WorldWideScience

Sample records for volume outdoor reaction

  1. Using Outdoor Adventure Education to Develop Students' Groupwork Skills: A Quantitative Exploration of Reaction and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Sam J.; Burns, Victoria E.; Cumming, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the initial development of groupwork skills through outdoor adventure education (OAE) and the factors that predict the extent of this development, using the first two levels of Kirkpatrick's model of training evaluation. University students (N = 238) completed questionnaires measuring their initial reactions to OAE (Level 1…

  2. Effects of Outdoor Housing of Piglets on Behavior, Stress Reaction and Meat Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Yonezawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Well-designed housing systems are important from the viewpoint of animal welfare and improvement of meat production. In this study, we investigated the effects of outdoor housing of pigs on their behavior, cortisol levels, and meat characteristics. Two groups that were born and raised in a spacious outdoor pen (4×10 m for every two sows or a minimum-sized standard pen in a piggery (1.9×2.2 m for every sow were studied. When their behaviors at the age of 2 to 3 wk were observed, the number of rooting episodes tended to be larger (p = 0.0509 and the total time of rooting tended to be longer (p = 0.0640 in the outdoor-housed piglets although the difference was not significant. Basal salivary cortisol levels of the outdoor piglets at the age of 4 wk were significantly lower than those of the indoor piglets (5.0±0.59 ng/ml vs. 11.6±0.91 ng/ml, 30 min after treatment, although their plasma cortisol levels were similar (53.3±3.54 ng/ml vs. 59.9±4.84 ng/ml, 30 min after treatment. When the ears were pierced at weaning, plasma and salivary cortisol levels were increased in both groups, even at 15 min after piercing. However, the increase in the outdoor-housed group was significantly less than that in the indoor-housed group. Throughout their lives, body weight and daily gain of the pigs were not significantly different between the two groups. In a meat taste preference test taken by 20 panelists, saltiness, flavor, and color of the outdoor-housed pork were found to be more acceptable. Moreover, when an electronic taste-sensing device was utilized, the C00 and CPA-C00 outputs (3.78±0.07 and −0.20±0.023, which correspond to compounds of bitterness and smells, respectively, were significantly lower in the outdoor-housed pork (5.03±0.16 and −0.13±0.009. Our results demonstrate that the outdoor housing system for piglets induces natural behaviors such as rooting and suppresses the strongest stress reaction of piglets, which could be important

  3. Enzyme Reactions in Nanoporous, Picoliter Volume Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Choi, Chang Kyoung [Michigan Technological University; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in nanoscale fabrication allow creation of small volume reaction containers that can facilitate the screening and characterization of enzymes. A porous, ~19 pL volume vessel has been used in this work to carry out enzyme reactions under varying substrate concentrations. Glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase can be contained in these structures and diffusively fed with a solution containing glucose and the fluorogenic substrate Amplex Red through the engineered nanoscale pore structure. Fluorescent microscopy was used to monitor the reaction, which was carried out under microfluidic control. Kinetic characteristics of the enzyme were evaluated and compared with results from conventional scale reactions. These picoliter, nanoporous containers can facilitate quick determination of enzyme kinetics in microfluidic systems without the requirement of surface tethering and can be used for applications in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening.

  4. Outdoor recreation activity trends by volume segments: U.S. and Northeast market analyses, 1982-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine volume segmentation within three selected outdoor recreational activities -- swimming, hunting and downhill skiing over an eight-year period, from 1982 through 1989 at the national level and within the Northeast Region of the U.S.; and to determine if trend patterns existed within any of these activities when the market size...

  5. Enzyme Reactions in Nanoporous, Picoliter Volume Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuti, Piro; Retterer, Scott T.; Choi, Chang-Kyoung; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in nanoscale fabrication allow creation of small volume reaction containers that can facilitate the screening and characterization of enzymes. A porous, ~19 pL volume vessel has been used in this work to carry out enzyme reactions under varying substrate concentrations. Assessment of small molecule and Green Fluorescent Protein diffusion from the vessels indicates that pore sizes on order of 10 nm can be obtained, allowing capture of proteins and diffusive exchange of small molecules. Glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase can be contained in these structures and diffusively fed with a solution containing glucose and the fluorogenic substrate Amplex Red™ through the engineered nanoscale pore structure. Fluorescent microscopy was used to monitor the reaction, which was carried out under microfluidic control. Kinetic characteristics of the enzyme (Km and Vmax) were evaluated and compared with results from conventional scale reactions. These picoliter, nanoporous containers can facilitate quick determination of enzyme kinetics in microfluidic systems without the requirement of surface tethering and can be used for applications in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening. PMID:22148720

  6. Evaluation of Aromatic Oxidation Reactions in Seven Chemical Mechanisms with an Outdoor Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simulations using seven chemical mechanisms are intercompared against O3, NOx and hydrocarbon data from photooxidation experiments conducted at the University of North Carolina outdoor smog chamber. The mechanisms include CB4–2002, CB05, CB05-TU, a CB05 vari...

  7. Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Valynda

    2010-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

  8. A second-generation constrained reaction volume shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M F; Tulgestke, A M; Davidson, D F; Hanson, R K

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a shock tube that features a sliding gate valve in order to mechanically constrain the reactive test gas mixture to an area close to the shock tube endwall, separating it from a specially formulated non-reactive buffer gas mixture. This second-generation Constrained Reaction Volume (CRV) strategy enables near-constant-pressure shock tube test conditions for reactive experiments behind reflected shocks, thereby enabling improved modeling of the reactive flow field. Here we provide details of the design and operation of the new shock tube. In addition, we detail special buffer gas tailoring procedures, analyze the buffer/test gas interactions that occur on gate valve opening, and outline the size range of fuels that can be studied using the CRV technique in this facility. Finally, we present example low-temperature ignition delay time data to illustrate the CRV shock tube's performance.

  9. A second-generation constrained reaction volume shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. F.; Tulgestke, A. M.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a shock tube that features a sliding gate valve in order to mechanically constrain the reactive test gas mixture to an area close to the shock tube endwall, separating it from a specially formulated non-reactive buffer gas mixture. This second-generation Constrained Reaction Volume (CRV) strategy enables near-constant-pressure shock tube test conditions for reactive experiments behind reflected shocks, thereby enabling improved modeling of the reactive flow field. Here we provide details of the design and operation of the new shock tube. In addition, we detail special buffer gas tailoring procedures, analyze the buffer/test gas interactions that occur on gate valve opening, and outline the size range of fuels that can be studied using the CRV technique in this facility. Finally, we present example low-temperature ignition delay time data to illustrate the CRV shock tube's performance.

  10. Outdoor Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarchuk, Shawna; Eick, Charles

    2011-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is an exciting way to connect the learning of science to nature and the environment. Many school grounds include gardens, grassy areas, courtyards, and wooded areas. Some even have nearby streams or creeks. These are built-in laboratories for inquiry! In the authors' third-grade classroom, they align and integrate…

  11. Outdoor Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Kathy

    Course objectives and learning activities are contained in this curriculum guide for a 16-week home economics course which teaches cooking and sewing skills applicable to outdoor living. The course goals include increasing male enrollment in the home economics program, developing students' self-confidence and ability to work in groups, and…

  12. Immunochemical estimations of allergenic activities from outdoor aero-allergens, collected by a high-volume air sampler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Poulsen, L K; Mygind, K;

    1989-01-01

    To quantify airborne allergens in amorphus and morphological particles, a survey with collection of aero-allergens on glass fibre filters by means of a high-volume air-sampler (HIVOL) was conducted. In preliminary laboratory experiments we compared various filter elution techniques......, and the pulverizing elution technique was found to be optimal with regard to yield and convenience. When a surfactant, Tween 20 (0.5% v/v), was added to the elution buffer, a recovery of 80% could be obtained. Allergens in eluates were analysed by means of an IgG-subclass RAST inhibition assay. This immunochemical...... method for quantification of airborne allergens was validated, as a high recovery of timothy grass pollen allergens was eluted from air filters, and eluates were shown specific by RAST inhibition. The amount of immunochemically measured airborne timothy and birch allergens collected by means of the HIVOL...

  13. Finite volume element method for analysis of unsteady reaction-diffusion problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sutthisak Phongthanapanich; Pramote Dechaumphai

    2009-01-01

    A finite volume element method is developed for analyzing unsteady scalar reaction--diffusion problems in two dimensions. The method combines the concepts that are employed in the finite volume and the finite element method together. The finite volume method is used to discretize the unsteady reaction--diffusion equation, while the finite element method is applied to estimate the gradient quantities at cell faces. Robustness and efficiency of the combined method have been evaluated on uniform rectangular grids by using available numerical solutions of the two-dimensional reaction-diffusion problems. The numerical solutions demonstrate that the combined method is stable and can provide accurate solution without spurious oscillation along the highgradient boundary layers.

  14. Outdoor Education Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Teachers' Federation, Toronto.

    A guide and introduction to outdoor education for the classroom teacher, the manual lists 5 aims and objectives of outdoor education and discusses the means for reaching these objectives through field trips, camping, outdoor learning centers, and outdoor teaching in school environs. Selected activities are described by subject area: arts and…

  15. Optimisation of forensic genetics procedures used in disputed paternity testing: adjustment of the PCR reaction volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, Damir; Bakal, Narcisa; Kovacević, Lejla; Hodzić, Melisa; Haverić, Anja; Haverić, Sanin; Ibrulj, Slavica; Durmić, Adaleta

    2006-05-01

    Standard molecular techniques, with only a slight modification, are very useful in obtaining and interpreting the final results in the field of forensic genetic. Data obtained through such analysis are highly reliable and can be used as a very powerful tool that produces valuable results. However, success and swiftness of DNA typing of biological evidence either that found at a crime scene or used in disputed paternity testing, depends on the optimization of numerous factors. One of the most important and critical phases that ensures reliability of the whole procedure is the choice of the most suitable volume for the amplification protocol. Buccal swabs were collected from volunteers. DNA was extracted by Qiagen Dnaeasy Tissue Kit. PowerPlex 16 kit was used to simultaneously amplify 15 STR loci by PCR. Amplification was carried out as described previously. The tested total working reaction volumes were 5, 10 and 25 microl. The PCR amplification was carried out in PE Gene Amp PCR System Thermal Cycler (ABI, Foster City, CA). Amplification products were analyzed on an ABI PRISM 377 instrument (ABI, Foster City, CA) in 5% bis-acrilamide gel. Amplification was generally successful for all the tested reaction volumes. Lower partial to complete DNA profiles ratio, the quality of obtained STR profiles, significantly reduced amount of reaction's components give advantage to 5 microl reaction volume over other two tested volumes in this case.

  16. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  17. Outdoors classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanska-Markowska, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Why should students be trapped within the four walls of the classroom when there are a lot of ideas to have lessons led in the different way? I am not a fan of having lessons at school. For many students it is also boring to stay only at school, too. So I decided to organize workshops and trips to Universities or outdoors. I created KMO ( Discoverer's Club for Teenagers) at my school where students gave me some ideas and we started to make them real. I teach at school where students don't like science. I try hard to change their point of view about it. That's why I started to take parts in different competitions with my students. Last year we measured noise everywhere by the use of applications on a tablet to convince them that noise is very harmful for our body and us. We examined that the most harmful noises were at school's breaks, near the motorways and in the households. We also proved that acoustic screens, which were near the motorways, didn't protect us from noise. We measured that 30 meters from the screens the noise is the same as the motorway. We won the main prize for these measurements. We also got awards for calculating the costs of a car supplied by powered by a solar panel. We measured everything by computer. This year we decided to write an essay about trees and weather. We went to the forest and found the cut trees because we wanted to read the age of tree from the stump. I hadn't known earlier that we could read the weather from the tree's grain. We examined a lot of trees and we can tell that trees are good carriers of information about weather and natural disasters. I started studies safety education and I have a lot of ideas how to get my students interested in this subject that is similar to P.E., physics and chemistry, too. I hope that I will use my abilities from European Space Education Resource Office and GIFT workshop. I plan to use satellite and space to teach my students how they can check information about terrorism, floods or other

  18. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  19. Optimisation of a selective method for the determination of organophosphorous triesters in outdoor particulate samples by pressurised liquid extraction and large-volume injection gas chromatography-positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, José Benito; Rodil, Rosario; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío

    2007-07-01

    A selective analytical method for the determination of nine organophosphate triesters and triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) in outdoor particulate matter is presented. It involves a fully automated pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) step, integrating an alumina clean-up process, and subsequent determination by large-volume injection gas chromatography-positive chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-PCI-MS/MS). The extraction variables (solvent, amount of adsorbent, temperature, time and number of cycles) were optimised using a multicriteria strategy which implements a desirability function that maximises both extraction and clean-up efficiencies while searching for the best-compromise PLE conditions. The final method affords quantification limits of between 0.01 and 0.3 microg g(-1) and recoveries of >80%, with the exceptions of the most polar analytes, TCEP and TPPO (~65%) for both urban dust and PM10 samples. Moreover, the method permitted the levels of these compounds in dust deposited outdoors (between LOD and 0.5 microg g(-1) for TEHP) and PM10 samples (between LOD and 2.4 microg m(-3) for TiBP) to be measured and reported for the first time.

  20. Stock Market Reactions on Returns and Trading Volume: The Impact of the Global Financial Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiya Sohail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study empirically examines the short term under- and overreaction effect in the Karachi Stock Exchange, Pakistan, in the context of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis considering the period from September 2007 to 2009. Background: Investors’ probable reaction to an anticipated or unforeseen event is gaining immense importance in order to understand the complex market behavior. The arrival of good or bad news can tend to bring about a rise or decline in the stock price even if the news does not directly impact company’s performance. Method: The sample data for the stock price, trading volume and KSE 100 index are obtained from the Karachi Stock Exchange (KSE and Securities and Exchange Commission of Pakistan (SECP websites for the period September 2007 to 2009. To reach our objective, we used event studies. Results: There is evidence of significant overreaction in the first two weeks and significant under- reaction in the 12th and 24th week following specifically in the financial sector. For the non-financial sector, the returns stay positive and insignificant for both the winner and loser portfolios thereby negating any evidence of significant overreaction. Contributions: We wants to contribute to the existing literature, testing the under- and overreaction hypothesis in an emerging market. Our study also attempts to draw attention to any evidence of returns reversal in the loser and winner portfolios based on the trading volume. Investors may capitalize on the trading volume information to earn contrarian profits.

  1. Reactions of the students to integral volume problems and socio–psycho–mathematical relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergene Özkan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research; how the changes in reactions which university students give integral volume problems before solution and after solution affect the solution processes is inspected. In the study adopting qualitative paradigm’s interpretive approach, case study is used as study design. Participants of the research are the 142 students which had been chosen from four different faculties of two universities in Istanbul, using nonprobability sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with two students randomly chosen from every department and Integral Volume Pre Solution Test and Integral Volume Solution and After Solution Test were used as data collection tools. The data have been analyzed using descriptive analysis and presented by frequency and percentage tables. As a result of the research, it is concluded that the reactions of the students in the faculty, their familiarity to the mathematical statement and their attitude towards the problem and faculty based institutional differences such as professors, professional expectation causes the evolution of the socio-psycho-mathematical relationship between university students and problems and that affects the solution processes.

  2. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    The thesis has three aims: The first aim is to review the existing knowledge about ethnic minorities’ outdoor recreation in Europe. The second aim is to investigate similarities and differences in outdoor recreation patterns between adolescents with ethnic Danish and ethnic minority background....... An emerging field of research on ethnicity and outdoor recreation was identified, compared to the research in North America. However, the European research on ethnicity and outdoor recreation is growing. The European research has shown differences in outdoor recreation pattern (e.g. the motives for outdoor...... for visiting natural areas were most often social, such as being with family and friends, and health and well-being reasons (exercise and relaxing from stress). However, the ethnic minority adolescents more often stated “to be with family” as an important reason for visiting green spaces compared...

  3. Orinoco Outdoor Wireless LAN

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Wireless communication allows mobile communications to be located at various places within a construction site and communicate with each other as well as with a central, fixed location such as the jobsite trailer. Wireless LAN is one of the wireless data communication technologies that can be used in a jobsite. The Orinoco Outdoor system consists of Central Outdoor Router(COR), Remote Outdoor Router(ROR) and Internet Client Software.

  4. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    for visiting natural areas were most often social, such as being with family and friends, and health and well-being reasons (exercise and relaxing from stress). However, the ethnic minority adolescents more often stated “to be with family” as an important reason for visiting green spaces compared...... recreation, activities, and preferred outdoor recreation areas) between the minority and majority populations and related these differences to the ethnic minorities’ cultural background. The second paper presents the empirical work of this thesis, which is based on a survey of adolescents’ outdoor recreation...... to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...

  5. Outdoor ground impedance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenborough, Keith; Bashir, Imran; Taherzadeh, Shahram

    2011-05-01

    Many models for the acoustical properties of rigid-porous media require knowledge of parameter values that are not available for outdoor ground surfaces. The relationship used between tortuosity and porosity for stacked spheres results in five characteristic impedance models that require not more than two adjustable parameters. These models and hard-backed-layer versions are considered further through numerical fitting of 42 short range level difference spectra measured over various ground surfaces. For all but eight sites, slit-pore, phenomenological and variable porosity models yield lower fitting errors than those given by the widely used one-parameter semi-empirical model. Data for 12 of 26 grassland sites and for three beech wood sites are fitted better by hard-backed-layer models. Parameter values obtained by fitting slit-pore and phenomenological models to data for relatively low flow resistivity grounds, such as forest floors, porous asphalt, and gravel, are consistent with values that have been obtained non-acoustically. Three impedance models yield reasonable fits to a narrow band excess attenuation spectrum measured at short range over railway ballast but, if extended reaction is taken into account, the hard-backed-layer version of the slit-pore model gives the most reasonable parameter values.

  6. Red blood cell volume as a predictor of fatal reactions in cattle infected with Theileria parva Katete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fandamu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparison of mean corpuscular volume (MCV and packed cell volume (PCV was made between cattle undergoing lethal and non-lethal reactions following experimental infections with the apicomplexan protozoa, Theileria parva Katete. This work confirmed that anaemia occurs in infected animals. However, the fall in PCV was steeper in lethal reactions compared to non-lethal reactions. Our results show that animals with initially lower MCV values are more prone to fatal reaction, despite having normal PCV profiles. The study also found that small red blood cells are more likely to be infected with T. parva. These findings suggest that animals with a higher proportion of small red blood cells in circulation will be more likely to succumb to T. parva infections. The potential for using MCV as a predictor of the outcome of infection challenge is discussed.

  7. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    for visiting natural areas were most often social, such as being with family and friends, and health and well-being reasons (exercise and relaxing from stress). However, the ethnic minority adolescents more often stated “to be with family” as an important reason for visiting green spaces compared...... to their ethnic Danish counterparts. The adolescents use different areas for outdoor recreation: the adolescents with ethnic Danish background use sports grounds for outdoor recreation, while adolescents with ethnic minority backgrounds use urban green spaces for outdoor recreation. For activities reported...... comparison of to what extend and in what way policy documents and research approaches take into account ethnic minority groups. The findings indicate that there is a correlation in the current national research approaches of the four countries and the societal and political context of the four countries...

  8. Predicting outdoor sound

    CERN Document Server

    Attenborough, Keith; Horoshenkov, Kirill

    2014-01-01

    1. Introduction  2. The Propagation of Sound Near Ground Surfaces in a Homogeneous Medium  3. Predicting the Acoustical Properties of Outdoor Ground Surfaces  4. Measurements of the Acoustical Properties of Ground Surfaces and Comparisons with Models  5. Predicting Effects of Source Characteristics on Outdoor Sound  6. Predictions, Approximations and Empirical Results for Ground Effect Excluding Meteorological Effects  7. Influence of Source Motion on Ground Effect and Diffraction  8. Predicting Effects of Mixed Impedance Ground  9. Predicting the Performance of Outdoor Noise Barriers  10. Predicting Effects of Vegetation, Trees and Turbulence  11. Analytical Approximations including Ground Effect, Refraction and Turbulence  12. Prediction Schemes  13. Predicting Sound in an Urban Environment.

  9. The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

  10. Vision + Community = Outdoor Learning Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Charles; Tatarchuk, Shawna; Anderson, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor learning areas are becoming more popular as a means for community-based, cross-curricular learning where children study issues of local relevance (Sobel 2004). Outdoor learning areas, any place outside of the school building where children can observe and interact with the natural world around them, include outdoor structures for seating…

  11. Outdoor Education and Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, José M.; Brewer, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Elementary students have limited opportunities to learn science in an outdoor setting at school. Some suggest this is partially due to a lack of teacher efficacy teaching in an outdoor setting. Yet the research literature indicates that outdoor learning experiences develop positive environmental attitudes and can positively affect science…

  12. Outdoor Experiences and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heather E.

    2017-01-01

    Positive outdoor teaching and learning experiences and sound pedagogical approaches undoubtedly have contributed towards an understanding of environmental sustainability but it is not always clear how, and to what extent, education can translate into action. This article argues, with reference to social learning theory, that role modelling,…

  13. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  14. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  15. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  16. Outdoor production of microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vree, de Jeroen H.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the production of microalgae under outdoor conditions, for this research was done at pilot scale. Microalgae are an interesting alternative to currently used sources for bulk commodities as food, feed and chemicals. Research activities within the field are shattered; different

  17. Outdoor recreation and ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentin, Sandra

    recreation, activities, and preferred outdoor recreation areas) between the minority and majority populations and related these differences to the ethnic minorities’ cultural background. The second paper presents the empirical work of this thesis, which is based on a survey of adolescents’ outdoor recreation...... pattern. The survey was conducted in two school districts: in North West Copenhagen and the municipality of Ringkøbing-Skjern (n=449, aged 14-16 years, 365 adolescents with ethnic Danish background, and 84 adolescents with ethnic minority background). The results of the questionnaire have shown both...... carried out during some part of the year, “going for a walk”, “barbequing”, “taking a trip with family” were frequently cited by both groups, but more common among adolescents with ethnic minority background. “Walking the dog” was much more common among adolescents with Danish background, who also more...

  18. Biochemical reactions in crowded environments: Revisiting the effects of volume exclusion with simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eGomez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular crowding is ubiquitous within cells and affects many biological processes including protein-protein binding, enzyme activities and gene regulation. Here we revisit some generic effects of crowding using a combination of lattice simulations and reaction-diffusion simulations with the program ReaDDy. Specifically, we implement three reactions, simple binding, a diffusion-limited reaction and a reaction with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Histograms of binding and unbinding times provide a detailed picture how crowding affects these reactions and how the separate effects of crowding on binding equilibrium and on diffusion act together. In addition, we discuss how crowding affects processes related to gene expression such as RNA polymerase-promoter binding and translation elongation.

  19. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II ? reactions of organic species

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    International audience; This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices con...

  20. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  1. Outdoor lighting guide

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    As concern grows over environmental issues and light pollution, this book satisfies a need for a straightforward and accessible guide to the use, design and installation of outdoor lighting.This all-inclusive guide to exterior lighting from the Institution of Lighting Engineers, recognized as the pre-eminent professional source in the UK for authoritative guidance on exterior lighting, provides a comprehensive source of information and advice on all forms of exterior lighting, from floodlighting, buildings and road lighting to elaborate Christmas decorations. Useful to practitioners

  2. Validation of a reaction volume reduction protocol for analysis of Y chromosome haplotypes targeting DNA databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S; Santos, S M; Rabêlo, K C N; Soriano, E P; Carvalho, M V D; Junior, A F Caldas; Porto, G G; Campello, R I C; Antunes, A A; Queiroz, R A; Souza, S M

    2017-04-28

    The use of Y chromosome haplotypes, important for the detection of sexual crimes in forensics, has gained prominence with the use of databases that incorporate these genetic profiles in their system. Here, we optimized and validated an amplification protocol for Y chromosome profile retrieval in reference samples using lesser materials than those in commercial kits. FTA(®) cards (Flinders Technology Associates) were used to support the oral cells of male individuals, which were amplified directly using the SwabSolution reagent (Promega). First, we optimized and validated the process to define the volume and cycling conditions. Three reference samples and nineteen 1.2 mm-diameter perforated discs were used per sample. Amplification of one or two discs (samples) with the PowerPlex(®) Y23 kit (Promega) was performed using 25, 26, and 27 thermal cycles. Twenty percent, 32%, and 100% reagent volumes, one disc, and 26 cycles were used for the control per sample. Thereafter, all samples (N = 270) were amplified using 27 cycles, one disc, and 32% reagents (optimized conditions). Data was analyzed using a study of equilibrium values between fluorophore colors. In the samples analyzed with 20% volume, an imbalance was observed in peak heights, both inside and in-between each dye. In samples amplified with 32% reagents, the values obtained for the intra-color and inter-color standard balance calculations for verification of the quality of the analyzed peaks were similar to those of samples amplified with 100% of the recommended volume. The quality of the profiles obtained with 32% reagents was suitable for insertion into databases.

  3. Group Cooperation in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Bruce E.

    1978-01-01

    Utilizing the Beatles' Yellow Submarine fantasy (e.g., the Blue Meanies), this outdoor education program is designed for sixth graders and special education students. Activities developed at the Cortland Resident Outdoor Education Camp include a series of group stress/challenge activities to be accomplished by everyone in the group, as a group.…

  4. Outdoor schools: Limits and dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Smetáčková

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor school is a stable element of Czech educational system. However,many changes have occurred during the last twenty years in the purposes of outdoorschools and in their organization. The article presents various school statistics andresults of research which included questionnaire survey in elementary schools in Pragueand a case study of two classes. The study found that the outdoor school programmesare getting shorter, budgets for outdoor schools are reduced, and prices of outdoorschool programmes for parents are increasing. Because of high prices, almost 20 % ofpupils cannot attend outdoor schools. Nevertheless, according to teachers, pupils andparents, the main purpose of outdoor school programmes is to create a better socialclimate in peer groups. Because of high rates of absence, this goal is partly invalid.Another purpose should be that teachers and children get to know each other better.This goal is invalid as well because many schools hire commercial agencies which limitsthe time that pupils and teachers spend together.

  5. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume III ? gas phase reactions of inorganic halogens

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, R.; Baulch, D. L.; Cox, R A; J. N. Crowley; Hampson, R. F.; Hynes, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.; M. J. Rossi; Troe, J.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This article, the third in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of inorganic halogen species, which were last published in J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, in 2000 (Atkinson et al., 2000), were updated on the IUPAC website in 2003 and are updated again in the present evaluation. The article consists of a summary sheet...

  6. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: AFT reaction control system, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are examined. Potential interaction with the software is examined through an evaluation of the software requirements. The analysis is restricted to flight software requirements and excludes utility/checkout software. The results of the hardware/software interaction analysis for the forward reaction control system are presented.

  7. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: Forward reaction control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the orbiter hardware/software interaction analysis for the AFT reaction control system are presented. The interaction between hardware failure modes and software are examined in order to identify associated issues and risks. All orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are discussed.

  8. Noncatalytic hydrogenation of naphthalene in nanosized membrane reactors with accumulated hydrogen and controlled adjustment of their reaction zone volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    As part of ongoing studies aimed at designing the next generation of nanosized membrane reactors (NMRs) with accumulated hydrogen, the noncatalytic hydrogenation of naphthalene in pores of ceramic membranes (TRUMEM ultrafiltration membranes with D av = 50 and 90 nm) is performed for the first time, using hydrogen preadsorbed in a hybrid carbon nanostructure: mono- and multilayered oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs) that form on inner pore surfaces. In this technique, the reaction proceeds in the temperature range of 330-390°C at contact times of 10-16 h. The feedstock is an 8% naphthalene solution in decane. The products are analyzed via chromatography on a quartz capillary column coated with polydimethylsiloxane (SE-30). It is established for the first time that in NMRs, the noncatalytic hydrogenation of naphthalene occurs at 370-390°C, forming 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene in amounts of up to 0.61%. The rate constants and activation energy (123.5 kJ/mol) of the noncatalytic hydrogenation reaction are determined for the first time. The possibility of designing an NMR with an adjustable reaction zone volume is explored. Changes in the pore structure of the membranes after their modification with pyrocarbon nanosized crystallites (PNCs) are therefore studied as well. It is shown that lengthening the process time reduces pore size: within 23 h after the deposition of PNCs, the average pore radius ( r av) falls from 25 to 3.1 nm. The proposed approach would allow us to design nanoreactors of molecular size and conduct hydrogenation reactions within certain guidelines to synthesize new chemical compounds.

  9. Visual Rhetoric in Outdoor Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Seliger, Marja

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a research, the aim of which is to find out how graphic expressions and visual language can be used for persuasion. The research material consists of outdoor advertisements photographed in their actual exhibition places in a city environment. Outdoor advertising media, which are used to communicate visual messages from a sender to several addressees, participate in building the visual city culture and open manifold solutions in design. The visual language used in the resear...

  10. CFC Outdoor Tournament 2011

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of whether you’re a fan of the "beautiful game", you’ve probably heard that the CFC Outdoor Tournament 2011 is the sporting event of the year for the CERN Football Club. This unmissable social, cultural and sporting event will be a chance for CERNois to mingle with external visitors. In the 2011 edition of this legendary tournament, which is over 45 years old, the principle of “fair play” is once again on display. Ten teams – 8 from CERN – are competing for the CFC title. The tournament concludes with a final on 7 July final. Along with a thrilling match, there will also be a host of festivities for the final, including an exhibition game, the final awards ceremony, surprise gifts, a barbeque, musical performances, and more! Make sure to highlight 7 July (after 18.00) on your agenda, and take advantage of what will surely be an unforgettable day! The final tournament matches have been in progress since April and are ...

  11. OUTDOOR EDUCATION AND GEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA GUARAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the reflection on the relationship between values and methodological principles of Outdoor Education and spatial and geographical education perspectives, especially in pre-school and primary school, which relates to the age between 3 and 10 years. Outdoor Education is an educational practice that is already rooted in the philosophical thought of the 16th and the 17th centuries, from John Locke to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and in the pedagogical thought, in particular Friedrich Fröbel, and it has now a quite stable tradition in Northern Europe countries. In Italy, however, there are still few experiences and they usually do not have a systematic and structural modality, but rather a temporarily and experimentally outdoor organization. In the first part, this paper focuses on the reasons that justify a particular attention to educational paths that favour outdoors activities, providing also a definition of outdoor education and highlighting its values. It is also essential to understand that educational programs in open spaces, such as a forest or simply the schoolyard, surely offers the possibility to learn geographical situations. Therefore, the question that arises is how to finalize the best stimulus that the spatial location guarantees for the acquisition of knowledge, skills and abilities about space and geography.

  12. OUTDOOR EDUCATION AND GEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA GUARAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the reflection on the relationship between values and methodological principles of Outdoor Education and spatial and geographical education perspectives, especially in pre-school and primary school, which relates to the age between 3 and 10 years. Outdoor Education is an educational practice that is already rooted in the philosophical thought of the 16th and the 17th centuries, from John Locke to Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and in the pedagogical thought, in particular Friedrich Fröbel, and it has now a quite stable tradition in Northern Europe countries. In Italy, however, there are still few experiences and they usually do not have a systematic and structural modality, but rather a temporarily and experimentally outdoor organization. In the first part, this paper focuses on the reasons that justify a particular attention to educational paths that favour outdoors activities, providing also a definition of outdoor education and highlighting its values. It is also essential to understand that educational programs in open spaces, such as a forest or simply the schoolyard, surely offers the possibility to learn geographical situations. Therefore, the question that arises is how to finalize the best stimulus that the spatial location guarantees for the acquisition of knowledge, skills and abilities about space and geography.

  13. Outdoor Education and Neuro-Linguistic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alistair

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the importance of increasing effective communication in outdoor education programs. Examines sensory preferences and how they affect vocabulary, voice tone, and body language. Describes ways that outdoor educators can use this information to improve their communication skills. (LP)

  14. Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163389.html Time Outdoors May Deliver Better Sleep Camping and exposure to natural light helps prime ... Spending time in the outdoors may improve your sleep, a small study suggests. Researchers found that a ...

  15. Release of silver nanoparticles from outdoor facades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaegi, Ralf; Sinnet, Brian; Zuleeg, Steffen; Hagendorfer, Harald; Mueller, Elisabeth; Vonbank, Roger; Boller, Markus; Burkhardt, Michael

    2010-09-01

    In this study we investigate the release of metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) from paints used for outdoor applications. A facade panel mounted on a model house was exposed to ambient weather conditions over a period of one year. The runoff volume of individual rain events was determined and the silver and titanium concentrations of 36 out of 65 runoff events were measured. Selected samples were prepared for electron microscopic analysis. A strong leaching of the Ag-NP was observed during the initial runoff events with a maximum concentration of 145 micro Ag/l. After a period of one year, more than 30% of the Ag-NP were released to the environment. Particles were mostly <15 nm and are released as composite colloids attached to the organic binders of the paint. Microscopic results indicate that the Ag-NP are likely transformed to considerably less toxic forms such as Ag2S.

  16. Fear of moving outdoors and development of outdoor walking difficulty in older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rantakokko, Merja; Mänty, Minna; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation.......To study which individual characteristics and environmental factors correlate with fear of moving outdoors and whether fear of moving outdoors predicts development of mobility limitation....

  17. Outdoor Acoustics as a General Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    A tutorial paper exploring the characteristics of sound outdoors. Outdoor acoustics is contrasted to room acoustics. A number of important aspects of outdoor acoustics are exemplified and theoretical approaches are outlined. These are influence of ground impedance, influence of weather, screening...

  18. Outdoor Leadership Skills: A Program Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooter, Wynn; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Successful hiring, training, and pairing or grouping of staff requires administrators to consider the relationship between their programs' goals and the specific outdoor leadership skills of individual leaders. Authors have divided outdoor leadership skills into a three-category structure, and models of outdoor leadership have focused on skills…

  19. A Phenomenology of Outdoor Education Leader Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Stephanie C.; Lauzon, Lara L.; Meldrum, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Limited qualitative research exists on the experiences of outdoor education leaders. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the job-related experiences of outdoor education leaders within and outside the workplace. Five participants who had experience as outdoor education leaders completed in-depth, one-on-one interviews about…

  20. Universal Design and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    Engagement in the natural environment provides authentic and concrete opportunities for children to enhance development in all domains (Bailie, 2010). As children play and explore in nature they build gross motor development moving through the outdoors. Learning outside and in nature not only allows for learning across subject areas and…

  1. Positive Psychology and Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    A relatively new movement in psychology, positive psychology, has many implications for the field of outdoor education. Positive psychology has the goal of fostering excellence through the understanding and enhancement of factors that lead to growth. It embraces the view that growth occurs when positive factors are present, as opposed to the…

  2. Counselling Techniques for Outdoor Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Michelle; Chase, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Outdoor leaders need counseling skills to deal with interpersonal conflicts that arise within a group and to facilitate participant growth and change. Person-centered counseling, reality therapy counseling, and behavioral counseling are discussed, as well as how various techniques from each can be used to the benefit of the leader and the group.…

  3. Multilayer Controller for Outdoor Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reske-Nielsen, Anders; Mejnertsen, Asbjørn; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2006-01-01

    A full software and hardware solution has been designed, implemented and tested for control of a small agricultural automatic tractor. The objective was to realise a user-friendly, multi-layer controller architecture for an outdoor platform. The collaborative research work was done as a part...

  4. Signature Pedagogies in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    The new National health and physical education curriculum in Australia includes outdoor education activities as a viable way to achieve intended learning outcomes. However, most health and physical education teacher education courses do not provide a strong focus on the theories, skills and pedagogies that are unique to the effective use of…

  5. Universal Design and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    Engagement in the natural environment provides authentic and concrete opportunities for children to enhance development in all domains (Bailie, 2010). As children play and explore in nature they build gross motor development moving through the outdoors. Learning outside and in nature not only allows for learning across subject areas and…

  6. Outdoor Acoustics as a General Discipline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    A tutorial paper exploring the characteristics of sound outdoors. Outdoor acoustics is contrasted to room acoustics. A number of important aspects of outdoor acoustics are exemplified and theoretical approaches are outlined. These are influence of ground impedance, influence of weather, screening...... due to natural and man-made obstacles. Various areas of application of outdoor sound are described, such as aircraft noise, road traffic noise and industrial noise. More unconventional applications such as outdoor sound reinforcement are also described. The choice of theoretical model must be adapted...

  7. The measurement of peripheral blood volume reactions to tilt test by the electrical impedance technique after exercise in athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Popov, S. G.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Vikulov, A. D.

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated the distribution of peripheral blood volumes in different regions of the body in response to the tilt-test in endurance trained athletes after aerobic exercise. Distribution of peripheral blood volumes (ml/beat) simultaneously in six regions of the body (two legs, two hands, abdomen, neck and ECG) was assessed in response to the tilt-test using the impedance method (the impedance change rate (dZ/dT). Before and after exercise session cardiac stroke (CSV) and blood volumes in legs, arms and neck were higher in athletes both in lying and standing positions. Before exercise the increase of heart rate and the decrease of a neck blood volume in response to tilting was lower (p blood volumes was higher (pblood volumes were similar. Also, the neck blood volumes as percentage of CSV (%/CSV) did not change in the control but increased in athletes (p exercise (mean HR = 156±8 beat/min, duration 30 min) blood volumes in neck and arms in response to the tilting were reduced equally, but abdomen (pblood volumes (p blood flow (%/CSV) did not change in athletes but decreased in control (pexercise. The data demonstrate greater orthostatic tolerance in athletes both before and after exercise during fatigue which is due to effective distribution of blood flows aimed at maintaining cerebral blood flow.

  8. Outdoor sports and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is estimated to be one of the most important risk factors for nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Athletes practicing outdoor sports receive considerable UV doses because of training and competition schedules with high sun exposure, and in alpine sports, by altitude-related increase of UV radiation and reflection from snow- and ice-covered surfaces. Extreme UV exposure in outdoor sports such as skiing, mountaineering, cycling, or triathlon has been documented in a series of dosimetric studies. Sweating because of physical exercise may contribute to UV-related skin damage as it increases the individual photosensitivity of the skin, facilitating the risk of sunburns. Large epidemiological studies showed that recreational activities such as sun exposure on the beach or during water sports were associated with an increased risk of basal cell carcinoma, whereas skiing has been shown to be at increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma. Risk factors of cutaneous melanoma such as the number of melanocytic nevi and solar lentigines have been found to be more frequent in subjects practicing endurance outdoor sports. An increased risk for cutaneous melanoma may be assumed for these athletes. In addition to the important sun exposure, exercise-induced immunosuppression may increase the risk for nonmelanoma skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma in athletes. Frequently, athletes seem to know little about the risk of sun exposure. Protective means such as avoiding training and competition with considerable sun exposure, choosing adequate clothing, and applying water-resistant sunscreen still need to be propagated in the community of outdoor sportsmen.

  9. Acute phototoxic reaction in a century cyclist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Heather P

    2015-01-01

    Medications can cause photosensitivity. Several of these medications, specifically the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), may be taken by athletes to treat joint and muscle discomfort. Many athletic events occur outdoors, which in turn exposes athletes to sunlight. Athletes taking NSAIDs and performing extensive outdoor activities may be at higher risk for phototoxic drug reactions. Clinicians may wish consider the potential for patient photosensitivity when recommending prescription and non-prescription medications to outdoor athletes.

  10. Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-07-01

    The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

  11. Active Families in the Great Outdoors: A Program to Promote Family Outdoor Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Jennifer I.; Bassett, David R.; Fouts, Hillary N.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Coe, Dawn P.

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated a 4-week program to increase the time families spent engaging in outdoor activity. Parents were provided strategies to increase family outdoor activity and locations to be active. Sixteen families completed the program. Duration and number of family outdoor activity bouts per week, type of activities, locations, and family…

  12. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV ? gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appen...

  13. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendi...

  14. A rapid method for the analysis of methyl dihydrojasmonate and galaxolide in indoor and outdoor air particulate matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontal, Marta; van Drooge, Barend L; Grimalt, Joan O

    2016-05-20

    A method for the analysis of methyl dihydrojasmonate (MHDJ) in air particulate matter (PM1 and PM2.5) is described for the first time. This fragrance is determined together galaxolide (HHCB). Airborne particles were collected by filtration of air volumes between 100 and 1000m(3). Recovery efficiencies of filter extraction with Soxhlet and pressurized liquids were evaluated. The method included reaction with BSTFA:TMCS for generation of trimethylsilyloxy derivatives which prevented deleterious effects in the gas capillary column by interaction of hydroxyl groups from air constituents other than these fragrances. This step avoided the use of additional clean up methods such as liquid column chromatography affording direct quantification by GC-EI-MS. The proposed method had enough sensitivity for quantification of these fragrances in indoor and outdoor environmental samples using small aliquots of the PM extracts, e.g. 2.5%, and therefore saving sample material for eventual determination of other compounds. The detection limits were 0.03ng and 0.01ng for MHDJ and HHCB, respectively. Both MHDJ and HHCB were predominantly found in the smallest PM fraction analyzed (<0.5μm). The outdoor concentrations were highest in busy urban streets. However, indoor levels in school classrooms and subway stations were one order of magnitude higher than those observed outdoor. This difference was consistent with the use of these compounds as additives in cleaning and personal care products and the small dispersion of these fragrances in indoor environments. Information on the occurrence of this and other fragrances is needed to increase the understanding on the influence of anthropogenic activities in the formation of organic aerosols and source apportionment.

