyzed. The resulting free-volume fractions are then used in the Doolittle equation to predict the shift in stress relaxation curves at 23 0 C. These predicted shift factors agree with the experimental measurements of Cizmecioglu et al. In addition, it is shown that previous assumptions concerning temperature dependence of free volume are inconsistent with the theory

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume I. Program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP): its background, its studies, and its results. The introductory chapter traces the growth of the issue of nuclear weapons proliferation and the organization and objectives of NASAP. Chapter 2 summarizes the program's assessments, findings, and recommendations. Each of Volumes II-VII reports on an individual assessment (Volumn II: Proliferation Resistance; Volume III: Resources and Fuel Cycle Facilities; Volume IV: Commercial Potential; Volume V: Economics and Systems Analysis; Volume VI: Safety and Environmental Considerations for Licensing; Volume VII: International Perspectives). Volume VIII (Advanced Concepts) presents a combined assessment of several less fully developed concepts, and Volume IX (Reactor and Fuel Cycle Descriptions) provides detailed descriptions of the reactor and fuel-cycle systems studied by NASAP

  2. Volume reduction and solidification of liquid and solid low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a brief background of the development of a method of radioactive waste volume reduction using a unique fluidized bed calciner/incinerator. The volume reduction system is capable of processing a variety of liquid chemical wastes, spent ion exchange resin beads, filter treatment sludges, contaminated lubricating oils, and miscellaneous combustible solids such as paper, rags, protective clothing, wood, etc. All of these wastes are processed in one chemical reaction vessel. Detailed process data is presented that shows the system is capable of reducing the total volume of disposable radioactive waste generated by light water reactors by a factor of 10. Equally important to reducing the volume of power reactor radwaste is the final form of the stored or disposable radwaste. This paper also presents process data related to a new radwaste solidification system, presently being developed, that is particularly suited for immobilizing the granular solids and ashes resulting from volume reduction by calcination and/or incineration

  3. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...... patients had significantly smaller substantia nigra and caudate volumes than controls but normal intracranial volume. In both patient groups there was a further trend towards smaller amygdala volumes. DISCUSSION: Increased ICV in PD patients is a new finding that may be explained by genetic factors...

  4. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volume: soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigau, E.; Kantor, G.; Lagarde, P.; Taieb, S.; Ceugnart, L.; Vilain, M.O.; Penel, N.; Depadt, G.

    2001-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities are currently treated with more conservative and functional approaches, combining surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The role of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy has been defined through randomized studies performed in the 80's and 90's. However, the ubiquity of tumour location for these tumours makes difficult a systematic definition of local treatments. Tumour volume definition is based on pre and post surgical imaging (MRI) and on described pathological report. The clinical target volume will take into account quality of the resection and anatomical barriers and will be based on an anatomy and not only on safety margins around the tumour bed. General rules for this irradiation (doses, volumes) and principal results will be presented. (authors)

  5. Programs to obtain vertical heights from mean sea level and for computing volume of sand/mineral along beaches: A case study with Kalbadevi beach profiling data and results

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ganesan, P.

    Two programs have been developed to process profile data, for obtaining vertical heights with respect to mean sea level (M.S.L.) and for computation of volume of heavy mineral / sand accumulation or erosion along the beaches. The final output...

  6. [Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koichi; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute an MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI.

  7. Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Koichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute and MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5 T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI. (author)

  8. Virtual Presenters: Towards Interactive Virtual Presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Cappellini, V.; Hemsley, J.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss having virtual presenters in virtual environments that present information to visitors of these environments. Some current research is surveyed and we will look in particular to our research in the context of a virtual meeting room where a virtual presenter uses speech, gestures, pointing

  9. Beyond the Floor Effect on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-4th Ed. (WISC-IV): Calculating IQ and Indexes of Subjects Presenting a Floored Pattern of Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, A.; Pezzuti, L.; Hulbert, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is now widely known that children with severe intellectual disability show a 'floor effect' on the Wechsler scales. This effect emerges because the practice of transforming raw scores into scaled scores eliminates any variability present in participants with low intellectual ability and because intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are…

  10. Vector velocity volume flow estimation: Sources of error and corrections applied for arteriovenous fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Stuart, Matthias Bo

    2016-01-01

    radius. The error sources were also studied in vivo under realistic clinical conditions, and the theoretical results were applied for correcting the volume flow errors. Twenty dialysis patients with arteriovenous fistulas were scanned to obtain vector flow maps of fistulas. When fitting an ellipsis......A method for vector velocity volume flow estimation is presented, along with an investigation of its sources of error and correction of actual volume flow measurements. Volume flow errors are quantified theoretically by numerical modeling, through flow phantom measurements, and studied in vivo...

