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Sample records for volume iv cost

  1. Culture of Schools. Final Report. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Anthropological Association, Washington, DC.

    The final volume of this 4-volume report contains further selections from "Anthropological Perspectives on Education," a monograph to be published by Basic Books of New York. (Other selections are in Vol. III, SP 003 902.) Monograph selections appearing in this volume are: "Great Tradition, Little Tradition, and Formal Education;""Indians,…

  2. New Trends in Mathematics Teaching, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, H. G., Ed.; Christiansen, Bent, Ed.

    This volume is largely based upon the preparation for and proceedings of the Third International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME) held in Karlsruhe, Federal Republic of Germany, in August 1976. The volume deals with 13 broad themes of general educational interest for mathematics teachers and educators. Six of these themes divided the…

  3. Jail Removal Cost Study. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    This second volume of the jail removal cost study provides a detailed report of the study findings which examine the costs, experiences, and ramifications of removing children from adult jails and lockups. The foreword supplies background information and hypothetical removal cost estimates. The approach used to conduct the jail removal cost study…

  4. OTEC SKSS preliminary designs. Volume IV. Appendixes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ,

    1980-02-29

    This volume contains appendices to the Station Keeping Subsystem design study for the 40 MeW Modular Experiment OTEC platforms. Appendices presented include: detailed drag calculations; sample CALMS computer printouts for SPAR and BARGE static analyses; sample time domain computer printouts (Hydromechanics, Inc.) program; extreme value and fatigue load calculations; anchor design calculations; deployment calculations; bottom slope plots; time domain analysis report by Hydromechanics Inc.; detailed cost analysis; control systems study report by Sperry Systems Management; cost estimates for model basin tests; and hydrodynamic loading on the mooring cables. (WHK)

  5. Hospitalization Costs for Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery Treated With Intravenous Acetaminophen (IV-APAP) Plus Other IV Analgesics or IV Opioid Monotherapy for Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiese, Brett A; Pham, An T; Shah, Manasee V; Eaddy, Michael T; Lunacsek, Orsolya E; Wan, George J

    2017-02-01

    To assess the impact on hospitalization costs of multimodal analgesia (MMA), including intravenous acetaminophen (IV-APAP), versus IV opioid monotherapy for postoperative pain management in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Utilizing the Truven Health MarketScan(®) Hospital Drug Database (HDD), patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA), total hip arthroplasty (THA), or surgical repair of hip fracture between 1/1/2011 and 8/31/2014 were separated into postoperative pain management groups: MMA with IV-APAP plus other IV analgesics (IV-APAP group) or an IV opioid monotherapy group. All patients could have received oral analgesics. Baseline characteristics and total hospitalization costs were compared. Additionally, an inverse probability treatment weighting [IPTW] with propensity scores analysis further assessed hospitalization cost differences. The IV-APAP group (n = 33,954) and IV opioid monotherapy group (n = 110,300) differed significantly (P opioid monotherapy group (US$12,540 ± $9564 vs. $13,242 ± $35,825; P opioid monotherapy. This difference was driven by medical costs; importantly, there was no difference in pharmacy costs. Generalizability of the results may be limited to patients admitted to hospitals similar to those included in HDD. Dosing could not be determined, so it was not possible to quantify utilization of IV-APAP or ascertain differences in opioid consumption between the 2 groups. This study did not account for healthcare utilization post-discharge.

  6. Comparative Analysis of Inpatient Costs for Obstetrics and Gynecology Surgery Patients Treated With IV Acetaminophen and IV Opioids Versus IV Opioid-only Analgesia for Postoperative Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ryan N; Pham, An T; Lovelace, Belinda; Balaban, Stela; Wan, George J

    2017-06-01

    Recovery from obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) surgery, including hysterectomy and cesarean section delivery, aims to restore function while minimizing hospital length of stay (LOS) and medical expenditures. Our analyses compare OB/GYN surgery patients who received combination intravenous (IV) acetaminophen and IV opioid analgesia with those who received IV opioid-only analgesia and estimate differences in LOS, hospitalization costs, and opioid consumption. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Premier Database between January 2009 and June 2015, comparing OB/GYN surgery patients who received postoperative pain management with combination IV acetaminophen and IV opioids with those who received only IV opioids starting on the day of surgery and continuing up to the second postoperative day. We performed instrumental variable 2-stage least-squares regressions controlling for patient and hospital covariates to compare the LOS, hospitalization costs, and daily opioid doses (morphine equivalent dose) of IV acetaminophen recipients with that of opioid-only analgesia patients. We identified 225 142 OB/GYN surgery patients who were eligible for our study of whom 89 568 (40%) had been managed with IV acetaminophen and opioids. Participants averaged 36 years of age and were predominantly non-Hispanic Caucasians (60%). Multivariable regression models estimated statistically significant differences in hospitalization cost and opioid use with IV acetaminophen associated with $484.4 lower total hospitalization costs (95% CI = -$760.4 to -$208.4; P = 0.0006) and 8.2 mg lower daily opioid use (95% CI = -10.0 to -6.4), whereas the difference in LOS was not significant, at -0.09 days (95% CI = -0.19 to 0.01; P = 0.07). Compared with IV opioid-only analgesia, managing post-OB/GYN surgery pain with the addition of IV acetaminophen is associated with decreased hospitalization costs and reduced opioid use.

  7. Cost of heliostats in low volume production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumheller, K.; Williams, T. A.; Dilbeck, R. A.; Allison, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    This study indicates that in small volumes, heliostats can be produced at an installed cost of approximately 200 $/M/sup 2/ for a 49.053 m/sup 2/ heliostat. Initial one-time costs of $10 to $15 million would be required, although part of the one-time costs are recoverable. This study provides estimated costs of heliostats that are produced in a plant operating on a continuous basis for a period of four years at a production rate of 2,500 heliostats per year. This scenario was selected somewhat arbitrarily as a scenario that could lead to heliostat market of 5,000 to 10,000 units per year.

  8. Capital Cost: Pressurized Water Reactor Plant Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139-MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume includes in addition to the foreword and summary, the plant description and the detailed cost estimate.

  9. Albanian: Basic Course. Volume IV, Lessons 37-46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This fourth of ten volumes of audiolingual classroom instruction in Albanian for adult students treats Albanian grammar, syntax, and usage in a series of exercises consisting of grammar perception drills, grammar analysis, translation exercises, readings, question-and-answer exercises, and dialogues illustrating specific grammatical features. A…

  10. Cost analysis of surgically treated pressure sores stage III and IV.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filius, A.; Damen, T.H.; Schuijer-Maaskant, K.P.; Polinder, S.; Hovius, S.E.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Health-care costs associated with pressure sores are significant and their financial burden is likely to increase even further. The aim of this study was to analyse the direct medical costs of hospital care for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV. We performed a retrospective chart

  11. Cost analysis of surgically treated pressure sores stage III and IV.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filius, A.; Damen, T.H.; Schuijer-Maaskant, K.P.; Polinder, S.; Hovius, S.E.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Health-care costs associated with pressure sores are significant and their financial burden is likely to increase even further. The aim of this study was to analyse the direct medical costs of hospital care for surgical treatment of pressure sores stage III and IV. We performed a retrospective chart

  12. The Impact of Individual Surgeon Volume on Hysterectomy Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.; Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Lee, Ted; Bonidie, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures women will undergo in their lifetime. Several factors affect surgical outcomes. It has been suggested that high-volume surgeons favorably affect outcomes and hospital cost. The objective is to determine the impact of individual surgeon volume on total hospital costs for hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications from 2011 to 2013 at 10 hospitals within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center System. Cases that included concomitant procedures were excluded. Costs by surgeon volume were analyzed by tertile group and with linear regression. Results: We studied 5,961 hysterectomies performed by 257 surgeons: 41.5% laparoscopic, 27.9% abdominal, 18.3% vaginal, and 12.3% robotic. Surgeons performed 1–542 cases (median = 4, IQR = 1–24). Surgeons were separated into equal tertiles by case volume: low (1–2 cases; median total cost, $4,349.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] [$3,903.54–$4,845.34]), medium (3–15 cases; median total cost, $2,807.90; 95% CI [$2,693.71–$2,926.93]) and high (>15 cases, median total cost $2,935.12, 95% CI [$2,916.31–$2,981.91]). ANOVA analysis showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in cost from low-to-medium– and low-to-high–volume surgeons. Linear regression showed a significant linear relationship (P < .001), with a $1.15 cost reduction per case with each additional hysterectomy. Thus, if a surgeon performed 100 cases, costs were $115 less per case (100 × $1.15), for a total savings of $11,500.00 (100 × $115). Conclusion: Overall, in our models, costs decreased as surgeon volume increased. Low-volume surgeons had significantly higher costs than both medium- and high-volume surgeons.

  13. Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems – Volume IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Duić

    2016-12-01

    In total 32 manuscripts were published in Volume IV, all of them reviewed by at least two reviewers. The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems would like to thank reviewers for their contribution to the quality of the published manuscripts.

  14. Low Cost Motor Demonstration Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-02-01

    by filament winding showed the best cost advantage and lowest development risk. Progress of the newer braided composite technology bears ...turning and machinability indices are usually based upon that qutlity of a material. The low grade carbon steels tend to be somewhat soft and gummy in an

  15. Least Cost Test Profile. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    16 0 FORDING 4.6.32 * 2,500 3 19ROOF ACCESS STEPS 4.6.28 200 1 16 DROPS 4.6.23 0 16 24 0 DOES NOT IN- CLUDE COST OF EMI DUMMY LOADS. SUPPRESSION...Adks, 0.L and ,aWe em, J.C., "niouveB Sonding fwr Sheltems," University * ~~Of ORYto Rsearch Institute Interim Technsical Report. Contract Mse. F=1S

  16. Low-cost, High Flexibility I-V Curve Tracer for Photovoltaic Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibirriaga, Julen Joseba Maestro; Pena, Xabier Miquelez de Mendiluce; Opritescu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the design, construction and test of an in-door low cost, high flexibility I-V curve tracer for photovoltaic modules. The tracer is connected to a Xenon lamp based flashing solar simulator. The designed tracer is able to deal with the very fast changing irradiation conditions...... and its control software offers the flexibility to automatically adapt to the different irradiation conditions set by the flashing solar simulator. Simulation and experimental tests have been carried out, in order to verify the behaviour and performance of the designed I-V curve tracer....

  17. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume IV - Hydrologic Parameter Data Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-09-01

    Volume IV of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the hydrologic parameter data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  18. FORMALIZING PRODUCT COST DISTORTION: The Impact of Volume-Related Allocation Bases on Cost Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Jermias

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose o f this study is to formally analyze product cost distortions resulting from the process of allocating costs to products based on Activity-Based Costing (ABC and the conventional product costing systems. The model developed in this paper rigorously shows the impact of treating costs that are not volume related as if they are. The model demonstrates that the source of product cost distortion is the difference between the proportion of driver used by each product in ABC and the proportion of the base used by the same product in the conventional costing systems. The difference arises because the conventional costing systems ignore the existence of batch-related and product-related costs. The model predicts a positive association between volume and size diversity with product cost distortions. When interaction between volume and size diversity exists, the distortion is either mitigated or exacerbated. The magnitude of the distortion is jointly determined by the size of the differences and the size of the total indirect costs.

  19. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 3: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This volume contains information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the six options described in Volume 1, Section 2: Option 1 -- Total removal clean closure; No subsequent use; Option 2 -- Risk-based clean closure; LLW fill; Option 3 -- Risk-based clean closure; CERCLA fill; Option 4 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; LLW fill; Option 5 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; CERCLA fill; and Option 6 -- Close to RCRA landfill standards; Clean fill. This volume is divided into two portions. The first portion contains the cost and planning schedule estimates while the second portion contains life-cycle costs and yearly cash flow information for each option.

  20. World Energy Data System (WENDS). Volume IV. Country data, SG-YO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-06-01

    The World Energy Data System contains organized data on those countries and international organizations that may have critical impact on the world energy scene. Included in this volume, Vol. IV, are Senegal, South Africa, Soviet Union, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States, Upper Volta, Venezuela, and Yugoslavia. The following topics are covered for most of the countries: economic, demographic, and educational profiles; energy policy; indigenous energy resources and uses; forecasts, demand, exports, imports of energy supplies; environmental considerations of energy supplies; power production facilities; energy industries; commercial applications of energy; research and development activities of energy; and international activities.

  1. Cost-Efficient Low-Volume Production Through Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D Printing, is a production method of rising popularity. The method works by adding layers of material, in contrast to subtracting, which is the dominating method today. The objective of this thesis has been to evaluate the cost-efficiency of producing relatively complex parts through additive manufacturing, compared to subtractive methods with production volumes less than 20 units. Initial findings narrow the additive methods down ...

  2. Cost-Efficient Low-Volume Production Through Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D Printing, is a production method of rising popularity. The method works by adding layers of material, in contrast to subtracting, which is the dominating method today. The objective of this thesis has been to evaluate the cost-efficiency of producing relatively complex parts through additive manufacturing, compared to subtractive methods with production volumes less than 20 units. Initial findings narrow the additive methods down ...

  3. Low cost biological lung volume reduction therapy for advanced emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakeer M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa Bakeer,1 Taha Taha Abdelgawad,1 Raed El-Metwaly,1 Ahmed El-Morsi,1 Mohammad Khairy El-Badrawy,1 Solafa El-Sharawy2 1Chest Medicine Department, 2Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Background: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR, using biological agents, is one of the new alternatives to lung volume reduction surgery.Objectives: To evaluate efficacy and safety of biological BLVR using low cost agents including autologous blood and fibrin glue.Methods: Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: group A (seven patients in which autologous blood was used and group B (eight patients in which fibrin glue was used. The agents were injected through a triple lumen balloon catheter via fiberoptic bronchoscope. Changes in high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT volumetry, pulmonary function tests, symptoms, and exercise capacity were evaluated at 12 weeks postprocedure as well as for complications.Results: In group A, at 12 weeks postprocedure, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and residual volume/total lung capacity (% predicted (P-value: <0.001 and 0.038, respectively. In group B, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and (residual volume/total lung capacity % predicted (P-value: 0.005 and 0.004, respectively. All patients tolerated the procedure with no mortality.Conclusion: BLVR using autologous blood and locally prepared fibrin glue is a promising method for therapy of advanced emphysema in term of efficacy, safety as well as cost effectiveness. Keywords: BLVR, bronchoscopy, COPD, interventional pulmonology

  4. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume IV. The environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    Many Indian tribes own rich deposits of very valuable energy resources. Existing and proposed uses of these tribal resources range from limited development of small oil and gas fields to large-scale extraction and conversion of coal, uranium, and oil shale. The adverse environmental impacts of such projects may create a conflict between a tribe's environmental policies and its economic, employment, and other long-term goals. The purpose of this volume is to provide tribal decision makers with reference documents on the mechanisms that are available to resolve such conflicts. This report focuses on the role of existing environmental laws in enabling tribes to achieve the needed balance among its objectives. Over a dozen major Federal statutes have been enacted to achieve this purpose. One law, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), provides procedures to ensure that environmental factors are included in the Federal decision-making process. Numerous other laws, such as the Clean Air Act, have been enacted to prevent or control any negative environmental impacts of actual projects. This volume documents the key provisions of the laws and regulations, and discusses their effectiveness in meeting total needs. Also, tribal options to strengthen these mechanisms are highlighted. Sections II and III report on the role of NEPA in tribal development decisions. Section IV reviews those laws and regulations that control project operations.

  5. Direct variable cost of the topical treatment of stages III and IV pressure injuries incurred in a public university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Julieta M F; Blanes, Leila; Borba, Luis G; Rocha, Luis R M; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2017-05-01

    to estimate the direct variable costs of the topical treatment of stages III and IV pressure injuries of hospitalized patients in a public university hospital, and assess the correlation between these costs and hospitalization time. Forty patients of both sexes who had been admitted to the São Paulo Hospital, São Paulo, SP, Brazil, from 2011 to 2012, with pressure injuries in the sacral, ischial or trochanteric region were included. The patients had a total of 57 pressure injuries in the selected regions, and the lesions were monitored daily until patient release, transfer or death. The quantities and types of materials, as well as the amount of professional labor time spent on each procedure and each patient were recorded. The unit costs of the materials and the hourly costs of the professional labor were obtained from the hospital's purchasing and human resources departments, respectively. Spearman's correlation coefficient and the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the statistical analyses. The mean topical treatment costs for stages III and IV PIs were significantly different (US$ 854.82 versus US$ 1785.35; p = 0.004). The mean topical treatment cost of stages III and IV pressure injuries per patient was US$ 1426.37. The mean daily topical treatment cost per patient was US$ 40.83. There was a significant correlation between hospitalization time and the total costs of labor and materials (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference between hospitalization time periods for stages III and IV pressure injuries (40.80 days and 45.01 days, respectively; p = 0.834). The mean direct variable cost of the topical treatment for stages III and IV pressure injuries per patient in this public university hospital was US$ 1426.37. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Fluidized-bed combustion 1000-hour test program. Volume IV. Engineering details and post-test inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, A. G.; Barker, S. N.; Phillips, R. N.; Pillai, K. K.; Raven, P.; Wood, P.

    1981-09-01

    Volume IV of the report on the 1000 hour programme consists of three appendices giving details of the enginmering/construction aspects of the plant and reports from Stal-Laval Turbin A.B. Appendix N has been entered individually. (LTN)

  7. Energy use in the marine transportation industry: Task III. Efficiency improvements; Task IV. Industry future. Final report, Volume IV. [Projections for year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    Tasks III and IV measure the characteristics of potential research and development programs that could be applied to the maritime industry. It was necessary to identify potential operating scenarios for the maritime industry in the year 2000 and determine the energy consumption that would result given those scenarios. After the introductory chapter the operational, regulatory, and vessel-size scenarios for the year 2000 are developed in Chapter II. In Chapter III, future cargo flows and expected levels of energy use for the baseline 2000 projection are determined. In Chapter IV, the research and development programs are introduced into the future US flag fleet and the energy-savings potential associated with each is determined. The first four appendices (A through D) describe each of the generic technologies. The fifth appendix (E) contains the baseline operating and cost parameters against which 15 program areas were evaluated. (MCW)

  8. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume II: Cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This document contains Volume II of the Closure Study for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Calcined Solids Storage Facility. This volume contains draft information on cost estimates, planning schedules, yearly cost flowcharts, and life-cycle costs for the four options described in Volume I: (1) Risk-Based Clean Closure; NRC Class C fill, (2) Risk-Based Clean Closure; Clean fill, (3) Closure to landfill Standards; NRC Class C fill, and (4) Closure to Landfill Standards; Clean fill.

  9. Cost Analysis of Correctional Standards: Institutional-Based Programs and Parole. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Neil M.; Wright, Virginia B.

    This second of two volumes provides cost guidelines and cost estimation techniques for use by jurisdictions in assessing costs of their own ongoing or contemplated correctional program activities. (Volume I is a companion summary published as a separate document for use by criminal justice policy-makers in need of a reference to the policy issues…

  10. UTILITATEA ANALIZEI RELAŢIEI COST-VOLUM-PROFIT ÎN METODA DIRECT-COSTING PENTRU PROCESUL DECIZIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelea CHIRILOV

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available În acest articol este analizată relaţia cost-volum-profit în scopul optimizării profitului şi fundamentării unor decizii economice optime. Sunt prezentate studii de caz metodologice menite să evidenţieze necesitatea indicatorilor: pragul de rentabilitate, marja de contribuţie, rezerva stabilităţii financiare, volumul vânzărilor necesar obţinerii profitului dorit, preţul marginal. Rezultatele obţinute sunt prezentate şi analizate de autori. Articolul se încheie cu concluziile autorilor privind avantajele oferite de calculele şi analizele ce pot fi efectuate pe baza relaţiei cost-volum-profit în metoda direct-costing pentru procesul decizional.THE UTILITY OF ANALYZING COST-VOLUME-PROFIT RELATIONSHIP THROUGH THE DIRECT-COSTING METHOD FOR DECISION MAKING PROCESSIn this article it is analyzed the cost-volume-profit relationship with the aim of profit optimization and elaboration of optimum economic decisions. The statement also reflects methodological case studies which highlight the necessity of the following indicators: break-even point, contribution margin, reserve of financial stability, sales volume required for obtaining target profit, marginal price. The results are presented and are analyzed by authors. The article ends up with the conclusions of the authors with regards to advantages provided by the calculations and analysis which can be performed on the basis of cost-volume-profit relationship through the direct-costing method for decision making process.

  11. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-03-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  12. The Del Mod System: An External Evaluation, Final Report, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Donald W.; And Others

    This is one of five volumes prepared to describe various aspects of the Del Mod System. This volume deals with the evaluation of the Del Mod System. Included are the following: (1) Del Mod Responsive Evaluation; (2) Evaluation Outcomes; (3) Validation of the Del Mod Responsive Evaluation Process; and (4) Conclusions. Appendices include: (A)…

  13. Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research. Volumes III [and] IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C., Ed.

    Two volumes of a handbook on theory and research in higher education are presented. The 11 papers included in Volume III are as follows: "Qualitative Research Methods in Higher Education" (R. Crowson); "Bricks and Mortar: Architecture and the Study of Higher Education" (J. Thelin and J. Yankovich); "Enrollment Demand Models and Their Policy Uses…

  14. An Evaluation of the Nutrition Services for the Elderly. Volume IV. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    This document is part of a five-volume nationwide study of Nutrition Services operations and elderly citizens participating in congregate dining and home delivery services authorized by Title III-C of the Older Americans' Act. This volume contains all technical appendices and is intended as a resource document. The Methodology Appendix is included…

  15. Solar central receiver prototype heliostat. Volume III. Cost estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The Boeing heliostat design can be produced and installed for a Capital Cost of $42 per square meter at high commercial plant quantities and rates. This is 14% less than the DOE cost target. Even at a low commercial plant production rate of 25,000 heliostats per year the Capital Cost of $48 per square meter is 2% less than the cost goal established by the DOE. Projected capital costs and 30 year maintenance costs for three scenarios of production and installation are presented: (1) commercial rate production of 25,000, 250,000, and 1,000,000 heliostats per year; (2) a one-time only production quantity of 2500 heliostats; and (3) commercial rate production of 25,000 heliostats per year with each plant (25,000 heliostats) installed at widely dispersed sites throughout the Southwestern United States. These three scenarios for solar plant locations and the manufacturing/installation processes are fully described, and detailed cost breakdowns for the three scenarios are provided.

  16. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume IV. Critical review of the design basis. [Critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-05-01

    Report XI, Technical Audit, is a compendium of research material used during the Initial Effort in making engineering comparisons and decisions. Volumes 4 and 5 of Report XI present those studies which provide a Critical Review of the Design Basis. The Critical Review Report, prepared by Intercontinental Econergy Associates, Inc., summarizes findings from an extensive review of the data base for the H-Coal process design. Volume 4 presents this review and assessment, and includes supporting material; specifically, Design Data Tabulation (Appendix A), Process Flow Sheets (Appendix B), and References (Appendix C). Volume 5 is a continuation of the references of Appendix C. Studies of a proprietary nature are noted and referenced, but are not included in these volumes. They are included in the Limited Access versions of these reports and may be reviewed by properly cleared personnel in the offices of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.

  17. Back Bay-Currituck Sound Data Report: Fish Studies, Volume IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data report is the fourth and final volume of data and preliminary analysis of data on the cooperative study of the ecology of Back Bay, Virginia, and Currituck...

  18. Fourth update of the Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program. Phase IV, Final report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.E.; Brown, P.E.; Kaminski, R.S.; Smith, M.H.; Ziegler, E.J.

    1981-09-01

    EEDB deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power plants. Its objective is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information for use in evaluating and monitoring US civilian nuclear power programs. It contains six nuclear power plant technical models and five comparison coal-fired fossil power plant technical models. (DLC)

  19. Cost effectiveness of adding clostridial collagenase ointment to selective debridement in individuals with stage IV pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Marissa J; Gilligan, Adrienne M; Waycaster, Curtis R; Schaum, Kathleen; Fife, Caroline E

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cost effectiveness (from a payer's perspective) of adding clostridial collagenase ointment (CCO) to selective debridement compared with selective debridement alone (non-CCO) in the treatment of stage IV pressure ulcers among patients identified from the US Wound Registry. A 3-state Markov model was developed to determine costs and outcomes between the CCO and non-CCO groups over a 2-year time horizon. Outcome data were derived from a retrospective clinical study and included the proportion of pressure ulcers that were closed (epithelialized) over 2 years and the time to wound closure. Transition probabilities for the Markov states were estimated from the clinical study. In the Markov model, the clinical outcome is presented as ulcer-free weeks, which represents the time the wound is in the epithelialized state. Costs for each 4-week cycle were based on frequencies of clinic visits, debridement, and CCO application rates from the clinical study. The final model outputs were cumulative costs (in US dollars), clinical outcome (ulcer-free weeks), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) at 2 years. Compared with the non-CCO group, the CCO group incurred lower costs ($11,151 vs $17,596) and greater benefits (33.9 vs 16.8 ulcer-free weeks), resulting in an economically dominant ICER of -$375 per ulcer. Thus, for each additional ulcer-free week that can be gained, there is a concurrent cost savings of $375 if CCO treatment is selected. Over a 2-year period, an additional 17.2 ulcer-free weeks can be gained with concurrent cost savings of $6,445 for each patient. In this Markov model based on real-world data from the US Wound Registry, the addition of CCO to selective debridement in the treatment of pressure ulcers was economically dominant over selective debridement alone, resulting in greater benefit to the patient at lower cost.

  20. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (IV) The Volume Dependence of the Light Hadron Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S R; Detmold, W; Lin, H W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M J; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2011-07-01

    The volume dependence of the octet baryon masses and relations among them are explored with Lattice QCD. Calculations are performed with nf = 2 + 1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ? 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 4.0 fm, with an anisotropic lattice spacing of b_s ? 0.123 fm in the spatial direction, and b_t = b_s/3.5 in the time direction, and at a pion mass of m_\\pi ? 390 MeV. The typical precision of the ground-state baryon mass determination is volume dependence of the masses, the Gell-Mann Okubo mass-relation, and of other mass combinations. A comparison with the predictions of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory is performed in both the SU(2)L ? SU(2)R and SU(3)L ? SU(3)R expansions. Predictions of the three-flavor expansion for the hadron masses are found to describe the observed volume dependences reasonably well. Further, the ?N? axial coupling constant is extracted from the volume dependence of the nucleon mass in the two-flavor expansion, with only small modifications in the three-flavor expansion from the inclusion of kaons and eta's. At a given value of m?L, the finite-volume contributions to the nucleon mass are predicted to be significantly smaller at m_\\pi ? 140 MeV than at m_\\pi ? 390 MeV due to a coefficient that scales as ? m_\\pi^3. This is relevant for the design of future ensembles of lattice gauge-field configurations. Finally, the volume dependence of the pion and kaon masses are analyzed with two-flavor and three-flavor chiral perturbation theory.

  1. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume IV. Model documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M L; Allen, B J; Gale, J E; Lutz, M S; O& #x27; Hara, N E; Wood, R K

    1979-02-01

    This volume is the fourth in a series of seven documenting the PIES Integrating Model. It contains detailed descriptions of the basic assumptions behind each of the components of PIES and how they interact with one another. Chapter II of this volume presents the methodology used to integrate supply and demand. It includes a discussion of both the interface between the Demand Model and the equilibrating mechanism and the various supply models via the equilibrating algorithm used by PIES. Chapters III through IX describe each supply submodel in turn: coal, oil, and natural gas supply, utilities, refineries, advanced technologies, and transportation. Code and data documentation are covered elsewhere in this series (Volumes V and VI respectively). PIES is an evolving system. As this document was being prepared, many parts of the model were being modified. This document describes the PIES Integrating Model as of January 1, 1978.

  2. Inventory of Federal energy-related environment and safety research for FY 1977. Volume IV. Indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    This volume contains indexes useful for accessing projects contained in the FY 1977 Federal Inventory. The indexing has been greatly broadened this year to provide hard copy users with greater flexibility in locating projects. The Inventory projects are printed sequentially by log number. An inventory log number is a unique number assigned to each project from a block of numbers set aside for each agency. The association of agencies with blocks of log numbers is found in the table of contents of the Index (Volume III).

  3. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  4. Technical Reports (Part II). End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The pamphlets included in this volume are technical reports prepared as outgrowths of the Student Information System of the Western Nevada Regional Education Center funded by a Title III grant under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. These reports demonstrate the use of the stored data; methods of interpreting the printouts from…

  5. Very Low Cost Expendable Harassment System Design Study. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    the wings. A canard version can use a vertical tail mounted either above the rear-mounted engine or mounted as winglets on swept wings. The question...active control. There is also dif- ficulty in arranging the layout to minimize sweep and winglet area, both of which are packaging and structural...the stock sizes necessary. Composites , in general, are discouraged for this application on the basis of their higher cost. However, fiberglass

  6. Transport of solid commodities via freight pipeline: demand analysis methodology. Volume IV. First year final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, W.B.; Plaut, T.

    1976-07-01

    In order to determine the feasibility of intercity freight pipelines, it was necessary to determine whether sufficient traffic flows currently exist between various origins and destinations to justify consideration of a mode whose operating characteristics became competitive under conditions of high-traffic volume. An intercity origin/destination freight-flow matrix was developed for a large range of commodities from published sources. A high-freight traffic-density corridor between Chicago and New York and another between St. Louis and New York were studied. These corridors, which represented 18 cities, had single-direction flows of 16 million tons/year. If trans-shipment were allowed at each of the 18 cities, flows of up to 38 million tons/year were found in each direction. These figures did not include mineral or agricultural products. After determining that such pipeline-eligible freight-traffic volumes existed, the next step was to determine the ability of freight pipeline to penetrate such markets. Modal-split models were run on aggregate data from the 1967 Census of Transportation. Modal-split models were also run on disaggregate data specially collected for this study. The freight pipeline service characteristics were then substituted into both the aggregate and disaggregate models (truck vs. pipeline and then rail vs. pipeline) and estimates of pipeline penetration into particular STCC commodity groups were made. Based on these very preliminary results, it appears that freight pipeline has market penetration potential that is consistent with high-volume participation in the intercity freight market.

  7. Mexico City air quality research initiative. Volume IV. Characterization and measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauzy, A. [ed.

    1994-04-01

    This volume describes the methods and the data gathered in an attempt to measure and characterize the meteorological factors and the concentration of different pollutants in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area. The main objective of this document was to provide input for the simulation models and to obtain information that could be used to test and improve the models` performance. Four field campaigns were conducted, as well as routine monitoring, in order to obtain a database of atmospheric dynamics and air pollution characteristics. Sections include Airborne measurements, Remote sensing measurements, and Traditional (in situ) measurements.

  8. Structural Analysis via Generalized Interactive Graphics - STAGING. Volume IV. Appendices to System Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    TE SECURITY CLA𔃿nfF 1. AT CIN OF THIS PAGE IIIla~r faa,. FOREWARD This final repo, t was prepared by the Columbus Laboratories of Battelle Memorial...Kasik C. Scofield W. Young F. Drobot Kevin Cadmus was a major contributor to the preparation of this volume. The work reported herein was conducted... IELT -----O ’) 8 . OL.F. . .DBDRT. IDaDAD IDBJLF ICKAGT DELPIC ENTRY CLASS: MAIN SEGMENT: (DE0) DESCI DELETE ANO DEACTIVATE ALL PICKED 2EAOS ON A LEVEL

  9. Advanced Composite Cost Estimating Manual. Volume II. Appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    0~~~~~~; - -m- O1 .,a 0 j in N j "s w f 0 0 Av .s 00 4 164 "i’ 3. -%’ 1*4*J. - N w 0-uo 16 fo moNi o w w -Q * * 0 h" v 0 a rq)E 4.1 w 0 -0 S p4 4 4...REkMOVE CHAIS 0.00J32 06COC43 I I 34 OPIN LC-OR 0*01402 o.ci’r2 I 31 PELEA *. 1.L. L JAO4 000035 22 36 RILtLA5E VAC. LINES 0.0031 !I kfMOVF lPAIk Ptk OVL...0 - NO 1- YES Ia YES INSERTS: 0 - NO 1 - YES 59 a *1 ACCEM-S COST PROJECTION CAM I UNIT MNER~aJboo~ AVE , LOT SIZiTYPE OF ESTIMATE UNIT COST aL. 21

  10. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1999. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brian; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2000-07-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The total effort invested in nuclear energy research in 1999 amounted to about 185 py/a and 4.7 MCHF of investment and maintenance costs. Approximately half of the salary, investment and maintenance costs are externally funded, primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the national co-operative for the disposal of nuclear waste (NAGRA), the Federal Office of Energy (BFE) through the nuclear safety inspectorate (HSK) and the Federal Office for Science and Education (BBW) in connection with the EU Framework Programmes; an increasing part of external funding is coming from domestic and foreign industry (nuclear component and fuel suppliers). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. 4 % of the total resources are invested in addressing more global aspects of energy. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. Progress in 1999 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 1999 is also provided.

  11. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 1998. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchley, Jon; Ringele, Ruth [eds.

    1999-09-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI`s Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The total effort invested in nuclear energy research in 1998 amounted to about 195 py/a and 4.5 millions CHF of investment and maintenance costs. Approximately half of the salary, investment and maintenance costs are externally funded, primarily by the Swiss Utilities, the national co-operative for the disposal of nuclear waste (NAGRA), the Federal Office of Energy (BFE) through the nuclear safety inspectorate (HSK) and the Federal Office for Science and Education (BBW) in connection with the EC Framework Programmes; an increasing part of external funding is coming from domestic and foreign industry (nuclear component and fuel suppliers). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. 4 % of the total resources are invested in addressing more global aspects of energy. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. A list of scientific publications in 1998 is included. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  12. Southwest Project: resource/institutional requirements analysis. Volume IV. Institutional studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormsby, L. S.; Sawyer, T. G.; Brown, Dr., M. L.; Daviett, II, L. L.; Weber, E. R.; Brown, J. E.; Arlidge, J. W.; Novak, H. R.; Sanesi, Norman; Klaiman, H. C.; Spangenberg, Jr., D. T.; Groves, D. J.; Maddox, J. D.; Hayslip, R. M.; Ijams, G.; Lacy, R. G.; Montgomery, J.; Carito, J. A.; Ballance, J. W.; Bluemle, C. F.; Smith, D. N.; Wehrey, M. C.; Ladd, K. L.; Evans, Dr., S. K.; Guild, D. H.; Brodfield, B.; Cleveland, J. A.; Hicks, K. L.; Noga, M. W.; Ross, A. M.

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate ways to accelerate the commercialization of solar electric-generating plants and their expected market penetration into the electric utility network of the southwestern US through year 2000. The study was conducted primarily from a utility perspective and included the utility view of the technical, legal, economic, and institutional considerations necessary to make central-station generation of electricity from solar power commercially successful. No dispersed uses of solar electric generation were addressed. The report provides a basis from which periodic updates can be made to analyze the effect of economic trends and technology developments on utilization of solar and/or conventional electric generation as technology continues to progress in future years. The basis established in this report utilized current state-of-the-art technology for solar and conventional electric generating plants. Also, 1977 costs of conventional electric generating plants were utilized. The cost of first generation commercial solar electric generating plants was based on assumptions reflecting large-scale manufacturing of components by a mature industry.

  13. Mission analysis of photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Volume IV. Supplementary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, S. L.; Breisacher, P.; Munjal, P. K.; Neiss, J. A.

    1977-03-01

    A discussion is presented of the most significant problems associated with the production and deployment of photovoltaic arrays. The principal chemical compounds to be used in the manufacture of silicon, gallium arsenide, and cadmium sulfide photovoltaic arrays are discussed with respect to physical and chemical properties, sources of the raw materials required to extract or synthesize these materials, the methods of manufacture, storage and handling in large quantities, transportation restrictions, spills, leaks, ignition and explosion. A discussion of safety hazards associated with the finished products is followed by an analysis of the toxicological properties of all raw, refined, and finished chemical species involved. The principal tool used in the evaluation of incentive strategies was a new Public Utility Financial Analysis and Planning Model which is described in some detail. After adaptation to match the characteristics of photovoltaic plants, it was used in the comparative evaluation of six different incentive strategies. The candidate strategies, the rationale for their selection, and the results of the comparative evaluation are presented. An account is given of an attempt to assess the full non-internalized costs of coal-fired power generation. A detailed description is given of the various damage elements and their associated societal costs for coal production, coal transportation, and coal-fired power generation. (MHR)

  14. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

    2004-02-28

    The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

  15. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

  16. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  17. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2002. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.; Gschwend, B. (eds.)

    2003-03-01

    Highlights in research and operation Projects established in previous years have yielded relevant and first-of-a-kind results, which have gained broad attention, both nationally and internationally, and which are presented in detail in this report. A few outstanding examples are cited below:Successful first measurements with highly active samples in LWR-PROTEUS Phase II (high burn-up fuel) have shown significant dependency of reactivity on burn-up, and increasing discrepancies between calculated and measured reactivity values with burn-up. As a consequence of these findings, the Swiss utilities wish to extend this phase. On-call calculations in the framework of the STARS project have been used to modify the feedwater system of the Leibstadt NPP. The modification has been subsequently confirmed during a turbine trip. An international consortium has been established for the ARTIST project (aerosol behaviour in the case of steam generator tube rupture). First tests showed higher aerosol retention than expected. The MEGAPIE project remains ongoing, and plans for post-irradiation examination (PIE) have now been established. Investigation of the leak which occurred in the LISOR loop in the Hot Lab has positively identified the cause of failure. PSI's contribution to the China Energy Technology Programme has been completed and documented. Among other results, the programme provided evidence for lower total costs (including externalities) by using 'clean coal' technologies. In parallel, and to assure continuation of the successful collaboration with the European research programmes, NES has participated in 27 'Expressions of Interest' for Integrated Projects and Networks of Excellence within the 6th EU Framework Programme. On the operational level, the year 2002 was marked by a series of significant events: The Federal Institutes of Technology, to which PSI belongs, have drawn up strategic plans for the years 2004-2007. The proposed PSI

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.L. (ed.)

    2002-03-01

    The year 2001 was marked by the extensive audit of energy research at PSI. The audit took place on 21/22 June, and nuclear energy research was evaluated by five international experts. It was possible to present the quality and relevance of our research in a convincing way. This, together with optimal use of the available resources in our department Nuclear Energy and Safety (NES), prompted the highly welcome result that the auditors attested a high degree of scientific quality to the NES projects in general, with some of them judged to be of world-class standard. They recommended all audited projects be maintained, adequate resources to be allocated accordingly and, if necessary, an increase of public funding in nuclear energy research to be granted to achieve this. Finally, it was recommended that energy research should be explicitly mentioned in the statement of the ultimate mission of PSI. At the level of 'daily work', efforts in several directions related to the future of the Hotlab were one of the main focuses during the past year. On the one hand, the safety-related backfitting of the facility (particularly in regard to fire protection) has been continued, and was coupled with intensive planning studies, and with a thorough radiological cleaning of the labs; this invariably led to some impediment to the current research activities. Despite external burdens, which have led to some delays and additional costs, three of the four refurbishment phases have been completed, and the corresponding laboratories were brought back into operation after inspection and approval by the regulatory authority HSK. Given the size and complexity of the project, progress must be considered very satisfactory. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  19. Prediction of Supersonic Store Separation Characteristics Including Fuselage and Stores of Noncircular Cross Section, Volume IV. Appendices C and D, Details of Program II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    VOLUME IV - APPENDICES C AND D, DETAILS OF PROGRAM II Joseph Mullen, Jr. Frederick K. Goodwin Marnix F. E. Dillenius Nielsen Engineering & Research...location in store source panel coordinates of leading edge of wing, feet RAZ semi-axis in vertical direction of elliptic body, feet RBY semi-axis in

  20. Optimizing Reactors Selection and Sequencing:Minimum Cost versus Minimum Volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachid Chebbi

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation targets minimum cost of reactors in series for the case of one single chemical reaction, considering plug flow and stirred tank reactor(s) in the sequence of flow reactors. Using Guthrie’s cost correlations three typical cases were considered based on the profile of the reaction rate reciprocal versus conversion. Significant differences were found compared to the classical approach targeting minimum total reactor volume.

  1. Predicted costs of environmental controls for a commercial oil shale industry. Volume 1. An engineering analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevens, T.D.; Culbertson, W.J. Jr.; Wallace, J.R.; Taylor, G.C.; Jovanovich, A.P.; Prien, C.H.; Hicks, R.E.; Probstein, R.F.; Domahidy, G.

    1979-07-01

    The pollution control costs for a commercial oil shale industry were determined in a joint effort by Denver Research Institute, Water Purification Associates of Cambridge, and Stone and Webster Engineering of Boston and Denver. Four commercial oil shale processes were considered. The results in terms of cost per barrel of syncrude oil are predicted to be as follows: Paraho Process, $0.67 to $1.01; TOSCO II Process, $1.43 to $1.91; MIS Process, $2.02 to $3.03; and MIS/Lurgi-Ruhrgas Process, $1.68 to $2.43. Alternative pollution control equipment and integrated pollution control strategies were considered and optimal systems selected for each full-scale plant. A detailed inventory of equipment (along with the rationale for selection), a detailed description of control strategies, itemized costs and predicted emission levels are presented for each process. Capital and operating cost data are converted to a cost per barrel basis using detailed economic evaluation procedures. Ranges of cost are determined using a subjective self-assessment of uncertainty approach. An accepted methodology for probability encoding was used, and cost ranges are presented as subjective probability distributions. Volume I presents the detailed engineering results. Volume II presents the detailed analysis of uncertainty in the predicted costs.