  15. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV – gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006/07. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  16. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  17. Suggested Bibliography for Outdoor Education and Camping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey State School of Conservation, Branchville.

    Seventy-seven books and articles published between 1939 and 1964 are listed in this bibliography for students and teachers of outdoor education. The entries are listed alphabetically under the following subject headings: outdoor education, conservation, administration, aquatics, archery, arts and crafts, Indian lore, nature study, riding, rifle,…

  18. Basic illustrated knots for the outdoors

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobson, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    Cliff Jacobson is one of North America's most respected outdoors writers and wilderness canoe guides. His experiences as a professional outfitter and canoeing consultant have resulted in more than a dozen top-selling books on camping, canoeing, navigation, and outdoor skills.

  19. UNBC: Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pat

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the University of Northern British Columbia's (UNBC's) Outdoor Recreation and Tourism Management (ORTM) Program, which focuses squarely on the management of outdoor recreation as it relates to conservation (i.e., in and around parks and protected areas), tourism that is both based in and concerned with the natural/cultural…

  20. Rugged Practices: Embodying Authenticity in Outdoor Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda-Cook, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    When people recreate outdoors, they value the quality of the experience. This study examines rhetorical practices that sustain or undermine perceived authentic outdoor recreation experiences. I conducted a rhetorical analysis of my fieldnotes gathered through participant observation and interview transcripts of online and in-person interviews. I…

  1. Using the Outdoors To Teach Language Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Rebecca R.; Staley, Frederick A.

    A framework for using the outdoors as a vehicle for providing meaningful language arts experiences is presented in this guide geared toward intermediate students but adaptable for other ages. The introduction outlines goals of language arts instruction and notes that activities conducted outdoors contribute to these goals because they are…

  2. Teaching STEM Outdoors: Activities for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selly, Patty Born

    2017-01-01

    Nurture young children's innate tendencies toward exploration, sensory stimulation, and STEM learning when you connect outdoor learning with STEM curriculum. Discover the developmental benefits of outdoor learning and how the rich diversity of settings and materials in nature gives rise to questions and inquiry for deeper learning. Full of…

  3. Does Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Really Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Keith C.

    2002-01-01

    Outdoor behavioral healthcare (OBH), using wilderness therapy and related outdoor programming, is an emerging treatment for adolescents with behavioral, psychological, and substance abuse disorders. A literature review examining OBH outcomes related to self-concept, interpersonal skills, substance abuse, criminal recidivism, and behavioral and…

  4. Indoor and Outdoor Play in Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain children's indoor and outdoor play in preschool programs in terms of teacher interaction, peer interaction and task orientation. Children's indoor and outdoor play behaviors were compared using the Individualized Classroom Assessment Scoring System (inCLASS). Findings included significant differences on…

  5. Lyme Disease: A Challenge for Outdoor Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcombe, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Describes signs and symptoms of Lyme disease; life cycle and feeding habits of the deer tick (Ixodes dammini), which transmits the spirochete bacterium; tick control measures; outdoor precautions; and veterinary considerations. Discusses the disease's potential impact on outdoor education, and suggests a reasoned, nonhysterical approach. Contains…

  6. Teaching Science in an Outdoor Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Phyllis; Railton, Esther P.

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide suggestions for teaching science outdoors through the use of the California Natural History Guides. Specific references to the Guides are made throughout the handbook. Learning activities related to outdoor science education are grouped under the following topics: objectives, suggested activities,…

  7. Association between Outdoor Fungal Concentrations during Winter and Pulmonary Function in Children with and without Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Hantan, Degejirihu; Burioka, Naoto; Nakamoto, Sachiko; Sano, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Jumpei; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor fungi are important components of airborne particulate matter (PM). However, the associations between pulmonary function and outdoor fungi are less well known compared to other airborne PM constituents. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between outdoor fungi and pulmonary function in children. Morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) rates were measured daily in 339 schoolchildren (including 36 with asthma), aged 10 to 12, 2 to 27 February 2015. Airborne PM was collected on filters, using a high volume air sampler, each day during the study period. The daily concentration of outdoor fungi-associated PM was calculated using a culture-based method. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the association between PEF values and daily concentrations of outdoor fungi, and the daily levels of suspended PM (SPM) and PM ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5). An increase in the interquartile range (46.2 CFU/m3) for outdoor fungal concentration led to PEF changes of −1.18 L/min (95% confidence interval, −2.27 to −0.08) in all children, 1.22 L/min (−2.96 to 5.41) in children without asthma, and −1.44 L/min (−2.57 to −0.32) in children with asthma. Outdoor fungi showed a significant negative correlation with PM2.5 levels (r = −0.4, p = 0.04), but not with SPM (r = ‒0.3, p = 0.10) levels. Outdoor fungi may be associated with pulmonary dysfunction in children. Furthermore, children with asthma may show greater pulmonary dysfunction than those without asthma. PMID:27136569

  8. Association between Outdoor Fungal Concentrations during Winter and Pulmonary Function in Children with and without Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Watanabe

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor fungi are important components of airborne particulate matter (PM. However, the associations between pulmonary function and outdoor fungi are less well known compared to other airborne PM constituents. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between outdoor fungi and pulmonary function in children. Morning peak expiratory flow (PEF rates were measured daily in 339 schoolchildren (including 36 with asthma, aged 10 to 12, 2 to 27 February 2015. Airborne PM was collected on filters, using a high volume air sampler, each day during the study period. The daily concentration of outdoor fungi-associated PM was calculated using a culture-based method. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the association between PEF values and daily concentrations of outdoor fungi, and the daily levels of suspended PM (SPM and PM ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5. An increase in the interquartile range (46.2 CFU/m3 for outdoor fungal concentration led to PEF changes of −1.18 L/min (95% confidence interval, −2.27 to −0.08 in all children, 1.22 L/min (−2.96 to 5.41 in children without asthma, and −1.44 L/min (−2.57 to −0.32 in children with asthma. Outdoor fungi showed a significant negative correlation with PM2.5 levels (r = −0.4, p = 0.04, but not with SPM (r = ‒0.3, p = 0.10 levels. Outdoor fungi may be associated with pulmonary dysfunction in children. Furthermore, children with asthma may show greater pulmonary dysfunction than those without asthma.

  9. Uptilted Macros as an Outdoor Solution for Indoor Users in High Rise Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Maria Laura Luque; Vejlgaard, Benny; Mogensen, Preben

    2015-01-01

    With an expected broadband traffic volume growth of 1000x in the coming years, the need to provide coverage and capacity to the high rise buildings scenarios becomes a challenge for operators. Due to the difficulties in deploying their networks inside buildings, an outdoor alternative is needed. ...

  10. Investigation of Cure Reaction, Rheology, Volume Shrinkage and Thermomechanical Properties of Nano-TiO2 Filled Epoxy/DDS Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotishkumar Parameswaranpillai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure reaction, rheology, volume shrinkage, and thermomechanical behavior of epoxy-TiO2 nanocomposites based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured with 4,4′-diaminodiphenylsulfone have been investigated. The FTIR results show that, at the initial curing stage, TiO2 acts as a catalyst and facilitates the curing. The catalytic effect of TiO2 was further confirmed by the decrease in maximum exothermal peak temperature (DSC results; however, it was also found that the addition of TiO2 decreases the overall degree of cure, as evidenced by lower total heat of reaction of the cured composites compared to neat epoxy. The importance of cure rheology in the microstructure formation during curing was explored by using rheometry. From the PVT studies, it was found that TiO2 decreases the volume shrinkage behavior of the epoxy matrix. The mechanical properties of the cured epoxy composites, such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, flexural strength, flexural modulus, impact strength, and fracture toughness of the polymer composites, were examined. The nanocomposites exhibited good improvement in dimensional, thermal, and mechanical properties with respect to neat cross-linked epoxy system. FESEM micrographs of fractured surfaces were examined to understand the toughening mechanism.

  11. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the...

  12. Measurements of Enthalpy Change of Reaction of Formation, Molar Heat Capacity and Constant-Volume Combustion Energy of Solid Complex Yb(Et2dtc)3(phen)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Weiming; Hu Qilin; Chang Xuan; Chen Sanping; Xie Gang; Gao Shengli

    2006-01-01

    A ternary solid complex Yb(Et2dtc)3(phen) was obtained from the reaction of hydrous ytterbium chloride with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaEt2dtc), and 1, 10-phenanthroline (o-phen·H2O) in absolute ethanol.The bonding characteristics of the complex were characterized by IR.The result shows Yb3+ bands with two sulfur atoms in the Na(Et2dtc)3 and two nitrogen atoms in the o-phen.The enthalpy change of liquid-phase reaction of formation of the complex ΔrHθm (l), was determined as being (-24.838±0.114) kJ·mol-1 at 298.15 K, by an RD-496 Ⅲ type heat conduction microcalormeter.The enthalpy change of the solid-phase reaction of formation of the complex ΔrHθm (s), was calculated as being (108.015±0.479) kJ·mol-1 on the basis of an appropriate thermochemistry cycle.The thermodynamics of liquid-phase reaction of formation of the complex was investigated by changing the temperature during the liquid-phase reaction.Fundamental parameters, the activation enthalpy, ΔHθ≠, the activation entropy, ΔSθ≠, the activation free energy, ΔGθ≠, the apparent reaction rate constant k, the apparent activation energy E, the pre-exponential constant A, and the reaction order n, were obtained by a combination of the reaction thermodynamic and kinetic equations with the data from the thermokinetic experiments.At the same time, the molar heat capacity of the complex cm, p, was determined to be (86.34±1.74) J·mol-1·K-1 by the same microcalormeter.The constant-volume combustion energy of the complex, ΔcU, was determined to be (-17954.08±8.11) kJ·mol-1 by an RBC-Ⅱ type rotating-bomb calorimeter at 298.15 K.Its standard enthalpy of combustion, ΔcHθm, and standard enthalpy of formation, ΔfHθm, were calculated to be (-17973.29±8.11) kJ·mol-1 and (-770.36±9.02) kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  13. Volume profile of α-chymotrypsin during adsorption and enzymatic reaction on a poly(acrylic acid) brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Artem; Erlkamp, Mirko; Steitz, Roland; Czeslik, Claus

    2016-04-07

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) brushes are known to provide a native-like environment for proteins. In this study, we explore this biocompatibility under high pressure conditions. Using α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) as a model enzyme, we report on the pressure dependencies of the enzymatic activity and the neutron scattering length density profile, when this enzyme is adsorbed on a PAA brush. From high pressure total internal reflection fluorescence spectroscopy, an increasing enzymatic activity has been observed up to 1000 bar, but a rather pressure independent enzymatic activity at higher pressures up to 2000 bar. This finding suggests a non-constant activation volume of α-CT on the PAA brush that is negative below 1000 bar. Thus, the compact nature of the transition state of α-CT is largely preserved upon adsorption. We have also performed high pressure neutron reflectivity experiments to determine the spatial distribution of α-CT inside the PAA brush. Apparently, the enzyme is strongly binding to the PAA chains with 2.3 mg m(-2) of adsorbed enzyme that is reduced to about 1.7 mg m(-2) at 1000-2000 bar. This change of adsorbed mass is consistent with a positive volume change of adsorption, which is probably reflecting electrostriction upon protein-PAA interaction. Thus, the performed high pressure experiments provide new insights into the volume profile of α-CT during adsorption and enzymatic activity on the PAA brush. They also demonstrate that the biocompatible properties of a PAA brush can even be enhanced by pressure.

  14. Study on Outdoor College English Teaching Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ling-po

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor college English teaching penetrates in each teaching procedure so that student could experience and partici-pate in the whole teaching process. Through the practice and observation of the outdoor classroom, students could give full play to their subjective initiative and really become the master of the class. Meanwhile outdoor experiential English teaching can maximize the initiative of students’learning, improve teams’vitality and creativity. Moreover this paper could also offer some suggestions on the teaching reform of colleges in our country.

  15. Outdoor Air Pollution, Heart Attack and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated outdoor ambient air particle pollution triggers heart attacks, strokes, and abnormal heart rhythms and worsens heart failure in individuals at high risk due to underlying medical conditions. Emergency Medical Services in communities are the first responders to these eme...

  16. Position fusion for an outdoor mobile robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Global Positioning Systems (GPS) provide an effective means of outdoor localisation. Unfortunately they are subject to a variety of errors, particularly in cluttered environments where GPS signal is not always available. Whilst GPS positional...

  17. Outdoor recreation in forest policy and legislation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Carsten; Pouta, Eija; Gentin, Sandra;

    2010-01-01

    The benefists of outdoor recreation and the need for recreation inventories and monitoring are described in various policy and legislation documents at the European level. The objective of this paper is to analyse how these recreational aspects are reflected at the national level in core forest...... in the field of outdoor recreation, and reveal similarities, differences, gaps and future needs. Among the main findings is a contradiction between the expressed political importance of outdoor recreation at the national level, and the absence of binding commitments for action. The majority of the countries...... surveyed recognise and express outdoor recreation in some form of political and/or legislative way. However, recreation monitoring or measurements are rarely mentioned in relevant policies or acts at the national, regional or local level, perhaps due to a l ack of political will or resources. The analysis...

  18. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Mark S; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Bradstreet, Christa Costas; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    .... The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play...

  19. Mobile Robots for Outdoor Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    1 everett-2 MOBILE ROBOTS FOR OUTDOOR SECURITY APPLICATIONS Tracy Heath Pastore (SSC-SD), H. R. Everett (SSC-SD), Kevin Bonner (RST) Space and...APR 1999 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mobile Robots for Outdoor Security Applications 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Based Intruder Detection for a Robotic Security System," SPIE Mobile Robots XIII, Boston, MA, 1-6 November, 1998. Everett, H.R., Gilbreath, G.A

  20. The little book of maths outdoors

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Terry

    2013-01-01

    This is a unique book that supports the current thinking behind outdoor learning. It features over 40 ideas for outdoor activities that support mathematics in the early years and the specific areas of learning in the revised EYFS. All the ideas are tried and tested by Terry and this book will prove to be popular in the early years and well into Key stage 1.

  1. Robust CCD photoelectric autocollimator for outdoor use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Gao; Zuoren Dong; Zhenglan Bian; Qing Ye; Zujie Fang; Ronghui Qu

    2011-01-01

    A robust charge-coupled device (CCD) photoelectric autocollimator for outdoor use is designed and demonstrated. The influence of outdoor conditions on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and imaging quality of the measuring system is experimentally analyzed. The pulse width modulation technology is applied to the automatic feedback control of the actively regulated illuminating light source of the measuring system to maximize SNR while avoiding image saturation. A Fourier phase shift method for subpixel estimation is adopted to achieve high-accuracy measurement in the presence of noises. Experimental results indicate that the technologies proposed here largely improve the measuring stability, dynamic range, and accuracy of the CCD photoelectric autocollimator used outdoors.%@@ A robust charge-coupled device(CCD)photoelectric autocollimator for outdoor use is designed and demonstrated.The influence of outdoor conditions on the signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)and imaging quality of the measuring system is experimentally analyzed.The pulse width modulation technology is applied to the automatic feedback control of the actively regulated illuminating light source of the measuring system to maximize SNR while avoiding image saturation.A Fourier phase shift method for subpixel estimation is adopted to achieve high-accuracy measurement in the presence of noises.Experimental results indicate that the technologies proposed here largely improve the measuring stability,dynamic range,and accuracy of the CCD photoelectric autocollimator used outdoors.

  2. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Mark S; Gray, Casey; Babcock, Shawna; Barnes, Joel; Bradstreet, Christa Costas; Carr, Dawn; Chabot, Guylaine; Choquette, Louise; Chorney, David; Collyer, Cam; Herrington, Susan; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Larouche, Richard; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Simon, Brenda; Brussoni, Mariana

    2015-06-08

    A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3-12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky) outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N=9) and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N=17), and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N=1908). More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: "Access to active play in nature and outdoors--with its risks--is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children's opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings--at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature." The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development.

  3. The use of outdoor games and their effects on the body of schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucher V.O.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research purpose - to ground and define the role of outdoor games in physical education of children of midchildhood. 20 children of midchildhood, which were up-diffused on two identical groups (control and basic on age and to physical development for 10 schoolchildren are involved in research. It is set that for the children of basic group the reaction of the respiratory system became better on the physical loading (on results the leadthrough of test of Serkin, the considerable improvement of function of breathing organs took a place. Set necessity of perfection of process of physical education of children. The measures of strengthening of interest are recommended to the lessons of physical culture for children, distributing and selection of games on the years of teaching. It is recommended in the process of teaching expressly to adhere to the following method of education of physical capabilities: complexity, regularity and sequence; duration of implementation of games and volume of loading; intervals of rest and their character.

  4. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in the intact cells of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boichenko, V A; Hou, J M; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    The volume and enthalpy changes for charge transfer in the 0.1-10 micros time window in photosynthetic reaction centers of the intact cells of Synechocystis PCC 6803 were determined using pulsed, time-resolved photoacoustics. This required invention of a method to correct for the cell artifact at the temperature of maximum density of water caused by the heterogeneous system. Cells grown under either white or red light had different PS I/PS II molar ratios, approximately 3 and approximately 1.7, respectively, but invariable action spectra and effective antenna sizes of the photosystems. In both cultures, the photoacoustic measurements revealed that their thermodynamic parameters differed strongly in the spectral regions of predominant excitation of PS I (680 nm) and PS II (625 nm). On correcting for contribution of the two photosystems at these wavelengths, the volume change was determined to be -27 +/- 3 and -2 +/- 3 A3 for PS I and PS II, respectively. The energy storage on the approximately 1 micros time scale was estimated to be 80 +/- 15% and 45 +/- 10% per trap in PS I and PS II, respectively. These correspond to enthalpies of -0.33 +/- 0.2 and -1 +/- 0.2 eV for the assumed formation of ion radical pairs P700+F(AB-) and Y(Z*)P680Q(A-), respectively. Taking the free energy of the above reactions as the differences of their redox potentials in situ, apparent entropy changes were estimated to be +0.4 +/- 0.2 and -0.2 +/- 0.2 eV for PS I and PS II, respectively. These values are similar to that obtained in vitro for the purified reaction center complexes on the microsecond time scale [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116, 7117-7125]. The constancy of these thermodynamic values over a 2-fold change of the ratio of PS I/PS II is support for this method of in vivo analysis. Our pulsed PA method can correct the "cell" or heterogeneous artifact and thus opens a new route for studying the thermodynamics of electron transfer in vivo.

  5. Characterization of the products formed by the reaction of trichlorocyanuric acid with 2-propanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, P Mark L; Barnett, Julie S

    2009-11-01

    We report a recent investigation into the death of a cat that was initially thought to involve intentionally burning the animal via the use of an ignitable liquid. The exposure of the animal to flame was ruled out. Instead, forensic investigation revealed the intentional mixing together of a common outdoor swimming pool chlorinator, trichlorocyanuric acid (TCCA), and 2-propanol (aka, isopropyl alcohol or rubbing alcohol). The reaction of these two chemicals resulted in the formation of cyanuric acid residue, hydrochloric acid, and the evolution of a significant volume of chlorine gas. Further alpha-chlorination side reactions also occurred between 2-propanol and TCCA to produce a variety of chlorinated 2-propanone species that were detected on the submitted evidence. The identification of the products of both the main reaction and the side reactions allowed the authors to determine what chemicals were originally mixed together by the culprit.

  6. The Outdoor World: An Outdoor Science and Culture Program for Seneca Indian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobey, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an outdoor summer science program for Seneca Indian children in grades 5-7 that featured weekly outdoor topics integrating science, traditional Native American/Seneca culture, and skills in reading and language arts. Daily activities included field trips, community guests, storytelling, and individual and group projects. (LP)

  7. Diversity in the Outdoors: National Outdoor Leadership School Students' Attitudes about Wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress, Sara; Hall, Troy

    2017-01-01

    Outdoor experiential education (OEE) programs often cater to white, upper-class individuals. With major demographic shifts occurring in the United States, OEE organizations are confronting this imbalance. The National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) is addressing this issue with its Gateway Scholarship Program. The purpose of this mixed-methods…

  8. Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Tremblay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A diverse, cross-sectorial group of partners, stakeholders and researchers, collaborated to develop an evidence-informed Position Statement on active outdoor play for children aged 3–12 years. The Position Statement was created in response to practitioner, academic, legal, insurance and public debate, dialogue and disagreement on the relative benefits and harms of active (including risky outdoor play. The Position Statement development process was informed by two systematic reviews, a critical appraisal of the current literature and existing position statements, engagement of research experts (N = 9 and cross-sectorial individuals/organizations (N = 17, and an extensive stakeholder consultation process (N = 1908. More than 95% of the stakeholders consulted strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the Position Statement; 14/17 participating individuals/organizations endorsed it; and over 1000 additional individuals and organizations requested their name be listed as a supporter. The final Position Statement on Active Outdoor Play states: “Access to active play in nature and outdoors—with its risks— is essential for healthy child development. We recommend increasing children’s opportunities for self-directed play outdoors in all settings—at home, at school, in child care, the community and nature.” The full Position Statement provides context for the statement, evidence supporting it, and a series of recommendations to increase active outdoor play opportunities to promote healthy child development.

  9. Turismo Activo y Outdoor Training: Metodología. (Adventure Sport Tourism and Outdoor Training: Methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Gómez Encinas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available ResumenUno de los aspectos más atractivos que tiene el outdoor training es su supuesta capacidad para conseguir que los aprendizajes obtenidos a través de sus actividades sean transferidos a otros ámbitos de la vida personal y profesional de sus participantes. En este sentido, la clave está en la metodología empleada. Este artículo profundiza en las fases que estructuran el proceso formativo del outdoor training describiendo: 1 las bases folosóficas que lo apoyan y que están expresadas en la teoría de la “educación a través de la experiencia” y 2 las diferentes fases que estructuran el proceso de formación de un outdoor, haciendo una descripción en profundidad de cada una de ellas: a Pre-Outdoor (Análisis y valoración de las necesidades, diseño de la actividad y reunión previa a la actividad, b Outdoor, c Post-outdoor (Reflexión y transferencia, y d Seguimiento posterior.AbstractOne of the most attractive aspects that has the outdoor training is their supposed capacity to get that the learnings obtained through their activities are transferred to other environments of the personal life and their participants' professional. In this sense, the key is in the used methodology. This article deepens in the phases that structure the formative process of the outdoor training describing: 1 the philosophy´s bases that support this process and that are expressed in the theory of experiential education, and 2 the different phases that structure the process of formation of an outdoor, making a description in depth of each one of them: to Pre-Outdoor (Analysis and valuation of the necessities, design of the activity and previous meeting to the activity, b Outdoor, c Post-outdoor (Reflection and transfer, and d Later Pursuit.

  10. Volumetric assessment of airborne indoor and outdoor fungi at poultry and cattle houses in the Mazandaran Province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajoudanifar, Hatef; Hedayati, Mohammad T; Mayahi, Sabah; Khosravi, Alireza; Mousavi, Bita

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the volume of airborne fungi in the indoor and outdoor environment of poultry and cattle houses in the Mazandaran Province in Iran. Indoor and outdoor air of twenty cattle houses and twenty-five poultry houses were sampled using a single-stage impactor, which draws air at 20 L min-1 and impacts sampled material onto Petri plates containing malt extract agar. The plates were incubated at 30 °C for seven days, after which the resulting colonies were counted. The fungi were identified and counted microscopically and macroscopically. A total of 4,662 fungal colonies were isolated from 90 plates collected from indoor and outdoor air of cattle and poultry houses. Cladosporium (55.3 %), yeast (10.0 %), and Aspergillus (9.4 %) were the most common findings. The concentration of airborne fungi in cattle and poultry houses ranged from 10 CFU m-3 to 1700 CFU m-3 in indoor and 10 CFU m-3 to 2170 CFU m-3 in outdoor environments. Cladosporium had the highest mean indoor (424.5 CFU m-3) and outdoor (449.7 CFU m-3) air concentration in the cattle houses. In the poultry houses, the highest mean concentrations were measured for Cladosporium (551.0 CFU m-3) outdoors and yeast (440.7 CFU m-3) indoors. These levels might present an occupational risk, but threshold levels for these environments have yet to be established worldwide.

  11. Outdoor air dominates burden of disease from indoor exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänninen, O.; Asikainen, A.; Carrer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Both indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution have significant public health impacts in Europe. Based on quantitative modelling of the burden of disease the outdoor sources dominate the impacts by a clear margin.......Both indoor and outdoor sources of air pollution have significant public health impacts in Europe. Based on quantitative modelling of the burden of disease the outdoor sources dominate the impacts by a clear margin....

  12. Split-second recognition: what makes outdoor advertising work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, A.; Aristoff, M.

    2009-01-01

    CBS Outdoor used a tachistoscope to determine how long it takes to recognize the brand/product advertised in 187 outdoor posters in the Netherlands. Additionally, CBS Outdoor measured the creative appeal of these advertisements. Using 80 content and format variables, an explanatory model was develop

  13. Creating and Enriching Quality and Safe Outdoor Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Can teachers of young children create stimulating and enriching outdoor environments that are also safe? This article highlights early childhood outdoor safety standards and presents a framework for creating quality and SAFE™ outdoor environments in early childhood programs that support children's interest and best practice. The outdoor…

  14. Outdoor Play and Learning for Infants and Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Suzanne M.

    Infants and toddlers like to crawl, climb, run, and explore in wide open, outdoor spaces. This publication provides ideas for day care providers on using outdoor play to facilitate learning in infants and toddlers. Section 1 discusses the benefits of daily outdoor play, including learning to interact with others, practicing language skills,…

  15. Parents' Perceptions of Preschool Activities: Exploring Outdoor Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya, Avanthi; Williams, Marcia; Edwards, Todd; Tandon, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Outdoor play is important for children's health and development, yet many preschool-age children in child care settings do not receive the recommended 60 min/day of outdoor play. Child care providers have previously described parent-related barriers to increasing outdoor playtime, including parents not providing appropriate…

  16. Split-second recognition: what makes outdoor advertising work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, A.; Aristoff, M.

    2009-01-01

    CBS Outdoor used a tachistoscope to determine how long it takes to recognize the brand/product advertised in 187 outdoor posters in the Netherlands. Additionally, CBS Outdoor measured the creative appeal of these advertisements. Using 80 content and format variables, an explanatory model was

  17. Outdoor Education--The Past Is Prologue to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    Although educators and philosophers such as Johann Amos Comenius, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Pestalozzi, and Froebel stressed the study of nature, outdoor education really began with the first teaching-learning act which occurred outdoors. The human being, physiologically and psychologically adapted for outdoor existence, has only been indoors for…

  18. Parents' Perceptions of Preschool Activities: Exploring Outdoor Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasuriya, Avanthi; Williams, Marcia; Edwards, Todd; Tandon, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Outdoor play is important for children's health and development, yet many preschool-age children in child care settings do not receive the recommended 60 min/day of outdoor play. Child care providers have previously described parent-related barriers to increasing outdoor playtime, including parents not providing appropriate…

  19. Provoking Dialogue: A Short History of Outdoor Education in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, James

    2011-01-01

    History helps educators more clearly describe the role of outdoor education in improving society by fostering awareness of human-nature interconnections. Five branches have shaped outdoor education in Ontario: (1) agricultural education; (2) environmental education; (3) outdoor adventure education; (4) ecological education; and (5) climate change…

  20. 9 CFR 3.103 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, outdoor. 3.103 Section 3.103 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation...

  1. 9 CFR 3.52 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, outdoor. 3.52 Section 3.52 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment and Transportation of...

  2. 9 CFR 3.27 - Facilities, outdoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, outdoor. 3.27 Section 3.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and Transportation of...

  3. Sustainability in outdoor recreation and tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia L. Winter; Kelly Bricker; Jeremy. Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Outdoor recreation and tourism represents a major service by which the public identifies with and better understands natural resources, even to the extent that it can foster environmental stewardship (for example, see Winter and Chavez 2008). Yet, myriad threats to recreation and tourism exist which need to be addressed. Addressing these threats can be...

  4. Indoorising the outdoors: Lifestyle sports revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salome, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Since the early nineties, lifestyle sports such as surfing, snowboarding and skydiving are on a large scale offered in artificial sport environments. In snow domes, on artificial white water courses, in climbing halls and in wind tunnels, these alternative outdoor sports are accessible for a broad a

  5. Confirmation of the Conditional Outdoor Leadership Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Tim; Priest, Simon

    1991-01-01

    Responses of 75 expert outdoor leaders from Canada and the United States concerning leadership in 12 hypothetical backpacking scenarios provided partial support for a theory that predicted probability of leadership style (democratic, autocratic, or abdicratic) based on favorability of conditions, task orientation, and relationship orientation.…

  6. Paddle Making: A Craft for Outdoor Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Allison

    2001-01-01

    Crafting experiences, such as paddle making, fit in with the ideals and goals of outdoor and experiential education and can be linked to environmental education by creating environmental consciousness. Crafting a canoe paddle from harvested materials directly engages students with the land and can lead to reflection on material objects, patterns…

  7. Response of Migrant Children to Outdoor Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hick, Thomas L.

    An outdoor education program for migrant children was compared with a typical school program during the summer of 1969. The Wide Range Achievement Test was administered to both groups to obtain a pretest and posttest measure of reading and arithmetic. Visual-motor development was measured by the Bender-Gestalt scored by the Koppitz Developmental…

  8. Environmental Studies. Plano Outdoor Learning Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plano Independent School District, TX.

    This curriculum guide for the Plano Intermediate School District (Texas) Outdoor Learning Center is divided into three major sections. Section I provides information on the numbered stations/posts found along the perimeter and inner trails of the center and includes brief comments on the philosophy of environmental education and the history…

  9. Indoorising the outdoors: Lifestyle sports revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salome, L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Since the early nineties, lifestyle sports such as surfing, snowboarding and skydiving are on a large scale offered in artificial sport environments. In snow domes, on artificial white water courses, in climbing halls and in wind tunnels, these alternative outdoor sports are accessible for a broad

  10. Building Social Capital through Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beames, Simon; Atencio, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the body of literature surrounding the subject of social capital has witnessed steady growth. While sociologists have extensively discussed how social capital can be created and sustained within local communities and national contexts, there is little evidence of the social capital discourse within the outdoor education…

  11. THE CHILD IN THE OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jseums are joining the field in using the outdoors as a class- room and the experience of the ... teachers are clarified. A museum is perhaps one of the best places to teach .... (This request was based on a number of recommendations that ...

  12. Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ve Got Skin in the Game Anti-Aging Vitamin D Related: What Is Skin Cancer? | True Stories | Ask the Experts Blog Events ... Weekend Warriors expand/collapse Golf: You've Got Skin in the Game expand/collapse Vitamin D Essential Outdoor Sun Safety Tips for Winter ...

  13. Sensory Perception, Rationalism and Outdoor Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Matthew R.

    2008-01-01

    There is a strong emphasis on sensory perception and "hands-on" learning in the outdoor environmental education of children. In addition, normative concerns infuse children's environmental curricula, and in particular, the notion that environmental education is not a passive undertaking; when one appreciates the essential value of the…

  14. Avalanche!--Teachable Moments in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Shayne

    2005-01-01

    Rarely do outdoor educators get the opportunity to safely incorporate an avalanche while the topic of the day is actually avalanche awareness and forecasting. Many similar possibilities exist in the expeditionary context, but even brief excursions may result in incredible learning experiences. These "teachable moments" occur regularly in the…

  15. Leave no trace in the outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The essential guide for enjoying the outdoors without harming the environment. - Details the seven core principles of Leave No Trace ethics and practices - Covers hiking, campfires, food storage, and personal hygiene - Endorsed by the USDI National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, Fish & Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and the USDA Forest Service

  16. Outdoor Lighting Networks: Market, Technologies and Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Wang, J.; Chen, R.; Jiang , D.; Yang, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Providing the right amount of light where and when it is needed is an opportunity to transform today’s cities into smart and livable urban spaces. New technologies are being introduced, such are adaptivecontrols and outdoor lighting networks, which can deliver energy andcost savings through adaptive

  17. Matrix vaccination guidelines : 2015 ABCD recommendations for indoor/outdoor cats, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosie, Margaret J; Addie, Diane D; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Horzinek, Marian C; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    2015-01-01

    OVERVIEW: In 2013, the ABCD published 'Matrix vaccination guidelines: ABCD recommendations for indoor/outdoor cats, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries' in a Special Issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (Volume 15, Issue 7, pages 540-544). The ABCD's vaccination recommendations

  18. Matrix vaccination guidelines : 2015 ABCD recommendations for indoor/outdoor cats, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosie, Margaret J; Addie, Diane D; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Horzinek, Marian C; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    OVERVIEW: In 2013, the ABCD published 'Matrix vaccination guidelines: ABCD recommendations for indoor/outdoor cats, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries' in a Special Issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (Volume 15, Issue 7, pages 540-544). The ABCD's vaccination recommendations

  19. Matrix vaccination guidelines : 2015 ABCD recommendations for indoor/outdoor cats, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosie, Margaret J; Addie, Diane D; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Horzinek, Marian C; Lloret, Albert; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    2015-01-01

    OVERVIEW: In 2013, the ABCD published 'Matrix vaccination guidelines: ABCD recommendations for indoor/outdoor cats, rescue shelter cats and breeding catteries' in a Special Issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery (Volume 15, Issue 7, pages 540-544). The ABCD's vaccination recommendations

  20. First investigation at elevated pressures to confirm the exact nature of the gated electron-transfer systems: volume profiles of the gated reduction reaction and nongated reverse oxidation reaction involving a [Cu(dmp)2(solvent)]2+/[Cu(dmp)2]+ couple (dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Sumitaka; Noda, Kyoko; Yamane, Ryouhei; Kishikawa, Nobuyuki; Takagi, Hideo D

    2007-02-19

    Redox reactions involving the [Cu(dmp)2]2+/+ couple (dmp = 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) in acetonitrile were examined at elevated pressures up to 200 MPa. Activation volumes were determined as -8.8 and -6.3 cm3 mol-1 for the reduction cross-reaction by [Co(bipy)3]2+ (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and for the oxidation cross-reaction by [Ni(tacn)2]3+ (tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane), respectively. The activation volume for the hypothetical gated mode of the self-exchange reaction estimated from the reduction cross-reaction was -13.9 cm3 mol-1, indicating extensive electrostrictive rearrangement of solvent molecules around the CuII complex during the change in the coordination geometry before the electron-transfer step. On the other hand, the activation volume for the self-exchange reaction estimated from the oxidation cross-reaction was -2.7 +/- 1.5 cm3 mol-1. Although this value was within the range that can be interpreted by the concept of the ordinary concerted process, from theoretical considerations it was concluded that the reverse (oxidation) cross-reaction of the gated reduction reaction of the [Cu(dmp)2(CH3CN)]2+/[Cu(dmp)2]+ couple proceeds through the product excited state while the direct self-exchange reaction between [Cu(dmp)2(CH3CN)]2+ and [Cu(dmp)2]+ proceeds through an ordinary concerted process.

  1. The relationship of student achievement to learning elementary science outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Steve Anthony

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between teaching elementary science outdoors and student achievement on science standards. The study also considered student attitudes toward learning outdoors in the schoolyard and their achievement on a science standard appropriate for teaching outdoors. The seminal work in the field (Louv, 2005) created the phrase "nature deficit disorder" to describe the condition of children that spend little time outdoors learning from and playing in nature. Five fourth grade classes took part in outdoor instruction on particular standards after taking an attitudinal survey on learning outdoors and a pretest on the science content. Both measures were repeated after outdoor instruction. The hypotheses of the study were that students receiving outdoor instruction demonstrate improved science achievement and that student attitudes towards learning science outdoors has a significant impact on student achievement related to a science standard. The results of the study indicate a gain in student achievement followed the outdoor science lessons, allowing the research to accept the hypothesis as valid. However, the study found that student attitude toward learning science outdoors was not a significant factor in predicting gains in student achievement.

  2. Real-time measurement of outdoor worker’s exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation in Pretoria, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgabutlane, M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Wright_2015.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 46656 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Wright_2015.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Volume 111 | Number 5/6May/June 2015... in Pretoria, South Africa. S Afr J Sci. 2015;111(5/6), Art. #2014-0133, 7 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.17159/ sajs.2015/20140133 Research Article Outdoor worker’s exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation Page 1 of 7 Real-time measurement of outdoor worker’s...

  3. Nearby outdoor environments and seniors physical activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available More than 60% of older Americans have sedentary lifestyles1 1 According to DHHS (1996. and are recommended more physical activities for health benefit. Nearby outdoor environments on residential sites may impact older inhabitants׳ physical activities there (defined as walking, gardening, yard work, and other outdoor physical activities on residential sites. This study surveyed 110 assisted-living residents in Houston, Texas, regarding their previous residential sites before moving to a retirement community and physical activities there. Twelve environmental features were studied under four categories (typology, motivators, function, and safety. Based on data availability, a subset of 57 sample sites was analyzed in Geographic Information Systems. Hierarchical linear modeling was applied to estimate physical activities as a function of the environments. Higher levels of physical activity were found to be positively related with four environmental features (transitional-areas, connecting-paths, walk-ability, and less paving.

  4. Metrology for fire experiments in outdoor conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Silvani, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Natural fires can be considered as scale-dependant, non-linear processes of mass, momentum and heat transport, resulting from a turbulent reactive and radiative fluid medium flowing over a complex medium, the vegetal fuel. In natural outdoor conditions, the experimental study of natural fires at real scale needs the development of an original metrology, one able to capture the large range of time and length scales involved in its dynamic nature and also able to resist the thermal, mechanical and chemical aggression of flames on devices. Robust, accurate and poorly intrusive tools must be carefully set-up and used for gaining very fluctuating data over long periods. These signals also need the development of original post-processing tools that take into account the non-steady nature of their stochastic components. Metrology for Fire Experiments in Outdoor Conditions closely analyzes these features, and also describes measurements techniques, the thermal insulation of fragile electronic systems, data acquisitio...

  5. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, M.

    2011-04-01

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This presentation documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  6. MAKING PUBLIC OUTDOOR SPACE IN TRANSITION

    OpenAIRE

    Maspoli, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    In urban public outdoor space, the possibility to define multi-functional islands, to create "fusion" of socialization, leisure and work spaces ‒ for example lounges with wireless connectivity, quiet corners to work as well as areas for socializing and relax … ‒ reduces isolation and increases innovation opportunities. The development of electronic live/work areas and villages is becoming an attractive option for the rehabilitation of open space in historic and postindustrial cities. There ar...

  7. Energy efficient outdoor lighting: an implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Farahat, Ahmed; Florea, Anna; Martínez Lastra, José Luis; Brañas Reyes, Christian; Azcondo Sánchez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Lighting strongly influences human daily activities. Smart lighting emerged as new generation of lighting system, able to precisely address the specific needs. Under conditions of shortage in fossil fuels and high prices for energy, smart lighting enables design of lighting systems, which can efficiently use power resources without compromising the user experience. The paper describes implementation of outdoor lighting solution targeting energy efficiency. The proposed approach takes holistic...

  8. Outdoor autonomous navigation using monocular vision

    OpenAIRE

    Royer, Eric; Bom, Jonathan; Dhome, Michel; Thuilot, Benoît; Lhuillier, Maxime; Marmoiton, Francois

    2005-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, a complete system for outdoor robot navigation is presented. It uses only monocular vision. The robot is first guided on a path by a human. During this learning step, the robot records a video sequence. From this sequence, a three dimensional map of the trajectory and the environment is built. When this map has been computed, the robot is able to follow the same trajectory by itself. Experimental results carried out with an urban electric vehicle are sho...

  9. Catchment areas of panoramic snapshots in outdoor scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeil, Jochen; Hofmann, Martin I.; Chahl, Javaan S.

    2003-03-01

    We took panoramic snapshots in outdoor scenes at regular intervals in two- or three-dimensional grids covering 1 m2 or 1 m3 and determined how the root mean square pixel differences between each of the images and a reference image acquired at one of the locations in the grid develop over distance from the reference position. We then asked whether the reference position can be pinpointed from a random starting position by moving the panoramic imaging device in such a way that the image differences relative to the reference image are minimized. We find that on time scales of minutes to hours, outdoor locations are accurately defined by a clear, sharp minimum in a smooth three-dimensional (3D) volume of image differences (the 3D difference function). 3D difference functions depend on the spatial-frequency content of natural scenes and on the spatial layout of objects therein. They become steeper in the vicinity of dominant objects. Their shape and smoothness, however, are affected by changes in illumination and shadows. The difference functions generated by rotation are similar in shape to those generated by translation, but their plateau values are higher. Rotational difference functions change little with distance from the reference location. Simple gradient descent methods are surprisingly successful in recovering a goal location, even if faced with transient changes in illumination. Our results show that view-based homing with panoramic images is in principle feasible in natural environments and does not require the identification of individual landmarks. We discuss the relevance of our findings to the study of robot and insect homing.