  11. The economics of radwaste volume reduction strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffre, M.; Ensminger, D.; Nalbandian, J.; Naughton, M.

    1984-01-01

    A recently concluded EPRI study has generated much of the information needed by utilities when they consider the purchase of volume reduction equipment. This paper presents some of the study's results on volume reduction economics. The paper contains two types of results. The first is a detailed look at the economics of fourteen equipment options at a hypothetical reactor station. Costs were calculated with VRTECH, a radwaste economics computer program developed by TASC. This analysis illustrates the major points of the project conclusions. Second, the effects of the major assumptions used in the hypothetical case are examined. This analysis shows that the radwaste generation rate and the burial cost escalation rate are primary considerations when evaluating the benefit of each option

  12. MEAN PLATELET VOLUME AND RISK OF THROMBOTIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasantha Kumar Thankappan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Stroke is a major cause of long term morbidity and mortality. Several factors are known to increase the liability to stroke. Platelets play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic complications, contributing to thrombus formation. Platelet size (mean platelet volume, MPV is a marker and possible determinant of platelet function, large platelets being potentially more reactive. Hence an attempt has-been made to study the association if any between mean platelet volume and thrombotic stroke. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between Mean Platelet Volume (MPV and thrombotic stroke. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study is a case control study and data was collected at Government Medical College Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala a tertiary care referral centre. The study was carried out among fifty patients diagnosed with thrombotic stroke and presenting to the hospital within forty eight hours of onset of symptoms. Fifty age group and sex matched controls were also recruited. Mean platelet volume was obtained using a SYSMEX automated analyser. RESULTS This study has shown a statistically significant relation between mean platelet volume and risk of thrombotic stroke but no statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume. CONCLUSION This study has shown an elevation of MPV in acute phase of thrombotic stroke. Platelet mass was found to be more or less a constant. This study did not find a statistically significant correlation between clinical severity of stroke and mean platelet volume.

  13. Testicular Volume: Size Does Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Lobo, Alexander; Segovia Fuentes, Javier; Cerpa Reyes, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    Testicular volume is critical for semen production and, consequently, for fertility. Hence the importance of knowing the normal size ranges and the different methods for calculating size, in order to classify patients at risk and refer them for appropriate management. Ultrasound is the first-line diagnostic method for the evaluation of testicular pathology, and it is also the best tool for estimating the volume of both testicles, bearing in mind that a testicular volume below 15 cc results in fertility problems. Although there are many causes of infertility, varicocele is undoubtedly the most important of all, because of its frequency and because it is amenable to curative surgical treatment.

  14. Cellwise conservative unsplit advection for the volume of fluid method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    We present a cellwise conservative unsplit (CCU) advection scheme for the volume of fluid method (VOF) in 2D. Contrary to other schemes based on explicit calculations of the flux balances, the CCU advection adopts a cellwise approach where the pre-images of the control volumes are traced......-overlapping donating regions and pre-images with conforming edges to their neighbors, resulting in the conservativeness and the boundedness (liquid volume fraction inside the interval [0, 1]) of the CCU advection scheme. Finally, the update of the liquid volume fractions is computed from the intersections of the pre......-image polygons with the reconstructed interfaces. The CCU scheme is tested on several benchmark tests for the VOF advection, together with the standard piecewise linear interface calculation (PLIC). The geometrical errors of the CCU compare favorably with other unsplit VOF-PLIC schemes. Finally, potential...

  15. Exploring the connectome: Petascale volume visualization of microscopy data streams

    KAUST Repository

    Beyer, Johanna; Hadwiger, Markus; Al-Awami, Ali K.; Jeong, Wonki; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Lichtman, Jeff W M D; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution microscopy let neuroscientists acquire neural-tissue volume data of extremely large sizes. However, the tremendous resolution and the high complexity of neural structures present big challenges to storage, processing, and visualization at interactive rates. A proposed system provides interactive exploration of petascale (petavoxel) volumes resulting from high-throughput electron microscopy data streams. The system can concurrently handle multiple volumes and can support the simultaneous visualization of high-resolution voxel segmentation data. Its visualization-driven design restricts most computations to a small subset of the data. It employs a multiresolution virtual-memory architecture for better scalability than previous approaches and for handling incomplete data. Researchers have employed it for a 1-teravoxel mouse cortex volume, of which several hundred axons and dendrites as well as synapses have been segmented and labeled. © 1981-2012 IEEE.