  2. Competition in the Dutch hospital sector: an analysis of health care volume and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe-Alkemade, Y J F M; Groot, T L C M; Lindeboom, M

    2017-03-01

    This paper evaluates the impact of market competition on health care volume and cost. At the start of 2005, the financing system of Dutch hospitals started to be gradually changed from a closed-end budgeting system to a non-regulated price competitive prospective reimbursement system. The gradual implementation of price competition is a 'natural experiment' that provides a unique opportunity to analyze the effects of market competition on hospital behavior. We have access to a unique database, which contains hospital discharge data of diagnosis treatment combinations (DBCs) of individual patients, including detailed care activities. Difference-in-difference estimates show that the implementation of market-based competition leads to relatively lower total costs, production volume and number of activities overall. Difference-in-difference estimates on treatment level show that the average costs for outpatient DBCs decreased due to a decrease in the number of activities per DBC. The introduction of market competition led to an increase of average costs of inpatient DBCs. Since both volume and number of activities have not changed significantly, we conclude that the cost increase is likely the result of more expensive activities. A possible explanation for our finding is that hospitals look for possible efficiency improvements in predominantly outpatient care products that are relatively straightforward, using easily analyzable technologies. The effects of competition on average cost and the relative shares of inpatient and outpatient treatments on specialty level are significant but contrary for cardiology and orthopedics, suggesting that specialties react differently to competitive incentives.

  3. Impact of Formulas, Language and Instruction on Student Performance on Cost-Volume-Profit Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Benny G.; Sargent, Carol Springer

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how three factors impacted performance on cost-volume-profit homework problems: language, formula use, and instruction. Students enrolled in Introduction to Financial Accounting (the first principles of accounting course) and Managerial Accounting (the second principles of accounting course) from eight different US colleges…

  4. Planning manual for energy resource development on Indian lands. Volume I. Benefit--cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-03-01

    Section II follows a brief introduction and is entitled ''Benefit-Cost Analysis Framework.'' The analytical framework deals with two major steps involved in assessing the pros and cons of energy resource development (or any other type of development). The first is to identify and describe the overall tribal resource planning and decision process. The second is to develop a detailed methodological approach to the assessment of the benefits and costs of energy development alternatives within the context of the tribe's overall planning process. Sections III, IV, and V present the application of the benefit-cost analysis methodology to coal; oil and gas; and uranium, oil shale, and geothermal development, respectively. The methodology creates hypothetical examples that illustrate realistic development opportunities for the majority of tribes that have significant reserves of one or more of the resources that may be economic to develop.

  5. Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

  6. Prostate volume index and chronic inflammation of the prostate type IV with respect to the risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Antonio B; Novella, Giovanni; Molinari, Alberto; Terrin, Alessandro; Minja, Anila; De Marco, Vincenzo; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo; Cerruto, Maria A; Curti, Pierpaolo; Cavalleri, Stefano; Artibani, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (PCA) alter the normal growth patterns of zonal anatomy with changes of prostate volume (PV). Chronic inflammatory infiltrates (CII) type IV are the most common non-cancer diagnosis of the prostate after biopsy. To evaluate associations of both PV index (PVI), i.e. the ratio of transitional zone volume (TZV) to peripheral zone volume (PZV), and CII with PCA in patients undergoing biopsy. Between January 2007 and December 2008, 268 consecutive patients who underwent prostate biopsy were retrospectively evaluated. PV and TZV were measured by transrectal ultrasound. PZV was computed by subtracting the PV from the TZV. CII were evaluated according to standard criteria. Significant associations of PVI and the presence of CII (CII+) with PCA risk were assessed by statistical methods. We evaluated 251 patients after excluding cases with painful rectal examinations, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >20 μg/ml and metastases. The PCA detection rate was 41.1%. PVI was a negative independent predictor of PCA. A PVI ≤1.0 was directly [odds ratio (OR) = 2.36] associated with PCA, which was detected more frequently in patients with a PVI ≤1.0 (29.1%) than in those with a PVI >1.0 (11.9%). CII+ was inversely (OR = 0.57) and independently associated with PCA, which was detected less frequently in cases with CII (9.9%) than in those without CII (21.1%). Potential study limitations might relate to the fact that PV was not measured by prostatectomy specimens and there was PSA confounding for CII and PCA. Low values of PVI are directly associated with risk of PCA, which was almost 2.5 times higher in patients with a PVI ≤1.0. The PVI might be an effective parameter for clustering patients at risk of PCA. CII+ was inversely associated with risk of PCA and decreased the probability of detecting PCA by 43%. The role of the PVI and CII in PCA carcinogenesis needs further research. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 5: Costs to Construct and Operate the Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs

  8. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  9. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs: Cost of Capital, Trading Volume, and Investor Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    In an incomplete market setting with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show that public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. In a model with exponential utility investors and an asset with a normally distributed dividend......, the Pareto efficient public information system is the system which enjoys the maximum ex ante cost of capital, and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. The public information system facilitates improved dynamic trading opportunities based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs in order to take...... information system. In an effectively complete market setting, in which investors do not need to trade dynamically in order to take full advantage of their differences in beliefs, the ex ante cost of capital and the investor welfare are both higher than in the incomplete market setting...

  10. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs: Cost of Capital, Trading Volume, and Investor Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    In an incomplete market setting with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show that public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. In a model with exponential utility investors and an asset with a normally distributed dividend...... information system. In an effectively complete market setting, in which investors do not need to trade dynamically in order to take full advantage of their differences in beliefs, the ex ante cost of capital and the investor welfare are both higher than in the incomplete market setting......, the Pareto efficient public information system is the system which enjoys the maximum ex ante cost of capital, and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. The public information system facilitates improved dynamic trading opportunities based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs in order to take...

  11. Steam Digest Volume IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  12. Can postoperative process of care utilization or complication rates explain the volume-cost relationship for cancer surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vivian; Short, Marah N; Aloia, Thomas A

    2017-08-01

    Past studies identify an association between provider volume and outcomes, but less is known about the volume-cost relationship for cancer surgery. We analyze the volume-cost relationship for 6 cancer operations and explore whether it is influenced by the occurrence of complications and/or utilization of processes of care. Medicare hospital and inpatient claims for the years 2005 through 2009 were analyzed for 6 cancer resections: colectomy, rectal resection, pulmonary lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and pancreatic resection. Regressions were first estimated to quantify the association of provider volume with costs, excluding measures of complications and processes of care as explanatory variables. Next, these variables were added to the regressions to test whether they weakened any previously observed volume-cost relationship. Higher hospital volume is associated with lower patient costs for esophagectomy but not for other operations. Higher surgeon volume reduces costs for most procedures, but this result weakens when processes of care are added to the regressions. Processes of care that are frequently implemented in response to adverse events are associated with 14% to 34% higher costs. Utilization of these processes is more prevalent among low-volume versus high-volume surgeons. Processes of care implemented when complications occur explain much of the surgeon volume-cost relationship. Given that surgeon volume is readily observed, better outcomes and lower costs may be achieved by referring patients to high-volume surgeons. Increasing patient access to surgeons with lower rates of complications may be the most effective strategy for avoiding costly processes of care, controlling expenditure growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear Geoplosics Sourcebook. Volume IV. Part I. Empirical Analysis of Ground Motion from Above and Underground Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    November 10, 1975. IV-1.8 Feynman , R. P., R. B. Leighton, and M. Sands, The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. II, Chapter 39, Addison Wesley, Massachusetts...Event, POR 6400, Sandia Laboratories, March 1971. IV-2.18 Preston, R. G., and V. E. Wheeler , Response of the Line-of-Sight Pipe to Ground Shock in the...Hupmobile Nuclear Effects Test, Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (Unpublished). IV-2.19 Randolph, P. L., R. G. Preston, and V. E. Wheeler , Preliminary

  14. Soil Properties Database of Spanish Soils Volume IV.- Valencia and Murcia; Base de Datos de Propiedades Edafologicas de los Suelos Espanoles Volumen IV.- Valencia y Murcia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trueba, C.; Millan, R.; Schmid, T.; Roquero, C.; Magister, M.

    1998-12-01

    The soil vulnerability determines the sensitivity of the soil after an accidental radioactive contamination due to Cs-137 and Sr-90. The Departamento de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia of CIEMAT is carrying out an assessment of the radiological vulnerability of the different Spanish soils found on the Iberian Peninsula. This requires the knowledge of the soil properties for the various types of existing soils. In order to achieve this aim, a bibliographical compilation of soil profiles has been made to characterize the different soil types and create a database of their properties. Depending on the year of publication and the type of documentary source, the information compiled from the available bibliography very heterogeneous. Therefore, an important effort has been made to normalize and process the information prior to its incorporation to the database. This volume presents the criteria applied to normalize and process the data as well as the soil properties of the various soil types belonging to the Comunidades Autonomas de Valencia and Murcia. (Author) 63 refs.

  15. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 4: License Application Plan and Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  16. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C. E.; Murphy, E. S.; Schneider, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Volume 2 contains appendixes on small MOX fuel fabrication facility description, site description, residual radionuclide inventory estimates, decommissioning, financing, radiation dose methodology, general considerations, packaging and shipping of radioactive materials, cost assessment, and safety (JRD)

  17. High-surgical-volume hospitals associated with better quality and lower cost of kidney transplantation in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yun Tsao

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Seventy-seven percent of kidney transplant surgeries were concentrated at six hospitals in Taiwan. There were significant differences in quality and cost between HSVHs and LSVHs. We suggest adopting volume-based strategies for nonurgent kidney transplants.

  18. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs: Cost of Capital, Trading Volume, and Investor Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    In an incomplete market setting with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show that public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. In a model with exponential utility investors and an asset with a normally distributed dividend...... advantage of the disagreements and the differences in con…dence among investors. This leads to a higher growth in the investors’certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex ante risk premium on the risky asset is unaffected by the informativeness of the public...

  19. Contemporary American Success Stories. Famous People of Asian Ancestry. Volume IV. A Mitchell Lane Multicultural Biography Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvis, Barbara J.

    This collection of biographical sketches presents role models of Asian American descent for American children. As part of the five-volume series written at a reading level for grades five to six, the success stories of the individuals profiled in this volume, and who have encountered racial prejudice and discrimination, remind all of the unique…

  20. Low cost sensing of vegetation volume and structure with a Microsoft Kinect sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, G.; Goulden, M.

    2011-12-01

    The market for videogames and digital entertainment has decreased the cost of advanced technology to affordable levels. The Microsoft Kinect sensor for Xbox 360 is an infrared time of flight camera designed to track body position and movement at a single-articulation level. Using open source drivers and libraries, we acquired point clouds of vegetation directly from the Kinect sensor. The data were filtered for outliers, co-registered, and cropped to isolate the plant of interest from the surroundings and soil. The volume of single plants was then estimated with several techniques, including fitting with solid shapes (cylinders, spheres, boxes), voxel counts, and 3D convex/concave hulls. Preliminary results are presented here. The volume of a series of wild artichoke plants was measured from nadir using a Kinect on a 3m-tall tower. The calculated volumes were compared with harvested biomass; comparisons and derived allometric relations will be presented, along with examples of the acquired point clouds. This Kinect sensor shows promise for ground-based, automated, biomass measurement systems, and possibly for comparison/validation of remotely sensed LIDAR.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the management of stage III C and IV epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forde GK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gareth K Forde,1 Jenny Chang,2 Argyrios Ziogas,21Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Irvine Medical Center, University of California, Orange, CA, USA; 2Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA Objectives: To examine the cost-effectiveness of primary debulking surgery (PDS when compared to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT in the management of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data linked to Medicare claims (SEER-Medicare. Methods: Using a Markov model, the cost-effectiveness of PDS was compared to that of NACT. We modeled cost and survival inputs using data from women in the SEER-Medicare database with ovarian cancer treated by either PDS or NACT between 1992 and 2009. Direct and indirect costs were discounted by an annual rate of 3%. Utility weights were obtained from published data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of PDS compared to NACT was calculated. Results: In our model, women with stage IIIC EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost for PDS when compared to NACT ($31,945 vs $30,016 but yielded greater quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs (1.79 vs 1.69. The ICER was $19,359/QALY gained. Women with stage IV EOC had a higher mean adjusted treatment cost following PDS when compared to NACT ($31,869 vs $27,338 but yielded greater QALYs (1.69 vs 1.66. The ICER was $130,083/QALY gained. A sensitivity analysis showed that for both PDS and NACT the ICER was sensitive to incremental changes in the utility weight. Conclusion: PDS is significantly more cost-effective for women with stage IIIC when compared to NACT. In women with stage IV EOC, PDS is also more cost-effective though the QALYs gained are much more costly and exceed a $50,000 willingness to pay. Keywords: Markov model, gynecologic cancer, chemotherapy, up front surgery

  2. Mastectomy Weight and Tissue Expander Volume Predict Necrosis and Increased Costs Associated with Breast Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalanis, Georgia C.; Nag, Shayoni; Georgek, Jakob R.; Cooney, Carisa M.; Manahan, Michele A.; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Impaired vascular perfusion in tissue expander (TE) breast reconstruction leads to mastectomy skin necrosis. We investigated factors and costs associated with skin necrosis in postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Methods: Retrospective review of 169 women with immediate TE placement following mastectomy between May 1, 2009 and May 31, 2013 was performed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected. Logistic regression analysis on individual variables was performed to determine the effects of tissue expander fill volume and mastectomy specimen weight on skin necrosis. Billing data was obtained to determine the financial burden associated with necrosis. Results: This study included 253 breast reconstructions with immediate TE placement from 169 women. Skin necrosis occurred in 20 flaps for 15 patients (8.9%). Patients with hypertension had 8 times higher odds of skin necrosis [odd ratio (OR), 8.10, P 300 cm3 had 10 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 10.66, P =0.010). Volumes >400 cm3 had 15 times higher odds of skin necrosis (OR, 15.56, P = 0.002). Mastectomy specimen weight was correlated with skin necrosis. Specimens >500 g had 10 times higher odds of necrosis and specimens >1000 g had 18 times higher odds of necrosis (OR, 10.03 and OR, 18.43; P =0.003 and P Mastectomy skin necrosis was associated with a 50% increased inpatient charge. Conclusion: Mastectomy flap necrosis is associated with HTN, larger TE volumes and mastectomy specimen weights, resulting in increased inpatient charges. Conservative TE volumes should be considered for patients with hypertension and larger mastectomy specimens. PMID:26301139

  3. The influence of management and construction methods in the repair costs of Spain’s low-volume road network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eutiquio Gallego

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the entire process of the implementation of the Spanish low volume road network, including the design criteria, the construction techniques and the management policies during all the periods. The current situation of low volume roads in Spain was analyzed with respect to the legal framework and their actual condition. In addition, the budget required for the repair of 41 low volume roads throughout Spain was calculated in order to statistically analyze the influence of the pavement materials and the period of construction. The main conclusions were that low volume roads constructed during the 1970´s are currently those in the best state of repair and those requiring the lower repair costs, even lower than those constructed after 1980´s. In addition, low volume roads constructed with higher quality materials and using standardized techniques required five times lower repair costs than those made of lower quality materials.

  4. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

  5. Intenational conference on high-energy physics. Volume 2. Sessions IV to VIII. [Geneva, June 27-July 4, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-02-01

    Volume 2 of the conference proceedings contains sessions on hadron physics, charged-lepton physics, the p-p-bar collider at CERN, future European accelerator possibilities, parallel discussion sessions (on high-energy) hadron-induced reactions, deep inelastic phenomena, hadron spectroscopy, weak ineractions and gauge theories, and quark confinement), and a closing session on gauge appreciation of developments in particle physics. A list of participants is also included. Three of the papers in this volume have already been cited in ERA, and can be found as reference to the entry CONF-790642-- in the Report Number Index. The remaining 36 will be processed as they are received on the Atomindex tape. (RWR)

  6. Transport of solid commodities via freight pipeline: cost estimating methodology. Volume III, parts A and B. First year final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, J.A.; Morlok, E.K.; Gimm, K.K.; Zandi, I.

    1976-07-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of an intercity freight pipeline, it was necessary to develop cost equations for various competing transportation modes. This volume presents cost-estimating equations for rail carload, trailer-on-flatcar, truck, and freight pipeline. Section A presents mathematical equations that approximate the fully allocated and variable costs contained in the ICC cost tables for rail carload, trailer-on-flatcar (TOFC) and truck common-carrier intercity freight movements. These equations were developed to enable the user to approximate the ICC costs quickly and easily. They should find use in initial studies of costs where exact values are not needed, such as in consideration of rate changes, studies of profitability, and in general inter-modal comparisons. Section B discusses the development of a set of engineering cost equations for pneumo-capsule pipelines. The development was based on an analysis of system components and can readily be extended to other types of pipeline. The model was developed for the purpose of a feasibility study. It employs a limited number of generalized parameters and its use is recommended when sufficient detailed and specific engineering information is lacking. These models were used in the comparison of modes presented in Volume I and hence no conclusions regarding relative costs or service of the modes are presented here. The primary conclusion is that the estimates of costs resulting from these models is subject to considerable uncertainty.

  7. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume IV. Bibliography and supporting data for physical oceanography. Final report. [421 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume IV contains the following: bibliography; appendices for supporting data for physical oceanography, and summary of the physical oceanography along the western Louisiana coast.

  8. Electrical, optical, and magnetic properties of organic solid-state materials IV. Materials Research Society, symposium proceedings Volume 488

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.R.; Jen, A.K.Y.; Rubner, M.F.; Chiang, L.Y.; Dalton, L.R. [eds.

    1998-07-01

    The symposium, Electrical, Optical, and Magnetic Properties of Organic Solid-State Materials IV, was sponsored by the Materials Research Society and held December 1--5, 1997, in Boston, Massachusetts. Early studies of charge transport in conducting polymers have evolved from the elucidation of fundamental structure/function relationships to applications as batteries, simple electrical devices such as diodes, chemical sensors, antistatic coatings, microwave and millimeter wave-absorbing materials, and photochromic devices. A particularly exciting evolution has been the discovery and development of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) which appear to be nearing commercialization in an amazingly short period of time. This application is of particular interest because both electrical and optical properties must be considered, and these have been important parallel themes of the conference. Moreover, nanostructure control is important for OLEDs, and nanoscale architectural engineering has been an increasingly important theme of the conference. Indeed, not only has the study of conjugated (quasidelocalized) electrons in organic solid-state materials resulted in interesting physical properties and device applications, but the desire to exploit these properties has promoted the development of new synthesis and processing methodologies to achieve special nanoscale and microscale structures. One hundred five papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Capital and operating cost estimates. Volume I. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    This Deliverable No. 18b - Capital and Operating Cost Estimates includes a detailed presentation of the 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant from the standpoint of capital, preoperations, start-up and operations cost estimation. The base capital cost estimate in June 1982 dollars was prepared by the Ralph M. Parsons Company under the direction of Grace. The escalated capital cost estimate as well as separate estimates for preoperations, startup and operations activities were developed by Grace. The deliverable consists of four volumes. Volume I contains details of methodology used in developing the capital cost estimate, summary information on a base June 1982 capital cost, details of the escalated capital cost estimate and separate sections devoted to preoperations, start-up, and operations cost. The base estimate is supported by detailed information in Volumes II, III and IV. The degree of detail for some units was constrained due to proprietary data. Attempts have been made to exhibit the estimating methodology by including data on individual equipment pricing. Proprietary details are available for inspection upon execution of nondisclosure and/or secrecy agreements with the licensors to whom the data is proprietary. Details of factoring certain pieces of equipment and/or entire modules or units from the 50,000 BPD capital estimate are also included. In the case of the escalated capital estimate, Grace has chosen to include a sensitivity analysis which allows for ready assessment of impacts of escalation rates (inflation), contingency allowances and the construction interest financing rates on the escalated capital cost. Each of the estimates associated with bringing the plant to commercial production rates has as a basis the schedule and engineering documentation found in Deliverable No. 14b - Process Engineering and Mechanical Design Report, No. 28b - Staffing Plans, No. 31b - Construction Plan, and No. 33b - Startup and Operation Plan.

  10. Effect of Fixed-Volume and Weight-Based Dosing Regimens on the Cost and Volume of Administered Iodinated Contrast Material at Abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Matthew S; Parikh, Kushal R; Mayo-Smith, William W; Israel, Gary M; Brown, Richard K J; Ellis, James H

    2017-03-01

    To determine the magnitude of subject-level and population-level cost savings that could be realized by moving from fixed-volume low-osmolality iodinated contrast material administration to an effective weight-based dosing regimen for contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT. HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-exempt retrospective cohort study of 6,737 subjects undergoing contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT from 2014 to 2015. Subject height, weight, lean body weight (LBW), and body surface area (BSA) were determined. Twenty-six volume- and weight-based dosing strategies with literature support were compared with a fixed-volume strategy used at the study institution: 125 mL 300 mgI/mL for routine CT, 125 mL 370 mgI/mL for multiphasic CT (single-energy, 120 kVp). The predicted population- and subject-level effects on cost and contrast material utilization were calculated for each strategy and sensitivity analyses were performed. Most subjects underwent routine CT (91% [6,127/6,737]). Converting to lesser-volume higher-concentration contrast material had the greatest effect on cost; a fixed-volume 100 mL 370 mgI/mL strategy resulted in $132,577 in population-level savings with preserved iodine dose at routine CT (37,500 versus 37,000 mgI). All weight-based iodine-content dosing strategies (mgI/kg) with the same maximum contrast material volume (125 mL) were predicted to contribute mean savings compared with the existing fixed-volume algorithm ($4,053-$116,076/strategy in the overall study population, $1-$17/strategy per patient). Similar trends were observed in all sensitivity analyses. Large cost and material savings can be realized at abdominopelvic CT by adopting a weight-based dosing strategy and lowering the maximum volume of administered contrast material. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  12. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

    2002-11-26

    OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimund, Kevin K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Wilson, Aaron D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  14. Physics of laser fusion. Volume IV. The future development of high-power solid-state laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.; Trenholme, J.B.

    1982-11-01

    Solid state lasers, particularly neodymium glass systems, have undergone intensive development during the last decade. In this paper, we review solid state laser technology in the context of high-peak-power systems for inertial confinement fusion. Specifically addressed are five major factors: efficiency, wavelength flexibility, average power, system complexity, and cost; these factors today limit broader application of the technology. We conclude that each of these factors can be greatly improved within current fundamental physical limits. We further conclude that the systematic development of new solid state laser madia, both vitreous and crystalline, should ultimately permit the development of wavelength-flexible, very high average power systems with overall efficiencies in the range of 10 to 20%.

  15. Service volume and other factors affecting the costs of immunizations in the Gambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Robert L.; Davis, Joe H.; Jobe, Kebba

    1984-01-01

    The total cost of the Expanded Programme on Immunization and of its various components in the Gambia over a period of one year (from July 1980 to June 1981) was investigated, and the costs per immunization dose and per fully immunized child were calculated. The total costs were to a large extent (45%) due to the cost of personnel and fixed costs. Where there was efficient delivery of immunizations, the average cost per dose was about one-fifth of that in the most costly facilities (range: US$2.32 to $0.41). The lower costs were related to more intensive use of the facilities. The national average cost was $1.09. The implications of the results of this study for policies to reduce costs are discussed, and further areas of research are suggested that will provide improved information to guide decision-makers in the use of scarce immunization programme resources for better health in the world. PMID:6334570

  16. Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume I. Sources, trends, and costs of control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

    1976-05-01

    Volume I deals with sources (what the emissions are and where they come from), trends (quantities of emissions and their dispersion with time), and costs of control (what it takes in time, energy, and money to meet minimum standards). Volume II concerns itself with the public health effects of energy production and utilization. Volume III summarizes the various techniques for controlling emissions, technological as well as economic, social, and political. (For abstracts of Vols. II and III, see ERDA Energy Research Abstracts, Vol. 2, Absts. 5764 and 5670, respectively) Each volume is divided into sections dealing with the atmosphere, water, land, and social activities--each division indicating a particular sphere of man's environment affected by energy production and use. The sources of information that were used in this study included textbooks, journal articles, technical reports, memoranda, letters, and personal communications. These are cited in the text at the end of each subsection and on the applicable tables and figures.

  17. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

  18. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

  19. Cost Study of Educational Media Systems and Their Equipment Components. Volume II, Technical Report. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Learning Corp., Washington, DC.

    A common instructional task and a set of educational environments are hypothesized for analysis of media cost data. The analytic structure may be conceptulized as a three-dimensional matrix: the first vector separates costs into production, distribution, and reception; the second vector delineates capital (initial) and operating (annual) costs;…

  20. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. The fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. STT R&D is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), dependng on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest.

  1. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-02-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. The fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. STT R&D is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), dependng on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest.

  2. Pack-and-Go Delivery Service: A Multi-Component Cost-Volume-Profit (CVP) Learning Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This educational case, in two parts (A and B), requires students to assume the role of a business consultant and to use Excel to develop a profit-planning or a cost-volume-profit (CVP) model for a package-delivery company opportunity currently being evaluated by a client. The name of the proposed business is Pack-and-Go, which would provide an…

  3. GPACC program cost work breakdown structure-dictionary. General purpose aft cargo carrier study, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The results of detailed cost estimates and economic analysis performed on the updated Model 101 configuration of the general purpose Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) are given. The objective of this economic analysis is to provide the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with information on the economics of using the ACC on the Space Transportation System (STS). The detailed cost estimates for the ACC are presented by a work breakdown structure (WBS) to ensure that all elements of cost are considered in the economic analysis and related subsystem trades. Costs reported by WBS provide NASA with a basis for comparing competing designs and provide detailed cost information that can be used to forecast phase C/D planning for new projects or programs derived from preliminary conceptual design studies. The scope covers all STS and STS/ACC launch vehicle cost impacts for delivering payloads to a 160 NM low Earth orbit (LEO).

  4. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 2, part 2: System engineering. [cost and programmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    The latest technical and programmatic developments are considered as well as expansions of the Rockwell SPS cost model covering each phase of the program through the year 2030. Comparative cost/economic analyses cover elements of the satellite, construction system, space transportation vehicles and operations, and the ground receiving station. System plans to define time phased costs and planning requirements that support major milestones through the year 2000. A special analysis is included on natural resources required to build the SPS reference configuration. An appendix contains the SPS Work Breakdown Structure and dictionary along with detail cost data sheet on each system and main element of the program. Over 200 line items address DDT&E, theoretical first unit, investment cost per satellite, and operations charges for replacement capital and normal operations and maintenance costs.

  5. Patent Abstract Digest. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    insert for high strength. ’The 339130ft.130C;361/390, 391, 399, 415 epoxy-glems bushing is machlied fromo poat stock With 339/30 .1 C;the grain...United States Patent [p91 [I 4,280,135 Siosabers [45] Jul 21, 1981 [541 REMOTE POINTING SYSTEM A’mary Examiner- Joseph A. Orsino, Jr. 176] Inventor...ward looking intruder detection system are eliminated MEASUREMENTS by look-up sensor instrumentation that utilizus mono- (751 Inventor: JOsePh L

  6. Oil shale mining cost analysis. Volume I. Surface retorting process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, B.S.; English, L.M.; Metz, R.D.; Lewis, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    An Oil Shale Mining Economic Model (OSMEM) was developed and executed for mining scenarios representative of commercially feasible mining operations. Mining systems were evaluated for candidate sites in the Piceance Creek Basin. Mining methods selected included: (1) room-and-pillar; (2) chamber-and-pillar, with spent shale backfilling; (3) sublevel stopping; and (4) sublevel stopping, with spent shale backfilling. Mines were designed to extract oil shale resources to support a 50,000 barrels-per-day surface processing facility. Costs developed for each mining scenario included all capital and operating expenses associated with the underground mining methods. Parametric and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the sensitivity of mining cost to changes in capital cost, operating cost, return on investment, and cost escalation.

  7. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Final conceptual design: Volume 2, Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-03-03

    Costs are listed for the following: magnet system, building layout and interface, cooling system, RF system, vacuum system, sensing system, injection system, interaction system, controls and instrumentation, program management and systems engineering, and testing and start-up. (DLC)

  8. Modulating ventilation - low cost VAV for office buildings. [Variable Air Volume]; Modulerende ventilation - low cost VAV til kontor-bygninger. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoej Christensen, A.; Olsen, Hans; Drivsholm, C.

    2012-02-15

    The report describes a concept for renovating older existing Constant Air Volume (CAV) ventilation systems to modulating low-cost Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems. The concept is based on the total ventilated area being divided into appropriate indoor climate zones, which can cover from one to several offices with similar climate needs. For this initial climate assessment two relatively ''simple'' tools were developed that can estimate the temperature level in one room from the ventilation airflow, heat loads, etc.: - BSimFast (24-hour mean temperature calculation according to SBI-196, 2000); - BSimLight (Temperature simulation based on Danvak Textbook of Heat and Climate Technology). The concept of 'one room' can also be extended to 'one zone' with appropriate assumptions. However, only one mean room temperature is calculated. The different climate zones were equipped with Halton HFB control unit at the air supply and exhaust side. The project the following feedback options were used: - HFB unit's damper opening degree (0 to 90 degrees); - HFB unit's current flow; - HFB unit's exhaust temperature; and feedback from: - Frequency transformer (fan speed); - The central static duct pressure at the ventilation unit. In the project a control algorithm is developed that ensures a robust control of the entire ventilation system without adverse cyclic variations, based among other things on the exhaust temperature for each climate zone, and with the requirement that at least one throttle valve is always at least 80% open. It turned out that information on the current partial air volumes was necessary in addition to the individual throttle settings. Otherwise, a cyclic variations could not be controlled..Thus, it was the exhaust temperature from individual climate zones that defined the respective volumes of air. The concept was implemented on a complete CAV system and on part of a large CAV system, respectively. (LN)

  9. A New, Effective and Low-Cost Three-Dimensional Approach for the Estimation of Upper-Limb Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Buffa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to validate a new procedure (SkanLab for the three-dimensional estimation of total arm volume. SkanLab is based on a single structured-light Kinect sensor (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA and on Skanect (Occipital, San Francisco, CA, USA and MeshLab (Visual Computing Lab, Pisa, Italy software. The volume of twelve plastic cylinders was measured using geometry, as the reference, water displacement and SkanLab techniques (two raters and repetitions. The right total arm volume of thirty adults was measured by water displacement (reference and SkanLab (two raters and repetitions. The bias and limits of agreement (LOA between techniques were determined using the Bland–Altman method. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and the standard error of measurement. The bias of SkanLab in measuring the cylinders volume was −21.9 mL (−5.7% (LOA: −62.0 to 18.2 mL; −18.1% to 6.7% and in measuring the volume of arms’ was −9.9 mL (−0.6% (LOA: −49.6 to 29.8 mL; −2.6% to 1.4%. SkanLab’s intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were very high (ICC >0.99. In conclusion, SkanLab is a fast, safe and low-cost method for assessing total arm volume, with high levels of accuracy and reliability. SkanLab represents a promising tool in clinical applications.

  10. Manufacturing cost analysis of a parabolic dish concentrator (General Electric design) for solar thermal electric power systems in selected production volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The manufacturing cost of a General Electric 12 meter diameter concentrator was estimated. This parabolic dish concentrator for solar thermal system was costed in annual production volumes of 100 - 1,000 - 5,000 - 10,000 - 50,000 100,000 - 400,000 and 1,000,000 units. Presented for each volume are the costs of direct labor, material, burden, tooling, capital equipment and buildings. Also presented is the direct labor personnel and factory space requirements. All costs are based on early 1981 economics.

  11. STS propellant scavenging systems study. Part 2, volume 2: Cost and WBS/dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of the cost analysis performed to update and refine the program phase C/D cost estimates for a Shuttle Derived Vehicle (SDV) tanker. The SDV tanker concept is an unmanned cargo vehicle incorporating a set of propellant tanks in the vehicle's payload module. The tanker will be used to meet the demand for a cryogenic propellant supply in orbit. The propellant tanks are delivered to a low Earth orbit or to an orbit in the vicinity of the Space Station. The intent of the economic analysis is to provide NASA with economic justification for the propellant scavenging concept that minimizes the total Space Transportation System life cycle cost. The detailed costs supporting the concept selection process are presented with descriptive text to aid in forecasting the phase C/D project and program planning. Included are all propellant scavenging costs as well as all SDV, STS and Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle charges to deliver the propellants to the Space Station.

  12. Systems cost/performance analysis (study 2.3). Volume 2, appendix A: Data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Data on selected payload equipments (components) which were collected for the purpose of exercising the systems cost performance model are reported in an appendix. The reader should be aware that, although most of the data are accurate, approximations based on engineering judgment and experience are used wherever actual data were unavailable. The approximations are justified by the objective of the study which was to develop a cost/performance model. Assuming that the model is successfully developed and is accepted for use by a body of users, the data base should be expanded and the approximations replaced by actual data.

  13. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer

  14. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  15. Low-cost preparation of mesoporous silica with high pore volume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuling Shen; Wei Wu; Kai Guo; Jianfeng Chen

    2007-01-01

    Mesoporous silica materials with high pore volume were successfully prepared by the chemical precipitation method, with water glass and a biodegradable nonionic surfactant polyethylene glycol (PEG). The obtained materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermo gravimetric analyzer and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the changes of the pore parameters depended on both the surfactant content and heat treatment temperature. When the content of PEG was 10wt% and the obtained PEG/SiO2 composite was heated at 600℃, the mesoporous silica with a pore volume of 2.2 cm3/g, a BET specific surface area of 361.55 m2/g, and a diameter of 2-4 μm could be obtained. The obtained mesoporous silica materials have potential applications in the fields of paint and plastic, as thickening, reinforcing, and flatting agents.

  16. Cost-Effectiveness Specification for Computer-Based Training Systems. Volume 1. Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    Included in this element are such places as auditoria , study halls, demonstration rooms, etc., where large numbers of students can be trained. Offices...etc.) which may accrue over several years will be permitted to surface and balance the large initial capital investment costs of implementing a

  17. The Major Causes of Cost Growth in Defense Acquisition, Volume II: Main Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Acquisition Volume II: Main Body Gene Porter, Project Leader Brian Gladstone C. Vance Gordon Nicholas Karvonides R. Royce Kneece, Jr. Jay Mandelbaum...Main Body Gene Porter, Project Leader Brian Gladstone C. Vance Gordon Nicholas Karvonides R. Royce Kneece, Jr. Jay Mandelbaum William D. O’Neil iii...information to DoD management on the status of the most important acquisition programs. Since 1969 , Congress has required that the SARs for MDAPs be

  18. Accurately measuring volume of soil samples using low cost Kinect 3D scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sterre, Boy-Santhos; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2013-04-01

    The 3D scanner of the Kinect game controller can be used to increase the accuracy and efficiency of determining in situ soil moisture content. Soil moisture is one of the principal hydrological variables in both the water and energy interactions between soil and atmosphere. Current in situ measurements of soil moisture either rely on indirect measurements (of electromagnetic constants or heat capacity) or on physically taking a sample and weighing it in a lab. The bottleneck in accurately retrieving soil moisture using samples is the determining of the volume of the sample. Currently this is mostly done by the very time consuming "sand cone method" in which the volume were the sample used to sit is filled with sand. We show that 3D scanner that is part of the 150 game controller extension "Kinect" can be used to make 3D scans before and after taking the sample. The accuracy of this method is tested by scanning forms of known volume. This method is less time consuming and less error-prone than using a sand cone.

  19. Research on producing high quality diffractive optical elements in volume at a low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daschner, Walter

    1997-11-01

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) can be utilized in a variety of possible applications in modern optical, as well as optoelectronic systems. The current roadblock for application of DOEs in consumer products is not the feasibility of the approach, as numerous applications have been successfully demonstrated. In order for the breakthrough to occur in industry, it is important to determine a convenient and cost-effective method for manufacturing DOEs. The industry will improve the design of their legacy systems and start including DOEs only when the performance improvement (which the utilization of DOEs achieves), can be purchased with a minimal amount of additional capital investment and cost-per-part. Therefore, the focus of this dissertation was to find a cost-effective method of fabricating large quantities of DOEs with currently available fabrication tools. Direct-write approaches were investigated to fabricate high-quality masters for a subsequent replication procedure based upon molding or casting. Electron-Beam Direct-Write was carried-out in a positive Novolac-based photo-resist which provides dry etch resistivity. Another focus of this development was to find a way to minimize Electron-Beam writing time for a given element. Proximity effect characterization and compensation has been carried-out in order to increase the fidelity of the pattern reproduction. A dry-etching procedure has been developed in order to transfer resist profiles into the substrate material. During this transfer step, the etch rates of resist and substrate material can be controlled; this in turn allows a choice of final feature depth in the substrate material (depending on refractive index and wavelength in use). Two Gray-Scale masking approaches were developed to allow the cost-effective mass fabrication of DOEs in a single optical exposure step. Thin film evaporation of Inconel achieves high-quality masks at a high price. High Energy Beam Sensitive Glass, the second mask material

  20. Oceanic Area System Improvement Study (OASIS). Volume VIII. Central East Pacific Region Flight Cost Model Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    RI ~ 4, 4, 5 - .4 u.n a a . 5g 4, ~ .4 0 8.41.4 .4 41 __________________________________ U 4, 1 .44,~5 44j~ 1 0 a ~ a 4,~1 4 ~.4N ~𔃾 41 - -4 0 U 4 -4...costs of the uncorrected ’error were somewhat mitigated by the Flight Tracking Model’s resolution of the conflict on the now- congested lower flight

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Appendices. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Appendices are presented concerning the evaluations of decommissioning financing alternatives; reference site description; reference BWR facility description; radiation dose rate and concrete surface contamination data; radionuclide inventories; public radiation dose models and calculated maximum annual doses; decommissioning methods; generic decommissioning information; immediate dismantlement details; passive safe storage, continuing care, and deferred dismantlement details; entombment details; demolition and site restoration details; cost estimating bases; public radiological safety assessment details; and details of alternate study bases.

  2. Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

  3. Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME) (18th, Lisbon, Portugal, July 29-August 3, 1994). Volumes I-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Ponte, Joao Pedro, Ed.; Matos, Joao Filipe, Ed.

    The Proceedings of PME-XVIII have been published in four separate volumes because of the large number of individual conference papers reported. Volume I contains brief reports for 11 Working Groups and 8 Discussion Groups, 55 "Short Oral Communications," 28 Posters, 5 Plenary Panel reports, and 4 Plenary Session reports. Volume II…

  5. A Small-Volume, Low-Cost, and Versatile Continuous Culture Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick Matteau

    Full Text Available Continuous culture devices can be used for various purposes such as establishing reproducible growth conditions or maintaining cell populations under a constant environment for long periods. However, commercially available instruments are expensive, were not designed to handle small volumes in the milliliter range, and can lack the flexibility required for the diverse experimental needs found in several laboratories.We developed a versatile continuous culture system and provide detailed instructions as well as a graphical user interface software for potential users to assemble and operate their own instrument. Three culture chambers can be controlled simultaneously with the proposed configuration, and all components are readily available from various sources. We demonstrate that our continuous culture device can be used under different modes, and can easily be programmed to behave either as a turbidostat or chemostat. Addition of fresh medium to the culture vessel can be controlled by a real-time feedback loop or simply calibrated to deliver a defined volume. Furthermore, the selected light-emitting diode and photodetector enable the use of phenol red as a pH indicator, which can be used to indirectly monitor the bulk metabolic activity of a cell population rather than the turbidity.This affordable and customizable system will constitute a useful tool in many areas of biology such as microbial ecology as well as systems and synthetic biology.

  6. ICAM (Integrated Computer-Aided Manufacturing) Manufacturing Cost/Design Guide. Volume 6. Project Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    FIGURE 11. EXAMPLE OF CED FORM.AT FOR ALUMI;NUM, SKIN 3-11 ,. .. >. . 1 .. . . • , 0 0 20 30 40 50 FTR450260000 15 Jan 1985 356-TS/ A356 -T6 ALUMINUM ...of DICE Format for Sheet Metal Parts .. 3-10 11 Example of CED Format for Aluminum Skin. . . . .. 3-11 12 Example of CED Format for Aluminum ...Investment Castings ............. . . . . . 3-12 13 Example of CED Format for Material Cost of Aluminum Extrusions .... ............. ... 3-13 14 Example of

  7. User manual for GEOCOST: a computer model for geothermal cost analysis. Volume 2. Binary cycle version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Walter, R.A.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1976-03-01

    A computer model called GEOCOST has been developed to simulate the production of electricity from geothermal resources and calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. GEOCOST combines resource characteristics, power recovery technology, tax rates, and financial factors into one systematic model and provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate their impacts on the cost of geothermal power. Both the geothermal reservoir and power plant are simulated to model the complete energy production system. In the version of GEOCOST in this report, geothermal fluid is supplied from wells distributed throughout a hydrothermal reservoir through insulated pipelines to a binary power plant. The power plant is simulated using a binary fluid cycle in which the geothermal fluid is passed through a series of heat exchangers. The thermodynamic state points in basic subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles are calculated for a variety of working fluids. Working fluids which are now in the model include isobutane, n-butane, R-11, R-12, R-22, R-113, R-114, and ammonia. Thermodynamic properties of the working fluids at the state points are calculated using empirical equations of state. The Starling equation of state is used for hydrocarbons and the Martin-Hou equation of state is used for fluorocarbons and ammonia. Physical properties of working fluids at the state points are calculated.

  8. Analysis of Phoenix Anomalies and IV and V Findings Applied to the GRAIL Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of patterns in IV&V findings and their correlation with post-launch anomalies allowed GRAIL to make more efficient use of IV&V services . Fewer issues. . Higher fix rate. . Better communication. . Increased volume of potential issues vetted, at lower cost. . Hard to make predictions of post-launch performance based on IV&V findings . Phoenix made sound fix/use as-is decisions . Things that were fixed eliminated some problems, but hard to quantify. . Broad predictive success in one area, but inverse relationship in others.

  9. A low-cost, small volume circuit for autologous blood normothermic perfusion of rabbit organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worner, Murray; Poore, Samuel; Tilkorn, Daniel; Lokmic, Zerina; Penington, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    We have designed a laboratory extracorporeal normothermic blood perfusion system for whole organs (e.g., kidney) that achieves pulsatile flow, low levels of hemolysis, and a blood priming volume of 60 mL or less. Using this uniquely designed extracorporeal circuit, we have achieved perfusion of two isolated ex vivo constructs. In the first experiment, we successfully perfused a rabbit epigastric flap based on the femoral vessels. In the second experiment, we were able to perfuse the isolated rabbit kidney for 48 h (range for all kidneys was 12-48 h) with excellent urine output, normal arterial blood gasses at 24 h, and normal ex vivo kidney histology at the conclusion of the experiments. These parameters have not been achieved before with any known or previously published laboratory extracorporeal circuits. The study has implications for prolonged organ perfusion prior to transplantation and for tissue engineering of vascularized tissues, such as by the perfusion of decellularized organs.