  10. Classification of Scenes into Indoor/Outdoor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Raja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective model for scene classification is essential, to access the desired images from large scale databases. This study presents an efficient scene classification approach by integrating low level features, to reduce the semantic gap between the visual features and richness of human perception. The objective of the study is to categorize an image into indoor or outdoor scene using relevant low level features such as color and texture. The color feature from HSV color model, texture feature through GLCM and entropy computed from UV color space forms the feature vector. To support automatic scene classification, Support Vector Machine (SVM is implemented on low level features for categorizing a scene into indoor/outdoor. Since the combination of these image features exhibit a distinctive disparity between images containing indoor or outdoor scenes, the proposed method achieves better performance in terms of classification accuracy of about 92.44%. The proposed method has been evaluated on IITM- SCID2 (Scene Classification Image Database and dataset of 3442 images collected from the web.

  11. Evaluation of Cooling Solutions for Outdoor Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wankhede, Mahendra; Goswami, A; Mahajan, S D

    2008-01-01

    The thermal management of an outdoor electronic enclosure can be quite challenging due to the additional thermal load from the sun and the requirement of having an air-sealed enclosure. It is essential to consider the effect of solar heating loads in the design process; otherwise, it can shorten the life expectancy of the electronic product or lead to catastrophic failure. In this paper we analyze and compare the effectiveness of different cooling techniques used for outdoor electronics. Various cooling techniques were compared like special coatings and paints on the outer surface, radiation shields, double-walled vented enclosures, fans for internal air circulation and air-to-air heat exchangers. A highly simplified, typical outdoor system was selected for this study measuring approximately 300x300x400 mm (WxLxH). Solar radiation was incident on 3 sides of the enclosure. There were 8 equally spaced PCBs inside the enclosure dissipating 12.5W each uniformly (100 watts total). A computational fluid dynamics (C...

  12. Development of thin-film photo-bioreactor and its application to outdoor culture of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Jun; Choi, Seung Phill; Kim, Jaoon Y H; Chang, Won Seok; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-06-01

    Photosynthetic microalgae have received much attention as a microbial source of diverse useful biomaterials through CO(2) fixation and various types of photo-bioreactors have been developed for efficient microalgal cultivation. Herein, we developed a novel thin-film photo-bioreactor, which was made of cast polypropylene film, considering outdoor mass cultivation. To develop optimal design of photo-bioreactor, we tested performance of three shapes of thin-film photo-bioreactors (flat, horizontal and vertical tubular shapes) and various parts in the bioreactor. Collectively, vertical tubular bioreactor with H/D ratio 6:1 and cylindrical stainless steel spargers showed the most outstanding performance. Furthermore, the photo-bioreactor was successfully applied to the cultivation of other microalgae such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella vulgaris. The scalability of photo-bioreactor was confirmed by gradually increasing culture volume from 4 to 25 L and the biomass productivity of each reactor was quite consistent (0.05-0.07 g/L/day) during the cultivation of H. pluvialis under indoor and outdoor conditions. Especially, we also achieved dry cell weight of 4.64 g/L and astaxanthin yield of 218.16 mg/L through long-term cultivation (100 days) under outdoor condition in 15 L photo-bioreactor using Haematococcus pluvialis, which means that the astaxanthin yield from outdoor cultivation is equal or superior to that obtained from controlled indoor condition. Therefore, these results indicate that we can apply this approach to development of optimal photo-bioreactor for the large-scale culture of microalgae and production of useful biomaterials under outdoor condition.

  13. Development of a versatile experimental setup for the evaluation of the photocatalytic properties of construction materials under realistic outdoor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, S; Portela, R; Hernández-Alonso, M D; Sánchez, B

    2014-10-01

    The interest on outdoor photocatalytic materials is growing in the last years. Nevertheless, most of the experimental devices designed for the assessment of their performance operate at controlled laboratory conditions, i.e., pollutant concentration, temperature, UV irradiation, and water vapor contents, far from those of real outdoor environments. The aim of the present study was the design and development of an experimental device for the continuous test of photocatalytic outdoor materials under sun irradiation using real outdoor air as feed, with the concomitant fluctuation of pollutant concentration, temperature, and water vapor content. A three-port measurement system based on two UV-transparent chambers was designed and built. A test chamber contained the photoactive element and a reference chamber to place the substrate without the photoactive element were employed. The third sampling point, placed outdoors, allowed the characterization of the surrounding air, which feeds the test chambers. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and UV-A irradiance were monitored at each sampling point with specific sensors. NO x concentration was measured by a chemiluminescence NO x analyzer. Three automatic valves allowed the consecutive analysis of the concentration at the three points at fixed time intervals. The reliability of the analytical system was demonstrated by comparing the NO x concentration data with those obtained at the nearest weather station to the experimental device location. The use of a chamber-based reaction system leads to an attenuation of NO x and atmospheric parameter profiles, but maintaining the general trends. The air characterization results showed the wide operating window under which the photoactive materials should work outdoors, depending on the traffic intensity and the season, which are reproduced inside the test chambers. The designed system allows the measurement of the photoactivity of outdoor materials or the comparison of several

  14. Outdoor Augmented Reality: State of the Art and Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Zendjebil, Imane; Ababsa, Fakhr-Eddine; Didier, Jean-Yves; Vairon, Jacques; Frauciel, Luc; Hachet, Martin; Guitton, Pascal; Delmont, Romuald

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The goal of an outdoor augmented reality system is to allow the human operator to move freely without restraint in its environment, to view and interact in real time with geo-referenced data via mobile wireless devices. This requires proposing new techniques for 3D localization, visualization and 3D interaction, adapted to working conditions in outdoor environment (brightness variation, features of displays used, etc.). This paper surveys recent advances in outdoor aug...

  15. Chemical Composition of Indoor and Outdoor PM2.5 in Three Schools in the City of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Tofful

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, children spend up to 30% of their time in school institutions; for this reason, the evaluation of indoor air quality in schools constitutes a necessary step forward in the direction of child health protection. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of PM2.5 collected simultaneously indoor and outdoor in three primary schools in Rome. Seasonal variations between winter and spring/summer were evaluated, as well as the role of the main macro-sources of PM (soil, sea, traffic, secondary inorganics and organics. During winter periods, characterized by strong atmospheric stability, the main contributors were organics and combustion products, which accounted for more than 70% of the total mass both indoor and outdoor. Spring/summer period was characterized by very low outdoor concentrations (12 μg/m3 on average and by a more balanced contribution of organic, traffic and secondary inorganic components. Indoor, the contribution of soil-related species from re-suspension of settled dust and secondary inorganic species from outdoor photochemical reactions became significant. Given that several indoor exceedances of the international air quality standards for PM2.5 were recorded during the most polluted days, the infiltration of outdoor air, due to the inadequate construction characteristics of the buildings and the absence of automated air filtration systems, seemed to be the main causes of the high PM concentrations measured indoor.

  16. Performance correlations of five solar collectors tested simultaneously outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Collector thermal efficiency, and efficiency degradation with time were measured for 5 flat-plate solar collectors tested simultaneously in an outdoor solar collector test facility. Results indicate that by using collector performance parameters which account for diffuse insolation, outdoor data recorded on 'cloudy' days can be used as a measure of performance, as long as the ratio of direct to total insolation exceeds approximately 0.6. These outdoor results also show good agreement with thermal efficiency data obtained indoors in a solar simulator. Significant efficiency degradation occurred on only one of the five collectors exposed to outdoor conditions for a period of one to two years.

  17. Space and place in Outdoor Education in New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The article draws on a doctoral study of young peoples’ participation in organised friluftsliv and outdoor education in Denmark and New Zealand. The research questions concentrate on views of nature, values and general characteristics in friluftsliv and outdoor education. The results are based...... on a qualitative approach using case study design with interviews and observations. For the analysis, ethnological cultural analysis was employed combined with configuration analysis to conceptualise the data. Theories and concepts of space and place in outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed. Results from...... the empirical studies on outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed and compared to the cultural perspective of friluftsliv in Denmark....

  18. Renovation of the CERN outdoor lighting

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Due to the renovation of the CERN outdoor lighting, traffic will be limited to one way along “Route Gregory” from the E entrance (France) up to “Route Fermi” just before the water tower between 12th and 23rd July 2010. Disruption can also be expected in the car parks “Les Erables” and “Les Tilleuls” close to building 30 and also the car park in front of building 377, between 19th and 30th July 2010. Thanks for your understanding. SEM Group

  19. O outdoor personalizado na cidade do Porto

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Fernanda Isabel de Jesus Viana do Carmo

    2009-01-01

    Dissertação de Mestrado apresentada à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Ciências da Comunicação, com especialização Marketing e Publicidade. Como é que o outdoor personalizado, enquanto potenciador da mensagem publicitária, de elevado grau de mutabilidade, de interacção com o meio envolvente, se relaciona com o espaço urbano? Defendemos o seguinte: o espaço urbano, oferecendo uma configuração singular, proporcionada pel...

  20. An Analysis of Outdoor Leaders' Ethics: Guiding Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, Denise

    Outdoor leaders model their values, and their ethical frameworks and moral development help shape their influence on others. Outdoor leaders face many obstacles as they seek to define ethical standards, including the challenge of defining common ethics, lack of professional certifications, the limits of professional ethics, and issues of power and…

  1. Getting the Most Out of Journaling: Strategies for Outdoor Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; O'Connell, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    Outdoor educators often ask students to write journals without training them in journal writing. A workshop in journal writing for university students in outdoor education courses covers how to write entries related to specific content areas; an understanding of Bloom's Taxonomy of Cognitive Thinking and how it applies to journal writing; and…

  2. Methodology in Outdoor Research: Approaches from an Alternative Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Tony

    2008-01-01

    Powerful, dominant discourses surrounding neo-Hahnian theory (as discussed by Brookes in 2003) and effectiveness (as discussed by Hargreaves and Fullan in 1998, for example) have influenced both practice and research in outdoor adventure education. This has led to a concentration of research that focuses on the impact of outdoor programmes. It has…

  3. Rain and Romanticism: The Environment in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor education provides an opportunity to engage with natural environments in ways that are distinct from other physical education teacher education (PETE) courses. This research examines how pre-service teachers (PSTs) within a PETE degree experienced "environment" on an outdoor education camp. Using self-study methodology and…

  4. Managing Fear in the Outdoor Experiential Education Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Outlines components of fear in outdoor adventure activities. Reports ratings by 311 Outward Bound students of 23 common fears in the outdoors. Discusses techniques of fear reduction therapy: systematic desensitization, flooding, modeling of coping methods by instructors, and rehearsal of adaptive behaviors. Contains 16 references. (SV)

  5. Outdoor Education Is More than Meets the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortill, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Any activity that involves learning, whether it is for therapeutic purposes, traditional education, or outdoor education, is experiential education. In particular, outdoor educators allow participants to experiment with their behaviour in the form of play, for the most part out-of-doors. Many in the industry refer to play as adventure. Those who…

  6. Appropriate Benefits for Outdoor Programs Targeting Juvenile Male Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyere, Brett L.

    2002-01-01

    A benefits-based management approach will enable outdoor adventure therapy programs for male adolescent offenders to be built around desired outcomes such as building connections to community, enhancing self-esteem, and establishing intergenerational relationships. Outdoor programs must maintain informal environments, involve participants in…

  7. Automatic video surveillance of outdoor scenes using track before detect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Birkemark, Christian M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper concerns automatic video surveillance of outdoor scenes using a single camera. The first step in automatic interpretation of the video stream is activity detection based on background subtraction. Usually, this process will generate a large number of false alarms in outdoor scenes due...

  8. The ODELIA Study on Noise Limits for Outdoor Machinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.; Carletti, E.; Spellerberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    In the ODELIA study for the European Commission an assessment of the outdoor equipment noise directive 2000/14/EC and its amendment 2005/88/EC has been performed. The directive requires noise marking for 57 types of equipment used outdoors, and sets noise limits for 22 of these. Since the limits

  9. The Future of Outdoor Recreation. What the Trends Tell Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Gina

    1986-01-01

    The author looked at trend data presented at the 1985 National Outdoor Recreation Trends Symposium and synthesized the results to offer insights into the future of outdoor recreation. Discussed are social, activity, private sector recreational, economic, tourism, and policy trends. (MT)

  10. Market segmentation of goods for sports and outdoor activities

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Bratyhina; Irina Toimenceva

    2013-01-01

    Article is devoted to questions to market segmentation of goods for sports and outdoor activities. Authors allocate the main segments of consumers of goods for sports and outdoor activities, carry out market segmentation on types of goods and services, and as segmentation on the competing organizations.

  11. Rain and Romanticism: The Environment in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor education provides an opportunity to engage with natural environments in ways that are distinct from other physical education teacher education (PETE) courses. This research examines how pre-service teachers (PSTs) within a PETE degree experienced "environment" on an outdoor education camp. Using self-study methodology and…

  12. Outdoor Education Summer Curriculum Project--1979. Phoenix Elementary District #1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Arthur; And Others

    Outside the classroom there are many opportunities that provide a variety of environmental, ecological and academic-oriented experiences. For inner city minority children from low income families the need for outdoor education programs is particularly critical. Much of the outdoor experience can be established right on the school site by using the…

  13. Outdoor Adventure & Eating Disorders: A Personal Perspective to Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kaye

    1999-01-01

    A female outdoor educator who had recovered from anorexia nervosa reflects on the boundaries between her personal and professional identity as she anticipates taking on a research role in adventure-therapy programs. Gender issues in outdoor education are discussed in relation to women's body image and eating disorders. (SV)

  14. The Implementation of Mobile Learning in Outdoor Education: Application of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hsin-Chih; Chang, Chun-Yen; Li, Wen-Shiane; Fan, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ying-Tien

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an m-learning method that incorporates Integrated Quick Response (QR) codes. This learning method not only achieves the objectives of outdoor education, but it also increases applications of Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning (CTML) (Mayer, 2001) in m-learning for practical use in a diverse range of outdoor locations. When…

  15. Social inequalities in young children's sports participation and outdoor play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtzes, Anne I; Jansen, Wilma; Bouthoorn, Selma H; Pot, Niek; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Raat, Hein

    2014-12-16

    Research on social inequalities in sports participation and unstructured physical activity among young children is scarce. This study aimed to assess the associations of family socioeconomic position (SEP) and ethnic background with children's sports participation and outdoor play. We analyzed data from 4726 ethnically diverse 6-year-old children participating in the Generation R Study. Variables were assessed by parent-reported questionnaires when the child was 6 years old. Low level of outdoor play was defined as outdoor play sports participation and outdoor play. Socioeconomic inequalities in children's sports participation were found when using maternal educational level (p sports participation among low SEP children). Socioeconomic inequalities in children's outdoor play were found when using household income only (p sports and play outdoor sports participation. Low SEP children and ethnic minority children are more likely not to participate in sports and more likely to display low levels of outdoor play compared with high SEP children and native Dutch children, respectively. In order to design effective interventions, further research, including qualitative studies, is needed to explore more in detail the pathways relating family SEP and ethnic background to children's sports participation and outdoor play.

  16. Foucault on Camp: What Does His Work Offer Outdoor Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Robyn; Burrows, Lisette

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we examine aspects of French social theorist, Michel Foucault's work and the contributions these can make to understanding practices in outdoor education. We look specifically at his notions of practice, discourse, power and the self and the lines of questioning that these concepts make possible in relation to outdoor education. We…

  17. Market segmentation of goods for sports and outdoor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bratyhina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to questions to market segmentation of goods for sports and outdoor activities. Authors allocate the main segments of consumers of goods for sports and outdoor activities, carry out market segmentation on types of goods and services, and as segmentation on the competing organizations.

  18. The Future of Outdoor Recreation. What the Trends Tell Us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Gina

    1986-01-01

    The author looked at trend data presented at the 1985 National Outdoor Recreation Trends Symposium and synthesized the results to offer insights into the future of outdoor recreation. Discussed are social, activity, private sector recreational, economic, tourism, and policy trends. (MT)

  19. An Educational Tool for Outdoor Education and Environmental Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Klas; Ohman, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest an outdoor education model that respects the need to critically discuss the general belief in a causal relationship between experiences of nature, environmentally-friendly attitudes and behavioural change, but that at the same time respects the legitimate claims on the part of outdoor education practice for…

  20. Playing with Nature: Supporting Preschoolers' Creativity in Natural Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiewra, Christine; Veselack, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Conducted at two separate natural outdoor classrooms with preschool-aged children from three to five years old, this qualitative research study investigated how outdoor environments supported children's creativity and imagination. Although many studies have explored the development of creative arts in the young children, few have focused on…

  1. Fancy a Career Doing Therapy in the Outdoors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Chris

    2003-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, no outdoor practitioner is working as a professional therapist and little formal training in outdoor therapy exists. Practice of this type requires supervision and professional accreditation. Interested undergraduates should check social work, probation, mental health, educational psychology, or occupational therapy…

  2. Outdoor activity and myopia in Singapore teenage children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirani, M; Tong, L; Gazzard, G; Zhang, X; Chia, A; Young, T L; Rose, K A; Mitchell, P; Saw, S-M

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the relationship of outdoor activities and myopia in Singapore teenage children. Teenage children (1249 participants), examined in the Singapore Cohort study Of Risk factors for Myopia (SCORM), during 2006 were included in analyses. Participants completed questionnaires that quantified total outdoor activity, and underwent an eye examination. The mean total time spent on outdoor activity was 3.24 h/day. The total outdoor activity (h/day) was significantly associated with myopia, odds ratio 0.90 (95% CI 0.84 to 0.96) (p = 0.004), after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, school type, books read per week, height, parental myopia, parental education and intelligence quotient. In addition, the total time spent outdoors was associated with significantly less myopic refraction (regression coefficient = 0.17; CI 0.10 to 0.25, p<0.001) and shorter axial length (regression coefficient -0.06 (CI -0.1 to -0.03, p<0.001). Total sports was also significantly negatively associated with myopia (p = 0.008) but not indoor sports (p = 0.16). Participants who spent more time outdoors were less likely to be myopic. Thus, outdoor activity may protect against development of myopia in children, supporting recent Australian data. As near work did not predict outdoor activity, this can be viewed as an independent factor and not merely the reciprocal of near work.

  3. Determination of lead, cations, and anions concentration in indoor and outdoor air at the primary schools in Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Normah; Jamaluddin, Farhana

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the concentration of lead (Pb), anions, and cations at six primary schools located around Kuala Lumpur. Low volume sampler (MiniVol PM10) was used to collect the suspended particulates in indoor and outdoor air. Results showed that the concentration of Pb in indoor air was in the range of 5.18 ± 1.08 μg/g-7.01 ± 0.08 μg/g. All the concentrations of Pb in indoor air were higher than in outdoor air at all sampling stations. The concentrations of cations and anions were higher in outdoor air than in indoor air. The concentration of Ca(2+) (39.51 ± 5.01 mg/g-65.13 ± 9.42 mg/g) was the highest because the cation existed naturally in soil dusts, while the concentrations of NO3 (-) and SO4 (2-) were higher in outdoor air because there were more sources of exposure for anions in outdoor air, such as highly congested traffic and motor vehicles emissions. In comparison, the concentration of NO3 (-) (29.72 ± 0.31 μg/g-32.00 ± 0.75 μg/g) was slightly higher than SO4 (2-). The concentrations of most of the parameters in this study, such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and Pb(2+), were higher in outdoor air than in indoor air at all sampling stations.

  4. Gas content of a two-phase layer containing gas and a melt of K/sub 2/O-V/sub 2/O/sub 8/ averaged by volume and its foam formation in a reaction-regeneration cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazleev, M.P.; Chekhov, O.S.; Ermakov, E.A.

    1985-06-20

    This paper discusses the results of an investigation of the gas content averaged over the volume, hydrodynamic programs, and foaming in the K/sub 2/O-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ melt plus gas system, which is used as a catalyst in several thermocatalytic processes. The experimental setup is described and a comparison of literature data on the gas content of different gas-liquid systems under comparable conditions is presented. The authors were able to determine the boundaries of the hydrodynamic modes in a bubbling reactor and derive equations for the calculation of the gas content. It was found that the gas content of the melt increased when V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ was reduced to V/sub 2/O/sub 4/ in the reaction portion of the reaction-regeneration cycle. Regeneration of the melt restores the value of gas content to its original level.

  5. Particle Swarm Optimization for Outdoor Lighting Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Castillo-Martinez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor lighting is an essential service for modern life. However, the high influence of this type of facility on energy consumption makes it necessary to take extra care in the design phase. Therefore, this manuscript describes an algorithm to help light designers to get, in an easy way, the best configuration parameters and to improve energy efficiency, while ensuring a minimum level of overall uniformity. To make this possible, we used a particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. These algorithms are well established, and are simple and effective to solve optimization problems. To take into account the most influential parameters on lighting and energy efficiency, 500 simulations were performed using DIALux software (4.10.0.2, DIAL, Ludenscheid, Germany. Next, the relation between these parameters was studied using to data mining software. Subsequently, we conducted two experiments for setting parameters that enabled the best configuration algorithm in order to improve efficiency in the proposed process optimization.

  6. Planning and Performing Outdoor Living Space Lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fošnarič Samo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The nature is man’s first teacher. Slovenian people are generally proud of their country being a green oasis in the middle of Europe, characterized by many natural and geographical features. As we were interested to see whether younger primary school students had experience with learning about such features in outdoor classes, we completed an empirical research on a sample of 84 primary school class teachers in the Prekmurje region. We investigated if teachers included field trips (and how many in their lesson plans and how many of those they actually took their students to. We established that teachers (too rarely allowed their students to gain knowledge and information directly from nature.

  7. Outdoor air pollution and sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Rafael; García-Blàquez, Núria; Jacquemin, Bénédicte; Checa, Miguel Angel

    2016-09-15

    Exposure to air pollution has been clearly associated with a range of adverse health effects, including reproductive toxicity, but its effects on male semen quality are still unclear. We performed a systematic review (up to June 2016) to assess the impact of air pollutants on sperm quality. We included 17 semi-ecological, panel, and cohort studies, assessing outdoor air pollutants, such as PM2.5, PM10, NOx, SO2, and O3, and their effects on DNA fragmentation, sperm count, sperm motility, and sperm morphology. Thirteen studies assessed air pollution exposure measured environmentally, and six used biomarkers of air pollution exposure (two did both). We rated the studies using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and assessed with the exposure method. Taking into account these factors and the number of studies finding significant results (positive or negative), the evidence supporting an effect of air pollution on DNA fragmentation is weak but suggestive, on sperm motility is limited and probably inexistent, on lower sperm count is inconclusive, and on sperm morphology is very suggestive. Because of the diversity of air pollutants and sperm parameters, and the studies' designs, we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. In summary, most studies concluded that outdoor air pollution affects at least one of the four semen quality parameters included in the review. However, results lack consistency, and furthermore, studies were not comparable. Studies using standardized air pollution and semen measures are required to obtain more reliable conclusions. CRD42015007175. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outdoor Workers and Sun Protection: Knowledge and Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Cioffi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor workers are at high risk of developing skin cancer. Primary prevention can potentiallyreduce the incidence of skin cancer in this group. This study aimed to determine theknowledge and sun protective behaviour of outdoor workers towards skin cancer. A shortquestionnaire was used to collect data from workers on construction sites during workinghours. Despite workers having knowledge of the risks of skin cancer their use of sun protectionwas less than satisfactory, particularly considering their cumulative exposure.Workplace health education programs for outdoor workers addressing sun protection areindicated, as is further research to increase understanding of issues workers have withsun protection in the workplace.

  9. Performance test procedures for thermal collectors - Outdoor testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, W. B.

    A review of outdoor solar collector test methods is presented, based largely on the CEC Recommendations for European Solar Collector Test Methods. Test facility design and instrumentation are discussed, with reference to their influence on measured collector efficiencies. Steady state outdoor testing, mixed indoor/outdoor testing and transient testing are reviewed, and it is concluded that although the testing of simple flat plate water heaters is fairly well understood, more work is now required to develop test methods for the new high performance collectors which are coming onto the market.

  10. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristou, C.; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment of buildings with a second "skin" and semi-outdoor space is examined in the present study. A literature review was conducted on similar structures and only a few studies were found focusing on the thermal environment. Two different building case studies were chosen...... building can be used by the occupants. The study was based on weather data for Copenhagen. In addition to the simulations, physical measurements were performed in DoV to assess the thermal environment in the semi-outdoor space. Since existing standards are not applicable for semi-outdoor spaces...

  11. Australian Outdoor (and) Environmental Education Research: Senses of "Place" in Two Constituencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Noel

    2016-01-01

    The Outdoor Council of Australia's renaming of "Australian Journal of Outdoor Education" ("AJOE") as "Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education" ("JOEE") follows deliberations among Australian and international stakeholders in outdoor education about the future of publishing in the field and raises a…

  12. Australian Outdoor (and) Environmental Education Research: Senses of "Place" in Two Constituencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Noel

    2016-01-01

    The Outdoor Council of Australia's renaming of "Australian Journal of Outdoor Education" ("AJOE") as "Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education" ("JOEE") follows deliberations among Australian and international stakeholders in outdoor education about the future of publishing in the field and raises a…

  13. Indoor-outdoor relationships of respirable sulfates and particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Douglas W.; Spengler, John D.

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of respirable particulates and sulfates have been measured in 68 homes in six cities for at least 1 yr. A conservation of mass model was derived describing indoor concentrations in terms of outdoor concentrations, infiltration and indoor sources. The measured data were analysed to identify important building characteristics and to quantify their effect. The mean infiltration rate of outdoor fine particulates was found to be approximately 70%. Cigarette smoking was found to be the dominant indoor source of respirable particulates. Increased indoor concentrations of sulfates were found to be associated with smoking and also with gas stoves. The effect of full air conditioning of the building was to reduce infiltration of outdoor fine particulates by about one half, while preventing dilution and purging of internally generated pollutants. The model for indoor respirable particulate and sulfate levels was found to compare well with measurements.

  14. Locating opportunities for outdoor action and adventure recreation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research overviews spatial recreation and tourism development policy, marketing and express outdoor recreationist and tourist preferences that translate into spatial suitability indicators or attraction features captured in a spatial resource ...

  15. Outdoor environmental assessment of attention promoting settings for preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson, F; Boldemann, C; Söderström, M; Blennow, M; Englund, J-E; Grahn, P

    2009-12-01

    The restorative potential of green outdoor environments for children in preschool settings was investigated by measuring the attention of children playing in settings with different environmental features. Eleven preschools with outdoor environments typical for the Stockholm area were assessed using the outdoor play environment categories (OPEC) and the fraction of visible sky from play structures (sky view factor), and 198 children, aged 4.5-6.5 years, were rated by the staff for inattentive, hyperactive and impulsive behaviors with the ECADDES tool. Children playing in large and integrated outdoor areas containing large areas of trees, shrubbery and a hilly terrain showed less often behaviors of inattention (pOPEC can be useful when to locate and develop health-promoting land adjacent to preschools.

  16. Participation of divorced single parents and their children in outdoor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participation of divorced single parents and their children in outdoor activities to ... South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... The leisure intervention programme played a positive role in improving ...

  17. Language Learning in Outdoor Environments: Perspectives of preschool staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Norling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Language environment is highlighted as an important area in the early childhood education sector. The term language environment refers to language-promoting aspects of education, such as preschool staff’s use of verbal language in interacting with the children. There is a lack of research about language learning in outdoor environments; thus children’s language learning is mostly based on the indoor physical environment. The aim of this study is therefore to explore, analyse, and describe how preschool staff perceive language learning in outdoor environments. The data consists of focus-group interviews with 165 preschool staff members, conducted in three cities in Sweden. The study is meaningful, thus results contribute knowledge regarding preschool staffs’ understandings of language learning in outdoor environments and develop insights to help preschool staff stimulate children’s language learning in outdoor environments.

  18. Research trends in outdoor pig production — A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Suk Park

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the industrialization of swine production in the late 1900s, swine farms in the United States, as well as in Europe, have largely become consolidated. Pig farms became larger in size but fewer in number, with 91% of market pigs being produced by large operations with 5,000 or more pigs on-site in the US, and only 3% of the total utilized agricultural land representing organic farming. Such change in the market made it difficult for small farmers to stay competitive, forcing them to find alternative ways to reduce the cost of production and increase profit using the outdoor production system. In contrast to the indoor confinement system, outdoor production system uses pasture-based units and/or deep-bedded hoop structures that promote animal welfare and environmental sustainability with a lower capital investment. In accord with the growing concern for animal and environmental welfare and food safety by the consumers, small farmers practicing an outdoor production system are seeing increased opportunities for marketing their products in the pork niche market. Unlike the general belief that the reproductive and growth performance measures of the outdoor sows and piglets are poorer in comparison with the animals reared indoors, studies showed that there was no significant difference in the performance measures, and some traits were even better in outdoor animals. Improved reproductive and production traits can increase the sustainability of outdoor farming. Present study reviewed the recent studies comparing the performance measures, meat quality and health of indoor and outdoor animals, as well as the efforts to improve the outdoor production system through changes in management such as hut types and breed of animals.

  19. Characteristics of outdoor falls among older people: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R; Ballinger, Claire; Phillips, Judith E; Newton, Rita

    2013-11-18

    Falls are a major threat to older people's health and wellbeing. Approximately half of falls occur in outdoor environments but little is known about the circumstances in which they occur. We conducted a qualitative study to explore older people's experiences of outdoor falls to develop understanding of how they may be prevented. We conducted nine focus groups across the UK (England, Wales, and Scotland). Our sample was from urban and rural settings and different environmental landscapes. Participants were aged 65+ and had at least one outdoor fall in the past year. We analysed the data using framework and content analyses. Forty-four adults aged 65 - 92 took part and reported their experience of 88 outdoor falls. Outdoor falls occurred in a variety of contexts, though reports suggested the following scenarios may have been more frequent: when crossing a road, in a familiar area, when bystanders were around, and with an unreported or unknown attribution. Most frequently, falls resulted in either minor or moderate injury, feeling embarrassed at the time of the fall, and anxiety about falling again. Ten falls resulted in fracture, but no strong pattern emerged in regard to the contexts of these falls. Anxiety about falling again appeared more prevalent among those that fell in urban settings and who made more visits into their neighbourhood in a typical week. This exploratory study has highlighted several aspects of the outdoor environment that may represent risk factors for outdoor falls and associated fear of falling. Health professionals are recommended to consider outdoor environments as well as the home setting when working to prevent falls and increase mobility among older people.

  20. Traditional and New Tendencies to Outdoor Sacral Spaces in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linas Krūgelis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes some features and traditions of outdoor sacral spaces in Lithuania, includes a historical analysis and various features of different historical periods and explains the new tendencies and possibilities of future development in contemporary Lithuania. By analysing the phenomenon of outdoor sacral spaces, some archaeological and historical data is used to identify the principles of creating such sacral space.Article in Lithuanian

  1. Large-scale autostereoscopic outdoor display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitterer, Jörg; Fidler, Franz; Saint Julien-Wallsee, Ferdinand; Schmid, Gerhard; Gartner, Wolfgang; Leeb, Walter; Schmid, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    State-of-the-art autostereoscopic displays are often limited in size, effective brightness, number of 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances, all of which are mandatory requirements for large-scale outdoor displays. Conventional autostereoscopic indoor concepts like lenticular lenses or parallax barriers cannot simply be adapted for these screens due to the inherent loss of effective resolution and brightness, which would reduce both image quality and sunlight readability. We have developed a modular autostereoscopic multi-view laser display concept with sunlight readable effective brightness, theoretically up to several thousand 3D viewing zones, and maximum 3D viewing distances of up to 60 meters. For proof-of-concept purposes a prototype display with two pixels was realized. Due to various manufacturing tolerances each individual pixel has slightly different optical properties, and hence the 3D image quality of the display has to be calculated stochastically. In this paper we present the corresponding stochastic model, we evaluate the simulation and measurement results of the prototype display, and we calculate the achievable autostereoscopic image quality to be expected for our concept.

  2. Adaptive information design for outdoor augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhöfer, Jan A; Govaers, Felix; El Mokni, Hichem; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Augmented Reality focuses on the enrichment of the user's natural field of view by consistent integration of text, symbols and interactive three-dimensional objects in real time. Placing virtual objects directly into the user's view in a natural context empowers highly dynamic applications. On the other hand, this necessitates deliberate choice of information design and density, in particular for deployment in hazardous environments like military combat scenarios. As the amount of information needed is not foreseeable and strongly depends on the individual mission, an appropriate system must offer adequate adaptation capabilities. The paper presents a prototypical, vehicle-mountable Augmented Reality vision system, designed for enhancing situation awareness in stressful urban warfare scenarios. Tracking, as one of the most crucial challenges for outdoor Augmented Reality, is accomplished by means of a Differential-GPS approach while the type of display to attach can be modified, ranging from ocular displays to standard LCD mini-screens. The overall concept also includes envisioning of own troops (blue forces), for which a multi-sensor tracking approach has been chosen. As a main feature, the system allows switching between different information categories, focusing on friendly, hostile, unidentified or neutral data. Results of an empirical study on the superiority of an in-view navigation cue approach conclude the paper.

  3. Energy Optimization for Outdoor Activity Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Boukhechba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mobile phone is no longer only a communication device, but also a powerful environmental sensing unit that can monitor a user’s ambient context. Mobile users take their devices with them everywhere which increases the availability of persons’ traces. Extracting and analyzing knowledge from these traces represent a strong support for several applications domains, ranging from traffic management to advertisement and social studies. However, the limited battery capacity of mobile devices represents a big hurdle for context detection, no matter how useful the service may be. We present a novel approach to online recognizing users’ outdoor activities without depleting the mobile resources. We associate the places visited by individuals during their movements with meaningful human activities using a novel algorithm that clusters incrementally user’s moves into different types of activities. To optimize the battery consumption, the algorithm behaves variably on the basis of users’ behaviors and the remaining battery level. Studies using real GPS records from two big datasets demonstrate that the proposal is effective and is capable of inferring human activities without draining the phone resources.

  4. Outdoor Air Pollution and Pterygium in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki Woong; Choi, Yoon Hyeong; Hwang, Sung Ha; Paik, Hae Jung; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    We investigated relationships between outdoor air pollution and pterygium in Korean adults. This study includes 23,276 adults in population-based cross-sectional data using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2011. Pterygium was assessed using slit lamp biomicroscopy. Air pollution data (humidity, particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm [PM₁₀], ozone [O₃], nitrogen dioxide [NO₂], and sulfur dioxide levels [SO₂]) for 2 years preceding the ocular examinations were acquired. Associations of multiple air pollutants with pterygium or pterygium recurrence after surgery were examined using multivariate logistic models, after adjusting for several covariates. Distributed lag models were additionally used for estimating cumulative effects of air pollution on pterygium. None of air pollution factors was significantly associated with pterygium or pterygium recurrence (each P > 0.05). Distributed lag models also showed that air pollution factors were not associated with pterygium or pterygium recurrence in 0-to-2 year lags (each P > 0.05). However, primary pterygium showed a weak association with PM10 after adjusting for covariates (odds ratio [OR] 1.23; [per 5 μg/m³ PM₁₀ increase]; P = 0.023). Aging, male sex, and greater sun exposure were associated with pterygium, while higher education level and myopia were negatively associated with pterygium (each P ≤ 0.001). Male sex and myopia were negatively associated with pterygium recurrence (each P air pollution and overall pterygium or pterygium recurrence in Korean adults.

  5. Hymenoptera venom allergy in outdoor workers: Occupational exposure, clinical features and effects of allergen immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toletone, Alessandra; Voltolini, Susanna; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Dini, Guglielmo; Bignardi, Donatella; Minale, Paola; Massa, Emanuela; Troise, Costantino; Durando, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives. To describe (i) the clinical characteristics of workers, exposed to hymenoptera stings, with an ascertained diagnosis of Hymenoptera Venom Allergy (HVA), (ii) the specific role of occupational exposure, (iii) the effect of Venom Immunotherapy (VIT) in reducing the severity of allergic episodes in workers exposed to repeated stings of hymenoptera, and (iv) the management of the occupational consequences caused by allergic reactions due to hymenoptera stings. Methods. Between 2000 and 2013 an observational study, including patients referred to the regional reference hospital of Liguria, Italy, with an ascertained diagnosis of HVA and treated with VIT, was performed. A structured questionnaire was administered to all patients to investigate the occupational features of allergic reactions. These were graded according to standard systems in patients at the first episode, and after re-stings, during VIT. Results. One-hundred and 8four out of the 202 patients referred had a complete data set. In 32 (17.4%) patients, the allergic reaction occurred during work activities performed outdoor. Of these, 31.2% previously stung by hymenoptera at work, and receiving VIT, were re-stung during occupational activity. The grades of reaction developed under VIT treatment resulted clinically less severe than of those occurred at the first sting (p-value = 0.031). Conclusion. Our findings confirmed the clinical relevance of HVA, and described its occupational features in outdoor workers with sensitization, stressing the importance of an early identification and proper management of the professional categories recognized at high risk of hymenoptera stings. The Occupational Physician should be supported by other specialists to recommend appropriate diagnostic procedures and the prescription of VIT, which resulted an effective treatment for the prevention of episodes of severe reactions in workers with a proven HVA. PMID:27924689

  6. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  7. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  8. Developing an audit checklist to assess outdoor falls risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curl, Angela; Thompson, Catharine Ward; Aspinall, Peter; Ormerod, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    Falls by older people (aged 65+) are linked to disability and a decrease in mobility, presenting a challenge to active ageing. As such, older fallers represent a vulnerable road user group. Despite this there is little research into the causes and prevention of outdoor falls. This paper develops an understanding of environmental factors causing falls or fear of falling using a walk-along interview approach with recent fallers to explore how older people navigate the outdoor environment and which aspects of it they perceived facilitate or hinder their ability to go outdoors and fear of falling. While there are a number of audit checklists focused on assessing the indoor environment for risk or fear of falls, nothing exists for the outdoor environment. Many existing street audit tools are focused on general environmental qualities and have not been designed with an older population in mind. We present a checklist that assesses aspects of the environment most likely to encourage or hinder those who are at risk of falling outdoors, developed through accounting for the experiences and navigational strategies of elderly individuals. The audit checklist can assist occupational therapists and urban planners, designers and managers in working to reduce the occurrence of outdoor falls among this vulnerable user group.

  9. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  10. Evaluating Outdoor Water Use Demand under Changing Climatic and Demographic Conditions: An Agent-based Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanta, L.

    2016-12-01

    Outdoor water use for landscape and irrigation constitutes a significant end use in residential water demand. In periods of water shortages, utilities may reduce garden demands by implementing irrigation system audits, rebate programs, local ordinances, and voluntary or mandatory water use restrictions. Because utilities do not typically record outdoor and indoor water uses separately, the effects of policies for reducing garden demands cannot be readily calculated. The volume of water required to meet garden demands depends on the housing density or lawn size, type of vegetation, climatic conditions, efficiency of garden irrigation systems, and consumer water-use behaviors. Many existing outdoor demand estimation methods are deterministic and do not include consumer responses to conservation campaigns. In addition, mandatory restrictions may have a substantial impact on reducing outdoor demands, but the effectiveness of mandatory restrictions depends on the timing and the frequency of restrictions, in addition to the distribution of housing density and consumer types within a community. This research investigates a garden end-use model by coupling an agent-based modeling approach and a mechanistic-stochastic water demand model to create a methodology for estimating garden demand and evaluating demand reduction policies. The garden demand model is developed for two water utilities, using a diverse data sets, including residential customer billing records, records of outdoor conservation programs, frequency and type of mandatory water use restrictions, lot size distribution, population growth, and climatic data. A set of garden irrigation parameter values, which are based on the efficiency of irrigation systems and irrigation habits of consumers, are determined for a set of conservation ordinances and restrictions. The model parameters are then validated using customer water usage data from the participating water utilities. A sensitivity analysis is conducted for

  11. Mass concentrations and indoor-outdoor relationships of PM in selected educational buildings in Niš, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Renata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass concentrations of particulate matter (PM fractions were measured in educational buildings in the city of Niš, Republic of Serbia. Two sampling campaigns were conducted in winter periods. The first campaign was in the period from 21 February to 15 April 2010 at the Faculty of Occupational Safety (FOS and the second campaign was from 20 March to 4 April 2013 at the primary school Vožd Karađorđe (VK. PM measurements were carried out with low volume samplers Sven/Leckel LVS3. The average daily PM10 concentration inside the FOS (47.0 ±21.8 μg/m3 was lower than PM10 concentration in outdoor air (50.7 ±28.1 μg/m3. The average daily PM10 concentration inside the VK (54.6 ± 17.6 μg/m3 was higher than in outdoor air (47.9 ± 22.8 μg/m3. The 24 hours average PM10 concentrations at FOS exceeded the EU limit value (50 mg/m3 during 34 % of days outdoors, and 39 % of days indoors. The 24 hours average PM10 concentrations at VK exceeded the limit value during 35 % of days outdoors, and 53 % of days indoors. The 24 hours average PM2.5 concentrations at VK exceeded the WHO daily mean guideline value (25 mg/m3 during 71 % of days outdoors, and 88 % of days indoors. The average PM10 I/O ratio at VK was 1.57 during teaching hours, and 1.00 during no teaching hours. Similarly, average PM2.5 I/O ratio at VK was 1.11 during teaching hours and 0.90 during no teaching hours. Average daily PM2.5/PM10 ratio in the ambient air at VK was 0.87, and 0.82 at FOS. Very strong correlations between the indoor and outdoor PM concentrations were observed at VK during no teaching hours (r>0.8. Moderate to strong negative correlations were found between the wind speed and PM at both schools. High outdoor PM concentrations and resuspension of particles are probably the most possible reasons for the elevated indoor PM concentrations found in the study. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III42008: Evaluation of Energy Performances and Indoor Environment

  12. An Exploration of Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences in Outdoor `Places' and Intentions for Teaching in the Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Erica; Patrick, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    This study explores pre-service teachers' past interactions with 'place' in outdoor settings and how these experiences contribute to their current perceptions of the importance of taking their own students into the outdoors. Specifically, the researchers were interested in investigating if current pre-service teachers are part of the 'nature-deficit disorder' generation described by Louv in his book, Last child in the woods: Saving our children from nature-deficit disorder (2005), as a generation of children growing up without direct experiences in nature. Study participants included 148 undergraduate pre-service elementary teachers enrolled in science teaching methods instructional courses at an urban college in the Northeastern United States and two suburban universities in the Southeastern United States. Participants wrote essay responses after reading Louv's Last Child in the Woods in which they were asked to relate the reading to their own past experiences and their ideas about elementary science education. Results indicate that a large majority of participants (97%) describe significant youth experiences in the outdoors, view nature as important in varying ways (89.9%), and express a desire to expose their own students to the outdoors (65.5%). Key findings are illustrated with direct quotations from the pre-service teachers' essay responses, as they write vividly of their interactions in outdoor places, referred to as 'place meanings'. Implications are presented for teacher educators working with pre-service teachers to build upon their outdoor experiences and prepare them for implementing nature-based instruction.