  16. Exploring the connectome: Petascale volume visualization of microscopy data streams

    KAUST Repository

    Beyer, Johanna

    2013-07-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution microscopy let neuroscientists acquire neural-tissue volume data of extremely large sizes. However, the tremendous resolution and the high complexity of neural structures present big challenges to storage, processing, and visualization at interactive rates. A proposed system provides interactive exploration of petascale (petavoxel) volumes resulting from high-throughput electron microscopy data streams. The system can concurrently handle multiple volumes and can support the simultaneous visualization of high-resolution voxel segmentation data. Its visualization-driven design restricts most computations to a small subset of the data. It employs a multiresolution virtual-memory architecture for better scalability than previous approaches and for handling incomplete data. Researchers have employed it for a 1-teravoxel mouse cortex volume, of which several hundred axons and dendrites as well as synapses have been segmented and labeled. © 1981-2012 IEEE.

  17. The Clinical Presentation, Survival Outcomes, and Management of Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma and Cardiac Metastasis Without Inferior Vena Cava Involvement: Results From a Pooled Clinical Trial Database and Systematic Review of Reported Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri Malone, Mariuxi A; Ares, Gustavo Ruiz; De Velasco, Guillermo; Brandão, Raphael; Lin, Xun; Norton, Craig; Simantov, Ronit; Moslehi, Javid; Krajewski, Katherine M; Choueiri, Toni K; McKay, Rana R

    2018-04-01

    Cardiac metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are uncommon and there are limited data regarding the presentation and outcomes of this population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of patients with RCC with cardiac metastasis without inferior vena cava (IVC) involvement. We conducted a pooled retrospective analysis of metastatic RCC patients treated in 4 clinical trials. Additionally, we conducted a systematic review of cases reported in the literature from 1973 to 2015. Patients with cardiac metastases from RCC without IVC involvement were included. Patient and disease characteristics were described. Additionally, treatments, response to therapy, and survival outcomes were summarized. Of 1765 metastatic RCC patients in the clinical trials database, 10 had cardiac metastases without IVC involvement. All patients received treatment with targeted therapy. There was 1 observed partial response (10%) and 6 patients showed stable disease (60%). The median progression-free survival was 6.9 months. The systematic review of reported clinical cases included 39 patients. In these patients, the most common cardiac site of involvement was the right ventricle (51%; n = 20). Patients were treated with medical (28%; n = 11) and/or surgical treatment (49%; n = 19) depending on whether disease was isolated (n = 13) or multifocal (n = 26). To our knowledge, this is the first series to report on the presentation and outcomes of patients with cardiac metastasis without IVC involvement in RCC. We highlight that although the frequency of patients with cardiac metastases without IVC involvement is low, these patients have a unique clinical presentation and warrant special multidisciplinary management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 1: data summary and conclusions. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region. The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Eleven RCA Member States participated in the CRP. Research co-ordination meetings (RCMs) for the CRP were held in Mito City, Japan, 17-21 October 1988 and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, 8-12 April 1991. The concluding meeting was held in Tianjin, China, 25-29 October 1993. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries

  19. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 1: data summary and conclusions. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region. The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Eleven RCA Member States participated in the CRP. Research co-ordination meetings (RCMs) for the CRP were held in Mito City, Japan, 17-21 October 1988 and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, 8-12 April 1991. The concluding meeting was held in Tianjin, China, 25-29 October 1993. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries. Refs, figs, tabs.