  10. Solar Pilot Plant, Phase I: preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost, commercial plant cost and performance. CDRL item 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-06-01

    Cost estimates are presented for the Solar Pilot Plant by cost breakdown structure element, with a commitment schedule and an expenditure schedule. Cost estimates are given for a Commercial Plant, including several point costs for plants with various solar multiples and storage times. Specific questions (ERDA) pertaining to commercial plant design and performance data are addressed. The cost estimates are supplemented by two books of vendor and subcontractor cost data.

  11. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 1: primary model documentation, Book 2, Chapters IV, V, VI, and VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, R.E.; Herod, J.S.

    1978-06-19

    The Industrial Sector Technology Use Model provides a single framework for integrating all of the information and analysis into a set of predictions of industrial energy use. Given this volume of information which must be considered, this requires a set of computerized engineering-economic models. The design of these models is the subject of Chapter IV. The environmental factors in ISTUM are developed and presented in Chapter V. Chapter VI discusses the work accomplished by DATA Resources, Inc. in support of the ISTUM. A glossary, briefly defining special terms used in the ISTUM documentation, is given in Chapter VII. (MCW)

  12. Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods: the case for cost over volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, Rebecca K; Sidle, John E; Wamalwa, Emmanuel S; Okumu, Thomas O; Bryant, Kendall L; Goulet, Joseph L; Maisto, Stephen A; Braithwaite, R Scott; Justice, Amy C

    2010-08-01

    Traditional homemade brew is believed to represent the highest proportion of alcohol use in sub-Saharan Africa. In Eldoret, Kenya, two types of brew are common: chang'aa, spirits, and busaa, maize beer. Local residents refer to the amount of brew consumed by the amount of money spent, suggesting a culturally relevant estimation method. The purposes of this study were to analyze ethanol content of chang'aa and busaa; and to compare two methods of alcohol estimation: use by cost, and use by volume, the latter the current international standard. Laboratory results showed mean ethanol content was 34% (SD = 14%) for chang'aa and 4% (SD = 1%) for busaa. Standard drink unit equivalents for chang'aa and busaa, respectively, were 2 and 1.3 (US) and 3.5 and 2.3 (Great Britain). Using a computational approach, both methods demonstrated comparable results. We conclude that cost estimation of alcohol content is more culturally relevant and does not differ in accuracy from the international standard.

  13. Analisis Cost Volume Profit sebagai Alat Bantu Manajemen dalam Rangka Perencanaan Laba dengan Penerapan Teori Kendala pada PT Skylite Surya Internusa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Deviarti

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available PT Skylite Solar Internusa is an industrial company that produces the houses lights and panel box. The purpose of this study is to help companies classify costs according to the behavior of costs, determine the calculation of the break event point of multiproduct, profit planning, and to overcome the constraints that occured in the company. The authors obtained data directly to the company's research and interviews with relevant parties, such as the production and the accounting department. The increase in profit in the fiscal year period 2009 due to demand for homes increased light and panel box. It can be concluded that the application of Cost-Volume-Profit analysis by using the break event point multiproduct can help management to determine how much sales volume may decline from the volume of sales is budgeted by the company and the company can make profit plan in 2010.

  14. Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint Experiment 1975-1976. Physical Oceanography Data Report, Salinity, Temperature and Depth Data, Camp Big Bear. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    PROFILEF PFR HA~LF DlAY (AM/P2M GMAT ) TS PLOTEI .EACH pRFFILE RJ)F.tIJ WITH PE~pFCT TO LiEfT OIVISIYJ MAK (-1-9 11X3.C*) T E)VPERATL-E SCALE SHlIFTS...wD W. IV. to CO toN~ w d x 1 CA OJ D *0 NOORE TH ’,4 ONE PREILE PER H&YL DAY (AM/PM GMAT ) IS PLOTTED -FACH PROJFILE RLOTTED WITH RESPECT TO LEFT

  15. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 2. Appendices. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE. This volume contains the appendices.

  16. Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darghouth, Naim; Wiser, Ryan

    2011-09-07

    The present report describes installed cost trends for grid-connected PV projects installed from 1998 through 2010 (with some limited and preliminary results presented for projects installed in the first six months of 2011). The analysis is based on project-level cost data from approximately 116,500 residential, non-residential, and utility-sector PV systems in the United States. The inclusion of utility-sector PV is a new element in this year’s report. The combined capacity of all systems in the data sample totals 1,685 MW, equal to 79% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the United States through 2010 and representing one of the most comprehensive sources of installed PV cost data for the U.S. Based on this dataset, the report describes historical installed cost trends over time, and by location, market segment, technology type, and component. The report also briefly compares recent PV installed costs in the United States to those in Germany and Japan, and describes trends in customer incentives for PV installations and net installed costs after receipt of such incentives. The analysis presented here focuses on descriptive trends in the underlying data, serving primarily to summarize the data in tabular and graphical form.

  17. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program: Volume 2, Supporting information. [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    This report provides cost estimates for the fifth evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans. The total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is estimated at $32.1 to $38.2 billion (expressed in constant 1986 collars) over the entire life of the system, or $1.5 to $1.6 billion more than that of the authorized system (i.e., the system without an MRS facility). The current estimate of the total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is $3.8 to $5.4 billion higher than the estimate for the same system in the 1986 TSLCC analysis. In the case with the maximum increase, nearly all of the higher cost is due to a $5.2-billion increase in the costs of development and evaluation (D and E); all other system costs are essentially unchanged. The cost difference between the improved-performance system and the authorized system is smaller than the difference estimated in last year's TSLCC analysis. Volume 2 presents the detailed results for the 1987 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost (TSLCC). It consists of four sections: Section A presents the yearly flows of waste between waste-management facilities for the 12 aggregate logistics cases that were studied; Section B presents the annual total-system costs for each of the 30 TSLCC cases by major cost category; Section C presents the annual costs for the disposal of 16,000 canisters of defense high-level waste (DHLW) by major cost category for each of the 30 TSLCC cases; and Section D presents a summary of the cost-allocation factors that were calculated to determine the defense waste share of the total-system costs.

  18. Assessment of the Combat Developer’s Role in Post-Deployment Software Support (PDSS) 30 June 1980 - 28 February 1981. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-31

    automation of individual battlefield systems is presenting increasing requirements for larger volumes of traffic, especially digital traffic, at higher...time" requirements of manual command and control in which time is measured in minutes to hours. These trends in digital data, time-compression, traffic...operations research, systems analysis, mathematics, electrical and electronic engineering, computer science, comunications and Army communications

  19. Proceedings of the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (11th, Austin, Texas, April 24-26, 1997). Volumes I-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yearout, Robert D., Ed.

    This set of proceedings documents includes 407 papers representative of the 1,825 papers and posters presented at a conference on undergraduate research. Volume I contains papers on the arts and humanities. Examples of topics include collaborative art, music composition using computer technology, interpreting Roman morality, gay marriage, and…

  20. SOLVENT-BASED TO WATERBASED ADHESIVE-COATED SUBSTRATE RETROFIT - VOLUME IV: FILM AND LABEL MANUFACTURING CASE STUDY: FLEXCON COMPANY, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume discusses a visit to a site operated by FLEXcon Company, Inc., a pressure-sensitive adhesive coater, to collect information on the pollution prevention opportunities and barriers associated with waterbased adhesives. The purpose of the visit to FLEXcon was to gather i...

  1. Cost of fuel cell systems on a mass basis as a function of production volume; Kosten von Brennstoffzellensystemen auf Massenbasis in Abhaengigkeit von der Absatzmenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werhahn, Johannes

    2009-07-01

    The currently high cost of fuel cells is determined by expensive materials and low production volume. A detailed understanding of the cost structures reveals unexploited potential that can reduce costs in future. However, this requires a method of predicting costs that can be applied with little effort and which offers both a sufficient degree of detail and also good accuracy. Existing forecasting methods do not, however, fulfil these requirements. The major objective of the present work was to apply mass-specific cost forecasting to fuel cell systems for the first time and to modify the approach for this application. In this method, the cost of an object is estimated solely by means of the object mass with the aid of empirical values (Euro/kg). The advantages of the method are its simple application and the accuracy of the forecast. Due to the considerable complexity of the fuel cell and the heterogeneity of the materials used, the application of mass-specific cost forecasting does not provide the desired benefits on the level of the aggregated system. The mass-specific cost forecast approach was therefore expanded and optimized. Instead of determining costs on the level of the aggregated system, the cost forecast was applied directly to the individual components. Cost parameters were also embedded in the method in order to include component-internal cost-relevant differences. Due to the great influence of the production rate on the manufacturing costs, an additional dependence on number of units was also integrated. Expanding the empirical values from discrete values to distribution functions enabled a detailed error analysis to be performed and also a statistical localization of the predicted production costs. Empirical values are necessary in order to implement the modified method and therefore an extensive data search was performed. To this end, a methodology was developed which comprehensively described the data acquisition and the required data evaluation on

  2. Analysis of concentrating PV-T systems for the commercial/industrial sector. Volume IV. Design analysis and trade-off study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1984-09-01

    Detailed reference designs developed for optimally sized photovoltaic-thermal (PV-T) systems are presented for three selected applications. The results of trade-off analyses to determine the effects of load variations, new components, changes in location, and variations in array cost are also discussed.

  3. Projection models for health effects assessment in populations exposed to radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants. Volume IV. SPAHR user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J.J.; Lundy, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    The Simulation Package for the Analysis of Health Risk (SPAHR) is a computer software package based upon a demographic model for health risk projections. The model extends several health risk projection models by making realistic assumptions about the population at risk, and thus represents a distinct improvement over previous models. Complete documentation for use of SPAHR is contained in this five-volume publication. The demographic model in SPAHR estimates population response to environmental toxic exposures. Latency of response, changing dose level over time, competing risks from other causes of death, and population structure can be incorporated into SPAHR to project health risks. Risks are measured by morbid years, number of deaths, and loss of life expectancy. Comparisons of estimates of excess deaths demonstrate that previous health risk projection models may have underestimated excess deaths by a factor of from 2 to 10, depending on the pollutant and the exposure scenario. The software supporting the use of the demographic model is designed to be user oriented. Complex risk projections are made by responding to a series of prompts generated by the package. The flexibility and ease of use of SPAHR make it an important contribution to existing models and software packages. This volume gives the more advanced user of the SPAHR computer package the information required to create tailor-made programs for addressing specific issues not covered by the three interactive packages. It assumes that the user is familiar with the concepts and terms relating to demography and health risk assessment.

  4. Comparação do volume da gota e custo do tratamento dos genéricos de maleato de timolol 0,5% Drop volume and cost of treatment with generic 0.5% timolol maleate preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Antonio Prata Junior

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o volume da gota das medicações genéricas de maleato de timolol a fim de determinar o custo real do tratamento em relação à medicação de referência. MÉTODOS: Foi determinado o volume da gota do Timoptol® 0,5% (Merck Sharp & Dome e dos genéricos maleato de timolol 0,5% dos laboratórios Allergan-Lok, Cristália e Falcon. Cinco frascos de 5 ml de cada medicação foram adquiridos no mercado. Dez gotas de cada frasco foram pesadas em balança de precisão individualmente, bem como, um mililitro de cada frasco para a determinação do volume da gota. Com base no volume da gota foi calculada a duração média em dias e o custo anual, considerando-se o gasto diário de 4 gotas e o preço máximo ao consumidor publicado em maio de 2003 com alíquota de 18%. RESULTADOS: Observaram-se diferenças estatisticamente significantes do volume da gota entre as medicações (pPURPOSE: To compare drop volume and treatment cost of generic 0.5% timolol maleate preparations. METHODS: The drop volume of Timoptol® 0.5% (Merck Sharp & Dohme and its generic preparations (Allergan-Lok, Cristália and Falcon were determined. Five bottles of each medication were purchased at local drugstores. Using a precision scale, ten drops and one mililiter of each bottle were weighed. Drop volume was calculated by the relation between volume and weight. Duration, in days, of each bottle and annual cost were calculated considering a daily use of 4 drops and maximum price to consumers published May, 2003. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were observed between drop volumes (p<0.0001%. Allergan-Lok timolol maleate had the largest drop (35.1 µl and the smallest was Falcon timolol maleate (27.3 µl. Timoptol® drop volume was 27.9 µl. Annual treatment costs were R$ 68.87 for Timoptol, R$ 72.76 for Allergan-Lok timolol maleate, R$ 50.00 for Cristalia timolol maleate and R$ 43.11 for Falcon timolol maleate (p<0.0001. Allergan-Lok timolol

  5. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Volume 2. Supporting information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-04-01

    This report presents the detailed results and assumptions for the January 1986 Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) analysis. The report is composed of three sections: Section A lists the costing assumptions which have been made about the principal waste management system parameters; Section B presents the yearly flows of waste material between system facilities for the 8 logistics cases which were studied; and Section C presents the annual total system costs for each of the 32 TSLCC cases by major cost category.

  6. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume III of IV, Assessment of Fishway Development and Design, 1982-1983 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    This volume covers the broad, though relatively short, historical basis for this project. The historical developments of certain design features, criteria and research activities are traced. Current design practices are summarized based on the results of an international survey and interviews with agency personnel and consultants. The fluid mechanics and hydraulics of fishway systems are discussed. Fishways (or fishpasses) can be classified in two ways: (1) on the basis of the method of water control (chutes, steps (ladders), or slots); and (2) on the basis of the degree and type of water control. This degree of control ranges from a natural waterfall to a totally artificial environment at a hatchery. Systematic procedures for analyzing fishways based on their configuration, species, and hydraulics are presented. Discussions of fish capabilities, energy expenditure, attraction flow, stress and other factors are included.

  7. Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

    1993-02-01

    The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration`s 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO{sub 2} emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO{sub 2} emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

  8. Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

    1993-02-01

    The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration's 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO[sub 2] emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO[sub 2] emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO[sub 2] emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO[sub 2] emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

  9. High-Volume Transanal Surgery with CPH34 HV for the Treatment of III-IV Degree Haemorrhoids: Final Short-Term Results of an Italian Multicenter Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Reboa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical chart of 621 patients with III-IV haemorrhoids undergoing Stapled Hemorrhoidopexy (SH with CPH34 HV in 2012–2014 was consecutively reviewed to assess its safety and efficacy after at least 12 months of follow-up. Mean volume of prolapsectomy was significantly higher (13.0 mL; SD, 1.4 in larger prolapse (9.3 mL; SD, 1.2 (p<0.001. Residual or recurrent haemorrhoids occurred in 11 of 621 patients (1.8% and in 12 of 581 patients (1.9%, respectively. Relapse was correlated with higher preoperative Constipation Scoring System (CSS (p=0.000, Pescatori’s degree (p=0.000, Goligher’s grade (p=0.003, prolapse exceeding half of the length of the Circular Anal Dilator (CAD (p=0.000, and higher volume of prolapsectomy (p=0.000. At regression analysis, only the preoperative CSS, Pescatori’s degree, Goligher’s grade, and volume of resection were significantly predictive of relapse. A high level of satisfaction (VAS = 8.6; SD, 1.0 coupled with a reduction of 12-month CSS (Δ preoperative CSS/12 mo CSS = 3.4, SD, 2.0; p<0.001 was observed. The wider prolapsectomy achievable with CPH34 HV determined an overall 3.7% relapse rate in patients with high prevalence of large internal rectal prolapse, coupled with high satisfaction index, significant reduction of CSS, and very low complication rates.

  10. DACC program cost and work breakdown structure-dictionary. General purpose aft cargo carrier study, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Results of detailed cost estimates and economic analysis performed on the updated 201 configuration of the dedicated Aft Cargo Carrier (DACC) are given. The objective of this economic analysis is to provide the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) with information on the economics of using the DACC on the Space Transportation System (STS). The detailed cost estimates for the DACC are presented by a work breakdown structure (WBS) to ensure that all elements of cost are considered in the economic analysis and related subsystem trades. Costs reported by WBS provide NASA with a basis for comparing competing designs and provide detailed cost information that can be used to forecast phase C/D planning for new projects or programs derived from preliminary conceptual design studies. The scope covers all STS and STS/DACC launch vehicle cost impacts for delivering an orbital transfer vehicle to a 120 NM low Earth orbit (LEO).

  11. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a Reference Boiling Water Reactor Power Station. Main report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWe.

  12. A study of space station needs, attributes and architectural options, volume 2, technical. Book 3: Economic benefits, costs and programmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The economic benefits, cost analysis, and industrial uses of the manned space station are investigated. Mission payload costs are examined in relation to alternative architectures and projected technological evolution. Various approaches to industrial involvement for financing, development, and marketing of space station resources are described.

  13. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Volume 1. Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, C. E.; Murphy, E. S.; Schneider, K J

    1979-01-01

    Detailed technology, safety and cost information are presented for the conceptual decommissioning of a reference small mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant. Alternate methods of decommissioning are described including immediate dismantlement, safe storage for a period of time followed by dismantlement and entombment. Safety analyses, both occupational and public, and cost evaluations were conducted for each mode.

  14. Assessing high altitude glacier volume change and remaining thickness using cost-efficient scientific techniques: the case of Nevado Coropuna (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Peduzzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher temperature and change in precipitation patterns have induced an acute decrease in Andean glaciers, thus leading to an additional stress on water supply. To adapt to climate changes, local governments need information on the rate of glacier volume losses and on current ice thickness. We show how volume changes can be accurately estimated in remote areas using readily available low-cost digital elevation models derived from both topographic maps and satellite images. They were used for estimating the volume changes over the Coropuna glacier (Peru from 1955 to 2002. Ice thickness was measured in 2004 using a georadar coupled with Ground Positioning System during a field expedition. It provided profiles of ice thickness on different slopes, orientations and altitudes. These were used to model the current glacier volume using Geographical Information System and statistical multiple regressions techniques. Computers were modified to resists to high altitude (6500 m temperatures and low pressure conditions. The results delineated a significant glacier volume loss and provided an estimate of the remaining ice. It provided the scientific evidence needed by local Peruvian NGO, COPASA, and the German Cooperation Program in order to alert local governments and communities and for enforcing new climate change adaptation policies.

  15. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 2: Assumptions, methodology and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. Three fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. Solar thermal technology research and development (R&D) is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), depending on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest. Analysis is also provided regarding two federal incentives currently in use: The Federal Business Energy Tax Credit and direct R&D funding.

  16. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 2: Assumptions, methodology and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-02-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. Three fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. Solar thermal technology research and development (R&D) is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), depending on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest. Analysis is also provided regarding two federal incentives currently in use: The Federal Business Energy Tax Credit and direct R&D funding.

  17. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km{sup 2} Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included.

  18. Estimating the real world daily usage and cost for exenatide twice daily and liraglutide in Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK based on volumes dispensed by pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDonell AL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L McDonell,1 Urpo Kiiskinen,2 Danielle C Zammit,3 Robert W Kotchie,1 Per-Olof Thuresson,3 Claudia Nicolay,4 Thomas Haslam,1 Michiel Bruinsma,5 Anne-Jeanine Janszen-Van Oosterhout,6 Thorsten Otto41IMS Health, London, UK; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Helsinki, Finland; 3IMS Health, Basel, Switzerland; 4Eli Lilly and Company, Bad Homburg, Germany; 5IMS Health, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 6Eli Lilly Nederland, Houten, the NetherlandsBackground: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonists are indicated for improvement of glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Cost is one aspect of treatment to be considered, in addition to clinical benefits, when selecting optimal therapy for a patient. The objective of this study was to estimate the average dose usage and real world daily cost of the GLP-1 receptor agonists, exenatide twice daily and liraglutide once daily, in Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK.Methods: Administrative databases were used to source the data from longitudinal records of dispensed prescriptions. Data were extracted from the IMS Longitudinal Prescription database which captures details of prescriptions dispensed in pharmacies. Information on the dispensed quantity of each product was used to estimate average daily usage per patient. Daily dose usage was multiplied by the public price per unit to estimate daily cost.Results: The dispensed volume in Germany corresponded to a mean dispensed daily dose of 16.81 µg for exenatide twice daily and 1.37 mg for liraglutide (mean daily cost €4.02 and €4.54, respectively. In the Netherlands, average dispensed daily doses of 17.07 µg and 1.49 mg were observed for exenatide twice daily and liraglutide (mean daily cost €3.05 and €3.97, respectively. In the UK, the mean dispensed volume corresponded to a daily usage of 20.49 µg for exenatide twice daily and 1.50 mg for liraglutide (mean daily cost £2.53 and £3.28, respectively.Conclusion: Estimates of average daily

  19. Aircraft Avionics and Missile System Installation Cost Study. Volume 1. Technical Report and Appendices A through E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-12

    adj.) = . 9313 SEE = 74 Mean = 209.85 Range = mhrs_100: 1.14 to 817 hw cac; 21 to 262 cabin: 0 to 117 cabrem: 0 to 339.6 IV-25 This CER applies to cases...300 gallon drop tank and the ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming Pod, the EA -6B did not have an ordnance carriage capability. This l.mited both training and...installation of the enhanced digital scan converter group (EDSCG). GFE EDSCG are required, consisting of: 1 ea - Signa. Data Converter, Intra Target

  20. Maglev Launch: Ultra-low Cost, Ultra-high Volume Access to Space for Cargo and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of efforts to reduce rocket launch costs, improvements are marginal. Launch cost to LEO for cargo is ~$10,000 per kg of payload, and to higher orbit and beyond much greater. Human access to the ISS costs $20 million for a single passenger. Unless launch costs are greatly reduced, large scale commercial use and human exploration of the solar system will not occur. A new approach for ultra low cost access to space-Maglev Launch-magnetically accelerates levitated spacecraft to orbital speeds, 8 km/sec or more, in evacuated tunnels on the surface, using Maglev technology like that operating in Japan for high speed passenger transport. The cost of electric energy to reach orbital speed is less than $1 per kilogram of payload. Two Maglev launch systems are described, the Gen-1System for unmanned cargo craft to orbit and Gen-2, for large-scale access of human to space. Magnetically levitated and propelled Gen-1 cargo craft accelerate in a 100 kilometer long evacuated tunnel, entering the atmosphere at the tunnel exit, which is located in high altitude terrain (~5000 meters) through an electrically powered ``MHD Window'' that prevents outside air from flowing into the tunnel. The Gen-1 cargo craft then coasts upwards to space where a small rocket burn, ~0.5 km/sec establishes, the final orbit. The Gen-1 reference design launches a 40 ton, 2 meter diameter spacecraft with 35 tons of payload. At 12 launches per day, a single Gen-1 facility could launch 150,000 tons annually. Using present costs for tunneling, superconductors, cryogenic equipment, materials, etc., the projected construction cost for the Gen-1 facility is 20 billion dollars. Amortization cost, plus Spacecraft and O&M costs, total $43 per kg of payload. For polar orbit launches, sites exist in Alaska, Russia, and China. For equatorial orbit launches, sites exist in the Andes and Africa. With funding, the Gen-1 system could operate by 2020 AD. The Gen-2 system requires more advanced technology

  1. Developing Successful Proposals in Women's Educational Equity, Volume I: The Guide = Desarrollo de propuestas exitosas relacionadas con la equidad educativa de la mujer, volumen I: La guia. Volume II: The Supplement. Volume III: The Swipe File. Volume IV: Workshop Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Walter R.; And Others

    Four volumes present materials and a training workshop on proposal writing. The materials aim to give people the skills and resources with which to translate their ideas into fully developed grant proposals for projects related to educational equity for women. However, the information is applicable to most other funding procedures. The first…

  2. Energy intensive industry for Alaska. Volume I: Alaskan cost factors; market factors; survey of energy-intensive industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, W.H.; Clement, M.; Baker, E.G.; Elliot, D.C.; Jacobsen, J.J.; Powers, T.B.; Rohrmann, C.A.; Schiefelbein, G.L.

    1978-09-01

    The Alaskan and product market factors influencing industry locations in the state are discussed and a survey of the most energy intensive industries was made. Factors external to Alaska that would influence development and the cost of energy and labor in Alaska are analyzed. Industries that are likely to be drawn to Alaska because of its energy resources are analyzed in terms of: the cost of using Alaska energy resources in Alaska as opposed to the Lower 48; skill-adjusted wage and salary differentials between relevant Alaskan areas and the Lower 48; and basic plant and equipment and other operating cost differentials between relevant Alaskan areas and the Lower 48. Screening and evaluation of the aluminum metal industry, cement industry, chlor-alkali industry, lime industry, production of methanol from coal, petroleum refining, and production of petrochemicals and agrichemicals from North Slope natural gas for development are made.

  3. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1980-05-01

    Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

  4. Department of Defense Materiel Distribution System Study. Volume 3, Book 5. Appendix D-3. Depot Cost and Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-01

    placed on labor. This premium is caused by the need to wear special cloth- ing, more inefficient working in cold spaces, and the need for extra...built-up asphalt and felt p*i>er with aggregate covering.- In addition to normal loadings, 100,000 square feet of the framing shall be stressed to...days per year. Conversion of shipments from annual to daily volumes involved a different routine. The annual shipment data received from the Stud

  5. High Voltage Design Guide. Volume IV. Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    by the reaction of urea with formaldehyde. An amino resin. Urethane. See Isocyanate Resins. Vinyl Resin. A synthetic resin formed by the polymerization...oxidation reactions are sludge, asphalt , a:ids, organic esters, soaps, and oxides. Oil color, as an index of the degree of refineme.. for unused oils...Materials Alkyd resins Acrylic plastics Cellulose esters Asphalt Cork Chloride flux Epoxy resins Copper (bare) Masonite Fiber board Melamine resins Greases

  6. Commencement Bay Study. Volume IV. Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    BAY Taxa Epibenthic Pump Infaunal Core Hydrozoa Hydroida (polyp) + Scyphozoa Scyphozoan medusae + Nemertea + Nematoda + + Turbellaria Polycladida...Occurrence Nemertea 2 0.8 Polychaeta unid. 14 5.9 Armandia brevis 3 1.2 Caitella capitata 6 2.5 Cirratulidae 1 0.4 Eteone longa 1 0.4 Platynereis

  7. Balanced program plan. Volume IV. Coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C. R.; Reichle, D. E.; Gehrs, C. W.

    1976-05-01

    This document contains a description of the biomedical and environmental research necessary to ensure the timely attainment of coal conversion technologies amenable to man and his environment. The document is divided into three sections. The first deals with the types of processes currently being considered for development; the data currently available on composition of product, process and product streams, and their potential effects; and problems that might arise from transportation and use of products. Section II is concerned with a description of the necessary research in each of the King-Muir categories, while the third section presents the research strategies necessary to assess the potential problems at the conversion plant (site specific) and those problems that might effect the general public and environment as a result of the operation of large-scale coal conversion plants. (auth)

  8. Cost and accuracy comparison between the diffuse interface method and the geometric volume of fluid method for simulating two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjalili, Shahab; Ivey, Christopher Blake; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The diffuse interface(DI) and volume of fluid(VOF) methods are mass conserving front capturing schemes which can handle large interfacial topology changes in realistic two phase flows. The DI method is a conservative phase field method that tracks an interface with finite thickness spread over a few cells and does not require reinitialization. In addition to having the desirable properties of level set methods for naturally capturing curvature and surface tension forces, the model conserves mass continuously and discretely. The VOF method, which tracks the fractional tagged volume in a cell, is discretely conservative by requiring costly geometric reconstructions of the interface and the fluxes. Both methods however, suffer from inaccuracies in calculation of curvature and surface tension forces. We present a quantitative comparison of these methods in terms of their accuracy, convergence rate, memory, and computational cost using canonical 2D two-phase test cases: damped surface wave, oscillating drop, equilibrium static drop, and dense moving drop. We further compared the models in their ability to handle thin films by looking at the impact of a water drop onto a deep water pool. Considering these results, we suggest qualitative guidelines for using the DI and VOF methods. Supported by ONR.

  9. Scale-up of Novel Low-Cost Carbon Fibers Leading to High-Volume Commercial Launch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, Mark A [The Dow Chemical Company

    2014-08-27

    The project started in September, 2012 with the goal of scaling up from the existing laboratory scale process for producing carbon fiber (CF) from polyolefin (PO) based precursor fiber using a Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation stabilization process. The award was used to develop a process that was capable of producing market development quantities of CF from PO precursor fiber at a rate of 4 kg/h of CF. The CF would target properties that met or exceeded the Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicles Technology [1] standard; i.e., 172 GPa modulus and 1.72 GPa strength at greater than or equal to 1% strain. The Dow proprietary process was capable of meeting and exceeding these targets properties. Project DE-EE0005760 resulted from a Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Dow and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with support from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and DOE. In the first budget period, the main goal was to design a sulfonation-desulfonation market development plant capable of stabilizing PO precursor fiber at a rate of 5 kg/h using a sulfonation solution. The detailed design, location, and cost estimate were determined as scheduled in the Project Management Plan (PMP). In parallel with this DOE award project was a fundamentals and economic evaluation funded by The Dow Chemical Company (Dow). The goal of the Dow sponsored project was to finalize the mass balances, energy balances, and levelized cost to produce CF using the Dow process. A Go-No-Go decision was scheduled in June, 2013 based on the findings of the DOE sponsored scale up project and the Dow sponsored project. In June, 2013, Dow made the No-Go decision to halt and abandon the Dow proprietary sulfonation-desulfonation process for stabilizing PO precursor fibers for the manufacturing of CF. This No-Go decision was identified in the original proposal and at the start of this project, and the decision was made as scheduled. The decision was based

  10. Systems cost/performance analysis (study 2.3). Volume 2, appendix A: Data base. [for unmanned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, B. H.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on selected payload equipments (components) which were collected for the purpose of exercising the systems cost/performance model. Although most of the data is accurate, approximations based on engineering judgment and experience are used wherever actual data was unavailable. The equipments are organized according to the following subsystems which use the specific components: stabilization and control, auxiliary propulsion, data processing, communication, and electrical power. The data sheet for each component states which subsystem utilizes the component, which configurations require the component, which equipment type the component is categorized as, and the data base identifier or code number assigned to the component. The data describing the component consist of the following four types: performance, safety, cost, and schedule.

  11. Design and high-volume manufacture of low-cost molded IR aspheres for personal thermal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazny, A. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Deegan, J. P.; Bundschuh, B.; Patton, E. K.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for infrared optical elements, particularly those made of chalcogenide materials, is rapidly increasing as thermal imaging becomes affordable to the consumer. The use of these materials in conjunction with established lens manufacturing techniques presents unique challenges relative to the cost sensitive nature of this new market. We explore the process from design to manufacture, and discuss the technical challenges involved. Additionally, facets of the development process including manufacturing logistics, packaging, supply chain management, and qualification are discussed.

  12. Cost/benefit tradeoffs for reducing the energy consumption of the commercial air transportation system. Volume 1: Technical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    The effectiveness and associated costs of operational and technical options for reduced fuel consumption by Douglas aircraft in the domestic airline fleet are assessed. Areas explored include alternative procedures for airline and flight operations, advanced and state of the art technology, modification and derivative configurations, new near-term aircraft, turboprop configuration studies, and optimum aircraft geometry. Data for each aircraft studied is presented in tables and graphs.

  13. Documentation of the analysis of the benefits and costs of aeronautical research and technology models, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, J. C.; Braun, R. L.; Denny, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of the benefits and costs of aeronautical research and technology (ABC-ART) models are documented. These models were developed by NASA for use in analyzing the economic feasibility of applying advanced aeronautical technology to future civil aircraft. The methodology is composed of three major modules: fleet accounting module, airframe manufacturing module, and air carrier module. The fleet accounting module is used to estimate the number of new aircraft required as a function of time to meet demand. This estimation is based primarily upon the expected retirement age of existing aircraft and the expected change in revenue passenger miles demanded. Fuel consumption estimates are also generated by this module. The airframe manufacturer module is used to analyze the feasibility of the manufacturing the new aircraft demanded. The module includes logic for production scheduling and estimating manufacturing costs. For a series of aircraft selling prices, a cash flow analysis is performed and a rate of return on investment is calculated. The air carrier module provides a tool for analyzing the financial feasibility of an airline purchasing and operating the new aircraft. This module includes a methodology for computing the air carrier direct and indirect operating costs, performing a cash flow analysis, and estimating the internal rate of return on investment for a set of aircraft purchase prices.

  14. Small capacity, low cost (Ni-H2) design concept for commercial, military, and higher-volume aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James R.; Cook, William D.; Smith, Ron

    1991-01-01

    Nickel Hydrogen (Ni/H2) batteries have become the technology of choice for both commercial and defense related satellites in geosynchronous orbits. Their use for low earth orbit (LEO) applications is not as advanced, but seems just as inevitable because of their inherent advantages over nickel cadmium batteries. These include superior energy density, longer cycle life, and better tolerance to over-charge and reversal. Ni/H2 cells have the added advantage in both construction and operation of not presenting the environmental possibility of cadmium pollution. Unfortunately, but necessarily, the design of these cells has been driven to high cost by the sophistication of the satellites and their uses. Now, using most of the same concepts but less costly materials and techniques, a low cost, small cell design was developed. Combined with the concept of the common pressure vessel, this new design promises to be ideal for the small-sat and commercial markets which, increasingly, are calling for large numbers of less expensive satellites.

  15. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  16. Importancia de la reconstrucción volumétrica y del pliegue glúteo en los parapléjicos con úlceras isquiáticas Enis Sarmiento IV Importance of volume and gluteal fold reconstruction in paraplegic patients with ischial ulcers type Enis Sarmiento IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Revelo Jirón

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Los parapléjicos rehabilitados son propensos a sufrir úlceras isquiáticas como complicación más frecuente. Cuando estas úlceras tienen compromiso óseo, su tratamiento solo puede ser quirúrgico. Bajo estas condiciones los colgajos miocutáneos locales son parte de la solución. En el artículo presentamos una serie personal de 10 pacientes parapléjicos rehabilitados con úlceras isquiáticas reconstruidas utilizando un colgajo miocutáneo en isla de la porción inferior del glúteo mayor transferido a través de un túnel subcutáneo. Ninguno de los pacientes de nuestro grupo de estudio sufrió recidiva y todos han tenido una buena evolución a largo plazo. La aportación principal del presente trabajo es hacer hincapié en respetar en estos casos 3 principios utilizados en Cirugía Estética: las incisiones quirúrgicas deben efectuarse en los pliegues naturales para evitar secuelas estético-funcionales; debemos dejar mínimas cicatrices y obtener una restauración volumétrica corporal. En ese sentido pensamos que el diseño de los colgajos debe respetar rigurosamente la orientación del pliegue glúteo y aportar un buen almohadillado para reconstruir el capital volumétrico de la zona glútea; además es primordial dejar pocas cicatrices para no aumentar los riesgos locales debido a la falta de trofismo de la piel. De esta manera, creemos que se evitan las recidivas y las complicaciones.Paraplegic patients, during their rehabilitation period, usually develop ischial ulcers as the most common complication. When there is bone involvement only the surgical approach can be successful. Myocutaneous flaps are part of this approach. We present a sample of 10 paraplegic patients under rehabilitation suffering ischial ulcers that were handled with myocutaneous island flaps obtained from the lower bundles of gluteus maximus and transferred though a subcutaneous tunnel. All these patients have had a long term good evolution with no recurrences

  17. The association of willingness-to-pay and patient attributes: a cost-volume-profit analysis of cardiac catheter unit services in Ramallah Hospital, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabr, Samer F K; Younis, Mustafa Mike Z; Forgione, Dana A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association of willingness-to-pay and patient attributes in relation to the multi-service cost-volume-profit structure of a cardiac catheter unit in Ramallah Hospital. This article contributes to the literature by providing primary evidence on patient willingness-to-pay, by identifying the specific break-even parameters of three hospital cardiac catheter unit service types (diagnosis, balloon, and pacemaker), and by demonstrating the cross-subsidization of patient income groups that is inherent in the existing hospital rate structure. Our results provide information useful for (1) evidence-based policy making with respect to hospital rate setting and cross-subsidies of patient income groups; (2) the advancement of hospital management, by demonstrating the estimated variable and fixed cost parameters and the impact of patient revenue mix on the profitability of cardiac catheter unit services; and (3) the advancement of theory, by documenting the relationship of patient demand and the cost of supply in a multi-patient-group, multi-service hospital setting.

  18. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle System Research and Development Project: Hybrid Vehicle Potential Assessment. Volume VI. Cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, K.S.

    1979-09-30

    The purpose of the cost analysis is to determine the economic feasibility of a variety of hybrid vehicles with respect to conventional vehicles specifically designed for the same duty cycle defined by the mission analysis. Several different hybrid configurations including parallel, parallel-flywheel, and series vehicles were evaluated. The ramifications of incorporating examples of advanced batteries, these being the advanced lead-acid, nickel-zinc, and sodium sulfur were also investigated. Vehicles were specifically designed with these batteries and for the driving cycles specified by the mission. Simulated operation on the missions yielded the energy consumption (petroleum and/or electricity) over the driving cycles. It was concluded that: in the event that gasoline prices reach $2.50 to $3.00/gal, hybrid vehicles in many applications will become economically competitive with conventional vehicles without subsidization; in some commercial applications hybrid vehicles could be economically competitive, when the gasoline price ranges from $1.20 to $1.50/gal. The cost per kWh per cycle of the advanced batteries is much more important economically than the specific energy; the series hybrid vehicles were found to be more expensive in comparison to the parallel or parallel-flywheel hybrids when designed as passenger vehicles; and hybrid vehicles designed for private use could become economically competitive and displace up to 50% of the fuel normally used on that mission if subsidies of $500 to $2000 were supplied to the owner/operator. (LCL)

  19. Analisis Kelayakan Investasi Perluasan Pabrik dengan Metode Cost-Volume-Profit dan Incremental pada PT XYZ, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Jonny

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PT XYZ received an offer of toll manufacturing services from its client as much as 360 units at a price of Rp14.000 for four years. To be able to fulfill the offer, the company must issue an investment of Rp1,3 billion for the plant expansion regarding to the limited capacity and specificity of the engine that must be purchased separately. There is also some additional operational cost for the company. Based on the analysis of costvolume-profit (CVP the company realized that the price offered is far below the desired corporate profit by 27% so that the new price agreed upon in the negotiation is Rp16.000. Meanwhile, using the price agreement and macroeconomic assumption for the next four years, the company can finally concluded to accept the offer of its client with a value weighted NPV up to Rp306, 5 million based on the incremental analysis.

  20. COST VOLUME PROFIT MODEL, THE BREAK -EVEN POINT AND THE DECISION MAKING PROCESS IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scorte Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Management accounting and cost calculation in the hospitality industry is a pathless land. The prezent article is a starting point of a long scientific approach on the domain of the hospitality industry and on the managerial accounting in this area. Our intention is to put the spot light back on the thorny problem of applying Financial Accounting and specifically its implementation in the hospitality industry. One aim of this article is to provide a picture of CVP analysis in decision making with customizing the hospitality industry. To cope with the crisis period, the competition and to achieve the expected profits of the hospitality industry ,managers have the possibility to apply CVP analysis, one of the most simple and useful analytical tools. This paper will address the basic version of the CVP model, exemplifying the main indicators of the particular model for the hospitality industry that can help guide decision-making.

  1. Robust dipstick urinalysis using a low-cost, micro-volume slipping manifold and mobile phone platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gennifer T; Dwork, Nicholas; Khan, Saara A; Millet, Matthew; Magar, Kiran; Javanmard, Mehdi; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K

    2016-05-24

    We introduce a novel manifold and companion software for dipstick urinalysis that eliminate many of the aspects that are traditionally plagued by user error: precise sample delivery, accurate readout timing, and controlled lighting conditions. The proposed all-acrylic slipping manifold is reusable, reliable, and low in cost. A simple timing mechanism ensures results are read out at the appropriate time. Results are obtained by capturing videos using a mobile phone and by analyzing them using custom-designed software. We show that the results obtained with the proposed device are as accurate and consistent as a properly executed dip-and-wipe method, the industry gold-standard, suggesting the potential for this strategy to enable confident urinalysis testing in home environments.

  2. Low-cost semirigid ureteroscopy is effective for ureteral stones: Experience of a single high volume center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giulianelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: To demonstrate how, in a center with a large number of patients, as our center is, it is possible to perform ureterolithotripsy using a limited set of instruments. Methods: We evaluated medical charts of our center related to semirigid ureteral ureteroscopy (URS with ureterolithotripsy using Holmium laser performed from July 2004 to July 2011. Overall, 658 URS for ureteral stones were performed in 601 patients, of which 204 in proximal ureter (31%, 86 in the mid (13.06% and 368 (57.76% in the distal ureter. In 504 patients (76.5% ureterohydronephrosis (Grade II-III was observed. In 57 patients (8.6%, we performed a bilateral approach at the same time, but most patients had a solitary distal ureteral stone. 106 patients (16.1% had more than one stone in their distal ureter and 96 (14.8% had a proximal ureteral stone treated in the same surgery as well. Results: The overall stone-free rate for ureteral stones was 86.1% (567/658. Success rates for proximal, medial and distal ureteral stones were 68.13% (139/204 patients, 84.8% (73/86 patients and 96.4% (355/368 patients, respectively. One hundred and twenty patients (18.3% required additional surgical treatment for their stones beyond the initial URS, including a second URS in 97 patients (14.74% and URS plus Retrograde Intra-Renal Surgery (RIRS in 23 patients (3.54%. The overall stonefree rate after the second treatment was 99.3%. Intra-operative complications accounted for 5.92% and consisted of ureteral perforations in 16 pts (2.4%, erosions of urothelium leading to significant bleeding in 15 pts (2.27%, severe pain in 4 pts (0.6%, fever in 3 pts (0.45% and one case of ureteral avulsion (0.15%. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the use of Holmium laser lithotripsy is a safe and effective means of treating ureteral stones regardless of sex, age, stone location, or stone size. The instrumentation we used was extremely limited, in order to reduce costs related to the

  3. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 4. Technology appendix. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    Volume IV of the ISTUM documentation gives information on the individual technology specifications, but relates closely with Chapter II of Volume I. The emphasis in that chapter is on providing an overview of where each technology fits into the general-model logic. Volume IV presents the actual cost structure and specification of every technology modeled in ISTUM. The first chapter presents a general overview of the ISTUM technology data base. It includes an explanation of the data base printouts and how the separate-cost building blocks are combined to derive an aggregate-technology cost. The remaining chapters are devoted to documenting the specific-technology cost specifications. Technologies included are: conventional technologies (boiler and non-boiler conventional technologies); fossil-energy technologies (atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, low Btu coal and medium Btu coal gasification); cogeneration (steam, machine drive, and electrolytic service sectors); and solar and geothermal technologies (solar steam, solar space heat, and geothermal steam technologies), and conservation technologies.