  13. Concentrations of 222Rn, 220Rn and their decay products measured in outdoor air in various rural zones (Morocco) by using solid-state nuclear track detectors and resulting radiation dose to the rural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misdaq, M A; Amrane, M; Ouguidi, J

    2010-03-01

    Alpha and beta activities per unit volume of air due to radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn) and their progenies were measured in the outdoor air at different locations in Morocco by using both CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). In addition, the radon concentration was continuously measured in one location by using the methods with SSNTDs and AlphaGuard counter. The influence of the geological and meteorological conditions as well as phosphate and building material dust on the radon concentration in the outdoor air of the areas studied was investigated. The committed equivalent doses due to (218)Po and (214)Po radon short-lived progeny were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of outdoor air. The annual effective dose due to radon short-lived progeny from the inhalation of outdoor air by the members of the rural population was estimated.

  14. Novel method for estimation of the indoor-to-outdoor airborne radioactivity ratio following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yanliang, E-mail: hytyl@163.com [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Hengyang Normal University, Hengyang, Hunan Province (China); Ishikawa, Tetsuo [Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima (Japan); Janik, Miroslaw [Regulatory Science Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji [Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Aomori (Japan); Hosoda, Masahiro [Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Science, Hirosaki, Aomori (Japan); Sorimachi, Atsuyuki [Fukushima Medical University, 1 Hikariga-oka, Fukushima (Japan); Kearfott, Kimberlee [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in Japan resulted in significant releases of fission products. While substantial data exist concerning outdoor air radioactivity following the accident, the resulting indoor radioactivity remains pure speculation without a proper method for estimating the ratio of the indoor to outdoor airborne radioactivity, termed the airborne sheltering factor (ASF). Lacking a meaningful value of the ASF, it is difficult to assess the inhalation doses to residents and evacuees even when outdoor radionuclide concentrations are available. A simple model was developed and the key parameters needed to estimate the ASF were obtained through data fitting of selected indoor and outdoor airborne radioactivity measurement data obtained following the accident at a single location. Using the new model with values of the air exchange rate, interior air volume, and the inner surface area of the dwellings, the ASF can be estimated for a variety of dwelling types. Assessment of the inhalation dose to individuals readily follows from the value of the ASF, the person's indoor occupancy factor, and the measured outdoor radioactivity concentration. - Highlights: • Actual ASF of the dwells is very important to estimate the inhalation dose. • A simple model is developed to describe ASF. • The key parameter of ASF is obtained from the measurement of NIRS. • The ASF of any dwellings can be obtained by our model and relatively parameters.

  15. Novel method for estimation of the indoor-to-outdoor airborne radioactivity ratio following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanliang; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Janik, Miroslaw; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Kearfott, Kimberlee

    2015-12-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) in Japan resulted in significant releases of fission products. While substantial data exist concerning outdoor air radioactivity following the accident, the resulting indoor radioactivity remains pure speculation without a proper method for estimating the ratio of the indoor to outdoor airborne radioactivity, termed the airborne sheltering factor (ASF). Lacking a meaningful value of the ASF, it is difficult to assess the inhalation doses to residents and evacuees even when outdoor radionuclide concentrations are available. A simple model was developed and the key parameters needed to estimate the ASF were obtained through data fitting of selected indoor and outdoor airborne radioactivity measurement data obtained following the accident at a single location. Using the new model with values of the air exchange rate, interior air volume, and the inner surface area of the dwellings, the ASF can be estimated for a variety of dwelling types. Assessment of the inhalation dose to individuals readily follows from the value of the ASF, the person's indoor occupancy factor, and the measured outdoor radioactivity concentration.

  16. Proceedings of the 1984 Conference on Outdoor Recreation: A Landmark Conference in the Outdoor Recreation Field (1st, Bozeman, Montana, November 1-4, 1984).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, John C., Ed.; Watters, Ron, Ed.

    This document consists of materials presented at a conference organized by representatives of university outdoor programs to discuss issues and exchange ideas about outdoor topics. Twenty-six papers were presented: (1) "Conference on Outdoor Recreation for the Disabled: Breaking the Stereotype" (Tom Whittaker and Sheila Brashear); (2)…

  17. Modeling emission rates and exposures from outdoor cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Rufus; Princevac, Marko; Weltman, Robert; Ghasemian, Masoud; Arora, Narendra K.; Bond, Tami

    2017-09-01

    Approximately 3 billion individuals rely on solid fuels for cooking globally. For a large portion of these - an estimated 533 million - cooking is outdoors, where emissions from cookstoves pose a health risk to both cooks and other household and village members. Models that estimate emissions rates from stoves in indoor environments that would meet WHO air quality guidelines (AQG), explicitly don't account for outdoor cooking. The objectives of this paper are to link health based exposure guidelines with emissions from outdoor cookstoves, using a Monte Carlo simulation of cooking times from Haryana India coupled with inverse Gaussian dispersion models. Mean emission rates for outdoor cooking that would result in incremental increases in personal exposure equivalent to the WHO AQG during a 24-h period were 126 ± 13 mg/min for cooking while squatting and 99 ± 10 mg/min while standing. Emission rates modeled for outdoor cooking are substantially higher than emission rates for indoor cooking to meet AQG, because the models estimate impact of emissions on personal exposure concentrations rather than microenvironment concentrations, and because the smoke disperses more readily outdoors compared to indoor environments. As a result, many more stoves including the best performing solid-fuel biomass stoves would meet AQG when cooking outdoors, but may also result in substantial localized neighborhood pollution depending on housing density. Inclusion of the neighborhood impact of pollution should be addressed more formally both in guidelines on emissions rates from stoves that would be protective of health, and also in wider health impact evaluation efforts and burden of disease estimates. Emissions guidelines should better represent the different contexts in which stoves are being used, especially because in these contexts the best performing solid fuel stoves have the potential to provide significant benefits.

  18. EVALUATION OF OUTDOOR SPORTS CLOTHING BRAND PERSONALITY BY USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha AĞAÇ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Brand personality attributed to the brand is in case the condition of human character traits. One of the areas of the brand personality is the outdoor sports clothing also knowing as “outdoor” th at working city people’s adoption of opening up to the outdoor as new way events in a growing desire. In this study, the aims are personality characteristics of the outdoor sport clothing brands and determining the harmony of these personality characterist ics with brands. The research is in form of surveying study. The research population consists of people in Turkey who sports outdoor on land. In the sampling selection simple random sampling technique is utilized with asking concerned people to participate in the survey on a voluntary basis. The obtained data are analyzed and evaluated by using SPSS packet program. The survey that has been proven reliability and validity ( α = 0904 in the pilot application has sent to the related association members in a month - long through internet and a total of 103 people were replied. It has been identified that research participants are interesting in mostly as trekking , mountaineering, camping and biking outdoor sports and they are working in the public sector. Under research, in the result of factor analysis to determine the brand personality of outd oor sports brands, it had been seen that "competence", “ traditional ” and " androgen” dimensions were come through and the dimension of “excitement” was separated into three parts.

  19. Green perspectives for public health: a narrative review on the physiological effects of experiencing outdoor nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza, Daniela; Schönbauer, Regina; Cervinka, Renate

    2014-05-19

    Natural environments offer a high potential for human well-being, restoration and stress recovery in terms of allostatic load. A growing body of literature is investigating psychological and physiological health benefits of contact with Nature. So far, a synthesis of physiological health outcomes of direct outdoor nature experiences and its potential for improving Public Health is missing. We were interested in summarizing the outcomes of studies that investigated physiological outcomes of experiencing Nature measuring at least one physiological parameter during the last two decades. Studies on effects of indoor or simulated Nature exposure via videos or photos, animal contact, and wood as building material were excluded from further analysis. As an online literature research delivered heterogeneous data inappropriate for quantitative synthesis approaches, we descriptively summarized and narratively synthesized studies. The procedure started with 1,187 titles. Research articles in English language published in international peer-reviewed journals that investigated the effects of natural outdoor environments on humans by were included. We identified 17 relevant articles reporting on effects of Nature by measuring 20 different physiological parameters. We assigned these parameters to one of the four body systems brain activity, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, and immune function. These studies reported mainly direct and positive effects, however, our analyses revealed heterogeneous outcomes regarding significance of results. Most of the studies were conducted in Japan, based on quite small samples, predominantly with male students as participants in a cross-sectional design. In general, our narrative review provided an ambiguous illustration of the effects outdoor nature exerted on physiological parameters. However, the majority of studies reported significant positive effects. A harmonizing effect of Nature, especially on physiological stress reactions, was

  20. A survey of perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides in indoor and outdoor air using passive air samplers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoeib, M.; Harner, T. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment Canada (Canada); Wilford, B.; Jones, K. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Environmental Science; Zhu, J. [Chemistry Research Division, Health Canada, Tunney' s Pasture, Ottawa (Canada)

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) has recently emerged as a priority environmental pollutant due to its widespread detection in biological samples from remote regions including the Arctic and the Mid-North Pacific Ocean. Because PFOS is fairly involatile, it is hypothesized that its occurrence in remote regions is the result of atmospheric transport of more volatile precursor compounds such as the perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (PFASs). PFASs are used in variety of consumer products for water and oil resistance including surface treatments for fabric, upholstery, carpet, paper and leather. In a recent pilot study employing high volume air samples, indoor air concentrations of PFASs were approximately 100 times greater than outdoor levels. This is of significance because people typically spend about 90% of their time indoors 5 and this exposure may serve as an important uptake pathway. Indoor air also serves as a source of PFASs to the outside where PFASs are ultimately transported and distributed throughout the environment. The current study is intended to be a more comprehensive survey of indoor and outdoor air allowing more confident conclusions to be made. Passive air samplers comprised of polyurethane foam (PUF) disks were used. These are quiet, non-intrusive samplers that operate without the aid of a pump or electricity. Air movement delivers chemical to the sampler which has a high retention capacity for persistent organic pollutants (POPs). PUF disks samplers have been previously used successfully to monitor different classes of hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants POPs.

  1. A Qualitative Investigation of Californian Youth Interests in the Outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Goldenberg

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has found connections between youth participation in recreational activities and academic achievement, civic involvement, and improved health. To investigate California youth outdoor recreation attitudes, behaviors, and constraints, eight focus groups were conducted with community recreation center youth participants. Youth answered 10 questions about their experiences, attitudes, and perceptions of outdoor recreation. Data were analyzed using grounded theory. Three to seven axial codes were identified for each question. Results showed that youth want to have more access to outdoor recreational activities. However, there are frequently considerable constraints for the youth to overcome including draws of technology, family obligations, and laziness. Safety was a recurring concern among participants. Understanding youth attitudes and perceptions allows managers to meet youth needs, program for youth interests, and provides a strong foundation for marketing and as a rational for funding grants.

  2. Aircraft noise and speech intelligibility in an outdoor living space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarsson, Jesper J; Nordström, Henrik; Lundén, Peter; Nilsson, Mats E

    2014-06-01

    Studies of effects on speech intelligibility from aircraft noise in outdoor places are currently lacking. To explore these effects, first-order ambisonic recordings of aircraft noise were reproduced outdoors in a pergola. The average background level was 47 dB LA eq. Lists of phonetically balanced words (LAS max,word = 54 dB) were reproduced simultaneously with aircraft passage noise (LAS max,noise = 72-84 dB). Twenty individually tested listeners wrote down each presented word while seated in the pergola. The main results were (i) aircraft noise negatively affects speech intelligibility at sound pressure levels that exceed those of the speech sound (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N aircraft noise on speech intelligibility outdoors.

  3. Outdoor thermal environmental research of the mountainous city by GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The study of urban outdoor thermal environment was carried out in one of the mountainous cities by using geography information system(GIS) technique which is connected with predicting and evaluating models for the outdoor thermal environment, monitoring data and simulating data. A prediction and evaluation system were set up.A typical mountainous city, i. e. , Yunyang city in Chongqing in China, was taken as an example, its urbanization trend and population growth was predicted and evaluated. The heat island intensity and its trend were simulated, the temperature field, velocity field and the humidity field were analyzed. The results show that GIS is an effective tool to deal with the outdoor thermal environment, especially for the mountainous cities with special geographical particularities. GIS can be used in the environmental management and the city planning especially for the mountainous cities.

  4. Outdoor education in New Zealand: a comparative and cultural perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2009-01-01

      This presentation takes general view of understanding outdoor education in New Zealand.  This is seen from an outsider's perspective and is compared with "friluftsliv" in Denmark and the Nordic countries. Analysing and understanding one's culture is never easy, and the main challenge is to focus...... on and question everyday phenomena which seem natural and that reproduce one's own perspective. Cultural analysis and the analysis of social configurations together with a comparative cultural perspective form the research approach.  . The presentation is based on a comparative and qualitative case study (Ragin......, 1992) of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Friluftsliv and outdoor education are understood as socio-cultural constructs which develop and differ in time and space. The theoretical framework is based on ethnological cultural analysis (Ehn & Lofgren, 1982, 2008) combined...

  5. The quality of service experience in outdoor activities programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Astrapellos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In our days the outdoor activities of recreation are new and continuously increasing tendency that has usually entered in the industry of tourism and called Alternative forms of tourism. The aim of this study was to examine the experience of service of individuals after their attendance in various programs of outdoor activities and recreation that offer various private companies of recreation. Another stream of research from the general marketing field has shown that subjective, affective and experiential factors comprise a substantial portion of consumer satisfaction with services. In the research participated 273 men and women of age of 20 – 50 years, which participated in various outdoor activities in Greece that were organised by two private companies of recreation. The results of this research should extend itself in future in a bigger number of companies of recreation so as to become the desirable generalisations but also be used in the frames of processes of marketing.

  6. The effect of female volleyball players’ leg volume and mass on balance and reaction timeBayan voleybolcuların bacak hacim ve kütlesinin denge ve reaksiyon zamanına etkisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan İbiş

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is aimed to investigate the relationship between leg volume - mass and balance – reaction time of the third league female volleyball players. 20 volunteer third league volleyball players, who are still active, are participated in this study. The average age of participant female volleyball players is 23,20±3,42 years, average height 176,30±7,78 cm, average weight 65.11±8,22 kg. Participant female volleyball players’ leg volume by Frustum method, leg mass by Hanavan method, static and dynamic balance by Biodex Balance System and visual reaction time by MOART Lafayette Reaction Measuring Device were measured. In analyzing the relation among the measurements, Pearson Product Moment Correlation coefficient was used. As a result of analysis of the obtained data; significant moderate correlation was found between the legs mass and dynamic balance (r=0.654, p<0,05. It was determined with a highly significant relationship between leg mass and foot volume (r=0.913, p<0,01 and foot mass (r=0.917, p<0,01. Also a significant relationship was found between leg volume and foot volume (r=0.800, p<0,01 and foot mass (r=0.644, p<0,05. Consequently; it can be said that there is a highly significant relationship between leg volume-mass and foot volume-mass, and there is a relationship between dynamic balance and leg mass of the third league female volleyball players.   Özet Bu çalışmada, üçüncü lig bayan voleybolcuların bacak hacimleri ile denge ve reaksiyon zamanları arasındaki ilişkinin incelenmesi amaçlanmıştır. Çalışmaya üçüncü ligde oynayan toplam 20 gönüllü bayan voleybolcu katılmıştır. Çalışmaya katılan bayan voleybolcuların yaş ortalamaları 23,20±3,42 yıl, boy ortalamaları 176,30±7,78 cm, ağırlık ortalamaları 65.11±8,22 kg’dır. Çalışmada katılan bayan voleybolcuların bacak hacmi Frustum yöntemi, bacak kütlesi Hanavan yöntemi, statik-dinamik denge ölçümü Biodex Denge

  7. Safety Cultures in Water-Based Outdoor Activities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren; Arvidsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the study Safe in Nature (Tryg i naturen) in which the aim was to analyze and discuss risk and safety related to outdoor recreation in the coastal regions of Denmark. A cultural perspective is applied to risk management and the safety cultures related to three selected...... water-based outdoor activities: small boat fishing, sea kayaking, and kite surfing. The theoretical framework used was cultural analysis and the methodological approach was mixed methods using case studies with survey and qualitative interviews. The study indicates that safety is a complex matter...

  8. Estimating Outdoor Illumination Conditions Based on Detection of Dynamic Shadows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus B.; Lal, Brajesh Behari

    2013-01-01

    The paper proposes a technique for estimation outdoor illumination conditions in terms of sun and sky radiances directly from pixel values of dynamic shadows detected in video sequences produved by a commercial stereo camera. The technique is applied to the rendering of virtual object into the im......The paper proposes a technique for estimation outdoor illumination conditions in terms of sun and sky radiances directly from pixel values of dynamic shadows detected in video sequences produved by a commercial stereo camera. The technique is applied to the rendering of virtual object...

  9. Terrain Mapping and Classification in Outdoor Environments Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Yukinobu Hata

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a three-dimensional terrain mapping and classification technique to allow the operation of mobile robots in outdoor environments using laser range finders. We propose the use of a multi-layer perceptron neural network to classify the terrain into navigable, partially navigable, and non-navigable. The maps generated by our approach can be used for path planning, navigation, and local obstacle avoidance. Experimental tests using an outdoor robot and a laser sensor demonstrate the accuracy of the presented methods.

  10. Self-organized architecture for outdoor mobile robot navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Huan-cheng; ZHU Miao-liang

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposed a multi-agent based architecture for outdoor mobile robot navigation where event-driven control is used to handle the dynamically changing of the environment. With the support of a distributed communication infrastructure and an event-driven situation evaluation agent, the robot can initiate action adaptive to the dynamical changes in the environment through reorganize its internal architecture. Adaptiveness and feasibility of the proposed architecture is validated through navigation experiments on the robot in a variety of natural outdoor environments.

  11. Psychological implications of outdoor adventure model of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kida

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is a synthetic analysis of the Outdoor Adventure Education model in the context of three elementary components: the environment – in relation to the theory of space from the perspective of sociological and pedagogical theory of space; personal perspective and growth as well as social development – in relation to psychological phenomena that accompany the individual and group involved in the process of Outdoor Adventure Education. The aim is to present how these processes determine the effects of education and what personalities’ elements are involved.

  12. Fast color/texture segmentation for outdoor robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blas, Morten Rufus; Agrawal, Motilal; Sundaresan, Aravind

    2008-01-01

    We present a fast integrated approach for online segmentation of images for outdoor robots. A compact color and texture descriptor has been developed to describe local color and texture variations in an image. This descriptor is then used in a two-stage fast clustering framework using K-means to ......We present a fast integrated approach for online segmentation of images for outdoor robots. A compact color and texture descriptor has been developed to describe local color and texture variations in an image. This descriptor is then used in a two-stage fast clustering framework using K...

  13. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  14. An outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci in an outdoor colony of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jencek, Jacqueline E; Beaufrère, Hugues; Tully, Thomas N; Garner, Michael M; Dunker, Freeland H; Baszler, Timothy V

    2012-12-01

    An outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci occurred in an outdoor colony of 63 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at the San Francisco Zoo. Affected penguins presented with inappetence, lethargy, and light green urates. Hematologic and serum biochemical findings were consistent with chronic inflammation. Penguins did not respond to initial supportive and antimicrobial therapy, and 3 died. Necropsy results of the 3 birds revealed hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, and histologic lesions included necrotizing hepatitis, splenitis, and vasculitis. Chlamydophila psittaci infection was confirmed by results of Gimenez staining, immunohistochemistry, and tissue polymerase chain reaction assay. As additional birds continued to present with similar clinical signs, the entire colony of penguins was prophylactically treated with a 30-day minimum course of doxycycline, administered orally or intramuscularly or as a combination of both. Despite treatment, 9 additional penguins died during a 3-month period. Pathologic results from these birds revealed renal and visceral gout (n = 4), cardiac insufficiency (n = 2), sepsis from a suspected esophageal perforation (n = 2), and no gross lesions (n = 1). During the outbreak, 4 birds presented with seizures, 5 developed dermatitis, and nearly 90% of birds in the colony showed severe keratoconjunctivitis, believed to be related to drug therapy with doxycycline. We report the clinical and pathologic features of Chlamydophila psittaci infection in an outdoor colony of penguins and the associated challenges of treatment.

  15. Attached and unattached fractions of short-lived radon decay products in outdoor environments: effect on the human respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrane, M; Oufni, L; Misdaq, M A

    2014-12-01

    The authors developed a model for determining the alpha- and beta-activities per unit volume of air due to radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn) and their decay products attached and unattached to the aerosol in the outdoor air at the workplace in natural conditions at different locations in Morocco by using both CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, the percentage of (218)Po, (214)Pb and (214)Po radionuclides attached to the aerosols and the unattached fraction f(j) for different values of the attachment rate were evaluated. Radon and thoron concentrations in outdoor air of the studied different locations were found to vary from 9.20±0.8 to 16.30±1.50 Bq m(-3) and 0.22±0.02 to 1.80±0.20 Bq m(-3), respectively. The committed equivalent doses due to the radon short-lived progeny (218)Po and (214)Po attached and unattached to the aerosol air were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of outdoor air.

  16. Perceived Environmental Barriers to Outdoor Mobility and Feelings of Loneliness Among Community-Dwelling Older People.

    OpenAIRE

    Rantakokko, Merja; Iwarsson, Susanne; Vahaluoto, Satu; Portegijs, Erja; Viljanen, Anne; Rantanen, Taina

    2014-01-01

    We examined the association between perceived environmental barriers to outdoor mobility and loneliness among community-dwelling older people. In addition, we studied whether walking difficulties and autonomy in participation outdoors affected this association.

  17. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  18. Acid rain attack on outdoor sculpture in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Richard A.

    2016-12-01

    A major concern motivating research in acid rain materials effects has been the potential for damage to cultural heritage, particularly outdoor marble and bronze sculpture. However, a combination of field and laboratory studies has failed to show a correlation between rain pH and loss of materials. In order to understand this counterintuitive lack of acid rain effect, an aqueous geochemical modeling approach was used to analyze rain runoff chemistry for the relative importance of acid rain neutralization, dry deposition, and in the case of marble, natural carbonate dissolution. This approach involved the development of pH - SO42- phase diagrams for marble (calcium carbonate) and bronze (copper) under ambient environmental conditions. This then enabled reaction path modeling of the acid neutralization process using the pH range typically found in wet deposition (3.5-6). The results were for marble that the theoretical maximum amount of Ca2+ ion that could be lost due acid rain neutralization would be 0.158 mmol/l compared to 10.5 mmol/l by dry deposition, and for bronze, the Cu2+ ion losses would be 0.21 mmol/l and 47.3 mmol/l respectively. Consequently dry deposition effects on these materials have the potential to dominate over wet deposition effects. To test these predictions the geochemical models were applied to examples of data sets from mass balance (runoff vs rainfall) studies on a marble statue in New York City and some bronze memorial plaques at Gettysburg PA. Although these data sets were collected in the early 1980s they remain valid for demonstrating the mass balance method. For the marble statue, the mean Ca2+ losses by dry deposition was about 69% of the total compared 0.3% for acid rain neutralization, which was less than the natural carbonate dissolution losses of 0.8%. For the bronze, the mean Cu2+ losses were 70.6% by SO42- dry deposition and 23% by NO3- dry deposition compared to 6.4% by acid rain neutralization. Thus for both cases the wet

  19. The effect of discontinuous airlift mixing in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leupold, Marco; Hindersin, Stefan; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Discontinuous airlift mixing was realized by injecting pressured air at time intervals with a frequency between 0.033 and 0.25 Hz (at 80 kPa; i.e., every 4-30 s; valve opening time 800 ms) into outdoor flat panel photobioreactors ([Formula: see text]). This caused a flow velocity between 2 and 20 cm s(-1) of the culture medium within the photobioreactor and the mixing time was between 38 and 103.5 s, requiring 0.175-1.340 L(gas volume) L(photobioreactor volume)(-1) min(-1) pressured air. In order to detect the effect on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus during outdoor experiments and to be able to compare obtained results, a batch run with an airlift frequency of 0.25 Hz was simultaneously used as control. Growth at different airlift frequencies was measured by the increase of cell dry weight (CDW) during 3-5 days and biomass yield on light energy was calculated. With increasing airlift frequencies, growth increased from 52 to 91 % compared to the control. When CDW was at around 1.0-1.5 g L(-1), airlift frequency had no effect on growth, indicating that mass transfer gradients of nutrients and gas were not the limiting factors of growth. Above 1.5 g CDW L(-1), growth increased with increasing airlift frequency and light limitation for a single cell occurred. This effect was observed during low and high irradiance and it is concluded that a higher mean flow causes a better light distribution, resulting in an enhanced growth. Biomass productivity and demand of pressured air are correlated logarithmically, which enables to save mixing energy during cultivation.

  20. Becoming Animate in Education: Immanent Materiality and Outdoor Learning for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David A. G.; Mcphie, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor environmental education has long postulated a link between experiences outdoors in "natural" environments and environmental concern. This paper suggests a straightforward relationship is problematic due to its implicit assumption of a nature/culture divide. Critical outdoor education has sought to overcome this dualism by…

  1. The Role and Place of Outdoor Education in the Australian National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Tonia; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    As Australia heads into a new era of implementing a National Curriculum, the place of Outdoor Education in Australian schools is under question. In the initial drafts of the National Curriculum, Outdoor Education has been marginalised. The authors propose that Outdoor Education should maintain a strong role, especially as processes of experiential…

  2. The Purposes Outdoor Education Does, Could and Should Serve in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the purposes that outdoor education does, could and should serve in Singapore. Gert Biesta's conceptualisation of three functions of education is adapted to frame deliberations on the purposes of outdoor education in Singapore's socio-political and educational milieu. The author suggests that outdoor education in…

  3. Bringing Outdoor Play Indoors in United Arab Emirates: Mud as a Powerful Binding Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Fiona S.

    2017-01-01

    Play and learning in the outdoors have been long-standing features of early years care and education. Unfortunately, children around the world no longer have sufficient opportunities for outdoor play for a variety of reasons. In the United Arab Emirates, climatic constraints limit outdoor play for 6 months of the year. One group of preservice…

  4. Outdoor Education in Rural Primary Schools in New Zealand: A Narrative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Tara; Legge, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    This research examines teaching outdoor education in two rural primary schools in Aotearoa New Zealand. The aim was to give "voice" to how outdoor education is taught, programmed and understood. Underpinning the research was the question: what factors enable/constrain teachers' ability to implement outdoor education? The findings…

  5. The Constitution of Outdoor Education Groups: An Analysis of the Literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Groups are ubiquitous in outdoor education and while there is a lot of literature on groups, there is limited examination of the assumptions made about groups and the effects these assumptions have on the practices of outdoor education. I utilise some of Michel Foucault's (1992) tools to investigate literature on outdoor education groups.…

  6. The Constitution of Outdoor Education Groups: An Analysis of the Literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Groups are ubiquitous in outdoor education and while there is a lot of literature on groups, there is limited examination of the assumptions made about groups and the effects these assumptions have on the practices of outdoor education. I utilise some of Michel Foucault's (1992) tools to investigate literature on outdoor education groups.…

  7. Ammonia emission and nutrient load in outdoor runs of laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnink, A.J.A.; Hol, J.M.G.; Beurskens, A.G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Ammonia emission and nutrient load in outdoor runs of laying hens were measured at a commercial farm with an outdoor run for 3000 hens, and at an experimental farm with two outdoor runs, each for approximately 250 hens. Ammonia emission was recorded at 5, 10,15 and 20 m from the hen house, using the

  8. The effect of a school-based outdoor education program on Visual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outdoor education in teaching and learning is being increasingly used as an ... museums, art galleries and architectural structures are therefore also considered to be outdoor educational environments that can be understood in terms of the school-based outdoor ..... veloping educational materials for SBOE; design-.

  9. Fostering Experiential Self-Regulation through Outdoor Adventure Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorp, Jim; Collins, Rachel; Rathunde, Kevin; Paisley, Karen; Schumann, Scott; Pohja, Mandy; Gookin, John; Baynes, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Learners thrive when they have the capacity to regulate interest and goal direction. Through direct experiences that are interesting and goal-relevant, learners can internalize and better understand their own agency in the learning process. This article further examines this premise in an outdoor adventure education (OAE) context through two…

  10. Why Play Outside? Problematising Outdoor Play as a Biopedagogical Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel B.; Barrett, Joe

    2017-01-01

    Although outdoor play has been widely recognised for the many benefits it affords children, some have rationalised the need for it based on goals related to physical health. More specifically, these instrumental goals have been closely related to obesity, overweight, and/or physical (in)activity. Adhering to obesity discourses and the notion of a…

  11. Impedance characterization of PV modules in outdoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Matei-lon; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Spataru, Sergiu

    2016-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) has been used for laboratory characterizations of photovoltaic (PV) technologies under well controlled conditions. This work applies IS for outdoor characterization of PV panels, in order to observe the effect of irradiance (G) and temperature (T) on the PV module...

  12. 9 CFR 3.4 - Outdoor housing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Outdoor housing facilities. 3.4 Section 3.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment,...

  13. Incorporating Outdoor Education into the Physical Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu

    2015-01-01

    Low motivation to participate in traditional or team sports, apathy toward competitive environments, and a low rate of transfer of skills to lifetime activities and wellness can be barriers for student pursuits of lifelong fitness. Adding an outdoor component can be a solution for some of these problems, while still accomplishing the National…

  14. The influence of outdoor thermal environment on young Japanese females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishii, Jin; Kondo, Emi; Fukagawa, Kenta

    2014-01-01

    the relationship between the physiological and psychological responses of humans and the enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature (ETFe). Subjective experiments were conducted in an outdoor environment. Subjects were exposed to the thermal environment in a standing posture. Air temperature...

  15. Indoor-Outdoor Detection Using a Smart Phone Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiping; Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-22

    In the era of mobile internet, Location Based Services (LBS) have developed dramatically. Seamless Indoor and Outdoor Navigation and Localization (SNAL) has attracted a lot of attention. No single positioning technology was capable of meeting the various positioning requirements in different environments. Selecting different positioning techniques for different environments is an alternative method. Detecting the users' current environment is crucial for this technique. In this paper, we proposed to detect the indoor/outdoor environment automatically without high energy consumption. The basic idea was simple: we applied a machine learning algorithm to classify the neighboring Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication cellular base station's signal strength in different environments, and identified the users' current context by signal pattern recognition. We tested the algorithm in four different environments. The results showed that the proposed algorithm was capable of identifying open outdoors, semi-outdoors, light indoors and deep indoors environments with 100% accuracy using the signal strength of four nearby GSM stations. The required hardware and signal are widely available in our daily lives, implying its high compatibility and availability.

  16. Outdoor Workers' Use of Sun Protection at Work and Leisure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl E. Peters

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: This high-participation rate cohort helps characterize sun protection behaviors among outdoor workers. Workers practiced better sun protection at work than on weekends, suggesting that workplace policies supportive of sun protection could be useful for skin cancer prevention in the construction industry.

  17. Emerging Environmental and Weather Challenges in Outdoor Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Brocherie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Given the climatic changes around the world and the growing outdoor sports participation, existing guidelines and recommendations for exercising in naturally challenging environments such as heat, cold or altitude, exhibit potential shortcomings. Continuous efforts from sport sciences and exercise physiology communities aim at minimizing the risks of environmental-related illnesses during outdoor sports practices. Despite this, the use of simple weather indices does not permit an accurate estimation of the likelihood of facing thermal illnesses. This provides a critical foundation to modify available human comfort modeling and to integrate bio-meteorological data in order to improve the current guidelines. Although it requires further refinement, there is no doubt that standardizing the recently developed Universal Thermal Climate Index approach and its application in the field of sport sciences and exercise physiology may help to improve the appropriateness of the current guidelines for outdoor, recreational and competitive sports participation. This review first summarizes the main environmental-related risk factors that are susceptible to increase with recent climate changes when exercising outside and offers recommendations to combat them appropriately. Secondly, we briefly address the recent development of thermal stress models to assess the thermal comfort and physiological responses when practicing outdoor activities in challenging environments.

  18. Albuquerque Public Schools Teacher's Guide to Outdoor Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque Public Schools, NM.

    Preparation of teachers and students for their one-day trip to the Albuquerque Public Schools' Outdoor Education Center is outlined. Topics covered include: orientation program; general preparation considerations; course of study; map of site; vocabulary; activity evaluation sheet; and a supplementary book list. Geology, biology, safety…

  19. Opportunities for Outdoor Education in the New National Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Geoff

    2000-01-01

    The recently revised national curriculum for England and Wales includes changes that emphasize the importance of personal, social, and environmental education; citizenship and learning across the curriculum; and education for sustainable development. Outdoor education can make significant contributions to areas of the curriculum that address…

  20. Old Time Apple Cider Makin': An Outdoor Education Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Bruce E.; Oakes, David B.

    An illustrated, self-contained packet, the resource materials contained in this guide are designed for adaptation to K-8. The resources and ideas presented here are designed to encourage utilization of the outdoors as a learning resource. While intrinsically multidisciplinary, the activities are particularly adaptable to social studies, science,…

  1. Time outdoors, blood vitamin D status and myopia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chen-Wei; Qian, Deng-Juan; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2017-03-16

    Myopia is a major public health concern throughout the world and the prevalence has been increasing rapidly in recent years, especially in urban Asia. The "vitamin D hypothesis" has been raised recently because vitamin D may be a link between less time outdoors and increased risk of myopia. We reviewed all studies published in English which examined the association of time outdoors and blood vitamin D status with myopia. The protective effect of time spent outdoors on the risk of myopia onset has been well-established with numerous observational studies and three trials published. Five studies reporting the association between the blood vitamin D status and the risk of myopia and two studies examining the variations in the vitamin D receptor as potential risk factors for myopia development were identified. Most of the current evidence was cross-sectional in nature and had not properly controlled important confounders in its analyses. The evidence supporting that vitamin D played a role in myopia development is weak and the mechanisms are unclear. At the current stage, it is still unclear whether blood vitamin D status regulates the onset or progression of myopia. Blood vitamin D status may only serve as a biomarker of outdoor exposure, which is the real protective factor for myopia.

  2. Qualitative Analysis of Indoor and Outdoor Airborne Fungi in Cowshed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is one of the most serious problems to human health. Fungi are the causal agents for different diseases in animals, plants, and human beings. Otomycosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, allergy, and systemic mycosis are among the fungal diseases caused. The present study was conducted to analyze the monthly incidence of airborne fungi, seasonal variation, and influence of meteorological parameters in indoor and outdoor fungi of cowshed at Hesaraghatta village, Bangalore. An aeromycological survey of indoor and outdoor area of cowshed at Hesaraghatta village in Bangalore city was carried out using the Andersen two-stage sampler onto a petri dish containing malt extract agar from January 2011 to December 2011. Altogether, 29 species belonging to 13 genera from indoor and 26 species belonging to 12 genera were recorded from outdoor environment of the cowshed; the dominant fungal species identified were Cladosporium sp., Aspergillus sp., and Alternaria alternata. Seasonal occurrence of fungal spores in both indoor and outdoor of the cowshed revealed that maximum spores were recorded in summer season followed by winter and rainy season.

  3. Memories as Useful Outcomes of Residential Outdoor Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Kendra R.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Residential outdoor environmental education (ROEE) programs for youth have been shown to yield lasting autobiographical episodic memories. This article explores how past program participants have used such memories, and draws on the memory psychology literature to offer a new perspective on the long-term impacts of environmental education.…

  4. On the applicability of models for outdoor sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    The suitable prediction model for outdoor sound fields depends on the situation and the application. Computationally intensive methods such as Parabolic Equation methods, FFP methods and Boundary Element Methods all have advantages in certain situations. These approaches are accurate and predict ...

  5. Outdoor Physical Education in French Schools during the Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attali, Michaël; Saint-Martin, Jean

    2017-01-01

    During the twentieth century, outdoor physical education (OPE) gradually integrated with the French education system. Culturally speaking, OPE had to overcome several hurdles because it promoted values such as freedom, initiative and responsibility that were deemed incompatible with the existing educational model. Beyond being a pedagogical tool,…

  6. Learners' Experiences of Peer Tutoring in the Context of Outdoor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Learners' Experiences of Peer Tutoring in the Context of Outdoor Learning: The ... its effectiveness in promoting learning in large class sizes which characterise ... 104 Class 6 learners as tutors, 86 Class 2 learners as tutees, and 8 teachers as ...

  7. Robust Crop and Weed Segmentation under Uncontrolled Outdoor Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Y. Jeon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An image processing algorithm for detecting individual weeds was developed and evaluated. Weed detection processes included were normalized excessive green conversion, statistical threshold value estimation, adaptive image segmentation, median filter, morphological feature calculation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. The developed algorithm was validated for its ability to identify and detect weeds and crop plants under uncontrolled outdoor illuminations. A machine vision implementing field robot captured field images under outdoor illuminations and the image processing algorithm automatically processed them without manual adjustment. The errors of the algorithm, when processing 666 field images, ranged from 2.1 to 2.9%. The ANN correctly detected 72.6% of crop plants from the identified plants, and considered the rest as weeds. However, the ANN identification rates for crop plants were improved up to 95.1% by addressing the error sources in the algorithm. The developed weed detection and image processing algorithm provides a novel method to identify plants against soil background under the uncontrolled outdoor illuminations, and to differentiate weeds from crop plants. Thus, the proposed new machine vision and processing algorithm may be useful for outdoor applications including plant specific direct applications (PSDA.

  8. Robust crop and weed segmentation under uncontrolled outdoor illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hong Y; Tian, Lei F; Zhu, Heping

    2011-01-01

    An image processing algorithm for detecting individual weeds was developed and evaluated. Weed detection processes included were normalized excessive green conversion, statistical threshold value estimation, adaptive image segmentation, median filter, morphological feature calculation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The developed algorithm was validated for its ability to identify and detect weeds and crop plants under uncontrolled outdoor illuminations. A machine vision implementing field robot captured field images under outdoor illuminations and the image processing algorithm automatically processed them without manual adjustment. The errors of the algorithm, when processing 666 field images, ranged from 2.1 to 2.9%. The ANN correctly detected 72.6% of crop plants from the identified plants, and considered the rest as weeds. However, the ANN identification rates for crop plants were improved up to 95.1% by addressing the error sources in the algorithm. The developed weed detection and image processing algorithm provides a novel method to identify plants against soil background under the uncontrolled outdoor illuminations, and to differentiate weeds from crop plants. Thus, the proposed new machine vision and processing algorithm may be useful for outdoor applications including plant specific direct applications (PSDA).