  20. Making your presentation fun: creative presentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KEENEN,MARTHA JANE

    2000-05-18

    What possesses someone to volunteer and go through hoops and red tape to make a presentation at a conference? For that matter, why does anyone ever present anything to anyone? Actually, presentations are a fact of life and there are many reasons for doing a presentation and doing it well. New and existing staff need training and orientation to the way things are done here. Handing all of them a manual and hoping they read it is pretty much a waste of paper. On the other hand, an effective, entertaining and upbeat presentation on the relevant topics is more likely to stick with those people. They will even have a name and face to remember and seek out when they have an issue on or with that topic. This can be a very effective beginning for networking with new peers. The presenter is seen as knowledgeable, as a source of information on company topics and possibly evaluated as a potential mentor or future manager. Project staff and/or peers benefit from clear, concise, presentations of topical knowledge. This is one way that a group working on various aspects of the same project or program can stay in touch and in step with each other. Most importantly, presentations may be the best or only door into the minds (and budgets) of management and customers. These presentations are a wonderful opportunity to address legal and compliance issues, budget, staffing, and services. Here is a chance, maybe the only one, to demonstrate and explain the wonderfulness of a program and the benefit they get by using the services offered most effectively. An interactive presentation on legal and compliance issues can be an effective tool in helping customers and/or management make good risk management decisions.

  1. Quantification of brain tissue through incorporation of partial volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Howard D.; Santago, Peter, II; Snyder, Wesley E.

    1992-06-01

    This research addresses the problem of automatically quantifying the various types of brain tissue, CSF, white matter, and gray matter, using T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. The method employs a statistical model of the noise and partial volume effect and fits the derived probability density function to that of the data. Following this fit, the optimal decision points can be found for the materials and thus they can be quantified. Emphasis is placed on repeatable results for which a confidence in the solution might be measured. Results are presented assuming a single Gaussian noise source and a uniform distribution of partial volume pixels for both simulated and actual data. Thus far results have been mixed, with no clear advantage being shown in taking into account partial volume effects. Due to the fitting problem being ill-conditioned, it is not yet clear whether these results are due to problems with the model or the method of solution.

  2. Revised tephra volumes for Cascade Range volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Isopach maps from tephra eruptions from Mount St. Helens were reported in Carey et al. (1995) and for tephra eruptions from Glacier Peak in Gardner et al. (1998). For exponential thinning, the isopach data only define a single slope on a log thickness versus square root of area plot. Carey et al. (1995) proposed a model that was used to estimate a second slope, and volumes were presented in both studies using this model. A study by Sulpizio (2005) for estimating the second slope and square root of area where the lines intersect involves a systematic analysis of many eruptions to provide correlation equations. The purpose of this paper is to recalculate the volumes of Cascades eruptions and compare results from the two methods. In order to gain some perspective on the methods for estimating the second slope, we use data for thickness versus distance beyond the last isopach that are available for some of the larger eruptions in the Cascades. The thickness versus square root of area method is extended to thickness versus distance by developing an approximate relation between the two assuming elliptical isopachs with the source at one of the foci. Based on the comparisons made between the Carey et al. (1995) and Sulpizio (2005) methods, it is felt that the later method provides a better estimate of the second slope. For Mount St. Helens, the estimates of total volume using the Sulpizio (2005) method are generally smaller than those using the Carey et al. (1995) method. For the volume estimates of Carey et al. (1995), the volume of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens is smaller than six of the eight previous eruptions. With the new volumes using the Sulpizio (2005) method, the 1980 eruption is smaller in volume than the upper end of the range for only three of the layers (Wn, Ye, and Yn) and is the same size as layer We. Thus the 1980 eruption becomes representative of the mid-range of volumes rather than being in the lower range.

  3. A new electric method for non-invasive continuous monitoring of stroke volume and ventricular volume-time curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konings Maurits K

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper a new non-invasive, operator-free, continuous ventricular stroke volume monitoring device (Hemodynamic Cardiac Profiler, HCP is presented, that measures the average stroke volume (SV for each period of 20 seconds, as well as ventricular volume-time curves for each cardiac cycle, using a new electric method (Ventricular Field Recognition with six independent electrode pairs distributed over the frontal thoracic skin. In contrast to existing non-invasive electric methods, our method does not use the algorithms of impedance or bioreactance cardiography. Instead, our method is based on specific 2D spatial patterns on the thoracic skin, representing the distribution, over the thorax, of changes in the applied current field caused by cardiac volume changes during the cardiac cycle. Since total heart volume variation during the cardiac cycle is a poor indicator for ventricular stroke volume, our HCP separates atrial filling effects from ventricular filling effects, and retrieves the volume changes of only the ventricles. Methods ex-vivo experiments on a post-mortem human heart have been performed to measure the effects of increasing the blood volume inside the ventricles in isolation, leaving the atrial volume invariant (which can not be done in-vivo. These effects have been measured as a specific 2D pattern of voltage changes on the thoracic skin. Furthermore, a working prototype of the HCP has been developed that uses these ex-vivo results in an algorithm to decompose voltage changes, that were measured in-vivo by the HCP on the thoracic skin of a human volunteer, into an atrial component and a ventricular component, in almost real-time (with a delay of maximally 39 seconds. The HCP prototype has been tested in-vivo on 7 human volunteers, using G-suit inflation and deflation to provoke stroke volume changes, and LVot Doppler as a reference technique. Results The ex-vivo measurements showed that ventricular filling