  4. Optimization of green infrastructure network at semi-urbanized watersheds to manage stormwater volume, peak flow and life cycle cost: Case study of Dead Run watershed in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Haratmeh, B.; Rai, A.; Minsker, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Green Infrastructure (GI) has become widely known as a sustainable solution for stormwater management in urban environments. Despite more recognition and acknowledgment, researchers and practitioners lack clear and explicit guidelines on how GI practices should be implemented in urban settings. This study is developing a noisy-based multi-objective, multi-scaled genetic algorithm that determines optimal GI networks for environmental, economic and social objectives. The methodology accounts for uncertainty in modeling results and is designed to perform at sub-watershed as well as patch scale using two different simulation models, SWMM and RHESSys, in a Cloud-based implementation using a Web interface. As an initial case study, a semi-urbanized watershed— DeadRun 5— in Baltimore County, Maryland, is selected. The objective of the study is to minimize life cycle cost, maximize human preference for human well-being and the difference between pre-development hydrographs generated from current rainfall events and design storms, as well as those that result from proposed GI scenarios. Initial results for DeadRun5 watershed suggest that placing GI in the proximity of the watershed outlet optimizes life cycle cost, stormwater volume, and peak flow capture. The framework can easily present outcomes of GI design scenarios to both designers and local stakeholders, and future plans include receiving feedback from users on candidate designs, and interactively updating optimal GI network designs in a crowd-sourced design process. This approach can also be helpful in deriving design guidelines that better meet stakeholder needs.

  5. Utilities and offsites design baseline. Outside Battery Limits Facility 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1984-05-25

    As part of the overall Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-1) project baseline being prepared by International Coal Refining Company (ICRC), the RUST Engineering Company is providing necessary input for the Outside Battery Limits (OSBL) Facilities. The project baseline is comprised of: design baseline - technical definition of work; schedule baseline - detailed and management level 1 schedules; and cost baseline - estimates and cost/manpower plan. The design baseline (technical definition) for the OSBL Facilities has been completed and is presented in Volumes I, II, III, IV, V and VI. The OSBL technical definition is based on, and compatible with, the ICRC defined statement of work, design basis memorandum, master project procedures, process and mechanical design criteria, and baseline guidance documents. The design basis memorandum is included in Paragraph 1.3 of Volume I. The baseline design data is presented in 6 volumes. Volume I contains the introduction section and utility systems data through steam and feedwater. Volume II continues with utility systems data through fuel system, and contains the interconnecting systems and utility system integration information. Volume III contains the offsites data through water and waste treatment. Volume IV continues with offsites data, including site development and buildings, and contains raw materials and product handling and storage information. Volume V contains wastewater treatment and solid wastes landfill systems developed by Catalytic, Inc. to supplement the information contained in Volume III. Volume VI contains proprietary information of Resources Conservation Company related to the evaporator/crystallizer system of the wastewater treatment area.

  6. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  7. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  8. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  9. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  10. Interim report on the development and application of environmental mapped data digitization, encoding, analysis, and display software for the ALICE system. Volume II. [MAP, CHAIN, FIX, and DOUT, in FORTRAN IV for PDP-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiot, L.W.; Lima, R.J.; Scholbrock, S.D.; Shelman, C.B.; Wehman, R.H.

    1979-06-01

    Volume I of An Interim Report on the Development and Application of Environmental Mapped Data Digitization, Encoding, Analysis, and Display Software for the ALICE System provided an overall description of the software developed for the ALICE System and presented an example of its application. The scope of the information presented in Volume I was directed both to the users and developers of digitization, encoding, analysis, and display software. Volume II presents information which is directly related to the actual computer code and operational characteristics (keys and subroutines) of the software. Volume II will be of more interest to developers of software than to users of the software. However, developers of software should be aware that the code developed for the ALICE System operates in an environment where much of the peripheral hardware to the PDP-10 is ANL/AMD built. For this reason, portions of the code may have to be modified for implementation on other computer system configurations. 11 tables.

  11. BALTICA IV. Plant maintenance for managing life and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hietanen, S.; Auerkari, P. [eds.] [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Operational Reliability

    1998-12-31

    BALTICA IV International Conference on Plant Maintenance Managing Life and performance held on September 7-9, 1998 on board M/S Silja Symphony on its cruise between Helsinki-Stockholm and at Aavaranta in Kirkkonummi. The BALTICA IV conference provides a forum for the transfer of technology from applied research to practice. This is one of the two volumes of the proceedings of the BALTICA IV International Conference on Plant Maintenance Managing Life and Performance. The BALTICA IV conference focuses on new technology, recent experience and applications of condition and life management, and on improvements in maintenance strategies for safe and economical operation of power plants. (orig.)

  12. BALTICA IV. Plant maintenance for managing life and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hietanen, S.; Auerkari, P. [eds.] [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Operational Reliability

    1998-12-31

    BALTICA IV International Conference on Plant Maintenance Managing Life and performance held on September 7-9, 1998 on board M/S Silja Symphony on its cruise between Helsinki-Stockholm and at Aavaranta in Kirkkonummi. The BALTICA IV conference provides a forum for the transfer of technology from applied research to practice. This is one of the two volumes of the proceedings of the BALTICA IV International Conference on Plant Maintenance Managing Life and Performance. The BALTICA IV conference focuses on new technology, recent experience and applications of condition and life management, and on improvements in maintenance strategies for safe and economical operation of power plants. (orig.)

  13. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  14. Full-scale testing, production and cost analysis data for the advanced composite stabilizer for Boeing 737 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniversario, R. B.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Parsons, J. T.; Peterson, D. C.; Pritchett, L. D.; Wilson, D. R.; Wogulis, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    The full scale ground test, ground vibration test, and flight tests conducted to demonstrate a composite structure stabilizer for the Boeing 737 aircraft and obtain FAA certification are described. Detail tools, assembly tools, and overall production are discussed. Cost analyses aspects covered include production costs, composite material usage factors, and cost comparisons.

  15. Group IV photonics for the mid infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soref, Richard

    2013-02-01

    This paper outlines the challenges and benefits of applying silicon-based photonic techniques in the 2 to 5 μm midinfrared (MIR) wavelength range for chem.-bio-physical sensing, medical diagnostics, industrial process control, environmental monitoring, secure communications, Ladar, active imaging, and high-speed communications at 2 μm. Onchip passive and active components, mostly waveguided, will enable opto-electronic CMOS or BiCMOS integrated "circuits" for system-on-a-chip applications such as spectroscopy and lab-on-a-chip. Volume manufacture in a silicon foundry is expected to yield low-cost (or even disposable) chips with benefits in size-weight-power and ruggedness. This is "long-wavelength optoelectronic integration on silicon" which we call LIOS. Room temperature operation appears feasible, albeit with performance compromises at 4 to 5 μm. In addition to the electronics layer (which may include RF wireless), a 3-D LIOS chip can include several inter-communicating layers utilizing the photonic, plasmonic, photoniccrystal and opto-electro-mechanical technologies. The LIOS challenge can be met by (1) discovering new physics, (2) employing "new" IV and III-V alloys, (3) scaling-up and modifying telecom components, and (4) applying nonlinearoptical wavelength conversion in some cases. This paper presents proposals for MIR chip spectrometers employing frequency-comb and Ge blackbody sources. Active heterostructures employing Si, Ge, SiGe, GeSn and SiGeSn are key for laser diodes, photodetectors, LEDs, switches, amplifiers, and modulators that provide totally monolithic foundry integration, while numerous III-V semiconductor MIR devices within the InGaAsSb and InGaAsP families offer practical hybrid integration on Si PICs. Interband cascade and quantum cascade lasers on Ge waveguides are important in this context.

  16. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  17. Research in collegiate mathematics education IV

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinsky, Ed; Kaput, Jim

    2001-01-01

    This fourth volume of Research in Collegiate Mathematics Education (RCME IV) reflects the themes of student learning and calculus. Included are overviews of calculus reform in France and in the U.S. and large-scale and small-scale longitudinal comparisons of students enrolled in first-year reform courses and in traditional courses. The work continues with detailed studies relating students' understanding of calculus and associated topics. Direct focus is then placed on instruction and student comprehension of courses other than calculus, namely abstract algebra and number theory. The volume co

  18. Cumulated UDC Supplement, 1965-1975. Volume IV: Classes 63/676 (63 Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, 64 Household and Domestic Economy, 65 Management. Communications, 66 Chemical Technology, 67/676 Various Industries; Leather, Pulp and Paper, Textiles, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation for Documentation, The Hague (Netherlands). Committee on Classification Research.

    In continuation of the "Cumulated UDC Supplement - 1964" published by the International Federation for Documentation, this document provides a cumulative supplement to the Universal Decimal Classification for 1965-1975. This fourth of a five volume series lists new classification subdivisions added to the system in the following subject areas: (1)…

  19. Computer-Based Information Management System. Project STEEL. A Special Project To Develop and Implement a Computer-Based Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory. Volume IV. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Theodore W.; And Others

    The document is part of the final report on Project STEEL (Special Teacher Education and Evaluation Laboratory) intended to extend the utilization of technology in the training of preservice special education teachers. This volume focuses on the fourth of four project objectives, the development and preliminary evaluation of a computer-based…

  20. Development of an Interpretive Structural Model and Strategies for Implementation Based on a Descriptive and Prescriptive Analysis of Resources for Environmental Education/Studies. A Sourcebook for the Design of a Regional Environmental Learning System, Volume IV: Conducting Collective Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, John N.

    The steps, approaches, and tools of the collective inquiry process posited by a Regional Environmental Learning System is the subject of this volume. Approaches discussed include: (1) charette approach, (2) AT&T/Battelle approach, and (3) the Washington State approach. Tools for collective inquiry are described and field tests are discussed.…

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Environmental Data and Models. Volume 2. Performance, Emissions, and Cost of Combustion-Based NOx Controls for Wall and Tangential Furnace Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H. Christopher [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Tran, Loan K. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1999-04-30

    This is Volume 2 of a two-volume set of reports describing work conducted at North Carolina State University sponsored by Grant Number DE-FG05-95ER30250 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The title of the project is “Quantitative Analysis of Variability and Uncertainty in Acid Rain Assessments.” The work conducted under sponsorship of this grant pertains primarily to two main topics: (1) development of new methods for quantitative analysis of variability and uncertainty applicable to any type of model; and (2) analysis of variability and uncertainty in the performance, emissions, and cost of electric power plant combustion-based NOx control technologies. These two main topics are reported separately in Volumes 1 and 2.

  2. Dibromidodimethyldipyridineplatinum(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairéad E. Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PtBr2(CH32(C5H5N2], the PtIV metal centre lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The structure displays weak intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  3. Marketing produktu Karel IV.

    OpenAIRE

    Mikšů, Šárka

    2009-01-01

    Goal of the thesis Marketing of the product Karel IV. is to propose chanels of marketing communication and indicate possibilities of next product's development. Theoretical part is based on marketing plan and it's partition. In the practical part you can find market analysis and competing products analysis, product's evolution description and marketing research.

  4. PLATO IV Accountancy Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Dorothy, Comp.

    The catalog was compiled to assist instructors in planning community college and university curricula using the 48 computer-assisted accountancy lessons available on PLATO IV (Programmed Logic for Automatic Teaching Operation) for first semester accounting courses. It contains information on lesson access, lists of acceptable abbreviations for…

  5. Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data report, volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, D.C.; von Bock, K.

    1983-03-01

    Data are reported from KNORR cruise 68, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pro-nounced water-column stratification. One hundred fifty-five stations, including 6 time-series sitings, were occupied within the shelf and shelf- break regimes of New York Bight. Measurements were made to assess water-mass characterization, nutrient cycling, carbon/nitrogen assimilation, bio-mass distribution and diel dynamics and benthic/water-column interfacial exchange. Data are also included from the cruise of ALBATROSS IV carried out contemporaneously with the KNORR investigations, in an area ranging from Nantucket Shoals to the upper reaches of the Gulf of Maine. 20 hydrographic stations were used to augment underway mapping in order to elucidate surface-layer chlorophyll and nutrient distributions occurring at an impor-tant boundary of the New York Bight.

  6. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station. Volume 1. Main report. Technical report, September 1977-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, H.D.; Holter, G.M.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Konzek, G.J.

    1980-06-01

    Technology, safety and cost information is given for the conceptual decommissioning of a large (1100MWe) boiling water reactor (BWR) power station. Three approaches to decommissioning, immediate dismantlement, safe storage with deferred dismantlement and entombment, were studied to obtain comparisons between costs, occupational radiation doses, potential dose to the public and other safety impacts. It also shows the sensitivity of decommissioning safety and costs to the power rating of a BWR in the range of 200 to 1100 MWE.

  7. Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System. Volume II. Appendix III. Media Cost Data. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, William E.; And Others

    Basic cost estimates for selected instructional media are tabled in this document, Part II (Appendix III) of the report "Analysis and Approach to the Development of an Advanced Multimedia Instructional System" by William E. Rhode and others. Learning materials production costs are given for motion pictures, still visuals, videotapes, live…

  8. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. E. Kramer

    1999-05-18

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the ''Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations'' (CRWMS M&O 1999b) and (CRWMS M&O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as ''line load''. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding the 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.13) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and a drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance.

  9. The Effects of Management Initiatives on the Costs and Schedules of Defense Acquisition Programs. Volume 2. Analyses of Ground Combat and Ship Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    negotiate a sales agreement with Turkey, the missiles were ___ 1~2.~~____ _____ __ I handed over to a unit of the New Mexico National Guard, The unit was...87 End Date Sep-89 Sep-06 Sep-06 Qnanthy, N/A N/AN/ Program Status Development-Completed Prduction - -3 yas of data Note: N/A moans not applicable. d...Quantity 12 18 12 Cost $146.5 $337.2 $239.1 3 Total Program Cost $205.9 $443.0 $344.9 Average Unit Cost Prduction $12.2 $18,7 $13,3 Total Pmgrn $17.2 $24.6

  10. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 11: PEP, cost, schedules, and work breakdown structure dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Cost scheduling and funding data are presented for the reference design of the power extension package. Major schedule milestones are correlated with current Spacelab flight dates. Funding distributions provide for minimum expenditure during the first year of the project.

  11. Cost accounting for the radiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Amilcare

    2014-05-01

    Cost accounting is the branch of managerial accounting that deals with the analysis of the costs of a product or service. This article reviews methods of classifying and allocating costs and relationships among costs, volume, and revenues. Radiology practices need to know the cost of a procedure or service to determine the selling price of a product, bid on contracts, analyze profitability, and facilitate cost control and cost reduction.

  12. Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project (Phase IV). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Nineteenth quarterly report, April 1980-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Hanes, M.H.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Nine 4 ohm-cm p type silicon ingots were grown and evaluated in support of the experimental program this quarter. Of these, three were polycrystalline ingots doped with Cr, Mo, and V, respectively, produced under conditions which successfully eliminated the metal-rich inclusions formed when growth of these heavily-doped specimens was attempted during the last quarter. Evaluation of polycrystalline ingots doped to the mid 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ range with Ti or V showed little evidence for grain boundary segregation. Deep level spectroscopy on both as-grown wafers and solar cells showed little variation in impurity concentration from place to place across the ingot regardless of the presence of grain boundaries or other structural features. Deep level spectroscopy was also used to monitor the electrically active impurity concentrations in ingots to be used for process studies, aging experiments, and high efficiency cells. The basic aspects of a model to describe efficiency behavior in high efficiency cells have been formulated and a computer routine is being implemented for back field type devices to analyze the functional relationships between impurity concentrations and cell performance.

  13. Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project: Phase IV. Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Twenty-first quarterly report, October-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Hanes, M.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

    1981-01-30

    The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Cr is highly mobile in silicon even at temperatures as low as 600/sup 0/C. Contrasting with earlier data for Mo, Ti, and V, Cr concentrations vary from place to place in polycrystalline silicon wafers and the electrically-active Cr concentration in the polysilicon is more than an order of magnitude smaller than would be projected from single crystal impurity data. We hypothesize that Cr diffuses during ingot cooldown after groth, preferentially segregates to grain boundaries and becomes electrically deactivated. Both Al and Au introduce deep levels when grown into silicon crystals. Accelerated aging data from Ni-contaminated silicon imply that no significant impurity-induced cell performance reduction should be expected over a twenty-year device lifetime. Combined electrical bias and thermal stressing of silicon solar cells containing Nb, Fe, Cu, Ti, Cr, and Ag, respectively produces no performance loss after 100 hour exposures up to 225/sup 0/C. Ti and V, but not Mo, can be gettered from polycrystalline silicon by POCl/sub 3/ or HCl at temperatures of 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C.

  14. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 5, Appendix D: Cost support information: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Harriz, J.T.; Ostrowski, E.

    1991-01-01

    The cost estimate provided for the DOE sponsored study of Air Blown Coal Gasification was developed from vendor quotes obtained directly for the equipment needed in the 50 MW, 100 MW, and 200 MW sized plants and from quotes from other jobs that have been referenced to apply to the particular cycle. Quotes were generally obtained for the 100 MW cycle and a scale up/down factor was used to generate the cost estimates for the 200 MW and 50 MW cycles, respectively. Information from GTPro (property of Thermoflow, Inc.) was used to estimate the cost of the 200 MW and 50 MW gas turbine, HRSG, and steam turbines. To available the use of GTPro`s estimated values for this equipment, a comparison was made between the quotes obtained for the 100 MW cycle (ABB GT 11N combustion turbine and a HSRG) against the estimated values by GTPro.

  15. Weapon System Costing Methodology for Aircraft Airframes and Basic Structures Volume II - Estimating Handbook and User’s Manual, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    asic structure. b. Material costs for secondary structure. c. Basic structure assembly material costs. c. ("om]X)nent assembly material costs. The...LAGS till GFrtf-’ ^Y^M HOURS ? " ASIC STOUCTURt TnoLIMG u t, 6 7 8 HAS 1 £ 3 (♦ F 7 «i R.I T TP? MTL • 7r. O.𔃻...UJ O O O l ( o tJ o «■ J O CJ ’t.- (Ji I J O O C) O cni en tjoD«JtTCJ o C3c_itr»f)t3t3t3tj c czt j in U"- Uŕ i.^ iD

  16. Small-Volume Injections: Evaluation of Volume Administration Deviation From Intended Injection Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Chen, Michael I; Claure, Rebecca E; Drover, David R; Efron, Bradley; Fitch, William L; Hammer, Gregory B

    2017-10-01

    In the perioperative period, anesthesiologists and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses routinely prepare and administer small-volume IV injections, yet the accuracy of delivered medication volumes in this setting has not been described. In this ex vivo study, we sought to characterize the degree to which small-volume injections (≤0.5 mL) deviated from the intended injection volumes among a group of pediatric anesthesiologists and pediatric postanesthesia care unit (PACU) nurses. We hypothesized that as the intended injection volumes decreased, the deviation from those intended injection volumes would increase. Ten attending pediatric anesthesiologists and 10 pediatric PACU nurses each performed a series of 10 injections into a simulated patient IV setup. Practitioners used separate 1-mL tuberculin syringes with removable 18-gauge needles (Becton-Dickinson & Company, Franklin Lakes, NJ) to aspirate 5 different volumes (0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mL) of 0.25 mM Lucifer Yellow (LY) fluorescent dye constituted in saline (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) from a rubber-stoppered vial. Each participant then injected the specified volume of LY fluorescent dye via a 3-way stopcock into IV tubing with free-flowing 0.9% sodium chloride (10 mL/min). The injected volume of LY fluorescent dye and 0.9% sodium chloride then drained into a collection vial for laboratory analysis. Microplate fluorescence wavelength detection (Infinite M1000; Tecan, Mannedorf, Switzerland) was used to measure the fluorescence of the collected fluid. Administered injection volumes were calculated based on the fluorescence of the collected fluid using a calibration curve of known LY volumes and associated fluorescence.To determine whether deviation of the administered volumes from the intended injection volumes increased at lower injection volumes, we compared the proportional injection volume error (loge [administered volume/intended volume]) for each of the 5 injection volumes using a linear

  17. Development and application of performance and cost models for the externally-fired combined cycle. Task 1, Volume 2. Topical report, June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.; Frey, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Rubin, E.S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Increasing restrictions on emission of pollutants from conventional pulverized coal fired steam (PCFS) plant generating electrical power is raising capital and operating cost of these plants and at the same time lowering plant efficiency. This is creating a need for alternative technologies which result in lower emissions of regulated pollutants and which are thermally more efficient. Natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation systems have lower capital cost and higher efficiencies than conventional coal fired steam plants, and at this time they are the leading contender for new power plant construction in the U.S. But the intermediate and long term cost of these fuels is high and there is uncertainty regarding their long-term price and availability. Coal is a relatively low cost fuel which will be abundantly available in the long term. This has motivated the development of advanced technologies for power production from coal which will have advantages of other fuels. The Externally Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) is one such technology. Air pollution control/hot gas cleanup issues associated with this technology are described.

  18. Cost/benefit tradeoffs for reducing the energy consumption of the commercial air transportation system. Volume 2: Market and economic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanabkoude, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The impact of the most promising fuel conserving options on fuel consumption, passenger demand, operating costs, and airline profits when implemented into the U.S. domestic and international airline fleets is assessed. The potential fuel savings achievable in the U.S. scheduled air transportation system over the forecast period, 1973-1990, are estimated.

  19. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume III: supplementary reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-09-01

    The appendices presented in this volume support and supplement Volume I of the Energy Extension Service Pilot Program Evaluation Report: The First Year. The appendices contain back-up data and detailed information on energy savings estimation and other analytic procedures. This volume also describes the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix I presents the Btu estimation procedures used to calculate state-by-state energy savings. Appendix II contains details of the data sources used for the evaluation. Appendix III presents program activity data, budget, and cost per client analyses. Appendix IV, the Multivariate Analysis of EES Survey Data, provides the basis for the Integrating Statistical Analyses. Appendix V describes the rationale and exclusion rules for outlying data points. The final appendix presents program-by-program fuel costs and self-reported savings and investment.

  20. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD) system. Volume 6: Implementation schedule, development costs, operational costs, benefit assessment, impact on company organization, spin-off assessment, phase 1, tasks 3 to 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrocq, C. A.; Hurley, M. J.; Dublin, M.

    1973-01-01

    A baseline implementation plan, including alternative implementation approaches for critical software elements and variants to the plan, was developed. The basic philosophy was aimed at: (1) a progressive release of capability for three major computing systems, (2) an end product that was a working tool, (3) giving participation to industry, government agencies, and universities, and (4) emphasizing the development of critical elements of the IPAD framework software. The results of these tasks indicate an IPAD first release capability 45 months after go-ahead, a five year total implementation schedule, and a total developmental cost of 2027 man-months and 1074 computer hours. Several areas of operational cost increases were identified mainly due to the impact of additional equipment needed and additional computer overhead. The benefits of an IPAD system were related mainly to potential savings in engineering man-hours, reduction of design-cycle calendar time, and indirect upgrading of product quality and performance.

  1. Ballast Water Treatment, U.S. Great Lakes Bulk Carrier Engineering and Cost Study. Volume 2: Analysis of On-Board Treatment Methods, Alternative Ballast Water Management Practices, and Implementation Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    citric acid monohydrate, sodium thiosulfate neutralizer Yes .05 to 32 Decreased sediment, potential corrosion increase (see Section 2.3) http...Kilograms KORDI Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute kPa Kilopascals kW Kilowatt kWh Kilowatt hour lb Pounds LCC Life cycle cost lt...flushing filter, disinfection with injected chlorine dioxide (chlorine dioxide is generated onboard from two component chemicals, sulfuric acid

  2. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  3. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1981-06-01

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

  4. Grid Connected Integrated Community Energy System. Volume 3A. Integrated demonstration systems and costs. Final report: Phase I, February 1, 1977-May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    In 1973, the University of Minnesota set a goal of conversion and retrofit for University Heating Plant whereby coal or lignite would become the primary fuel by the year 1980. The University, with the addition of St. Mary's and Fairview Hospitals, Augsburg College, and possibly some small Community add-ons, provides a community wherein a major portion of steam distribution is already established. This provides for the development of a larger Grid-ICES for relatively low capital expenditures. Steam demand factors, equipment, and costs are discussed. A discussion on the steam production system is followed by a description of the capital costs of demonstration systems (specifically, baghouses). The solid waste heat recovery system, fuel and energy transport and storage, and district heating by steam and hot water are discussed. The combined community service demands are detailed.

  5. SOLERAS: Solar Energy Water Desalination Project. Exxon Research and Engineering. Volume 3: Appendices pilot plan and design details and subsystem direct cost support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Details of the design of a water desalination solar pilot plant in Yanbu, Saudi Arabia are presented. The major subsystems of the plant are defined, including solar energy collection and simulation, energy storage, energy delivery, reverse osmosis/multiple effect distillation, water storage, waste disposal, backup power generators, controls and instrumentation data acquisition, facilities and enclosures, and computers. A list of the plant equipment and a set of process flow diagrams are provided. A cost analysis of the pilot plant is included.

  6. ILLIAC IV Applications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-31

    necember, 1973 indicates that it would be reasonable to use PF./l ^s a comnatible lanauaoe for the implementation of distributed systems. C...mini-host has even made it cost-effective for the Dinital Eouinment Corporation to include a PDP-11 to IMP interface in their line of peripherals

  7. dBASE IV basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  8. Phase IV of Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, ...

  9. Ultrathin magnetic structures IV applications of nanomagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Bretislav

    2004-01-01

    The ability to understand and control the unique properties of interfaces has created an entirely new field of magnetism which already has a profound impact in technology and is providing the basis for a revolution in electronics. The last decade has seen dramatic progress in the development of magnetic devices for information technology but also in the basic understanding of the physics of magnetic nanostructures. Volume III describes thin film magnetic properties and methods for characterising thin film structure topics that underpin the present 'spintronics' revolution in which devices are based on combined magnetic materials and semiconductors. The present volume (IV) deals with the fundamentals of spintronics: magnetoelectronic materials, spin injection and detection, micromagnetics and the development of magnetic random access memory based on GMR and tunnel junction devices. Together these books provide readers with a comprehensive account of an exciting and rapidly developing field. The treatment is de...

  10. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A.; Zhou, Xiaobin; Larrabee, Glenn J.; Millis, Scott R.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory…

  13. Costs and benefits of industrial reporting and voluntary targets for energy efficiency. A report to the Congress of the United States. Volume I: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Section 131(c) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) (Public Law 102-486) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the costs and benefits of federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy-intensive industries. It also requires DOE to evaluate the role of reporting and targets in improving energy efficiency. Specifically, the legislation states: Not later than one year after the data of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall, in consultation with affected industries, evaluate and report to the Congress regarding the establishment of Federally mandated energy efficiency reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets for energy intensive industries. Such report shall include an evaluation of the costs and benefits of such reporting requirements and voluntary energy efficiency improvement targets, and recommendations regarding the role of such activities in improving energy efficiency in energy intensive industries. This report is DOE`s response to that directive. It is the culmination of a year-long study that included (1) analysis of documents pertaining to a previous reporting and targets effort, the industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements Program (or the CE-189 program, following the designation of the reporting form used to collect data in that program), administered by DOE from 1976 to 1985, as well as other important background information; (2) extensive consultations with government and industry officials regarding the CE-189 Program, experience with other programs that have reporting elements, and the attributes of possible alternative strategies for reporting and targets; and (3) analyses of the costs and benefits of the CE-189 Program and several alternatives to the CE-189 approach.

  14. Normative price for a manufactured product: the SAMICS methodology. Volume II. Analysis. JPL publication 78-98. [Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlain, R.G.

    1979-01-15

    The Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS) provide standard formats, data, assumptions, and procedures for determining the price a hypothetical solar array manufacturer would have to be able to obtain in the market to realize a specified after-tax rate of return on equity for a specified level of production. This document presents the methodology and its theoretical background. It is contended that the model is sufficiently general to be used in any production-line manufacturing environment. Implementation of this methodology by the Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation computer program (SAMIS III, Release 1) is discussed.

  15. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

  16. Avoidable waste management costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  17. DSM-IV Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) will become one of most frequently used reference documents in counseling profession. Describes progress being made in development of DSM-IV, scheduled for publication in 1994. Describes revision process and proposed organizational changes and new diagnostic…

  18. Nuclear Employment Planning. Volume 4. Data Dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    3398 t• DNA-TR-90-33-V4 Nuclear Employment Planning OIPU EWE COPY Volume IV-Data Dictionary Donald W. Doerfler D TIC Lowry A. West ELECTE Debora R...DNA 001 -88-C-0068 Volume IV--Data Dictionary PE 62715HPR - RW 6. AUTHOR(S) TA - RN Donald W. Doerfler , Lowry A. West, WU - DH042980 Debora R. Gleason

  19. Ventilação mecânica volume-controlada versus pressão controlada em modelo canino de lesão pulmonar aguda: efeitos cardiorrespiratórios e sobre o custo de oxigênio da respiração Volume controlled ventilation versus pressure controlled ventilation in a canine acute lung injury model: effects on cardiorespiratory parameters and oxygen cost of breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO DO VALLE PINHEIRO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Persiste a questão sobre se há vantagens mecânicas ou de trocas gasosas no uso da ventilação pressão-controlada (VPC sobre a ciclada a volume (VCV. Objetivos: Comparar, de forma randômica, a VPC com a VCV com fluxo desacelerado nos modos assistido e controlado em modelo experimental de lesão pulmonar aguda. Métodos: Sete cães com lesão pulmonar aguda grave (PaO2/FIO2 Background: It is questionable whether pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV has advantages over volume-cycled ventilation (VCV. Objectives: To compare PCV to VCV with decelerating flow profile during assisted and controlled modes in an acute lung injury experimental model. Methods: Severe acute lung injury (PaO2/FIO2 < 100 mmHg was induced by oleic acid IV infusion (0.05 mg/kg in seven dogs. The animals were submitted to PCV and VCV in a randomized sequence. After 40 minutes in the assisted mode, ventilation was changed to the controlled mode after neuromuscular blockade. The tidal volume and the inspiratory time were kept constant throughout the experiment. Results: There were no differences in gas exchange (PaO2 and PaCO2, cardiac output or oxygen delivery (DO2 between VCV and PCV. The same was observed regarding maximum airway and plateau pressures, and also to the static compliance. Oxygen consumption (VO2 after neuromuscular blockade was 124 ± 48 in VCV versus 143 ± 50 ml/min in PCV, p = 0.42. In the assisted mode, there was a statistical trend of a higher VO2 in PCV (219 ± 72 versus 154 ± 67 ml/min in VCV, p = 0.06, that was associated with a statistical trend of a higher oxygen cost of breathing (OCB during assisted PCV, although without statistical significance (31 ± 77 in VCV versus 75 ± 96 ml/min in PCV, p = 0.23, and also in a lower PvO2 (34 ± 7 in PCV versus 42 ± 6 ml/min in VCV, p = 0.02. These occurred despite a higher maximum inspiratory flow in the assisted mode in PCV (58 ± 9 versus 48 ± 4 L/min in VCV, p = 0.01. In both VCV and

  20. Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2008-10-01

    This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density

  1. Aqueous complexation of thorium(IV), uranium(IV), neptunium(IV), plutonium(III/IV), and cerium(III/IV) with DTPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Alex; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2012-07-16

    Aqueous complexation of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), Pu(III/IV), and Ce(III/IV) with DTPA was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and cyclic voltammetry at 1 M ionic strength and 25 °C. The stability constants for the 1:1 complex of each trivalent and tetravalent metal were calculated. From the potentiometric data, we report stability constant values for Ce(III)DTPA, Ce(III)HDTPA, and Th(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 20.01 ± 0.02, log β(111) = 22.0 ± 0.2, and log β(101) = 29.6 ± 1, respectively. From the absorption spectrophotometry data, we report stability constant values for U(IV)DTPA, Np(IV)DTPA, and Pu(IV)DTPA of log β(101) = 31.8 ± 0.1, 32.3 ± 0.1, and 33.67 ± 0.02, respectively. From the cyclic voltammetry data, we report stability constant values for Ce(IV) and Pu(III) of log β(101) = 34.04 ± 0.04 and 20.58 ± 0.04, respectively. The values obtained in this work are compared and discussed with respect to the ionic radius of each cationic metal.

  2. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    syndrome; his condition was 6408 THE ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF BONE HEAL- not recognized on diagnosis as an occupation-related ING. (Dij.) Watson , J...PHENOMENA. bones) to each of four cathode wires. A stainless (Enq.) Watson , J. (Electrical Engineering steel grid anode was used on the skin surface. Of Dept...flector showed only a slight Increase. In a third Shielded mice were placed 25 cm (2 wavelengths) aport experiment, an inflated rubber sphere with a

  3. Fast reactor safety and related physics. Volume IV. Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 58 papers concerning single-phase flow and sodium boiling; sodium boiling and subassembly flow blockages; transient-overpower and loss-of-flow experiments; fuel and cladding behavior and relocation; fuel and cladding freezing; molten-fuel-coolant interaction; aerosols and fission product release, and post-accident heat removal. Thirteen papers have been perivously abstracted and included in ERA.

  4. Wind energy conversion. Volume IV. Drive system dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Labuszewski, T.

    1978-09-01

    The dynamics of the drive system and various approaches to power transmission are described. The effects on performance of using a constant rotor speed as opposed to a rotor speed varying with the wind speed are discussed for various rotor operating schedules and typical wind distributions. The dynamics of the combined rotor, alternator, and drive system are analyzed. Conditions which could lead to electro-dynamic instabilities and desynchronization are discussed as well as means for stabilizing the system. The dynamics of the drive system and important design conditions for various drive systems are discussed, such as location of the alternators, use of hydraulic drive systems and smoothing techniques.

  5. Snohomish Estuary Wetlands Study. Volume IV. Delineation of Wetland Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    River FIG. 4 -G. 5 CARNATION [] Scale in Miles 0 5 1 FALL CITY SNOHOMISH ESTUARY WETLANDS STUDY 8AOUAH FIG. 6-/ 44 Isan A EVRT 12 1 land NO4Carnation on the Snoqualmie River (Tolt River confluence). I B. OBJECTIVES 8. The objectives of the overall Snohomish Estuary Wetlands

  6. Annotated Bibliography for Lake Erie. Volume IV. Physical,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    chlorine and alka- lis, and organic mercury compounds. The latter are as slimi- cides used in the pulping industry. Mercury is incorporated and...livestock and poultry production is concentrated are also potential sources of serious pollution. In Ohio, animal-waste pollu- tion problems are being...bridge between Huron and Ontario. (BU) 235. Farwell, Oliver A. 1925. Botanical gleanings in Michigan. Am. Mid. Nat. 9(7):259. 102 Brief account of

  7. Biological Effects of Nonionizing Electromagnetic Radiation. Volume IV. Number 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    B.: Johnson, R.: Frazer, J. W (Dept. Diagnosis, Dental Sch., Univ. Frazer, J. W ;Reis, R BullNYAcadMed 55(11): 1222- Texas Health Science Center, San...frying, meat cooking, pasta drying, fish thawing, microwave ovens in the United Kingdom. Two of the poultry cooking, and vacuum drying. Non-food ap

  8. Inertial Navigation System Standardized Software Development. Volume IV. Program Listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    8217 der 0’ ftI L’_ ’* C. C’ T iC C..C ’ C , -1 >’ C ." C’ý C’.. a’ c C’! 1 I.. b.. * I cc Cs c - ., ( Cz jeo -~ -e- Cj.c .j , j j uj m mU.. LU.C,~ t LAw L

  9. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume IV - 2008: Issue 3, October

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. October 2008. The articles in this issue of Homeland Securit...

  10. NASA's Role in Aeronautics: A Workshop. Volume IV - General Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Engineering.

    The central task of a 1980 workshop on the role of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in aeronautics was to examine the relationship of NASA's research capabilities to the state of U.S. aviation and to make recommendations about NASA's future role in aeronautics. The findings and recommendations of the Panel on General…

  11. PISA 2015 Results: Students' Financial Literacy. Volume IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) examines not just what students know in science, reading and mathematics, but what they can do with what they know. Results from PISA show educators and policy makers the quality and equity of learning outcomes achieved elsewhere, and allow them to learn from the policies and practices…

  12. The Modern RPG IV Language

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This updated, classic work on the RPG language covers all the new functions and features that have been added since 2003, including new op codes and built-in functions, new chapters on free-format RPG IV and Web programming interfaces, information on implementing XML within RPG IV, and expanded information on procedures. This reference guide takes both novice and experienced RPG IV programmers through the language, from its foundation to its most advanced techniques. More than 100 charts and tables, as well as 350 real-life code samples of functions and operations are included, showing readers

  13. Boletin de Informacion Educativa, Ano IV, No. 8 (Educational Information Bulletin, Volume IV, No. 8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministerio de Educacion y Cultura, Santa Fe (Argentina). Centro de Documentacion e Informacion Educativa de la Provincia de Santa Fe.

    This information bulletin is published by the Documentation and Educational Information Center in the Argentine province of Santa Fe. The bulletin reports on educational developments in the province and abroad, educational problems, statistics, legislation, documentation and information techniques, and information from international organizations.…

  14. 45 CFR 304.15 - Cost allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost allocation. 304.15 Section 304.15 Public... FEDERAL FINANCIAL PARTICIPATION § 304.15 Cost allocation. A State agency in support of its claims under title IV-D of the Social Security Act must have an approved cost allocation plan on file with...

  15. 45 CFR 205.150 - Cost allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost allocation. 205.150 Section 205.150 Public... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 205.150 Cost allocation. A State plan under title I, IV-A, X, XIV, or XVI (AABD) of the Social Security Act must provide that the State agency will have an approved cost allocation plan on...

  16. Quantitative neuroimaging in mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Raphael; Mayfield, Joan; Swift, Caren; Nestrasil, Igor

    2014-02-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the MCOLN1 gene. This gene encodes the endosomal/lysosomal transient receptor potential channel protein mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). Affected patients suffer from neurodevelopmental abnormalities and progressive retinal dystrophy. In a prospective natural history study we hypothesized the presence of an additional slow cerebral neurodegenerative process. We have recruited 5 patients, tested their neurodevelopmental status, and measured cerebral regional volumes and white matter integrity using MRI yearly. Over a period of up to 3 years, MLIV patients remained neurologically stable. There was a trend for increased cortical and subcortical gray matter volumes and increased ventricular size, while white matter and cerebellar volumes decreased. Mean diffusivity (MD) was increased and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were below normal in all analyzed brain regions. There was a positive correlation between motor scores of the Vineland Scale and the FA values in the corticospinal tract (corr coef 0.39), and a negative correlation with the MD values (corr coef -0.50) in the same brain region. We conclude from these initial findings that deficiency in mucolipin-1 affects the entire brain but that there might be a selective regional cerebral neurodegenerative process in MLIV. In addition, these data suggest that diffusion-weighted imaging might be a good biomarker for following patients with MLIV. Therefore, our findings may be helpful for designing future clinical trials.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV (MPS IV), also known as Morquio syndrome, is a progressive condition that mainly affects ... Management Genetic Testing (3 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Morquio syndrome Genetic Testing Registry: Mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS-IV-A ...

  18. Dairy Product Manufacturing Costs at Cooperative Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, K. Charles

    1983-01-01

    Cost data are summarized for 14 plants manufacturing cheese, butter, and powder and average costs are presented for each product. Average cost curves are estimated for each plant. The scale of plant for least-cost operations is identified for plants of each product type. Plant capacity utilization and seasonal volume variation and their impacts on manufacturing cost are delineated.

  19. Hydride heat pump. Volume I. Users manual for HYCSOS system design program. [HYCSOS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, R.; Moritz, P.

    1978-05-01

    A method for the design and costing of a metal hydride heat pump for residential use and a computer program, HYCSOS, which automates that method are described. The system analyzed is one in which a metal hydride heat pump can provide space heating and space cooling powered by energy from solar collectors and electric power generated from solar energy. The principles and basic design of the system are presented, and the computer program is described giving detailed design and performance equations used in the program. The operation of the program is explained, and a sample run is presented. This computer program is part of an effort to design, cost, and evaluate a hydride heat pump for residential use. The computer program is written in standard Fortran IV and was run on a CDC Cyber 74 and Cyber 174 computer. A listing of the program is included as an appendix. This report is Volume 1 of a two-volume document.

  20. Nuclear volume and prognosis in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1992-01-01

    The prognostic value of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (MNV) was investigated retrospectively in 100 ovarian cancer patients with FIGO-stage IB-II (n = 51) and stage III-IV (n = 49) serous tumors. No association was demonstrated between the MNV and the survival or between the MNV and two...

  1. Nuclear volume and prognosis in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.;

    1992-01-01

    The prognostic value of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume (MNV) was investigated retrospectively in 100 ovarian cancer patients with FIGO-stage IB-II (n = 51) and stage III-IV (n = 49) serous tumors. No association was demonstrated between the MNV and the survival or between the MNV and two...

  2. Volume Entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Astuti, Valerio; Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Building on a technical result by Brunnemann and Rideout on the spectrum of the Volume operator in Loop Quantum Gravity, we show that the dimension of the space of the quadrivalent states --with finite-volume individual nodes-- describing a region with total volume smaller than $V$, has \\emph{finite} dimension, bounded by $V \\log V$. This allows us to introduce the notion of "volume entropy": the von Neumann entropy associated to the measurement of volume.

  3. FUNDAMENTALS OF AMHARIC (REVISED), UNITS IV-VII (LESSONS 16-35).

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARTON, DONALD K.; AND OTHERS

    THIS IS THE SECOND OF A THREE-VOLUME COURSE IN BASIC AMHARIC. FOLLOWING THE SAME FORMAT AS THE FIRST VOLUME, EACH LESSON IN UNITS IV-VII CONTAINS A DIALOG, GRAMMATICAL NOTES, PATTERN DRILLS, EXERCISES, AND A VOCABULARY LIST. ENGLISH-AMHARIC AND AMHARIC-ENGLISH GLOSSARIES ARE APPENDED. THIS COURSE WILL PREPARE THE STUDENT TO PERFORM AT A…

  4. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  5. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  6. A Resource Cost Aware Cumulative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Helmut; Hadzic, Tarik

    We motivate and introduce an extension of the well-known cumulative constraint which deals with time and volume dependent cost of resources. Our research is primarily interested in scheduling problems under time and volume variable electricity costs, but the constraint equally applies to manpower scheduling when hourly rates differ over time and/or extra personnel incur higher hourly rates. We present a number of possible lower bounds on the cost, including a min-cost flow, different LP and MIP models, as well as greedy algorithms, and provide a theoretical and experimental comparison of the different methods.