  9. Enhancing Children's Outdoor Learning Experiences with a Mobile Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikala, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how a mobile learning application can enhance children's outdoor learning experiences. The study draws upon empirical evidence gathered in one case study conducted in a Finnish primary school setting in the fall of 2012. The data were collected with student and teacher surveys. The case study indicated that the mobile…

  10. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  11. Geostudies: Structuring a Multi-Credit Outdoor Environmental Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    Offers a guide for designing a multi-credit course integrating several subject areas including geography, environmental science, and outdoor education. The program has three main components-theoretical, experiential and practical-involving classroom and field studies, environmental co-op, and environmental leadership opportunities. Timetabling and…

  12. A Socio-Environmental Case for Skill in Outdoor Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the crisis of sustainability, this paper revisits understandings of human--environment relations established through skill-based outdoor activities that are used commonly among adventure recreation, education, and tourism. Reconsidering a predominant focus on risk and a persistent tension between technical and environmental…

  13. Insurance and Risk Management at the National Outdoor Leadership School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Lantien

    1990-01-01

    Describes how an outdoor program specializing in wilderness expeditions approaches risk management, liability, and insurance. Discusses maintaining good communications with insurance agents, managing crisis situations, participating in program audits, reading the fine print, international insurance coverage, and the basis for insurance premiums.…

  14. Understanding Groups in Outdoor Adventure Education through Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jostad, Jeremy; Sibthorp, Jim; Paisley, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Relationships are a critical component to the experience of an outdoor adventure education (OAE) program, therefore, more fruitful ways of investigating groups is needed. Social network analysis (SNA) is an effective tool to study the relationship structure of small groups. This paper provides an explanation of SNA and shows how it was used by the…

  15. Environmental Effects on Learning: The Outdoor Field Trip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, W. Wade; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Reports effects of an outdoor field trip on learning within the context of a community-based Summery Ecology Program for children between 7 and 13 years of age. Results include the finding that novel environments are poor settings for imposed task learning when compared with familiar environments. (CS)

  16. outdoor air pollution in South Africa in 2000

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of several sources of outdoor air pollution such as fossil-fuel combustion. ... national monitoring network is limited, uneven in distribution across the ... Systems (GIS) Unit of the Medical Research Council. ..... purposes to cleaner fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas ... transport, conserving energy, and using appliances with.

  17. outdoor air pollution in South Africa in 2000

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of several sources of outdoor air pollution such as fossil-fuel combustion. .... distribution with a counterfactual risk factor distribution, conferring the ... Systems (GIS) Unit of the Medical Research Council. ..... purposes to cleaner fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas ... transport, conserving energy, and using appliances with.

  18. Leadership Status Congruency and Cohesion in Outdoor Expedition Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eys, Mark A.; Ritchie, Stephen; Little, Jim; Slade, Heather; Oddson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between status congruency and group cohesion in outdoor expedition groups in an educational setting. Specifically, three aspects of status congruency were assessed in relation to group cohesion in four adventure canoe groups. The groups participated in 2-week expeditions in the…

  19. Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies Trial Edition. Set III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairwell, Kay, Ed.; And Others

    The predominant focus of the 24 Outdoor Biology Instructional Strategies (OBIS) Trial Edition Set III activities is on animal behavior, and the adaptations and diversity of both plants and animals. Night time activities, games, investigation, experimentation, and crafts are used to study ants, birds, clams, water snails, water striders, spiders,…

  20. Nature and Its Influence on Children's Outdoor Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, Kellie; Gray, Tonia; Malone, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that humans need contact with nature for their wellbeing, however at the same time young children are becoming increasingly separated from the natural world as their access to the outdoors diminishes. The importance of school and prior-to-school settings in connecting children with nature has been…

  1. A Socio-Environmental Case for Skill in Outdoor Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    In response to the crisis of sustainability, this paper revisits understandings of human--environment relations established through skill-based outdoor activities that are used commonly among adventure recreation, education, and tourism. Reconsidering a predominant focus on risk and a persistent tension between technical and environmental…

  2. Memories as Useful Outcomes of Residential Outdoor Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Kendra R.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Residential outdoor environmental education (ROEE) programs for youth have been shown to yield lasting autobiographical episodic memories. This article explores how past program participants have used such memories, and draws on the memory psychology literature to offer a new perspective on the long-term impacts of environmental education.…

  3. Factors that Influence Women's Technical Skill Development in Outdoor Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Karen; Loeffler, TA

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical foundation for understanding women's technical skill development (TSD) in outdoor adventure. An examination of societal and biological factors influencing women's TSD focuses on gender role socialization, sense of competence, technical conditioning, sexism, spatial ability, and risk-taking. The article suggests…

  4. Play--The Making of Deep Outdoor Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Leif Inge

    2012-01-01

    To be outdoors and involved in adventures concerns the movement between safety and risk, the familiar and the unfamiliar. Deep involvement in activities and the seriousness found in play are essential in "Bildung." Findings in this paper stem from ethnographic fieldwork conducted in a kayak community, between late autumn 2006 until the fall of…

  5. On the development of approximate models for outdoor sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1998-01-01

    The suitable prediction model for outdoor sound propagation depends on the situation and the application. Computationally intensive method such as Parabolic Equation methods, FFP methods and Boundary Element Methods all have advantages in certain situations. None of these approaches are at present...

  6. On the applicability of models for outdoor sound (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    The suitable prediction model for outdoor sound fields depends on the situation and the application. Computationally intensive methods such as parabolic equation methods, FFP methods, and boundary element methods all have advantages in certain situations. These approaches are accurate and predict...

  7. Indoor-Outdoor Detection Using a Smart Phone Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiping Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the era of mobile internet, Location Based Services (LBS have developed dramatically. Seamless Indoor and Outdoor Navigation and Localization (SNAL has attracted a lot of attention. No single positioning technology was capable of meeting the various positioning requirements in different environments. Selecting different positioning techniques for different environments is an alternative method. Detecting the users’ current environment is crucial for this technique. In this paper, we proposed to detect the indoor/outdoor environment automatically without high energy consumption. The basic idea was simple: we applied a machine learning algorithm to classify the neighboring Global System for Mobile (GSM communication cellular base station’s signal strength in different environments, and identified the users’ current context by signal pattern recognition. We tested the algorithm in four different environments. The results showed that the proposed algorithm was capable of identifying open outdoors, semi-outdoors, light indoors and deep indoors environments with 100% accuracy using the signal strength of four nearby GSM stations. The required hardware and signal are widely available in our daily lives, implying its high compatibility and availability.

  8. Winter Outdoor Trekking: Spiritual Aspects of Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirásek, Ivo; Veselský, Pavel; Poslt, Jirí

    2017-01-01

    This text deals with the potential spiritual aspects of being outdoors within the framework of non-formal and informal education. The course being examined was organized by the Vacation School of Lipnice--Outward Bound Czech Republic, and the participants in this course made up the research sample. While the research was not directly focused on…

  9. Planning Intentionally for Children's Outdoor Environments: The Gift of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenow, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    When the author was a child 50 years ago, nobody planned her outdoor environment. Her home was close to flower-filled meadows that she could explore freely, and her preschool and elementary school classrooms opened onto beautiful woodlands that children used as an important part of their day-to-day learning. The last time she visited her old…

  10. Analysis of noise control measures on outdoor machinery using EQUIP+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Noise control of different types of outdoor machinery covered by EU Directive 2000/14/EC such as construction machines, generators and other equipment powered by internal combustion engines requires knowledge of the noise path model and the potential noise control measures. As there is often a

  11. Fostering Experiential Self-Regulation through Outdoor Adventure Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorp, Jim; Collins, Rachel; Rathunde, Kevin; Paisley, Karen; Schumann, Scott; Pohja, Mandy; Gookin, John; Baynes, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Learners thrive when they have the capacity to regulate interest and goal direction. Through direct experiences that are interesting and goal-relevant, learners can internalize and better understand their own agency in the learning process. This article further examines this premise in an outdoor adventure education (OAE) context through two…

  12. Outdoor-indoor Space: Unified Modeling and Shortest Path Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Kejser; Nielsen, Jens Thomas Vejlby; Lu, Hua;

    2016-01-01

    Graph models are widely used for representing the topology of outdoor space (O-Space) and indoor space (I-Space). However, existing models neglect the intersection between O-Space and I-Space, only allowing for computations such as shortest path and nearest neighbor queries in either O-Space or I...

  13. Facilitator, Teacher, or Leader? Managing Conflicting Roles in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Glyn

    2010-01-01

    A facilitator is commonly defined as a substantively neutral person who manages the group process in order to help groups achieve identified goals or purposes. However, outdoor educators rarely experience the luxury of only managing the group process, because they are typically responsible for the provision of leadership, skill instruction, and…

  14. Outdoor Classrooms--Let Your Soil Conservation District Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyday, Russell W.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Highlights efforts to educate the public in soil and water conservation and includes history of these efforts in the nation and in North Carolina. Available from: Center for Environmental, Camping and Outdoor Education; University of North Carolina at Greensboro; Pine Lake Field Campus; 4016 Blumenthal Road; Greensboro, NC, 27406. (AN)

  15. Outdoor Recreation Participation and Environmental Concern: A Research Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gretchen Newhouse; Simpson, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Many experiential educators assume that participation in outdoor recreation creates an awareness and commitment to the environment through direct experience. This research summary looks to whether the research supports such an assumption. Specifically it reviews the key literature on this topic, examines the various classifications of outdoor…

  16. Stochastic Automata for Outdoor Semantic Mapping using Optimised Signal Quantisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caponetti, Fabio; Blas, Morten Rufus; Blanke, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Autonomous robots require many types of information to obtain intelligent and safe behaviours. For outdoor operations, semantic mapping is essential and this paper proposes a stochastic automaton to localise the robot within the semantic map. For correct modelling and classi¯cation under...

  17. The parabolic equation method for outdoor sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arranz, Marta Galindo

    The parabolic equation method is a versatile tool for outdoor sound propagation. The present study has focused on the Cranck-Nicolson type Parabolic Equation method (CNPE). Three different applications of the CNPE method have been investigated. The first two applications study variations...

  18. Family Learning Outdoors: Guided Participation on a Nature Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; McClain, Lucy R.

    2016-01-01

    This informal learning research project examined how guided participation processes support the use of cultural tools (such as scientific equipment) during a nature walk at one nature center. This paper analyzed family interactions outdoors using microethnographic methods. An informal learning framework based on guided participation and cultural…

  19. Planetariums as a Source of Outdoor Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyma, Aksu; Umdu Topsakal, Ünsal

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to study the effect of using planetariums as an outdoor learning environment regarding students' opinions. Therefore, descriptive qualitative research was used. The participants were from a school in Istanbul. Ten students, 4 male and 6 female, participated in a planetarium visit to a museum. The data of the study were…

  20. Adaptive outdoor comfort model calibrations for a semitropical region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thitisawat, M.; Polakit, K.; Caldieron, J.M.; Mangone, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a part of a research project funded by Architectural Research Centers Consortium (ARCC) and Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The project focuses on finding a way to assess outdoor comfort and developing design criteria for a semitropical region of South Florida. A series of surveys

  1. Outdoor Education: A Neglected Resource for Combating Internal Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemake, Josephine Stahl; Patti, Anthony V.

    1978-01-01

    Defining internal pollution as "the contamination and abuse of the human body through the habitual use of substances taken to relieve anxieties and tensions", this article asserts that outdoor education experiences can combat internal pollution through active physical, social, and intellectual involvement, promoting the security of belonging,…

  2. Research on the Effectiveness of Outdoor Management Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard J.

    A 6-year study of outdoor-based management training (OMT) programs used traditional evaluation methods and new methods designed specifically for these unique programs. A survey of 1,000 training directors indicated that this type of training was very controversial. The next step was to use traditional training and organizational behavior…

  3. Sense of place in outdoor-pursuits trip groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon L. Todd; Anderson B. Young; Lynn S. Anderson; Timothy S. O' Connell; Mary Breunig

    2009-01-01

    Studies have revealed that sense of community and group cohesion increase significantly over time in outdoor-pursuits trip groups. This study sought to understand similar development of sense of place. Do people simultaneously become more attached to or dependent on the natural environment as they grow closer to each other? Results from a study of college students...

  4. Outdoor Orientation Program Effects: Sense of Place and Social Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Mathew L.; Martin, Bruce; Mittelstaedt, Robin; Schanning, Kevin; Ogle, Derek

    2009-01-01

    More than 200 schools currently use some form of the Outward Bound-adapted model of outdoor orientation (OO). Assisting students with the transition to college is a primary goal of these programs (Bell, Holmes, Vigneault, & Williams, 2008). This study was conducted at a small Midwestern liberal-arts college with a strong environmental mission.…

  5. Environmental temperature influence on behaviors of outdoor gestating sows

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of seasonal air temperatures on behavior of outdoor pregnant sows was evaluated and modeled using 91 sows during 24-h observations in winter, spring, and summer seasons. Minimum and maximum temperatures ranged between –10.7 to 39.2 degree C, respectively, during data collection. Each...

  6. Adaptive outdoor comfort model calibrations for a semitropical region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thitisawat, M.; Polakit, K.; Caldieron, J.M.; Mangone, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a part of a research project funded by Architectural Research Centers Consortium (ARCC) and Florida Atlantic University (FAU). The project focuses on finding a way to assess outdoor comfort and developing design criteria for a semitropical region of South Florida. A series of surveys h

  7. Outdoor Play: Does Avoiding the Risks Reduce the Benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Helen; Wyver, Shirley

    2008-01-01

    Although the term "risk-taking" often has negative connotations, the reality is that the willingness to engage in some risky activities provides opportunities to learn new skills, try new behaviours and ultimately reach our potential. Challenge and risk, in particular during outdoor play, allows children to test the limits of their physical,…

  8. The Social System in Outdoor Adventure Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibthorp, Jim; Jostad, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the social system interact with one another to produce group-level behavior that determines the functionality of the small group in outdoor adventure education (OAE). This article synthesizes the contemporary literature and theory regarding eight aspects of the OAE social system: (a) Macro Contextual Factors, (b) Student…

  9. The effect of outdoor learning activities on the development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-29

    May 29, 2017 ... This research was designed according to one group pre-test and post-test ... knowledge with practice in nature and outdoor environments ... The idea that education should be given in nature dates back to Aristotle and Plato.

  10. Genetical and biological control of cotton ashy stem caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in outdoor pot experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elsalam, Kamel Ahmed

    2010-04-01

    Two outdoor pot experiments were carried out to evaluate the reaction of 11 commercial Egyptian cotton cultivars Macrophomina phaseolina, the incitant of ashy stem in cotton and to evaluate the antagonistic ability of 27 isolates of Trichoderma sp. against pathogen cotton cultivars Giza 85, Giza 87, Giza 89 and Giza 90 were resistant to M. phaseolina because both survival and plant height of these cultivars was not affected when the soil was infested with the pathogen. None of the cultivars were found to be immune to highly pathogenic of M. phaseolina isolate. Of the 27 isolate's of Trichoderma that were evaluated, the best antagonistic performance was given by isolates nos. 2, 10, and 16 were promising for commercialization because they significantly increased survival and improved plant height and dry weight of the surviving cotton seedlings.

  11. Review on Thermal Characteristics of Compound Outdoor Wall of Wood Framed Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Benhua; ZHAO Yong; REN Haiqing; CHEN Enling

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most important components of a construction, the outdoor wall plays a significant role in heat insulation, heat preservation and energy saving. Improving the heat insulation of the outdoor wall is the focus of researchers. This paper reviews the development of the compound outdoor wall and introduces the structure of the compound outdoor wall of wood framed construction. Methods for measuring the thermal characteristics of the compound outdoor wall including the steady and unsteady state thermal characteristics, tests in laboratory and field, and researches on the thermal characteristics of the compound outdoor wall are elaborately reviewed. Researches on the thermal characteristics of the compound outdoor wall will promote the further development of wood framed construction in China.

  12. Mechanisms influencing student understanding on an outdoor guided field trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskey, Nourah Al-Rashid

    Field trips are a basic and important, yet often overlooked part of the student experience. They provide the opportunity to integrate real world knowledge with classroom learning and student previous personal experiences. Outdoor guided field trips leave students with an increased understanding, awareness and interest and in science. However, the benefits of this experience are ambiguous at best (Falk and Balling, 1982; Falk and Dierking, 1992; Kisiel, 2006.) Students on an outdoor guided field trip to a local nature park experienced a significant increase in their understanding of the rock cycle. The changes in the pre-field trip test and the post-field trip test as well as their answers in interviews showed a profound change in the students' understanding and in their interest in the subject matter. The use of the "student's voice" (Bamberger and Tal, 2008) was the motivation for data analysis. By using the students' voice, I was able to determine the mechanisms that might influence their understanding of a subject. The central concepts emerging from the data were: the outdoor setting; the students' interest; the social interaction. From these central concepts, a conceptual model was developed. The outdoor setting allows for the freedom to explore, touch, smell and movement. This, in turn, leads to an increased interest in subject matter. As the students are exploring, they are enjoying themselves and become more open to learning. Interest leads to a desire to learn (Dewey, 1975). In addition to allowing the freedom to explore and move, the outdoor setting creates the condition for social interaction. The students talk to each other as they walk; they have in-depth discourse regarding the subject matter---with the teachers, each other and with the guides. The guides have an extremely important role in the students' learning. The more successful guides not only act as experts, but also adjust to the students' needs and act or speak accordingly. The

  13. View Transformation Based on a Single Outdoor Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Hui Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An automatic approach for view transformation based on a single outdoor image is proposed in this paper. First, the hierarchical segmentation method is conducted to segment an outdoor image into several meaningful regions and each region is labelled as sky, ground or standing object. Then, different methods are used to estimate each region's depth according to its label. After that, the obtained depth information is utilized to create a new view image after any rotation, translation and pitch. Finally, the image inpainting work for the missing colour region is accomplished using its neighbour's colour. Extensive experiments show the proposed approach not only improves the accuracy of view transformation, but also performs well even for images with occlusion phenomena.

  14. Pose tracking for augmented reality applications in outdoor archaeological sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Georges; Asmar, Daniel; Elhajj, Imad; Al-Harithy, Howayda

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, agencies around the world have invested huge amounts of effort toward digitizing many aspects of the world's cultural heritage. Of particular importance is the digitization of outdoor archaeological sites. In the spirit of valorization of this digital information, many groups have developed virtual or augmented reality (AR) computer applications themed around a particular archaeological object. The problem of pose tracking in outdoor AR applications is addressed. Different positional systems are analyzed, resulting in the selection of a monocular camera-based user tracker. The limitations that challenge this technique from map generation, scale, anchoring, to lighting conditions are analyzed and systematically addressed. Finally, as a case study, our pose tracking system is implemented within an AR experience in the Byblos Roman theater in Lebanon.

  15. Drinking behaviour in sows kept outdoors during the winter months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Heidi Mai-Lis; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2014-01-01

    of water intake in sows kept outdoors with free access to water. Thestudy was performed on an organic pig herd with outdoor sows. Twenty-four Danish Lan-drace × Yorkshire sows of different parity (mean: 4.5 ± 2.8) housed in individual farrowingpaddocks with free access to water provided by a frost......-proof drinking bowl were used. Theindividual sow’s water intake from the drinking bowl was measured continuously fromsix days before farrowing until weaning at seven weeks after farrowing. Temperature ofsupplied water to each drinking bowl, air temperature and rainfall was measured contin-uously. Numbers of born...... alive, stillborn and weaned piglets were recorded. The recordingperiod was divided into two temperature categories; control days (CD) with daily averageair temperature at or above 0◦C and frosty days (FD) with daily average air temperaturebelow 0◦C. The FD included data from 22 days representing 11 sows...

  16. Emergence and Development of Outdoor Sculpture in Southwestern Nigerian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. AKINTONDE R. O. ROM KALILU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Public outdoor sculpture in Southwest of Nigeria is prodigious. From its emergence as an art practice in 1934, its practice has passed through six phases of great importance. Yet the practice has not been studied in appreciable scholarly depth despite constant changes in taste necessitated by religious, socio-cultural, and political complexities of the Southwest. The study traces the emergence and the development of public outdoor sculpture in the zone. It examines the development of its forms, styles, themes, materials and techniques. It also investigates various attitudes associated with the productions, uses and maintenance of the sculptures among the various stake-holders at different levels. The study covers a period of one hundred and five years between 1900 and 2005; the period marked the beginning, high development level, proliferation and decline of outdoor sculpture practice in South-west of Nigeria. Data for study were derived from oral and bibliographical records and observation of the sculptures. In all, one hundred and sixty six sculptural works were identified, with larger concentrations of the works in Lagos and Osun States. The paper observes that sculptures were mainly expressed in realism. The medium mostly used is cement and is invariably rendered in additive techniques. Themes generally expressed centres on Yoruba heroes and heroines, socio-political and economic matters. The various attitudes of all the stakeholders concerning these sculptures indicate that there is the problem of poor control of standard, abuse and lack of maintenance. Significantly, the study resolved the chronological problem associated with the emergence of public outdoor sculpture in the Southwest zone of Nigeria.  

  17. Ambient Background Particulate Compositiion Outdoor Natural Background: Interferents/Clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    FIGURES 1. Map of UK Sampling Locations, Lizard, Pershore, Birmingham, Lichfield 10 2. Mean UK Airborne Pollen, Fungi , and Bacteria and/or their Sum... Airborne Pollen, Fungi , and Bacteria and/or their Sum @ Four Locations 12 4. TOTAL VS CULTURABLE MEASUREMENTS OF NATURAL OUTDOOR BACTERIA 10...characterize exposures to particulate matter in an effort to access the health effects on military personnel in the Middle East. For approximately 1 year

  18. Education for sustainable development using indoor and outdoor activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigon, Lenka

    2016-04-01

    Environmental education became an important part of our development in the last years. We put a lot of effort into a task how to improve students'values, skills, understanding and how to significantly enhance their learning and achievements regarding ecological problems. At the same time we also know that environmental learning is easier when our students have the opportunity to feel, see, touch, taste and smell the nature. Therefore teachers in my school develop regular access to the outdoors as a learning resource. Students understand the impact of their activities on the environment and they also like to participate in the nature protection. My school (Biotechnical Centre)is an example of educational centre where different research and development programes are strongly oriented to the sustainable development. Students are educated to become experts in biotechnology, agronomy, food technology and horticulture. At the same time they are educated how to care for the nature. The institution itself cooperates with different fields of economy (farms, food - baker industry, floristry, country design etc.). For these reasons the environmental education is an essential dimension of basic education focused on a sphere of interaction that lies at the root of personal and social development. We try to develop different outdoor activities through all the school year. These activities are: analyse the water quality; research waste water treatment plants; exploration of new food sources (like aquaponics - where fish and plants grow together); collecting plants with medical activities; care for the plants in the school yard; growing new plants in the poly tunnel; learning about unknown plants - especially when visiting national and regional parks; selling different things in the school shop - also for local citizens; participating in the world wide activity - "Keep the country tidy" etc. Students and teachers enjoy to participate in different outdoor activities; we both

  19. TIGRE - An autonomous ground robot for outdoor exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Alfredo; Amaral, Guilherme; Dias, André; Almeida, Carlos; Almeida, José; Silva, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    13th International Conference on Autonomous Robot Systems (Robotica), 2013 In this paper we present an autonomous ground robot developed for outdoor applications in unstructured scenarios. The robot was developed as a versatile robotics platform for development, test and validation of research in navigation, control, perception and multiple robot coordination on all terrain scenarios. The hybrid systems approach to the control architecture is discussed in the context of multiple robot coor...

  20. Relationship Between Outdoor and Indoor Ozone Pollution Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xiaogang; LIU Junjie

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the changing rule of indoor ozone concentration and its influencing factors. A for-mula of indoor-outdoor concentration ratio(I/O ratio)was deduced based on the indoor ozone mass-balance equa-tion. The ozone I/O ratio in different kinds of buildings was studied. Results show that I/O ratio is much related to air-exchange rate, which is well compatible with the theoretical calculation results.

  1. Outdoor, indoor, and personal exposure to VOCs in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgate, John L; Church, Timothy R; Ryan, Andrew D; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Fredrickson, Ann L; Stock, Thomas H; Morandi, Maria T; Sexton, Ken

    2004-10-01

    We measured volatile organic compound (VOC) exposures in multiple locations for a diverse population of children who attended two inner-city schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Fifteen common VOCs were measured at four locations: outdoors (O), indoors at school (S), indoors at home (H), and in personal samples (P). Concentrations of most VOCs followed the general pattern O approximately equal to S long-term health risks from children's exposure to these compounds.

  2. Sheltering in buildings from large-scale outdoor releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, W.R.; Price, P.N.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2004-06-01

    Intentional or accidental large-scale airborne toxic release (e.g. terrorist attacks or industrial accidents) can cause severe harm to nearby communities. Under these circumstances, taking shelter in buildings can be an effective emergency response strategy. Some examples where shelter-in-place was successful at preventing injuries and casualties have been documented [1, 2]. As public education and preparedness are vital to ensure the success of an emergency response, many agencies have prepared documents advising the public on what to do during and after sheltering [3, 4, 5]. In this document, we will focus on the role buildings play in providing protection to occupants. The conclusions to this article are: (1) Under most circumstances, shelter-in-place is an effective response against large-scale outdoor releases. This is particularly true for release of short duration (a few hours or less) and chemicals that exhibit non-linear dose-response characteristics. (2) The building envelope not only restricts the outdoor-indoor air exchange, but can also filter some biological or even chemical agents. Once indoors, the toxic materials can deposit or sorb onto indoor surfaces. All these processes contribute to the effectiveness of shelter-in-place. (3) Tightening of building envelope and improved filtration can enhance the protection offered by buildings. Common mechanical ventilation system present in most commercial buildings, however, should be turned off and dampers closed when sheltering from an outdoor release. (4) After the passing of the outdoor plume, some residuals will remain indoors. It is therefore important to terminate shelter-in-place to minimize exposure to the toxic materials.

  3. Relationship between indoor and outdoor carbonaceous particulates in roadside households

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funasaka, K.; Miyazaki, T.; Tsuruho, K. [Osaka City Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences (Japan); Tamura, K. [The National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan); Mizuno, T. [Mie University (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry for Materials; Kuroda, K. [Osaka City University Medical School (Japan). Dept. of Preventive Medicine and Environmental Health

    2000-07-01

    Concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and carbonaceous particulates in indoor and outdoor air at roadside private households were measured in Osaka, Japan. The particulate samples were collected on filters using a portable AND sampler capable of separating particles into three different size ranges: over 10 {mu}m, 2-10 {mu}m (coarse) and below 2 {mu}m (fine) in aerodynamic diameter. The filters were weighed and then analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) by thermal oxidation using a CHN CORDER. The results showed that indoor fine PM concentration is considerably affected by fine EC and the fine EC in indoor air is significantly correlated to that in outdoor air, r = 0.86 (n = 30, p < 0.001). A simple estimation from EC content ratio in diesel exhaust particles indicated that about 30% of indoor particulates of less than 10 {mu}m (PM10) were contributed from diesel exhaust. Additionally, the size characteristics of outdoor PM at roadside and background sites were examined using Andersen Cascade Impactors. (author)

  4. High-rise Buildings versus Outdoor Thermal Environment in Chongqing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-sha Wang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief description of the over quick urbanization sinceChongqing, one of the biggest cities in China, has been a municipality directly under theCentral Government in 1997, excessive development and exceeding increase of high-risebuildings because of its special geographical position which finally leads to the worseningof the urban outdoor thermal environment. Then, this paper makes a bright balance to thefield measurement and simulated results of the wind speed field, temperature field of onemultifunctional high-rise building in Chongqing university located in the city center, andthe contrasted results validate the correctness of CFD in the outdoor thermal environmentalsimulation, expose the disadvantages of high-rise buildings on the aspects of blocking thewind field, decreasing wind speed which results in accumulation of the air-conditioningheat revolving around and periscian region where sunshine can not rip into. Finally, inorder to improve the urban outdoor thermal environment near the high-rise buildingsespecially for the angle of natural ventilation, this paper simulates the wind environment indifferent architectural compositions and architectural layouts by CFD, and the simulatedresults show that freestyle and tower buildings which can guarantee the wind speed andtake the air-conditioning heat away are much suitable and reasonable for the specialChongqing geography. These conclusions can also be used as a reference in othermountain cities, especially for the one with a great number of populations.

  5. Target product profiles for protecting against outdoor malaria transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killeen Gerry F

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual sprays (IRS have decimated malaria transmission by killing indoor-feeding mosquitoes. However, complete elimination of malaria transmission with these proven methods is confounded by vectors that evade pesticide contact by feeding outdoors. Methods For any assumed level of indoor coverage and personal protective efficacy with insecticidal products, process-explicit malaria transmission models suggest that insecticides that repel mosquitoes will achieve less impact upon transmission than those that kill them outright. Here such models are extended to explore how outdoor use of products containing either contact toxins or spatial repellents might augment or attenuate impact of high indoor coverage of LLINs relying primarily upon contact toxicity. Results LLIN impact could be dramatically enhanced by high coverage with spatial repellents conferring near-complete personal protection, but only if combined indoor use of both measures can be avoided where vectors persist that prefer feeding indoors upon humans. While very high levels of coverage and efficacy will be required for spatial repellents to substantially augment the impact of LLINs or IRS, these ambitious targets may well be at least as practically achievable as the lower requirements for equivalent impact using contact insecticides. Conclusions Vapour-phase repellents may be more acceptable, practical and effective than contact insecticides for preventing outdoor malaria transmission because they need not be applied to skin or clothing and may protect multiple occupants of spaces outside of treatable structures such as nets or houses.

  6. The effect of uric acid on outdoor copper and bronze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, E; Bowden, D J; Brimblecombe, P; Kenneally, H; Morselli, L

    2009-03-15

    Bird droppings are often quoted as a decay agent for outdoor goods, in particular buildings and statues. Undoubtedly, they represent one of the major causes of aesthetic damage on outdoor materials, but the real chemical damage they are able to induce, in particular on metals, is not so well studied. This work focused on the short term role of uric acid, the main constituent of bird urine, with respect to copper, which make such an important contribution to architectural elements of buildings and outdoor sculpture. Preliminary results of laboratory tests and analyses on real exposed samples showed that uric acid chemically affects copper and bronzes: the surface of the metal is modified and copper urates formed. Also natural patina, formed on statues and roof, react with uric acid, even if it seems to afford some protection toward bird droppings. In general, experimental results confirm that the potential chemical damage by bird droppings is significant when considering external cultural heritage such as statues, metal monuments and buildings with historic copper roofs.

  7. Outdoor relative radiometric calibration method using gray scale targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN; YiNi; YAN; Lei; YANG; Bin; JING; Xin; CHEN; Wei

    2013-01-01

    The radiometric calibration of remote sensors is a basis and prerequisite of information quantification in remote sensing. This paper proposes a method for outdoor relative radiometric calibration using gray scale targets. In this method, the idea of two substitutions is adopted. Sunlight is used to replace the integrating sphere light source, and gray scale targets are used to re-place the diffuser. In this way, images at different radiance levels obtained outdoors can calculate the relative radiometric cali-bration coefficients using the least square method. The characteristics of this method are as follows. Firstly, compared with la-boratory calibration, it greatly reduces the complexity of the calibration method and the test cost. Secondly, compared with the existing outdoor relative radiometric calibration of a single radiance level, it uses test images of different radiance levels to re-duce errors. Thirdly, it is easy to operate with fewer environmental requirements, has obvious advantages in the rapid calibra-tion of airborne remote sensors before or after flight and is practical in engineering. This paper theoretically and experimental-ly proves the feasibility of this method. Calibration experiments were conducted on the wide-view multispectral imager (WVMI) using this method, and the precision of this method was evaluated by analyzing the corrected images of large uniform targets on ground. The experiment results have demonstrated that the new method is effective and its precision meets the re-quirement of the absolute radiometric calibration.

  8. Residential indoor and outdoor coarse particles and associated endotoxin exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda J.; Dobbin, Nina A.; Lyrette, Ninon; Wallace, Lance; Foto, Mark; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Kearney, Jill; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Gilbert, Nicolas L.; Harrison, Ian; Rispler, Kathleen; Héroux, Marie-Eve

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that coarse particles (PM 10-2.5) have detrimental impacts upon health, especially for respiratory effects. There are limited data available for indoor residential exposures. Some data exist regarding the composition of this PM size fraction with emphasis on crustal elements and biological components. This study includes data from 146 homes sampled in Regina, Saskatchewan (SK) where 5-day integrated concurrent monitoring of indoor and outdoor coarse particles was conducted during the winter and summer of 2007. The coarse particle filters were subsequently analysed for endotoxin content to determine the contribution of this compound. Winter indoor geometric mean concentrations of coarse particles exceeded outdoor concentrations (3.73 μg m -3 vs 2.49 μg m -3; paired t-test p Endotoxin concentrations (EU μg -1) were lower indoors than outdoors in both seasons. Spatial variability of ambient coarse particles was assessed to determine the suitability of using a single monitoring station within a city to estimate exposure. The coefficients of variation between homes sampled simultaneously and the central monitoring station were calculated (median COV in summer = 15% and winter = 24%) and showed significant variability by week, especially during the summer months, suggesting a single site may be insufficient for characterizing exposure. Future studies should consider daily measurements per home to understand shorter term exposures and day to day variability of these pollutants.

  9. Next Evolution of the Seneca College Outdoor Recreation Program: One Year of High Level Professional Outdoor Training and Development for Post-Diploma/Post-Degree Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Clare

    1998-01-01

    Describes the steps in utilizing fast-tracking to phase out the overloaded two-year Outdoor Recreation Technician Co-op program at Seneca College (Ontario) and phase in a one-year graduate Outdoor Recreation Certificate program with a lower teacher-student ratio. A concept model relates generalist core skills to specializations and outdoor…

  10. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  11. Indoor/outdoor relationships of PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 mass concentrations and their water-soluble ions in a retirement home and a school dormitory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanvand, Mohammad Sadegh; Naddafi, Kazem; Faridi, Sasan; Arhami, Mohammad; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Pourpak, Zahra; Rastkari, Noushin; Momeniha, Fatemeh; Kashani, Homa; Gholampour, Akbar; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Yunesian, Masud

    2014-01-01

    Indoor/outdoor particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5, and PM1) and their water-soluble ions were measured in a retirement home and a school dormitory in Tehran, from May 2012 to January 2013. Hourly indoor/outdoor PM concentrations were measured using GRIMM dust monitors and 24-h aerosol samples were collected by low-volume air samplers. Water-soluble ions were determined using an ion chromatography (IC) instrument. Although the mean outdoor PM concentrations in both sampling sites were almost equal, the mean indoor PM10 in the school dormitory was approximately 1.35 times higher than that in the retirement home. During a Middle Eastern dust storm, the 24-h average PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 concentrations were respectively 3.4, 2.9, and 1.9 times as high as those in normal days outdoors and 3.4, 2.8, and 1.6 times indoors. The results indicated that secondary inorganic aerosols were the dominant water-soluble ions of indoor and outdoor PM. We found that the smaller the particle, the higher the percentage of secondary inorganic aerosols. Except for PM10 in the school dormitory, strong correlations were found between indoor and outdoor PM. We estimated that nearly 45% of PM10, 67% of PM2.5, and 79% of PM1 in the retirement home, and 32% of PM10, 76% of PM2.5, and 83% of PM1 in the school dormitory originated from outdoor environment.

  12. Predation by Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes at an Outdoor Piggery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Fleming

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor pig operations are an alternative to intensive systems of raising pigs; however for the majority of outdoor pork producers, issues of biosecurity and predation control require significant management and (or capital investment. Identifying and quantifying predation risk in outdoor pork operations has rarely been done, but such data would be informative for these producers as part of their financial and logistical planning. We quantified potential impact of fox predation on piglets bred on an outdoor pork operation in south-western Australia. We used remote sensor cameras at select sites across the farm as well as above farrowing huts to record interactions between predators and pigs (sows and piglets. We also identified animal losses from breeding records, calculating weaning rate as a proportion of piglets born. Although only few piglets were recorded lost to fox predation (recorded by piggery staff as carcasses that are “chewed”, it is likely that foxes were contributing substantially to the 20% of piglets that were reported “missing”. Both sets of cameras recorded a high incidence of fox activity; foxes appeared on camera soon after staff left for the day, were observed tracking and taking live piglets (despite the presence of sows, and removed dead carcasses from in front of the cameras. Newly born and younger piglets appeared to be the most vulnerable, especially when they are born out in the paddock, but older piglets were also lost. A significant ( p = 0.001 effect of individual sow identification on the weaning rate, but no effect of sow age (parity, suggests that individual sow behavior towards predators influences predation risk for litters. We tracked the movement of piglet carcasses by foxes, and confirmed that foxes make use of patches of native vegetation for cover, although there was no effect of paddock, distance to vegetation, or position on the farm on weaning rate. Trials with non-toxic baits reveal high levels

  13. Source identification, apportionment and toxicity of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 airborne particulates in a region characterised by wood burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Linares, Claudio; Ovando-Fuentealba, Luis; Orellana-Donoso, Sandra; Gatica, Silvana; Klerman, Francisca; Mudge, Stephen M; Gallardo, Waldo; Pinaud, Jean Paul; Loyola-Sepulveda, Rodrigo

    2016-05-18

    The occurrence of airborne particulate matter has been flagged as "of concern" in several megacities, especially in Asia. Selected Chilean regions have similar problems as wood burning is the major source of heating in homes. This concern has led to mitigation measures restricting the burning of wood at periods when the particulate matter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) concentrations are predicted to be high. This work investigates the linkage between indoor and outdoor particle concentrations, determines their source through the polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) signature and investigates the efficacy of the current management practice of burning restrictions. The PM2.5 fraction was collected at 12 different properties with coincident indoor and outdoor sampling using a low-volume active sampler for 24 hours. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 ranged from 6 to 194 μg m(-3) with a mean of 72 μg m(-3) and corresponding outdoor concentrations ranged from 5 to 367 μg m(-3) with a mean of 85 μg m(-3) over the winter periods of 2014 and 2015; the Chilean national permitted maximum in outdoor air is 50 μg m(-3) in 24 hours. Higher concentrations were measured when the outdoor air temperature was lower. The PAHs were analysed on the PM2.5 fraction; the indoor concentrations ranged from 2 to 291 ng m(-3) with a mean of 51 ng m(-3) compared to an outdoor concentration between 3 and 365 ng m(-3) with a mean of 71 ng m(-3). Multivariate statistical analysis of the PAH profiles using principal components analysis (PCA) and polytopic vector analysis (PVA) identified wood burning, static and mobile diesel emissions and kerosene combustion as the major contributors to the particulate matter. When converted to toxicity equivalents (BaP-TEQ), the highest toxicity arising from PAHs in the indoor air was associated with a property that used a "leaky" combined wood stove and heater and also used a wood-fired brazier for local heating. In outdoor air, there was a relationship between the

  14. Predation by Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) at an Outdoor Piggery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Patricia A.; Dundas, Shannon J.; Lau, Yvonne Y. W.; Pluske, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Predation of piglets by red foxes is a significant risk for outdoor/free-range pork producers, but is often difficult to quantify. Using remote sensing cameras, we recorded substantial evidence of red foxes taking piglets from around farrowing huts, and found that piglets were most likely to be recorded as “missing” over their first week. These data suggest that fox predation contributed to the marked production differences between this outdoor farm and a similar-sized intensive farm under the same management, and warrant greater control of this introduced, invasive predator. Abstract Outdoor pig operations are an alternative to intensive systems of raising pigs; however for the majority of outdoor pork producers, issues of biosecurity and predation control require significant management and (or) capital investment. Identifying and quantifying predation risk in outdoor pork operations has rarely been done, but such data would be informative for these producers as part of their financial and logistical planning. We quantified potential impact of fox predation on piglets bred on an outdoor pork operation in south-western Australia. We used remote sensor cameras at select sites across the farm as well as above farrowing huts to record interactions between predators and pigs (sows and piglets). We also identified animal losses from breeding records, calculating weaning rate as a proportion of piglets born. Although only few piglets were recorded lost to fox predation (recorded by piggery staff as carcasses that are “chewed”), it is likely that foxes were contributing substantially to the 20% of piglets that were reported “missing”. Both sets of cameras recorded a high incidence of fox activity; foxes appeared on camera soon after staff left for the day, were observed tracking and taking live piglets (despite the presence of sows), and removed dead carcasses from in front of the cameras. Newly born and younger piglets appeared to be the most

  15. Perceived impact on student engagement when learning middle school science in an outdoor setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbatiello, James

    Human beings have an innate need to spend time outside, but in recent years children are spending less time outdoors. It is possible that this decline in time spent outdoors could have a negative impact on child development. Science teachers can combat the decline in the amount of time children spend outside by taking their science classes outdoors for regular classroom instruction. This study identified the potential impacts that learning in an outdoor setting might have on student engagement when learning middle school science. One sixth-grade middle school class participated in this case study, and students participated in outdoor intervention lessons where the instructional environment was a courtyard on the middle school campus. The outdoor lessons consisted of the same objectives and content as lessons delivered in an indoor setting during a middle school astronomy unit. Multiple sources of data were collected including questionnaires after each lesson, a focus group, student work samples, and researcher observations. The data was triangulated, and a vignette was written about the class' experiences learning in an outdoor setting. This study found that the feeling of autonomy and freedom gained by learning in an outdoor setting, and the novelty of the outdoor environment did increase student engagement for learning middle school science. In addition, as a result of this study, more work is needed to identify how peer to peer relationships are impacted by learning outdoors, how teachers could best utilize the outdoor setting for regular science instruction, and how learning in an outdoor setting might impact a feeling of stewardship for the environment in young adults.