  4. Variable retinal presentations in nanophthalmos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Zafar, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    Nanophthalmos is an uncommon developmental ocular disorder characterized by a small eye with short axial length, high hyperopia and high lens/eye volume ratio due to arrested development of the globe in all directions. Different types of fundus changes can rarely occur with nanophthalmos. We describe five cases of nanophthalmos, each of them presenting with a different fundus appearance. Our case series highlights variability of pigmentary changes from retinal flecks to bone spicules and bull's eye maculopathy, which are rare in the combinations described here. (author)

  5. Eigenvalues of the volume operator in loop quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Krzysztof A

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple method to calculate certain sums of the eigenvalues of the volume operator in loop quantum gravity. We derive the asymptotic distribution of the eigenvalues in the classical limit of very large spins, which turns out to be of a very simple form. The results can be useful for example in the statistical approach to quantum gravity

  6. On pressure: volume relations in hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.Y. Ie (Eric)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 is a brief introduction to several aspects of cardiovascular pressure-volume relations in dialysis patients. The aims of the thesis are presented. In Chapter 2, an overview is presented of circulatory physiology in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Volume withdrawal by

  7. Report on the results of the R and D of a 200 t/d entrained bed coal gasification pilot plant. Summary - Part 2. Volume 3: Results of the study operation and the evaluation; 1986- 200t/nichi funryusho sekitan gaska hatsuden pilot plant no kenkyu seika hokokusho (Matome). Sono 2. Dai 3 hen kenkyu unten seika to sono hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    A project was finished which had been carried out for 11 years since 1986 for technology of the entrained bed coal gasification power generation technology using a 200 t/d coal gasification combined cycle power generation pilot plant, and it was comprehensively summed up. In Volume 3: Results of the study operation and the evaluation, the following were summarized on gasifier: gasification performance of 200 t/d furnace, operation ability of the bituminous coal supply system, stability of char recovery, deposition of slag and char in furnace, discharge characteristics of molten slag, operation characteristics, etc. The following on gas refining facilities: dry desulfurizer, dust remover, new gas refining equipment (fixed bed dust removal/desulfurization system, packed bed desulfuriztion/dust removal system), etc. The following on gas turbine facilities: 12.5 MW gas turbine, large gas turbine, large gas turbine combustor, etc. Additionally, the paper summarized the control system and total function, operation characteristics of the whole pilot plant, relations of environmental preservation, study of the effective slag utilization, collection/study of unfavorable conditions/troubles and matters for the reflection, etc. (NEDO)

  8. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, Regina E.; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-01-01

    The Site Environmental Report is an integrated report on Berkeley Lab's environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. It summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2007. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory's environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities

  9. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Regina E.; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report is an integrated report on Berkeley Lab's environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. It summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2007. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory's environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  10. TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies

  11. Transcranial sonography: integration into target volume definition for glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Becker, Georg; Flentje, Michael; Richter, Susanne; Goerttler-Krauspe, Irene; Koelbl, Oliver