  7. Contribution of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) Collagen IV to the Mechanical Properties of the Glomerular Basement Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Lazarina

    The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) is a vital part of the blood-urine filtration barrier in the kidneys. In healthy GBMs, the main tension-resisting component is alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) type IV collagen, but in some diseases it is replaced by other collagen IV isoforms. As a result, the GBM becomes leaky and disorganized, ultimately resulting in kidney failure. Our goal is to understanding the biomechanical aspects of the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains and how their absence could be responsible for (1) the initial injury to the GBM and (2) progression to kidney failure. A combination of experiments and computational models were designed for that purpose. A model basement membrane was used to compare experimentally the distensibility of tissues with the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains present and missing. The experiments showed basement membranes containing alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) chains were less distensible. It has been postulated that the higher level of lateral cross-linking (supercoiling) in the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks contributes additional strength/stability to basement membranes. In a computational model of supercoiled networks, we found that supercoiling greatly increased the stiffness of collagen IV networks but only minimally decreased the permeability, which is well suited for the needs of the GBM. It is also known that the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks are more protected from enzymatic degradation, and we explored their significance in GBM remodeling. Our simulations showed that the more protected network was needed to prevent the system from entering a dangerous feedback cycle due to autoregulation mechanisms in the kidneys. Overall, the work adds to the evidence of biomechanical differences between the alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV)alpha5(IV) networks and other collagen IV networks, points to supercoiling as the main source of biomechanical differences, discusses the suitability of alpha3(IV)alpha4(IV

  8. Least Cost Test Profile. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    Clark AB on mobile medical facilities. These facilities are utilizing 20’ ISO’s for the clinic, laboratory, pharmacy, X-ray, surgery, pre-op and dental ...S-55286D CP 550100-E MIL-STD-XXXX CORE MATERIALl - 4.6.1 4.2.1.3.2.3 DENSITY - 4.6.1.1 COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH - 4.6.1.2 4.2.1.3.2.3 a(4) SHEAR STRENGTH

  9. Low Cost High Volume Radiographic Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    STRING: INSPECTOR I.D. " INTEGER: ERROR Lue*1 I I §! A5-9 CRTRES - CREATE A TEST RESULTS RECORD ARGUMENTS: 2 0 INTEGER: TEST SEQUENCE NO. eSTRING ...INSPECTION ARGUMENTS: NONE SVIMD - SAVE IMAGE ON DISK ARGUMENTS: I eSTRING : NAME MDFY MKFMC MKFMP MKFMT RVI NS P SvIMD IESSAGE: NOT I MPLEMENTED RETURN A5

  10. Estimating the Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen for Postoperative Pain Management on Length of Stay and Inpatient Hospital Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, E Eve; Pham, An; Woldman, Robert L; Spiegelman, Andrew; Strassels, Scott A; Wan, George J; Zimmerman, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The provision of safe, effective, cost-efficient perioperative inpatient acute pain management is an important concern among clinicians and administrators within healthcare institutions. Overreliance on opioid monotherapy in this setting continues to present health risks for patients and increase healthcare costs resulting from preventable adverse events. The goal of this study was to model length of stay (LOS), potential opioid-related complications, and costs for patients reducing opioid use and adding intravenous acetaminophen (IV APAP) for management of postoperative pain. Data for this study were de-identified inpatient encounters from The Advisory Board Company across 297 hospitals from 2012-2014, containing 2,238,433 encounters (IV APAP used in 12.1%). Encounters for adults ≥18 years of age admitted for cardiovascular, colorectal, general, obstetrics and gynecology, orthopedics, or spine surgery were included. The effects of reducing opioids and adding IV APAP were estimated using hierarchical statistical models. Costs were estimated by multiplying modeled reductions in LOS or complication rates by observed average volumes for medium-sized facilities, and by average cost per day or per complication (LOS: US$2383/day; complications: derived from observed charges). Across all surgery types, LOS showed an average reduction of 18.5% (10.7-32.0%) for the modeled scenario of reducing opioids by one level (high to medium, medium to low, or low to none) and adding IV APAP, with an associated total LOS-related cost savings of $4.5 M. Modeled opioid-related complication rates showed similar improvements, averaging a reduction of 28.7% (5.4-44.0%) with associated cost savings of $0.2 M. In aggregate, costs decreased by an estimated $4.7 M for a medium-sized hospital. The study design demonstrates associations only and cannot establish causal relationships. The cost impact of LOS is modeled based on observed data. This investigation indicates that reducing opioid

  11. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  12. VeVeRa-IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelien Eggink; Debbie Oudijk; Klarita Sadiraj

    2012-01-01

    Original title: VeVeRa-IV The Dutch population is set to age rapidly in the coming years. More and more people will also attain a very great age. This means that the need for home care and care provided in nursing or residential care homes will also increase. As part of the Long-term Care Programme

  13. Phase IV of Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvarna, Viraj

    2010-04-01

    Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT). No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan). Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  14. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  15. Federal Logistics Information System. FLIS Procedures Manual Publications. Volume 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    4,5,7,15 dress Code DEMIL Demilitarization 4,15 DoDAAD Department of De- fense Activity Ad- DESC Defense Electronics 2,14 dress Dictionary Supply Center...Supply 2.14 DoDAAC Department of De- Center fense Activity Ad- dress Code iv CH 2 DoD 4100.39-M Volume 15 Volume(s) Volume(s) DoDAAD Department of De

  16. Postoperative volume balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, H; Mortensen, C.R.; Secher, Niels H.

    2017-01-01

    In healthy humans, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) do not increase with expansion of the central blood volume by head-down tilt or administration of fluid. Here, we exposed 85 patients to Trendelenburg's position about one hour after surgery while cardiovascular variables were determined...... non-invasively by Modelflow. In Trendelenburg's position, SV (83 ± 19 versus 89 ± 20 ml) and CO (6·2 ± 1·8 versus 6·8 ± 1·8 l/min; both Pheart rate (75 ± 15 versus 76 ± 14 b min(-1) ) and mean arterial pressure were unaffected (84 ± 15 versus 84 ± 16 mmHg). For the 33 patients......, determination of SV and/or CO in Trendelenburg's position can be used to evaluate whether a patient is in need of IV fluid as here exemplified after surgery....

  17. Displacement volume collected from tows monitoring collected in the North Atlantic Ocean on NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV cruises AL9505, AL9506 and others as part of the GB project from 1995-02-11 to 1999-06-23 (NODC Accession 0098781)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BioVolume Data from Bongo Tows during Broadscale Cruises, 1995-1999 Dave Mountain, Jack Green and Joe Kane, NMFS This displacement volume data comes from one net...

  18. Chile; Staff Report for the 2015 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 Article IV Consultation highlights that the GDP growth of Chile has remained lackluster over the past year. The main force behind the economic slowdown in 2014 has been the sharp fall in private investment, mainly the consequence of the end of the mining boom, but also reflecting the uncertainty and adjustment costs associated with the structural reform agenda. The IMF staff expects growth to increase modestly to 2.5 percent in 2015, mainly thanks to strong fiscal support. Private d...

  19. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...

  20. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...

  1. Alle har en historie, IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydegaard, Torbjørn

    Alle har en historie IV: Pædagogik med Freedom Writers lader et væld af pædagogiske facetter udspringe af den kendte skole-film Freedom Writers’ scener og handlinger. Der er både fokus på en almen tilgang til pædagogik og på Freedom Writer-metodikken, dels gennem de filmscener, der sættes til...

  2. Capital cost: pressurized water reactor plant. Commercial electric power cost studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-06-01

    The investment cost study for the 1139 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) central station power plant consists of two volumes. This volume contains the drawings, equipment list and site description.

  3. Assessing the Benefits and Costs of Motion for C-17 Flight Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    28 Availability of Simulator . ..................... 3 Summary of Costs ......................... 35 IV . CONCLUSIONS...Section II summarizes the assessment of benefits, Sec. III summar- izes the assessment of costs, and Sec. IV presents conclusions. Further supporting...differences in the availability of the three motion system alternatives are minor at best, the fiscal costo shown in Table 3.4 are the greatest cost

  4. Determinants and Effects of Logistics Costs in Container Ports: The Transaction Cost Economics Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hyuk-soo Cho

    2014-01-01

    .... Based on country-level analysis, this study is designed to investigate empirically internal capabilities and external environments of logistics costs and traffic volumes in individual container ports...

  5. Cost Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Kira

    The objective of this dissertation is to investigate determinants and consequences of asymmetric cost behavior. Asymmetric cost behavior arises if the change in costs is different for increases in activity compared to equivalent decreases in activity. In this case, costs are termed “sticky......” if the change is less when activity falls than when activity rises, whereas costs are termed “anti-sticky” if the change is more when activity falls than when activity rises. Understanding such cost behavior is especially relevant for decision-makers and financial analysts that rely on accurate cost information...... to facilitate resource planning and earnings forecasting. As such, this dissertation relates to the topic of firm profitability and the interpretation of cost variability. The dissertation consists of three parts that are written in the form of separate academic papers. The following section briefly summarizes...

  6. Uranium enrichment reduction in the Prototype Gen-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) with PBO reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The Korean Prototype Gen-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) is supposed to be loaded with a relatively-costly low-enriched U fuel, while its envisaged transuranic fuels are not available for transmutation. In this work, the U-enrichment reduction by improving the neutron economy is pursued to save the fuel cost. To improve the neutron economy of the core, a new reflector material, PbO, has been introduced to replace the conventional HT9 reflector in the current PGSFR core. Two types of PbO reflectors are considered: one is the conventional pin-type and the other one is an inverted configuration. The inverted PbO reflector design is intended to maximize the PbO volume fraction in the reflector assembly. In addition, the core radial configuration is also modified to maximize the performance of the PbO reflector. For the baseline PGSFR core with several reflector options, the U enrichment requirement has been analyzed and the fuel depletion analysis is performed to derive the equilibrium cycle parameters. The linear reactivity model is used to determine the equilibrium cycle performances of the core. Impacts of the new PbO reflectors are characterized in terms of the cycle length, neutron leakage, radial power distribution, and operational fuel cost.

  7. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Conceptual design and evaluation of commercial plant. Volume III. Economic analyses (Deliverable Nos. 15 and 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of Task I of Phase I in the form of a Conceptual Design and Evaluation of Commercial Plant report. The report is presented in four volumes as follows: I - Executive Summary, II - Commercial Plant Design, III - Economic Analyses, IV - Demonstration Plant Recommendations. Volume III presents the economic analyses for the commercial plant and the supporting data. General cost and financing factors used in the analyses are tabulated. Three financing modes are considered. The product gas cost calculation procedure is identified and appendices present computer inputs and sample computer outputs for the MLGW, Utility, and Industry Base Cases. The results of the base case cost analyses for plant fenceline gas costs are as follows: Municipal Utility, (e.g. MLGW), $3.76/MM Btu; Investor Owned Utility, (25% equity), $4.48/MM Btu; and Investor Case, (100% equity), $5.21/MM Btu. The results of 47 IFG product cost sensitivity cases involving a dozen sensitivity variables are presented. Plant half size, coal cost, plant investment, and return on equity (industrial) are the most important sensitivity variables. Volume III also presents a summary discussion of the socioeconomic impact of the plant and a discussion of possible commercial incentives for development of IFG plants.

  8. Tracking Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  9. Costs Associated with Intravenous Cancer Therapy Administration in Patients with Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma in a US Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sheng Duh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common chemotherapies in metastatic soft tissue sarcoma (mSTS require intravenous (IV administration. This often requires patients to make multiple outpatient visits per chemotherapy cycle, possibly impeding patients’ daily activities and increasing caregiver burden and medical costs. This study investigated costs associated with IV cancer therapy administration in mSTS from the payer perspective of the health care system. Patients and Methods. From the Experian Healthcare database, 1,228 mSTS patients were selected. Data were analyzed on outpatient visits during 2005–2012 involving IV cancer therapy administration. Costs were estimated on a per patient per visit (PPPV and per patient per month (PPPM basis. Results. The mean (median cost of IV therapy was $2,427 ($1,532 PPPV and $5,468 ($4,310 PPPM, of which approximately 60% was IV drug costs. IV administration costs averaged $399 PPPV and $900 PPPM, representing 16.5% of total visit costs. Anthracycline and alkylating-agents-based therapies had the highest PPPV and PPPM IV administration costs, respectively (mean $479 and $1,336, resp.. Patients with managed care insurance had the highest IV administration costs (mean $504 PPPV; $1,120 PPPM. Conclusions. IV administration costs constitute a considerable proportion of the total costs of receiving an IV cancer therapy to treat mSTS.

  10. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 3: Cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary, phase 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. A narrative summary of the cost estimates and work breakdown structure/dictionary for both study phases is presented. Costs were estimated using the Grumman Space Programs Algorithm for Cost Estimating (SPACE) computer program and results are given for four AOTV configurations. The work breakdown structure follows the standard of the joint government/industry Space Systems Cost Analysis Group (SSCAG). A table is provided which shows cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  11. Measuring rainfall with low-cost cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamano, Paola; Cavagnero, Paolo; Croci, Alberto; Laio, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    In Allamano et al. (2015), we propose to retrieve quantitative measures of rainfall intensity by relying on the acquisition and analysis of images captured from professional cameras (SmartRAIN technique in the following). SmartRAIN is based on the fundamentals of camera optics and exploits the intensity changes due to drop passages in a picture. The main steps of the method include: i) drop detection, ii) blur effect removal, iii) estimation of drop velocities, iv) drop positioning in the control volume, and v) rain rate estimation. The method has been applied to real rain events with errors of the order of ±20%. This work aims to bridge the gap between the need of acquiring images via professional cameras and the possibility of exporting the technique to low-cost webcams. We apply the image processing algorithm to frames registered with low-cost cameras both in the lab (i.e., controlled rain intensity) and field conditions. The resulting images are characterized by lower resolutions and significant distortions with respect to professional camera pictures, and are acquired with fixed aperture and a rolling shutter. All these hardware limitations indeed exert relevant effects on the readability of the resulting images, and may affect the quality of the rainfall estimate. We demonstrate that a proper knowledge of the image acquisition hardware allows one to fully explain the artefacts and distortions due to the hardware. We demonstrate that, by correcting these effects before applying the image processing algorithm, quantitative rain intensity measures are obtainable with a good accuracy also with low-cost modules.

  12. BCS class IV drugs: Highly notorious candidates for formulation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadi, Rohan; Dand, Neha

    2017-02-28

    BCS class IV drugs (e.g., amphotericin B, furosemide, acetazolamide, ritonavir, paclitaxel) exhibit many characteristics that are problematic for effective oral and per oral delivery. Some of the problems associated include low aqueous solubility, poor permeability, erratic and poor absorption, inter and intra subject variability and significant positive food effect which leads to low and variable bioavailability. Also, most of the class IV drugs are substrate for P-glycoprotein (low permeability) and substrate for CYP3A4 (extensive pre systemic metabolism) which further potentiates the problem of poor therapeutic potential of these drugs. A decade back, extreme examples of class IV compounds were an exception rather than the rule, yet today many drug candidates under development pipeline fall into this category. Formulation and development of an efficacious delivery system for BCS class IV drugs are herculean tasks for any formulator. The inherent hurdles posed by these drugs hamper their translation to actual market. The importance of the formulation composition and design to successful drug development is especially illustrated by the BCS class IV case. To be clinically effective these drugs require the development of a proper delivery system for both oral and per oral delivery. Ideal oral dosage forms should produce both a reasonably high bioavailability and low inter and intra subject variability in absorption. Also, ideal systems for BCS class IV should produce a therapeutic concentration of the drug at reasonable dose volumes for intravenous administration. This article highlights the various techniques and upcoming strategies which can be employed for the development of highly notorious BCS class IV drugs. Some of the techniques employed are lipid based delivery systems, polymer based nanocarriers, crystal engineering (nanocrystals and co-crystals), liquisolid technology, self-emulsifying solid dispersions and miscellaneous techniques addressing the P

  13. Report on the O IV and S IV lines observed by IRIS

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    The O IV intercombination lines observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) between 1397 and 1407 A provide useful density diagnostics. This document presents data that address two issues related to these lines: (1) the contribution of S IV to the O IV 1404.8 line; and (2) the range of sensitivity of the O IV 1399.8/1401.2 ratio.

  14. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a clinical tool for extending the…

  15. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  16. Test Review: Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yiting; Lai, Mark H. C.; Xu, Yining; Zhou, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the "Advanced Clinical Solutions for WAIS-IV and WMS-IV". The "Advanced Clinical Solutions (ACS) for the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition" (WAIS-IV; Wechsler, 2008) and the "Wechsler Memory Scale-Fourth Edition" (WMS-IV; Wechsler, 2009) was published by Pearson in 2009. It is a…

  17. Estimating the cost-per-result of a national reflexed Cryptococcal antigenaemia screening program: Forecasting the impact of potential HIV guideline changes and treatment goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Naseem; Coetzee, Lindi Marie; Schnippel, Kathryn; Glencross, Deborah Kim

    2017-01-01

    During 2016, the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) introduced laboratory-based reflexed Cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) screening to detect early Cryptococcal disease in immunosuppressed HIV+ patients with a confirmed CD4 count of 100 cells/μl or less. The aim of this study was to assess cost-per-result of a national screening program across different tiers of laboratory service, with variable daily CrAg test volumes. The impact of potential ART treatment guideline and treatment target changes on CrAg volumes, platform choice and laboratory workflow are considered. CD4 data (with counts result was calculated for four scenarios, including the existing service status quo (Scenario-I), and three other settings (as Scenarios II-IV) which were based on information from recent antiretroviral (ART) guidelines, District Health Information System (DHIS) data and UNAIDS 90/90/90 HIV/AIDS treatment targets. Scenario-II forecast CD4 testing offered only to new ART initiates recorded at DHIS. Scenario-III projected all patients notified as HIV+, but not yet on ART (recorded at DHIS) and Scenario-IV forecast CrAg screening in 90% of estimated HIV+ patients across South Africa (also DHIS). Stata was used to assess daily CrAg volumes at the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles across 52 CD4-laboratories. Daily volumes were used to determine technical effort/ operator staff costs (% full time equivalent) and cost-per-result for all scenarios. Daily volumes ranged between 3 and 64 samples for Scenario-I at the 5th and 95th percentile. Similarly, daily volumes ranges of 1-12, 2-45 and 5-100 CrAg-directed samples were noted for Scenario's II, III and IV respectively. A cut-off of 30 CrAg tests per day defined use of either LFA or EIA platform. LFA cost-per-result ranged from $8.24 to $5.44 and EIA cost-per-result between $5.58 and $4.88 across the range of test volumes. The technical effort across scenarios ranged from 3.2-27.6% depending on test volumes and

  18. Southwest Project: resource/institutional requirements analysis. Volume III. Systems integration studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormsby, L. S.; Sawyer, T. G.; Brown, Dr., M. L.; Daviet, II, L. L; Weber, E. R.; Brown, J. E.; Arlidge, J. W.; Novak, H. R.; Sanesi, Norman; Klaiman, H. C.; Spangenberg, Jr., D. T.; Groves, D. J.; Maddox, J. D.; Hayslip, R. M.; Ijams, G.; Lacy, R. G.; Montgomery, J.; Carito, J. A.; Ballance, J. W.; Bluemle, C. F.; Smith, D. N.; Wehrey, M. C.; Ladd, K. L.; Evans, Dr., S. K.; Guild, D. H.; Brodfeld, B.; Cleveland, J. A.; Hicks, K. L.; Noga, M. W.; Ross, A. M.

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide information to DOE which can be used to establish its plans for accelerated commercialization and market penetration of solar electric generating plants in the southwestern region of the United States. The area of interest includes Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and sections of Oklahoma and Texas. The system integration study establishes the investment that utilities could afford to make in solar thermal, photovoltaic, and wind energy systems, and to assess the sensitivity of the break-even cost to critical variables including fuel escalation rates, fixed charge rates, load growth rates, cloud cover, number of sites, load shape, and energy storage. This information will be used as input to Volume IV, Institutional Studies, one objective of which will be to determine the incentives required to close the gap between the break-even investment for the utilities of the Southwest and the estimated cost of solar generation.

  19. Determinants of Infant Behaviour IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, B. M., Ed.

    This volume consists of reports of individual studies and surveys of research work on mother-infant interactions. It is divided into two parts. The first section presents a wide range of studies on mother-infant relations as exhibited in the behavior of animals. The second part, concerning human behavior, includes studies on the natural history of…

  20. EFFECTIVE INDEPENDENT QUALITY ASSESSMENT USING IV&V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nageswara Rao

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Software is critical to the effectiveness, competitiveness, and survival of any organization. Unexpected behavior or critical problems that bring operations to an idle are just not an option. Effective oversight is critical to good project management and as it is important for the project manager to ensure that the project is on track and to be completed within the estimated schedule and cost by maintaining the quality of the deliverables. This paper describes the role of Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V integrated into the software development life cycle in bringing down company’s cost to develop software products, improve the quality of developed systems and save money throughout the system life cycle by detecting and identifying risk elements throughout the entire software development process thus allowing project and quality assurance managers to respond quickly in order to mitigate risks earlier in the product development life cycle, with more effectiveness, and with less impact on cost and schedule.

  1. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  2. Apollonius de Perges, Coniques tome 2.2, livre IV

    CERN Document Server

    Rashed, Roshdi

    2009-01-01

    Book IV of the Konika consists of two parts; the first presents a theory of poles and polars, the second deals with the number of intersections and points of contact in a conic section. Previously the book was only extant as the very unreliable text of a Greek commentary by Eutocius. Roshdi Rashed here presents for the first time an edition of an Arabic translation based on a text independent of this Greek version. This is a valuable re-discovery, for which reason it is published here as a separate volume. It contains an edition princeps of the Arabic text, together with a faithful translation

  3. Toward Phase IV, Populating the WOVOdat Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratdomopurbo, A.; Newhall, C. G.; Schwandner, F. M.; Selva, J.; Ueda, H.

    2009-12-01

    One of challenges for volcanologists is the fact that more and more people are likely to live on volcanic slopes. Information about volcanic activity during unrest should be accurate and rapidly distributed. As unrest may lead to eruption, evacuation may be necessary to minimize damage and casualties. The decision to evacuate people is usually based on the interpretation of monitoring data. Over the past several decades, monitoring volcanoes has used more and more sophisticated instruments. A huge volume of data is collected in order to understand the state of activity and behaviour of a volcano. WOVOdat, The World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) Database of Volcanic Unrest, will provide context within which scientists can interpret the state of their own volcano, during and between crises. After a decision during the 2000 IAVCEI General Assembly to create WOVOdat, development has passed through several phases, from Concept Development (Phase-I in 2000-2002), Database Design (Phase-II, 2003-2006) and Pilot Testing (Phase-III in 2007-2008). For WOVOdat to be operational, there are still two (2) steps to complete, which are: Database Population (Phase-IV) and Enhancement and Maintenance (Phase-V). Since January 2009, the WOVOdat project is hosted by Earth Observatory of Singapore for at least a 5-year period. According to the original planning in 2002, this 5-year period will be used for completing the Phase-IV. As the WOVOdat design is not yet tested for all types of data, 2009 is still reserved for building the back-end relational database management system (RDBMS) of WOVOdat and testing it with more complex data. Fine-tuning of the WOVOdat’s RDBMS design is being done with each new upload of observatory data. The next and main phase of WOVOdat development will be data population, managing data transfer from multiple observatory formats to WOVOdat format. Data population will depend on two important things, the availability of SQL database in volcano

  4. Analysis of Phoenix Anomalies and IV & V Findings Applied to the GRAIL Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    NASA IV&V was established in 1993 to improve safety and cost-effectiveness of mission critical software. Since its inception the tools and strategies employed by IV&V have evolved. This paper examines how lessons learned from the Phoenix project were developed and applied to the GRAIL project. Shortly after selection, the GRAIL project initiated a review of the issues documented by IV&V for Phoenix. The motivation was twofold: the learn as much as possible about the types of issues that arose from the flight software product line slated for use on GRAIL, and to identify opportunities for improving the effectiveness of IV&V on GRAIL. The IV&V Facility provided a database dump containing 893 issues. These were categorized into 16 bins, and then analyzed according to whether the project responded by changing the affected artifacts or using as-is. The results of this analysis were compared to a similar assessment of post-launch anomalies documented by the project. Results of the analysis were discussed with the IV&V team assigned to GRAIL. These discussions led to changes in the way both the project and IV&V approached the IV&V task, and improved the efficiency of the activity.

  5. A cerium(IV)-carbon multiple bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregson, Matthew; Lu, Erli; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Chemistry

    2013-12-02

    Straightforward access to a cerium(IV)-carbene complex was provided by one-electron oxidation of an anionic ''ate'' cerium(III)-carbene precursor, thereby avoiding decomposition reactions that plague oxidations of neutral cerium(III) compounds. The cerium(IV)-carbene complex is the first lanthanide(IV)-element multiple bond and involves a twofold bonding interaction of two electron pairs between cerium and carbon. [German] Auf direktem Wege zu einem Cer(IV)-Carbenkomplex gelangt man durch die Einelektronenoxidation einer anionischen Carben-Cerat(III)-Vorstufe. So werden Zersetzungsprozesse vermieden, die die Oxidation neutraler Cer(III)-Verbindungen erschweren. Der Cer(IV)-Carbenkomplex enthaelt die erste Lanthanoid(IV)-Element-Mehrfachbindung; dabei binden Cer und Kohlenstoff ueber zwei Elektronenpaare.

  6. Cost comparisons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    How much does the LHC cost? And how much does this represent in other currencies? Below we present a table showing some comparisons with the cost of other projects. Looking at the figures, you will see that the cost of the LHC can be likened to that of three skyscrapers, or two seasons of Formula 1 racing! One year's budget of a single large F1 team is comparable to the entire materials cost of the ATLAS or CMS experiments.   Please note that all the figures are rounded for ease of reading.    CHF € $   LHC 4.6 billions 3 billions  4 billions   Space Shuttle Endeavour (NASA) 1.9 billion 1.3 billion 1.7 billion   Hubble Space Telescope (cost at launch – NASA/...

  7. Linking quality of care and training costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Tabor, Ann; Madsen, Mette E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide a model for conducting cost-effectiveness analyses in medical education. The model was based on a randomised trial examining the effects of training midwives to perform cervical length measurement (CLM) as compared with obstetricians on patients' waiting times. (CLM......-performed CLM was the most cost-effective strategy, whereas midwife-performed CLM was cost-effective for WTP values above EUR 0.73 minute(-1) . CONCLUSION: Cost-effectiveness models can be used to link quality of care to training costs. The example used in the present study demonstrated that different training......), as compared with obstetricians. METHODS: The model included four steps: (i) gathering data on training outcomes, (ii) assessing total costs and effects, (iii) calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and (iv) estimating cost-effectiveness probability for different willingness to pay (WTP...

  8. The Status of the Construction of MICE Step IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snopok, P. [Fermilab; Overton, E. [Sheffield U.

    2014-07-01

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment will provide the demononstration ionization cooling. The experiment is being built in a series of Steps. Step IV, which consists of a tracking spectrometer upstream and downstream of an absorber/focus-coil module will be completed in early in 2015. In this configuration, the emittance of the muon beam upstream and downstream of the absorbed will be measured precisely allowing the emittance reduction and the factors that determine the ionization-cooling effect to be studied in detail. Each tracking spectrometer consists of a scintillating-fibre tracker placed within a 4 T field provided by the superconducting spectrometer solenoid. The muon beam is transported to the absorber/focus-coil module: a 22 liter volume of liquid hydrogen placed inside a superconducting focusing coil. The properties of lithium hydride, and possibly other absorber materials, will also be studied. All the components of Step IV have been manufactured and integration of the experiment in the MICE Hall at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory is underway. The construction and performance of Step IV will be described. A full study of ionization cooling will be carried out with Step V of the experiment which will include a short 201 MHz linac module in which beam transport is achieved with a superconducting “coupling-coil”. The status of the preparation of the components of Step V of the experiment will be described briefly.

  9. System optimization of solar hydrogen energy system based on hydrogen production cost. 2; Suiso seizo cost wo hyoka shihyo to shita taiyo suiso energy system no saiteki sekkei. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ota, D.; Yamagami, Y.; Tani, T. [Science University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    In this paper, to evaluate the hydrogen production cost per unit volume, system optimization of solar hydrogen energy system is discussed. Based on the simulation of the I-V characteristics of amorphous Si (a-Si) photovoltaic array, the working point between the array and hydrogen generator was determined. The cost ratio of each design point was calculated. The optimum design points were 500 W/m{sup 2} for the single crystal Si system, and 600 W/m{sup 2} for the a-Si system. When the rating capacity of design point was constant, almost constant cost ratio was obtained independent of the type of photovoltaic cells. It was found that the photovoltaic cells can be fabricated in about 15% lower cost at maximum. It was also found that the optimum design point sifts to the lower insolation site due to reduction of the photovoltaic cell cost. Since the annual hydrogen generation quantity does not depend on the type of photovoltaic cells under the constant rating capacity of design point, hydrogen can be produced in lower cost by using photovoltaic cell of lower cost. 5 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. The costs of turnover in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Spector, William D.; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. Objectives To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. Data and sample 902 nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), Medicare enrollment files, Census and Area Resource File (ARF). Research Design We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable (IV) limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. Results The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The IV estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (p=0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10 percentage point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. Conclusion The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs. PMID:19648834

  11. Economic evaluation of a combined photo-Fenton/MBR process using pesticides as model pollutant. Factors affecting costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Pérez, José Antonio; Román Sánchez, Isabel María; Carra, Irene; Cabrera Reina, Alejandro; Casas López, José Luis; Malato, Sixto

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to carry out an economic assessment on a solar photo-Fenton/MBR combined process to treat industrial ecotoxic wastewater. This study focuses on the impact of the contamination present in wastewater, the photochemical oxidation, the use of an MBR as biological process and the plant size on operating and amortization costs. As example of ecotoxic pollutant, a mixture of five commercial pesticides commonly used in the Mediterranean area has been used, ranging from 500 mg/L to 50mg/L, expressed as dissolved organic carbon concentration. The economic evaluation shows that (i) the increase in pollution load does not always involve an increase in photo-Fenton costs because they also depend on organic matter mineralization; (ii) the use of an MBR process permits lower photochemical oxidation requirements than other biological treatments, resulting in approximately 20% photo-Fenton cost reduction for highly polluted wastewater; (iii) when pollution load decreases, the contribution of reactant consumption to the photo-Fenton process costs increase with regard to amortization costs; (iv) 30% total cost reduction can be gained treating higher daily volumes, obtaining competitive costs that vary from 1.1-1.9 €/m(3), depending on the pollution load.

  12. Stark broadening of B IV spectral lines

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrijevic, Milan S; Simic, Zoran; Kovacevic, Andjelka; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Stark broadening parameters for 157 multiplets of helium like boron (B IV) have been calculated using the impact semiclassical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series. An example of the influence of Stark broadening on B IV lines in DO white dwarfs is given.

  13. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  14. Metsahovi Radio Observatory - IVS Network Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uunila, Minttu; Zubko, Nataliya; Poutanen, Markku; Kallunki, Juha; Kallio, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Metsahovi Radio Observatory together with Finnish Geodetic Institute officially became an IVS Network Station. Eight IVS sessions were observed during the year. Two spacecraft tracking and one EVN X-band experiment were also performed. In 2012, the Metsahovi VLBI equipment was upgraded with a Digital Base Band Converter, a Mark 5B+, a FILA10G, and a FlexBuff.

  15. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  16. Thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Roa, Linfeng; Weger, H.T.; Felmy, A.R. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (United States); Choppin, G.R. [Florida State University (United States); Yui, Mikazu [Waste Isolation Research Division, Tokai Works, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    This report provides thermodynamic data for predicting concentrations of Th(IV), U(IV), Np(IV), and Pu(IV) in geologic environments, and contributes to an integration of the JNC chemical thermodynamic database, JNC-TDB (previously PNC-TDB), for the performance analysis of geological isolation system for high-level radioactive wastes. Thermodynamic data for the formation of complexes or compounds with hydroxide, chloride, fluoride, carbonate, nitrate, sulfate and phosphate are discussed in this report. Where data for specific actinide(IV) species was lacking, the data were selected based on chemical analogy to other tetravalent actinides. In this study, the Pitzer ion-interaction model is used to extrapolate thermodynamic constants to zero ionic strength at 25degC. (author)

  17. Apollonius de Perge, Coniques tome 2.3, livres II-IV

    CERN Document Server

    Decorps-Foulquier, Micheline

    2010-01-01

    Volume 2.3, containing the Greek translations of books II-IV, completes the edition of the Conica of Apollonius of Perga. It is arranged according to the same principle as the previous volume on book I: the critical edition of the Greek text is accompanied by numerous notes and a lexicon of all mathematical terms. An introduction and a French translation provide further insights into the text. The edition of the Greek books of the Conica will be thematically complemented by volume 3 of the SGA series, containing the critical edition of Eutocius of Ascalon's commentary on the Conica and its Fre

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  19. Minimizing Costs Can Be Costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Rasmussen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A quite common practice, even in academic literature, is to simplify a decision problem and model it as a cost-minimizing problem. In fact, some type of models has been standardized to minimization problems, like Quadratic Assignment Problems (QAPs, where a maximization formulation would be treated as a “generalized” QAP and not solvable by many of the specially designed softwares for QAP. Ignoring revenues when modeling a decision problem works only if costs can be separated from the decisions influencing revenues. More often than we think this is not the case, and minimizing costs will not lead to maximized profit. This will be demonstrated using spreadsheets to solve a small example. The example is also used to demonstrate other pitfalls in network models: the inability to generally balance the problem or allocate costs in advance, and the tendency to anticipate a specific type of solution and thereby make constraints too limiting when formulating the problem.

  20. 《中华人民共和国药典(2015年版)》(四部)中微生物检验相关通则的增、修订情况介绍%An introduction to the revision of microbiological test in the general principle of the Pharmacopoeia of the People’s Republic of China (2015 version) volume IV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯震; 范一灵; 杨美成

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To systematically introduce major supplement and revision in the general principle of the Pharmacopoeia of the People’s Republic of China (Chinese Pharmacopoeia) (2015 version) volume IV. Methods:The main differences between Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010 version) and Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2015 version) were compared. Results:New ideas in microbiological test were established in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2015 version), and supplement and updating amendment were carried out in testing technology and methods, environmental facilities, culture media and quality management. Conclusion: The general principle related to microbiological test in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2015 version) is tending to be perfect and has achieved the international pharmaceutical standard.%目的:介绍《中华人民共和国药典(2015年版)》(四部)中微生物检验相关通则的主要增、修订情况。方法:比较本版和前版药典相关内容的主要差异。结果:本版药典中微生物检验相关通则体现了新的检验理念,在检验技术、检验方法、环境设施、培养体系和质量管理等方面均进行了增、修订。结论:本版药典中微生物检验相关通则更趋完善,已与国际全面接轨。

  1. Return of feature-based cost modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Robert C.; Patrawala, Taher B.

    1998-10-01

    Feature Based Cost Modeling is thought of as a relative new approach to cost modeling, but feature based cost modeling had considerable development in the 1950's. Considerable work was published in the 1950's by Boeing on cost for various casting processes--sand casting, die casting, investment casting and permanent mold casting--as a function of a single casting feature, casting volume. Additional approaches to feature based cost modeling have been made, and this work is a review of previous works and a proposed integrated model to feature based cost modeling.

  2. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  3. Low-cost LANDSAT processing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, N. L.; Hooper, N. J.; Spann, G. W.

    1980-01-01

    LANDSAT analysis system is assembled from commercially available components at relatively low cost. Small-scale system is put together for price affordable for state agencies and universities. It processes LANDSAT data for subscene areas on repetitive basis. Amount of time required for processing decreases linearly with number of classifications desired. Computer programs written in FORTRAN IV are available for analyzing data.

  4. 47 CFR 27.1238 - Eligible costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Legal fees; (5) Site acquisition fees-contractor; and (6) Arbitrator fee; (c) Transmission facility—analog conversion costs: (1) Transmitter upgrading or retuning; (2) Combiner re-tuning or new; (3) Power... modifications; (iii) Electrical/HVAC; and (iv) Mechanical (7) Engineering: (i) Structural; and (ii)...

  5. Costs and Clinical Quality Among Medicare Beneficiaries..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors of Costs and Clinical Quality Among Medicare Beneficiaries - Associations with Health Center Penetration of Low-Income Residents, published in Volume 4,...

  6. Costs and Clinical Quality Among Medicare Beneficiaries..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors of Costs and Clinical Quality Among Medicare Beneficiaries - Associations with Health Center Penetration of Low-Income Residents, published in Volume 4,...

  7. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 4. Technology appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-19

    This volume of the 4-volume ISTUM documentation gives information on the individual technology specifications. The first chapter presents a general overview of the ISTUM technology data bases. It includes an explanation of the data-base printouts and how the separate-cost building blocks are combined to derive an aggregate-technology cost. The remaining chapters document the specific-technology-cost specifications. Boiler technologies (conventional coal steam, conventional natural gas and oil in the steam-service sector, black liquor and wood boilers, and space-heat service sector) and non-boiler conventional technologies (natural gas non-boiler, oil-fired non-boiler, coal-fired non-boiler technologies and non-boiler primary system costs) are covered in Chapter II. Chapter III, Fossil Energy Technologies, covers atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, low-Btu gasification of coal, and medium-Btu gasification. Chapter IV, Cogeneration and Self-Generation Technologies, covers the steam service sector, machine-drive service sector, and electrolytic service sector. Solar and geothermal technologies (solar steam, solar space heat, and geothermal steam technologies) are covered in Chapter V, while Chapter VI covers conservation technologies. (MCW)

  8. An efficient strategy for heterologous expression and purification of active peptide hainantoxin-IV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    Full Text Available Hainantoxin-IV (HNTX-IV from the venom of the spider Selenocosmia hainana is a potent antagonist that specifically inhibits the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S sodium channels. The toxin peptide consists of 35 amino acids and adopts a typical inhibitory cystine knot (ICK motif. To obtain adequate HNTX-IV peptides for further insight into the structure-activity relationships of the toxin, a novel strategy including cloning, expression and purification was developed in an E. coli expression system. For this purpose, a seamless restriction-free (RF cloning method was employed for the construction of an expression vector to avoid introducing unwanted sequences into the target gene. Furthermore, the solubility of recombinant HNTX-IV could be promoted efficiently by the combination of a glutathione S-transferase (GST tag and a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO tag. Finally, an affinity-chromatography-free purification strategy was developed by cut-off dialysis tubing combined with trichloroacetic acid (TCA extraction. Further HPLC purification yielded recombinant, tag-free HNTX-IV with high yield and purity. The molecular weight of recombinant HNTX-IV (rHNTX-IV is identical to its theoretical value according to Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption / Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The recombinant toxin has similar activity (IC50 value of 120 nM on the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S sodium channels in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons to native toxins. In the report, an efficient and cost-effective strategy for producing rHNTX-IV was developed, which paved the way for the further study of structure-activity relationships of rHNTX-IV and its pharmaceutical applications.

  9. Atmosphere of Mars - Mariner IV models compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, V. R.; Fjeldbo, G.; Fjeldbo, W. C.

    1966-01-01

    Mariner IV models of three Mars atmospheric layers analogous to terrestrial E, F-1 and F-2 layers, considering relative mass densities, temperatures, carbon dioxide photodissociation and ionization profile

  10. IV&V Project Assessment Process Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) will launch NASA's Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). This launch vehicle will provide American launch capability for human exploration and travelling beyond Earth orbit. SLS is designed to be flexible for crew or cargo missions. The first test flight is scheduled for December 2017. The SLS SRR/SDR provided insight into the project development life cycle. NASA IV&V ran the standard Risk Based Assessment and Portfolio Based Risk Assessment to identify analysis tasking for the SLS program. This presentation examines the SLS System Requirements Review/System Definition Review (SRR/SDR), IV&V findings for IV&V process validation correlation to/from the selected IV&V tasking and capabilities. It also provides a reusable IEEE 1012 scorecard for programmatic completeness across the software development life cycle.

  11. Periodontal Disease Part IV: Periodontal Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Turnbull, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In Part IV of this article, the author describes two periodontal infections, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (trench mouth) and periodontal abscess, both acute painful conditions for which patients may seek advice from their family physician rather than their dentist.

  12. VOLUMNECT: measuring volumes with Kinect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino Ferreira, Beatriz; Griné, Miguel; Gameiro, Duarte; Costeira, João. Paulo; Sousa Santos, Beatriz

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a solution to volume measurement object packing using 3D cameras (such as the Microsoft KinectTM). We target application scenarios, such as warehouses or distribution and logistics companies, where it is important to promptly compute package volumes, yet high accuracy is not pivotal. Our application auto- matically detects cuboid objects using the depth camera data and computes their volume and sorting it allowing space optimization. The proposed methodology applies to a point cloud simple computer vision and image processing methods, as connected components, morphological operations and Harris corner detector, producing encouraging results, namely an accuracy in volume measurement of 8mm. Aspects that can be further improved are identified; nevertheless, the current solution is already promising turning out to be cost effective for the envisaged scenarios.

  13. An Economic Analysis of Generation IV Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, J S; Lamont, A D; Rothwell, G S; Smith, C F; Greenspan, E; Brown, N; Barak, A

    2002-03-01

    This report examines some conditions necessary for Generation IV Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) to be competitive in the world energy market. The key areas that make nuclear reactors an attractive choice for investors are reviewed, and a cost model based on the ideal conditions is developed. Recommendations are then made based on the output of the cost model and on conditions and tactics that have proven successful in other industries. The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS), a specific SMR design concept, is used to develop the cost model and complete the analysis because information about the ENHS design is readily available from the University of California at Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Department. However, the cost model can be used to analyze any of the current SMR designs being considered. On the basis of our analysis, we determined that the nuclear power industry can benefit from and SMRs can become competitive in the world energy market if a combination of standardization and simplification of orders, configuration, and production are implemented. This would require wholesale changes in the way SMRs are produced, manufactured and regulated, but nothing that other industries have not implemented and proven successful.