  16. Learning outdoor leadership: a qualitative study of adult students' experiences in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Enoksen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore students’ learning, experiences and understandings of outdoor leadership. In the theoretical framework different aspects of friluftsliv and outdoor leadership were reviewed. Experiential learning and the self-directed learning approach were the main learning perspectives in the theoretical framework. The literature review showed that limited research effort has been directed to the topics of outdoor leadership, transition into leadership and self-...

  17. Outdoor play among children in relation to neighborhood characteristics: a cross-sectional neighborhood observation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarts Marie-Jeanne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although environmental characteristics as perceived by parents are known to be related to children’s outdoor play behavior, less is known about the relation between independently measured neighborhood characteristics and outdoor play among children. The purpose of this study was to identify quantitative as well as qualitative neighborhood characteristics related to outdoor play by means of neighborhood observations. Methods Questionnaires including questions on outdoor play behavior of the child were distributed among 3,651 parents of primary school children (aged 4–12 years. Furthermore, neighborhood observations were conducted in 33 Dutch neighborhoods to map neighborhood characteristics such as buildings, formal outdoor play facilities, public space, street pattern, traffic safety, social neighborhood characteristics, and general impression. Data of the questionnaires and the neighborhood observations were coupled via postal code of the respondents. Multilevel GEE analyses were performed to quantify the correlation between outdoor play and independently measured neighborhood characteristics. Results Parental education was negatively associated with outdoor play among children. Neither the presence nor the overall quality of formal outdoor play facilities were (positively related to outdoor play among children in this study. Rather, informal play areas such as the presence of sidewalks were related to children’s outdoor play. Also, traffic safety was an important characteristic associated with outdoor play. Conclusions This study showed that, apart from individual factors such as parental education level, certain modifiable characteristics in the neighborhood environment (as measured by neighborhood observations were associated with outdoor play among boys and girls of different age groups in The Netherlands. Local policy makers from different sectors can use these research findings in creating more activity

  18. Comparative analysis of the outdoor culture of Haematococcus pluvialis in tubular and bubble column photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M C García-Malea; Sánchez, E Del Río; López, J L Casas; Fernández, F G Acién; Sevilla, J M Fernández; Rivas, J; Guerrero, M G; Grima, E Molina

    2006-05-29

    The present paper makes a comparative analysis of the outdoor culture of H. pluvialis in a tubular photobioreactor and a bubble column. Both reactors had the same volume and were operated in the same way, thus allowing the influence of the reactor design to be analyzed. Due to the large changes in cell morphology and biochemical composition of H. pluvialis during outdoor culture, a new, faster methodology has been developed for their evaluation. Characterisation of the cultures is carried out on a macroscopic scale using a colorimetric method that allows the simultaneous determination of biomass concentration, and the chlorophyll, carotenoid and astaxanthin content of the biomass. On the microscopic scale, a method was developed based on the computer analysis of digital microscopic images. This method allows the quantification of cell population, average cell size and population homogeneity. The accuracy of the methods was verified during the operation of outdoor photobioreactors on a pilot plant scale. Data from the reactors showed tubular reactors to be more suitable for the production of H. pluvialis biomass and/or astaxanthin, due to their higher light availability. In the tubular photobioreactor biomass concentrations of 7.0 g/L (d.wt.) were reached after 16 days, with an overall biomass productivity of 0.41 g/L day. In the bubble column photobioreactor, on the other hand, the maximum biomass concentration reached was 1.4 g/L, with an overall biomass productivity of 0.06 g/L day. The maximum daily biomass productivity, 0.55 g/L day, was reached in the tubular photobioreactor for an average irradiance inside the culture of 130 microE/m2s. In addition, the carotenoid content of biomass from tubular photobioreactor increased up to 2.0%d.wt., whereas that of the biomass from the bubble column remained roughly constant at values of 0.5%d.wt. It should be noted that in the tubular photobioreactor under conditions of nitrate saturation, there was an accumulation of

  19. Community perceptions on outdoor malaria transmission in Kilombero Valley, Southern Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irene R Moshi; Halfan Ngowo; Angel Dillip; Daniel Msellemu; Edith P Madumla; Fredros O Okumu; Maureen Coetzee; Ladslaus L Mnyone; Lenore Manderson

    2017-01-01

    ...) in Africa has contributed to a significant reduction in malaria transmission. Even so, residual malaria transmission persists in many regions, partly driven by mosquitoes that bite people outdoors...

  20. An indoor air aerosol model for outdoor contaminant transmission into occupied rooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hui; ZHAO Shen; CAO Guo-qing

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a simple model for outdoor air contaminant transmission into occupied rooms. In the model, several factors such as filtration, ventilation, deposition, re-emission, outdoor concentration and indoor sources are included. The model results show that the air exchange rate plays an important role in the transmission of outdoor contaminants into the indoor environment. The model shows that increasing the value of the filtration efficiency decreases the mass concentration of indoor particles. In addition, if outdoor aerosol particles have a periodic behaviour, indoor aerosol particles also behave periodically but smoother. Indoor sources are found to be able to increase indoor concentrations greatly and continuously.

  1. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in indoor and outdoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, Ruthann A.; Perovich, Laura J.

    The past 50 years have seen rapid development of new building materials, furnishings, and consumer products and a corresponding explosion in new chemicals in the built environment. While exposure levels are largely undocumented, they are likely to have increased as a wider variety of chemicals came into use, people began spending more time indoors, and air exchange rates decreased to improve energy efficiency. As a result of weak regulatory requirements for chemical safety testing, only limited toxicity data are available for these chemicals. Over the past 15 years, some chemical classes commonly used in building materials, furnishings, and consumer products have been shown to be endocrine disrupting chemicals - that is they interfere with the action of endogenous hormones. These include PCBs, used in electrical equipment, caulking, paints and surface coatings; chlorinated and brominated flame retardants, used in electronics, furniture, and textiles; pesticides, used to control insects, weeds, and other pests in agriculture, lawn maintenance, and the built environment; phthalates, used in vinyl, plastics, fragrances, and other products; alkylphenols, used in detergents, pesticide formulations, and polystyrene plastics; and parabens, used to preserve products like lotions and sunscreens. This paper summarizes reported indoor and outdoor air concentrations, chemical use and sources, and toxicity data for each of these chemical classes. While industrial and transportation-related pollutants have been shown to migrate indoors from outdoor sources, it is expected that indoor sources predominate for these consumer product chemicals; and some studies have identified indoor sources as the predominant factor influencing outdoor ambient air concentrations in densely populated areas. Mechanisms of action, adverse effects, and dose-response relationships for many of these chemicals are poorly understood and no systematic screening of common chemicals for endocrine disrupting

  2. Impedance characterization of PV modules in outdoor conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Matei-lon; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Spataru, Sergiu;

    2016-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) has been used for laboratory characterizations of photovoltaic (PV) technologies under well controlled conditions. This work applies IS for outdoor characterization of PV panels, in order to observe the effect of irradiance (G) and temperature (T) on the PV module’s...... impedance spectrum, and further construct an impedance model that can link environmental changes to the model’s parameters. To achieve this, an optimized setup has been developed for long-term impedance spectra monitoring synchronised with accurate irradiance and temperature data. Preliminary results show...

  3. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THANOS KRIEMADIS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD. For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development will be presented. Basic theories and models will be analysed as well as the benefits earned and evaluation concerns about the effectiveness of such training programs.

  4. Spatial Resilience of Outdoor Domestic Space in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Felicio Veríssimo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the people of Mozambique have faced oppression and social spatial segregation and responded in a way that has reinforced rather than dismantled their traditional values. Since pre-colonial times, the population’s strategy for escaping from environmental and foreign political disruption has been to reinvent tradition, based on the principles of resilience, resistance and self-reliance. The development of decentralised human settlements, involving the appropriation of land for domestic space and the self-organisation of neighbourhoods, were strategies to protect communities from adversity and secure collective self-reliance. Following Mozambique’s conversion to globalization, the post-colonial ‘cement city’ is now the core of neo-liberalism, as a node of the global economy, where foreign donors and international market economy control national political economy, exacerbating the premise of the negation of self-sufficiency that continues to evolve resiliently at its margins. The adoption of a neo-liberal model of development during the 1990s, completely bypasses the realities of Mozambican society. This paper argues that the strategy of self-production of space regarding the household/Outdoor Domestic Space unit, which existed previously as a resistance strategy, first of all against colonialism and secondly, against the statist definition of socialism, thirdly, has become a successful strategy for survival, as the building block of the decentralised Agrocity, in the face of a global economy which totally neglects both the people and the land. Outdoor Domestic Space is a multifaceted space that refers to the external space surrounding the built house and which, in the case of Mozambique, is where daily life takes place, involving strong social, ecological and productive functions. Under successive periods of political economy oppression and environmental adversity, the Outdoor Domestic Space has been adapted and refined to

  5. On the applicability of models for outdoor sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1999-01-01

    The suitable prediction model for outdoor sound fields depends on the situation and the application. Computationally intensive methods such as Parabolic Equation methods, FFP methods and Boundary Element Methods all have advantages in certain situations. These approaches are accurate and predict...... not only sound pressure levels but also phase information. Such methods are, however, not always able to predict the sound field for more complicated scenarios involving terrain features, atmospheric wind and temperature gradients and turbulence. Another class of methods is based upon approximate theory...

  6. Personal, indoor and outdoor air pollution levels among pregnant women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembari, Anna; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; de Nazelle, Audrey; Dadvand, Payam; Vrijheid, Martine; Cirach, Marta; Martinez, David; Figueras, Francesc; Querol, Xavier; Basagaña, Xavier; Eeftens, Marloes; Meliefste, Kees; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    AimThe aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between pregnant women's personal exposures to NOx, NO2, PM2.5 concentration and absorbance as a marker for black carbon and their indoor and outdoor concentration levels at their residence, and also to identify predictors of personal exposure and indoor levels using questionnaire and time activity data. MethodWe recruited 54 pregnant women in Barcelona who carried a personal PM2.5 sampler for two days and NOx/NO2 passive badges for one week, while indoor and outdoor PM2.5 and NOx/NO2 levels at their residence were simultaneously measured. Time activity and house characteristics were recorded. Gravimetry determinations for PM2.5 concentration and absorbance measurements were carried out on the PM2.5 filter samples. ResultsLevels of personal exposure to NOx, PM2.5 and absorbance were slightly higher than indoor and outdoor levels (geometric mean of personal NOx = 61.9 vs indoor NOx = 60.6 μg m-3), while for NO2 the indoor levels were slightly higher than the personal ones. Generally, there was a high statistically significant correlation between personal exposure and indoor levels (Spearman's r between 0.78 and 0.84). Women spent more than 60% of their time indoors at home. Ventilation of the house by opening the windows, the time spent cooking and indicators for traffic intensity were re-occurring statistically significant determinants of the personal and indoor pollutants levels with models for NOx explaining the 55% and 60% of the variability respectively, and models for NO2 explaining the 39% and 16% of the variability respectively. Models for PM2.5 and absorbance explained the least of the variability. ConclusionOur findings improve the current understanding of the characterization and inter-associations between personal, indoor and outdoor pollution levels among pregnant women. Variability in personal and indoor NOx and to a lesser extent NO2 levels could be explained well, but not the variability

  7. Sub-Surface Windscreen for Outdoor Measurement of Infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A windscreen is configured for measuring outdoor infrasonic sound. The windscreen includes a container and a microphone. The container defines a chamber. The microphone is disposed in the chamber and can be operatively supported by the floor. The microphone is configured for detecting infrasonic sound. The container is advantageously formed from material that exhibits an acoustic impedance of between 0 and approximately 3150 times the acoustic impedance of air. A reflector plate may be disposed in the container. The reflector plate operatively can support the microphone and provides a doubling effect of infrasonic pressure at the microphone.

  8. Parametric Design of Outdoor Broadcasting Studio Based on Schema Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly demonstrates that the schema is an important way for the architect to cognize architecture form logic. It connects schema to algorithm of parametric design in order to seek the “algorithm schema” generation in parametric design of architecture. Meanwhile, this paper discusses the generative process and methods of the “algorithm schema” in parametric design of architecture by describing a case of outdoor broadcasting studio of Hunan Economic Radio. It also reveals the importance of “algorithm schema” for the cognition and architectural form logic generation.

  9. Validation of an Efficient Outdoor Sound Propagation Model Using BEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirós-Alpera, S.; Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda; Jacobsen, Finn

    2001-01-01

    An approximate, simple and practical model for prediction of outdoor sound propagation exists based on ray theory, diffraction theory and Fresnel-zone considerations [1]. This model, which can predict sound propagation over non-flat terrain, has been validated for combinations of flat ground, hills...... and barriers, but it still needs to be validated for configurations that involve combinations of valleys and barriers. In order to do this a boundary element model has been implemented in MATLAB to serve as a reliable reference....

  10. The influence of outdoor thermal environment on young Japanese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Ishii, Jin; Kondo, Emi; Fukagawa, Kenta; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Sakoi, Tomonori; Tsuchikawa, Tadahiro; Matsubara, Naoki; Horikoshi, Tetsumi

    2014-07-01

    The influence of short wave solar radiation appears to be strong outdoors in summer, and the influence of airflow appears to be strong outdoors in winter. The purpose of this paper was to clarify the influence of the outdoor environment on young Japanese females. This research shows the relationship between the physiological and psychological responses of humans and the enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature (ETFe). Subjective experiments were conducted in an outdoor environment. Subjects were exposed to the thermal environment in a standing posture. Air temperature, humidity, air velocity, short wave solar radiation, long wave radiation, ground surface temperature, sky factor, and the green solid angle were measured. The temperatures of skin exposed to the atmosphere and in contact with the ground were measured. Thermal sensation and thermal comfort were measured by means of rating the whole-body thermal sensation (cold-hot) and the whole body thermal comfort (comfortable-uncomfortable) on a linear scale. Linear rating scales are given for the hot (100) and cold (0), and comfortable (100) and uncomfortable (0) directions only. Arbitrary values of 0 and 100 were assigned to each endpoint, the reported values read in, and the entire length converted into a numerical value with an arbitrary scale of 100 to give a linear rating scale. The ETFe considered to report a neither hot nor cold, thermally neutral sensation of 50 was 35.9 °C, with 32.3 °C and 42.9 °C, respectively, corresponding to the low and high temperature ends of the ETFe considered to report a neither comfortable nor uncomfortable comfort value of 50. The mean skin temperature considered to report a neither hot nor cold, thermally neutral sensation of 50 was 33.3 °C, with 31.0 °C and 34.3 °C, respectively, corresponding to the low and high temperature ends of the mean skin temperature considered to report a neither comfortable nor uncomfortable comfort value of 50. The

  11. Outdoor performance results for NBS Round Robin collector no. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency of a PPG flat-plate solar collector was evaluated utilizing an outdoor solar collector test facility at the NASA-Lewis Research Center, as part of the National Bureau of Standards 'round robin' collector test program. The correlation equation for collector thermal efficiency Eta curve fit of the data was: Eta = 0.666 - 1.003(Btu/hr-sq ft-F) Theta, where the parameter Theta is the difference between the average fluid temperature and the ambient temperature, all divided by the total flux impinging on the collector.

  12. Reaction Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅育熙

    1998-01-01

    The paper proposes reaction graphs as graphical representations of computational objects.A reaction graph is a directed graph with all its arrows and some of its nodes labeled.Computations are modled by graph rewriting of a simple nature.The basic rewriting rules embody the essence of both the communications among processes and cut-eliminations in proofs.Calculi of graphs are ideentified to give a formal and algebraic account of reaction graphs in the spirit of process algebra.With the help of the calculi,it is demonstrated that reaction graphs capture many interesting aspects of computations.

  13. A model for light distribution and average solar irradiance inside outdoor tubular photobioreactors for the microalgal mass culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, F.G.A.; Camacho, F.G.; Perez, J.A.S.; Sevilla, J.M.F.; Grima, E.M. [Univ. of Almeria (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-09-05

    A mathematical model to estimate the solar irradiance profile and average light intensity inside a tubular photobioreactor under outdoor conditions is proposed, requiring only geographic, geometric, and solar position parameters. First, the length of the path into the culture traveled by any direct or disperse ray of light was calculated as the function of three variables: day of year, solar hour, and geographic latitude. Then, the phenomenon of light attenuation by biomass was studied considering Lambert-Beer`s law (only considering absorption) and the monodimensional model of Cornet et al. (1900) (considering absorption and scattering phenomena). Due to the existence of differential wavelength absorption, none of the literature models are useful for explaining light attenuation by the biomass. Therefore, an empirical hyperbolic expression is proposed. The equations to calculate light path length were substituted in the proposed hyperbolic expression, reproducing light intensity data obtained in the center of the loop tubes. The proposed model was also likely to estimate the irradiance accurately at any point inside the culture. Calculation of the local intensity was thus extended to the full culture volume in order to obtain the average irradiance, showing how the higher biomass productivities in a Phaeodactylum tricornutum UTEX 640 outdoor chemostat culture could be maintained by delaying light limitation.

  14. Real-time indoor and outdoor measurements of black carbon at primary schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reche, C.; Rivas, I.; Pandolfi, M.; Viana, M.; Bouso, L.; Àlvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Querol, X.

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological and toxicological studies have demonstrated the association between Black Carbon in indoor and outdoor air and the occurrence of health risks. Data on air quality in schools is of special interest, as children are more vulnerable to health hazards. In this context, indoor and outdoor measurements of real-time Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) were collected at 39 primary schools located in Barcelona (Spain), with classrooms naturally ventilated under warm weather conditions. A main contribution of road traffic emissions to indoor and outdoor EBC levels was evidenced through different approaches. Simultaneous measurements of EBC levels at schools under different traffic conditions revealed concentrations by 30-35% higher at schools exposed to higher vehicles intensities. Moreover, a significant correlation was obtained between average outdoor EBC levels at different districts of the city and the percentage of surface area in each district used for the road network (R2 = 0.61). Higher indoor than outdoor levels were recorded at some instances when the indoor sampling location was relatively closer to road traffic, even under low outdoor temperatures. Indeed, the average indoor/outdoor EBC ratios for each school correlate moderately between campaigns in spite of significant differences in temperature between sampling periods. These two facts highlight the strong dependency of the EBC levels on the distance to traffic. The peaks of exposure inside the classrooms seemed to be determined by outdoor concentrations, as shown by the parallelism between indoor and outdoor mean EBC daily cycles and the similar contribution of traffic rush hours to indoor and outdoor daily mean levels. The airtightness of the classroom was suggested as the responsible for the indoor/outdoor ratios of EBC higher than 1 recorded at nights.

  15. Mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    The purpose of this series is to provide a continuing critical review of the literature concerned with mechanistic aspects of inorganic and organo­ metallic reactions in solution, with coverage being complete in each volume. The papers discussed are selected on the basis of relevance to the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and many include results of a nonkinetic nature when useful mechanistic information can be deduced. The period of literature covered by this volume is July 1982 through December 1983, and in some instances papers not available for inclusion in the previous volume are also included. Numerical results are usually reported in the units used by the original authors, except where data from different papers are com­ pared and conversion to common units is necessary. As in previous volumes material included covers the major areas of redox processes, reactions of the nonmetallic elements, reaction of inert and labile metal complexes and the reactions of organometallic compounds. While m...

  16. Status of outdoor radioactive contamination at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

    1994-12-01

    This document summarizes the status of outdoor radioactive contamination near Hanford Site facilities and disposal sites. It defines the nature and areal extend of the radioactively contaminated areas and describes the historical, ongoing, and planned radiological monitoring and control activities. Radioactive waste has been disposed of to the soil column since shortly after the reactors and production facilities began operating. Radioactive liquid wastes were placed directly into the ground via liquid discharges to cribs, ponds, ditches, and reverse wells. Solid wastes were placed in trenches, burial vaults, and caissons. Although the Hanford Site covers 1,450 km{sup 2}, the radioactively contaminated area is only about 36 km{sup 2} or 2.5% of the original site. Over time, contamination has migrated from some of the waste management sites through various vectors (e.g., burrowing animals, deep-rooted vegetation, erosion, containment system failure) or has been deposited to the surface soil via spills and unplanned releases (e.g., line leaks/breaks, tank leaks, and stack discharges) and created areas of outdoor radioactivity both on and below the surface. Currently 26 km{sup 2} are posted as surface contamination and 10 km{sup 2} are posted as underground contamination.

  17. The Archaeo-Astronomy Project -- Supporting the Outdoor Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, D; Alder, A

    2010-01-01

    Field trips and the outdoor classroom are a vital part of many courses at school and FE/HE level. They apply previously obtained skills and knowledge in the field and further deeper learning. However, it would be desirable to teach the material in situ rather than providing a field trip at the end of a course; thereby avoiding referring to the field trip in a few months time where everything will become much clearer. Furthermore, there is clear evidence provided by the National Peak Park Authority on how neglected e.g. the Peak District National Park sites are by Primary and Secondary schools. They quote inaccessibility and other common barriers associated to the outdoor classroom. The archaeo-astronomy project envisages the development of an Elearning environment allowing FE/HE students and pupils (Key Stage 2-4) to experience and explore ancient landscapes e.g. in the Peak District National Park. This project would support the learning experience of students on science and environmental modules. Furthermore...

  18. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant.

  19. Outdoor air pollution and respiratory health in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kian Fan; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhong, Nanshan

    2011-10-01

    With the rapid economic development occurring in the last decade in many countries of Asia, the level of air pollution has increased from both industrial and motor vehicle emissions. Compared with Europe and North America, the potential health effects of this increasing air pollution in Asia remain largely unmeasured. Recent data published by the Health Effects Institute from some major cities in India and China reveal that a 10 µg/m(3) increase in PM(10) was associated with an increase in mortality of 0.6% in daily all-natural cause mortality, with higher risks being found at extremes of high temperatures and in the lowest economically advantaged population. Other Asian studies have confirmed the link between hospital admissions for the worsening of COPD and the increase in asthma prevalence to levels of outdoor air pollutants. Although potential health effects appear to be similar to already-published Western data, it is important that further studies be carried out in Asia that will inform the public and the authorities of the necessity to curb levels of outdoor air pollutants to acceptable levels.

  20. Information and communication technology solutions for outdoor navigation in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teipel, Stefan; Babiloni, Claudio; Hoey, Jesse; Kaye, Jeffrey; Kirste, Thomas; Burmeister, Oliver K

    2016-06-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) is potentially mature enough to empower outdoor and social activities in dementia. However, actual ICT-based devices have limited functionality and impact, mainly limited to safety. What is an ideal operational framework to enhance this field to support outdoor and social activities? Review of literature and cross-disciplinary expert discussion. A situation-aware ICT requires a flexible fine-tuning by stakeholders of system usability and complexity of function, and of user safety and autonomy. It should operate by artificial intelligence/machine learning and should reflect harmonized stakeholder values, social context, and user residual cognitive functions. ICT services should be proposed at the prodromal stage of dementia and should be carefully validated within the life space of users in terms of quality of life, social activities, and costs. The operational framework has the potential to produce ICT and services with high clinical impact but requires substantial investment. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outdoor Air Quality Level Inference via Surveillance Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a universal problem confronted by many developing countries. Because there are very few air quality monitoring stations in cities, it is difficult for people to know the exact air quality level anytime and anywhere. Fortunately, large amount of surveillance cameras have been deployed in the cities and can capture image densely and conveniently in the cities. In this case, this provides the possibility to utilize surveillance cameras as sensors to obtain data and predict the air quality level. To this end, we present a novel air quality level inference approach based on outdoor images. Firstly, we explore several features extracted from images as the robust representation for air quality prediction. Then, to effectively fuse these heterogeneous and complementary features, we adopt multikernel learning to learn an adaptive classifier for air quality level inference. In addition, to facilitate the research, we construct an Outdoor Air Quality Image Set (OAQIS dataset, which contains high quality registered and calibrated images with rich labels, that is, concentration of particles mass (PM, weather, temperature, humidity, and wind. Extensive experiments on the OAQIS dataset demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. Geometric and colour data fusion for outdoor 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, Pilar; Adán, Antonio; Salamanca, Santiago; Domínguez, Vicente; Chacón, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera) and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination) conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture), we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields.

  3. Geometric and Colour Data Fusion for Outdoor 3D Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Chacón

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the generation of accurate, dense and coloured 3D models of outdoor scenarios from scanners. This is a challenging research field in which several problems still remain unsolved. In particular, the process of 3D model creation in outdoor scenes may be inefficient if the scene is digitalized under unsuitable technical (specific scanner on-board camera and environmental (rain, dampness, changing illumination conditions. We address our research towards the integration of images and range data to produce photorealistic models. Our proposal is based on decoupling the colour integration and geometry reconstruction stages, making them independent and controlled processes. This issue is approached from two different viewpoints. On the one hand, given a complete model (geometry plus texture, we propose a method to modify the original texture provided by the scanner on-board camera with the colour information extracted from external images taken at given moments and under specific environmental conditions. On the other hand, we propose an algorithm to directly assign external images onto the complete geometric model, thus avoiding tedious on-line calibration processes. We present the work conducted on two large Roman archaeological sites dating from the first century A.D., namely, the Theatre of Segobriga and the Fori Porticus of Emerita Augusta, both in Spain. The results obtained demonstrate that our approach could be useful in the digitalization and 3D modelling fields.

  4. The LED outdoor lighting revolution : Opportunities, threats and mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aube, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The presence of artificial light at night (ALAN) in environment is now known to have non negligible consequences on the night sky, the fauna, the flora and the human health. A real revolution is undergoing in the outdoor lighting industry threatens the night integrity. This revolution is driven by the advent of the cost-effective Light-Emitting Diode (LED) technology into the outdoor lighting industry. The LEDs provides many opportunities: they are long lasting, easily controlled, and generally allow a more efficient photometric design which, in term, may result in energy savings.After explaining the complex and non-linear behaviour of the propagation of the ALAN into the nocturnal environment, we will outline the potential impact of the ALAN on the human health and on the night sky, and we will introduce some dedicated indicators for its evaluation. We will focus on the role of the blue content of the ALAN in the evaluation of its impact. More specifically we will show how white LED technology, that often shows increased blue light content, compares to the traditional High Pressure Sodium technology. Finally, we will identify the possible mitigations to restrict the adverse impacts of the white LEDs in the urban and rural environment.

  5. Technique for Outdoor Test on Concentrating Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sansoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor experimentation of solar cells is essential to maximize their performance and to assess utilization requirements and limits. More generally tests with direct exposure to the sun are useful to understand the behavior of components and new materials for solar applications in real working conditions. Insolation and ambient factors are uncontrollable but can be monitored to know the environmental situation of the solar exposure experiment. A parallel characterization of the photocells can be performed in laboratory under controllable and reproducible conditions. A methodology to execute solar exposure tests is proposed and practically applied on photovoltaic cells for a solar cogeneration system. The cells are measured with concentrated solar light obtained utilizing a large Fresnel lens mounted on a sun tracker. Outdoor measurements monitor the effects of the exposure of two multijunction photovoltaic cells to focused sunlight. The main result is the continuous acquisition of the V-I (voltage-current curve for the cells in different conditions of solar concentration and temperature of exercise to assess their behavior. The research investigates electrical power extracted, efficiency, temperatures reached, and possible damages of the photovoltaic cell.

  6. Rooftop Unitary Air Conditioner with Integral Dedicated Outdoor Air System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiax Llc

    2006-02-28

    Energy use of rooftop and other unitary air-conditioners in commercial applications accounts for about 1 quad (10{sup 15} Btu) of primary energy use annually in the U.S. [Reference 7]. The realization that this cooling equipment accounts for the majority of commercial building cooled floorspace and the majority also of commercial building energy use has spurred development of improved-efficiency equipment as well as development of stricter standards addressing efficiency levels. Another key market driver affecting design of rooftop air-conditioning equipment has been concern regarding comfort and the control of humidity. Trends for increases in outdoor air ventilation rates in certain applications, and the increasing concern about indoor air quality problems associated with humidity levels and moisture in buildings points to a need for improved dehumidification capability in air-conditioning equipment of all types. In many cases addressing this issue exacerbates energy efficiency, and vice versa. The integrated dedicated outdoor air system configuration developed in this project addresses both energy and comfort/humidity issues.

  7. The influence of Chinese Classical Garden Aesthetics on the design of outdoor environment in residential area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石运红

    2016-01-01

    The outdoor environment of residential area is closely related to the life of the residents. This paper analyzes the aesthetic ideas of Chinese classical gardens, and seeks the way of the outdoor environment design of residential areas with perfect function, reasonable layout and beautiful environment.

  8. Revealing the Interactional Features of Learning and Teaching Moments in Outdoor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Jane; Bateman, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The data considered in this article was generated as part of a doctoral research study entitled: "A sociocultural consideration of child-initiated interaction with teachers in indoor and outdoor spaces" (Waters 2011) where child-initiated, teacher-child interaction in indoor and outdoor spaces were investigated. The purpose of the…

  9. Older persons afraid of falling reduce physical activity to prevent outdoor falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Jong, R. de; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective.: The aim of this study was to test the assumption that the level of outdoor physical activity mediates the relationship between fear of falling and actual outdoor falls according to the Task Difficulty Homeostasis Theory. Method.: A prospective follow-up study of 10 months conducted in th

  10. The Indoorisation of Outdoor Sports. An Exploration of the Rise of Lifestyle Sports in Artificial Settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottenburg, Maarten van; Salome, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    During the last twenty years, a remarkable new type of service has been developed in the world of sports, which can be described as the indoorisation of outdoor sports. Typical outdoor sports like climbing, skiing, surfing, rowing, and skydiving, which used to be exclusively practiced in a natural e

  11. 78 FR 59475 - Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines; Outdoor Developed Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... vehicles; tent pads and tent platforms; and camp shelters. The scoping requirements added by the final rule... recreational vehicles at dump stations; tent pads and tent platforms; camp shelters; viewing areas; outdoor... tent pads and tent platforms, camp shelters, viewing areas, outdoor recreation access routes,...

  12. Plants Have a Chance: Outdoor Educational Programmes Alter Students' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Outdoor educational programmes are generally believed to be a suitable alternative to conventional biology settings that improve participants' environmental attitudes and knowledge. Here we examine whether outdoor educational programmes focused solely on practical work with plants influence participants' knowledge of and attitudes towards plants.…

  13. An Empirical Examination of Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare Field Instructor Job-Related Stress and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Genevieve; Russell, Keith C.; Cross, Reid

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect and analyze demographic characteristics and job related difficulties experienced by field instructors in outdoor behavioral healthcare programs which utilized wilderness therapy as well as other treatment modalities. Three state-licensed outdoor behavioral healthcare programs in the United States provided a…

  14. 24 CFR 3280.813 - Outdoor outlets, fixtures, air-conditioning equipment, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Electrical Systems § 3280.813 Outdoor outlets, fixtures, air-conditioning equipment, etc. (a) Outdoor.../or air conditioning equipment located outside the manufactured home, shall have permanently affixed, adjacent to the outlet, a metal tag which reads: This Connection Is for Air Conditioning Equipment Rated at...

  15. View the Zoo! Evaluation of Visual Communication in an Outdoor Educational Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Heidi L.; And Others

    Almost all of what people learn from outdoor educational settings such as zoos and gardens stems from the exhibits themselves or signs about the exhibits. Evaluation of the various forms of visual communication in outdoor educational settings is necessary to determine the effectiveness of exhibitions, educational activities, and/or conservation…

  16. A Historical Review of Outdoor Leadership Curricular Development and the Future with Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelchat, Christopher; Karp, Grace Goc

    2012-01-01

    This article is a call for research to be conducted on how to adequately design and evaluate outdoor leader preparation programs (Sugerman, 1999). The profession of outdoor leadership has been slow to examine effective ways of assessing the development of student knowledge, disposition, and performance that inform instructional practice and…

  17. Outdoor Education and Mobile Learning: An Autobiographical Narrative Using Application-Based Information and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeff, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Although mobile learning using smartphones and applications or apps have the potential to inform and educate individuals in an outdoor environment, users may find that connectivity issues and basic knowledge of outdoor environments, including both physical and emotional, could be limited by what this technology provided. This study provided my…

  18. Outdoor Adventure Risk Management: Curriculum Design Principles from Industry and Educational Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Nevin; Robinson, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Leaders working in the outdoor adventure field are faced with making critical decisions that keep students, clients, or customers safe from the perils of risk-related activities while enabling them to benefit from these experiences. The knowledge and competency necessary to analyze and manage risk is integral to those providing outdoor adventure…

  19. Enough of Ronald and Mickey: Focusing on Learning in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beames, Simon; Brown, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen years ago Loynes expressed concern that market-place values were detrimentally impacting on the provision of outdoor education experiences. As tertiary educators with an interest in the impact of globalization on outdoor education, we have sought to extend Loynes' use of McDonaldization by drawing on Bryman's conceptual framework…

  20. Chemical Characterization of the Indoor Air Quality of a University Hospital: Penetration of Outdoor Air Pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Wel, L. van; Beckmann, G.; Anzion, R.B.M.

    2017-01-01

    For healthcare centers, local outdoor sources of air pollution represent a potential threat to indoor air quality (IAQ). The aim of this study was to study the impact of local outdoor sources of air pollution on the IAQ of a university hospital. IAQ was characterized at thirteen indoor and two

  1. Improving the Accuracy of Outdoor Educators' Teaching Self-Efficacy Beliefs through Metacognitive Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Scott; Sibthorp, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in emerging outdoor educators' teaching self-efficacy beliefs is critical to student safety and learning. Overinflated self-efficacy beliefs can result in delayed skilled development or inappropriate acceptance of risk. In an outdoor education context, neglecting the accuracy of teaching self-efficacy beliefs early in an educator's…

  2. Exploring Kindergarten Teachers' Views and Roles Regarding Children's Outdoor Play Environments in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Qaryouti, Ibrahim A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore kindergarten teachers' views and roles regarding outdoor play environments in Omani kindergartens. Thirty kindergarten teachers from 15 private kindergartens were observed and interviewed. The results indicated that teachers recognize the importance of outdoor play in children's development and learning.…

  3. Outdoor Centers and Camps: A 'Natural' Location for Youth Leadership Development. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielsmeier, James C.

    This digest offers camp leaders, outdoor experiential educators, school and college faculty, or youth agency staff who are interested in nurturing youth leaders a framework for designing youth leadership programs which employ an outdoor setting as a "leadership classroom." Basic categories for leadership theory are defined: trait theory,…

  4. Outdoor education in the Mid-Atlantic states: an assessment of market segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie L. Young; Megan L. Hash; Roy Ramthun

    2007-01-01

    Programs that emphasize experiential learning in outdoor settings have a long history in the United States and have been offered by a wide range of organizations. This study focused on programming that included environmental education, experiential education, and outdoor education. The purpose of this study was to examine the range of services and programs that offer...

  5. The Indoorisation of Outdoor Sports. An Exploration of the Rise of Lifestyle Sports in Artificial Settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs. Maarten van Bottenburg; MSc Lotte Salome

    2010-01-01

    During the last twenty years, a remarkable new type of service has been developed in the world of sports, which can be described as the indoorisation of outdoor sports. Typical outdoor sports like climbing, skiing, surfing, rowing, and skydiving, which used to be exclusively practiced in a natural

  6. The indoorisation of outdoor sports: an exploration of the rise of lifestyle sports in artificial settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bottenburg, M.; Salome, L.

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, a remarkable new type of service has been developed in the world of sports, which can be described as the indoorisation of outdoor sports. Typical outdoor sports like climbing, skiing, surfing, rowing and skydiving, which used to be exclusively practised in a natural

  7. 78 FR 63971 - Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for Outdoor Research, Development, Test and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Availability of Record of Decision for Outdoor Research, Development, Test... decision to expand the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division's (NSWCDD) outdoor research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) activities within the Potomac River Test Range (PRTR) complex, the...

  8. Whose Place, Whose History? Outdoor Environmental Education Pedagogy as "Reading" the Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    Outdoor education practice around the world occurs in diverse circumstances, environments and cultures. The application of outdoor education to specific cultural and environmental issues in particular places and communities has received little attention in research. While research in fields such as cultural geography has addressed the…

  9. Outdoor Education and Mobile Learning: An Autobiographical Narrative Using Application-Based Information and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeff, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Although mobile learning using smartphones and applications or apps have the potential to inform and educate individuals in an outdoor environment, users may find that connectivity issues and basic knowledge of outdoor environments, including both physical and emotional, could be limited by what this technology provided. This study provided my…

  10. Outdoor Natural Science Learning with an RFID-Supported Immersive Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsung-Yu; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chu, Yu-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Despite their successful use in many conscientious studies involving outdoor learning applications, mobile learning systems still have certain limitations. For instance, because students cannot obtain real-time, context-aware content in outdoor locations such as historical sites, endangered animal habitats, and geological landscapes, they are…

  11. A Young Child's Perspectives on Outdoor Play: A Case Study from Vancouver, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, A. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing amount of concern about the lack of direct exposure that young children have to nature and the outdoors in Canada and the United States, leading to an increase in outdoor- and nature-based learning models for young children. However, very little research has been done in the field of early childhood environmental…

  12. Place-Based Curriculum Making: Devising a Synthesis between Primary Geography and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor learning provides children with an opportunity to experience the interdisciplinary nature of the real world through interactions with each other and the planet. Geographical enquiry involves exploring the outdoors in an investigative capacity. Space, place and sustainability are three core concepts in primary geography, although…

  13. Outdoor Natural Science Learning with an RFID-Supported Immersive Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsung-Yu; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chu, Yu-Ling

    2009-01-01

    Despite their successful use in many conscientious studies involving outdoor learning applications, mobile learning systems still have certain limitations. For instance, because students cannot obtain real-time, context-aware content in outdoor locations such as historical sites, endangered animal habitats, and geological landscapes, they are…

  14. The Hidden Turmoil: Females Achieving Longevity in the Outdoor Learning Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Michelle; Gray, Tonia

    2013-01-01

    Being a woman in the outdoor learning profession can bring distinctive challenges and roadblocks. Even more difficult is sustaining a life-long career, flourishing into a woman's 50s or 60s. Based on this premise, career longevity seems elusive for some women who aspire to work in the outdoors. This paper analyses the autobiographies of three…

  15. Exploring Early Childhood Teachers' Beliefs and Practices about Preschool Outdoor Play: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintic, Sandra; Petty, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored how early childhood teachers' beliefs and practices influence the function of preschool outdoor play. Teachers believed that supervision was paramount. They perceived that the physical design of the outdoor environment posed limitations for planning, preparation, and implementation. Teachers' recollections of…

  16. The Great Outdoors: Comparing Leader Development Programs at the U.S. Naval Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Wesley S.; Smith, David G.; Thomas, Joseph J.; Carlson, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares outdoor adventure-based leader development programs with a traditional non-outdoor program to test predictions about differential effects on leader development outcomes. Participants were drawn from the population of U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen involved in experiential leader development programs as a component of their…

  17. Recontextualizing the Role of the Facilitator in Group Interaction in the Outdoor Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Ina

    2009-01-01

    The traditional role of the facilitator in outdoor education is frequently seen as outside the group of participants, either in a position of power over the participants or detached and passive. Following an ethnographic study at a residential outdoor centre, an in-depth analysis of the facilitation process was carried out, which revealed that the…

  18. Elementary Science Education in Classrooms and Outdoors: Stakeholder Views, Gender, Ethnicity, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Thomson, Margareta M.; Tugurian, Linda P.; Stevenson, Kathryn Tate

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a mixed-methods study of 2 schools' elementary science programs including outdoor instruction specific to each school's culture. We explore fifth-grade students in measures of science knowledge, environmental attitudes, and outdoor comfort levels including gender and ethnic differences. We further examine students'…

  19. Effects of housing system (outdoor vs cages) and age of laying hens on egg characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. Effects of two housing systems (cages vs outdoor) on external and internal egg characteristics were investigated. 2. In total 785 eggs from three different lines in cages and 268 eggs from outdoor-housed layers were examined for egg weight, albumen, yolk and shell content, albumen height and pH,

  20. Does outdoor work during the winter season protect against depression and mood difficulties?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Ina H; Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard; Dalsgaard, Sofie B;

    2011-01-01

    At temperate latitudes, 1-5% of the population suffer from winter depression; during winter, mood difficulties tend to increase but may be alleviated by bright light therapy. Unlike indoor workers, outdoor workers are exposed to therapeutic levels of sunlight during winter. We hypothesized...... that outdoor work may protect against mood difficulties and depression....