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies indicate that transcranial sonography (TCS) reliably displays the extension of malignant brain tumors. The effect of integrating TCS into radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was investigated herein. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients subtotally resected for GBM underwent TCS during radiotherapy planning and were conventionally treated (54 to 60 Gy). Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and stereotactic boost planning target volumes (PTVs, 3-mm margin) were created, based on contrast enhancement on computed tomography (CT) only (PTV CT ) or the combined CT and TCS information (PTV CT+TCS ). Noncoplonar conformal treatment plans for both PTVs were compared. Tumor progression patterns and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were related to both PTVs. Results: A sufficient temporal bone window for TCS was present in 11 of 13 patients. GTVs as defined by TCS were considerably larger than the respective CT volumes: Of the composite GTV CT+TCS (median volume 42 ml), 23%, 13%, and 66% (medians) were covered by the overlap of both methods, CT only and TCS only, respectively. Median sizes of PTV CT and PTV CT+TCS were 34 and 74 ml, respectively. Addition of TCS to CT information led to a median increase of the volume irradiated within the 80% isodose by 32 ml (median factor 1.51). PTV CT+TCS volume was at median 24% of a 'conventional' MRI(T2)-based PTV. Of eight progressions analyzed, three and six occurred inside the 80% isodose of the plans for PTV CT and for PTV CT+TCS , respectively. Conclusion: Addition of TCS tumor volume to the contrast-enhancing CT volume in postoperative radiotherapy planning for GBM increases the treated volume by a median factor of 1.5. Since a high frequency of marginal recurrences is reported from dose-escalation trials of this disease, TCS may complement established methods in PTV definition

  12. Present diagnostic strategies for acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Results of a questionnaire in a retrospective trial conducted by the Respiratory Nuclear Medicine Working Group of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Masami; Inoue, Tomio; Honda, Norinari; Suga, Kazuyoshi; Imai, Teruhiko

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to re-evaluate and clarify the diagnostic role of ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy in Japan, now that single-detector-row helical CT and multidetector-row CT are available in clinical practice. The Respiratory Nuclear Medicine Working Group of the Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine distributed a questionnaire to institutions in Japan equipped with scintillation cameras as of September 2001. Of 1,222 institutions, 239 returned effective answers (19.6%). The most frequent combination for initial diagnosis of acute pulmonary thromboembolism was chest radiography, perfusion lung scintigraphy, and contrast-enhanced CT (111 institutions, 46.4%). The questionnaire revealed that the validity and usage of perfusion lung scintigraphy and those of contrast-enhanced CT were equivalent in the present clinical situation. On the other hand, the diagnostic value of ventilation lung scintigraphy in suspected pulmonary thromboembolism has not been established in Japan. Even though contrast-enhanced CT is widely used in Japan, perfusion lung scintigraphy is still required to determine disease severity and monitor its progress. (author)

  13. Sirenomelia: A Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, S; Kumar, Shiva; Reddy, Surweshwar; Prasad, Hari; Irfan, G M

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Sirenomelia (Mermaid Syndrome), which is an extreme example of the caudal regression syndrome. It invariably presents with lower limb fusion, sacral and pelvic bony anomalies, absent external genitalia, imperforate anus, and renal agenesis or dysgenesis. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation. One of our cases survived for 12 days after birth. This new born had an unusually high anorectal anomaly in which the colon was ending at the level of mid transverse colon, fused lower limbs and genital anomalies. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed horseshoe kidney. Colostomy was performed on day 2 of life. The second case encountered was a stillborn baby on whom an autopsy was performed. PMID:26023366

  14. Sirenomelia: a rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Ramesh; Srinivas, S; Kumar, Shiva; Reddy, Surweshwar; Prasad, Hari; Irfan, G M

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting two cases of Sirenomelia (Mermaid Syndrome), which is an extreme example of the caudal regression syndrome. It invariably presents with lower limb fusion, sacral and pelvic bony anomalies, absent external genitalia, imperforate anus, and renal agenesis or dysgenesis. There are approximately 300 cases reported in the literature, 15% of which are associated with twinning, most often monozygotic. The syndrome of caudal regression is thought to be the result of injury to the caudal mesoderm early in gestation. One of our cases survived for 12 days after birth. This new born had an unusually high anorectal anomaly in which the colon was ending at the level of mid transverse colon, fused lower limbs and genital anomalies. Ultrasound of the abdomen revealed horseshoe kidney. Colostomy was performed on day 2 of life. The second case encountered was a stillborn baby on whom an autopsy was performed.

  15. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms

  16. RELAP5/MOD3 code manual. Volume 4, Models and correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The RELAP5 code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of light water reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems. RELAP5/MOD3 code documentation is divided into seven volumes: Volume I presents modeling theory and associated numerical schemes; Volume II details instructions for code application and input data preparation; Volume III presents the results of developmental assessment cases that demonstrate and verify the models used in the code; Volume IV discusses in detail RELAP5 models and correlations; Volume V presents guidelines that have evolved over the past several years through the use of the RELAP5 code; Volume VI discusses the numerical scheme used in RELAP5; and Volume VII presents a collection of independent assessment calculations