  14. Energy perspectives 2035 - Volume 2, scenarios I to IV; Energieperspektiven 2035 -- Band 2: Szenarien I bis IV. Darstellung der Szenarien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, A.

    2007-07-15

    This comprehensive report published by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the four scenarios concerning future developments in Swiss energy supply policy. The four complex scenarios include variants entitled 'business as usual', 'increased co-operation', 'new priorities' and 'on the way to a 2000-Watt society'. These scenarios deal with the development of energy demand and electricity offerings in Switzerland for the period 1990 to 2035. They are reviewed in the light of various sensitivity factors. These sensitivity factors include a high GDP, oil prices of 50 US-dollars per barrel and a warmer climate. The report presents the results of the model calculations made. First of all, the report takes a look at the motivation and aims behind the work and discusses the modelling methods, system limits and conventions used and the possibilities offered by the perspectives as well as the limits encountered. The four scenarios are then presented and discussed in detail. Implementation variants in the private, services, industrial and traffic sectors are discussed and various electricity supply variants are presented, as are the associated environmental issues involved. The scenarios are compared with each other and pricing and security of supply issues are discussed. Finally, a short synopsis of the scenarios is presented and decision criteria are discussed as are implementation instruments. Ethical dilemmas and the risks involved are noted

  15. Comparison of Russian and IVS intensive series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdubov, S. L.

    2013-08-01

    The article presents results of first comparison the Russian National UT1-UTC estimation program Ru-U and IVS-intensive international campaign. It is shown that the Ru-U sessions are performing with good accuracy and results can be included into international VLBI data processing scheme. Comparison of different distributions shows that the problem of correlation lack between single delay formal errors and UT1 estimations are presented both in Ru-U and IVS-intensive series.

  16. Labor Costs in the Technical Operation of Three Research Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Malcolm; Phelps, Doug

    1984-01-01

    Investigates costs and operations of back office activities of three middle-sized research libraries focusing on costs of labor and effects of automation. Measuring costs, labor compensation differences, differences in hours per volume, differences in organization, reduction of labor costs due to automation, and the quality dimension are…

  17. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  18. Preceedings of the International Congress (12th), Corrosion Control for Low-Cost Reliability, Held in Houston, Texas on September 19 -24, 1993. Volume 4. Oil/Gas/Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-24

    Equimolar NaNo,- 379 Methods to Combat Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Cryogenic KNO3 Melt at Various Temperatures Aluminum Heat Exchangers I. Singh, C...highly priced materials with an abundant cost penalty. Therefore, it is important to have a method of assessing the performance of candidate materials...applications. From an economical point of view Alloy 625 looks very unattractive to many potential users because of its very high price tag. As a direct

  19. Synthesis and characterization of chiral thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) benzamidinate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoene, Sebastian; Maerz, Juliane; Kaden, Peter; Patzschke, Michael; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    Two chiral benzamidinate complexes of tetravalent actinides (Th(IV) and U(IV)) were synthesized using a salt metathesis reaction of the corresponding actinide(IV) tetrachlorides and the potassium salt of the chiral benzamidine (S,S)-N,N-Bis-(1-phenylethyl)-benzamidine ((S)-HPEBA). The structure of the complexes was determined with single crystal X-ray diffraction. These are the first examples of chiral amidinate complexes of actinides.

  20. Fitness cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L.; Pedersen, Thomas M.; Udekwu, Klas I.

    2012-01-01

    of each isolate was determined in a growth competition assay with a reference isolate. Significant fitness costs of 215 were determined for the MRSA isolates studied. There was a significant negative correlation between number of antibiotic resistances and relative fitness. Multiple regression analysis...... to that seen in Denmark. We propose a significant fitness cost of resistance as the main bacteriological explanation for the disappearance of the multiresistant complex 83A MRSA in Denmark following a reduction in antibiotic usage.......Denmark and several other countries experienced the first epidemic of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during the period 196575, which was caused by multiresistant isolates of phage complex 83A. In Denmark these MRSA isolates disappeared almost completely, being replaced by other...

  1. Axis IV--psychosocial and environmental problems--in the DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, A; Ekselius, L; Ramklint, M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to further explore the properties of axis IV in the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV). In a naturalistic cross-sectional design, a group (n = 163) of young (18-25 years old) Swedish psychiatric outpatients was assessed according to DSM-IV. Psychosocial and environmental problems/axis IV were evaluated through structured interviewing by a social worker and by self-assessment on a questionnaire. Reliability between professional assessment and self-assessment of axis IV was examined. Concurrent validity of axis IV was also examined. Reliability between professional and self-assessed axis IV was fair to almost perfect, 0.31-0.83, according to prevalence and bias-adjusted kappa. Categories of psychosocial stress and environmental problems were related to the presence of axis I disorders, co-morbidity, personality disorders and decreasing Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) values. The revised axis IV according to DSM-IV seems to have concurrent validity, but is still hampered by limited reliability.

  2. The case for implementing activity based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, Paul H; Bolinger-Perez, Nicole; Boysen, Kent

    2012-01-01

    ABC identifies profitable volumes to give managers information to better manage volumes. Managers must balance the demand for service while maintaining a reasonable profit margin. Disparate systems work extremely well for their intended purposes, but they do not communicate with one another. The strength of the data they hold individually may be leveraged when implementing ABC methodology. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota implemented a pilot of ABC to evaluate CT services where there is a high volume, multiple service location for cost comparison, variety of patient acuity and service mix, and large capital investments.The goal was to reveal the actual cost of CT services at the procedural level.

  3. Alternatives for managing wastes from reactors and post-fission operations in the LWR fuel cycle. Volume 4. Alternatives for waste isolation and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-05-01

    Volume IV of the five-volume report contains information on alternatives for final storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. Section titles include: basic concepts for geologic isolation; geologic storage alternatives; geologic disposal alternatives; extraterrestrial disposal; and, transmutation. (JGB)

  4. The Poly(acrylonitrule-co-acrylic acid-graft-β-cyclodextrin Hydrogel for Thorium(IV Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojian Duan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the β-CD(AN-co-AA hydrogel was used to remove the thorium(IV [Th(IV] from the water system, and the new adsorbent was characterized through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The influences of contact time, pH value, ionic strength, solid-liquid ratio, initial Th(IV concentration, and temperature on Th(IV adsorption onto the functional hydrogel were researched. The results showed that the experimental data followed the Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacity (qmax for Th(IV was 692 mg/g at pH 2.95, which approached the calculated (qe 682 mg/g. The desorption capacity of Th(IV in different HNO3 concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 0.5 M was also studied, and the percentage of the maximum desorption was 86.85% in the condition of 0.09 M HNO3. The selectivity of β-CD(AN-co-AA hydrogel was also be studied, the results indicated that this material retained the good adsorption capacity to Th(IV even when the Ca2+, Mg2+, or Pb2+ existed in the system. The findings indicate that β-CD(AN-co-AA can be used as a new candidate for the enrichment and separation of Th(IV, or its analogue actinides, from large-volume solution in practical application.

  5. Renormalized Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Gover, A Rod

    2016-01-01

    For any conformally compact manifold with hypersurface boundary we define a canonical renormalized volume functional and compute an explicit, holographic formula for the corresponding anomaly. For the special case of asymptotically Einstein manifolds, our method recovers the known results. The anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, but the coefficients of divergences do. We give explicit formulae for these divergences valid for any choice of regulating hypersurface; these should be relevant to recent studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies. The anomaly is expressed as a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. We show that the variation of these energy functionals is exactly the obstruction to solving a singular Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the...

  6. Towards Universal Screening for Toxoplasmosis: Rapid, Cost-Effective, and Simultaneous Detection of Anti-Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA Antibodies by Use of Very Small Serum Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Swinburne A J

    2016-07-01

    Rapid, cost-effective, and early determination of the serological status of potentially infected individuals, particularly pregnant women, can be critical in preventing life-threatening infections and subsequent fetal congenital abnormalities. An article in this issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology (X. Li, C. Pomares, G. Gonfrier, B. Koh, S. Zhu, M. Gong, J. G. Montoya, and H. Dai, J Clin Microbiol 54:1726-1733, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.03371-15) describes an innovative multiplexed immunoassay that offers a path toward universal screening.

  7. A literature review of cost-effectiveness of intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for treating acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Heesoo; Wang, Guijing; George, Mary G

    2017-01-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rtPA) is recommended treatment for acute ischemic stroke patients, but the cost-effectiveness of IV rtPA within different time windows after the onset of acute ischemic stroke is not well reviewed. To conduct a literature review of the cost-effectiveness studies about IV rtPA by treatment times. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane Library, with the key words acute ischemic stroke, tissue plasminogen activator, cost, economic benefit, saving, and incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. The review is limited to original research articles published during 1995-2016 in English-language peer-reviewed journals. We found 16 studies meeting our criteria for this review. Nine of them were cost-effectiveness studies of IV rtPA treatment within 0-3 hours after stroke onset, 2 studies within 3-4.5 hours, 3 studies within 0-4.5 hours, and 2 study within 0-6 hours. IV rtPA is a cost-saving or a cost-effectiveness strategy from most of the study results. Only one study showed incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of IV rtPA within one year was marginally above $50,000 per QALY threshold. IV rtPA within 0-3 hours after stroke led to cost savings for lifetime or 30 years, and IV rtPA within 3-4.5 hours after stroke increased costs but still was cost-effective. The literature generally showed that intravenous IV rtPA was a dominant or a cost-effective strategy compared to traditional treatment for acute ischemic stroke patients without IV rtPA. The findings from the literature lacked generalizability because of limited data and various assumptions.

  8. On the stabilization of niobium(V) solutions by zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    Niobium cannot be separated from zirconium or hafnium when these elements occur together in solution with common anions such as chloride and sulphate. This is ascribed to the co-polymerization of niobium(V) and the hydrolysed ionic species of zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) to form colloidal...

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the WAIS-IV and WMS-IV in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Delyana I.; Davidson, Patrick S. R.; Schindler, Dwayne; Messier, Claude

    2013-01-01

    New editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence and Memory scales are now available. Yet, given the significant changes in these new releases and the skepticism that has met them, independent evidence on their psychometric properties is much needed but currently lacking. We administered the WAIS-IV and the Older Adult version of the WMS-IV to 145…

  11. The Berkeley SETI program - SERENDIP IV instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthimer, Dan; Bowyer, Stuart; Ng, David; Donnelly, Charles; Cobb, Jeff; Lampton, Michael; Airieau, Sabine

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the hardware design of SERENDIP IV, which will be deployed in early 1997 for a 21-cm sky survey at the National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center's 305-m radio telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. SERENDIP IV is a 167 million channel spectrum analyzer, covering a 100-Mhz bandwidth, with 0.6-Hz resolution and a 1.7-s integration time. SERENDIP IV's modular design incorporates a bank of digital mixers and filters to separate the 100 MHz band into 40 2.5 MHz subbands. Each 2.5 MHz subband is further broken down into 0.6 Hz bins by means of a four million point fast Fourier transform. The resulting power spectra are analyzed by 40 high-speed processors. Narrowband signals having power significantly above background noise levels are recorded along with telescope coordinates, time, and frequency. The data are sent in real time to Berkeley for analysis.

  12. Seafloor earthquake measurement system, SEMS IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platzbecker, M.R.; Ehasz, J.P.; Franco, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    Staff of the Telemetry Technology Development Department (2664) have, in support of the U.S. Interior Department Mineral Management Services (MMS), developed and deployed the Seafloor Earthquake Measurement System IV (SEMS IV). The result of this development project is a series of three fully operational seafloor seismic monitor systems located at offshore platforms: Eureka, Grace, and Irene. The instrument probes are embedded from three to seven feet into the seafloor and hardwired to seismic data recorders installed top side at the offshore platforms. The probes and underwater cables were designed to survive the seafloor environment with an operation life of five years. The units have been operational for two years and have produced recordings of several minor earthquakes in that time. Sandia Labs will transfer operation of SEMS IV to MMS contractors in the coming months. 29 figs., 25 tabs.

  13. Oxochloroalkoxide of the Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV as oxides precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Luiz Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV oxides mixture (CeO2-3TiO2 was prepared by thermal treatment of the oxochloroisopropoxide of Cerium (IV and Titanium (IV. The chemical route utilizing the Cerium (III chloride alcoholic complex and Titanium (IV isopropoxide is presented. The compound Ce5Ti15Cl16O30 (iOPr4(OH-Et15 was characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and TG/DTG. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the oxides resulting from the thermal decomposition of the precursor at 1000 degreesC for 36 h indicated the formation of cubic cerianite (a = 5.417Å and tetragonal rutile (a = 4.592Å and (c = 2.962 Å, with apparent crystallite sizes around 38 and 55nm, respectively.

  14. Functions in Free-Format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2009-01-01

    Written especially for programmers adopting a free-format style, this manual explores the role of functions in writing RPG IV programs. Demonstrating the potential of functions, many topics are explored such as details about existing RPG IV built-in functions, writing new functions, using ILE concepts to use C functions, and utilizing IBM API's functions. Explaining how to write small programs, either as sub-procedures or modules, and how to gather those parts together to make programs that are easy to write and maintain, this is a natural next step for programmers familiar with a free-format

  15. Polityka religijna Ptolemeusza IV Filopatora : wybrane aspekty

    OpenAIRE

    Grabowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Religion was very highly placed in the politics and propaganda of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Ptolemy IV Philopator belonged to the kings of Egypt who were particularly active in this field. The person of Ptolemy I Soter, who was the founder of the dynasty, was of considerable importance in his policy. Among many other things, Ptolemy IV established his eponymous cult in Ptolemais. He also invested the dynastic cult with its final form by incorporating into it the cult of Theoi Soters (Ptolemy I a...

  16. Capital cost: low and high sulfur coal plants; 800 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This Commercial Electric Power Cost Study for 800-MWe (Nominal) low- and high-sulfur coal plants consists of three volumes. (This is the fourth subject in a series of eight performed in the Commercial Electric Power Cost Studies by the US NRC). The low-sulfur coal plant is described in Volumes I and II, while Volume III (this volume) describes the high sulfur coal plant. The design basis, drawings, and summary cost estimate for a 794-MWe high-sulfur coal plant are presented in this volume. This information was developed by redesigning the low-sulfur sub-bituminous coal plant for burning high-sulfur bituminous coal. The reference design includes a lime flue-gas-desulfurization system. These coal plants utilize a mechanical draft (wet) cooling tower system for condenser heat removal. Costs of alternate cooling systems are provided in Report No. 7 in this series of studies of costs of commercial electrical power plants.

  17. Analysis IV integration and spectral theory, harmonic analysis, the garden of modular delights

    CERN Document Server

    Godement, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Analysis Volume IV introduces the reader to functional analysis (integration, Hilbert spaces, harmonic analysis in group theory) and to the methods of the theory of modular functions (theta and L series, elliptic functions, use of the Lie algebra of SL2). As in volumes I to III, the inimitable style of the author is recognizable here too, not only because of his refusal to write in the compact style used nowadays in many textbooks. The first part (Integration), a wise combination of mathematics said to be modern and classical, is universally useful whereas the second part leads the reader towards a very active and specialized field of research, with possibly broad generalizations.

  18. Tin and germanium monochalcogenide IV-VI semiconductor nanocrystals for use in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunez, Priscilla D; Buckley, Jannise J; Brutchey, Richard L

    2011-06-01

    The incorporation of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals into the photoabsorbant material of photovoltaic devices may reduce the production costs of solar cells since nanocrystals can be readily synthesized on a large scale and are solution processable. While the lead chalcogenide IV-VI nanocrystals have been widely studied in a variety of photovoltaic devices, concerns over the toxicity of lead have motivated the exploration of less toxic materials. This has led to the exploration of tin and germanium monochalcogenide IV-VI semiconductors, both of which are made up of earth abundant elements and possess properties similar to the lead chalcogenides. This feature article highlights recent efforts made towards achieving synthetic control over nanocrystal size and morphology of the non-lead containing IV-VI monochalcogenides (i.e., SnS, SnSe, SnTe, GeS and GeSe) and their application toward photovoltaic devices.

  19. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.L.; Hutzler, M.J.

    1979-04-01

    This report is Volume I of a six-volume series documenting the Integrating Model of the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES) as it existed on January 1, 1978. It offers a review of entire PIES system, including the basic components of the Integrating Model, which are described in detail in Volume IV of this series. In particular, this volume addresses the problem that PIES solves and the major features and applications of PIES.

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV inhibitory activity of parotid exudate of Bufo melanostictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allenki Venkatesham

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes arises as a result of β-cell failure combined with concomitant insulin resistance. Glucagon-like peptide-1 is a gastrointestinal hormone that is released postprandially from the L cells of the gut and exerts a glucose- dependent and direct insulinotropic effect on the pancreatic β cell. Which activate adenylate cyclase and enhances insulin secretion. GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by DPP-IV to GLP-1(9-37 amide following release from gut L cells. GLP-1 directly enhances glucose-dependent insulin secretion via an increase in β-cell cAMP. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV is a plasma membrane glycoprotein ectopeptidase. In mammals, DPP-IV was widely expressed on the surface of endothelial and epithelial cells and highest levels in humans have been reported to occur in the intestine, bone marrow and kidney. Inhibiting DPP-IV reduces its rapid degradation of GLP-1, increasing circulating levels of the active hormone in vivo and prolonging its beneficial effects. The IC 50 value of parotid exudate was found to be 9.4 μg/ml. The maximum % inhibition (61.8 was showed at a concentration of 12μg/ml. Parotid exudate through inhibition of DPP-IV, improves glucose tolerance and enhances insulin secretion. DPP-IV inhibitors are a novel class of oral hypoglycemic agents with a potential to improve pancreatic beta cell function and the clinical course of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  2. Painlevé IV coherent states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, David, E-mail: david.bermudez@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Contreras-Astorga, Alonso, E-mail: aloncont@iun.edu [Department of Mathematics and Actuarial Science, Indiana University Northwest, 3400 Broadway, Gary IN 46408 (United States); Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico); Fernández C, David J., E-mail: david@fis.cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Física, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, 07000 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-11-15

    A simple way to find solutions of the Painlevé IV equation is by identifying Hamiltonian systems with third-order differential ladder operators. Some of these systems can be obtained by applying supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM) to the harmonic oscillator. In this work, we will construct families of coherent states for such subset of SUSY partner Hamiltonians which are connected with the Painlevé IV equation. First, these coherent states are built up as eigenstates of the annihilation operator, then as displaced versions of the extremal states, both involving the related third-order ladder operators, and finally as extremal states which are also displaced but now using the so called linearized ladder operators. To each SUSY partner Hamiltonian corresponds two families of coherent states: one inside the infinite subspace associated with the isospectral part of the spectrum and another one in the finite subspace generated by the states created through the SUSY technique. - Highlights: • We use SUSY QM to obtain Hamiltonians with third-order differential ladder operators. • We show that these systems are related with the Painlevé IV equation. • We apply different definitions of coherent states to these Hamiltonians using the third-order ladder operators and some linearized ones. • We construct families of coherent states for such systems, which we called Painlevé IV coherent states.

  3. Bis(4-methylpiperidinium hexachloridostannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Helliwell

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, (C6H14N2[SnCl6], is built of 4-methylpiperidinium cations, occupying special positions on the mirror plane, and hexachloridostannate(IV anions on a special position of 2/m symmetry. The ions are linked via N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds into chains running along the b axis.

  4. TFRC—IVS Flow Control Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEKaijian; LINYaping; YANGAng

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the TCP (Trans-mission Control Protocol) friendliness of multicast video-conferencing systems. Through the analysis and simulation experiments it is shown that the slow response to network state changes and the fixed rate adjustment process lead to TCP unfriendliness in the bandwidth sharing. Therefore,this paper proposes a new TCP friendly flow control al-gorithm called TFRC-IVS flow control algorithm for the current best-effort Internet. TFRC-IVS (TCP-Friendly Rate Control--INRIA Videoconferencing System) algo-rithm utilizes TCP friendly control function derived from complex TCP model to calculate TCP friendly sending rate.Simulation results show that TFRC-IVS flow control algorithm improves the smoothness of transmission rates and converges quickly to the stable sending rate. In addi-tion, the TCP friendly control function in TFRC-IVS flow control algorithm ensures the TCP friendliness of video flows and fair bandwidth allocation with TCP flows, which the traditional static rate adjustment algorithm lacks.

  5. [Infusion of propofol or closed-circuit isoflurane. A study of cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, N; Rezzoug, A; Dolan, P; Bonada, G; Feiss, P

    1993-01-01

    The choice of an anaesthetic agent is influenced by its cost. The use of a circle absorber system decreases the cost of the maintenance of anaesthesia with halogenated agents. Fast recovery and low incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting are the main advantages of propofol. The cost of propofol can limit its use for the maintenance of anaesthesia except for short procedures. This prospective study compared in 50 ASA 1 and 2 patients the cost of anaesthesia with either propofol (group P, n = 25) or the association thiopentone-isoflurane administered with a rebreathing circuit (group I, n = 25). Patients were premedicated the evening before surgery with 2.5 mg lorazepam. Anaesthesia was induced with either propofol (2-3 mg.kg-1) or thiopentone (4-6 mg.kg-1) and maintained with either propofol (6-10 mg.kg-1.h-1) in group P or isoflurane continuously injected as liquid in the expiratory limb of the circuit in group I. The side effects of anaesthesia and the delay of recovery and discharge from the recovery room were assessed. Peroperative cost of anaesthesia included nitrous oxide, isoflurane and i.v. agents, fluids volumes and disposable devices. The total cost of anaesthesia included also the recovery room stay. The mean duration of anaesthesia was not significantly different between the two groups (109.4 +/- 7.1 min vs 107.3 +/- 7.3 min group P vs group I). The delay lf recovery (eyes opening) was shorter in the propofol group (14.4 +/- 1.3 min vs 19.4 +/- 1.4 min) as well as the delay of discharge from the recovery room (70 +/- 4 min, vs 82.4 +/- 4.6 min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Adding source positions to the IVS Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, S.; Thaller, D.

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneous estimation of source positions, Earth orientation parameters (EOPs) and station positions in one common adjustment is crucial for a consistent generation of celestial and terrestrial reference frame (CRF and TRF, respectively). VLBI is the only technique to guarantee this consistency. Previous publications showed that the VLBI intra-technique combination could improve the quality of the EOPs and station coordinates compared to the individual contributions. By now, the combination of EOP and station coordinates is well established within the IVS and in combination with other space geodetic techniques (e.g. inter-technique combined TRF like the ITRF). Most of the contributing IVS Analysis Centers (AC) now provide source positions as a third parameter type (besides EOP and station coordinates), which have not been used for an operational combined solution yet. A strategy for the combination of source positions has been developed and integrated into the routine IVS combination. Investigations are carried out to compare the source positions derived from different IVS ACs with the combined estimates to verify whether the source positions are improved by the combination, as it has been proven for EOP and station coordinates. Furthermore, global solutions of source positions, i.e., so-called catalogues describing a CRF, are generated consistently with the TRF similar to the IVS operational combined quarterly solution. The combined solutions of the source positions time series and the consistently generated TRF and CRF are compared internally to the individual solutions of the ACs as well as to external CRF catalogues and TRFs. Additionally, comparisons of EOPs based on different CRF solutions are presented as an outlook for consistent EOP, CRF and TRF realizations.

  7. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germain Dominique P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV, the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS, is an inherited connective tissue disorder defined by characteristic facial features (acrogeria in most patients, translucent skin with highly visible subcutaneous vessels on the trunk and lower back, easy bruising, and severe arterial, digestive and uterine complications, which are rarely, if at all, observed in the other forms of EDS. The estimated prevalence for all EDS varies between 1/10,000 and 1/25,000, EDS type IV representing approximately 5 to 10% of cases. The vascular complications may affect all anatomical areas, with a tendency toward arteries of large and medium diameter. Dissections of the vertebral arteries and the carotids in their extra- and intra-cranial segments (carotid-cavernous fistulae are typical. There is a high risk of recurrent colonic perforations. Pregnancy increases the likelihood of a uterine or vascular rupture. EDS type IV is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait that is caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene coding for type III procollagen. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs, non-invasive imaging, and the identification of a mutation of the COL3A1 gene. In childhood, coagulation disorders and Silverman's syndrome are the main differential diagnoses; in adulthood, the differential diagnosis includes other Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis can be considered in families where the mutation is known. Choriocentesis or amniocentesis, however, may entail risk for the pregnant woman. In the absence of specific treatment for EDS type IV, medical intervention should be focused on symptomatic treatment and prophylactic measures. Arterial, digestive or uterine complications require immediate hospitalisation, observation in an intensive care unit. Invasive imaging techniques are contraindicated. Conservative approach is usually recommended when caring for a vascular

  8. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume

  9. Comparison between cylindrical and prismatic lithium-ion cell costs using a process based cost model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciez, Rebecca E.; Whitacre, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    The relative size and age of the US electric vehicle market means that a few vehicles are able to drive market-wide trends in the battery chemistries and cell formats on the road today. Three lithium-ion chemistries account for nearly all of the storage capacity, and half of the cells are cylindrical. However, no specific model exists to examine the costs of manufacturing these cylindrical cells. Here we present a process-based cost model tailored to the cylindrical lithium-ion cells currently used in the EV market. We examine the costs for varied cell dimensions, electrode thicknesses, chemistries, and production volumes. Although cost savings are possible from increasing cell dimensions and electrode thicknesses, economies of scale have already been reached, and future cost reductions from increased production volumes are minimal. Prismatic cells, which are able to further capitalize on the cost reduction from larger formats, can offer further reductions than those possible for cylindrical cells.

  10. Annotations on Mexico's WISC-IV: a validity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Anthony D; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Hollingworth, Liz

    2012-01-01

    This project seeks to provide evidence on the internal structure of the Escala Wechsler de Inteligencia para Niños-IV (EWIN-IV; Wechsler, 2007a ) through a confirmatory factor analysis and intercorrelational study. Also provided is information on the adaptation process and other sources of validity evidence in support of the EWIN-IV norms. The standardization data for the EWIN-IV were used for all analyses. The factor loadings and correlational patterns found on the EWIN-IV are comparable to those seen in the American versions of the test. The proposed factor and scoring structure of the EWIN-IV was supported.

  11. A Fresh Look at the Benefits and Costs of the US Acid Rain Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Acid Rain Program (Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments) has achieved substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from power plants in the United States. We compare new estimates of the benefits and costs of Title IV to th...

  12. A Fresh Look at the Benefits and Costs of the US Acid Rain Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Acid Rain Program (Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments) has achieved substantial reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from power plants in the United States. We compare new estimates of the benefits and costs of Title IV to th...

  13. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-06-04

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  14. Fluctuations in type IV pilus retraction

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, M; Jonsson, A B; Wallin, M; Linden, Martin; Johansson, Emil; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Wallin, Mats

    2005-01-01

    The type IV pilus retraction motor is found in many important bacterial pathogens. It is the strongest known linear motor protein and is required for bacterial infectivity. We characterize the dynamics of type IV pilus retraction in terms of a stochastic chemical reaction model. We find that a two state model can describe the experimental force velocity relation and qualitative dependence of ATP concentration. The results indicate that the dynamics is limited by an ATP-dependent step at low load and a force-dependent step at high load, and that at least one step is effectively irreversible in the measured range of forces. The irreversible nature of the sub-step(s) lead to interesting predictions for future experiments: We find different parameterizations with mathematically identical force velocity relations but different fluctuations (diffusion constant). We also find a longer elementary step compared to an earlier analysis, which agrees better with known facts about the structure of the pilus filament and e...

  15. [Fe IV] Emission in Ionized Nebulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rodríguez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados de un análisis de la emisión en [Fe IV] en varias nebulosas ionizadas, basado en nuevas identificaciones y medidas anteriores de líneas de [Fe IV]. Las abundancias de Fe obtenidas al sumar las abundancias de los iones relevantes (principalmente Fe++ y Fe3+ resultan ser menores, por factores en el rango 2.6-5.9, que las abundancias implicadas por las líneas de [Fe III] y un factor de corrección por la ionizacion obtenido con modelos de ionizacion. Se discuten las posibles razones de esta discrepancia así como las implicaciones que tiene para nuestro entendimiento tanto de la evolución del polvo en nebulosas ionizadas como de la historia química de galaxias de baja metalicidad.

  16. Photovoltaic performance parameters at the nanoscale from in situ I-V curve measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Sadia; Tennyson, Elizabeth; Leite, Marina

    Monocrystalline photovoltaic (PV) devices exhibit higher efficiencies than polycrystalline devices, but the high manufacturing costs associated with single crystal solar cells pose a hindrance to their wide implementation. Polycrystalline CuInxGa(1 - x)Se2 (CIGS) material with high optical absorbance and low cost/Watt, is a promising alternative. Yet, the efficiency of this low-cost technology is still substantially lower than the theoretical values estimated by the Shockley-Queisser limit. This is likely due to microstructural non-uniformities, which cannot be accessed by macroscopic light I-V measurements. Therefore, we spatially resolve the electrical response of these devices by `local' I-Vs. For that, we utilize a 100x objective as a local excitation source and LabVIEW to map the PV performance with sub-micronscale resolution through extrapolation of key parameters from pixel by pixel I-V curves. Extraction of performance parameters such as short-circuit current, opencircuit voltage fill factor, and maximum power point can provide useful information regarding optimal microstructural characteristics. This information is not only valuable for CIGS-based devices, but also will be an essential tool for maximizing performance across all PV technologies.

  17. The smart IV stand design through human tracking mobile robot system by CDS cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seong-Hyeon; Choe, Jong-Hun; Seo, Suk-Hyun; Kim, Won-Hoe; Lee, Hong-Kyu; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Vision-based recognition of the object as a general interface gives us high cost and complicated problem. This research suggests human tracking system by Arduino, and Laser-CdS cell system track wire that pass laser line. In this paper, we review existing literature on application systems of recognition which involves many interdisciplinary studies. We conclude that our method can only reduce cost, but is easy way to trace people's location with the use of wire. Furthermore, we apply several recognition systems including CdS-based mobile robot that is applied IV stand used at the hospital effectively.

  18. Dipyridinium tribromidochloridobis(4-chlorophenylstannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Mun Lo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The tin atom in the substituted ammonium stannate(IV, (C5H6N2[SnBr3(C6H4Cl2Cl], lies on a center of symmetry in a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. Each independent halogen site is occupied by bromine and chlorine anions in an approximate 3:1 ratio. The pyridinium cation forms a hydrogen bond to only one of the halogen atoms.

  19. What Is New in Rome IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmulson, Max J; Drossman, Douglas A

    2017-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are diagnosed and classified using the Rome criteria; the criteria may change over time as new scientific data emerge. The Rome IV was released in May 2016. The aim is to review the main changes in Rome IV. FGIDs are now called disorders of gut-brain interaction (DGBI). Rome IV has a multicultural rather than a Western-culture focus. There are new chapters including multicultural, age-gender-women’s health, intestinal microenvironment, biopsychosocial, and centrally mediated disorders. New disorders have been included although not truly FGIDs, but fit the new definition of DGBI including opioid-induced gastrointestinal hyperalgesia, opioid-induced constipation, and cannabinoid hyperemesis. Also, new FGIDs based on available evidence including reflux hypersensitivity and centrally mediated abdominal pain syndrome. Using a normative survey to determine the frequency of normal bowel symptoms in the general population changes in the time frame for diagnosis were introduced. For irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) only pain is required and discomfort was eliminated because it is non-specific, having different meanings in different languages. Pain is now related to bowel movements rather than just improving with bowel movements (ie, can get worse with bowel movement). Functional bowel disorders (functional diarrhea, functional constipation, IBS with predominant diarrhea [IBS-D], IBS with predominant constipation [IBS-C], and IBS with mixed bowel habits) are considered to be on a continuum rather than as independent entities. Clinical applications such as diagnostic algorithms and the Multidimensional Clinical Profile have been updated. The new Rome IV iteration is evidence-based, multicultural oriented and with clinical applications. As new evidence become available, future updates are expected. PMID:28274109

  20. Soome-ugri IV maailmakongressi kunstiprogramm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Soome-ugri IV maailmakongressi kultuuriprogrammi raames toimub Sagadis Tiiu Kirsipuu kureeritud puuskulptuuri sümpoosion "Ilmapuu". 8. augustist on soome-ugri kunstnikud Anatoli Stepanov, Nikolai Bõkov, Marja-Liisa Mäki-Penttilä, Jakov Jakovlev, Reino Saijets, Jozsef Lukacs, Anatoli Punegov, Pjotr Rjabov, Elo Liiv ja Urmas Rauba teinud puuskulptuure, mida eksponeeritakse kongressi toimumise ajal Tallinnas. Urmas Sisaski kontsert mõisapargis

  1. Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, Alexander Matthew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jaegers, Peter James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Over the course of summer 2016, the effects of several computational modeling assumptions with respect to the Godiva IV reactor were examined. The majority of these assumptions pertained to modeling errors existing in the control rods and burst rod. The Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MCNP, was used to investigate these modeling changes, primarily by comparing them to that of the original input deck specifications.

  2. DNA ligase IV syndrome; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Thomas; Gennery, Andrew R

    2016-10-07

    DNA ligase IV deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency, LIG4 syndrome, often associated with other systemic features. DNA ligase IV is part of the non-homologous end joining mechanism, required to repair DNA double stranded breaks. Ubiquitously expressed, it is required to prevent mutagenesis and apoptosis, which can result from DNA double strand breakage caused by intracellular events such as DNA replication and meiosis or extracellular events including damage by reactive oxygen species and ionising radiation.Within developing lymphocytes, DNA ligase IV is required to repair programmed DNA double stranded breaks induced during lymphocyte receptor development.Patients with hypomorphic mutations in LIG4 present with a range of phenotypes, from normal to severe combined immunodeficiency. All, however, manifest sensitivity to ionising radiation. Commonly associated features include primordial growth failure with severe microcephaly and a spectrum of learning difficulties, marrow hypoplasia and a predisposition to lymphoid malignancy. Diagnostic investigations include immunophenotyping, and testing for radiosensitivity. Some patients present with microcephaly as a predominant feature, but seemingly normal immunity. Treatment is mainly supportive, although haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used in a few cases.

  3. Generation-IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Harold

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear power technology has evolved through roughly three generations of system designs: a first generation of prototypes and first-of-a-kind units implemented during the period 1950 to 1970; a second generation of industrial power plants built from 1970 to the turn of the century, most of which are still in operation today; and a third generation of evolutionary advanced reactors which began being built by the turn of the 20^th century, usually called Generation III or III+, which incorporate technical lessons learned through more than 12,000 reactor-years of operation. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a cooperative international endeavor to develop advanced nuclear energy systems in response to the social, environmental and economic requirements of the 21^st century. Six Generation IV systems under development by GIF promise to enhance the future contribution and benefits of nuclear energy. All Generation IV systems aim at performance improvement, new applications of nuclear energy, and/or more sustainable approaches to the management of nuclear materials. High-temperature systems offer the possibility of efficient process heat applications and eventually hydrogen production. Enhanced sustainability is achieved primarily through adoption of a closed fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling of plutonium, uranium and minor actinides using fast reactors. This approach provides significant reduction in waste generation and uranium resource requirements.

  4. Unraveling Higher Education's Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Gus; Charles, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The activity-based costing (ABC) method of analyzing institutional costs in higher education involves four procedures: determining the various discrete activities of the organization; calculating the cost of each; determining the cost drivers; tracing cost to the cost objective or consumer of each activity. Few American institutions have used the…

  5. Road crash costs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Road crashes result in all kinds of social costs, such as medical costs, production loss, human losses, property damage, settlement costs and costs due to congestion. Studies into road crash costs and their trends are carried out quite regularly. In 2009, the costs amounted to € 12.5 billion, or 2.2

  6. Astragaloside IV Improves Metabolic Syndrome and Endothelium Dysfunction in Fructose-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of metabolic syndrome has increased in modern society and the condition is proving to be a common precursor of cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether astragaloside IV, a major active constituent of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch Bge., is able to prevent the development of hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in fructose-fed rats. Rats were fed with 10% fructose in their drinking water for 8 weeks. From the beginning of week 5, two groups of fructose-fed rats were treated with 0.5 or 2 mg/kg, i.p., astragaloside IV. Another group of fructose-fed rats, injected with the same volume of vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO from week 5, served as the control group. At the end of the treatment period, blood pressure, blood glucose, glucose tolerance, blood insulin and lipids were determined. In addition, in vitro experiments were conducted at the end of the eight week treatment period to evaluate endothelium-dependent aortic vasorelaxation, as well as myocardial and aortic tissue levels of nitrate and nitrite (NOx and cGMP. Fructose-fed rats developed clustering signs of metabolic syndrome, such as increased bodyweight, mild hypertension, hyperinsulinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, impaired glucose tolerance and impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Administration of astragaloside IV reduced blood pressure and triglyceride levels in fructose-fed rats and high dose of astragaloside IV also improved glucose tolerance and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. The astragaloside IV-induced improvement in vasorelaxation was associated with increased levels of aortic NOx and cGMP and was abrogated by blockade of nitric oxide synthase with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME. On the basis of its favourable effects on lipid metabolism, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and the nitric oxide–cGMP-related pathway, astragaloside IV may be useful in ameliorating food-induced metabolic syndrome.

  7. Research on the association between physical activity volume and medical care cost in a community-based elderly population aged 70 years and over in Japan%日本仙台鹤谷地区70岁以上老年人运动量与医疗费用的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光; 白翠瑾; 牛凯军; 永富良一

    2010-01-01

    目的 探讨日本仙台鹤谷地区70岁以上老年人不同运动量与医疗费用之间的关系.方法 以日本仙台鹤谷地区70岁以上缴纳国民医疗保险的494名老年人为调查对象,通过现场问卷调查对不同运动量与医疗费用的关系进行分析. 结果 通过25个月对医疗费用的前瞻性研究发现.在运动时间一定的情况下,Ⅰ级运动量组平均每人每个月所消耗的住院医疗费、住院天数、门诊医疗费、门诊次数及总医疗费分别为(196.7±72.1)美元、(0.7±0.3)d、(308.7±54.4)美元、(6.2±1.1)次、(506.9±94.2)美元;Ⅱ级运动量组分别为(139.8±72.1)美元、(0.5±0.3)d、(295.3±54.6)美元、(6.1±1.1)次、(437.8±94.5)美元;Ⅲ级运动量组分别为(134.1±72.5)美元、(0.4±0.3)d、(278.8±54.9)美元、(5.8±1.1)次、(418.1±95.0)美元,3组老年人随运动量的不同,住院医疗费及总医疗费差异有统计学意义(F=5.85、8.11,均P=0.01). 结论 在运动时间一定的条件下,维持相对较高运动量与低医疗费有很高的相关性.%Objective To investigate the association between physical activity volume and medical care cost in elderly persons aged 70 years and over in Crane Valley, Sendal, Japan. Methods A total of 494 community-dwelling Japanese elderly persons living in residential area of Sendai City in northern Japan completed a self-administered questionnaire that included questions on physical activity. We ascertained total medical care costs through computerized linkage with claims lodged between November 2002 and December 2004 from the Miyagi National Health Insurance Association.Results After multivariate adjustment for potential confounders, the average monthly medical costs of hospitalization, hospital days, outpatient medical expenses, out-patient numbers and the total medical expenses in grade Ⅰ exercise volume group were (196.7±72.1) U.S. dollars, (0. 7±0.3) d, (308. 7±54.4) U.S. dollars, (6.2±1.1) times and (506

  8. COST MEASUREMENT AND COST MANAGEMENT IN TARGET COSTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisello Anna Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Firms are coping with a competitive scenario characterized by quick changes produced by internationalization, concentration, restructuring, technological innovation processes and financial market crisis. On the one hand market enlargement have increased the number and the segmentation of customers and have raised the number of competitors, on the other hand technological innovation has reduced product life cycle. So firms have to adjust their management models to this scenario, pursuing customer satisfaction and respecting cost constraints. In a context where price is a variable fixed by the market, firms have to switch from the cost measurement logic to the cost management one, adopting target costing methodology. The target costing process is a price driven, customer oriented profit planning and cost management system. It works, in a cross functional way, from the design stage throughout all the product life cycle and it involves the entire value chain. The process implementation needs a costing methodology consistent with the cost management logic. The aim of the paper is to focus on Activity Based Costing (ABC application to target costing process. So: -it analyzes target costing logic and phases, basing on a literary review, in order to highlight the costing needs related to this process; -it shows, through a numerical example, how to structure a flexible ABC model – characterized by the separation between variable, fixed in the short and fixed costs - that effectively supports target costing process in the cost measurement phase (drifting cost determination and in the target cost alignment; -it points out the effectiveness of the Activity Based Costing as a model of cost measurement applicable to the supplier choice and as a support for supply cost management which have an important role in target costing process. The activity based information allows a firm to optimize the supplier choice by following the method of minimizing the

  9. 45 CFR 309.130 - How will Tribal IV-D programs be funded and what forms are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... equal to 90 percent of pre-approved costs of installing the Model Tribal IV-D System. (d) Non-Federal..., mineral rights and other similar revenue sources; (v) A small or declining tax base; and (vi) Little or no economic development. (5)(i) If approved, a temporary waiver submitted under either paragraph (e)(1)(i)...

  10. Density diagnostics derived from the O iv and S iv intercombination lines observed by IRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Del Zanna, G.; Dudík, J.; Mason, H. E.; Giunta, A.; Reeves, K. K.