  1. The Outdoor Environment in Norwegian Kindergartens as Pedagogical Space for Toddlers' Play, Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Thomas; Martinsen, Marianne T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines some characteristics of the outdoor environment in Norwegian kindergartens. Understood as pedagogical space, outdoor conditions may enhance or restrict the youngest children's possibilities for play, learning and development. In 117 of 133 kindergartens (response rate: 87 %) participating in a longitudinal study, the heads of…

  2. Plants Have a Chance: Outdoor Educational Programmes Alter Students' Knowledge and Attitudes towards Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Outdoor educational programmes are generally believed to be a suitable alternative to conventional biology settings that improve participants' environmental attitudes and knowledge. Here we examine whether outdoor educational programmes focused solely on practical work with plants influence participants' knowledge of and attitudes towards plants.…

  3. Statistical model evaluation and calibrations for outdoor comfort assessment in South Florida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caldieron, J.M.; Thitisawat, M.; Polakit, K.; Mangone, G.

    2011-01-01

    In tropical and subtropical areas, people can spend more time outdoors than in other latitudes. Understanding the sensitivity of outdoor comfort is a fundamental element for architects and urban designers working in these specific climates. This study is part of a research project attempting to

  4. Whose Place, Whose History? Outdoor Environmental Education Pedagogy as "Reading" the Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    Outdoor education practice around the world occurs in diverse circumstances, environments and cultures. The application of outdoor education to specific cultural and environmental issues in particular places and communities has received little attention in research. While research in fields such as cultural geography has addressed the…

  5. Reliving the Gold Rush: An Outdoor Education Program in the Old West.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankie, Brett

    1979-01-01

    In teaching fifth-grade outdoor education in the forest and in an old gold rush town, the outdoor education staff seldom uses textbooks but does use many reading/communication techniques to help transfer knowledge of many disciplines in a direct way. (Author/SB)

  6. The Effect of Outdoor Learning Activities on the Development of Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Günseli; Özyilmaz Akamca, Güzin

    2017-01-01

    Learning ought to be supported by both in class activities and outdoor activities contributing to structuring knowledge. Outdoor activities allow children to actively participate and to learn by doing. Learning requires a lot of work and activities. These activities, which provide primary experiences, help children to change theoretical knowledge…

  7. Statistical model evaluation and calibrations for outdoor comfort assessment in South Florida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caldieron, J.M.; Thitisawat, M.; Polakit, K.; Mangone, G.

    2011-01-01

    In tropical and subtropical areas, people can spend more time outdoors than in other latitudes. Understanding the sensitivity of outdoor comfort is a fundamental element for architects and urban designers working in these specific climates. This study is part of a research project attempting to rela

  8. 7 CFR 301.45-7 - Assembly and inspection of regulated articles and outdoor household articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assembly and inspection of regulated articles and outdoor household articles. 301.45-7 Section 301.45-7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... QUARANTINE NOTICES Gypsy Moth § 301.45-7 Assembly and inspection of regulated articles and outdoor...

  9. Place-Based Curriculum Making: Devising a Synthesis between Primary Geography and Outdoor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor learning provides children with an opportunity to experience the interdisciplinary nature of the real world through interactions with each other and the planet. Geographical enquiry involves exploring the outdoors in an investigative capacity. Space, place and sustainability are three core concepts in primary geography, although…

  10. A Case for the Place of Music in the Outdoor Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardy, Marie

    2000-01-01

    Music can become an indispensable part of outdoor education because music summons the basic connections that sustain human life. Outdoor education is challenged to reach beyond the traditional campfire and sing-a-long activities. Various works are cited regarding the relevance of music to multiple intelligence theory, logical-mathematics training,…

  11. Nature connection, outdoor play, and environmental stewardship in residential environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejewski, Robert G.

    A lack of exposure to the natural world has led to a generation of children disconnected from nature. This phenomenon has profound negative implications for the physical and psychological well being of today's youth. Residential environmental education provides one avenue to connect children to nature. One purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Outdoor School, a residential environmental education program, on ecological knowledge, children's connection to nature, school belonging, outdoor play attitude, environmental stewardship attitude, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior, as reported by participants. A quasi-experimental research design was utilized in the study. A total of 228 fifth grade students (156 treatment, 72 control) from central Pennsylvania participated. The results of the program evaluation indicated that Outdoor School was successful in achieving significant, positive gains in the areas of ecological knowledge, connection to nature, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior. No change was found from pretest to post-test in outdoor play attitudes, environmental stewardship attitudes, and school belonging. Additionally, the study addressed gaps in the literature regarding the relationship between connection to nature, environmental stewardship, and outdoor play using two different approaches. An adaptation of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used to predict outdoor play behavior in children. In this model, favorable attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control lead to intentions to perform a given behavior. Intention to perform the behavior is the best predictor for behavior performance. For this study, participants' feeling of connection to nature was added as an affective independent variable. This model explained 45% of the variance in outdoor play. The hypothesis that a connection to nature would be a significant predictor of both attitudes toward outdoor play was

  12. Towards an understanding of an outdoor education program: Listening to participants' stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanely, Shannon Dee

    Today, human beings spend more than 90% of their lives indoors (Evans, 2003). Not long ago, both urban and rural children grew up mostly outdoors, and had direct experiences with plants, animals, and the ways in which the necessities of daily life were grown, made, and used. When they were not helping with household work, children spent much of their time exploring the outdoor environment, relatively free from adult interference. The lives of children today are much different. Children now have fewer opportunities for unstructured play and regular contact with the natural world. Outdoor education programs are one tool that can provide children with continued access to the natural world. This study was conducted to determine how outdoor education program participants interpret their experiences in the natural world, how participant engagement with an outdoor education program shapes their perception of the natural world, and how participant interpretation of an outdoor education program shapes their actions for caring for the natural world when they return home. Using qualitative research methods, my study was conducted with four sixth-grade students participating in a four-day residential outdoor education program. The participants, two females and two males, were given cameras to document the most important aspects of their outdoor education experience. The pictures were used to stimulate conversation and encourage reflection during the interview process. Data sources consisted of a pre-program interview with each student, daily interviews with students while they were participating in the outdoor education program, and a post-program interview conducted one week after the program ended. Critical incident technique analysis was used to delineate the most critical elements of each participant's outdoor education experience. My study found that participants interpreted their outdoor education program as a positive experience. Classes that were challenging and gave

  13. The relationship between perceived health and physical activity indoors, outdoors in built environments, and outdoors in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, Tytti P; Tyrväinen, Liisa; Korpela, Kalevi M

    2014-11-01

    A body of evidence shows that both physical activity and exposure to nature are connected to improved general and mental health. Experimental studies have consistently found short term positive effects of physical activity in nature compared with built environments. This study explores whether these benefits are also evident in everyday life, perceived over repeated contact with nature. The topic is important from the perspectives of city planning, individual well-being, and public health. National survey data (n = 2,070) from Finland was analysed using structural regression analyses. Perceived general health, emotional well-being, and sleep quality were regressed on the weekly frequency of physical activity indoors, outdoors in built environments, and in nature. Socioeconomic factors and other plausible confounders were controlled for. Emotional well-being showed the most consistent positive connection to physical activity in nature, whereas general health was positively associated with physical activity in both built and natural outdoor settings. Better sleep quality was weakly connected to frequent physical activity in nature, but the connection was outweighed by other factors. The results indicate that nature provides an added value to the known benefits of physical activity. Repeated exercise in nature is, in particular, connected to better emotional well-being. © 2014 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  14. Exploring the Relationship of Outdoor Recreational Resources to Physical Inactivity, Obesity and Diabetes for the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Access to outdoor recreational resources is important for promoting healthy behavior and physical activity, which may decrease the risk of disease. To date, no study has examined the relationship between access to outdoor recreational resources (including protected l...

  15. Teachers’ intentions with outdoor teaching in school forests: Skills and knowledge teachers want students to develop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Wilhelmsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an interest among Swedish teachers to locate teaching outdoors. This study focuses on four teachers in grades 4-6, to explore their intentions and objectives with regular teaching outdoors. Datasources consist of semi-structured interviews, descriptions on successful activities, and reflections on metaphors. The use of intentional analysis and Bloom’s revised taxonomy on teachers’ objectives show that the teachers stress the out-of-school learning that draws on the actual world and concrete material. Yet their objectives with these authentic experiences are diverse. Two teachers have mainly cognitive objectives with a holistic view of knowledge where outdoor and indoor interact. To become knowledgeable, each individual student needs teaching in this proper context. The other two teachers primarily have affective objectives, in a dichotomy between learning theoretical knowledge indoors, and learning practical, concrete knowledge outdoors. They consider the outdoor arena as crucial for students with learning difficulties.

  16. Consumer expectations of the quality of pork produced in sustainable outdoor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Bredahl, Lone; Magnussen, Maria

    on all dimensions of expected quality apart from price. Unrealistic expectations about a better taste of outdoor pork may become a serious problem. Related research has shown that disappointment can only be avoided when product qualities are achieved in outdoor and organic pork that come at least close...... to be extremely low for pork in general, stated purchase intentions should also be discounted in the case of pork from outdoor production systems. The most striking result in the present research was observed in relation to consumers' quality expectations. Respondents had been asked to state their quality...... expectations for pork from pigs raised in extensive outdoor production systems as well as conventional indoor production systems. When compared for pork produced under the two different systems, a "halo" effect was found. Consumers gave substantially higher ratings to pork from outdoor production systems...

  17. Modeling of outdoor-to-indoor radio channels via propagation graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Troels; Steinböck, Gerhard; Fleury, Bernard Henri

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a model for the outdoor-to-indoor radio channel in terms of a propagation graph. The model accounts for outdoor scattering and in-room reverberation. It is observed from the model how such a scenario results in channels with several room excitations leading to "clusters" in the simul......We formulate a model for the outdoor-to-indoor radio channel in terms of a propagation graph. The model accounts for outdoor scattering and in-room reverberation. It is observed from the model how such a scenario results in channels with several room excitations leading to "clusters......" in the simulated channel impulse responses. Simulation studies further indicate that the outdoor-to-indoor and inroom channels differ in terms of spatial envelope correlation. Published in:...

  18. Measurements of pulse rate using long-range imaging photoplethysmography and sunlight illumination outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2017-02-01

    Imaging photoplethysmography, a method using imagers to record absorption variations caused by microvascular blood volume pulsations, shows promise as a non-contact cardiovascular sensing technology. The first long-range imaging photoplethysmography measurements at distances of 25, 50, and 100 meters from the participant was recently demonstrated. Degraded signal quality was observed with increasing imager-to-subject distances. The degradation in signal quality was hypothesized to be largely attributable to inadequate light return to the image sensor with increasing lens focal length. To test this hypothesis, a follow-up evaluation with 27 participants was conducted outdoors with natural sunlight illumination resulting in 5-33 times the illumination intensity. Video was recorded from cameras equipped with ultra-telephoto lenses and positioned at distances of 25, 50, 100, and 150 meters. The brighter illumination allowed high-definition video recordings at increased frame rates of 60fps, shorter exposure times, and lower ISO settings, leading to higher quality image formation than the previous indoor evaluation. Results were compared to simultaneous reference measurements from electrocardiography. Compared to the previous indoor study, we observed lower overall error in pulse rate measurement with the same pattern of degradation in signal quality with respect to increasing distance. This effect was corroborated by the signal-to-noise ratio of the blood volume pulse signal which also showed decreasing quality with respect to increasing distance. Finally, a popular chrominance-based method was compared to a blind source separation approach; while comparable in measurement of signal-to-noise ratio, we observed higher overall error in pulse rate measurement using the chrominance method in this data.

  19. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  20. An initial assessment of the bioclimatic comfort in an outdoor public space in Lisbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sandra; Andrade, Henrique

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the application of a methodology designed to analyse the relationship between climatic conditions and the perception of bioclimatic comfort. The experiment consisted of conducting simultaneous questionnaire surveys and weather measurements during 2 sunny spring days in an open urban area in Lisbon. The results showed that under outdoor conditions, thermal comfort can be maintained with temperatures well above the standard values defined for indoor conditions. There seems to be a spontaneous adaptation in terms of clothing whenever the physiological equivalent temperature threshold of 31 degrees C is surpassed. The perception of air temperature is difficult to separate from the perception of the thermal environment and is modified by other parameters, particularly wind. The perception of solar radiation is related to the intensity of fluxes from various directions (i.e. falling upon both vertical and horizontal surfaces), weighted by the coefficients of incidence upon the human body. Wind was found to be the most intensely perceived variable, usually negatively. Wind perception depends largely on the extreme values of wind speed and wind variability. Women showed a stronger negative reaction to high wind speed than men. The experiment proved that this methodology is well-suited to achieving the proposed objectives and that it may be applied in other areas and in other seasons.

  1. An Idea (Like a Seedling) Grows. Genesis and Development of Outdoor/Conservation Education in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollums, Don

    The document describes how outdoor education in the Bloomfield Hills School District of Michigan can be traced to 1957, when elementary school students participated in a resident outdoor school experience for a week. In 1968, a committee on outdoor education was formally organized. The committee developed a rationale and objectives for outdoor…

  2. The Short Term Effectiveness of an Outdoor Environmental Education on Environmental Awareness and Sensitivity of In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur-Berberoglu, Emel; Ozdilek, Hasan Göksel; Yalcin-Ozdilek, Sükran

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor education is mostly mentioned in terms of environmental education. The aim of this research is to determine the short term effectiveness of an outdoor environmental education program on biodiversity awareness, environmental awareness and sensitivity to natural environment. The data is collected from an outdoor environmental education…

  3. Indoor versus Outdoor Scene Classification Using Probabilistic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Lalit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for indoor versus outdoor scene classification using a probabilistic neural network (PNN. The scene is initially segmented (unsupervised using fuzzy -means clustering (FCM and features based on color, texture, and shape are extracted from each of the image segments. The image is thus represented by a feature set, with a separate feature vector for each image segment. As the number of segments differs from one scene to another, the feature set representation of the scene is of varying dimension. Therefore a modified PNN is used for classifying the variable dimension feature sets. The proposed technique is evaluated on two databases: IITM-SCID2 (scene classification image database and that used by Payne and Singh in 2005. The performance of different feature combinations is compared using the modified PNN.

  4. Indoor versus Outdoor Scene Classification Using Probabilistic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhendu Das

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for indoor versus outdoor scene classification using a probabilistic neural network (PNN. The scene is initially segmented (unsupervised using fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM and features based on color, texture, and shape are extracted from each of the image segments. The image is thus represented by a feature set, with a separate feature vector for each image segment. As the number of segments differs from one scene to another, the feature set representation of the scene is of varying dimension. Therefore a modified PNN is used for classifying the variable dimension feature sets. The proposed technique is evaluated on two databases: IITM-SCID2 (scene classification image database and that used by Payne and Singh in 2005. The performance of different feature combinations is compared using the modified PNN.

  5. Indoor versus Outdoor Scene Classification Using Probabilistic Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Pathangay, Vinod; Patra, Arpita; Dyana, A.; Das, Sukhendu

    2006-12-01

    We propose a method for indoor versus outdoor scene classification using a probabilistic neural network (PNN). The scene is initially segmented (unsupervised) using fuzzy[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]-means clustering (FCM) and features based on color, texture, and shape are extracted from each of the image segments. The image is thus represented by a feature set, with a separate feature vector for each image segment. As the number of segments differs from one scene to another, the feature set representation of the scene is of varying dimension. Therefore a modified PNN is used for classifying the variable dimension feature sets. The proposed technique is evaluated on two databases: IITM-SCID2 (scene classification image database) and that used by Payne and Singh in 2005. The performance of different feature combinations is compared using the modified PNN.

  6. Parametric sensitivity analysis for temperature control in outdoor photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Darlan A; Rodrigues, Vinicius O; Gómez, Sonia V; Sales, Emerson A; Jorquera, Orlando

    2013-09-01

    In this study a critical analysis of input parameters on a model to describe the broth temperature in flat plate photobioreactors throughout the day is carried out in order to assess the effect of these parameters on the model. Using the design of experiment approach, variation of selected parameters was introduced and the influence of each parameter on the broth temperature was evaluated by a parametric sensitivity analysis. The results show that the major influence on the broth temperature is that from the reactor wall and the shading factor, both related to the direct and reflected solar irradiation. Other parameter which play an important role on the temperature is the distance between plates. This study provides information to improve the design and establish the most appropriate operating conditions for the cultivation of microalgae in outdoor systems.

  7. A bioclimatic design methodology for urban outdoor spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaid, H.; Bar-El, M.; Hoffman, M. E.

    1993-03-01

    The development of a bioclimatic urban design methodology is described. The cluster thermal time constant ( CTTC) model for predicting street-level urban air temperature variations is coupled with the wind-profile power law and the index of thermal stress (ITS.) for human comfort. The CTTC model and the power law produce the diurnal air temperature and wind speed variations in various canyonlike urban forms. The thermal comfort requirements for lightly-dressed, moderately-walking/seated persons in the outdoor space in summer are then obtained using the ITS. model. The proposed methodology enables a first-order assessment of the climatic implications of different features of the physical structure of the city such as street orientation, canyon height-to-width ratio, building density, and street shading. The application of the proposed methodology is demonstrated for Tel Aviv.

  8. Resources for National Water Savings for Outdoor Water Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melody, Moya [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Hannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Alison [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dunham, Camilla [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    In support of efforts by the U.S. Environmental Agency's (EPA's) WaterSense program to develop a spreadsheet model for calculating the national water and financial savings attributable to WaterSense certification and labeling of weather-based irrigation controllers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory reviewed reports, technical data, and other information related to outdoor water use and irrigation controllers. In this document we categorize and describe the reviewed references, highlighting pertinent data. We relied on these references when developing model parameters and calculating controller savings. We grouped resources into three major categories: landscapes (section 1); irrigation devices (section 2); and analytical and modeling efforts (section 3). Each category is subdivided further as described in its section. References are listed in order of date of publication, most recent first.

  9. Efisiensi Energi Jaringan Homogeneous Wcdma/3g Pada Lingkungan Outdoor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linawati Linawati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunication technology and applications have developed fast recently. Hence this development will take energy consumption significantly. Many studies have been done on energy efficiency on cellular network. The studies are more focused on energy usage of the base station, as the base station is the component of cellular station which takes the most energy consumption. Therefore this study analyzes energy efficiency on homogeneous network of WCDMA/3G for outdoor environment. Energy consumption of three macro base stations is compared with energy consumption of 12 micro base stations. This comparison analysis has been conducted on the same Area Spectral Efficiency (ASE. The results show that the macro base stations are more efficient for energy usage than the micro base stations. However based on ASE requirements, the micro base stations are more efficient than the macro base stations on both busy hours and non-busy hour.

  10. Production of Spirulina biomass: maintenance of Monoalgal culture outdoors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonshak, A.; Abeliovich, A.; Boussiba, S.; Richmond, A.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of sodium bicarbonate concentration, population density, and temperature on the maintenance of an outdoor monoculture of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis were studied. A clear response by Spirulina to the concentration of bicarbonate was evident, with 0.2M bicarbonate representing the lowest concentration in which a monoculture could be maintained. When the temperatures fell during the winter period to some 20-25/sup 0/C below the optimum for Spirulina. Chlorella sp. gradually increased and became the dominant species in the culture. Raising the temperature by covering the pond with transparent polyethylene resulted in a sharp decline in the population of Chlorella, and a gradual resumption of species dominance by Spirulina. In winter, there was an inverse relationship in the pond between the population density of Spirulina and the extent of contamination by Chlorella sp., but no such effect was observed under field conditions at temperatures higher than 25/sup 0/C.

  11. Outdoor mass culture of Spirulina maxima in sea-water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tredici, M.R.; Papuzzo, T.; Tomaselli, L.

    1986-04-01

    The results of a whole year experiment on the outdoor mass culture of Spirulina maxima strain 4Mx on fertilized sea-water are reported. Carbonate and phosphate precipitation in the seawater media was prevented by maintaining a low concentration of phosphate and by controlling the pH in the range of 8.0-8.3. The mean annual yield of biomass on sea-water plus urea as nitrogen source was 7.35 g(dry weight)m/sup -2/.day/sup -1/, a value slightly lower than that obtained on the standard bicarbonate medium (8.14 g.m/sup -2/.day/sup -1/). On sea-water plus nitrate the yield was only 5.2 g.m/sup -2/.day/sup -1/. The nitrogen content of the biomass was higher in summer and lower in winter. The seasonal effect was more evident when nitrate was the nitrogen source.

  12. A Novel Conservation Method of Historical Outdoor Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aivaras Kareiva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel conservation method was developed for the protection of historical outdoor ceramics. The historical ceramics from monastery of “San Filippo di Fragalà” (Sicily, Italy were chosen for this study. Polymeric films on the surface of ceramics specimens were formed using Silres BS 16 as a precursor. For the comparison, the material Paraloid B-82, which is already known in the conservation practice, was also used for the formation of protective coatings on historical ceramics. The investigated samples were characterized by SEM, TG, EDX, XRD methods and contact angle measurements. The results obtained showed that ceramic samples were successfully preserved and saturated by Silres BS 16 with forming effective polymeric coatings on ancient ceramics surfaces. Keywords: Ancient ceramics, conservation, Silres BS 16, SEM, TG, contact angle.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.6823

  13. Development of Outdoor Service Robot to Collect Trash on Streets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Masayuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Miyagawa, Hidekazu; Kondo, Takashi; Ohkawa, Fujio

    The outdoor service robot which we call OSR-01 is developed intending for cleaning up urban areas by means of collecting discarded trash such as PET bottles, cans, plastic bags and so on. We, in this paper, describe the architecture of OSR-01 consisting of hardwares such as sensors, a manipulator, driving wheels, etc. for searching for and picking up trash, and softwares such as fast pattern matching for identifying various trash and distance measurement for picking up via the manipulator. After describing the vision system in detail, which is one of the most critical parts of the trash collection task, we show the result of an open experiment in which OSR-01 collects PET bottles on a real shopping street in the special zone for robot research and development in Kitakyushu-city.

  14. Outdoor Portable System for Quantified Analysis of Human Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Hessas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study, is to collect gait by the wearable sensors attached to the person’s body, then we propose a homemade system called Digit Eye Jockey. This system gathers a mechanical structure and an electronic device based on potentiometers for measuring spatiotemporal parameters and joints angles in the sagittal plane for hip and knee and in both sagittal and transverse planes for the ankle. The responses are very linear and the relative error is less than 5%. This instrument is a robust and light tool to assess the instantaneous spatiotemporal and articular parameters during gait, over a great number of steps, on any type of ground and even outdoors.

  15. Perceived benefits and drawbacks of participation in outdoor science school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Christine M.

    This qualitative study examined the perceived benefits and drawbacks of participation in Orange County Department of Education's Outdoor Science School during the fall of2010. A sample of 16 site staff: 10 teachers, and 3 administrators were interviewed during October 2010. The student themes that emerged for perceived student benefits included an enhanced selfworth, increased independence, support for various types of learners, and improved environmental attitudes. Themes for participating teachers were also found and included an increased social bond between teacher and student, having time set aside just for science, and improved group management skills. Obstacles such as inclement weather, lack of parental support, and insufficient content preparation in the classroom before attending for students and the perception of personal sacrifice and logistical difficulties for teachers were thought to be the most substantial obstacles. Stakeholder alignment between the groups was also examined.

  16. Spatio-temporal Background Models for Outdoor Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pless Robert

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Video surveillance in outdoor areas is hampered by consistent background motion which defeats systems that use motion to identify intruders. While algorithms exist for masking out regions with motion, a better approach is to develop a statistical model of the typical dynamic video appearance. This allows the detection of potential intruders even in front of trees and grass waving in the wind, waves across a lake, or cars moving past. In this paper we present a general framework for the identification of anomalies in video, and a comparison of statistical models that characterize the local video dynamics at each pixel neighborhood. A real-time implementation of these algorithms runs on an 800 MHz laptop, and we present qualitative results in many application domains.

  17. Indoor/outdoor ozone concentrations at a contemporary art gallery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, T.D.; Ramer, B.; Kaspyzok, G.; Delany, A.C.

    1984-02-01

    Ozone concentrations were measured both inside and outside the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, near a small city in rural eastern England, during a three-week period in summer. The inside concentration was typically 70 +/- 10% of the outside concentration during the period of expected maximum outside levels. During the period of observation the maximum outside ozone levels have been well in excess of 120 ppb. The relatively high indoor/outdoor ozone ratio is a function of the Centre's design, its internal geometry, and its ventilation system. Conventional art galleries and museums experience much lower indoor ozone exposure. The measured indoor ozone levels imply deleterious effects on the gallery exhibits and an enhanced ozone exposure may have to be considered in the design of modern galleries and museums. 8 references.

  18. The Role of Outdoor Art in Urban Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippelli, G. M.; Kesling, M.; Ryan, T.; Fraser, J.; McDonald, F.; Rollings, A.; Miss, M.; Kanpetch, B.; Trueblood, M.

    2015-12-01

    Finding ways to engage youth in inadvertent learning about nature and the environment is challenging, particularly in urban areas where environmental literacy is profoundly limited by access to safe and representative spaces. Termed the Nature Deficit Disorder, the lack of contact and connection between people and their environment leads to a less than holistic approach to environmental management at the personal and governmental levels. One of the challenges is developing ways to engage youth in science learning not by bringing them indoors to a science museum but rather by taking the science museum outdoors. Funded by the NSF Informal Science Learning program, we launched a collaborative between scientists and artists to understand the nature and impact of environmental learning through outdoor art and science programming, called StreamLines. Launched in 2014 and now near full deployment, the program is part of a bigger initiative in Indianapolis (Reconnecting to Our Waterways) to embrace the multiple waterways that traverse the city as a valuable community and health resource. This collaborative is designed to function on multiple levels. An Artist and Scientists Roundtable engages practitioners in regular conversations supplemented by external readings to share how practitioners use concepts and tools from the "opposite" side to inform their work and scholarship. Physical installations of iconic art at individual sites reflect the environmental conditions at individual sites are designed as tools for explicit and implicit learning and exploration about the environment. Music, poetry, and dance programming developed for individual sites portray cogent characteristics of place and are meant to allow visitors to see how artists engage with and draw from the environment for inspiration. A research approach unpins all of these efforts, utilizing a set of different sample populations to explore environmental education and potential advocacy after interactions with

  19. USE OF ASSISTED PHOTOGRAMMETRY FOR INDOOR AND OUTDOOR NAVIGATION PURPOSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pagliari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, devices and applications that require navigation solutions are continuously growing. For instance, consider the increasing demand of mapping information or the development of applications based on users’ location. In some case it could be sufficient an approximate solution (e.g. at room level, but in the large amount of cases a better solution is required. The navigation problem has been solved from a long time using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS. However, it can be unless in obstructed areas, such as in urban areas or inside buildings. An interesting low cost solution is photogrammetry, assisted using additional information to scale the photogrammetric problem and recovering a solution also in critical situation for image-based methods (e.g. poor textured surfaces. In this paper, the use of assisted photogrammetry has been tested for both outdoor and indoor scenarios. Outdoor navigation problem has been faced developing a positioning system with Ground Control Points extracted from urban maps as constrain and tie points automatically extracted from the images acquired during the survey. The proposed approach has been tested under different scenarios, recovering the followed trajectory with an accuracy of 0.20 m. For indoor navigation a solution has been thought to integrate the data delivered by Microsoft Kinect, by identifying interesting features on the RGB images and re-projecting them on the point clouds generated from the delivered depth maps. Then, these points have been used to estimate the rotation matrix between subsequent point clouds and, consequently, to recover the trajectory with few centimeters of error.

  20. Simulation of global warming effect on outdoor thermal comfort conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshan, G.R.; Ranjbar, F. [Univ. of Tehran (IR). Dept. of Physical Geography; Orosa, J.A. [Univ. of A Coruna (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    2010-07-01

    In the coming decades, global warming and increase in temperature, in different regions of the world, may change indoor and outdoor thermal comfort conditions and human health. The aim of this research was to study the effects of global warming on thermal comfort conditions in indoor ambiences in Iran. To study the increase in temperature, model for assessment of greenhouse-gas induced climate change scenario generator compound model has been used together with four scenarios and to estimate thermal comfort conditions, adaptive model of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has been used. In this study, Iran was divided into 30 zones, outdoor conditions were obtained using meteorological data of 80 climatological stations and changes in neutral comfort conditions in 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 were predicted. In accordance with each scenario, findings from this study showed that temperature in the 30 zones will increase by 2100 to between 3.4 C and 5.6 C. In the coming decades and in the 30 studied zones, neutral comfort temperature will increase and be higher and more intense in the central and desert zones of Iran. The low increase in this temperature will be connected to the coastal areas of the Caspian and Oman Sea in southeast Iran. This increase in temperature will be followed by a change in thermal comfort and indoor energy consumption from 8.6 % to 13.1 % in air conditioning systems. As a result, passive methods as thermal inertia are proposed as a possible solution.

  1. Use of Assisted Photogrammetry for Indoor and Outdoor Navigation Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, D.; Cazzaniga, N. E.; Pinto, L.

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, devices and applications that require navigation solutions are continuously growing. For instance, consider the increasing demand of mapping information or the development of applications based on users' location. In some case it could be sufficient an approximate solution (e.g. at room level), but in the large amount of cases a better solution is required. The navigation problem has been solved from a long time using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). However, it can be unless in obstructed areas, such as in urban areas or inside buildings. An interesting low cost solution is photogrammetry, assisted using additional information to scale the photogrammetric problem and recovering a solution also in critical situation for image-based methods (e.g. poor textured surfaces). In this paper, the use of assisted photogrammetry has been tested for both outdoor and indoor scenarios. Outdoor navigation problem has been faced developing a positioning system with Ground Control Points extracted from urban maps as constrain and tie points automatically extracted from the images acquired during the survey. The proposed approach has been tested under different scenarios, recovering the followed trajectory with an accuracy of 0.20 m. For indoor navigation a solution has been thought to integrate the data delivered by Microsoft Kinect, by identifying interesting features on the RGB images and re-projecting them on the point clouds generated from the delivered depth maps. Then, these points have been used to estimate the rotation matrix between subsequent point clouds and, consequently, to recover the trajectory with few centimeters of error.

  2. Palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Molnár, Árpád

    2013-01-01

    This handbook and ready reference brings together all significant issues of practical importance for interested readers in one single volume. While covering homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, the text is unique in focusing on such important aspects as using different reaction media, microwave techniques or catalyst recycling. It also provides a comprehensive treatment of modern-day coupling reactions and emphasizes those topics that show potential for future development, such as continuous flow systems, water as a reaction medium, and catalyst immobilization, among others. With i

  3. Portable proton exchange membrane fuel-cell systems for outdoor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oszcipok, M.; Zedda, M.; Hesselmann, J.; Huppmann, M.; Wodrich, M.; Junghardt, M.; Hebling, C.

    A hydrogen fuelled, 30 W proton exchange membrane fuel-cell (PEMFC) system is presented that is able to operate at an ambient temperature between -20 and 40 °C. The system, which comprises the fuel-cell stack, pumps, humidifier, valves and blowers is fully characterized in a climatic chamber under various ambient temperatures. Successful cold start-up and stable operation at -20 °C are reported as well as the system behaviour during long-term at 40 °C. A simple thermal model of the stack is developed and validated, and accounts for heat losses by radiation and convection. Condensation of steam is addressed as well as reaction gas depletion. The stack is regarded as a uniform heat source. The electrochemical reaction is not resolved. General design rules for the cold start-up of a portable fuel-cell stack are deduced by the thermal model and are taken into consideration for the design. The model is used for a comparison between active-assisted cold start-up procedures with a passive cold start-up from temperatures below 0 °C. It is found that a passive cold start-up may not be the most efficient strategy. Additionally, the influence of different stack concepts on the start-up behaviour is analysed by the thermal model. Three power classes of PEMFC stacks are compared: a Ballard Mk902 module for automotive applications with 85 kW, the forerunner stack Ballard Mk5 (5 kW) for medium power applications, and the developed OutdoorFC stack (30 W), for portable applications.

  4. What is the Relationship between Risky Outdoor Play and Health in Children? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Brussoni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Risky outdoor play has been associated with promoting children’s health and development, but also with injury and death. Risky outdoor play has diminished over time, concurrent with increasing concerns regarding child safety and emphasis on injury prevention. We sought to conduct a systematic review to examine the relationship between risky outdoor play and health in children, in order to inform the debate regarding its benefits and harms. We identified and evaluated 21 relevant papers for quality using the GRADE framework. Included articles addressed the effect on health indicators and behaviours from three types of risky play, as well as risky play supportive environments. The systematic review revealed overall positive effects of risky outdoor play on a variety of health indicators and behaviours, most commonly physical activity, but also social health and behaviours, injuries, and aggression. The review indicated the need for additional “good quality” studies; however, we note that even in the face of the generally exclusionary systematic review process, our findings support the promotion of risky outdoor play for healthy child development. These positive results with the marked reduction in risky outdoor play opportunities in recent generations indicate the need to encourage action to support children’s risky outdoor play opportunities. Policy and practice precedents and recommendations for action are discussed.

  5. Culturability and concentration of indoor and outdoor airborne fungi in six single-family homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Adhikari, Atin; Crawford, Carlos M.; Reponen, Tiina

    In this study, the culturability of indoor and outdoor airborne fungi was determined through long-term sampling (24-h) using a Button Personal Inhalable Aerosol Sampler. The air samples were collected during three seasons in six Cincinnati area homes that were free from moisture damage or visible mold. Cultivation and total microscopic enumeration methods were employed for the sample analysis. The geometric means of indoor and outdoor culturable fungal concentrations were 88 and 102 colony-forming units (CFU) m -3, respectively, with a geometric mean of the I/ O ratio equal to 0.66. Overall, 26 genera of culturable fungi were recovered from the indoor and outdoor samples. For total fungal spores, the indoor and outdoor geometric means were 211 and 605 spores m -3, respectively, with a geometric mean of I/ O ratio equal to 0.32. The identification revealed 37 fungal genera from indoor and outdoor samples based on the total spore analysis. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of culturable and total fungal spores showed significant correlations ( r=0.655, pvalue of culturability (38% and 33% for indoor and outdoor, respectively) followed by Aspergillus/Penicillium (9% and 2%) among predominant genera of fungi. Increased culturability of fungi inside the homes may have important implications because of the potential increase in the release of allergens from viable spores and pathogenicity of viable fungi on immunocompromised individuals.

  6. What is the Relationship between Risky Outdoor Play and Health in Children? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussoni, Mariana; Gibbons, Rebecca; Gray, Casey; Ishikawa, Takuro; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen; Bienenstock, Adam; Chabot, Guylaine; Fuselli, Pamela; Herrington, Susan; Janssen, Ian; Pickett, William; Power, Marlene; Stanger, Nick; Sampson, Margaret; Tremblay, Mark S

    2015-06-08

    Risky outdoor play has been associated with promoting children's health and development, but also with injury and death. Risky outdoor play has diminished over time, concurrent with increasing concerns regarding child safety and emphasis on injury prevention. We sought to conduct a systematic review to examine the relationship between risky outdoor play and health in children, in order to inform the debate regarding its benefits and harms. We identified and evaluated 21 relevant papers for quality using the GRADE framework. Included articles addressed the effect on health indicators and behaviours from three types of risky play, as well as risky play supportive environments. The systematic review revealed overall positive effects of risky outdoor play on a variety of health indicators and behaviours, most commonly physical activity, but also social health and behaviours, injuries, and aggression. The review indicated the need for additional "good quality" studies; however, we note that even in the face of the generally exclusionary systematic review process, our findings support the promotion of risky outdoor play for healthy child development. These positive results with the marked reduction in risky outdoor play opportunities in recent generations indicate the need to encourage action to support children's risky outdoor play opportunities. Policy and practice precedents and recommendations for action are discussed.

  7. Estimating mortality derived from indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Ji

    Full Text Available Following an extensive review of the literature, we further analyze the published data to examine the health effects of indoor exposure to particulate matter (PM of outdoor origin. We obtained data on all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality per 10 μg/m3 increase in outdoor PM10 or PM2.5; the infiltration factors for buildings; and estimated time spent outdoors by individuals in the United States, Europe, China, and globally. These data were combined log-linear exposure-response model to estimate the all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality of exposure to indoor PM pollution of outdoor origin. Indoor PM pollution of outdoor origin is a cause of considerable mortality, accounting for 81% to 89% of the total increase in mortality associated with exposure to outdoor PM pollution for the studied regions. The findings suggest that enhancing the capacity of buildings to protect occupants against exposure to outdoor PM pollution has significant potential to improve public health outcomes.

  8. Studies of the Atmospheric Chemsitry of Energy-Related Volatile Organic Compounds and of their Atmospheric Reaction Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Atkinson; Janet Arey

    2007-04-14

    The focus of this contract was to investigate selected aspects of the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted into the atmosphere from energy-related sources as well as from biogenic sources. The classes of VOCs studied were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs, the biogenic VOCs isoprene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and cis-3-hexen-1-ol, alkenes (including alkenes emitted from vegetation) and their oxygenated atmospheric reaction products, and a series of oxygenated carbonyl and hydroxycarbonyl compounds formed as atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons and other VOCs. Large volume reaction chambers were used to investigate the kinetics and/or products of photolysis and of the gas-phase reactions of these organic compounds with hydroxyl (OH) radicals, nitrate (NO3) radicals, and ozone (O3), using an array of analytical instrumentation to analyze the reactants and products (including gas chromatography, in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and direct air sampling atmospheric pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry). The following studies were carried out. The photolysis rates of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene and of eleven isomeric methylnitronaphthalenes were measured indoors using blacklamp irradiation and outdoors using natural sunlight. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals, Cl atoms and NO3 radicals with naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, 1- and 2-ethylnaphthalene and the ten dimethylnaphthalene isomers. Rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with four unsaturated carbonyls and with a series of hydroxyaldehydes formed as atmospheric reaction products of other VOCs, and for the gas-phase reactions of O3 with a series of cycloalkenes. Products of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals and O3 with a series of biogenically emitted VOCs were identified and quantified. Ambient atmospheric measurements of the concentrations of a

  9. Environmental determinants of outdoor play in children: a large-scale cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Marie-Jeanne; Wendel-Vos, Wanda; van Oers, Hans A M; van de Goor, Ien A M; Schuit, Albertine J

    2010-09-01

    Outdoor play is a cheap and natural way for children to be physically active. This study aims to identify physical as well as social correlates of outdoor play in the home and neighborhood environment among children of different age groups. Cross-sectional data were derived from 6470 parents of children from 42 primary schools in four Dutch cities by means of questionnaires (2007-2008). Multivariate sequential Poisson GEE analyses were conducted (2010) to quantify the correlation between physical and social home and neighborhood characteristics and outdoor play among boys and girls aged 4-6 years, 7-9 years, and 10-12 years. This study showed that next to proximal (home) environmental characteristics such as parental education (RR=0.93-0.97); the importance parents pay to outdoor play (RR=1.32-1.75); and the presence of electronic devices in the child's own room (RR=1.04-1.15), several neighborhood characteristics were significantly associated with children's outdoor play. Neighborhood social cohesion was related to outdoor play in five of six subgroups (RR=1.01-1.02), whereas physical neighborhood characteristics (e.g., green neighborhood type, presence of water, diversity of routes) were associated with outdoor play in specific subgroups only. Neighborhood social cohesion was related to outdoor play among children of different age and gender, which makes it a promising point of action for policy development. Policies aimed at improving physical neighborhood characteristics in relation to outdoor play should take into account age and gender of the target population. 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RELATIVE LEVELS OF INDOOR AND OUTDOOR PARTICLE NUMBER CONCENTRATIONS IN A RESIDENTIAL BUILDING IN XI'AN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanming Kang; Ke Zhong; Shun-Cheng Lee

    2006-01-01

    The time series of indoor and outdoor particle number concentrations in a naturally ventilated residential building in Xi'an were tested simultaneously for 7 days in summer. The relationships between indoor and outdoor concentrations were examined and discussed, and linear regression analysis was employed to correlate the indoor and outdoor concentrations. The diurnal cycles of indoor and outdoor particle concentrations of different particle size ranges all showed positive correlations between indoor and outdoor number concentrations. The I/O ratios of number concentrations varied with the increase of particle size in the range of 0.89 (±0.19) to 0.99 (±0.15).

  11. Impact of an outdoor gym on park users' physical activity: A natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranney, Leonie; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Kariuki, Maina; Stride, Vicki; Scott, Ashleigh; Hua, Myna; Bauman, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of an outdoor gym installation on park users' physical activity levels and examined the characteristics of outdoor gym users. A before-after time series design was employed, consisting of nine data collection periods: three each at baseline, post outdoor gym installation, and at 12-month follow-up. Repeated observational surveys and park intercept interviews were conducted. There was a small but significant increase in senior park users engaging in moderate to vigorous physical activity at follow-up (1.6 to 5.1%; pgym area for: MVPA (6 to 40%; pgyms on physical activity outcomes.

  12. Profiles of Airborne Fungi in Buildings and Outdoor Environments in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Brian G.; Kirkland, Kimberly H.; Flanders, W. Dana; Morris, George K.

    2002-01-01

    We examined 12,026 fungal air samples (9,619 indoor samples and 2,407 outdoor samples) from 1,717 buildings located across the United States; these samples were collected during indoor air quality investigations performed from 1996 to 1998. For all buildings, both indoor and outdoor air samples were collected with an Andersen N6 sampler. The culturable airborne fungal concentrations in indoor air were lower than those in outdoor air. The fungal levels were highest in the fall and summer and l...