    2016-10-01

    The intensity of the O iv 2s2 2p 2P-2s2p24P and S iv 3 s2 3p 2P-3s 3p24 P intercombination lines around 1400 Å observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) provide a useful tool to diagnose the electron number density (Ne) in the solar transition region plasma. We measure the electron number density in a variety of solar features observed by IRIS, including an active region (AR) loop, plage and brightening, and the ribbon of the 22-June-2015 M 6.5 class flare. By using the emissivity ratios of O iv and S iv lines, we find that our observations are consistent with the emitting plasma being near isothermal (logT[K] ≈ 5) and iso-density (Ne ≈ 1010.6 cm-3) in the AR loop. Moreover, high electron number densities (Ne ≈ 1013 cm-3) are obtained during the impulsive phase of the flare by using the S iv line ratio. We note that the S iv lines provide a higher range of density sensitivity than the O iv lines. Finally, we investigate the effects of high densities (Ne ≳ 1011 cm-3) on the ionization balance. In particular, the fractional ion abundances are found to be shifted towards lower temperatures for high densities compared to the low density case. We also explored the effects of a non-Maxwellian electron distribution on our diagnostic method. The movie associated to Fig. 3 is available at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of artificial antigens for astragaloside IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-lan Yu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to produce artificial antigens for astragaloside IV that could be used to prepare antibodies against astragaloside IV screened in Radix astragali (Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch Bunge, Fabaceae and its preparations, using an indirect ELISA. Astragaloside IV was coupled to carrier proteins, bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin using the sodium periodate method and was then evaluated using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF MS and animal immunizations. The coupling ratio of astragaloside IV to bovine serum albumin ratio was determined to be thirteen, and the indirect ELISA demonstrated that three groups of mice immunized with astragaloside IV-bovine serum albumin produced anti-astragaloside IV- bovine serum albumin-specific antibody, with a minimum serum titer of 1:9600. A method for synthesizing highly immunogenic astragaloside IV artificial antigens was successfully developed thus indicating its feasibility in the establishment of a fast immunoassay for astragaloside IV content determination in Radix astragali and its products.

  12. Planning a Kinetic and Mechanistic Study with Cerium (IV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Samir B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Presents a kinetic study that utilizes a method for varying the concentrations of the possible Ce(IV) species and computing the concentration distribution of the sulfato and hydroxo species of Ce(IV). (MLH)

  13. Use of a cost accounting system to evaluate costs of a VA special program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, T J; Wray, N P

    1999-04-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) established six mobile clinics to provide care for rural veterans. Each was operated by a parent VA Medical Center (VAMC). To describe the use of a cost-accounting system which does not provide costs at the service or patient level to determine the costs of the mobile clinics. Costs per visit were compared among the mobile clinics with the parent VAMCs and with simulated fixed-location clinics. Cost data came from VA's Centralized Accounting for Local Management (CALM) data. Utilization data came from VA's outpatient file. Information was obtained from the VAMCs' fiscal services to reallocate costs among the CALM subaccounts to generate cost data that was comparable among the mobile clinics. Costs per visit for the mobile clinics were twice as high as those of the parent VAMCs. Costs per visit would be lower at fixed-location clinics unless the volume were substantially less than that provided by the mobile clinics. Differences between cost allocations for accounting purposes and research are likely to necessitate adjusting cost accounting data for research purposes. Fortunately, information from the accountants or primary data can lead to a cost database which is appropriate for research evaluations. In the mobile clinics study, the analysis of cost accounting data led to the conclusion that mobile clinics were not a cost-effective way in which to provide care to rural veterans.

  14. Determining the IV fluids required for a ten day medical emergency on Space Station Freedom - Comparison of packaged vs. on-orbit produced solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Gerald J.; Lloyd, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    To aid planning for the storage of supplies onboard Space Station Freedom, an estimate was made of the amount of intravenous (IV) fluid required to support a patient who has suffered a medical emergency for a period of up to 10 days. Six different medical scenarios were evaluated, and the volume of IV fluids required for each scenario was estimated. Up to 220 liters of fluid would be required to support a patient for all of the scenarios. When optimizing the volumes to support any single scenario, a total of 123 liters is required. Use of a water polishing system to produce sterile water for injection from potable supplies and on-station formulation of IV fluids results in a smaller mass and volume requirement for the Fluid Therapy Subsystem than carrying prepackaged bags of fluid.

  15. Optimal pricing decision model based on activity-based costing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王福胜; 常庆芳

    2003-01-01

    In order to find out the applicability of the optimal pricing decision model based on conventional costbehavior model after activity-based costing has given strong shock to the conventional cost behavior model andits assumptions, detailed analyses have been made using the activity-based cost behavior and cost-volume-profitanalysis model, and it is concluded from these analyses that the theory behind the construction of optimal pri-cing decision model is still tenable under activity-based costing, but the conventional optimal pricing decisionmodel must be modified as appropriate to the activity-based costing based cost behavior model and cost-volume-profit analysis model, and an optimal pricing decision model is really a product pricing decision model construc-ted by following the economic principle of maximizing profit.

  16. Cumulative Reactant Species Index for Volumes I-V of the Compilation of Data Relevant to Gas Lasers. Volume VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    cross section (relative) 2027 ICt Electron affinity 214, 1161 Extinction coefficient for continuous absorption 702, 2032 12 Electron affinity 214, 1161...864 On Ne, high-energy production of free electrons 1622 On W, elt -ctron yields from surface 865 On Xe, high-energy ionization 1624 On He, high-energy

  17. Safety and feasibility of radiofrequency ablation for treatment of Bosniak IV renal cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Marcos Roberto; Viana, Publio Cesar Cavalcante; Yamanari, Tássia Regina; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Nahas, William

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To describe our initial experience with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Bosniak IV renal cysts. Materials and Methods From 2010 to 2014, 154 renal tumor cases were treated with percutaneous thermal ablation, of which 10 cases (6.4%) from nine patients were complex renal cysts and were treated with radiofrequency ablation. Results All complex cysts were classified as Bosniak IV (four women and five men; mean age: 63.6 yrs, range: 33–83 years). One patient had a single kidney. Lesion size ranged from 1.5 to 4.1cm (mean: 2.5cm) and biopsy was performed on four cysts immediately before the procedure, all of which were malignant (two clear cell and two papillary carcinoma). Mean volume reduction of complex cysts was 25% (range: 10–40%). No patients required retreatment with RFA and no immediate or late complications were observed. The follow-up of Bosniak IV cysts had a median of 27 months (interquartile range [IQR], 23 to 38) and no recurrence or significant loss of renal function were observed. Conclusions Mid-term follow-up of the cases in our database suggests that image-guided percutaneous RFA can treat Bosniak IV cysts with very low complication rates and satisfactorily maintain renal function. PMID:27286107

  18. The Quality Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenie Constantin PAULICĂ

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Quality has a cost and this fact cannot be denied. In the same time, it is true that non-quality is more expensive. Quality is considered asbeing expensive because no one tries to calculate non-quality costs. Out of the final cost of a product, non-quality stands for 20% up to 35%.According to this idea all the economic sectors contain error costs caused by the mistakes made during the production process. To have a realconsummation situation, it is necessary to know the cost quantum. The final quality cost is the result of the following costs: prevention costs,necessary to preclude errors; evaluation costs, as results of a final product evaluation, and failure costs, generated by the non – attainment ofproduct’s purpose. The gross of these costs stand for the total quality costs. Nowadays, the problem inheres in how much this quality cost representsout of the final cost.

  19. Surgical decision making for stage IV adult acquired flatfoot disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kyle S; Hyer, Christopher F

    2014-07-01

    Adult acquired flatfoot deformity is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition affecting the lower extremity. Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) is the primary etiology for the development of a flatfoot deformity in an adult. PTTD is classified into 4 stages (with stage IV subdivided into stage IV-A and IV-B). This classification is described in detail in this article.

  20. 29 CFR 4022.63 - Estimated title IV benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated title IV benefit. 4022.63 Section 4022.63 Labor... PAYABLE IN TERMINATED SINGLE-EMPLOYER PLANS Benefit Reductions in Terminating Plans § 4022.63 Estimated... administrator shall determine each participant's estimated title IV benefit. The estimated title IV...

  1. 78 FR 45592 - DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION DeltaPoint Capital IV, LP; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that DeltaPoint Capital IV, L.P., 45 East Avenue... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). DeltaPoint Capital IV,...

  2. 40 CFR 144.23 - Class IV wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class IV wells. 144.23 Section 144.23... INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAM Authorization of Underground Injection by Rule § 144.23 Class IV wells. (a) Injection into existing Class IV wells is authorized for up to six months after approval or promulgation...

  3. Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURHAM, L.A.; JOHNSON, R.L.; RIEMAN, C.R.; SPECTOR, H.L.; Environmental Science Division; U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS BUFFALO DISTRICT

    2007-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the preremedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in predesign data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in predesign characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland1, Ashland2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate predesign contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District.

  4. Principles and methods of managerial cost-accounting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suver, J D; Cooper, J C

    1988-01-01

    An introduction to cost-accounting systems for pharmacy managers is provided; terms are defined and examples of specific applications are given. Cost-accounting systems determine, record, and report the resources consumed in providing services. An effective cost-accounting system must provide the information needed for both internal and external reports. In accounting terms, cost is the value given up to secure an asset. In determining how volumes of activity affect costs, fixed costs and variable costs are calculated; applications include pricing strategies, cost determinations, and break-even analysis. Also discussed are the concepts of direct and indirect costs, opportunity costs, and incremental and sunk costs. For most pharmacy department services, process costing, an accounting of intermediate outputs and homogeneous units, is used; in determining the full cost of providing a product or service (e.g., patient stay), job-order costing is used. Development of work-performance standards is necessary for monitoring productivity and determining product costs. In allocating pharmacy department costs, a ratio of costs to charges can be used; this method is convenient, but microcosting (specific identification of the costs of products) is more accurate. Pharmacy managers can use cost-accounting systems to evaluate the pharmacy's strategies, policies, and services and to improve budgets and reports.

  5. Expanding the Ecological Validity of WAIS-IV and WMS-IV With the Texas Functional Living Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Drozdick, Lisa Whipple; Cullum, C. Munro

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of functional status is an important aspect of clinical evaluation. As part of the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale–Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Memory Scale–Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), participants completed the Texas Functional Living Scale (TFLS), a measure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living. The relationships between TFLS and WAIS-IV and WMS-IV were examined in both normally developing and clinical samples. In general, the highest correlati...

  6. COSTS CALCULATION OF TARGET COSTING METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian UNGUREANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cost information system plays an important role in every organization in the decision making process. An important task of management is ensuring control of the operations, processes, sectors, and not ultimately on costs. Although in achieving the objectives of an organization compete more control systems (production control, quality control, etc., the cost information system is important because monitors results of the other. Detailed analysis of costs, production cost calculation, quantification of losses, estimate the work efficiency provides a solid basis for financial control. Knowledge of the costs is a decisive factor in taking decisions and planning future activities. Managers are concerned about the costs that will appear in the future, their level underpinning the supply and production decisions as well as price policy. An important factor is the efficiency of cost information system in such a way that the information provided by it may be useful for decisions and planning of the work.

  7. COSTS CALCULATION OF TARGET COSTING METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian UNGUREANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cost information system plays an important role in every organization in the decision making process. An important task of management is ensuring control of the operations, processes, sectors, and not ultimately on costs. Although in achieving the objectives of an organization compete more control systems (production control, quality control, etc., the cost information system is important because monitors results of the other. Detailed analysis of costs, production cost calculation, quantification of losses, estimate the work efficiency provides a solid basis for financial control. Knowledge of the costs is a decisive factor in taking decisions and planning future activities. Managers are concerned about the costs that will appear in the future, their level underpinning the supply and production decisions as well as price policy. An important factor is the efficiency of cost information system in such a way that the information provided by it may be useful for decisions and planning of the work.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) complexes with Schiff bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radoske, Thomas; Maerz, Juliane; Kaden, Peter; Patzschke, Michael; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements

    2017-06-01

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of several imine complexes of tetravalent thorium (Th(IV)) and uranium (U(IV)). The ligands investigated in this study are a Schiff base type, including the well-known salen ligand (H{sub 2}Le, Fig. 1). The complexation in solution was investigated by NMR measurements indicating paramagnetic effects of unpaired f-electrons of U(IV) on the ligand molecule. We also determined the solid-state molecular structures of the synthesized complexes by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The synthesized complexes show an eight-fold coordination geometry around the actinide center surrounded by two tetradentate ligands with 2N- and 2O-donor atoms.

  9. Revisiting Case IV: a reassessment of bias and standard errors of Case IV under range restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Dustin A; Mendoza, Jorge L; Terry, Robert

    2013-11-01

    In 2004, Hunter and Schmidt proposed a correction (called Case IV) that seeks to estimate disattenuated correlations when selection is made on an unmeasured variable. Although Case IV is an important theoretical development in the range restriction literature, it makes an untestable assumption, namely that the partial correlation between the unobserved selection variable and the performance measure is zero. We show in this paper why this assumption may be difficult to meet and why previous simulations have failed to detect the full extent of bias. We use meta-analytic literature to investigate the plausible range of bias. We also show how Case IV performs in terms of standard errors. Finally, we give practical recommendations about how the contributions of Hunter and Schmidt (2004) can be extended without making such stringent assumptions.

  10. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  11. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  12. Dual (type IV left anterior descending artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozdil Baskan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital coronary artery anomalies are uncommon. Dual left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD is defined as the presence of two LADs within the anterior interventricular sulcus (AIVS, and is classified into four types. Type IV is a rarely reported subtype and differs from the others, with a long LAD originating from the right coronary artery (RCA. Dual LAD is a benign coronary artery anomaly, but should be recognised especially before interventional procedures. With the increasing use of multidedector computed tomography (MDCT, it is essential for radiologists to be aware of this entity and the cross-sectional findings.

  13. Stable kagome lattices from group IV elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaerts, O.; Schoeters, B.; Partoens, B.

    2015-03-01

    A thorough investigation of three-dimensional kagome lattices of group IV elements is performed with first-principles calculations. The investigated kagome lattices of silicon and germanium are found to be of similar stability as the recently proposed carbon kagome lattice. Carbon and silicon kagome lattices are both direct-gap semiconductors but they have qualitatively different electronic band structures. While direct optical transitions between the valence and conduction bands are allowed in the carbon case, no such transitions can be observed for silicon. The kagome lattice of germanium exhibits semimetallic behavior but can be transformed into a semiconductor after compression.

  14. Benzylchloridobis(quinolin-8-olatotin(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qibao Wang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, [Sn(C7H7(C9H6NO2Cl], the SnIV ion is in a distorted octahedral coordination environment formed by the O and N atoms of two bis-chelating quinolin-8-olate ligands, a Cl atom and a C atom from a benzyl ligand. The axial sites are occupied by an N atom of a quinolinate ligand and the C atom of the benzyl ligand. The axial Sn—N bond is slightly shorter than the equatorial Sn—N bond.

  15. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  16. Topological characterisation and identification of critical domains within glucosyltransferase IV (GtrIV of Shigella flexneri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Anesh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three bacteriophage genes gtrA, gtrB and gtr(type are responsible for O-antigen glucosylation in Shigella flexneri. Both gtrA and gtrB have been demonstrated to be highly conserved and interchangeable among serotypes while gtr(type was found to be specific to each serotype, leading to the hypothesis that the Gtr(type proteins are responsible for attaching glucosyl groups to the O-antigen in a site- and serotype- specific manner. Based on the confirmed topologies of GtrI, GtrII and GtrV, such interaction and attachment of the glucosyl groups to the O-antigen has been postulated to occur in the periplasm. Results In this study, the topology of GtrIV was experimentally determined by creating different fusions between GtrIV and a dual-reporter protein, PhoA/LacZ. This study shows that GtrIV consists of 8 transmembrane helices, 2 large periplasmic loops, 2 small cytoplasmic N- and C- terminal ends and a re-entrant loop that occurs between transmembrane helices III and IV. Though this topology differs from that of GtrI, GtrII, GtrV and GtrX, it is very similar to that of GtrIc. Furthermore, both the N-terminal periplasmic and the C-terminal periplasmic loops are important for GtrIV function as shown via a series of loop deletion experiments and the creation of chimeric proteins between GtrIV and its closest structural homologue, GtrIc. Conclusion The current study provides the basis for elucidating the structure and mechanism of action of this important O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase.

  17. Cosmic evolution of the C IV in high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tescari, E.; Viel, M.; D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; Calura, F.; Borgani, S.; Tornatore, L.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the properties of triply ionized carbon (C IV) in the intergalactic medium (IGM) using a set of high resolution and large box size cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of a Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. We rely on a modification of the publicly available TreeSPH code GADGET-2 that self-consistently follows the metal enrichment mechanism by means of a detailed chemical evolution model. We focus on several numerical implementations of galactic feedback: galactic winds in the energy-driven and momentum-driven prescriptions, galactic winds hydrodynamically coupled to the surrounding gas and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) powered by gas accretion on to massive black holes. Furthermore, our results are compared to a run in which galactic feedback is not present and we also explore different initial stellar mass function. After having addressed some global properties of the simulated volume like the impact on the star formation rate and the content in carbon and C IV, we extract mock IGM transmission spectra in neutral hydrogen (H I) and C IV and perform Voigt profile fitting. The results are then compared with high-resolution quasar (QSO) spectra obtained with the Ultraviolet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) at Keck. We find that feedback has little impact on statistics related to the neutral hydrogen, while C IV is more affected by galactic winds and/or AGN feedback. The feedback schemes investigated have a different strength and redshift evolution with a general tendency for AGN feedback to be more effective at lower redshift than galactic winds. When the same analysis is performed over observed and simulated C IV lines, we find a reasonably good agreement between data and simulations over the column density range NC IV= 1012.5-15 cm-2. Also the C IV linewidth distribution appears to be in agreement with the observed values, while the H I Doppler parameters, bH I

  18. Time-driven activity-based costing to identify opportunities for cost reduction in pediatric appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang R; Abbas, Paulette I; Smith, Carolyn M; Carberry, Kathleen E; Ren, Hui; Patel, Binita; Nuchtern, Jed G; Lopez, Monica E

    2016-12-01

    As reimbursement programs shift to value-based payment models emphasizing quality and efficient healthcare delivery, there exists a need to better understand process management to unearth true costs of patient care. We sought to identify cost-reduction opportunities in simple appendicitis management by applying a time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) methodology to this high-volume surgical condition. Process maps were created using medical record time stamps. Labor capacity cost rates were calculated using national median physician salaries, weighted nurse-patient ratios, and hospital cost data. Consumable costs for supplies, pharmacy, laboratory, and food were derived from the hospital general ledger. Time-driven activity-based costing resulted in precise per-minute calculation of personnel costs. Highest costs were in the operating room ($747.07), hospital floor ($388.20), and emergency department ($296.21). Major contributors to length of stay were emergency department evaluation (270min), operating room availability (395min), and post-operative monitoring (1128min). The TDABC model led to $1712.16 in personnel costs and $1041.23 in consumable costs for a total appendicitis cost of $2753.39. Inefficiencies in healthcare delivery can be identified through TDABC. Triage-based standing delegation orders, advanced practice providers, and same day discharge protocols are proposed cost-reducing interventions to optimize value-based care for simple appendicitis. II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Process-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert H; Bott, Marjorie J; Forbes, Sarah; Redford, Linda; Swagerty, Daniel L; Taunton, Roma Lee

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how quality improvement affects costs is important. Unfortunately, low-cost, reliable ways of measuring direct costs are scarce. This article builds on the principles of process improvement to develop a costing strategy that meets both criteria. Process-based costing has 4 steps: developing a flowchart, estimating resource use, valuing resources, and calculating direct costs. To illustrate the technique, this article uses it to cost the care planning process in 3 long-term care facilities. We conclude that process-based costing is easy to implement; generates reliable, valid data; and allows nursing managers to assess the costs of new or modified processes.

  20. Solid phase extraction, separation and preconcentration of rare elements thorium(IV), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), cerium(IV) and chromium(III) amid several other foreign ions with eriochrome black T anchored to 3-D networking silica gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Bhavya; Barman, Milan K; Chatterjee, Mousumi; Roy, Dipika; Mandal, Bhabatosh

    2016-06-17

    The present work reports the systematic studies on extraction, separation and preconcentration of Th(IV), U(VI), Zr(IV), Ce(IV) and Cr(III) amid several other foreign ions using EBT anchored {SiO2}n3-D microarray. The effect of various sorption parameters, such as pH, concentration, temperature, sample volume, flow-rate and co-existing foreign ions were investigated. Quantitative sorption was ensured at solution pH: 6.0-6.5 for Th(IV), Ce(IV), Cr(III) and pH: 2.75-3.0 for Zr(IV), U(VI) couple. Analysis on extracted species and extraction sites reveals that [Th4(μ(2)-OH)8(H2O)4](8+), [Ce6(μ(2)-OH)12(H2O)5](12+), [Cr3(μ(2)-OH)4(H2O)](5+), [(UO2)3(μ(2)-OH)5(H2O)3](+) and [Zr4(μ(2)-OH)8(H2O)0.5](8+) for the respective metal ions gets extracted at HOMO of the extractor. HOMO-{metal ion species} was found to be 1:1 complexation. Sorption was endothermic, entropy-gaining, instantaneous and spontaneous in nature. A density functional theory (DFT) calculation has been performed to analyze the 3-D structure and electronic distribution of the synthesized extractor.

  1. Zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-catalyzed highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-06-16

    In this report, zirconium(IV)- and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 83% yield and up to 98% ee, while, for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 79% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclized tetrahydrofuran compounds could be obtained in most cases.

  2. Zirconium(IV) and Hafnium(IV)-Catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Epoxidation of Homoallylic and Bishomoallylic Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2010-01-01

    In this report, zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV)-bishydroxamic acid complexes were utilized in the highly enantioselective epoxidation of homoallylic alcohols and bishomoallylic alcohols, which used to be quite difficult substrates for other types of asymmetric epoxidation reactions. The performance of the catalyst was improved by adding polar additive and molecular sieves. For homoallylic alcohols, the reaction could provide epoxy alcohols in up to 81% yield and up to 98% ee, while for bishomoallylic alcohols, up to 75% yield and 99% ee of epoxy alcohols rather than cyclize compounds could be obtained in most cases. PMID:20481541

  3. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  4. Predicting DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Li, Chanjuan; Liu, Zhihong; Du, Jiewen; Ye, Jiming; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) is a promising Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) drug target. DPP-IV inhibitors prolong the action of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), improve glucose homeostasis without weight gain, edema, and hypoglycemia. However, the marketed DPP-IV inhibitors have adverse effects such as nasopharyngitis, headache, nausea, hypersensitivity, skin reactions and pancreatitis. Therefore, it is still expected for novel DPP-IV inhibitors with minimal adverse effects. The scaffolds of existing DPP-IV inhibitors are structurally diversified. This makes it difficult to build virtual screening models based upon the known DPP-IV inhibitor libraries using conventional QSAR approaches. In this paper, we report a new strategy to predict DPP-IV inhibitors with machine learning approaches involving naïve Bayesian (NB) and recursive partitioning (RP) methods. We built 247 machine learning models based on 1307 known DPP-IV inhibitors with optimized molecular properties and topological fingerprints as descriptors. The overall predictive accuracies of the optimized models were greater than 80%. An external test set, composed of 65 recently reported compounds, was employed to validate the optimized models. The results demonstrated that both NB and RP models have a good predictive ability based on different combinations of descriptors. Twenty "good" and twenty "bad" structural fragments for DPP-IV inhibitors can also be derived from these models for inspiring the new DPP-IV inhibitor scaffold design.

  5. Multiplexed Dosing Assays by Digitally Definable Hydrogel Volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faralli, Adele; Melander, Fredrik; Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack

    2016-01-01

    Stable and low-cost multiplexed drug sensitivity assays using small volumes of cells or tissue are in demand for personalized medicine, including patientspecific combination chemotherapy. Spatially defined projected light photopolymerization of hydrogels with embedded active compounds is introduc...

  6. Small Molecule AngIV-based Analogs to Treat Alzheimers Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W Wright

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients are presently without adequate treatment thus new therapeutic approaches are needed to slow and hopefully reverse disease progression. Neurotrophic agents such as nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have received research attention concerning their potential to treat AD but have not progressed to clinical trials due to their large size, inability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB, and the high cost of synthesis. This review focuses on one over looked neurotrophin, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF that acts via the Type 1 tyrosine kinase receptor Met to mediate stem cell differentiation, synaptogenesis, neurogenesis, and protect against tissue insults in a wide range of cell types including neurons. We have determined that the brain angiotensin and HGF/c-Met systems interact in such a way that angiotensin IV (AngIV-based analogs including Nle1-AngIV, Norleual-AngIV, Dihexa, and others influence HGF dimerization which is a prerequisite to binding at the Met receptor. Several of these analogs have shown the ability to facilitate the formation of new functional synaptic connections in hippocampal slices, promote neurogenesis, and augment memory consolidation and retrieval in animal models of AD. This family of compounds represents a new class of drugs with lead candidates that are orally active, penetrate the BBB sufficiently to reach therapeutic concentrations, and reverse memory deficits seen in animal models of dementia.

  7. Cost of care for cystic fibrosis: an investigation of cost determinants using national registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanyuan; García-Pérez, Sonia; Massie, John; van Gool, Kees

    2015-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive disease with treatments intensifying as patients get older and severity worsens. To inform policy makers about the cost burden in CF, it is crucial to understand what factors influence the costs and how they affect the costs. Based on 1,060 observations (from 731 patients) obtained from the Australian Data Registry, individual annual health care costs were calculated and a regression analysis was carried out to examine the impact of multiple variables on the costs. A method of retransformation and a hypothetical patient were used for cost analysis. We show that an additional one unit improvement of FEV1pp (i.e., forced expiratory volume in 1 s as a percentage of predicted volume) reduces the costs by 1.4%, or for a hypothetical patient whose FEV1pp is 73 the cost reduction is A$252. The presence of chronic infections increases the costs by 69.9-163.5% (A$12,852-A$30,047 for the hypothetical patient) depending on the type of infection. The type of CF genetic mutation and the patient's age both have significant effects on the costs. In particular, being homozygous for p.F508del increases the costs by 26.8% compared to all the other gene mutations. We conclude that bacterial infections have a very strong influence on the costs, so reducing both the infection rates and the severity of the condition may lead to substantial cost savings. We also suggest that the patient's genetic profile should be considered as an important cost determinant.

  8. The Problem with the Delta Cost Project Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquette, Ozan; Parra, Edna

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Postsecondary Education System (IPEDS) collects data on Title IV institutions. The Delta Cost Project (DCP) integrated data from multiple IPEDS survey components into a public-use longitudinal dataset. The DCP Database was the basis for dozens of journal articles and a series of influential policy reports. Unfortunately, a flaw in…

  9. Cost/Risk Analysis for Disk Retirement. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-03

    3.30. SXtIINXNtAXXtNPISASS, ALBET ,XEFFf,IfR 730. 75000. 15260. 1.000 4.00 1.00 I. 3 SUBFLEET TIME NUMBER OF NUMBER OF NUMBER OT NUIBER OF RFC DOLLAR...SPECIFIED WITH STATISTICAL UPDATE. MAX ALLOWABLE FAILURE PROSABILITY20.0100. XIMIH,XNKAX,XHPISASS 1 ALBET ,XEVPpIPR= 750. 750. 15260. 1.000 4.00 1.00 1...FACTOR. SF=6.00. XNMtIN.XNMAX,XtNPISASS, ALBET ,XEFF,IPR• 750. 750. 48106. 0.750 4.00 1.00 1. 3 SU6FLEET IinE NiibER OF Nunbtwe OF kiubi OF nurL.ER OF

  10. Aqueous chemistry of Ce(iv): estimations using actinide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Rémi; Réal, Florent; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Pédrot, Mathieu; Pourret, Olivier; Vallet, Valérie

    2017-10-10

    The prediction of cerium (Ce) aqueous speciation is relevant in many research fields. Indeed, Ce compounds are used for many industrial applications, which may require the control of Ce aqueous chemistry for their synthesis. The aquatic geochemistry of Ce is also of interest. Due to its growing industrial use and its release into the environment, Ce is now considered as an emerging contaminant. Cerium is also used as a proxy of (paleo)redox conditions due to the Ce(iv)/Ce(iii) redox transition. Finally, Ce(iv) is often presented as a relevant analogue of tetravalent actinides (An(iv)). In the present study, quantum chemical calculations were conducted to highlight the similarities between the structures of Ce(iv) and tetravalent actinide (An(iv); An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu) aqua-ions, especially Pu(iv). The current knowledge of An(iv) hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation in water was briefly reviewed but important discrepancies were observed in the available data for Ce(iv). Therefore, new estimations of the hydrolysis constants of Ce(iv) and the solubility of Ce(iv)-(hydr)oxides are proposed, by analogy with Pu(iv). By plotting pH-Eh (Pourbaix) diagrams, we showed that the pH values corresponding to the onset of Ce(iv) species formation (i.e. Ce(iv)-(hydr)oxide or dissolved Ce(iv)) agreed with various experimental results. Although further experimental studies are required to obtain a more accurate thermodynamic database, the present work might yet help to predict more accurately the Ce chemical behavior in aqueous solution.

  11. Correcting C IV-based virial black hole masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatman, Liam; Hewett, Paul C.; Banerji, Manda; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2017-02-01

    The C IVλλ1498,1501 broad emission line is visible in optical spectra to redshifts exceeding z ˜ 5. C IV has long been known to exhibit significant displacements to the blue and these `blueshifts' almost certainly signal the presence of strong outflows. As a consequence, single-epoch virial black hole (BH) mass estimates derived from C IV velocity widths are known to be systematically biased compared to masses from the hydrogen Balmer lines. Using a large sample of 230 high-luminosity (LBol = 1045.5-1048 erg s-1), redshift 1.5 < z < 4.0 quasars with both C IV and Balmer line spectra, we have quantified the bias in C IV BH masses as a function of the C IV blueshift. C IV BH masses are shown to be a factor of 5 larger than the corresponding Balmer-line masses at C IV blueshifts of 3000 km s-1and are overestimated by almost an order of magnitude at the most extreme blueshifts, ≳5000 km s-1. Using the monotonically increasing relationship between the C IV blueshift and the mass ratio BH(C IV)/BH(Hα), we derive an empirical correction to all C IV BH masses. The scatter between the corrected C IV masses and the Balmer masses is 0.24 dex at low C IV blueshifts (˜0 km s-1) and just 0.10 dex at high blueshifts (˜3000 km s-1), compared to 0.40 dex before the correction. The correction depends only on the C IV line properties - i.e. full width at half-maximum and blueshift - and can therefore be applied to all quasars where C IV emission line properties have been measured, enabling the derivation of unbiased virial BH-mass estimates for the majority of high-luminosity, high-redshift, spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the literature.

  12. Ovarian volume throughout life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelsey, Thomas W; Dodwell, Sarah K; Wilkinson, A Graham

    2013-01-01

    cancer. To date there is no normative model of ovarian volume throughout life. By searching the published literature for ovarian volume in healthy females, and using our own data from multiple sources (combined n=59,994) we have generated and robustly validated the first model of ovarian volume from...... to about 2.8 mL (95% CI 2.7-2.9 mL) at the menopause and smaller volumes thereafter. Our model allows us to generate normal values and ranges for ovarian volume throughout life. This is the first validated normative model of ovarian volume from conception to old age; it will be of use in the diagnosis...

  13. ILC Reference Design Report Volume 4 - Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Jaros, John; Miyamoto, Akiya; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Gajewski, Jan; Idzik, Marek; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kulis, Szymon; Suszycki, Leszek; Swientek, Krzysztof; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Bernreuther, Werner; Feld, Lutz; Hebbeker, Thomas; Muennich, Astrid; Roth, Stefan; Stahl, Achim; Tonutti, Manfred; Rindani, Saurabh; Sarkar, Utpal; Singh, S.K.; Adloff, Catherine; Delebecque, Pierre; Hermel, Richard; Karyotakis, Yannis; Lafaye, Remi; Prast, Julie; Muhlleitner, Milada Margarete; Singh, R.K.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Antipov, Sergei; Arnold, Ned; Berger, Edmond; Carwardine, John; Drake, Gary; Emery, Louis; Friedsam, Horst; Fuerst, Joel; Gai, Wei; Gerbick, Scot; Gerig, Rod; Kelly, Michael; Kim, Kwang-Je; Lenkszus, Frank; Liu, Wanming; Magill, Stephen; Noonan, John; Repond, Jose; Saunders, Claude; Shepard, Ken; Underwood, David G.; Wang, Haitao; Weerts, Harry; Xia, Lei; Xiao, Aimin; Zhang, Jinlong; Yock, Philip; Singh, Bhartendu K.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Biswal, S.S.; Godbole, Rohini; Vempati, Sundir K.; Comerma, Albert; Dieguez, Angel; Garrido, Luis; Gascon, David; Graciani, Ricardo; Grauges, Eugeni; Herms, Atila; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Cabruja, Enric; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Miquel, Ramon; Lux, Thorsten; Martinez, Manel; Padilla, Cristobal; Riu, Imma; Ward, Bennie; Sun, Yipeng; Ablikim, Medina; Bai, Sha; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Cao, J.S.; Chen, He Sheng; Chen, Sen Yu; Chen, Yuan Bo; Cheng, Jian; Chi, Yun Long; Dai, Jian Ping; Dong, Dong; Dong, Hai Yi; Du, Shuxian; Fang, Shou Xian; Gao, Jian She; Gao, Jie; Ge, Ming Qi; Ge, Rui; Geng, Zhe Qiao; Gu, Jun; He, An; Hou, Mi; Hu, Tao; Huang, Tong Ming; Jiang, Xiao Ming; Jin, Shan; Kang, Wen; Kong, Xiang Cheng; Li, Chun Hua; Li, Da Zhang; Li, Gang; Li, Shao Peng; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiao Ping; Li, Zhong Quan; Liu, Shao Zhen; Liu, Wei Bin; Liu, Ya Ping; Liu, Yu Dong; Lu, Cai-Dian; Ma, Li; Ma, Qiang; Ouyang, Qun; Pam, Wei Min; Pei, Guo Xi; Pei, Shi Lun; Peng, G.X.; Qin, Qing; Qu, Hua Min; Shi, Cai Tu; Sun, Hong; Sun, Yi; Wang, Chun Hong; Wang, Dou; Wang, Guang Wei; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Jiu Qing; Wang, Shu Hong; Wang, Yi Fang; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Jia Lin; Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Xu, Gang; Xu, Qing Jin; Yu, Cheng Hui; Yu, Xian Ming; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yue, Jun Hui; Zhai, Ji Yuan; Zhang, Chuang; Zhang, He; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jing Ru; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Yuan; Zhao, Ji Jiu; Zhao, Jing Xia; Zhao, Sheng Chu; Zhou, De Min; Zhou, Shun; Zhu, Xiong Wei; Zong, Zhang Guo; Liu, Chun; Wu, Yue Liang; Yang, Jin Min; Liang, Jian Tao; Liu, Li Qiang; Lu, Wen Hui; Xiong, Lian You; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Tong Xian; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Traversi, Gianluca; Eigen, Gerald; Osland, Per; Handu, Virender K.; Jawale, Suresh B.; Joshi, Gopal; Pande, Manjiri; Pande, Rajni; Rao, Sista V.L.S.; Singh, Pitamber; Sinha, Anil K.; Suthar, Rameshwar L.; Topkar, Anita; Adey, David; Hawkes, Chris; Hillier, Stephen James; Mikami, Yoshinari; Miller, Owen; Stockton, Mark; Watson, Nigel Keith; Wilson, John A.; Petersen, Troels Christian; Driouichi, Chafik; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Klinkby, Esben; Xella, Stefania; Von Toerne, Eckhard; Brock, Ian; Desch, Klaus; Dreiner, Herbert; Hohlfeld, Mark; Killenberg, Martin; Kittel, Olaf; Koch, Manuel; Kohrs, Robert; Krautscheid, Thorsten; Kruger, Hans; Langenfeld, Ulrich; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Reuen, Lars; Ummenhofer, Martin; Wermes, Norbert; Wienemann, Peter; Butler, John; Cussans, David; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Helen; Lynch, Clare; Velthuis, Jaap J.; Hearty, Christopher; Mattison, Thomas; Anerella, Michael; Dawson, Sally; Marone, Andrew; Morse, William Michael; Parker, Brett; Parsa, Zohreh; Pogorelsky, Igor; Radeka, Veljko; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Partridge, Richard; Narain, Meenakshi; Coca, Cornelia; Orlandea, Marius Ciprian; Popescu, Sorina; Teodorescu, Eliza; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Christophe, Grojean; Baddams, Nigel; Baldy, Jean-Luc; Camporesi, Tiziano; Capatina, Ofelia; De Roeck, Albert; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Eliasson, Peder; Ellis, John R.; Ferguson, John; Gastal, Martin; Hauschild, Michael; Hauviller, Claude; Hawkings, Richard; Kraml, Sabine; Latina, Andrea; Parma, Vittorio; Pedersen, John; Quesnel, Jean-Pierre; Rinolfi, Louis; Rolandi, Gigi; Ruehl, Ingo; Sauli, Fabio; Schulte, Daniel; Tavian, Laurent; Zimmermann, Frank; Chung, Jin-Hyuk; Hwang, Youngseok; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Eun San; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Hongjoo; Kim, Hyoungsuk; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Youngim; Park, Hwanbae; Shin, Seunghwan; Son, Dongchul; Suh, Jun Suhk; Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Datta, Anindya; Ghosh, Kirtiman; Kundu, Anirban; Bhandari, R.K.; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Mallik, C.; Nabhiraj, P.Y.

    2007-01-01

    This report, Volume IV of the International Linear Collider Reference Design Report, describes the detectors which will record and measure the charged and neutral particles produced in the ILC's high energy e+e- collisions. The physics of the ILC, and the environment of the machine-detector interface, pose new challenges for detector design. Several conceptual designs for the detector promise the needed performance, and ongoing detector R&D is addressing the outstanding technological issues. Two such detectors, operating in push-pull mode, perfectly instrument the ILC interaction region, and access the full potential of ILC physics.

  14. Balancing efficacy with cost: antiemetic control in the pediatric stem cell transplant (SCT) population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S K; Hoorntje, L E; Levine, K J; Mayer, D K; Eichelberger, W J; Guinan, E C

    2000-03-01

    We studied the practice patterns regarding intravenous (i.v.) ondansetron in children receiving stem cell transplants (SCT) at The Children's Hospital, Boston to identify cost efficiencies. The pharmacy provided information on material and preparation costs on 36 patients who received i.v. ondansetron during 41 SCT in 1995. We examined the effects of frequency, duration, and route of administration on costs. There were 498 days of ondansetron administration costing $49,083 (95$). Tremendous variation existed in frequency and duration with one third receiving i.v. ondansetron once daily, despite published evidence of equivalence of once a day and divided dosing. A switch to once daily i.v. dosing for all patients would have resulted in >/=28% savings. The median duration of use was 11 days (range 1-48); placing a cap for 7-10 days based on the length of SCT conditioning regimens, would produce savings of 48-60% over current use. By shifting administration route from i.v. to oral, a savings of 67% over current use, without a cap on duration, would be realized. Identifying areas for cost savings can be achieved after thorough analysis of all the component costs. We demonstrated that significant cost reductions could be realized by simple changes in prescribing practices without jeopardizing efficacy. These savings are achieved by standardizing dosing interval, route of administration and duration of treatment without altering daily dosage or access to an effective antiemetic. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 553-557.

  15. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  16. Trends In Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays and Costs..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The article, Trends In Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays and Costs, 2002-2009, Implications For the Future, published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of Medicare and Medicaid...

  17. The Impact of Medicaid Peer Support Utilization on Cost

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Impact of Medicaid Peer Support Utilization on Cost, published in Volume 4, Issue 1 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  18. Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Impact of Chronic Conditions on the Cost of Cancer Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries, published in Volume 2, Issue 4 of the Medicare...

  19. Trends In Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays and Costs..

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The article, Trends In Complicated Newborn Hospital Stays and Costs, 2002-2009, Implications For the Future, published in Volume 4, Issue 4 of Medicare and Medicaid...

  20. The Impact of Medicaid Peer Support Utilization on Cost

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in The Impact of Medicaid Peer Support Utilization on Cost, published in Volume 4, Issue 1 of the Medicare and Medicaid Research...

  1. Cost Effectiveness Analysis, A DTIC Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    Model for Estimating * 0 6 DUGAS. DORIS J. Software Life Cycle Costs (ModelGuidelines for Attracting Private *4Concept). Volume 1.Capital to Corp$ of...of Category It Test Program A0-A023 442 An Econometric Analysis of aitonance Data. VOlunteer Enlistments of service AD-AO21 258 HUMPHREYS . THOMAS H

  2. Synthesis and characterization of thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) corrole complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ashleigh L; Buckley, Heather L; Lukens, Wayne W; Arnold, John

    2013-09-18

    The first examples of actinide complexes incorporating corrole ligands are presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesized via salt metathesis with the corresponding lithium corrole in remarkably high yields (93% and 83%, respectively). Characterization by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed both complexes to be dimeric, having two metal centers bridged via bis(μ-chlorido) linkages. In each case, the corrole ring showed a large distortion from planarity, with the Th(IV) and U(IV) ions residing unusually far (1.403 and 1.330 Å, respectively) from the N4 plane of the ligand. (1)H NMR spectroscopy of both the Th and U dimers revealed dynamic solution behavior. In the case of the diamagnetic thorium corrole, variable-temperature, DOSY (diffusion-ordered) and EXSY (exhange) (1)H NMR spectroscopy was employed and supported that this behavior was due to an intrinsic pseudorotational mode of the corrole ring about the M-M axis. Additionally, the electronic structure of the actinide corroles was assessed using UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility. This novel class of macrocyclic complexes provides a rich platform in an underdeveloped area for the study of nonaqueous actinide bonding and reactivity.

  3. Minimum cost connection networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    . We use three axioms to characterize allocation rules that truthfully implement cost minimizing networks satisfying all connection demands in a game where: (1) a central planner announces an allocation rule and a cost estimation rule; (2) every agent reports her own connection demand as well as all...... connection costs; and, (3) the central planner selects a cost minimizing network satisfying reported connection demands based on estimated connection costs and allocates true connection costs of the selected network....