  13. Capture reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endt, P.M.

    1956-01-01

    Capture reactions will be considered here from the viewpoint of the nuclear spectroscopist. Especially important to him are the capture of neutrons, protons, and alpha particles, which may proceed through narrow resonances, offering a well defined initial state for the subsequent deexcitation proces

  14. Allergic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... round, they may be caused by exposure to indoor allergens such as dust mites, indoor molds or pets. Urticaria, or hives, is characterized ... home. Video: What is an allergic reaction? » Utility navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen ...

  15. Synthesis of MnO2 nanoparticles and their effective utilization as UV protectors for outdoor high voltage polymeric insulators used in power transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bhandari, Subhendu; Khastgir, Dipak

    2016-12-07

    Polymeric outdoor insulators derived from polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) are replacing conventional ceramic insulators in high voltage power transmission lines because of their improved electrical, mechanical and hydrophobic performance. Major impediments like failure of polymeric insulators due to natural aging by UV radiation from sunlight and electrical tracking have limited their usage. Herein, it is demonstrated about the usage of manganese dioxide based nanoparticles as an effective agent to prevent the UV accelerated aging of polymeric insulators. MnO2 nanoparticles of different shapes and dimension were synthesized using a single step wet chemical reaction between KMnO4 and methyl acetate. Namely, 2D δ-MnO2 nanosheets, 1D α-MnO2 nanowires and 3D α-MnO2 nanorods were formed. These nanoparticles were extensively characterized by various techniques. In the scope of the study, the δ-MnO2 (10(-5) S cm(-1); 1 MHz) nanosheet demonstrated the lowest electrical AC conductivity and a higher band gap compared to the 1D (10(-4) S cm(-1); 1 MHz) and 3D variety (10(-4) S cm(-1); 1 MHz). Owing to the lower electrical conductivity of the δ-MnO2 nanosheet, it was further incorporated at different filler volumes in the polymeric matrix (blend of polydimethyl siloxane/ethylene vinyl acetate) as a UV protector material for the polymer based high voltage composite polymeric insulator. The UV protection ability, induced by the δ-MnO2 nanosheet, was achieved without adversely affecting other properties of the formulated insulator compound material. The optimum properties of the composite were found to be obtained at 3 phr (three parts of δ-MnO2 nanosheet per hundred parts of polymer) loading of the nanosheet. The current work will promise to pave a new pathway for the generation of UV resistant high voltage power transmission line insulator materials. It would be interesting in the future to study the effect of incorporation of manganese dioxide based nanosheets on the UV

  16. Determination of Enthalpy Change of Reaction of Formation,Molar Heat Capacity and Constant-Volume Combustion Energy of the Ternary Solid Complex Lu(Et2dtc)3(phen)%Lu(Et2dtc)3(phen)的生成反应焓变、摩尔热容和恒容燃烧能测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛红光; 陈三平; 谢钢; 扬旭武; 高胜利; 史启祯

    2006-01-01

    A ternary solid complex Lu(Et2dtc)3(phen) has been obtained from the reaction of hydrated lutetiumchloride with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (NaEt2dtc), and 1,10-phenanthroline (o-phen·H2O) in absolute ethanol. IR spectrum of the complex indicates that Lu3+ binds with sulfur atom in the Na (Et2dtc)3 and nitrogen atom in the o-phen. The enthalpy change of liquid-phase reaction of formation of the complex, △rHm(-)(1), was determined to be (-32.821 ± 0.147 ) Kj·mol-1 at 298.15 K by an RD-496 Ⅲ type heat conduction microcalormeter. The enthalpy change of the solid-phase reaction of formation of the complex, △rHm(-) (s), was calculated to be (104.160 ± 0.168) Kj · mol-1 on the basis of an appropriate thermochemistry cycle. The thermodynamics of liquid-phase reaction of formation of the complex was investigated by changing the temperature of liquid-phase reaction. Fundamental parameters, such as the activation enthalpy (△H(-)≠), the activation entropy (△S(-)≠), the activation free energy (△G≠(-)), the apparent reaction rate constant (k), the apparent activation energy (E), the pre-exponential constant (A) and the reaction order (n), were obtained by combination the reaction thermodynamic and kinetic equations with the data of thermokinetic experiments. The molar heat capacity of the complex, cm, was determined to be (82.23 ± 1.47) J·mol-1·K-1 by the same microcalormeter. The constant-volume combustion energy of the complex, △Cu, was determined as (-17 898.228 ± 8.59) Kj·mol-1 by an RBC-Ⅱ type rotating-bomb calorimeter at 298.15 K. Its standard enthalpy of combustion, △cHm(-), and standard enthalpy of formation, △fHm(-), were calculated to be (-17 917.43 ± 8.11) Kj·mol-1 and (-859.95 ±10.12) Kj·mol-1, respectively.

  17. Effect of the environmental stimuli upon the human body in winter outdoor thermal environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondo, Emi; Ishii, Jin; Sakoi, Tomonori;

    2013-01-01

    the psychological thermal responses of the human body and winter outdoor thermal environment variables. Subjective experiments were conducted in the winter outdoor environment. Environmental factors and human psychological responses were measured. The relationship between the psychological thermal responses...... of the human body and the outdoor thermal environment index ETFe (enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature) in winter was shown. The variables which influence the thermal sensation vote of the human body are air temperature, long-wave thermal radiation and short-wave solar radiation....... The variables that influence the thermal comfort vote of the human body are air temperature, humidity, short-wave solar radiation, long-wave thermal radiation, and heat conduction. Short-wave solar radiation, and heat conduction are among the winter outdoor thermal environment variables that affect...

  18. Physical perfection of students of educational institutions law enforcement by means of outdoor games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutergin N.B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider the means and methods of use of outdoor games in physical perfection of students. Highlighted in the direction of professionally-applied physical skills of students. Proposed systematization of outdoor games. The brief content of the big games and the average mobility. Proposed themes and a summary of the single combat with the use of outdoor games. Particular consideration when choosing outdoor games should be given their focus on the development of skills to move freely on the carpet, the tackler and be free of seizures opponent chase the opponent. For strength training are recommended games that require short-term display of speed and power voltages of moderate load. For the development of endurance recommended games with multiple repetition of actions, with continuous motor activity.

  19. Hunting Plan: Amendment to conduct Becoming an Outdoors Woman Feral Hog Hunt

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the hog hunt plan for the Becoming an Outdoors Woman (BOW) program on St. Vincent NWR. The objective of the BOW hunt is to provide a quality hunting...

  20. An analysis of bioclimatic zones and implications for design of outdoor built environments in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Ayman Hassaan A. [Department of Architecture Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza 12211 (Egypt); Department of Architecture Engineering, The British University in Egypt, El-Sherouk City (Egypt)

    2011-03-15

    Climate considerations are essential dimensions in the assessment of quality of outdoor built environments. This paper provides an analysis of bioclimatic classification of Egypt to help the environmental design of wide range of purposes, including: climate responsive design; energy conservation and thermal comfort in the outdoor built environments. The analysis of this classification uses a bioclimatic approach in which the comfort zone and monthly climatic lines were determined and plotted on the psychrometric chart. Since the mean radiant temperature (T{sub mrt}) is the most important input parameter for the energy balance in outdoor environments, the charts apply the ASHRAE 55-2004 standard considering the operative temperature as a function of T{sub mrt}. Analysis for each bioclimatic zone determines the potential of passive design strategies to maintain thermal comfort in outdoor spaces and to contribute to energy efficient built environment. Finally, this study suggests a design guideline matrix for landscape architectural design for the different bioclimatic zones. (author)

  1. Outdoor advertising, obesity, and soda consumption: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent research has shown that neighborhood characteristics are associated with obesity prevalence. While food advertising in periodicals and television has been linked to overweight and obesity, it is unknown whether outdoor advertising is related to obesity. Methods To test the association between outdoor food advertising and obesity, we analyzed telephone survey data on adults, aged 18–98, collected from 220 census tracts in Los Angeles and Louisiana. We linked self-reported information on BMI and soda consumption with a database of directly observed outdoor advertisements. Results The higher the percentage of outdoor advertisements promoting food or non-alcoholic beverages within a census tract, the greater the odds of obesity among its residents, controlling for age, race and educational status. For every 10% increase in food advertising, there was a 1.05 (95% CI 1.003 - 1.093, padvertising and overweight/obesity. PMID:23305548

  2. Protection performance of some polyurethane surface systems on wood surface in outdoor conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özgenc

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different surface system applied oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L. were investigated resistance to the outdoor conditions of the test and control wood. Surface systems were compared as two different property polyurethane-based materials. Outdoor test has been implemented in Sürmene coastal, Uzungol and Hıdırnebi plateaus. Oriental spruce samples were compared based on the discoloration and reduction in fiber to parallel compressive strength in outdoor conditions. The weathering test in Hıdırnebi plateau was found at the lowest discoloration and reduction rate on compressive strength. According to the obtained results; polyester-based material, the oriental spruce wood against discoloration and reduction in compressive strength was determined at outdoor conditions is relatively well preserved

  3. Comparison of mold concentrations quantified by MSQPCR in indoor and outdoor air sampled simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meklin, Teija; Reponen, Tiina; McKinstry, Craig; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Grinshpun, Sergey A; Nevalainen, Aino; Vepsäläinen, Asko; Haugland, Richard A; Lemasters, Grace; Vesper, Stephen J

    2007-08-15

    Mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) was used to measure the concentrations of the 36 mold species in indoor and outdoor air samples that were taken simultaneously for 48 h in and around 17 homes in Cincinnati, Ohio. The total spore concentrations of 353 per m(3) of indoor air and 827 per m(3) of outdoor air samples were significantly different (pAspergillus penicillioides, Cladosporium cladosporioides types 1 and 2 and Cladosporium herbarum were correlated in indoor and outdoor air samples (p-valueor=0.5). These results suggest that interpretation of the meaning of short-term (<48 h) mold measurements in indoor and outdoor air samples must be made with caution.

  4. US EPA Base Study Standard Operating Procedure for Continuous Monitoring of Outdoor Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    The procedure described is intended for monitoring continuously and simultaneously outdoor air quality parameters that are most commonly associated with indoor air quality: the concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), temperature, nd relative humidity (RH).

  5. Living in the Real World--"Babies Get Out: Outdoor Settings for Infant Toddler Play."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Suggests advantages and design considerations for outdoor settings for babies. Climate, wildlife, equipment, and the needs and natures of both babies and caregivers are discussed. Provides ideas for landscape design and structures. (SH)

  6. Effects of bioaerosol polluted outdoor air on airways of residents: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, C.; zur Nieden, A; Jankofsky, M; Stilianakis, N; Boedeker, R; Eikmann, T

    2003-01-01

    Background: Bioaerosol pollution of workplace and home environments mainly affects airways and mucous membranes. The effect of environmental outdoor residential bioaerosol pollution, for example, livestock holdings, farming, and waste disposal plants, is unclear.

  7. Yeast-like fungi isolated from indoor air in school buildings and the surrounding outdoor air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Ejdys

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 111 isolates of yeast-like fungi and yeasts belonging to 40 species of 19 genera were identified in indoor air and outdoor air. Only one species, Kluyveromyces marxianus, was recorded in both types of air and seasons (spring and autumn. Kluyveromyces lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica, a species having the greatest symbiotic abilities, dominated in indoor air and outdoor air, respectively. Intensely used rooms, especially those with limited access of air, have the broadest range of species of yeast-like fungi. A comparison of both habitats shows that school rooms pose a greater epidemiological risk of yeast-like infections than outdoor air. The indoor as well as outdoor mycobiota undergoes phenological changes although it is determined by other biotic and abiotic factors.

  8. Reflective Practice as a Means for Preparing to Teach Outdoors in an Ecological Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Tali; Morag, Orly

    2009-06-01

    Although teachers are engaged in many field-trips, they seldom have the pedagogical knowledge and experience to enact them. This article presents an effort to support reflective practice of teachers in the outdoors. The teaching experience of five pre- and in-service teachers included preparation for teaching in the outdoors, designing learning materials, teaching elementary and junior-high school students in an ecogarden, and reflecting upon these teaching experiences. The data collected by teachers and researchers highlighted challenges such as lack of confidence, class management and inadequate student motivation. The group and the instructors’ support and collaboration and careful preparation yielded a positive outdoor teaching experience. We suggest that supported field experience followed by individual and group reflection are promising in encouraging teachers to carry out outdoor learning activities.

  9. Correlation between mechanical and chemical degradation after outdoor and accelerated laboratory aging for multilayer photovoltaic backsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiao-Chi; Lyu, Yadong; Yu, Li-Chieh; Gu, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    Channel cracking fragmentation testing and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy were utilized to study mechanical and chemical degradation of a multilayered backsheet after outdoor and accelerated laboratory aging. A model sample of commercial PPE backsheet, namely polyethylene terephthalate/polyethylene terephthalate/ethylene vinyl acetate (PET/PET/EVA) was investigated. Outdoor aging was performed in Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA for up to 510 days, and complementary accelerated laboratory aging was conducted on the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) SPHERE (Simulated Photodegradation via High Energy Radiant Exposure). Fracture energy, mode I stress intensity factor and film strength were analyzed using an analytical model based on channel cracking fragmentation testing results. The correlation between mechanical and chemical degradation was discussed for both outdoor and accelerated laboratory aging. The results of this work provide preliminary understanding on failure mechanism of backsheets after weathering, laying the groundwork for linking outdoor and indoor accelerated laboratory testing for multilayer photovoltaic backsheets.

  10. A cultural and comparative perspective on outdoor education in New Zealand and friluftsliv in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The paper is based on a comparative and qualitative case study of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Cultural analysis with a comparative cultural perspective informed the research approach. Configurational analysis was used as an important supplement to focus on cultural...... functionalism and personal relationships linked to identity. Outdoor education in New Zealand can generally be understood as a reproduction of political ideas and values in western liberal societies. Friluftsliv in Denmark exhibits complexity of forms and settings within outdoor education, with simple life...... patterns linked to bodily movement. It is argued that outdoor education in New Zealand is focused on action, risk and challenge, with personal development as the central pedagogical goal. There seems to be a general search for effectiveness and a special relationship to land and nature with both...

  11. Relationships of sun-protection habit strength with sunscreen use during outdoor sport and physical activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lawler, Sheleigh; McDermott, Liane; O'Riordan, David; Spathonis, Kym; Eakin, Elizabeth; Leslie, Evie; Gallois, Cindy; Berndt, Nadine; Owen, Neville

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional questionnaire study was to assess associations of a self-report index of sun protection habit strength with sunscreen use in sporting environments and outdoor physical activity. Participants (n = 234...

  12. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  13. Relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomichi Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Japanese cedar pollinosis (JCP is an important illness caused by the inhalation of airborne allergenic cedar pollens, which are dispersed in the early spring throughout the Japanese islands. However, associations between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of allergic symptoms are largely unknown, due to a lack of understanding regarding personal pollen exposures in relation to indoor and outdoor concentrations. This study aims to examine the relationships among indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne Japanese cedar pollen counts. We conducted a 4-year monitoring campaign to quantify indoor, outdoor, and personal airborne cedar pollen counts, where the personal passive settling sampler that has been previously validated against a volumetric sampler was used to count airborne pollen grains. A total of 256 sets of indoor, outdoor, and personal samples (768 samples were collected from 9 subjects. Medians of the seasonally-integrated indoor-to-outdoor, personal-to-outdoor, and personal-to-indoor ratios of airborne pollen counts measured for 9 subjects were 0.08, 0.10, and 1.19, respectively. A greater correlation was observed between the personal and indoor counts (r = 0.89 than between the personal and outdoor counts (r = 0.71, suggesting a potential inaccuracy in the use of outdoor counts as a basis for estimating personal exposures. The personal pollen counts differed substantially among the human subjects (49% geometric coefficient of variation, in part due to the variability in the indoor counts that have been found as major determinants of the personal pollen counts. The findings of this study highlight the need for pollen monitoring in proximity to human subjects to better understand the relationships between pollen exposures and the prevalence or severity of pollen allergy.

  14. Outdoor-indoor air pollution in urban environment: challenges and opportunity

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis Y.C. eLeung

    2015-01-01

    With the continual improvement in our quality of life, indoor air quality has become an important area of concern in the twenty-first century. Indoor air quality is affected by many factors including the type and running conditions of indoor pollution sources, ventilation conditions, as well as indoor activities. Studies revealed that the outdoor environment is also an important factor that cannot be neglected for indoor air quality studies. In this review, the indoor and outdoor air pollutio...

  15. Outdoor - budování týmů v organizaci

    OpenAIRE

    Štefanová, Tereza

    2008-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis deals with a form of outdoor method of teambuilding in organizations. The methodic part introduces a general conception of building teams including work and cooperation in teams, team roles and teams within organizations. In conclusion the main concept of teambuilding is outlined trough the use of experience education. The practical part is dedicated to particular forms of outdoor programs in the Czech Republic and their influence over team members with response to rope...

  16. Resilience of Outdoor Spaces in an Era of Climate Change: The Problem of Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Hatuka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper recommends expanding research on the interrelations between climate change, cities, culture and the way climate change influences participants’ thermal, emotional and perceptual well-being in public spaces as a key step in developing contextual design codes for outdoor public spaces. Proposing a general framework to address climate challenges in developing countries, the paper advocates focusing on the developing world, where outdoor spaces are extremely vulnerable and available studies are scarce.

  17. Outdoor surviving experiment with three green house enchytraeid species (Oligochaeta: Enchytraeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boros, G.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Some enchytraeid species of tropical, subtropical or Mediterranean origin can appear in artificial environments,e.g. green houses due to the worldwide commercial network. Since the used soil from green houses is often disposed outdoors, aquestion raised that these exotic enchytraeid species could survive under continental climate conditions. In this experiment two ofthe resettled green house species survived outdoors the winter frost and the arid summer season in Hungary.

  18. Outdoor-indoor air pollution in urban environment: Challenges and opportunity

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis Y.C. eLeung

    2015-01-01

    With the continual improvement in our quality of life, indoor air quality has become an important area of concern in the twenty-first century. Indoor air quality is affected by many factors including the type and running conditions of indoor pollution sources, ventilation conditions, as well as indoor activities. Studies revealed that the outdoor environment is also an important factor that cannot be neglected for indoor air quality studies. In this review, the indoor and outdoor air pollutio...

  19. Comparison of mold concentrations quantified by MSQPCR in indoor and outdoor air sampled simultaneously

    OpenAIRE

    Meklin, Teija; Reponen, Tiina; McKinstry, Craig; Cho, Seung-Hyun; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Nevalainen, Aino; Vepsäläinen, Asko; Haugland, Richard A.; LeMasters, Grace; Vesper, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) was used to measure the concentrations of the 36 mold species in indoor and outdoor air samples that were taken simultaneously for 48 h in and around 17 homes in Cincinnati, Ohio. The total spore concentrations of 353 per m3 of indoor air and 827 per m3 of outdoor air samples were significantly different (p≤0.05). However, only the concentrations of Aspergillus penicillioides, Cladosporium cladosporioides types 1 and 2 and Cladosporium herbarum were cor...

  20. Sampling Outdoor, Resting Anopheles gambiae and Other Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in Western Kenya with Clay Pots

    OpenAIRE

    Odiere, M.; Bayoh, M. N.; Gimnig, J; Vulule, J; Irungu, L.; Walker, E.

    2007-01-01

    Clay pots were analyzed as devices for sampling the outdoor resting fraction of Anopheles gambiae Giles (Diptera: Culicidae) and other mosquito species in a rural, western Kenya. Clay pots (Anopheles gambiae resting pots, herein AgREPOTs), outdoor pit shelters, indoor pyrethrum spray collections (PSC), and Colombian curtain exit traps were compared in collections done biweekly for nine intervals from April to June 2005 in 20 housing compounds. Of 10,517 mosquitoes sampled, 4,668 An. gambiae s...

  1. [Particulate matter and atmospheric pollutants exposure for outdoor workers in the Muggia area (Trieste, Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Ranieri; Barbieri, Pierluigi; Cozzutto, Sergio; Barbieri, Gianpiero; Sist, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Urban air pollution originates from traffic, heating and industrial activities and it exposes several categories of workers to noxious chemicals; in recent years various surveys have been carried on taxi drivers, bus drivers, policemen, newspaper kiosks, fuel station workers and general population, for assessing exposure to main contaminants, benzene and PAHs in particular. defining a specific sampling strategy for collecting an experimental data base for the assessment of potential population exposure to atmospheric particulate matter in the Muggia area (Trieste, North-East Italy). A sample of 14 urban police officers working mainly on the roads and potentially subject to occupational exposure has been analyzed, as well as a sample of the municipal administrative personnel (13 people) working in indoor environments during the same sampling periods. Exposure has been monitored by personal samplers and high volume environmental samples; urinary levels of 1 OH-pyrene and creatinine were collected for each participant at the end of each sampling period. PAHs analyses provided diagnostic ratios for identification of the sources of pollution. In general experimental BaP values stay below the environmental target value, with satisfactory agreement between environmental and personal monitoring. Levels of urinary 1 OH-pyrene for administrative personnel was detected always below the background value (0.089 micromoles/mole creatinine), while they are above the background and below the attention value for most of urban police officers. Municipal police officers participating to the present study, while belonging to one of the categories of people most exposed to outdoor PM, do not show any worrying exposure to the considered chemicals associated to their occupational activity, in comparison to other factors, possibly associated to personal lifestyles.

  2. Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2006-06-01

    We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

  3. Parallax Park - A bilingual, outdoor, interactive family exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, M. K.; Benedict, G. F.; Preston, S. L.; Armosky, B. J.; Cianciolo, F. W., Jr.; Wetzel, M. N.; Freeman, R.; Ransenberg, A.

    2004-12-01

    We present a design for Parallax Park, an outdoor, interactive family exhibit for McDonald Observatory that will bring the quest for learning about extra-solar planets and the astronomical distance ladder down to Earth for the more than 100,000 visitors who come to the Observatory each year. The Park will teach visitors the basic principles of astrometry. It will concentrate on distance determination and extrasolar planet detection, and emphasize the advantages of space-based astrometric measurements. Visitors will experience parallax by traveling a path around a representation of the Sun, mimicking Earth's orbit, while viewing representations of stars at various distances and in various directions. Concepts include Cepheids as standard candles, the inverse square law, and motion around a center of mass. The exhibit includes interactive components suitable for children's use. Text labels and printed guides, in English and Spanish, will explain how to use the Park to explore the uses of astrometry in modern science. This program was made possible through funding from the Hubble Space Telescope Cycle 11 and 12 Education and Public Outreach Grant Programs. Support from the NASA/JPL Space Interferometry Mission (JPL contract #1227563) is also gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Control and protection of outdoor embedded camera for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, F.; Jegouzo, I.; Gaudemard, J.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of CABERNET- Podet-Met (CAmera BEtter Resolution NETwork, Pole sur la Dynamique de l'Environnement Terrestre - Meteor) project is the automated observation, by triangulation with three cameras, of meteor showers to perform a calculation of meteoroids trajectory and velocity. The scientific goal is to search the parent body, comet or asteroid, for each observed meteor. To install outdoor cameras in order to perform astronomy measurements for several years with high reliability requires a very specific design for the box. For these cameras, this contribution shows how we fulfilled the various functions of their boxes, such as cooling of the CCD, heating to melt snow and ice, the protecting against moisture, lightning and Solar light. We present the principal and secondary functions, the product breakdown structure, the technical solutions evaluation grid of criteria, the adopted technology products and their implementation in multifunction subsets for miniaturization purpose. To manage this project, we aim to get the lowest manpower and development time for every part. In appendix, we present the measurements the image quality evolution during the CCD cooling, and some pictures of the prototype.

  5. An outdoor test facility for the Cherenkov Telescope Array mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Medina, M C; Maya, J; Mancilla, A; Larrarte, J J; Rasztocky, E; Benitez, M; Dipold, J; Platino, M

    2013-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescopes Array (CTA) is planned to be an Observatory for very high energy gamma ray astronomy and will consist of several tens of telescopes which account for a reflective surface of more than 10000 m$^2$. The mirrors of these telescopes will be formed by a set of facets. Different technological solutions, for a fast and cost efficient production of light-weight mirror facets are under test inside the CTA Consortium. Most of them involve composite structures whose behavior under real observing conditions is not yet fully tested. An outdoor test facility has been built in one of the candidate sites for CTA, in Argentina (San Antonio de los Cobres [SAC], 3600m a.s.l) in order to monitor the optical and mechanical properties of these facets exposed to the local atmospheric conditions for a given period of time. In this work we present the preliminary results of the first Middle Size Telescope (MST) mirror-monitoring campaign, started in 2013.

  6. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2009-04-16

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  7. Long Term Outdoor Testing of Low Concentration Solar Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraas, Lewis; Avery, James; Minkin, Leonid; Huang, H. X.; Hebrink, Tim; Hurt, Rik; Boehm, Robert

    2011-12-01

    A 1-axis carousel tracker equipped with four 3-sun low-concentration mirror modules has now been under test outdoors at the University of Nevada in Las Vegas (UNLV) for three years. There are three unique features associated with this unit. First, simple linear mirrors are used to reduce the amount of expensive single crystal silicon in order to potentially lower the module cost while potentially maintaining cell efficiencies over 20% and high module efficiency. Simple linear mirrors also allow the use of a single axis tracker. Second, the azimuth carousel tracker is also unique allowing trackers to be used on commercial building rooftops. Third, an experiment is underway comparing aluminum based mirrors with novel 3M Company multilayer polymeric mirrors which are potentially very low cost. Comparing the data from March of 2008 through March of 2011 shows that the aluminum mirror degradation to date is negligible and that the carousel tracker has been operating continuously and reliable. Also, no degradation has been observed for the 3M brand cool mirrors after one year in use.

  8. Parallax Park - A Bilingual, Outdoor, Interactive Family Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, G. F.; Parallax Park Design Team

    2005-10-01

    Parallax Park will be an outdoor, interactive family exhibit for McDonald Observatory. It will bring the quest for extra-solar planets and the astronomical distance scale down to Earth for the more than 100,000 visitors who come to the Observatory each year. The Park will teach visitors the basic principles of astrometry. It will concentrate on distance determination and extrasolar planet detection, and emphasize the advantages of space-based astrometry measurements. Visitors will experience parallax by traveling a path around a representation of the Sun, mimicking Earth's orbit, while viewing representations of stars at various distances and in various directions. Concepts include parallax, Cepheids as standard candles, the inverse square law, and motion around a center of mass. The exhibit includes interactive components suitable for children's use. Text labels and printed guides, in English and Spanish, will explain how to use the Park to explore the uses of astrometry in modern science. In addition auxiliary educational materials that align with the National Science Education Standards will be produced.

  9. Obstacle detection in range-image sequence for outdoor navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduno, M.; Vachon, Bertrand

    1994-08-01

    We deal with the conception of a perception system that's goal is to assist a mobile robot teleoperator by providing pertinent information about eventual obstacles appearing in the robot work space. This range image based perception system is to be embedded on a vehicle able to move at speeds up to 40 km/h in an outdoor environment. A method taking speed constraints into account is proposed. In the first step of this method, a segmentation algorithm is applied to the first range image scanned by the motionless robot to determine areas of interest. From these areas, distinctive attributes are computed and recorded as symbolic representations of each obstacle region. In the second and following steps, obstacles are localized in images scanned during robot motion. The difference between actual object position in the range image and its predicted value is used by an extended Kalman filter to correct the estimated robot configuration. A dynamic image segmentation using emergency and security criteria is carried out and new obstacles can now be detected from the range image and expressed in the robot coordinates system.

  10. Quantitative ultraviolet skin exposure in children during selected outdoor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, S K; Rosenthal, F S; Luckmann, R; Lew, R A

    1991-06-01

    We determined the cumulative exposure of 3 body sites to ultraviolet radiation from sunlight for 126 children observed from 1-3 d during a variety of common recreational activities at a girl scout camp, baseball camp and community baseball field. Median arm exposure to children playing baseball at a camp ranged from 27.6% to 33.2% of the possible ambient exposure. These exposures are similar to adult exposures reported for comparable activities. Median exposure to the arm at the girl scout camp during mixed activities ranged from 9.0% to 26.5% of possible ambient exposure. At the girl scout camp, exposure both within and between activity groups varied substantially and were more variable than the baseball players' exposure. Arm exposure was greater than cheek and forehead exposure for all subject groups, with an arm-to-cheek exposure ratio ranging from 1.7 to 2.3. For organized sports, such as baseball, it may be possible to assign a single exposure estimate for use in epidemiologic studies or risk estimates. However, for less uniform outdoor activities, wide variability in exposure makes it more difficult to predict an individual's exposure.

  11. Outdoor field experience with autonomous RPC based stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, L.; Assis, P.; Blanco, A.; Carolino, N.; Cerda, M. A.; Conceição, R.; Cunha, O.; Ferreira, M.; Fonte, P.; Luz, R.; Mendes, L.; Pereira, A.; Pimenta, M.; Sarmento, R.; Tomé, B.

    2016-09-01

    In the last two decades Resistive Plate Chambers were employed in the Cosmic Ray Experiments COVER-PLASTEX and ARGO/YBJ. In both experiments the detectors were housed indoors, likely owing to gas distribution requirements and the need to control environment variables that directly affect RPCs operational stability. But in experiments where Extended Air Shower (EAS) sampling is necessary, large area arrays composed by dispersed stations are deployed, rendering this kind of approach impossible. In this situation, it would be mandatory to have detectors that could be deployed in small standalone stations, with very rare opportunities for maintenance, and with good resilience to environmental conditions. Aiming to meet these requirements, we started some years ago the development of RPCs for Autonomous Stations. The results from indoor tests and measurements were very promising, both concerning performance and stability under very low gas flow rate, which is the main requirement for Autonomous Stations. In this work we update the indoor results and show the first ones concerning outdoor stable operation. In particular, a dynamic adjustment of the high voltage is applied to keep gas gain constant.

  12. Free recall and outdoor running: cognitive and physical demand interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epling, Samantha L; Blakely, Megan J; Russell, Paul N; Helton, William S

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive resource theory is a proposed explanation for people's limited ability to perform multiple tasks simultaneously. Reallocation of a restricted supply of cognitive resources to two or more tasks may be detrimental to performance on one or both tasks. Many professionals in high-risk fields, such as those engaged in firefighting, military, and search and rescue missions, face simultaneous mental and physical demands, yet little is known about the resources required to move over the natural terrain these operators may encounter. In the present research, we investigated whether interference was found between outdoor running and a word recall task. As hypothesized, a reduction in word recall was observed in the dual task compared to a recall-alone task; however, the distance run was not significantly different between the dual task and the run-alone task. Subjective reports of workload, task focus, and being "spent" (measures calculated from responses on a questionnaire) were greatest in the dual task. These results support the cognitive resource theory and have important theoretical and practical implications. Further research is required to better understand the type and extent of cognitive resources required by such physical tasks and the potential interference with simultaneous mental tasks.

  13. Outdoor play in children: associations with objectively-measured physical activity, sedentary behavior and weight status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Michelle R; Faulkner, Guy E J

    2014-08-01

    To determine the amount of time children play outdoors and examine associations with weekday, weekend and after-school physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior (SB), and weight-status (normal-weight, overweight/obese). Data were extracted from Project BEAT (Toronto, 2010-2011; www.beat.utoronto.ca). Children's (n=856; mean age=11±0.6years) PA and SB were measured using accelerometry. Outdoor play (OP) was assessed via parental report and collapsed into three categories (2h/day) and differences in anthropometric and PA characteristics were assessed. 55.1%, 37.2%, and 7.7% of children played outdoors for 2h/day, respectively, on weekdays. OP was higher on weekends and in boys. OP was associated with SB, light PA and MVPA at all time-points, whereby children attaining activity profiles. Boys playing outdoors for overweight/obese and had lower PA levels than normal weight boys. However, overweight/obese boys who spent >2h/day playing outdoors had PA profiles similar to normal weight counterparts. Encouraging children to spend more time outdoors may be an effective strategy for increasing PA, reducing SB, and preventing excess weight gain (particularly boys' play). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inverse associations of outdoor activity and vitamin D intake with the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Liu, Gui-you; Lv, Zheng; Wen, Shi-rong; Bi, Sheng; Wang, Wei-zhi

    2014-10-01

    Early studies had suggested that vitamin D intake was inversely associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. However, the associations of vitamin D intake and outdoor activities with Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear, so this study is to evaluate these relationships from a case-control study in elderly Chinese. The study population involved 209 cases with new onsets of PD and 210 controls without neurodegenerative diseases. The data on dietary vitamin D and outdoor activities were collected using a food-frequency questionnaire and self-report questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between dietary outdoor activities, vitamin D intake and PD. Adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, alcohol use, education, and body mass index (BMI). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for PD in quartiles for outdoor physical activity were 1 (reference), 0.739 (0.413, 1.321), 0.501 (0.282, 0.891), and 0.437 (0.241, 0.795), respectively (P=0.002 for trend). Adjusted ORs for PD in quartiles for total vitamin D intake were 1 (reference), 0.647 (0.357, 1.170), 0.571 (0.318, 1.022), and 0.538 (0.301, 0.960), respectively (P=0.011 for trend). Our study suggested that outdoor activity and total vitamin D intake were inversely associated with PD, and outdoor activity seems to be more significantly associated with decreased risk for PD.

  15. Modeling indoor air pollution of outdoor origin in homes of SAPALDIA subjects in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Eeftens, Marloes; Aguilera, Inmaculada; Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Ineichen, Alex; Davey, Mark; Phuleria, Harish C; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Künzli, Nino

    2015-09-01

    Given the shrinking spatial contrasts in outdoor air pollution in Switzerland and the trends toward tightly insulated buildings, the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) needs to understand to what extent outdoor air pollution remains a determinant for residential indoor exposure. The objectives of this paper are to identify determining factors for indoor air pollution concentrations of particulate matter (PM), ultrafine particles in the size range from 15 to 300nm, black smoke measured as light absorbance of PM (PMabsorbance) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and to develop predictive indoor models for SAPALDIA. Multivariable regression models were developed based on indoor and outdoor measurements among homes of selected SAPALDIA participants in three urban (Basel, Geneva, Lugano) and one rural region (Wald ZH) in Switzerland, various home characteristics and reported indoor sources such as cooking. Outdoor levels of air pollutants were important predictors for indoor air pollutants, except for the coarse particle fraction. The fractions of outdoor concentrations infiltrating indoors were between 30% and 66%, the highest one was observed for PMabsorbance. A modifying effect of open windows was found for NO2 and the ultrafine particle number concentration. Cooking was associated with increased particle and NO2 levels. This study shows that outdoor air pollution remains an important determinant of residential indoor air pollution in Switzerland.

  16. Improvement of Soil and Water Conservation Outdoor Classrooms and Volunteers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. L.; Lin, Y. H.; Huang, K. F.; Chan, H. C.

    2016-12-01

    In order to improve the knowledge and understanding of soil and water conservation, the Soil and Water Conservation Bureau, Taiwan sets up soil and water conservation outdoor classrooms and assigns volunteers for on-site commentating. There are 19 soil and water conservation outdoor classrooms and 483 volunteers. In order to intergate education resource and improve quality, the examination of outdoor classrooms and training of the volunteers were conducted. The training programs aimed to improve the standard of living, promote a general mood of voluntary service, and encourage the public to cultivate the value of hometown-treasuring and the sentiment of people-helping. The service system of volunteers was also organized through the training programs. The assessments of soil and water conservation outdoor classrooms were conducted through the on-site investigations. The improvement suggestions were then put forward according to the characteristics of the classrooms. The improvement contents were compiled for each outdoor classroom and there are five common suggestions depicted as follows: 1. the expectations of internationalization; 2. the issues of land leases; 3. improvement of traffic flow; 4. the format and information of explanation boards should be unified; and 5. the issues of facility maintaining. Key words: Soil and water conserveation, Volunteer, Outdoor classroom.

  17. Comparison of Degradation on Aluminum Reflectors for Solar Collectors due to Outdoor Exposure and Accelerated Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Wette

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reflectors for concentrated solar thermal technologies need to withstand 20 or even 30 years of outdoor exposure without significant loss of solar specular reflectance. In order to test the durability of innovative reflectors within a shorter period of time, an accelerated aging methodology is required. The problem with accelerated testing is that poor correlation between laboratory and field test results has been achieved in the past. This is mainly because unrealistic degradation mechanisms are accelerated in the weathering chambers. In order to define a realistic testing procedure, a high number of accelerated aging tests have been performed on differently coated aluminum reflectors. The degradation mechanisms of the accelerated tests have been classified and systematically compared to samples that have been exposed at nine different exposure sites outdoors. Besides the standardized aging tests, innovative aging procedures have been developed in such way that the agreement to the degradation pattern observed outdoors is increased. Although degradation depends on materials and location, five generic degradation mechanisms were detected. Standardized tests only reproduced one or two of the five mechanisms detected outdoors. Additionally, several degradation effects that were not observed outdoors appeared. The innovative accelerated aging tests of artificially soiled samples were able to reproduce three of the five mechanisms observed outdoors, presenting a much more realistic overall degradation pattern.

  18. The Relationship between Outdoor Activity and Health in Older Adults Using GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Buchner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity (PA provides health benefits in older adults. Research suggests that exposure to nature and time spent outdoors may also have effects on health. Older adults are the least active segment of our population, and are likely to spend less time outdoors than other age groups. The relationship between time spent in PA, outdoor time, and various health outcomes was assessed for 117 older adults living in retirement communities. Participants wore an accelerometer and GPS device for 7 days. They also completed assessments of physical, cognitive, and emotional functioning. Analyses of variance were employed with a main and interaction effect tested for ±30 min PA and outdoor time. Significant differences were found for those who spent >30 min in PA or outdoors for depressive symptoms, fear of falling, and self-reported functioning. Time to complete a 400 m walk was significantly different by PA time only. QoL and cognitive functioning scores were not significantly different. The interactions were also not significant. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the feasibility of using accelerometer and GPS data concurrently to assess PA location in older adults. Future analyses will shed light on potential causal relationships and could inform guidelines for outdoor activity.

  19. Analysis of colors used on outdoor advertising in urban landscape: a case study in Osaka city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mika; Fujibayashi, Kazumi; Shimonaka, Tomomi; Sato, Masako; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2002-06-01

    This is a case study for practical survey and assessment of urban landscapes containing outdoor advertisements in Osaka City, Japan. We practically surveyed and analyzed the colors used on the outdoor advertisements in the three urban areas: the business area long the main street, the amusement area along the shopping street, and the station plaza in front of the railroad terminal. Further by the laboratory experiments, we examined the interrelation between the atmosphere of the area and the impression arising from the outdoor advertisements using the pictures of street scenes on video monitor. In this experiment, eye movements of each subject observing the scene were analyzed by eye point recorder. (1) In general, vivid red, yellow, green and blue, and white and black were frequently used on the outdoor advertisements in every area. (2) The character of each area was respectively found out by analysis of the following factors: the type of advertisement, the size of each advertisement, and the arrangement of the advertisements. Vivid colors on the outdoor advertisements could be clearly perceived even from a distance. Then, our eyes would be attracted by vivid colors of them. (4) The atmosphere of the area would be affected by favorable or unfavorable impression from the outdoor advertisements. For instance, on the main street, the advertisements would impress us favorably if they are in harmony with each other and create an orderly and elegant streetscape. On the shopping street, various advertisements would impress us favorably if they create a lively and cheerful streetscape.

  20. CHARACTERIZATIONS AND RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OUTDOOR AND INDOOR BIOAEROSOLS IN AN OFFICE BUILDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhu; Patrick Phelan; Tianhua Duan; Gregory Raupp; H. J. S. Fernando

    2003-01-01

    Characterizations and relationships between indoor and outdoor bioaerosols were examined in an occupied office building, equipped with an air conditioning (HVAC) system, in Tempe, Arizona, USA. A two-stage microbial air sampler was used to collect bioaerosols both inside and outside the office at fixed locations in space and at regular time intervals from August to December, 2000. Simultaneous measurements of bioaerosol, temperature, relative humidity,light intensity and wind speed were performed to explore the effects of environmental factors on bioaerosol levels.Twenty species of airborne bacteria and four genera of airborne fungi were found in our samples. The particle sizes of most outdoor and indoor bioaerosols were larger than 8.0 μm. According to the measurements of sampling days, the concentrations of outdoor bioaerosols were highest in the morning, but declined in the afternoon and reached the lowest point in the evening. The concentration peak of indoor bioaerosol (especially at the lower level) occurred in the evening,suggesting that the concentration of indoor bioaerosols follows that of outdoors, but with a time delay due to the lag associated with indoor-outdoor air exchange. With regard to the effects of four environmental factors - temperature, relative humidity, light intensity, and wind speed, the relative humidity had the most pronounced influence on the outdoor bioaerosol concentrations with the number of bacteria and fungi increasing sharply on a day of high relative humidity in the desert area.