  4. Immunohistochmical Study of Glomerular Mesengial Collagen IV Expression in Diabetic Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jalali

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Extra-cellular matrix and basement membrane play important roles in many developmental phenamenon during development and after birth. Among the components of the basement membrane, collagen fibers specially type IV, are the most important part of this area. As kidney is one of the target organs in diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end stage-renal disease and result an increase in morbidity and mortality of effected individuals, therefore early diagnosis leads to better treatment. The aim of this investigation was to study the primary diagnostic parameters by special regards to collagen IV fibers.Materials & Methods: In this study, 24 male balb/c mice were divided into experimental and control groups. In experimental group, the beta cells of Langerhance were chemically destroyed by an injection of 160 mg/kg alloxan and subdivided in experimental groups 1 and 2. Controls were kept untreated. Experimental group 1and 2 were sacrified 8 and 16 weeks after treatment with alloxan respectively. The same procedure was performed for control group. Immunohistochmical studies were carried out using monocolonal antibody against collagen type IV in Glomeruli. In addition, using morphometrical and stereological methods the volume of the glumerles was compared in all groups.Results: Our finding showed that in experimental groups with special regards in 16 weeks diabetic mice, the rate of collagen type IV in basement membrane around the parietal layer of Bowman capsule, mesangial cells and endothelium of capillary in glomerules increased significantly compared to controls and experimental group 1 (p<0.05, while there was not a significant difference among experimental group 2 and controls. Our data also revealed that the number of mesangial cells as well as glomerular volume increased significantly in experimental 2 (4.635±0.289×106µm3 compared to experimental 1 (3.504±0.189×106µm3 and controls (3.422

  5. Concentrated photovoltaics system costs and learning curve analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haysom, Joan E.; Jafarieh, Omid; Anis, Hanan; Hinzer, Karin

    2013-09-01

    An extensive set of costs in /W for the installed costs of CPV systems has been amassed from a range of public sources, including both individual company prices and market reports. Cost reductions over time are very evident, with current prices for 2012 in the range of 3.0 ± 0.7 /W and a predicted cost of 1.5 /W for 2020. Cost data is combined with deployment volumes in a learning curve analysis, providing a fitted learning rate of either 18.5% or 22.3% depending on the methodology. This learning rate is compared to that of PV modules and PV installed systems, and the influence of soft costs is discussed. Finally, if an annual growth rate of 39% is assumed for deployed volumes, then, using the learning rate of 20%, this would predict the achievement of a cost point of 1.5 /W by 2016.

  6. INSURANCE AND THE CORPORATE COST OF CAPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Wieczorek-Kosmala

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to provide some support to the thesis that insurance may reduce the cost of capital in a company by influencing both the cost of capital components and the need for rising capital. The problem is here perceived from two perspectives – the classical concept related to the weighted average cost of capital (WACC and a novel concept related to the risk-based capital structure model with the total average cost of capital (TACC. The paper explains the idea of insurance as a retrospective (post-loss risk financing tool and the risk transfer mechanism upon it. As the risk financing tool insurance reduces the need for the balance-sheet capital in a company and thus the financial distress costs. Also, insurance may reduce the level of operating risk and thus influences the required returns of the capital providers. These observations allow emphasising the impact of insurance on the WACC. However, according to the novel concept of the risk-based capital structure, insurance (as a risk financing tool represents an off-balance sheet capital component. As a consequence, it extends the volume of total capital. The presented conceptual model, based on the TACC concept, indicates that large volume of insurance (the insurance sum and its relatively low cost (the insurance premium gives the possibility to the significant reduction of the cost of capital on average. The concluding remarks discuss some dilemmas over the utility of the TACC concept.

  7. Integrated Parallel Processes: The Elements of Meaning in Language. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    world line>s. (DEFPROP MAKENEWWORLDLINES (LAMBDA (ITEMS WORLDLINE) (COND [(NULL ITEMS) NIL] [(CONS (LIST (INTERN ( GENSYM )) (NEXTSTATE (CAR ITEMS)) (CADR...DEFPROP #MK-OCC (LAMBDA NIL (PROG (X) (SETO X (INTERN ( GENSYM ))) (PUTPROP X T (QUOTE OCCURRENCE)) (PUTPROP X (INTERN ( GENSYM )) (QUOTE NEUTRAL)) (SET X

  8. Better Ceramics Through Chemistry IV. Materials Research Society Sumposium Proceedings. Volume 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-31

    of 6.0 gem - - i.e. assuming BaTiO 3). This film has a single coat of BaTiO 3 . Scanning Auger microprobe analysis (SAM) and RBS have also been used to...probably nucleated by dust. We have found that surface moisture on glass can cause severe crazing of the films. On unpolished alumina, however, the films...CuO and Y2 BaCuO5 . Again films deposit.cl directly onto unpolished alumina show severe cracking, and films deposited onto BaTiO3 coated alumina also

  9. The H-6000 Tuning Guide. Volume IV. Appendixes. Revision 1. Changes 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-12

    COBR in common command list #15J Correction to security problems in DRL TASK #18H Elimination of security breach for invalid classification 0261...SYSTEM PATCHES . 1050 ASCII 1,SORT 068J 1060 OCT 0 068J 1070 ASCII 1, COBR #11K 1080 OCT 0 #11K 1090$ ALTER 977 * ALTERS FROM SYSTEM PATCHES * 1100 ZERO...C65 SORT #68J 1110 ZERO C66 COBR #11K 1120$ ALTER 1067 **** ALTERS FROM SYSTEM PATCHES *** 1130C65 XCALL SORTBIN 068J 1140C66 XCALL COBR ,BIN 011K

  10. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IV-A: An Evaluation of Follow Through.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Linda B.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model presents background information and discusses the evaluation of the progress of Cohort III entering-kindergarten children during 4 years of Follow Through participation. Also discussed, for the purpose of examining replicability of effects, is the progress…

  11. Environmental and Cultural Impact. Proposed Tennessee Colony Reservoir, Trinity River, Texas. Volume IV. Appendix F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Some other species in this area are hackberry (Celtis laevigata), water oak (Quercus nigra), pecan ( Carya illinoensis ), and American elm (Ulmus...Some upland hickory species ( Carya ) will also be encountered. These areas should be maintained as such in order to prevent erosion of the future

  12. Biological Effects of Laser Radiation. Volume IV. Optical Second Harmonic Generation in Biological Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-17

    the result of a photochemical rather tha a phototherml 3 mob~aim. The specific concern of this chesis is the generation of optical eecoed-harmoi...local fundamental field at frequency w and a, 0 and * are complex coefficients . While 9q. (3) is a scalar equation, it still reflects an important...aniso- tropic property of a nonlinear dipole. That is, the coefficient 8 and all other even order term coefficients vanish if )j simply changes sign

  13. Attitudes of Major Soviet Nationalities. Volume IV. Central Asia. Kazakhstan, Kirgizistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-06-01

    following chapters: KAZAKHSTAN-AND THE KAZAKHS - Zev Katz KIRGIZISTAN AND THE KIRGIZ - Allen Hetmanek TURKMENISTAN’AND THE TURKMEN - A. Berdi Murat ...8217 0 co L Ln (N L -4 -4j 0 0 -40 co 0’ 0) 𔃺 6’D 00 00 0 H "- 0 0 ’. . 󈧜 CA4 04 (N 41 d.J 04. 0) U 0 0 0W ,4 ( LA -. cn ULA -n LA r- 07% 0 *ja 0 L 00...TURKMEN prepared by A. Berdi Murat Columbia Universi ty This chapter is based on a paper contributed by the above-named specialist. However, the chapter

  14. WMO WDCGG data catalogue. GAW data. Volume IV - Greenhouse gases and other atmospheric gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The fourth issue of the data catalogue gives information on measurement methods, instruments, and data handling procedures for recording data on greenhouse gases at the observation stations submitting data to the WDCGG up to December 2000. Chapter 1 gives details of the observation stations; Chapter 2, the data index, is prepared to give notice of the data. Chapter 3 contains detail of the observation programme: category and location, date when observation started, instrument manufacturers, characteristics of instrument system calibration methods, and data selection procedures. It gives references on the observation programme at each station. Gases measured are: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorocarbons, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluorocarbons, tetrachloromethane, trichloroethane, trichloromethane, carbon monoxide, nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen oxides, odd nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), organic peroxides, hydrogen peroxide, and isotopes ({sup 13}C). 3 apps.

  15. Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems – Volume IV

    OpenAIRE

    Neven Duić

    2016-01-01

    The Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems - JSDEWES is an international journal dedicated to the improvement and dissemination of knowledge on methods, policies and technologies for increasing the sustainability of development by de-coupling growth from natural resources and replacing them with knowledge based economy, taking into account its economic, environmental and social pillars, as well as methods for assessing and measuring sustainability of devel...

  16. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2004. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.; Gschwend, B

    2005-03-01

    Highlights of the main activities during the year covered by this report are given below in the framework of the corresponding projects. They include tasks that were completed during the year, as well as certain projects still in their early stages or start-up phase. While NES is encouraging a networking of its activities, both within the Department and throughout PSI (e.g. through its involvement in the MicroXAS Beamline; the MEGAPIE project; and the collaboration with the General Energy Department, ENE, in the context of the GaBE project), most of the activities are the prime responsibilities of the distinct organisational units (Laboratories) within NES. This basis forms a well-defined, scientific focus for the projects, each of which requires particular expertise and specialised equipment or facilities. (author)

  17. Sodium--NaK engineering handbook. Volume IV. Sodium pumps, valves, piping, and auxiliary equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foust, O J [ed.

    1978-01-01

    The handbook is useful for designers in the Liquid Metals Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program and by the engineering and scientific community performing investigation and experimentation requiring high-temperature Na and NaK technology. Data are presented for pumps, bearings and seals, valves, vessels and piping, and auxiliary equipment including vapor traps, freeze plugs, fuel-channel flow regulators, antivortexing devices, and miscellaneous mechanical elements. Reactor materials are also discussed. (FS)

  18. Flexible roof drill for low coal. Volume 2. Phase III and Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoup, N.H.

    1977-09-01

    Design specifications were developed for a flexible drilling and bolting system. The system configuration is based on the use of the Galis dual-boom roof drill as a vehicle for the drilling/bolting system. The WSU Flex-drill drivehead is mounted on the Galis drill boom and the Galis parts are modified to accommodate the revised system. The flexible drillhead supports a bolt bender/inserter designed by Bendix Corporation and is integrated into the system operation. A supplemental bolt thruster was designed to complete insertion of the roof bolt following operation and removal of the Bendix bender from the bolt shank. The complete cycle of drilling a 1-3/8-in. diameter bolt hole, bending a roof bolt into the hole, thrusting the bolt head and washer to the roof surface, and final torquing of the bolt is manually controlled by the operator located in the new position behind the bolting line. The new operating position is beneath newly bolted roof in a safer location in back of the stab jack ad roof jacks positioning the drill boom and drivehead. The Flex-drill/bolting system prototype was constructed from both purchased components and parts specially fabricated in the shops for this design. This unit was assembled and test-operated with appropriate support equipment in a laboratory test stand. Numerous test holes were drilled in blocks of concrete at feed rates of 5 ft/min with drill rotation speeds of 360 rpm. The drill feeds uniformly and cuts smoothly with no difficulty in collection of dust or clogging of the drill bit. The holes drilled were straight, as evidence by passage of a 1-1/4-in. diameter bar full depth into the hole with no binding or evidence of curvature. The flexible drill is capable of drilling 8-ft-deep roof bolt holes in low coal 36 in. in height.

  19. The U.S. Air Service in World War I. Volume IV. Postwar Review,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    annotation to a mini- mum. All ef the documents reproduced here nave been taken from a microfilm copy of Edgar S. Gorroll, "History of the Air Service, AEF...World War I He directed that such information be sent to Col. Edgar S. Gorrell. Assistant Chief of Staff. who was compiling the history of the Air...piingurvaiuonapigs Commanding ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ orin wither the bebogt2oraie h dsiiitt and ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Orhs Frar’.cc.ri 14 th tulran ilno al o orepc Theion tops

  20. Decisive Action Training Environment at the National Training Center. Volume IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    using wrist actigraphy to better identify best practices for leader endurance. NOTE: Actigraphy is a continuous measurement of activity or movement... wrist actigraphy suggest sleep times may actually be somewhat lower. A study conducted in 2000 demonstrated that individuals sleep approximately 43... Wrist actigraphy from a band or watch worn by the leader would provide the leader and the Army with accurate information on current sleep patterns

  1. Intriguing Animals. Language Arts Theme Units, Volume IV. Cross Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the primary grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units on intriguing animals that reach diverse needs by working through emotional memory, deductive reasoning, and multiple intelligences.…

  2. Industrial applications study. Volume IV. Industrial plant surveys. Final report. [Waste heat recovery and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence M.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1977-01-01

    An initial evaluation of the waste heat recovery and utilization potential in the manufacturing portion of the industrial sector is presented. The scope of this initial phase addressed the feasibility of obtaining in-depth energy information in the industrial sector. Within this phase, the methodology and approaches for data gathering and assessment were established. Using these approaches, energy use and waste heat profiles were developed at the 2-digit level; with this data, waste heat utilization technologies were evaluated. This study represents an important first step in the evaluation of waste heat recovery potential.

  3. The Stamford Public Education Facilities Utilization Plan. Stamford Educational Public Policy Impact Study. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Marcia Marker; And Others

    In the last decade, Stamford has been transformed from a suburban town to an urban center of national renown. A responsive yet directive public school system is critical in preserving a feeling of community. The Stanford Educational Planning Committee, a team of interdisciplinary professionals and a broad-based community group, examined trends in…

  4. Design Calculation Procedure for Passive Solar Houses at Navy Installations in the Pacific Northwest. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    al blwta o h toaemss h toaewl begi toreraiat thi enrgy Som het trnsfr aso tkesplac thoug baeL oicalec nvetv 7i urns teto utb adt rvd suficentsufac...of one thousand cubic feet (or MCF) which have a heat content of around I MBtu. At pynsent, most utilities have a sliding price scale for their enrgy

  5. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  6. Defense Science Study Group IV: Study Reports 1994-1995. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-02-01

    34constant-width" network, interconnect which carries fluids/gases such as water, air, fuel, oil, coolant. or steam, must be " tapered " along the paths to...shape of a basketball . No matter from which direction the pulse strikes the target, it will see about the same size reflective target. The luminescence

  7. How To Dance through Time. Volume IV: The Elegance of Baroque Social Dance. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 45-minute VHS videotape is the fourth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows how to dance the most influential social dances of the French Baroque Court. The ceremonious Minuet is the most famous of the 18th century dance invention. The Allemande is the pivotal bridge linking to the 19th century. The Contredance…

  8. Tooele Army Depot Revised Final Site-Wide Ecological Risk Assessment. Volume IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    SWERA/Rev Final I^)t/November 25, 1997 307 ’S a s ■c s v8 8 fcq I S «5 K § ’•C I w 3 2 i S a PB « s * •o et £■8 B _ 9 fS jf »n c... fcq u o o. S 2 3 rj OS z N X Q- u w TSK 0003/SWERA/Rev Final Rpt/November 25, 1997 358 in "* z z z § » Q Q Q S O § J2o D § Q §S3 O

  9. Evaluating an Integrated Approach to the Management of Cerebral Palsy. Volume I of IV. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, Laird W.

    The integrated Management of Cerebral Palsy (IMCP) project evaluated the effectiveness of a program of conductive education, which was said to involve training motorically disabled children in small, motivating groups of similarly handicapped peers to actively and voluntarily pursue those movements that are both incompatible with reflexes and…

  10. BRL-CAD Tutorial Series: Volume IV Converting Geometry Between BRLCAD and Other Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    large collection of tools and utilities, including an interactive three-dimensional geometry editor, raytracing and generic framebuffer libraries...a large collection of tools and utilities, including an interactive geometry editor, raytracing and generic framebuffer libraries, network...particularly effective tool for producing high-resolution and physically realistic geometry for ballistic penetration, radar signature, and other types of

  11. Book review: Rare and endangered biota of Florida, volume IV. Invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Arnett, Ross H.

    2010-01-01

    Book Review: Of all of the Florida invertebrates that exist, or may have existed (one estimate claims 50,000 species) only descriptions of 350 species are included in this book. These are species that are thought to be, according to the many individual authors who wrote the accounts of these species, in decline or in danger of extinction. Final acceptance to be included in this book, and others in the series, is made by the Florida Committee on Rare and Endangered Plants and Animals. They bel...

  12. Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume IV. Spectroscopic data for iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, W.L. (ed.)

    1985-02-01

    Comprehensive spectroscopic data tables are presented for all ions of Fe. Tables of ionization potentials, wave lengths of spectral lines, atomic energy levels, and transition probabilities are given which were excerpted from general critical compilations. All utilized compilations are less than five years old and include data on electric dipole as well as magnetic dipole transitions.

  13. Operations Events Census Report: Volume IV. 1981 through 1985. Sanitized Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    0964 GARCIA , DANIEL 0599 GARCIA , DAVID MARQUEZ 0869 GARDNER, HAROLD J. 0916 GARDNER, ROBERT C. 0638 GARDNER, STEVEN K. 0837 GARNER, MICHAEL M. 0837...V FULTON, DAVID L. 0599 FULWYLER, NILES J. 0935 FUNSTON, NELSON E. 0636 FUTRELL, DONALD K. 0935 GABRIEL , DANNY J. 0935 GABRIEL , JANET 0974 GABRIEL ...FRANCIS G. 0935 MARQUEZ , IAN R. 0963 MARR, JAMES E., III 0648 MARRS, CLIFFORD C. 0636 MARSHALL, JOE T. 0680 MARSHALL, LARRY L. 0655 MARTIN, CARLETON

  14. Paul Scherrer Institute Scientific Report 2000. Volume IV: Nuclear Energy and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Brian; Gschwend, Beatrice [eds.

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy related research in Switzerland is concentrated at PSI's Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department (NES). The activities of the department are concentrated on three main domains of: Safety and related problems of operating plants; safety features of future reactor and fuel cycles; waste management. Comprehensive assessments of energy systems are carried out in cooperation with PSI's General Energy Research Department. Many of the programs are part of collaborations with universities, industry, or international organisations. Progress in 2000 in these topical areas is described in this report. A list of scientific publications in 2000 is also provided.

  15. Oceanic Area System Improvement Study (OASIS). Volume IV. Caribbean Region Air Traffic Services System Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Departamento de Transito Aereo) of the National Airways Division (Division de Aerovias Nacionales) as the authority responsible for the general...Directorate of Air Transport and Traffic (Direccion General Sectorial de Transporte y Transito Aereo - DGTTA), which in turn falls under the authority of...Northern Coastal Region of 4 the Directorate of Engineering and Systems (Direccion de Ingenieria y Sistemas), which is responsible for maintenance of the

  16. Retirement for Cause Inspection System Design. Volume 2. Appendices (Phase IV. Engineering Specifications).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    lnglh. The depth will he such Ihat any component 6 inches in length (thickness) will he no closer than 6 inches to any tank surlaice oer the surface...Recent ly init iat ed 6.2 development procgramis are puirsuing these contcep~ts furt her. The pro~grams are in I oo early a stage tCC have p~roCduced

  17. [The relationships of intelligence and memory assessed using the WAIS-IV and the WMS-IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepach, A C; Daseking, M; Petermann, F; Waldmann, H C

    2013-11-01

    This study examines the relationships of intelligence and memory scores derived from WAIS-IV and WMS-IV. We were especially interested in the reciprocal predictive values of the test scales. A sample of 137 healthy adults with an age range between 16 and 69 years was assessed with the WAIS-IV and the WMS-IV. The test order was balanced. Pearson correlations were conducted on the subtest and scale level. A series of 14 linear regression models was tested with memory performance as predictor for intelligence and vice versa. A model including the 3 main memory scales of the WMS-IV was able to predict the global IQ best. It nevertheless explained only 46% of the variance. The memory and intelligence measures show significant relationships, but also represent distinct functions. WAIS-IV and WMS-IV complement one another. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Road crash costs.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Road crashes result in all kinds of social costs, such as medical costs, production loss, human losses, property damage, settlement costs and costs due to congestion. Studies into road crash costs and their trends are carried out quite regularly. In 2009, the costs amounted to € 12.5 billion, or 2.2% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Insight into these costs is used for policy preparation and evaluation, and makes it possible to compare them with costs in other areas. Another important app...

  19. The Design of the IGE Evaluation Project Phase IV Comparative Studies. Comparative Study of Phase IV IGE Evaluation Project. Phase IV, Project Paper 80-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Thomas A.; And Others

    This paper outlines the design of two Comparative Studies of Phase IV of the Individually Guided Education (IGE) Evaluation Project. More than 2,000 elementary schools in 25 states use the IGE system. The Evaluation Project was designed to gain a comprehensive view of the system's operation and effectiveness. Phase IV investigated pupil outcomes,…

  20. 新型数字化智能输液仪的研制及应用%The research and application of a new type of digitalized intelligent IV monitoring device.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华嘉临; 何茗芳; 缪学明; 冯钧; 支杨

    2011-01-01

    Objective:The goal of this research is to study and to develop a new type of digitized intelligent IV monitoring device in order to robotize the IV infusion process, to increase the safety factor, to reduce the working load of nurses, and to make patient having better rest. Methods:The method of such a device is described as the followings. The device which applies the principle of electronic load sensor consists of 5 parts: load sensor, data collector, data processor,data display including a liquid crystal display screen,a wireless transmitter and an alarming device. Results:The device can automatically monitor the whole process of an IV infusion process, including measuring the volume of the medical liquid in an IV bottle, the infusion rate, the required infusion time, and automatic alarming. Conclusions: This device applies high technology with low cost, high market demand, ease to use, and ease for market development; It would become the first candidate candidate for an IV infusion monitoring system.%目的:研制一种新型数字化智能输液监测仪,自动监测输液过程,提高安全系数,减轻护士工作负担,保证患者休息.方法:该输液监测仪采用电子称重的原理,由五部分构成:传感器、数据采集部件、数据处理部件、液晶面板显示和无线发送并报警.结果:实现对输液全过程进行自动化测试,测试输液容器容量、输液速度、需要时间、自动报警.结论:该装置技术含量高、成本低廉、实用性强、使用简便、易于推广,可成为输液监测系统的首选装置.

  1. The MAX IV storage ring project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Pedro F; Leemann, Simon C; Sjöström, Magnus; Andersson, Ake

    2014-09-01

    The MAX IV facility, currently under construction in Lund, Sweden, features two electron storage rings operated at 3 GeV and 1.5 GeV and optimized for the hard X-ray and soft X-ray/VUV spectral ranges, respectively. A 3 GeV linear accelerator serves as a full-energy injector into both rings as well as a driver for a short-pulse facility, in which undulators produce X-ray pulses as short as 100 fs. The 3 GeV ring employs a multibend achromat (MBA) lattice to achieve, in a relatively short circumference of 528 m, a bare lattice emittance of 0.33 nm rad, which reduces to 0.2 nm rad as insertion devices are added. The engineering implementation of the MBA lattice raises several technological problems. The large number of strong magnets per achromat calls for a compact design featuring small-gap combined-function magnets grouped into cells and sharing a common iron yoke. The small apertures lead to a low-conductance vacuum chamber design that relies on the chamber itself as a distributed copper absorber for the heat deposited by synchrotron radiation, while non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating provides for reduced photodesorption yields and distributed pumping. Finally, a low main frequency (100 MHz) is chosen for the RF system yielding long bunches, which are further elongated by passively operated third-harmonic Landau cavities, thus alleviating collective effects, both coherent (e.g. resistive wall instabilities) and incoherent (intrabeam scattering). In this paper, we focus on the MAX IV 3 GeV ring and present the lattice design as well as the engineering solutions to the challenges inherent to such a design. As the first realisation of a light source based on the MBA concept, the MAX IV 3 GeV ring offers an opportunity for validation of concepts that are likely to be essential ingredients of future diffraction-limited light sources.

  2. Mean nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Bichel, P.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the following nine parameters with respect to their prognostic value in females with endometrial cancer: four stereologic parameters [mean nuclear volume (MNV), nuclear volume fraction, nuclear index and mitotic index], the immunohistochemical expression of cancer antigen (CA125...

  3. Sampling: Making Electronic Discovery More Cost Effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Luoma

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With the huge volumes of electronic data subject to discovery in virtually every instance of litigation, time and costs of conducting discovery have become exceedingly important when litigants plan their discovery strategies.  Rather than incurring the costs of having lawyers review every document produced in response to a discovery request in search of relevant evidence, a cost effective strategy for document review planning is to use statistical sampling of the database of documents to determine the likelihood of finding relevant evidence by reviewing additional documents.  This paper reviews and discusses how sampling can be used to make document review more cost effective by considering issues such as an appropriate sample size, how to develop a sampling strategy, and taking into account the potential value of the litigation in relation to the costs of additional discovery efforts. 

  4. Corruption costs lives: a cross-country study using an IV approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, Mon-Chi; Lee, Ming-Hsuan

    2016-04-01

    This study quantitatively estimates the effects of corruption on five major health indicators by using recent cross-country panel data covering 119 countries for the period of 2005-2011. The corruption indicators provided by the World Bank and Transparency International are used, and both the two-way fixed effect and the two-stage least squares approaches are employed for our estimation. The estimation results show that, in general, corruption is negatively associated with a country's health outcomes. A lower level of corruption or a better control of corruption in a country can lead to longer life expectancy, a lower infant mortality rate and a lower under-five mortality rate for citizens. However, our estimation finds no significant association between corruption and individual diseases including human immunodeficiency virus prevalence and tuberculosis incidence. The findings suggest that corruption reduction itself is an effective method to promote health. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Cost evaluation of clinical laboratory in Taiwan's National Health System by using activity-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin-Guang; Chen, Shao-Fen; Yeh, Shu-Hsing; Shih, Po-Wen; Lin, Ching-Chiang

    2016-11-01

    To cope with the government's policies to reduce medical costs, Taiwan's healthcare service providers are striving to survive by pursuing profit maximization through cost control. This article aimed to present the results of cost evaluation using activity-based costing performed in the laboratory in order to throw light on the differences between costs and the payment system of National Health Insurance (NHI). This study analyzed the data of costs and income of the clinical laboratory. Direct costs belong to their respective sections of the department. The department's shared costs, including public expenses and administrative assigned costs, were allocated to the department's respective sections. A simple regression equation was created to predict profit and loss, and evaluate the department's break-even point, fixed cost, and contribution margin ratio. In clinical chemistry and seroimmunology sections, the cost per test was lower than the NHI payment and their major laboratory tests had revenues with the profitability ratio of 8.7%, while the other sections had a higher cost per test than the NHI payment and their major tests were in deficit. The study found a simple linear regression model as follows: "Balance=-84,995+0.543×income (R2=0.544)". In order to avoid deficit, laboratories are suggested to increase test volumes, enhance laboratory test specialization, and become marginal scale. A hospital could integrate with regional medical institutions through alliances or OEM methods to increase volumes to reach marginal scale and reduce laboratory costs, enhancing the level and quality of laboratory medicine.

  6. Prediction of IV curves for a superconducting thin film using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, M.; Haider, S. A.; Akram, T.; Naqvi, S. R.; He, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a framework using artificial neural networks that predicts the IV characteristics of a superconducting thin film with square array of nano-engineered periodic antidots, called holes. We adopt the conventionally used commercial physical properties measurement system to obtain a dataset comprising transport measurements, and use this dataset to train our artificial neural network. Once trained, the model is capable of predicting the curve for varying temperature and magnetic flux values, which are cross validated by the physical properties measurement system. Consistent with the works in literature, our framework suggests Josephson Junctions like behavior near transition temperature and at stronger magnetic fields. Our study is important since repeated measurements using the conventional method are time consuming and costly; we demonstrate that the proposed method may be effectively used to classify the IV characteristics over a wide range of temperature and magnetic field values.

  7. [Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, M; Washizuka, T; Ikeguchi, S; Sasayama, S

    1996-08-01

    Vaughan Williams class IV antiarrhythmic drugs have Ca-channel blocking actions. Since L-type Ca-channels play key roles in regulating pulse conduction in atrioventricular node as well as in pathologically-depolarized myocardium, Ca-channel blockers known to modulate this type of Ca-channel (ICa,L) are used as antiarrhythmic agents. ICa,L channels have relatively high threshold potential (-40 mV) to activate and long-opening properties, and are enhanced by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Among three major ICa,L blockers, dihydropyridines such as nifedipine were found to bind to the channel from extracellular side. In contrast, verapamil and diltiazem interact with the channel from the cytoplasmic side, thereby causing rate-dependent block of ICa,L channels. This sideness of pharmacological action of the Ca-channel blockers determines an important therapeutic modality and their indication for tachyarrhythmias.

  8. Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Martínez Carmenate

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente ensayo está extraído de la obra inédita de Urbano Martínez Carmenate, Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV. Ofrece una mirada sobre los primeros años de la trayectoria profesional de Alejo Carpentier. Se muestra cómo, durante la década de 1920, se inicia como periodista y cronista teatral. A la vez, comienzan sus conexiones con el Grupo Minorista, que desempeña un papel destacado en la etapa republicana en Cuba. También se contempla su viaje a México en 1926, que constituye su primer contacto directo con la naturaleza y la cultura americanas.

  9. Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbano Martínez Carmenate

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente ensayo está extraído de la obra inédita de Urbano Martínez Carmenate, Carpentier, la otra novela (cap. IV. Ofrece una mirada sobre los primeros años de la trayectoria profesional de Alejo Carpentier. Se muestra cómo, durante la década de 1920, se inicia como periodista y cronista teatral. A la vez, comienzan sus conexiones con el Grupo Minorista, que desempeña un papel destacado en la etapa republicana en Cuba. También se contempla su viaje a México en 1926, que constituye su primer contacto directo con la naturaleza y la cultura americanas.

  10. Capital cost: low and high sulfur coal plants; 800 MWe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The Commercial Electric Power Cost Study for 800-MWe (Nominal) low- and high-sulfur coal plants consists of three volumes. (This the fourth subject in a series of eight performed in the Commercial Electric Power Cost Studies by the US NRC). The low-sulfur coal plant is described in Volumes I and II (this volume), while Volume III describes the high-sulfur coal plant. The design basis and cost estimate for the 801-MWe low-sulfur coal plant is presented in Volume I and the drawings, equipment list, and site description are contained in this document. The design basis, drawings, and summary cost estimate for a 794-MWe high-sulfur coal plant are presented in Volume III. This information was developed by redesigning the low-sulfur sub-bituminous coal plant for burning high-sulfur bituminous coal. The reference design includes a lime flue gas desulfurization system. These coal plants utilize a mechanical draft (wet) cooling tower system for condenser heat removal. Costs of alternate cooling systems are provided in Report No. 7 in this series of studies of costs of commercial electrical power plants.

  11. New mono-organotin (IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Amirah Faizah Abdul; Baba, Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Eighteen new mono-organotin dithiocarbamate compounds derived each nine from methyltin(IV) and phenyltin(IV) reacted using in-situ method with various type of N-dialkylamine together with carbon disulphide with the ratio of 1:3:3. Elemental and gravimetric analysis showed that the general formula of these compounds were RSnCl[S2CNR'R″]2 (R= Ph, CH3, R' = CH3, C2H5, C7H7 and R″ = C2H5, C6H11, iC3H7, C7H7). These compounds had been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The infrared spectra of these compounds showed three important peaks indicating the formation of dithiocarbamate compounds, ν(CN), ν(CS) and ν(Sn-S) band which present in the region of 1444-1519, 954-1098 and 318-349 cm-1 respectively. The ultraviolet-visible spectra showed an absorption band for the π - π* transition of NCS group in the range of 253 - 259 nm due to the intramolecular charge transfer of the ligand. The 13C NMR spectra showed an important shift for δ(N13CS2) in the range of 196.8 - 201.9 ppm.. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed three new structures with the general formula of PhSnCl[S2CN(Et)(i-Pr)]2, MeSnCl[S2CN(Me)(Cy)]2 and MeSnCl[S2CN(i-Pr)(CH2Ph)]2. All structures having a distorted octahedral geometry set by CClS4 donor atom from the two chelating dithiocarbamate ligands.

  12. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) platform configuration and integration. Final report. Volume I. Systems requirements and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Studies leading to the development of two 400 MW Offshore Thermal Energy Conversion Commercial Plants are presented. This volume includes a summary of three tasks: task IIA--systems evaluation and requirements; task IIB--evaluation plan; task III--technology review; and task IV--systems integration evaluation. Task IIA includes the definition of top level requirements and an assessment of factors critical to the selection of hull configuration and size, quantification of payload requirements and characteristics, and sensitivity of system characteristics to site selection. Task IIB includes development of a methodology for systematically evaluating the candidate hullforms, based on interrelationships and priorities developed during task IIA. Task III includes the assessment of current technology and identification of deficiencies in relation to OTEC requirements and the development of plans to correct such deficiencies. Task IV involves the formal evaluation of the six candidate hullforms in relation to sit and plant capacity to quantify cost/size/capability relationships, leading to selection of an optimum commercial plant. (WHK)

  13. Sources of Operating Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Mackie, Peter; Nellthorp, John; Laird, James

    2005-01-01

    Historically, road vehicle operating costs have tended to dominate highway economic appraisals in developing countries, due to the poor road surfaces that can occur there. The operating costs of railways and ports are also substantial, and form key components of cost benefit analyses of their associated infrastructure. The definition of operating costs for Bank projects is therefore important ...

  14. Cost/CYP: a bottom line that helps keep CSM projects cost-efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    In contraceptive social marketing (CSM), the objective is social good, but project managers also need to run a tight ship, trimming costs, allocating scarce funds, and monitoring their program's progress. 1 way CSM managers remain cost-conscious is through the concept of couple-years-of-protection (CYP). Devised 2 decades ago as an administrative tool to compare the effects of different contraceptive methods, CYP's uses have multiplied to include assessing program output and cost effectiveness. Some of the factors affecting cost/CYP are a project's age, sales volume, management efficiency, and product prices and line. These factors are interconnected. The cost/CYP figures given here do not include outlays for commodities. While the Agency for International Development's commodity costs alter slightly with each new purchase contrast, the agency reports that a condom costs about 4 cents (US), an oral contraceptive (OC) cycle about 12 cents, and a spermicidal tablet about 7 cents. CSM projects have relatively high start-up costs. Within a project's first 2 years, expenses must cover such marketing activities as research, packaging, warehousing, and heavy promotion. As a project ages, sales should grow, producing revenues that gradually amortize these initial costs. The Nepal CSM project provides an example of how cost/CYP can improve as a program ages. In 1978, the year sales began, the project's cost/CYP was about $84. For some time the project struggled to get its products to its target market and gradually overcome several major hurdles. The acquisition of jeeps eased distribution and, by adding another condom brand, sales were increased still more, bringing the cost/CYP down to $8.30 in 1981. With further sales increases and resulting revenues, the cost/CYP dropped to just over $7 in 1983. When the sales volume becomes large enough, CSM projects can achieve economies of scale, which greatly improves cost-efficiency. Fixed costs shrink as a proportion of total

  15. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies Using Photometric Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Abhishek; SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    2017-01-01

    SDSS-IV/eBOSS survey will allow a ˜1% measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and a 4.0%Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) measurement using a relatively uniform set of luminous, early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 image both wider areas and deeper volumes than would be possible with spectroscopy, allowing one to probe both larger scales and larger volumes. The ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric data has been well demonstrated by Padmanabhan et al. (2007).

  16. Bayesian comparison of cost-effectiveness of different clinical approaches to diagnose coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, R.E.; Eng, C.; Horowitz, S.F.; Gorlin, R.; Goldstein, S.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of four clinical policies (policies I to IV) in the diagnosis of the presence or absence of coronary artery disease. A model based on Bayes theorem and published clinical data was constructed to make these comparisons. Effectiveness was defined as either the number of patients with coronary disease diagnosed or as the number of quality-adjusted life years extended by therapy after the diagnosis of coronary disease. The following conclusions arise strictly from analysis of the model and may not necessarily be applicable to all situations. As prevalence of coronary disease in the population increased, it caused a linear increase in cost per patient tested, but a hyperbolic decrease in cost per effect, that is, increased cost-effectiveness. Thus, cost-effectiveness of all policies (I to IV) was poor in populations with a prevalence of disease below 10%. Analysis of the model also indicates that at prevalences less than 80%, exercise thallium scintigraphy alone as a first test (policy II) is a more cost-effective initial test than is exercise electrocardiography alone as a first test (policy I) or exercise electrocardiography first combined with thallium imaging as a second test (policy IV). Exercise electrocardiography before thallium imaging (policy IV) is more cost-effective than exercise electrocardiography alone (policy I) at prevalences less than 80%. 4) Noninvasive exercise testing before angiography (policies I, II and IV) is more cost-effective than using coronary angiography as the first and only test (policy III) at prevalences less than 80%. 5) Above a threshold value of prevalence of 80% (for example patients with typical angina), proceeding to angiography as the first test (policy III) was more cost-effective than initial noninvasive exercise tests (policies I, II and IV).

  17. Agglomerated nanoparticles of hydrous Ce(IV) + Zr(IV) mixed oxide: Preparation, characterization and physicochemical aspects on fluoride adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Abir; Chakrabarti, Sharadindra; Biswas, Krishna; Ghosh, Uday Chand, E-mail: ucghosh@yahoo.co.in

    2014-07-01

    Hydrous Ce(IV)–Zr(IV) oxide (Ce/Zr ~ 1:1, mol/mol) (HCZMO) prepared by simple chemical precipitation was nanoparticles (60–70 nm) agglomerate with irregular surface morphology. The BET surface area, pore volume and pHzpc were estimated to be 185.04 m² g⁻¹, 0.1219 cm³ g⁻¹ and 5.8 (±0.2), respectively. Investigation of fluoride adsorption over HCZMO from its aqueous phase at an optimized pH ~ 6.0 showed that the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium data described, respectively, the pseudo-second order equation (R² = 0.98–0.99) and the Langmuir isotherm (R² > 0.99) very well. Values of the computed Arrhenius activation energy, Ea (1.16 kJ mol⁻¹), Langmuir monolayer capacity, θ (19.5 mg g⁻¹), D–R adsorption energy, ED–R (15.05 kJ mol⁻¹) and isosteric heat of reaction, ΔHr (0.518 kJ mol⁻¹) suggested that the fluoride has high affinity for homogeneous HCZMO surface for adsorption. Evidences appeared from the equal distribution co-efficient values and too well Langmuir isotherm fit. The fluoride adsorption reactions at 298–313 K with HCZMO were spontaneous (ΔG⁰ = negative) despite endothermic nature (ΔH⁰, kJ mol⁻¹ = +3.53, +4.04), owing to the increase of entropy (ΔS⁰, J mol⁻¹ K⁻¹ = +12.4, 13.8). More than 95% fluoride was released from F⁻-HCZMO (24.8 mg F⁻ g⁻¹) by 1.0 M NaOH, confirming the ion-exchange adsorption mechanism inclining to chemisorption. 1 g HCZMO per liter of a groundwater (F⁻: 4.40 mg L⁻¹) can reduce fluoride level below 1.5 mg L⁻¹ in batch treatment.

  18. Collagen IV in Normal Skin and in Pathological Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Howard, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Type IV collagen is a type of collagen found primarily in the skin within the basement membrane zone. The type IV collagen C4 domain at the C-terminus is not removed in post-translational processing, and the fibers are thus link head-to-head, rather than in a parallel fashion. Also, type IV collagen lacks a glycine in every third amino-acid residue necessary for the tight collagen helix. Thus, the overall collagen-IV conformation is structurally more pliable and kinked, relative to other collagen subtypes. These structural features allow collagen IV to form sheets, which is the primary structural form found in the cutaneous basal lamina. There are six human genes associated with collagen IV, specifically COL4A1, COL4A2, COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 and COL4A6. The aim of this review is to highlight the significance of this protein in normal skin, and in selected diseases. The alpha 3 protein constituent of type IV collagen is thought to be the antigen implicated in Goodpasture's syndrome, wherein the immune system attacks the basement membranes of the renal glomeruli and pulmonary alveoli. In addition, mutations to the genes coding for type IV collagen lead to the Alport syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibodies directed against denatured human type IV collagen have been described in rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and SLE. Structural studies of collagen IV have been utilized to differentiate between subepidermal blistering diseases, including bullous pemphigoid, acquired epidermolysis bullosa, anti-epiligrin cicatricial pemphigoid, and bullous lupus erythematosus. Collagen IV is also of importance in wound healing and in embryogenesis. Pathological studies have demonstrated that minor structural differences in collagen IV can lead to distinct, clinically different diseases.

  19. Attachment of cells to basement membrane collagen type IV

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Of ten different cell lines examined, three showed distinct attachment and spreading on collagen IV substrates, and neither attachment nor spreading was enhanced by adding soluble laminin or fibronectin. This reaction was not inhibited by cycloheximide or antibodies to laminin, indicating a direct attachment to collagen IV without the need of mediator proteins. Cell-binding sites were localized to the major triple-helical domain of collagen IV and required an intact triple helical conformatio...

  20. Collagen IV in normal skin and in pathological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu-Velez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Type IV collagen is a type of collagen found primarily in the skin within the basement membrane zone. The type IV collagen C4 domain at the C-terminus is not removed in post-translational processing, and the fibers are thus link head-to-head, rather than in a parallel fashion. Also, type IV collagen lacks a glycine in every third amino-acid residue necessary for the tight collagen helix. Thus, the overall collagen-IV conformation is structurally more pliable and kinked, relative to other collagen subtypes. These structural features allow collagen IV to form sheets, which is the primary structural form found in the cutaneous basal lamina. There are six human genes associated with collagen IV, specifically COL4A1, COL4A2, COL4A3, COL4A4, COL4A5 and COL4A6. The aim of this review is to highlight the significance of this protein in normal skin, and in selected diseases. Results: The alpha 3 protein constituent of type IV collagen is thought to be the antigen implicated in Goodpasture′s syndrome, wherein the immune system attacks the basement membranes of the renal glomeruli and pulmonary alveoli. In addition, mutations to the genes coding for type IV collagen lead to the Alport syndrome. Furthermore, autoantibodies directed against denatured human type IV collagen have been described in rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and SLE. Structural studies of collagen IV have been utilized to differentiate between subepidermal blistering diseases, including bullous pemphigoid, acquired epidermolysis bullosa, anti-epiligrin cicatricial pemphigoid, and bullous lupus erythematosus. Collagen IV is also of importance in wound healing and in embryogenesis. Conclusions: Pathological studies have demonstrated that minor structural differences in collagen IV can lead to distinct, clinically different diseases.